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Sample records for altered nitrate assimilation

  1. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

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    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  2. Regulation of nitrate assimilation in cyanobacteria.

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    Ohashi, Yoshitake; Shi, Wei; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate assimilation by cyanobacteria is inhibited by the presence of ammonium in the growth medium. Both nitrate uptake and transcription of the nitrate assimilatory genes are regulated. The major intracellular signal for the regulation is, however, not ammonium or glutamine, but 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), whose concentration changes according to the change in cellular C/N balance. When nitrogen is limiting growth, accumulation of 2-OG activates the transcription factor NtcA to induce transcription of the nitrate assimilation genes. Ammonium inhibits transcription by quickly depleting the 2-OG pool through its metabolism via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle. The P(II) protein inhibits the ABC-type nitrate transporter, and also nitrate reductase in some strains, by an unknown mechanism(s) when the cellular 2-OG level is low. Upon nitrogen limitation, 2-OG binds to P(II) to prevent the protein from inhibiting nitrate assimilation. A pathway-specific transcriptional regulator NtcB activates the nitrate assimilation genes in response to nitrite, either added to the medium or generated intracellularly by nitrate reduction. It plays an important role in selective activation of the nitrate assimilation pathway during growth under a limited supply of nitrate. P(II) was recently shown to regulate the activity of NtcA negatively by binding to PipX, a small coactivator protein of NtcA. On the basis of accumulating genome information from a variety of cyanobacteria and the molecular genetic data obtained from the representative strains, common features and group- or species-specific characteristics of the response of cyanobacteria to nitrogen is summarized and discussed in terms of ecophysiological significance.

  3. Disruption of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) and uncoupling protein (UCP) alters rates of foliar nitrate and carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Gandin, Anthony; Denysyuk, Mykhaylo; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-07-01

    Under high light, the rates of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation can be influenced by reductant consumed by both foliar nitrate assimilation and mitochondrial alternative electron transport (mAET). Additionally, nitrate assimilation is dependent on reductant and carbon skeletons generated from both the chloroplast and mitochondria. However, it remains unclear how nitrate assimilation and mAET coordinate and contribute to photosynthesis. Here, hydroponically grown Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertional mutants for alternative oxidase (AOX1A) and uncoupling protein (UCP1) fed either NO3 (-) or NH4 (+) were used to determine (i) the response of NO3 (-) uptake and assimilation to the disruption of mAET, and (ii) the interaction of N source (NO3 (-) versus NH4 (+)) and mAET on photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and electron transport. The results showed that foliar NO3 (-) assimilation was enhanced in both aox1a and ucp1 compared with the wild-type, suggesting that foliar NO3 (-) assimilation is probably driven by a decreased capacity of mAET and an increase in reductant within the cytosol. Wild-type plants had also higher rates of net CO2 assimilation (A net) and quantum yield of PSII (ϕPSII) under NO3 (-) feeding compared with NH4 (+) feeding. Additionally, under NO3 (-) feeding, A net and ϕPSII were decreased in aox1a and ucp1 compared with the wild type; however, under NH4 (+) they were not significantly different between genotypes. This indicates that NO3 (-) assimilation and mAET are both important to maintain optimal rates of photosynthesis, probably in regulating reductant accumulation and over-reduction of the chloroplastic electron transport chain. These results highlight the importance of mAET in partitioning energy between foliar nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

  4. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae.

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    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N) acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO) as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed.

  5. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae

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    Emanuel eSanz-Luque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed.

  6. Nitrate assimilation in plant shoots depends on photorespiration

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B.; Bloom, Arnold J

    2004-01-01

    Photorespiration, a process that diminishes net photosynthesis by ≈25% in most plants, has been viewed as the unfavorable consequence of plants having evolved when the atmosphere contained much higher levels of carbon dioxide than it does today. Here we used two independent methods to show that exposure of Arabidopsis and wheat shoots to conditions that inhibited photorespiration also strongly inhibited nitrate assimilation. Thus, nitrate assimilation in both dicotyledonous and monocotyledono...

  7. Nitrate assimilation in plant shoots depends on photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B; Bloom, Arnold J

    2004-08-03

    Photorespiration, a process that diminishes net photosynthesis by approximately 25% in most plants, has been viewed as the unfavorable consequence of plants having evolved when the atmosphere contained much higher levels of carbon dioxide than it does today. Here we used two independent methods to show that exposure of Arabidopsis and wheat shoots to conditions that inhibited photorespiration also strongly inhibited nitrate assimilation. Thus, nitrate assimilation in both dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species depends on photorespiration. This previously undescribed role for photorespiration (i) explains several responses of plants to rising carbon dioxide concentrations, including the inability of many plants to sustain rapid growth under elevated levels of carbon dioxide; and (ii) raises concerns about genetic manipulations to diminish photorespiration in crops.

  8. Modification of potassium nitrate assimilation test for identification of clinically important yeasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, D. H.; Salkin, I F; Hurd, N J; Levy, I L; Kemna, M A

    1988-01-01

    The modification of an auxanographic method used in yeast species identification to determine potassium nitrate (KNO3) assimilation resulted in a simple and inexpensive KNO3 assimilation test medium. The medium provided accurate and reliable results in less than 24 h.

  9. The identification of the nitrate assimilation related genes in the novel Bacillus megaterium NCT-2 accounts for its ability to use nitrate as its only source of nitrogen.

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    Shi, Weiwei; Lu, Wei; Liu, Qunlu; Zhi, Yuee; Zhou, Pei

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus megaterium NCT-2 is a novel bacterium that can utilize nitrate as its only nitrogen source for growth.The nitrate assimilation related genes that are involved in this process would be expected to be crucial. However, little is known about the genomic background of this bacterium,let alone the sequences of the nitrate assimilation related genes. In order to further investigate the nitrate assimilation function of the NCT-2, genome sequencing was performed.After obtaining the fine map of the NCT-2 genome, which was submitted to the NCBI GenBank (AHTF00000000), the sequences of the nitrate assimilation related genes (the nitrate reductase electron transfer subunit nasB and the nitrate reductase catalytic subunit nasC, the nitrite reductase [NAD(P)H]large subunit nasD and the nitrite reductase [NAD(P)H] small subunit nasE, and the glutamine synthetase glnA) were identified.Multiple alignments were performed to find out the sequence identities of the nitrate assimilation related genes to that of their similar species. Through KEGG signaling mapping search, the nitrate assimilation related genes were revealed to be located in the nitrogen metabolism signaling pathway. The putative 3D protein structures of these genes were modeled by SWISS MODEL, and shown to be highly similar to the nitrate assimilation related genes in the PDB database. Finally, the sequence validity of the nitrate assimilation related genes was verified by PCR with specifically designed primers.

  10. Culture Studies of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects Associated with Nitrate Assimilation and Denitrification

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    Sigman, D. M.; Granger, J.; Lehmann, M. F.; Difiore, P. J.; Tortell, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotope effects of nitrate-consuming reactions such as nitrate assimilation and denitrification are potential indicators of the physiological state of the organisms carrying out these reactions. Moreover, an understanding of these isotope effects is needed to use the stable isotopes to investigate the fluxes associated with these reactions in modern and ancient environments. We have used batch cultures to investigate the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of (1) nitrate assimilation by eukaryotic and prokaryotic algae and by heterotrophic bacteria, and (2) nitrate reduction by denitrifying bacteria. We observe intra- and inter-specific variation in isotope effect amplitudes and, in the case of denitrifiers, indications of isotope effect decreases during individual nitrate drawdown experiments. However, the measured N and O isotope effect ratio is close to 1 for all studied organisms, with the exception of an unusual denitrifier (Rhodobacter sphaeroides) that possesses only periplasmic (non-respiratory) nitrate reductase. This observation and other findings are consistent with nitrate reductase being the predominant source of isotope fractionation and with most isotope effect amplitude variability arising from variable degrees to which nitrate imported into the cell is reduced versus effluxed back into the environment; the more efflux, the more complete the expression of the fractionation imparted by nitrate reduction. If this is the case, then isotope effect amplitudes in the field should be related to physiological conditions in the environment, a prediction that, we argue, is supported by recent studies of (1) nitrate assimilation in the polar ocean and (2) denitrification in sediment porewaters.

  11. Interactions between nitrate and ammonium in their uptake, allocation, assimilation, and signaling in plants.

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    Hachiya, Takushi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-21

    Nitrogen (N) availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire inorganic N from the soil, mainly in the form of nitrate and ammonium. To date, researchers have focused on these N sources, and demonstrated that plants exhibit elaborate responses at both physiological and morphological levels. Mixtures of nitrate and ammonium are beneficial in terms of plant growth, as compared to nitrate or ammonium alone, and therefore synergistic responses to both N sources are predicted at different steps ranging from acquisition to assimilation. In this review, we summarize interactions between nitrate and ammonium with respect to uptake, allocation, assimilation, and signaling. Given that cultivated land often contains both nitrate and ammonium, a better understanding of the synergism between these N sources should help to identify targets with the potential to improve crop productivity.

  12. Negative feedback loops leading to nitrate homeostasis and oscillatory nitrate assimilation in plants and fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yongshun

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient for plants and fungi. For plants it has been shown that cytosolic nitrate levels are under homeostatic control. Here we describe two networks that can obtain robust, i.e. perturbation independent, homeostatic behavior in cytosolic nitrate concentration. One of the networks, a member in the family of outflow controllers, is based on a negative feedback loop containing a nitrate-induced activation of a controller molecule which removes nitrate. In plants this co...

  13. Horizontal transfer of a nitrate assimilation gene cluster and ecological transitions in fungi: a phylogenetic study.

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    Jason C Slot

    Full Text Available High affinity nitrate assimilation genes in fungi occur in a cluster (fHANT-AC that can be coordinately regulated. The clustered genes include nrt2, which codes for a high affinity nitrate transporter; euknr, which codes for nitrate reductase; and NAD(PH-nir, which codes for nitrite reductase. Homologs of genes in the fHANT-AC occur in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but they have only been found clustered in the oomycete Phytophthora (heterokonts. We performed independent and concatenated phylogenetic analyses of homologs of all three genes in the fHANT-AC. Phylogenetic analyses limited to fungal sequences suggest that the fHANT-AC has been transferred horizontally from a basidiomycete (mushrooms and smuts to an ancestor of the ascomycetous mold Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from diverse eukaryotes and eubacteria, and cluster structure, are consistent with a hypothesis that the fHANT-AC was assembled in a lineage leading to the oomycetes and was subsequently transferred to the Dikarya (Ascomycota+Basidiomycota, which is a derived fungal clade that includes the vast majority of terrestrial fungi. We propose that the acquisition of high affinity nitrate assimilation contributed to the success of Dikarya on land by allowing exploitation of nitrate in aerobic soils, and the subsequent transfer of a complete assimilation cluster improved the fitness of T. reesei in a new niche. Horizontal transmission of this cluster of functionally integrated genes supports the "selfish operon" hypothesis for maintenance of gene clusters.

  14. CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in C3 but not C4 plants and slows growth under nitrate in C3 plants.

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    Bloom, Arnold J; Asensio, Jose Salvador Rubaio; Randall, Lesley; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B; Carlisle, Eli A

    2012-02-01

    The CO2 concentration in Earth's atmosphere may double during this century. Plant responses to such an increase depend strongly on their nitrogen status, but the reasons have been uncertain. Here, we assessed shoot nitrate assimilation into amino acids via the shift in shoot CO2 and O2 fluxes when plants received nitrate instead of ammonium as a nitrogen source (deltaAQ). Shoot nitrate assimilation became negligible with increasing CO2 in a taxonomically diverse group of eight C3 plant species, was relatively insensitive to CO2 in three C4 species, and showed an intermediate sensitivity in two C3-C4 intermediate species. We then examined the influence of CO2 level and ammonium vs. nitrate nutrition on growth, assessed in terms of changes in fresh mass, of several C3 species and a Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Elevated CO2 (720 micromol CO2/mol of all gases present) stimulated growth or had no effect in the five C3 species tested when they received ammonium as a nitrogen source but inhibited growth or had no effect if they received nitrate. Under nitrate, two C3 species grew faster at sub-ambient (approximately 310 micromol/mol) than elevated CO2. A CAM species grew faster at ambient than elevated or sub-ambient CO2 under either ammonium or nitrate nutrition. This study establishes that CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in a wide variety of C3 plants and that this phenomenon can have a profound effect on their growth. This indicates that shoot nitrate assimilation provides an important contribution to the nitrate assimilation of an entire C3 plant. Thus, rising CO2 and its effects on shoot nitrate assimilation may influence the distribution of C3 plant species.

  15. ALTERED STATES OF LITERATURE: SHAMANIC ASSIMILATION AND ROMANTIC INSPIRATION

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    Marcel de Lima Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the connections between the assimilation of certain shamanic practices related to Romantic inspiration in English literature. The interest in the world of altered states of consciousness as a manifestation of the sacred is typical among Romantic writers in nineteenth-century England. These writers in fact sought the manifestation of the world of dreams by means of ingesting substances that alter consciousness, thus assimilating a practice that is likewise and primarily shamanic. This search is the object under investigation in this article, which aims at showing that, despite conspicuous cultural differences, there are indeed similarities that pervade shamanic practices and the Romantic ideal in their quests toward the sacred.

  16. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Jonathan P Zehr; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  17. Photorespiration and nitrate assimilation: a major intersection between plant carbon and nitrogen.

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    Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-02-01

    C3 carbon fixation has a bad reputation, primarily because it is associated with photorespiration, a biochemical pathway thought to waste a substantial amount of the carbohydrate produced in a plant. This review presents evidence collected over nearly a century that (1) Rubisco when associated with Mn(2+) generates additional reductant during photorespiration, (2) this reductant participates in the assimilation of nitrate into protein, and (3) this nitrate assimilation facilitates the use of a nitrogen source that other organisms tend to avoid. This phenomenon explains the continued dominance of C3 plants during the past 23 million years of low CO2 atmospheres as well as the decline in plant protein concentrations as atmospheric CO2 rises.

  18. Characterization and expression analysis of a gene cluster for nitrate assimilation from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans.

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    Böer, Erik; Schröter, Anja; Bode, Rüdiger; Piontek, Michael; Kunze, Gotthard

    2009-02-01

    In Arxula adeninivorans nitrate assimilation is mediated by the combined actions of a nitrate transporter, a nitrate reductase and a nitrite reductase. Single-copy genes for these activities (AYNT1, AYNR1, AYNI1, respectively) form a 9103 bp gene cluster localized on chromosome 2. The 3210 bp AYNI1 ORF codes for a protein of 1070 amino acids, which exhibits a high degree of identity to nitrite reductases from the yeasts Pichia anomala (58%), Hansenula polymorpha (58%) and Dekkera bruxellensis (54%). The second ORF (AYNR1, 2535 bp) encodes a nitrate reductase of 845 residues that shows significant (51%) identity to nitrate reductases of P. anomala and H. polymorpha. The third ORF in the cluster (AYNT1, 1518 bp) specifies a nitrate transporter with 506 amino acids, which is 46% identical to that of H. polymorpha. The three genes are independently expressed upon induction with NaNO(3). We quantitatively analysed the promoter activities by qRT-PCR and after fusing individual promoter fragments to the phytase (phyK) gene from Klebsiella sp. ASR1. The AYNI1 promoter was found to exhibit the highest activity, followed by the AYNT1 and AYNR1 elements. Direct measurements of nitrate and nitrite reductase activities performed after induction with NaNO(3) are compatible with these results. Both enzymes show optimal activity at around 42 degrees C and near-neutral pH, and require FAD as a co-factor and NADPH as electron donor.

  19. Requirement for the plastidial oxidative pentose phosphate pathway for nitrate assimilation in Arabidopsis.

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    Bussell, John D; Keech, Olivier; Fenske, Ricarda; Smith, Steven M

    2013-08-01

    Sugar metabolism and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) are strongly implicated in N assimilation, although the relationship between them and the roles of the plastidial and cytosolic OPPP have not been established genetically. We studied a knock-down mutant of the plastid-localized OPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconolactonase 3 (PGL3). pgl3-1 plants exhibited relatively greater resource allocation to roots but were smaller than the wild type. They had a lower content of amino acids and free NO3 - in leaves than the wild type, despite exhibiting comparable photosynthetic rates and efficiency, and normal levels of many other primary metabolites. When N-deprived plants were fed via the roots with 15NO3 -, pgl3-1 exhibited normal induction of OPPP and nitrate assimilation genes in roots, and amino acids in roots and shoots were labeled with (15) N at least as rapidly as in the wild type. However, when N-replete plants were fed via the roots with sucrose, expression of specific OPPP and N assimilation genes in roots increased in the wild type but not in pgl3-1. Thus, sugar-dependent expression of N assimilation genes requires OPPP activity and the specificity of the effect of the pgl3-1 mutation on N assimilation genes establishes that it is not the result of general energy deficiency or accumulation of toxic intermediates. We conclude that expression of specific nitrate assimilation genes in the nucleus of root cells is positively regulated by a signal emanating from OPPP activity in the plastid.

  20. DROUGHT-INDUCED EFFECTS AND RECOVERY OF NITRATE ASSIMILATION AND NODULE ACTIVITY IN COWPEA PLANTS INOCULATED WITH BRADYRHIZOBIUM SPP. UNDER MODERATE NITRATE LEVEL

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    Silveira Joaquim Albenísio Gomes da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to establish comparative effects of drought and recovery on the nitrate assimilation and nodule activity related to N2 fixation in cowpea plants [Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp.] previously inoculated with Bradyrhizobium spp. BR-3256 (CB-756 strain in the presence of 5 mol m-3 NO-3. Twenty-eight-day-old nodulated plants were submitted to water deprivation during 4 consecutive days and afterwards resupplied with nutrient solution during 2 days. The water deprivation caused a rapid increase in the nitrate content in root and a marked reduction in leaf nitrate reductase (NR activity. In contrast nodule NR activity was slightly increased by water deprivation. Concomitantly, in nodules of water stressed plants, leghemoglobin and glutamine synthetase (GS activity declined and a progressive reduction in ureide-N concentration in xylem sap was observed. Leaf-NR activity increased rapidly after rehydration while leaf nitrate content declined. In contrast both GS activity and soluble protein content in the nodule continued to decline in rewatered plants. In addition the concentration of leghemoglobin recovered well, while the xylem ureide-N content experienced a slight increase after rehydration. Despite the nitrate assimilation in leaves and the nodule activity had been both severely affected by water stress, the rapid recovery of nitrate reductase activity suggests that the nitrate assimilation process is less sensitive to drought/rehydration cycle when cowpea plants are nodulated in presence of moderate nitrate level.

  1. NITRIFICATION OF UREA AND ASSIMILATION OF NITRATE IN SATURATED SOILS UNDER AEROBIC CONDITIONS

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    A. E. Ghaly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate nitrification activity of urea and the assimilation of nitrate in a well aerated soil using perfusion technique with addition of glucose as an energy and carbon source. In this study, urea was rapidly nitrified by the bacteria in the saturated soil but its course of transformation to NO3 was not linear. There was an initial increase in the concentration of nitrite during the nitrification experiment which indicated that the conversion of nitrite to nitrate was appreciably slower than the rate of conversion of urea to nitrite. The rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2- was faster than the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- in the first 12 days and as a result the nitrate concentration reached 2.72 µg/ml on the 12th day. After day 12, the concentration of NH4+ in solution declined significantly and the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- became faster than the rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2-. The concentration of NO2-N in the solution reached zero on the 23rd day. The nitrification curve has the character of a sigmoid curve whose midpoint, which representing the most rapid rate of nitrification, fell at the point of half conversion of urea to nitrite. The curve asymptotically approaches a nitrate value that represents 98% conversion of urea into nitrate. The rest of the urea (NH4 has presumably been synthesized into bacterial cells. The initial pH of the soil was 7.7 due to the presence of NH4 which decreased gradually due to the production of NO3 reaching 6.9 by day 23. A nitrate reduction was observed under aerobic conditions. Denitrification did not proceed according to the known fact that O2 prevents the denitrifying organisms from producing the enzyme responsible for the process. The alternative pathway for nitrate reduction could be by assimilatory reduction where nitrate was converted to ammonium and then to cells. The removal of nitrate and production of ammonium caused a rise in the pH. The

  2. Nitrate assimilation gene cluster from the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

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    Frías, J E; Flores, E; Herrero, A

    1997-01-01

    A region of the genome of the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that contains a cluster of genes involved in nitrate assimilation has been identified. The genes nir, encoding nitrite reductase, and nrtABC, encoding elements of a nitrate permease, have been cloned. Insertion of a gene cassette into the nir-nrtA region impaired expression of narB, the nitrate reductase structural gene which together with nrtD is found downstream from nrtC in the gene cluster. This indicates that the nir-nrtABCD-narB genes are cotranscribed, thus constituting an operon. Expression of the nir operon in strain PCC 7120 is subjected to ammonium-promoted repression and takes place from an NtcA-activated promoter located 460 bp upstream from the start of the nir gene. In the absence of ammonium, cellular levels of the products of the nir operon are higher in the presence of nitrate than in the absence of combined nitrogen.

  3. Evaluation of the Role of Mixed Amino Acids in Nitrate Uptake and Assimilation in Leafy Radish by Using 15N-Labeled Nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xing-quan; CHEN Hui-yun; NI Qin-xue; Kyu Seung

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the role of mixed amino acids in nitrate uptake and assimilation was evaluated in leafy radish by using 15N labeled nitrate. The mixtures of alanine, (i-alanine, aspartic acid, asparagines, glutamic acid, glutamine, and glycine were sprayed to plant leaf two or four times. The activity of the enzymes related to the process of NO3- reduction (nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase) was affected differently depending on the application rate of mixed amino acids. Applying mixed amino acids increased the fresh weight, dry weight, and N yield. The NO3-content was reduced to 24-38%, but no significant differences were observed in amino acids and proteins. In addition, the nitrogen derived from fertilizer and the 15N-NO3-recovery rate increased to 2-8% and 15-47%, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the positive effect of mixed amino acids on nitrate uptake and assimilation might be attributed to the regulation on NO3- uptake and assimilation, but not to the preference for amino acids as sources of reduced nitrogen.

  4. Nitrate Effect on Rice Growth and Nitrogen Absorption and Assimilation at Different Growth Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ying-Hua; ZHANG Ya-Li; SHEN Qi-Rong; WANG Song-Wei

    2006-01-01

    The effect of nitrate (NO3-) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) growth as well as N absorption and assimilation during different growth stages was examined using three typical rice cultivars. Dry weight, yield, N uptake, nitrate reductase activity(NRA) in leaves, and glutamine synthetase activity (GSA) in roots and leaves during their entire growth periods, as well as the kinetic parameters of ammonium (NH4+) uptake at the seedling stage, were measured with solution culture experiments. Results indicated that addition of NH4+-N and NO3--N at a ratio of 75:25 (NH4++NO3- treatment) whencompared with that of NH4+-N alone (NH4+ treatment) increased the dry weight of 'Nanguang' cultivar by 30% and treatment compared to the NH4+ treatment, NRA in the leaves increased by 2.09 folds, and GSA increased by 92% in the roots and 52% in the leaves of the three cultivars. NO3- supply increased the maximum uptake rate (Vmax) in the uptake rate of NH4+ by rice. There was no effect on the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of the three cultivars.Thus, some replacement of NH4+ with NO3- could greatly improve the growth of rice plants, mainly on account of the increased uptake of NH4+ promoted by NO3-, and future studies should focus on the molecular mechanism of the increased uptake of NH4+ by NO3-.

  5. Understanding strategy of nitrate and urea assimilation in a Chinese strain of Aureococcus anophagefferens through RNA-seq analysis.

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    Hong-Po Dong

    Full Text Available Aureococcus anophagefferens is a harmful alga that dominates plankton communities during brown tides in North America, Africa, and Asia. Here, RNA-seq technology was used to profile the transcriptome of a Chinese strain of A. anophagefferens that was grown on urea, nitrate, and a mixture of urea and nitrate, and that was under N-replete, limited and recovery conditions to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie nitrate and urea utilization. The number of differentially expressed genes between urea-grown and mixture N-grown cells were much less than those between urea-grown and nitrate-grown cells. Compared with nitrate-grown cells, mixture N-grown cells contained much lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins that are involved in nitrate transport and assimilation. Together with profiles of nutrient changes in media, these results suggest that A. anophagefferens primarily feeds on urea instead of nitrate when urea and nitrate co-exist. Furthermore, we noted that transcripts upregulated by nitrate and N-limitation included those encoding proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide transport, degradation of amides and cyanates, and nitrate assimilation pathway. The data suggest that A. anophagefferens possesses an ability to utilize a variety of dissolved organic nitrogen. Moreover, transcripts for synthesis of proteins, glutamate-derived amino acids, spermines and sterols were upregulated by urea. Transcripts encoding key enzymes that are involved in the ornithine-urea and TCA cycles were differentially regulated by urea and nitrogen concentration, which suggests that the OUC may be linked to the TCA cycle and involved in reallocation of intracellular carbon and nitrogen. These genes regulated by urea may be crucial for the rapid proliferation of A. anophagefferens when urea is provided as the N source.

  6. Variation of summer phytoplankton community composition and its relationship to nitrate and regenerated nitrogen assimilation across the North Atlantic Ocean

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    Van Oostende, N.; Fawcett, S. E.; Marconi, D.; Lueders-Dumont, J.; Sabadel, A. J. M.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Jönsson, B. F.; Sigman, D. M.; Ward, B. B.

    2017-03-01

    The North Atlantic Ocean is considered a nitrogen (N) limited system once vernal stabilisation of the water column alleviates light limitation and allows phytoplankton growth to deplete surface nutrients to virtually undetectable levels. Ammonium and other regenerated N forms are then the main surface N source for phytoplankton production. The effort to determine which phytoplankton groups contribute to long-term biological export production would be greatly aided by information on which phytoplankton groups are responsible for the assimilation of nitrate, as opposed to those assimilating predominantly regenerated N. In this study, we used the natural abundance N isotopes to examine basin-scale patterns of nitrate and regenerated N assimilation and evaluated the relationships between these trends and phytoplankton community composition. Samples were collected during a summertime cruise transect (August-September 2013) from the subtropical (36°N 73°W) to the subarctic (54°N 20°W) North Atlantic and analysed for the N isotopic composition (δ15N vs. N2 in air) of particulate nitrogen (PN) and nitrate, size-fractionated chlorophyll a, and phytoplankton group biomass using flow cytometry. The depth of the 300 nmol l-1 nitrate isopleth shoaled from the subtropics (79 m), where phytoplankton stripped surface waters of nitrate, to the subarctic, where it intersected with the surface and the upward nutrient supply drove a summer phytoplankton bloom. The δ15N of PN above the nitracline increased from the subtropics (-0.3‰) to the subarctic (4.2‰), reflecting both a change in the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate source (from 2.4‰ to 5.1‰) and increased reliance by phytoplankton on nitrate relative to regenerated N. Throughout the transect, the phytoplankton community was mainly composed of pico- and nano-sized cells (>88% of chlorophyll a in the <20 μm size fraction). In the part of the transect southwest of the Grand Banks, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

  7. Aerobic-heterotrophic nitrogen removal through nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation by marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yating; Wang, Yanru; Fu, Lin; Gao, Yizhan; Zhao, Haixia; Zhou, Weizhi

    2017-04-01

    An aerobic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5 was screened to achieve efficient nitrate and ammonium removal simultaneously and fix nitrogen in cells without N loss. Approximately 98.0% of nitrate (100mg/L) was removed in 48h through assimilatory nitrate reduction and nitrate reductase was detected in the cytoplasm. Instead of nitrification, the strain assimilated ammonium directly, and it could tolerate as high as 1600mg/L ammonium concentration while removing 844.6mg/L. In addition, ammonium assimilation occurred preferentially in the medium containing nitrate and ammonium with a total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency of 80.4%. The results of nitrogen balance and Fourier infrared spectra illustrated that the removed nitrogen was all transformed to protein or stored as organic nitrogen substances in cells and no N was lost in the process. Toxicological studies with the brine shrimp species Artemia naupliia indicated that Vibrio sp. Y1-5 can be applied in aquatic ecosystems safely.

  8. Organic matrix based slow release fertilizer enhances plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod K; Singh, Rana P

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of organic matrix based slow release fertilizers (SRFs) on plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Brassica juncea L. cv, pusa bold. The agro-waste materials like cow dung, clay soil, neem leaves and rice bran were mixed together in 2:2:1:1 ratio and used as organic matrix for the immobilization of chemical fertilizer nutrients with commercial grade saresh (Acacia gum, 15% solution) as binder. Different fertilizer treatments were organic matrix based slow release fertilizers, SRF-I (542.0 kg ha(-1)); SRF-II (736.5 kg ha(-1)) and chemical fertilizer combinations, boron (3 kg ha(-1))+sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)) and boron (3 kg ha(-1)) + sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1))+phosphorus (15 kg ha(-1))+potassium (100 kg ha(-1)). Organic matrix based SRF-II released ammonium up to 50-d in wetsoil under laboratory conditions which showed maximum retention of the nutrients. Avery significant increase in plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield was recorded in organic matrix based SRF-II applied plants. The maximum percent increase in biomass production was observed with organic matrix based SRF-II (increase of 65.8% in root fresh weight, 38.0% in root dry weight, 45.9% in leaf fresh weight plant(-1) and 27.5 % in leaf dry weight plant(-1) in 60-d old plants). It also increased the acquisition and assimilation of nitrate from the plant's rhizosphere which was evident by 45.6% increase in nitrate, 27.5% in nitrite and 11.7% in nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of 45-d old plants over control. The organic matrix based SRF-II significantly increased the seed yield by 28% in Indian mustard. Cost analysis revealed thatthis formulation is cost effective as it is based on agro waste materials.

  9. The response of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I to changes in photorespiration and nitrate assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Berkley J; Strand, Deserah D; Kramer, David M; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-05-01

    Photosynthesis captures light energy to produce ATP and NADPH. These molecules are consumed in the conversion of CO2 to sugar, photorespiration, and NO3(-) assimilation. The production and consumption of ATP and NADPH must be balanced to prevent photoinhibition or photodamage. This balancing may occur via cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (CEF), which increases ATP/NADPH production during photosynthetic electron transport; however, it is not clear under what conditions CEF changes with ATP/NADPH demand. Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and dark interval relaxation kinetics were used to determine the contribution of CEF in balancing ATP/NADPH in hydroponically grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) supplied different forms of nitrogen (nitrate versus ammonium) under changes in atmospheric CO2 and oxygen. Measurements of CEF were made under low and high light and compared with ATP/NADPH demand estimated from CO2 gas exchange. Under low light, contributions of CEF did not shift despite an up to 17% change in modeled ATP/NADPH demand. Under high light, CEF increased under photorespiratory conditions (high oxygen and low CO2), consistent with a primary role in energy balancing. However, nitrogen form had little impact on rates of CEF under high or low light. We conclude that, according to modeled ATP/NADPH demand, CEF responded to energy demand under high light but not low light. These findings suggest that other mechanisms, such as the malate valve and the Mehler reaction, were able to maintain energy balance when electron flow was low but that CEF was required under higher flow.

  10. Nitrate Assimilation Genes of the Marine Diazotrophic, Filamentous Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. Strain WH9601

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qingfeng; Li, Hong; Post, Anton F.

    2000-01-01

    A 4.0-kb DNA fragment of Trichodesmium sp. strain WH9601 contained gene sequences encoding the nitrate reduction enzymes, nirA and narB. A third gene positioned between nirA and narB encodes a putative membrane protein with similarity to the nitrate permeases of Bacillus subtilis (NasA) and Emericella nidulans (CrnA). The gene was shown to functionally complement a ΔnasA mutant of B. subtilis and was assigned the name napA (nitrate permease). NapA was involved in both nitrate and nitrite upta...

  11. Metabolic changes and associated cytokinin signals in response to nitrate assimilation in roots and shoots of Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Jessica; Love, Jonathan; Guo, Qianqian; Song, Jiancheng; Cao, Mingshu; Fraser, Karl; Huege, Jan; Jones, Chris; Novák, Ondřej; Turnbull, Matthew H; Jameson, Paula E

    2016-04-01

    The efficiency of inorganic nitrogen (N) assimilation is a critical component of fertilizer use by plants and of forage production in Lolium perenne, an important pasture species worldwide. We present a spatiotemporal description of nitrate use efficiency in terms of metabolic responses and carbohydrate remobilization, together with components of cytokinin signal transduction following nitrate addition to N-impoverished plants. Perennial ryegrass (L. perenne cv. Grasslands Nui) plants were grown for 10 weeks in unfertilized soil and then treated with nitrate (5 mM) hydroponically. Metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed a dynamic interaction between N and carbon metabolism over a week-long time course represented by the relative abundance of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid intermediates and stored water-soluble carbohydrates (WSCs). The initial response to N addition was characterized by a rapid remobilization of carbon stores from the low-molecular weight WSC, along with an increase in N content and assimilation into free amino acids. Subsequently, the shoot became the main source of carbon through remobilization of a large pool of high-molecular weight WSC. Associated quantification of cytokinin levels and expression profiling of putative cytokinin response regulator genes by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction support a role for cytokinin in the mediation of the response to N addition in perennial ryegrass. The presence of high levels of cis-zeatin-type cytokinins is discussed in the context of hormonal homeostasis under the stress of steady-state N deficiency.

  12. Inhibition of respiration and nitrate assimilation enhances photohydrogen evolution under low oxygen concentrations in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutthann, Franziska; Egert, Melanie; Marques, Alexandra; Appel, Jens

    2007-02-01

    In cyanobacterial membranes photosynthetic light reaction and respiration are intertwined. It was shown that the single hydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is connected to the light reaction. We conducted measurements of hydrogenase activity, fermentative hydrogen evolution and photohydrogen production of deletion mutants of respiratory electron transport complexes. All single, double and triple mutants of the three terminal respiratory oxidases and the ndhB-mutant without a functional complex I were studied. After activating the hydrogenase by applying anaerobic conditions in the dark hydrogen production was measured at the onset of light. Under these conditions respiratory capacity and amount of photohydrogen produced were found to be inversely correlated. Especially the absence of the quinol oxidase induced an increased hydrogenase activity and an increased production of hydrogen in the light compared to wild type cells. Our results support that the hydrogenase as well as the quinol oxidase function as electron valves under low oxygen concentrations. When the activities of photosystem II and I (PSII and PSI) are not in equilibrium or in case that the light reaction is working at a higher pace than the dark reaction, the hydrogenase is necessary to prevent an acceptor side limitation of PSI, and the quinol oxidase to prevent an overreduction of the plastoquinone pool (acceptor side of PSII). Besides oxygen, nitrate assimilation was found to be an important electron sink. Inhibition of nitrate reductase resulted in an increased fermentative hydrogen production as well as higher amounts of photohydrogen.

  13. Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockers Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Antiarrhythmics Anticoagulants Antiplatelet Therapy Aspirin Beta-Blockers Blood Thinners Calcium Channel Blockers Digitalis Medicines Diuretics Inotropic Agents Statins, Cholesterol-Lowering Medicines Nitrates Disclaimer The information ...

  14. The Azospirillum brasilense rpoN gene is involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation, ammonium uptake, and flagellar biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcamps, A; Van Dommelen, A; Stigter, J; Vanderleyden, J; de Bruijn, F J

    1996-05-01

    The rpoN (ntrA) gene (encoding sigma 54) of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was isolated by using conserved rpoN primers and the polymerase chain reaction, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the RpoN protein was found to share a high degree of homology with other members of the sigma 54 family. Two additional open reading frames were found in the Azospirillum brasilense rpoN region, with significant similarity to equivalent regions surrounding the rpoN locus in other bacteria. An rpoN mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was constructed by gene replacement and found to be defective in nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation, and ammonium uptake. Lack of ammonium uptake was also found in previously isolated Azospirillum brasilense ntrB and ntrC mutants, further supporting the role of the ntr system in this process. In addition, the rpoN mutant was found to be nonmotile, suggesting a role of RpoN in Azospirillum brasilense flagellar biosynthesis.

  15. AtTGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought resistance by enhancing nitrate transport and assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Dandan; Min, Donghong; Li, Weiwei; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhou, Yongbin; Li, Liancheng; Chen, Ming; Ma, Youzhi

    2015-02-13

    To cope with environmental stress caused by global climate change and excessive nitrogen application, it is important to improve water and nitrogen use efficiencies in crop plants. It has been reported that higher nitrogen uptake could alleviate the damaging impact of drought stress. However, there is scant evidence to explain how nitrogen uptake affects drought resistance. In this study we observed that bZIP transcription factor AtTGA4 (TGACG motif-binding factor 4) was induced by both drought and low nitrogen stresses, and that overexpression of AtTGA4 simultaneously improved drought resistance and reduced nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis. Following drought stress there were higher nitrogen and proline contents in transgenic AtTGA4 plants than in wild type controls, and activity of the key enzyme nitrite reductase (NIR) involved in nitrate assimilation processes was also higher. Expressions of the high-affinity nitrate transporter genes NRT2.1 and NRT2.2 and nitrate reductase genes NIA1 and NIA2 in transgenic plants were all higher than in wild type indicating that higher levels of nitrate transport and assimilation activity contributed to enhanced drought resistance of AtTGA4 transgenic plants. Thus genetic transformation with AtTGA4 may provide a new approach to simultaneously improve crop tolerance to drought and low nitrogen stresses.

  16. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Silvestrini

    Full Text Available A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1, nitrite reductase (YNI1, a high affinity transporter (YNT1, as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2. Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1 transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems.

  17. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems.

  18. Long-term fertilization alters the relative importance of nitrate reduction pathways in salt marsh sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Ji, Qixing; Angell, John H.; Kearns, Patrick J.; Yang, Hannah J.; Bowen, Jennifer L.; Ward, Bess B.

    2016-08-01

    Salt marshes provide numerous valuable ecological services. In particular, nitrogen (N) removal in salt marsh sediments alleviates N loading to the coastal ocean. N removal reduces the threat of eutrophication caused by increased N inputs from anthropogenic sources. It is unclear, however, whether chronic nutrient overenrichment alters the capacity of salt marshes to remove anthropogenic N. To assess the effect of nutrient enrichment on N cycling in salt marsh sediments, we examined important N cycle pathways in experimental fertilization plots in a New England salt marsh. We determined rates of nitrification, denitrification, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) using sediment slurry incubations with 15N labeled ammonium or nitrate tracers under oxic headspace (20% oxygen/80% helium). Nitrification and denitrification rates were more than tenfold higher in fertilized plots compared to control plots. By contrast, DNRA, which retains N in the system, was high in control plots but not detected in fertilized plots. The relative contribution of DNRA to total nitrate reduction largely depends on the carbon/nitrate ratio in the sediment. These results suggest that long-term fertilization shifts N cycling in salt marsh sediments from predominantly retention to removal.

  19. Absorption et assimilation du nitrate et recyclage de l’azote organique chez les plantes : intérêt pour le colza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morot-Gaudry Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus (winter oilseed rape is an important agricultural crop cultivated for oil, which can be used as an edible product or for industrial application, bioester for example. Despite the very high capacity of oilseed rape to take up nitrate, many authors have reported a very low recovery of nitrogen in field-grown crops whatever the level of N fertilizer applied. In this manuscript we describe the main biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in nitrate uptake, reduction, assimilation and N recycling during the reproductive period to gain sufficient knowledge to determine the relative importance of environmental and genetic factors determining N management in plants. This understanding will provide the necessary background for improvement of oilseed rape varieties.

  20. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2].

  1. How to improve an un-alterable model forecast? A sequential data assimilation based error updating approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragne, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.; Alfredsen, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    Accuracy of reservoir inflow forecasts is instrumental for maximizing value of water resources and influences operation of hydropower reservoirs significantly. Improving hourly reservoir inflow forecasts over a 24 hours lead-time is considered with the day-ahead (Elspot) market of the Nordic exchange market in perspectives. The procedure presented comprises of an error model added on top of an un-alterable constant parameter conceptual model, and a sequential data assimilation routine. The structure of the error model was investigated using freely available software for detecting mathematical relationships in a given dataset (EUREQA) and adopted to contain minimum complexity for computational reasons. As new streamflow data become available the extra information manifested in the discrepancies between measurements and conceptual model outputs are extracted and assimilated into the forecasting system recursively using Sequential Monte Carlo technique. Besides improving forecast skills significantly, the probabilistic inflow forecasts provided by the present approach entrains suitable information for reducing uncertainty in decision making processes related to hydropower systems operation. The potential of the current procedure for improving accuracy of inflow forecasts at lead-times unto 24 hours and its reliability in different seasons of the year will be illustrated and discussed thoroughly.

  2. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1991-01-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  3. Salinity Stress Effects on Growth and Nitrate Assimilation in Bean Seedlings Likely to be Mediated via Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhamgaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Salinity stress usually imposes adverse effects on plant systems, but the severity depends upon plant species, growth status and genotype, nutritional and environmental conditions etc. Present study analyses salinity effects on growth and in vivo nitrate reductase activity (NRA in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings to work out the mechanism. Results : Supply of 10-200 mM NaCl with 10 mM KNO3 for 24 h in continuous light reduced the overall growth of the bean seedlings, with perfect –ve correlation for seedling weight, root length and shoot length. Salinity effect with 10 mM NH4Cl was lesser and with 10 mM NH4NO3 was intermediary. NaCl treatment with 10 mM KNO3 reduced the fresh wt of the root as well as shoot tissue but increased in vivo NRA exerting strong correlation and more prominent effect in the root tissue. Very high NaCl concentration prominently increased NRA at 1, 10 and 50 mM KNO3 showing inverse gradation in effect. Salt treatment with NH4NO3, reduced the in vivo NRA of the root tissue, but the stress parameters, like proline and peroxidase were increased. Conclusions : The salinity stress effects on NRA are less severe with NH4+, more prominent for root and more effective at low NO3- concentration. Inverse correlation between decrease in fresh mass and increase in NRA with salinity suggests the involvement of NR in the synthesis of nitric oxide and the observed effect of stress is the balance of two factors reduced assimilatory effect and increased nitric oxide stress.

  4. Plant Species Richness and Nitrogen Deposition can Alter Microbial Assimilation of New Photosynthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H.; Zak, D.; Reich, P.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial assimilation of recent photosynthate was analyzed in a 6-year-long field experiment to determine how plant species richness impacts microbial metabolism of new photosynthate, and how this may be modified by atmospheric N deposition. Our study was conducted at the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) FACE (Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) experiment located at the Cedar Creek Natural History area in Minnesota, USA. In this experiment, plant species richness, atmospheric N deposition, and atmospheric CO2 concentration were manipulated in concert. The depleted δ13C of fumigation CO2 enabled us to investigate the effect of plant species richness and atmospheric N deposition on the metabolism of soil microbial communities in the elevated CO2 treatment. We determined the δ13C of bacterial, actinobacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). In the elevated CO2 conditions of this study, the δ13C of bacterial PLFAs (i15:0, i16:0, 16:1ω7c, 16:1ω9c, 10Me16:0, and 10Me18:0) and the fungal PLFA 18:1ω9c was significantly lower in species-rich plant communities than in species-poor plant communities, indicating that microbial incorporation of new C increased with plant species richness. Despite an increase in plant production, total PLFA decreased under N deposition by 27%. Moreover, N deposition also decreased fungal relative abundance in species-rich plant communities. In our study, plant species richness directly increased microbial incorporation of new photosynthate, providing a mechanistic link between greater plant detritus production in species-rich plant communities and larger and more active soil microbial community.

  5. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency: mechanism and implications for coastal eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew; Dziallas, Claudia; Casciotti, Karen; Ducklow, Hugh

    2013-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the coastal zone. The assimilation of nitrate by coastal phytoplankton and its conversion into organic matter is an important feature of the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Dissolved reactive nitrogen is converted into a particulate form, which eventually undergoes nitrogen removal via microbial denitrification. High and unbalanced nitrate loads to the coastal zone may alter planktonic nitrate assimilation efficiency, due to the narrow stochiometric requirements for nutrients typically shown by these organisms. This implies a cascade of changes for the cycling of other elements, such as carbon, with unknown consequences at the ecosystem level. Here, we report that the nitrate removal efficiency (NRE) of a natural phytoplankton community decreased under high, unbalanced nitrate loads, due to the enhanced recycling of organic nitrogen and subsequent production and microbial transformation of excess ammonium. NRE was inversely correlated with the amount of nitrate present, and mechanistically controlled by dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and organic carbon (Corg) availability. These findings have important implications for the management of nutrient runoff to coastal zones.

  6. Elevated pCO(2 )favours nitrate reduction in the roots of wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Gat.) and significantly alters N-metabolism in transformants lacking functional nitrate reductase in the roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Jörg; Hetzger, Ilka; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf-R; Walch-Liu, Pia; Engels, Christof; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2002-12-01

    The impact of elevated pCO(2 )on N-metabolism of hydroponically grown wild-type and transformed tobacco plants lacking root nitrate reduction was studied in order to elucidate the effects on (i) nitrate uptake, (ii) long-distance transport of N, (iii) nitrate reduction with emphasis on root-NR, and (iv) the allocation of N between the root and shoot. The findings were related to alterations of growth rates. At elevated pCO(2 )the wild type exhibited higher growth rates, which were accompanied by an increase of NO(3)(-)-uptake per plant, due to a higher root:shoot ratio. Furthermore, elevated pCO(2 )enhanced nitrate reduction in the roots of the wild type, resulting in enhanced xylem-loading of organic N (amino-N) to supply the shoot with sufficient nitrogen, and decreased phloem-transport of organic N in a basipetal direction. Transformed tobacco plants lacking root nitrate reduction were smaller than the wild type and exhibited lower growth rates. Nitrate uptake per plant was decreased in transformed plants as a consequence of an impeded root growth and, thus, a significantly decreased root:shoot ratio. Surprisingly, transformed plants showed an altered allocation of amino-N between the root and the shoot, with an increase of amino-N in the root and a substantial decrease of amino-N in the shoot. In transformed plants, xylem-loading of nitrate was increased and the roots were supplied with organic N via phloem transport. Elevated pCO(2 )increased shoot-NR, but only slightly affected the growth rates of transformed plants, whereas carbohydrates accumulated at elevated pCO(2 )as indicated by a significant increase of the C/N ratio in the leaves of transformed plants. Unexpectedly, the C/N balance and the functional equilibrium between root and shoot growth was disturbed dramatically by the loss of nitrate reduction in the root.

  7. DNA content alterations in Tetrahymena pyriformis macronucleus after exposure to food preservatives sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Chasapis, C T; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity, in terms of changes in the DNA content, of two food preservatives, sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis using DNA image analysis technology. For this purpose, selected doses of both food additives were administered for 2 h to protozoa cultures and DNA image analysis of T. pyriformis nuclei was performed. The analysis was based on the measurement of the Mean Optical Density which represents the cellular DNA content. The results have shown that after exposure of the protozoan cultures to doses equivalent to ADI, a statistically significant increase in the macronuclear DNA content compared to the unexposed control samples was observed. The observed increase in the macronuclear DNA content is indicative of the stimulation of the mitotic process and the observed increase in MOD, accompanied by a stimulation of the protozoan proliferation activity is in consistence with this assumption. Since alterations at the DNA level such as DNA content and uncontrolled mitogenic stimulation have been linked with chemical carcinogenesis, the results of the present study add information on the toxicogenomic profile of the selected chemicals and may potentially lead to reconsideration of the excessive use of nitrates aiming to protect public health.

  8. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  9. Exotic grasses and nitrate enrichment alter soil carbon cycling along an urban-rural tropical forest gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Daniela F; Lee, Joseph K; McCleery, Taylor L; LeCroy, Chase S

    2015-12-01

    Urban areas are expanding rapidly in tropical regions, with potential to alter ecosystem dynamics. In particular, exotic grasses and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition simultaneously affect tropical urbanized landscapes, with unknown effects on properties like soil carbon (C) storage. We hypothesized that (H1) soil nitrate (NO3 (-) ) is elevated nearer to the urban core, reflecting N deposition gradients. (H2) Exotic grasslands have elevated soil NO3 (-) and decreased soil C relative to secondary forests, with higher N promoting decomposer activity. (H3) Exotic grasslands have greater seasonality in soil NO3 (-) vs. secondary forests, due to higher sensitivity of grassland soil moisture to rainfall. We predicted that NO3 (-) would be positively related to dissolved organic C (DOC) production via changes in decomposer activity. We measured six paired grassland/secondary forest sites along a tropical urban-to-rural gradient during the three dominant seasons (hurricane, dry, and early wet). We found that (1) soil NO3 (-) was generally elevated nearer to the urban core, with particularly clear spatial trends for grasslands. (2) Exotic grasslands had lower soil C than secondary forests, which was related to elevated decomposer enzyme activities and soil respiration. Unexpectedly, soil NO3 (-) was negatively related to enzyme activities, and was lower in grasslands than forests. (3) Grasslands had greater soil NO3 (-) seasonality vs. forests, but this was not strongly linked to shifts in soil moisture or DOC. Our results suggest that exotic grasses in tropical regions are likely to drastically reduce soil C storage, but that N deposition may have an opposite effect via suppression of enzyme activities. However, soil NO3 (-) accumulation here was higher in urban forests than grasslands, potentially related to of aboveground N interception. Net urban effects on C storage across tropical landscapes will likely vary depending on the mosaic of grass cover, rates of N

  10. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation in yeasts: alteration in enzyme activities associated with changes in cultural conditions and growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomulka, K W; Moat, A G

    1972-01-01

    Ammonia assimilation has been investigated in four strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring, at intervals throughout the growth cycle, the activities of several enzymes concerned with inorganic ammonia assimilation. Enzyme activities in extracts of cells were compared after growth in complete and defined media. The effect of shift from growth in a complete to growth in a defined medium (and the reverse) was also determined. The absence of aspartase (EC 4.3.1.1, l-aspartate-ammonia lyase) activity, the low specific activities of alanine dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.1.2, l-glutamate-ammonia ligase (ADP)], and the marked increase in activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.4, l-glutamate:NADP-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] during the early stages of growth support the conclusion that yeasts assimilate ammonia primarily via glutamate. The NADP-GDH showed a rapid increase in activity just before the initiation of exponential growth, reached a maximum at the mid-exponential stage, and then gradually declined in activity in the stationary phase. The NADP-GDH reached a higher level of activity when the yeasts were grown on the defined medium as compared with complete medium. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.2, l-glutamate:NAD-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] showed only slight increases in activity during the exponential phase of growth. There was an inverse relationship in that the NADP-GDH increased in activity as the NAD-GDH decreased. The NAD-GDH activity was higher after growth on the complete medium. The glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1. l-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase) activity rose and fell in parallel with the NADP-GDH, although its specific activity was somewhat lower. Although other ammonia-assimilatory enzymes were demonstrable, it seems unlikely that their combined activities could account

  11. Inactivation of nitrate reductase alters metabolic branching of carbohydrate fermentation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Zhang, Shuyi; Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady M; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-05-01

    To produce cellular energy, cyanobacteria reduce nitrate as the preferred pathway over proton reduction (H2 evolution) by catabolizing glycogen under dark anaerobic conditions. This competition lowers H2 production by consuming a large fraction of the reducing equivalents (NADPH and NADH). To eliminate this competition, we constructed a knockout mutant of nitrate reductase, encoded by narB, in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. As expected, ΔnarB was able to take up intracellular nitrate but was unable to reduce it to nitrite or ammonia, and was unable to grow photoautotrophically on nitrate. During photoautotrophic growth on urea, ΔnarB significantly redirects biomass accumulation into glycogen at the expense of protein accumulation. During subsequent dark fermentation, metabolite concentrations--both the adenylate cellular energy charge (∼ATP) and the redox poise (NAD(P)H/NAD(P))--were independent of nitrate availability in ΔnarB, in contrast to the wild type (WT) control. The ΔnarB strain diverted more reducing equivalents from glycogen catabolism into reduced products, mainly H2 and d-lactate, by 6-fold (2.8% yield) and 2-fold (82.3% yield), respectively, than WT. Continuous removal of H2 from the fermentation medium (milking) further boosted net H2 production by 7-fold in ΔnarB, at the expense of less excreted lactate, resulting in a 49-fold combined increase in the net H2 evolution rate during 2 days of fermentation compared to the WT. The absence of nitrate reductase eliminated the inductive effect of nitrate addition on rerouting carbohydrate catabolism from glycolysis to the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway, indicating that intracellular redox poise and not nitrate itself acts as the control switch for carbon flux branching between pathways.

  12. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  13. The phylogenetic relationships of the hat-shaped ascospore-forming, nitrate-assimilating Pichia species, formerly classified in the genus Hansenula Sydow et Sydow, based on the partial sequences of 18S and 26S ribosomal RNAs (Saccharomycetaceae): the proposals of three new genera, Ogataea, Kuraishia, and Nakazawaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Maeda, K; Mikata, K

    1994-07-01

    The twenty-seven strains of the hat-shaped ascospore-forming, nitrate-assimilating species, formerly classified in the genus Hansenula, of the genus Pichia were examined for their 18S and 26S rRNA partial base sequencings. All the strains examined were separate phylogenetically from the type strain of P. membranaefaciens (type species of genus Pichia). Based on the sequence data obtained [by number of base differences (five or more) with P. anomala and base sequences on fingerprint segment] in the 18S rRNA partial base sequences, these species were divided into seven groups. Group I, including P. anomala (identical to H. anomala, type species of genus Hansenula), P. canadensis, P. muscicola, P. silvicola, P. subpelliculosa, P. americana, P. bimundalis, P. ciferrii, P. syndowiorum, P. bispora, and P. fabianii, corresponded to the genus Hansenula Sydow et Sydow. Groups II and III were comprised of P. capsulata and P. holstii, respectively. Group IV included P. angusta, P. minuta var. minuta, P. minuta var. nonfermentans, P. philodendra, P. glucozyma, and P. henricii. Groups V, VI, and VII included P. jadinii, P. petersonii, and P. dryadoides, respectively. The nitrate assimilation-negative species, P. wickerhamii was phylogenetically distant from P. membranaefaciens. The seven groupings are discussed phylogenetically and taxonomically. For Groups IV, II, and III, the three new genera were proposed as Ogataea, Kuraishia, and Nakazawaea, respectively, with the type species, O. minuta (identical to P. minuta), K. capsulata (identical to P. capsulata), and N. holstii (identical to P. holstii).

  14. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  15. Experimental soil warming and cooling alters the partitioning of recent assimilates: evidence from a (14)C-labelling study at the alpine treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A; Hagedorn, F; Niklaus, P A

    2016-05-01

    Despite concerns about climate change effects on ecosystems functioning, little is known on how plant assimilate partitioning changes with temperature. Particularly, large temperature effects might occur in cold ecosystems where critical processes are at their temperature limit. In this study, we tested temperature effects on carbon (C) assimilate partitioning in a field experiment at the alpine treeline. We warmed and cooled soils of microcosms planted with Pinus mugo or Leucanthemopsis alpina, achieving daily mean soil temperatures (3-10 cm depth) around 5.8, 12.7 and 19.2 °C in cooled, control and warmed soils. We pulse-labelled these systems with (14)CO2 for one photoperiod and traced (14)C over the successive 4 days. Plant net (14)C uptake increased steadily with soil temperature. However, (14)C amounts in fungal hyphae, soil microbial biomass, soil organic matter, and soil respiration showed a non-linear response to temperature. This non-linear pattern was particularly pronounced in P. mugo, with five times higher (14)C activities in cooled compared to control soils, but no difference between warmed and control soil. Autoradiographic analysis of the spatial distribution of (14)C in soils indicated that temperature effects on the vertical label distribution within soils depended on plant species. Our results show that plant growth, in particular root metabolism, is limited by low soil temperature. As a consequence, positive temperature effects on net C uptake may not be paralleled by similar changes in rhizodeposition. This has important implications for predictions of soil C storage, because rhizodeposits and plant biomass vary strongly in their residence times.

  16. Um método de investigação da assimilação heterotrófica do amônio e nitrato por organismos planctônicos A method for investigating the heterotrophic assimilation of ammonium and nitrate through planktonic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineu Bianchini-Júnior

    2000-05-01

    ammonium and nitrate is investigated for various predetermined concentrations of water samples extracted from the upper subsurface of the littoral zone of a small reservoir (Lake IAG in São Paulo, Brazil ( 23º39’ S and 46º37’ W. Five concentrations were predetermined for added ammonium: 300; 370; 440; 650; 1280 µg.N.L-1 and nitrate: 340; 590; 890; 1090; 1590 µg.N.L-1. The samples were maintained under dark and oxygenated at a controlled temperature of 20ºC ± 1ºC, for the period of 9 days for ammonium and 11 days for nitrate. Once a day the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in the flasks were analyzed colorimetric method. The highest uptake rate occurred at the initial concentrations of 300 µg.N.L-1 (k = 0,23 day-1 and 340 µg.N.L-1 (k = 0,25 day-1 for ammonium and nitrate respectively. These results indicate that the latter concentrations are close to the ideal conditions for assimilation of ammonium and nitrate by the microorganisms in the system. It is suggested therefore that these are the concentrations at which incubation processes should be started. In addition, concentrations above 500 µg.N.L-1 for ammonium and 600 µg.N.L-1 for nitrate are likely to cause inhibition of the assimilation process. The data do not follow a simple Michaelis-Menten equation, probably because some inhibition in the assimilation occurred.

  17. Keeping Nitrate in the Roots: An Unexpected Requirement for Cadmium Tolerance in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alain Gojon; Frédéric Gaymard

    2010-01-01

    @@ The nitrate ion (NO-3) is a major nitrogen source for higher plants. Following uptake from the soil solution into the plant, nitrate can be either stored in the vacuoles or assimilated to supply the nitrogen atom for amino acid biosynthesis. In many herbaceous species, nitrate assimilation occurs redominantly in the leaves (Andrews, 1986), where a large part of the reducing power needed for this process directLy originates from the photosystems.

  18. Assimilatory Nitrate Reduction in Hansenula polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Beatrice; Berardi, Enrico

    In the last decade, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha (syn.: Pichia angusta) has become an excellent experimental model for genetic and molecular investigations of nitrate assimilation, a subject traditionally investigated in plants, filamentous fungi and bacteria. Among other advantages, H. polymorpha offers classical and molecular genetic tools, as well as the availability of genomic sequence data.

  19. Global Isotope Metabolomics Reveals Adaptive Strategies for Nitrogen Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczy, Michael E; Forsberg, Erica M; Thorgersen, Michael P; Poole, Farris L; Benton, H Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Tran, Minerva L; Wall, Judy D; Elias, Dwayne A; Adams, Michael W W; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-06-17

    Nitrogen cycling is a microbial metabolic process essential for global ecological/agricultural balance. To investigate the link between the well-established ammonium and the alternative nitrate assimilation metabolic pathways, global isotope metabolomics was employed to examine three nitrate reducing bacteria using (15)NO3 as a nitrogen source. In contrast to a control (Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2), the results show that two of the isolates from Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Pseudomonas N2A2 and N2E2) utilize nitrate and ammonia for assimilation concurrently with differential labeling observed across multiple classes of metabolites including amino acids and nucleotides. The data reveal that the N2A2 and N2E2 strains conserve nitrogen-containing metabolites, indicating that the nitrate assimilation pathway is a conservation mechanism for the assimilation of nitrogen. Co-utilization of nitrate and ammonia is likely an adaption to manage higher levels of nitrite since the denitrification pathways utilized by the N2A2 and N2E2 strains from the Oak Ridge site are predisposed to the accumulation of the toxic nitrite. The use of global isotope metabolomics allowed for this adaptive strategy to be investigated, which would otherwise not have been possible to decipher.

  20. A stable isotope approach and its application for identifying nitrate source and transformation process in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiguo; Kang, Pingping; Sun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of water is a worldwide environmental problem. Recent studies have demonstrated that the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotopes of nitrate (NO3(-)) can be used to trace nitrogen dynamics including identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes. This paper analyzes the current state of identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes using N and O isotopes of nitrate. With regard to nitrate sources, δ(15)N-NO3(-) and δ(18)O-NO3(-) values typically vary between sources, allowing the sources to be isotopically fingerprinted. δ(15)N-NO3(-) is often effective at tracing NO(-)3 sources from areas with different land use. δ(18)O-NO3(-) is more useful to identify NO3(-) from atmospheric sources. Isotopic data can be combined with statistical mixing models to quantify the relative contributions of NO3(-) from multiple delineated sources. With regard to N transformation processes, N and O isotopes of nitrate can be used to decipher the degree of nitrogen transformation by such processes as nitrification, assimilation, and denitrification. In some cases, however, isotopic fractionation may alter the isotopic fingerprint associated with the delineated NO3(-) source(s). This problem may be addressed by combining the N and O isotopic data with other types of, including the concentration of selected conservative elements, e.g., chloride (Cl(-)), boron isotope (δ(11)B), and sulfur isotope (δ(35)S) data. Future studies should focus on improving stable isotope mixing models and furthering our understanding of isotopic fractionation by conducting laboratory and field experiments in different environments.

  1. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  2. Assimilating atmosphere reanalysis in coupled data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaran; Lu, Feiyu; Liu, Zhengyu; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Shaoqing

    2016-06-01

    This paper tests the idea of substituting the atmospheric observations with atmospheric reanalysis when setting up a coupled data assimilation system. The paper focuses on the quantification of the effects on the oceanic analysis resulted from this substitution and designs four different assimilation schemes for such a substitution. A coupled Lorenz96 system is constructed and an ensemble Kalman filter is adopted. The atmospheric reanalysis and oceanic observations are assimilated into the system and the analysis quality is compared to a benchmark experiment where both atmospheric and oceanic observations are assimilated. Four schemes are designed for assimilating the reanalysis and they differ in the generation of the perturbed observation ensemble and the representation of the error covariance matrix. The results show that when the reanalysis is assimilated directly as independent observations, the root-mean-square error increase of oceanic analysis relative to the benchmark is less than 16% in the perfect model framework; in the biased model case, the increase is less than 22%. This result is robust with sufficient ensemble size and reasonable atmospheric observation quality (e.g., frequency, noisiness, and density). If the observation is overly noisy, infrequent, sparse, or the ensemble size is insufficiently small, the analysis deterioration caused by the substitution is less severe since the analysis quality of the benchmark also deteriorates significantly due to worse observations and undersampling. The results from different assimilation schemes highlight the importance of two factors: accurate representation of the error covariance of the reanalysis and the temporal coherence along each ensemble member, which are crucial for the analysis quality of the substitution experiment.

  3. Multiscale Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 Multiscale Data Assimilation Dr. Pierre F.J. Lermusiaux Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Ocean Science and Engineering...concerned with next-generation multiscale data assimilation , with a focus on shelfbreak regions, including non-hydrostatic effects. Our long-term...goals are to: - Develop and utilize GMM-DO data assimilation schemes for rigorous multiscale inferences, where observations provide information on

  4. Thermospheric Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Thermospheric Data Assimilation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0058 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Tomoko...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Program Manager: Dr. Julie J Moses, AFOSR, 703-696-9586, Julie.moses@us.af.mil 14. ABSTRACT This project...thermosphere-ionosphere first- principles model. An ensemble data assimilation procedure, constructed with the NCAR Data Assimilation Research Testbed

  5. The urease inhibitor NBPT negatively affects DUR3-mediated uptake and assimilation of urea in maize roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eZanin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread use of urease inhibitors in agriculture, little information is available on their effect on nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Aim of this work was to study, at physiological and transcriptional level, the effects of NBPT on urea nutrition in hydroponically grown maize plants. Presence of NBPT in the nutrient solution limited the capacity of plants to utilize urea as a N-source; this was shown by a decrease in urea uptake rate and 15N accumulation. Noteworthy, these negative effects were evident only when plants were fed with urea, as NBPT did not alter 15N accumulation in nitrate-fed plants. NBPT also impaired the growth of Arabidopsis plants when urea was used as N-source, while having no effect on plants grown with nitrate or ammonium.This response was related, at least in part, to a direct effect of NBPT on the high affinity urea transport system. Impact of NBPT on urea uptake was further evaluated using lines of Arabidopsis overexpressing ZmDUR3 and dur3-knockout; results suggest that not only transport but also urea assimilation could be compromised by the inhibitor. This hypothesis was reinforced by an over-accumulation of urea and a decrease in ammonium concentration in NBPT-treated plants. Furthermore, transcriptional analyses showed that in maize roots NBPT treatment severely impaired the expression of genes involved in the cytosolic pathway of ureic-N assimilation and ammonium transport. NBPT also limited the expression of a gene coding for a transcription factor highly induced by urea and possibly playing a crucial role in the regulation of its acquisition.This work provides evidence that NBPT can heavily interfere with urea nutrition in maize plants, limiting influx as well as the following assimilation pathway.

  6. The Urease Inhibitor NBPT Negatively Affects DUR3-mediated Uptake and Assimilation of Urea in Maize Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Tomasi, Nicola; Zamboni, Anita; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of urease inhibitors in agriculture, little information is available on their effect on nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation. Aim of this work was to study, at physiological and transcriptional level, the effects of N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) on urea nutrition in hydroponically grown maize plants. Presence of NBPT in the nutrient solution limited the capacity of plants to utilize urea as a N-source; this was shown by a decrease in urea uptake rate and (15)N accumulation. Noteworthy, these negative effects were evident only when plants were fed with urea, as NBPT did not alter (15)N accumulation in nitrate-fed plants. NBPT also impaired the growth of Arabidopsis plants when urea was used as N-source, while having no effect on plants grown with nitrate or ammonium. This response was related, at least in part, to a direct effect of NBPT on the high affinity urea transport system. Impact of NBPT on urea uptake was further evaluated using lines of Arabidopsis overexpressing ZmDUR3 and dur3-knockout; results suggest that not only transport but also urea assimilation could be compromised by the inhibitor. This hypothesis was reinforced by an over-accumulation of urea and a decrease in ammonium concentration in NBPT-treated plants. Furthermore, transcriptional analyses showed that in maize roots NBPT treatment severely impaired the expression of genes involved in the cytosolic pathway of ureic-N assimilation and ammonium transport. NBPT also limited the expression of a gene coding for a transcription factor highly induced by urea and possibly playing a crucial role in the regulation of its acquisition. This work provides evidence that NBPT can heavily interfere with urea nutrition in maize plants, limiting influx as well as the following assimilation pathway.

  7. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  8. Ammonia production and assimilation: its importance as a tolerance mechanism during moderate water deficit in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Eva; Rubio-Wilhelmi, María del Mar; Ríos, Juan José; Blasco, Begoña; Rosales, Miguel Ángel; Melgarejo, Rubén; Romero, Luis; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2011-05-15

    Nitrate assimilation diminishes under water stress. This can augment the photorespiratory rate as a protection mechanism, increasing the ammonium concentration, which must be rapidly assimilated. We therefore examined the effect of moderate water stress in photorespiration and N assimilation, as possible tolerance mechanisms in cherry tomato. Five cherry tomato cultivars with different degrees of water stress tolerance were submitted to two water treatments: well-watered (100% FC) and water stress (50% FC). In the susceptible cultivars, nitrate assimilation declined but without stimulating photorespiration. Zarina, a stress-tolerant cultivar, showed increased activity of the main enzymes involved in photorespiration, together with greater assimilation of nitrates and of the resulting ammonium. This translates as higher concentrations of N as well as amino acids and proteins. We characterize these mechanisms in the cv. Zarina (tolerant) as essential to water stress tolerance, acting on N metabolism as well as helping to maintain or augment biomass.

  9. Displacement Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, W Steven; Mariano, Arthur J; Restrepo, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information important. While the displacement transformation is not tied to any particular assimilation scheme, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  10. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanko, S.; Ingversen, J.

    1971-01-01

    The uptake and assimilation of nitrate and ammonia have been studied in Zea mays. Nitrogen-starved maize roots are capable of accumulating a potential capacity for nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Reestablishment of nitrogen supply leads to intense uptake, reaching 154 % of the reference variant...

  11. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen.

  12. Glucose elevates NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 protein levels and nitrate transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Femke; Thodey, Kate; Lejay, Laurence V; Bevan, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Mineral nutrient uptake and assimilation is closely coordinated with the production of photosynthate to supply nutrients for growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nitrate uptake from the soil is mediated by genes encoding high- and low-affinity transporters that are transcriptionally regulated by both nitrate and photosynthate availability. In this study, we have studied the interactions of nitrate and glucose (Glc) on gene expression, nitrate transport, and growth using glucose-insensitive2-1 (gin2-1), which is defective in sugar responses. We confirm and extend previous work by showing that HEXOKINASE1-mediated oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) metabolism is required for Glc-mediated NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (NRT2.1) expression. Treatment with pyruvate and shikimate, two products derived from intermediates of the OPPP that are destined for amino acid production, restores wild-type levels of NRT2.1 expression, suggesting that metabolites derived from OPPP metabolism can, together with Glc, directly stimulate high levels of NRT2.1 expression. Nitrate-mediated NRT2.1 expression is not influenced by gin2-1, showing that Glc does not influence NRT2.1 expression through nitrate-mediated mechanisms. We also show that Glc stimulates NRT2.1 protein levels and transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NRT2.1 expression, demonstrating another possible posttranscriptional mechanism influencing nitrate uptake. In gin2-1 plants, nitrate-responsive biomass growth was strongly reduced, showing that the supply of OPPP metabolites is essential for assimilating nitrate for growth.

  13. Evaluating Data Assimilation Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Law, K J H

    2011-01-01

    Data assimilation refers to methodologies for the incorporation of noisy observations of a physical system into an underlying model in order to infer the properties of the state of the system (and/or parameters). The model itself is typically subject to uncertainties, in the input data and in the physical laws themselves. This leads naturally to a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior probability distribution of the system state, given the observations, plays a central conceptual role. The aim of this paper is to use this Bayesian posterior probability distribution as a gold standard against which to evaluate various commonly used data assimilation algorithms. A key aspect of geophysical data assimilation is the high dimensionality of the computational model. With this in mind, yet with the goal of allowing an explicit and accurate computation of the posterior distribution in order to facilitate our evaluation, we study the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in a periodic geometry. We compute the posterior prob...

  14. Optimality in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey; Yatheendradas, Soni

    2016-04-01

    It costs a lot more to develop and launch an earth-observing satellite than it does to build a data assimilation system. As such, we propose that it is important to understand the efficiency of our assimilation algorithms at extracting information from remote sensing retrievals. To address this, we propose that it is necessary to adopt completely general definition of "optimality" that explicitly acknowledges all differences between the parametric constraints of our assimilation algorithm (e.g., Gaussianity, partial linearity, Markovian updates) and the true nature of the environmetnal system and observing system. In fact, it is not only possible, but incredibly straightforward, to measure the optimality (in this more general sense) of any data assimilation algorithm as applied to any intended model or natural system. We measure the information content of remote sensing data conditional on the fact that we are already running a model and then measure the actual information extracted by data assimilation. The ratio of the two is an efficiency metric, and optimality is defined as occurring when the data assimilation algorithm is perfectly efficient at extracting information from the retrievals. We measure the information content of the remote sensing data in a way that, unlike triple collocation, does not rely on any a priori presumed relationship (e.g., linear) between the retrieval and the ground truth, however, like triple-collocation, is insensitive to the spatial mismatch between point-based measurements and grid-scale retrievals. This theory and method is therefore suitable for use with both dense and sparse validation networks. Additionally, the method we propose is *constructive* in the sense that it provides guidance on how to improve data assimilation systems. All data assimilation strategies can be reduced to approximations of Bayes' law, and we measure the fractions of total information loss that are due to individual assumptions or approximations in the

  15. On Assimilation of English Sounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恩华

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a careful study of assimilation in English speaking, meanwhile a systematic knowledge of assimilation wil be helpful for the pronunciations of English learners, facilitate English fluency and improve listening comprehension.

  16. Displacement data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, W. Steven; Venkataramani, Shankar; Mariano, Arthur J.; Restrepo, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information is important. While the displacement transformation is generic, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  17. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  18. Micromachined Amperometric Nitrate Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Dohyun Kim; Ira Goldberg; Jack Judy

    2003-01-01

    A nitrate-sensing system that consists of a micromachined sensor substrate, nitrate-permeable membrane, integrated microfluidic channels, and standard fluidic connectors has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested. Our microsensor was designed for in-situ monitoring of nitrate concentrations in ground water. A silver electrode was patterned for amperometric nitrate detection. An electrochemically oxidized silver electrode was used as a reference electrode. Microfluidic channels were ...

  19. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  20. Short-Term Treatment with the Urease Inhibitor N-(n-Butyl) Thiophosphoric Triamide (NBPT) Alters Urea Assimilation and Modulates Transcriptional Profiles of Genes Involved in Primary and Secondary Metabolism in Maize Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Venuti, Silvia; Tomasi, Nicola; Zamboni, Anita; De Brito Francisco, Rita M.; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To limit nitrogen (N) losses from the soil, it has been suggested to provide urea to crops in conjunction with the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT). However, recent studies reported that NBPT affects urea uptake and urease activity in plants. To shed light on these latter aspects, the effects of NBPT were studied analysing transcriptomic and metabolic changes occurring in urea-fed maize seedlings after a short-term exposure to the inhibitor. We provide evidence that NBPT treatment led to a wide reprogramming of plant metabolism. NBPT inhibited the activity of endogenous urease limiting the release and assimilation of ureic-ammonium, with a simultaneous accumulation of urea in plant tissues. Furthermore, NBPT determined changes in the glutamine, glutamate, and asparagine contents. Microarray data indicate that NBPT affects ureic-N assimilation and primary metabolism, such as glycolysis, TCA cycle, and electron transport chain, while activates the phenylalanine/tyrosine-derivative pathway. Moreover, the expression of genes relating to the transport and complexation of divalent metals was strongly modulated by NBPT. Data here presented suggest that when NBPT is provided in conjunction with urea an imbalance between C and N compounds might occur in plant cells. Under this condition, root cells also seem to activate a response to maintain the homeostasis of some micronutrients. PMID:27446099

  1. Short-Term Treatment with the Urease Inhibitor N-(n-Butyl) Thiophosphoric Triamide (NBPT) Alters Urea Assimilation and Modulates Transcriptional Profiles of Genes Involved in Primary and Secondary Metabolism in Maize Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Venuti, Silvia; Tomasi, Nicola; Zamboni, Anita; De Brito Francisco, Rita M; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To limit nitrogen (N) losses from the soil, it has been suggested to provide urea to crops in conjunction with the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT). However, recent studies reported that NBPT affects urea uptake and urease activity in plants. To shed light on these latter aspects, the effects of NBPT were studied analysing transcriptomic and metabolic changes occurring in urea-fed maize seedlings after a short-term exposure to the inhibitor. We provide evidence that NBPT treatment led to a wide reprogramming of plant metabolism. NBPT inhibited the activity of endogenous urease limiting the release and assimilation of ureic-ammonium, with a simultaneous accumulation of urea in plant tissues. Furthermore, NBPT determined changes in the glutamine, glutamate, and asparagine contents. Microarray data indicate that NBPT affects ureic-N assimilation and primary metabolism, such as glycolysis, TCA cycle, and electron transport chain, while activates the phenylalanine/tyrosine-derivative pathway. Moreover, the expression of genes relating to the transport and complexation of divalent metals was strongly modulated by NBPT. Data here presented suggest that when NBPT is provided in conjunction with urea an imbalance between C and N compounds might occur in plant cells. Under this condition, root cells also seem to activate a response to maintain the homeostasis of some micronutrients.

  2. Quantifying nitrate dynamics in an oligotrophic lake using Δ17O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tanaka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopic compositions of nitrate, including the 17O anomalies (Δ17O, were determined twice in 1 yr (June and August 2007 in the oligotrophic water column of Lake Mashu, Japan. These data were then used to quantify the geochemical dynamics of nitrate in the lake, by using the deposition rate of the atmospheric nitrate onto the entire catchment area of the lake. The total amount of nitrate in the lake water decreased from 4.2 to 2.1 Mmol during the period between the observations, while the average Δ17O values remained uniform at +2.5‰. The Δ17O values corresponded to an small and uniform mixing ratio of atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate of 9.7 ± 0.8%. These results indicate that 0.52 ± 0.34 Mmol of the remineralized nitrate was fed into the water column through nitrification, while 2.6 ± 0.4 Mmol of nitrate was simultaneously removed from the water column by assimilation, during the period between the observations. The lake water dissolved nitrate was characterized by rapid removal through assimilation during summer until it was almost completely removed from the euphotic layer, as well as continuous feeding into the lake through nitrification (3.2 ± 0.3 Mmol a−1 and deposition (0.35 ± 0.2 Mmol a−1, regardless of the seasons. The 15N-depleted nitrogen isotopic compositions of nitrate were as low as −6.5‰ in June, which also indicates that in-lake nitrification is the major source of nitrate in the lake and suggests that there is low potential for denitrification in and around the lake. Atmospheric nitrate deposited into the lake will be assimilated quickly, having a mean residence time of 1.2 ± 0.1 yr. In addition, more than 90% of the assimilated nitrate will be remineralized to nitrate and re-assimilated via active nitrogen cycling in the lake.

  3. Snow Radiance Assimilation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.; Durand, M. T.; Toure, A.; Margulis, S. A.; Goita, K.; Royer, A.; Lu, H.

    2009-12-01

    Passive microwave-based retrievals of terrestrial snow parameters from satellite observations form a 30-year global record which will continue for the forseeable future. So far, these snow retrievals have been generated primarily by regression-based empirical “inversion” methods based on snapshots in time, and are limited to footprints around 25 km in diameter. Assimilation of microwave radiances into physical land surface models may be used to create a retrieval framework that is inherently self-consistent with respect to model physics as well as a more physically-based approach vs. legacy retrieval/inversion methods. This radiance assimilation approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success, and represents one motivation for our work. A radiance assimilation scheme for snow requires a snowpack land surface model (LSM) coupled to a radiative transfer model (RTM). In previous local-scale studies, Durand, Kim, & Margulis (2008) explored the requirements on LSM model fidelity (i.e., snowpack state information) required in order for the RTM to produce brightness temperatures suitable for radiance assimilation purposes at a local scale, using the well-known Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) as the RTM and a combination of Simple SIB (SSiB) and Snow Atmosphere (SAST) as the LSM. They also demonstrated improvement of simulated snow depth through the use of an ensemble Kalman filter scheme at this local scale (2009). This modeling framework reflects another motivation—namely, possibilities for downscaling. Our focus at this stage has been at the local scale where high-quality ground truth data is available in order to evaluate radiance assimilation under a “best case scenario.” The quantitative results then form a benchmark for future assessment of effects such as sparse forcing data, upscaling/downscaling, forest attenuation, and model details. Field data from

  4. Hormonal control of sulfate uptake and assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones have a plethora of functions in control of plant development, stress response, and primary metabolism, including nutrient homeostasis. In the plant nutrition, the interplay of hormones with responses to nitrate and phosphate deficiency is well described, but relatively little is known about the interaction between phytohormones and regulation of sulfur metabolism. As for other nutrients, sulfate deficiency results in modulation of root architecture, where hormones are expected to play an important role. Accordingly, sulfate deficiency induces genes involved in metabolism of tryptophane and auxin. Also jasmonate biosynthesis is induced, pointing to the need of increase the defense capabilities of the plants when sulfur is limiting. However, hormones affect also sulfate uptake and assimilation. The pathway is coordinately induced by jasmonate and the key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is additionally regulated by ethylene, abscisic acid, nitric oxid, and other phytohormones. Perhaps the most intriguing link between hormones and sulfate assimilation is the fact that the main regulator of the response to sulfate starvation, SULFATE LIMITATION1 (SLIM1) belongs to the family of ethylene related transcription factors. We will review the current knowledge of interplay between phytohormones and control of sulfur metabolism and discuss the main open questions.

  5. The nodule inception-like protein 7 modulates nitrate sensing and metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaings, Loren; Camargo, Antonio; Pocholle, Delphine; Gaudon, Virginie; Texier, Yves; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; Fernandez, Emilio; Meyer, Christian; Krapp, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Nitrate is an essential nutrient, and is involved in many adaptive responses of plants, such as localized proliferation of roots, flowering or stomatal movements. How such nitrate-specific mechanisms are regulated at the molecular level is poorly understood. Although the Arabidopsis ANR1 transcription factor appears to control stimulation of lateral root elongation in response to nitrate, no regulators of nitrate assimilation have so far been identified in higher plants. Legume-specific symbiotic nitrogen fixation is under the control of the putative transcription factor, NIN, in Lotus japonicus. Recently, the algal homologue NIT2 was found to regulate nitrate assimilation. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana NIN-like protein 7 (NLP7) knockout mutants constitutively show several features of nitrogen-starved plants, and that they are tolerant to drought stress. We show that nlp7 mutants are impaired in transduction of the nitrate signal, and that the NLP7 expression pattern is consistent with a function of NLP7 in the sensing of nitrogen. Translational fusions with GFP showed a nuclear localization for the NLP7 putative transcription factor. We propose NLP7 as an important element of the nitrate signal transduction pathway and as a new regulatory protein specific for nitrogen assimilation in non-nodulating plants.

  6. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  7. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) is a middleware architecture that facilitates the incorporation of heterogeneous sensing and control devices...

  8. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) addresses the fundamental problem of command, control, and communications systems interoperability....

  9. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, Christopher A.

    2015-01-03

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  10. Regional ocean data assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher A; Moore, Andrew M; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Cornuelle, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  11. Immigration, assimilation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, J T

    1998-01-01

    "This paper analyzes the welfare effects of immigration and its subsequent effect on ethnic diversity in a model featuring human capital spillovers which depend on the degree of ethnic heterogeneity, variation rates of time preference across individuals and endogenous levels of immigration and assimilation. In the model, an increase in ethnic diversity reduces the spillovers effect for the majority. Nonetheless, immigration can be welfare improving for the majority ethnic group even if it increases the degree of diversity as long as it raises the average human capital level and/or growth rate by increasing the proportion of people with low rates of time preference."

  12. Minimizing Nitrate Reduction during Kjeldahl Digestion of Plant Tissue Extracts and Stem Exudates : APPLICATION TO N STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, G M; Mackown, C T; Volk, R J

    1982-01-01

    From 10 to 60% of the nitrate present in plant tissue extracts and stem exudates of corn (Zea mays L.) was found to be reduced during Kjeldahl digestion, even in the absence of added reducing agents. This reduction is of particular concern in [(15)N]nitrate assimilation studies, because it results in an overestimate of nitrate reduction. To overcome this problem, a method was developed for removing nitrate prior to Kjeldahl digestion, thereby preventing nitrate reduction. The procedure utilizes hydrogen peroxide for partial oxidation of organic matter in order to minimize the nitration of organic compounds. The free nitrates are then volatilized as nitric acid from concentrated sulfuric acid at 95 degrees C. When the proposed method was used as a pretreatment to Kjeldahl digestion, less than 0.5% of the applied nitrate was recovered in the reduced nitrogen fraction of plant tissue extracts and stem exudates.

  13. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  14. Data assimilation of depth-distributed satellite chlorophyll-α in two Mediterranean contrasting sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaroni, S.; Tsiaras, K.; Petihakis, G.; Hoteit, I.; Economou-Amilli, A.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2016-08-01

    A new approach for processing the remote sensing chlorophyll-α (Chl-α) before assimilating into an ecosystem model is applied in two contrasting, regarding productivity and nutrients availability, Mediterranean sites: the DYFAMED and POSEIDON E1-M3A fixed point open ocean observatories. The new approach derives optically weighted depth-distributed Chl-α profiles from satellite data based on the model simulated Chl-α vertical distribution and light attenuation coefficient. We use the 1D version of the operational ecological 3D POSEIDON model, based on the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The required hydrodynamic properties are obtained (off-line) from the POSEIDON operational 3D hydrodynamic Mediterranean basin scale model. The data assimilation scheme is the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, the ensemble variant of the singular evolutive extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. The performance of the proposed assimilation approach was evaluated against the Chl-α satellite data and the seasonal averages of available in situ data for nitrate, phosphate and Chl-α. An improvement of the model simulated near-surface and subsurface maximum Chl-α concentrations is obtained, especially at the DYFAMED site. Model nitrate is improved with assimilation, particularly with the new approach assimilating depth-distributed Chl-α, while model phosphate is slightly worse after assimilation. Additional sensitivity experiments were performed, showing a better performance of the new approach under different scenarios of model Chl-α deviation from pseudo-observations of surface Chl-α.

  15. Data assimilation of depth-distributed satellite chlorophyll-α in two Mediterranean contrasting sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kalaroni, S.

    2016-04-12

    A new approach for processing the remote sensing chlorophyll-α (Chl-α) before assimilating into an ecosystem model is applied in two contrasting, regarding productivity and nutrients availability, Mediterranean sites: the DYFAMED and POSEIDON E1-M3A fixed point open ocean observatories. The new approach derives optically weighted depth-distributed Chl-α profiles from satellite data based on the model simulated Chl-α vertical distribution and light attenuation coefficient. We use the 1D version of the operational ecological 3D POSEIDON model, based on the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The required hydrodynamic properties are obtained (off-line) from the POSEIDON operational 3D hydrodynamic Mediterranean basin scale model. The data assimilation scheme is the Singular Evolutive Interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, the ensemble variant of the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. The performance of the proposed assimilation approach was evaluated against the Chl-α satellite data and the seasonal averages of available in-situ data for nitrate, phosphate and Chl-α. An improvement of the model simulated near-surface and subsurface maximum Chl-α concentrations is obtained, especially at the DYFAMED site. Model nitrate is improved with assimilation, particularly with the new approach assimilating depth-distributed Chl-α, while model phosphate is slightly worse after assimilation. Additional sensitivity experiments were performed, showing a better performance of the new approach under different scenarios of model Chl-α deviation from pseudo-observations of surface Chl-α.

  16. Summer nitrate uptake and denitrification in an upper Mississippi River backwater lake: The role of rooted aquatic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiling, Rebecca M.; Richardson, W.B.; Cavanaugh, J.C.; Bartsch, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    In-stream nitrogen processing in the Mississippi River has been suggested as one mechanism to reduce coastal eutrophication in the Gulf of Mexico. Aquatic macrophytes in river channels and flood plain lakes have the potential to temporarily remove large quantities of nitrogen through assimilation both by themselves and by the attached epiphyton. In addition, rooted macrophytes act as oxygen pumps, creating aerobic microsites around their roots where coupled nitrification-denitrification can occur. We used in situ 15N-NO3- tracer mesocosm experiments to measure nitrate assimilation rates for macrophytes, epiphyton, and microbial fauna in the sediment in Third Lake, a backwater lake of the upper Mississippi River during June and July 2005. We measured assimilation over a range of nitrate concentrations and estimated a nitrate mass balance for Third Lake. Macrophytes assimilated the most nitrate (29.5 mg N m-2 d-1) followed by sediment microbes (14.4 mg N m-2 d-1) and epiphytes (5.7 mg N m-2d-1. Assimilation accounted for 6.8% in June and 18.6% in July of total nitrate loss in the control chambers. However, denitrification (292.4 mg N m-2 d-1) is estimated to account for the majority (82%) of the nitrate loss. Assimilation and denitrification rates generally increased with increasing nitrate concentration but denitrification rates plateaued at about 5 mg N L-1. This suggests that backwaters have the potential to remove a relatively high amount of nitrate but will likely become saturated if the load becomes too large. ?? 2010 US Government.

  17. Stalking the Perfect Culture Assimilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses and gives examples of culture assimilators composed of a narrative of an intercultural encounter, four alternative interpretations, and four feedback explanations. Culture assimilators can be used to teach Americans about how to conduct themselves appropriately in France. (Author/BK)

  18. Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Ling Ruan; John W.Patrick; Hans Weber

    2010-01-01

    @@ It has been a pleasure to organize this special issue of Molecular Plant on 'Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development'. Assimilate, a collective term describing organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), is of paramount importance for plant development and realization of crop productivity.

  19. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  20. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  1. Nonlinear data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on nonlinear data assimilation that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. Both contributions focus on so-called particle filters. The first contribution by Jan van Leeuwen focuses on the potential of proposal densities. It discusses the issues with present-day particle filters and explorers new ideas for proposal densities to solve them, converging to particle filters that work well in systems of any dimension, closing the contribution with a high-dimensional example. The second contribution by Cheng and Reich discusses a unified framework for ensemble-transform particle filters. This allows one to bridge successful ensemble Kalman filters with fully nonlinear particle filters, and allows a proper introduction of localization in particle filters, which has been lacking up to now.

  2. Influence of nitrate on oxalate- and glyoxylate-dependent growth and acetogenesis by Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifritz, Corinna; Fröstl, Jürgen M; Drake, Harold L; Daniel, Steven L

    2002-12-01

    Oxalate and glyoxylate supported growth and acetate synthesis by Moorella thermoacetica in the presence of nitrate under basal (without yeast extract) culture conditions. In oxalate cultures, acetate formation occurred concomitant with growth and nitrate was reduced in the stationary phase. Growth in the presence of [(14)C]bicarbonate or [(14)C]oxalate showed that CO(2) reduction to acetate and biomass or oxalate oxidation to CO(2) was not affected by nitrate. However, cells engaged in oxalate-dependent acetogenesis in the presence of nitrate lacked a membranous b-type cytochrome, which was present in cells grown in the absence of nitrate. In glyoxylate cultures, growth was coupled to nitrate reduction and acetate was formed in the stationary phase after nitrate was totally consumed. In the absence of nitrate, glyoxylate-grown cells incorporated less CO(2) into biomass than oxalate-grown cells. CO(2) conversion to biomass by glyoxylate-grown cells decreased when cells were grown in the presence of nitrate. These results suggest that: (1) oxalate-grown cells prefer CO(2) as an electron sink and bypass the nitrate block on the acetyl-CoA pathway at the level of reductant flow and (2) glyoxylate-grown cells prefer nitrate as an electron sink and bypass the nitrate block of the acetyl-CoA pathway by assimilating carbon via an unknown process that supplements or replaces the acetyl-CoA pathway. In this regard, enzymes of known pathways for the assimilation of two-carbon compounds were not detected in glyoxylate- or oxalate-grown cells.

  3. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  4. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...... in nitrogen leaching since the mid-80s. Nevertheless, further effort is needed, particularly in ecologically sensitive areas. This article discusses different regulatory approaches – and in particular the need for a differentiated nitrate regulation tailored to meet site-specific ecological demands – from...... of the mandatory specification standards of the Nitrates Directive combined with additional instruments to address the need for severe restrictions on fertiliser use or cultivation practices in the most ecologically vulnerable areas....

  5. Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is the system used by the Global Forecast System (GFS) model to place observations into a gridded model space for the...

  6. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model...... with model non-linearities and biased errors. A literature review analyzes the most popular techniques and their application in hydrological modelling. Since bias is an important problem in groundwater modelling, two bias aware Kalman filters have been implemented and compared using an artificial test case....... In this thesis, the Kalman filter is used for data assimilation with a focus on groundwater modelling. However the developed techniques are general and can be applied also in other modelling domains. Modelling involves conceptualization of the processes of Nature. Data assimilation provides a way to deal...

  7. WAVE ASSIMILATION AND NUMERICAL PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An adjoint variational method for wave data assimilation in the LAGFD-WAM wave model is proposed. The adjoint equation of the wavenumber energy spectrum balance equation is derived. And fortunately, its characteristic equations are the same as those in the LAGFD-WAM wave model. Simple experiments on the functional optimization and assimilation effectiveness during the prediction period indicated that the adjoint variational method is effective for wave assimilation and that the initial optimization of the wave model is important for the short-range wave prediction. All of this is under the assumption that the wind field is accurate, the method is the important first step for combined wind and wave data assimilation systems.

  8. Global Land Data Assimilation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface...

  9. Data Assimilation in Ocean Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    contour plots of the estimates of the sea surface height ( SSH ) for the top layer after 5 Topex/ Poseidon simulated repeat cycles. The top plot in Figure... SSH ): Top: SSH for the actual truth; middle: SSH with no data assimilation; and bottom: SSH with data assimilation from satellite altimetry. Darker...regions are deeper, lighter regions are higher. 2: RMSE of the SSH for the top two layers. The lower curve is the RMSE for the surface layer while the

  10. CONSIDERATIONS UPON ASSIMILATED ADMINISTRATIVE ACTS

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Although the classic administrative courts know as object the acts against classic administrative acts, it should not be lost sight of the assimilated administrative acts, which also may be subject to acts in this litigation. Taking in consideration this category of acts, this study will examine the documents falling into this category and the impact that such acts have on public authorities. Given the significant increase of administrative cases that have as object assimilated administrative...

  11. NifQ and NifO are essential to express nitrogenase activity in the presence of nitrate in Azotobacter vinelandii

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Vicente, Emilio; Barahona Martín, Emma; Wilcoxen, J.; Navarro Rodríguez, Mónica; Buesa Galiano, José María; Britt, David; Rubio Herrero, Luis Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of nitrate, Azotobacter vinelandii is able to assimilate nitrogen by using nitrogenase and nitrate reductase/nitrite reductase pathways simultaneously. Nitrogenase and nitrate reductase are Mo-enzymes containing FeMo-co and Mo-MGD at their active sites, respectively. In order to optimize the use of Mo, a scarce metal in nature, regulation of Mo distribution between both enzymes must be strictly controlled during nitrogen assimilation processes. The nifO and nifQ genes are grou...

  12. Low and high doses of UV-B differentially modulate chlorpyrifos-induced alterations in nitrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-09-01

    The present study assessed the comparative responses on the specific growth rate, nitrogen metabolism and enzymes associated with nitrogen metabolism in two nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria-Nostoc muscorum and Phormidium foveolarum exposed to two UV-B doses (low; UV-BL: 0.5472kJm(-2) and high; UV-BH: 5.472kJm(-2)) and two doses of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate; low i.e. CPL, 1µgml(-1) and high i.e. CPH, 2µgml(-1)) singly and in combination. The specific growth rate, NO3(-) and NO2(-) uptake, nitrate assimilating enzymes - nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase and ammonium assimilating enzymes - glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were severely affected when treated either with CPH or/and UV-BH while glutamate dehydrogenase exhibited a stimulatory response. CPL also reduced all the measured parameters (except GDH activity) after 24h, however, a stimulatory effect was observed after 72h due to an increase in nitrogen metabolism (and other antioxidant) enzymes during this period. UV-BL did not cause significant alteration in the studied parameters while in combination with CP doses, it either alleviated the inhibitory effects or further enhanced the CPL induced activities of these enzymes (except GDH). Overall results indicate the resistant nature of P. foveolarum against the inhibitory doses of UV-B and chlorpyrifos in comparison to N. muscorum.

  13. Diurnal variation of dominant nitrate retention processes in an agricultural headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Nitrate and ammonium are introduced by agricultural practice into the environment and are transformed and retained on their pathway through aquatic environments. In particular, biological transformation processes (i.e. microbial denitrification or ammonium oxidation and assimilation) are responsible for the largest part of nitrate removal, which are also crucial processes in headwater streams. It is well known, that most of the biological processes are influenced by available (solar) energy fluxes, temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations, which vary with time and space. However, looking at biogeochemical hot spots in the landscapes` hydrological interface, the stream and river network (e.g. stream sections with a high biological activity), the temporal variability of biological processes can be an important control on total nitrate export. In this study, we therefore identified most important diurnal time periods for nitrate retention in a 75 m impervious section of an agricultural headwater stream using oxygen saturation dynamics and nitrate isotopes. We regularly measured discharge, hydro-geochemical and climate parameters, as well as nitrate and water isotopes in grab samples at three locations along the reach. On average, we observed a decrease of 10% in nitrate concentration from up- to downstream, which was only caused by biological processes and not by dilution. Nitrate isotope analysis indicated distinct trends along the reach and with time of the day. Both nitrate assimilation and nitrification caused significant changes in nitrate isotope distribution in the early day. To explain the distinct observed process dynamics from the morning to the afternoon, we simulated net primary production (NEP) and respiration using the river metabolism model RIVERMETC with observed oxygen concentrations and water temperatures. Comparing the results with the observed nitrate dynamics, the short time period when NEP occurs (~10:30 -12:30) seems to be crucial for

  14. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  15. Data assimilation in a coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the California current system using an incremental lognormal 4-dimensional variational approach: Part 3-Assimilation in a realistic context using satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hajoon; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Fiechter, Jerome

    2016-10-01

    A fully coupled physical and biogeochemical ocean data assimilation system is tested in a realistic configuration of the California Current System using the Regional Ocean Modeling System. In situ measurements for sea surface temperature and salinity as well as satellite observations for temperature, sea level and chlorophyll are used for the year 2000. Initial conditions of the combined physical and biogeochemical state are adjusted at the start of each 3-day assimilation cycle. Data assimilation results in substantial reduction of root-mean-square error (RMSE) over unconstrained model output. RMSE for physical variables is slightly lower when assimilating only physical variables than when assimilating both physical variables and surface chlorophyll. Surface chlorophyll RMSE is lowest when assimilating both physical variables and surface chlorophyll. Estimates of subsurface, nitrate and chlorophyll show modest improvements over the unconstrained model run relative to independent, unassimilated in situ data. Assimilation adjustments to the biogeochemical initial conditions are investigated within different regions of the California Current System. The incremental, lognormal 4-dimensional data assimilation method tested here represents a viable approach to coupled physical biogeochemical state estimation at practical computational cost.

  16. Lexical frequency and voice assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernestus, Mirjam; Lahey, Mybeth; Verhees, Femke; Baayen, R Harald

    2006-08-01

    Acoustic duration and degree of vowel reduction are known to correlate with a word's frequency of occurrence. The present study broadens the research on the role of frequency in speech production to voice assimilation. The test case was regressive voice assimilation in Dutch. Clusters from a corpus of read speech were more often perceived as unassimilated in lower-frequency words and as either completely voiced (regressive assimilation) or, unexpectedly, as completely voiceless (progressive assimilation) in higher-frequency words. Frequency did not predict the voice classifications over and above important acoustic cues to voicing, suggesting that the frequency effects on the classifications were carried exclusively by the acoustic signal. The duration of the cluster and the period of glottal vibration during the cluster decreased while the duration of the release noises increased with frequency. This indicates that speakers reduce articulatory effort for higher-frequency words, with some acoustic cues signaling more voicing and others less voicing. A higher frequency leads not only to acoustic reduction but also to more assimilation.

  17. Toward a multivariate reanalysis of the North Atlantic Ocean biogeochemistry during 1998-2006 based on the assimilation of SeaWiFS chlorophyll data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, C.; Brasseur, P.; Brankart, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Today, the routine assimilation of satellite data into operational models of ocean circulation is mature enough to enable the production of global reanalyses describing the ocean circulation variability during the past decades. The expansion of the "reanalysis" concept from ocean physics to biogeochemistry is a timely challenge that motivates the present study. The objective of this paper is to investigate the potential benefits of assimilating satellite-estimated chlorophyll data into a basin-scale three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic. The aim is on the one hand to improve forecasts of ocean biogeochemical properties and on the other hand to define a methodology for producing data-driven climatologies based on coupled physical-biogeochemical modeling. A simplified variant of the Kalman filter is used to assimilate ocean color data during a 9-year period. In this frame, two experiments are carried out, with and without anamorphic transformations of the state vector variables. Data assimilation efficiency is assessed with respect to the assimilated data set, nitrate of the World Ocean Atlas database and a derived climatology. Along the simulation period, the non-linear assimilation scheme clearly improves the surface analysis and forecast chlorophyll concentrations, especially in the North Atlantic bloom region. Nitrate concentration forecasts are also improved thanks to the assimilation of ocean color data while this improvement is limited to the upper layer of the water column, in agreement with recent related literature. This feature is explained by the weak correlation taken into account by the assimilation between surface phytoplankton and nitrate concentrations deeper than 50 meters. The assessment of the non-linear assimilation experiments indicates that the proposed methodology provides the skeleton of an assimilative system suitable for reanalyzing the ocean biogeochemistry based on ocean color data.

  18. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J.

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are indicative of a greater role of yeasts in the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Especially in acidic soils and other habitats, yeasts may play a role in the degradation of carbon compounds. Such compounds include purines like uric acid and adenine, aliphatic amines, diamines and hydroxyamines, phenolics and other benzene compounds and polysaccharides. Assimilation of purines and amines is a feature of many ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. However, benzene compounds are degraded by only a few ascomycetous yeasts (e.g. the Stephanoascus/ Blastobotrys clade and black yeastlike fungi) but by many basidiomycetes, e.g. Filobasidiales, Trichosporonales, red yeasts producing ballistoconidia and related species, but not by Tremellales. Assimilation of polysaccharides is wide-spread among basidiomycetes

  19. The influence of rate and time of nitrate supply on nitrogen fixation and yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen

    1986-01-01

    pea, by the lowest rate of nitrate at this application time. The pea very efficiently took up and assimilated the nitrate N supplied. The average fertilizer N recovery was 82%. The later the N was supplied the more efficiently it was recovered. When nitrate was supplied at the flat pod growth stage 88......The influence of nitrate N supply on dry matter production, N content and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soil-grown pea (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in a pot experiment by means of15N fertilizer dilution. In pea receiving no fertilizer N symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soil and seed-borne N...... contributed with 82, 13 and 5% of total plant N, respectively. The supply of low rates of nitrate fertilizer at sowing (“starter N”) increased the vegetative dry matter production, but not the seed yield significantly. Nitrogen fixation was not significantly decreased by the lower rates of nitrate but higher...

  20. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model...... with model non-linearities and biased errors. A literature review analyzes the most popular techniques and their application in hydrological modelling. Since bias is an important problem in groundwater modelling, two bias aware Kalman filters have been implemented and compared using an artificial test case...

  1. Storm surge variational assimilation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-li HUANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate errors caused by uncertainty of parameters and further improve capability of storm surge forecasting, the variational data assimilation method is applied to the storm surge model based on unstructured grid with high spatial resolution. The method can effectively improve the forecasting accuracy of storm surge induced by typhoon through controlling wind drag force coefficient parameter. The model is first theoretically validated with synthetic data. Then, the real storm surge process induced by the TC 0515 typhoon is forecasted by the variational data assimilation model, and results show the feasibility of practical application.

  2. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  3. Nitrate absorption through hydrotalcite reformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Musumeci, Anthony W

    2006-10-01

    Thermally activated hydrotalcite based upon a Zn/Al hydrotalcite with carbonate in the interlayer has been used to remove nitrate anions from an aqueous solution resulting in the reformation of a hydrotalcite with a mixture of nitrate and carbonate in the interlayer. X-ray diffraction of the reformed hydrotalcites with a d(003) spacing of 7.60 A shows that the nitrate anion is removed within a 30 min period. Raman spectroscopy shows that two types of nitrate anions exist in the reformed hydrotalcite (a) nitrate bonded to the 'brucite-like' hydrotalcite surface and (b) aquated nitrate anion in the interlayer. Kinetically the nitrate is replaced by the carbonate anion over a 21 h period. Two types of carbonate anions are observed. This research shows that the reformation of a thermally activated hydrotalcite can be used to remove anions such as nitrate from aqueous systems.

  4. Radiolytic Alteration of Biosignatures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    When exposed to ionizing radiation, a complex distribution of redox states and reactive intermediates form in both perchlorate and nitrate salts. These reactive species then act to alter the forms of organic biosignatures preserved on Mars.

  5. Two types of parasitic assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurgec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that consonant harmony and parasitic vowel harmony are more similar than previously assumed. I provide a unified and restrictive analysis of parasitic assimilation using feature spreading constraints. In particular, I attribute the differences between the attested and unattested patterns to two types of markedness constraints—alignment and agreement.

  6. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelhoven, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are indica

  7. The Phonological Assimilation of Borrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Saleh M.

    Linguistic borrowing from English to Jordanian Arabic at the lexical level is described, focusing on phonology and the extent to which Jordanian Arabic has affected the phonetic structure of English loans assimilated partially or completely into it. Conspicuous distinctive sound features in the two languages that may affect non-native speakers'…

  8. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  9. Nitrate respiration associated with detrital aggregates in aerobic bottom waters of the abyssal NE Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgast, D. M.; Carlucci, A. F.; Bauer, J. E.

    Rates of nitrate utilization in tube core respirometers (TCR) placed over aggregates on the seafloor at an abyssal site (Station M) in the eastern North Pacific Ocean increased at times of high particle flux. In the presence of aggregates, both oxygen and nitrate were used in respiration. The ratio of O 2 : NO 3 concentrations in ambient waters was 3.9, while O 2 : NO 3 utilization rates in TCR overlying and TCR aggregate pore waters were 2.6 and 0.6, respectively. We postulated that denitrification was occurring in microzones of the particle-rich oxygenated (135 μM) waters. To test this, nitrate respiration was measured aboard a ship in oxygen-minimum (˜26 μM) water supplemented with particulate matter collected by a surface net tow. Dissolved oxygen consumption occurred immediately, followed by nitrate utilization while oxygen was still present. Calculations from cell densities indicated 0.6 μM of the original 42 μM of nitrate was assimilated into bacterial biomass during 36 h of incubation, suggesting the major portion of the utilized nitrate was used in respiration. Nitrate utilization rates in the in situ incubation study and those of the shipboard experiment were 3.1 and 2.7 μM d -1, respectively. The results of the present studies suggest nitrate respiration occurs in microzones of aggregates in oxygenated bottom waters at times of high particle flux and causes some loss of fixed nitrogen.

  10. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter......Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  11. Nitrogen assimilation by single cells in hot springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poret-peterson, A. T.; Romaniello, S. J.; Bose, M.; Williams, P.; Elser, J. J.; Shock, E.; Anbar, A. D.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical cycles and require nutrients, such as ammonium and nitrate, to function. As a result, following nutrient flows provides opportunities to study how microbial activity influences ecosystem-level processes. Most past measurements of microbial nutrient uptake rely on bulk measurements, which are informative but provide little information about heterogeneity among community members involved in elemental transformations, nor about possible effects of physiological state or taxonomic identity. Since microbial communities tend to be phylogenetically and physiologically diverse, it is reasonable to expect that community members will respond differently to nutrient addition. Here, we examine nitrogen assimilation (via addition of 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate) in Yellowstone hot spring microbial communities. Using the NanoSIMS, we imaged cells at a very high spatial resolution (nanometer scale) necessary to determine 15N enrichments in single micron-sized cells. We compare the N isotopic enrichments observed in single cells to that determined in bulk sediments by standard isotope ratio mass spectrometry. NanoSIMS imaging of 56 individual cells from sediments of an acidic hot spring (pH 4.7, T=67oC) incubated with 15N-ammonium shows that about two-thirds of the cells (38) exhibited 15N-enrichment. Most cells had 15N enrichments from 0.39 to 0.91 atom %, while some cells were much more significantly enriched. Bulk analyses of sediments show that ammonium assimilation and nitrate assimilation readily occurred at this spring. These findings show that microbes in this hot spring may differentially take up ammonium, which may arise from a number of factors including differences in cellular N requirements, growth rates, and the ability to transport ammonium. This work represents some of the first single-cell isotopic measurements from an extreme environment. Efforts are underway to image sediment samples from other hot springs and to pair Nano

  12. Transcriptomic analyses of nitrogen assimilation processes in a Chinese strain of Aureococcus anophagefferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aureococcus anophagefferens is a harmful alga that dominates plankton communities during brown tides in North America, Africa, and Asia. In order to figure out the processes of nitrogen assimilation in a Chinese strain of A. anophagefferens, RNA-seq technology was used to examine transcriptomic differences in A. anophagefferens that was grown on urea, nitrate, or a mixture of urea and nitrate, and that was under N-replete, limited and recovery conditions. We noted that transcripts upregulated by nitrate and N-limitation included those encoding proteins involved in amino acid, nucleotide and aminosugar transport, degradation of amides and cyanates, and nitrate assimilation pathway. The data suggest that A. anophagefferens possesses an ability to utilize a variety of dissolved organic nitrogen. Moreover, transcripts for synthesis of proteins, glutamate-derived amino acids, spermines and sterols were upregulated by urea. Transcripts encoding key enzymes that are involved in the ornithine–urea cycle (OUC and TCA cycle were differentially regulated by urea and nitrogen concentration, which suggests that the OUC may be linked to the TCA cycle and involved in reallocation of intracellular carbon and nitrogen. These genes regulated by urea may be crucial for the rapid proliferation of A. anophagefferens when urea is provided as the N source. Here, we provide the experimental procedures and analytical processes in detail. The data set is deposited in GEO with the accession number GSE60576.

  13. Physiological and transcriptomic aspects of urea uptake and assimilation in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérigout, Patricia; Lelandais, Maud; Bitton, Frédérique; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Briand, Xavier; Meyer, Christian; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2008-07-01

    Urea is the major nitrogen (N) form supplied as fertilizer in agriculture, but it is also an important N metabolite in plants. Urea transport and assimilation were investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Uptake studies using (15)N-labeled urea demonstrated the capacity of Arabidopsis to absorb urea and that the urea uptake was regulated by the initial N status of the plants. Urea uptake was stimulated by urea but was reduced by the presence of ammonium nitrate in the growth medium. N deficiency in plants did not affect urea uptake. Urea exerted a repressive effect on nitrate influx, whereas urea enhanced ammonium uptake. The use of [(15)N]urea and [(15)N]ammonium tracers allowed us to show that urea and ammonium assimilation pathways were similar. Finally, urea uptake was less efficient than nitrate uptake, and urea grown-plants presented signs of N starvation. We also report the first analysis, to our knowledge, of Arabidopsis gene expression profiling in response to urea. Our transcriptomic approach revealed that nitrate and ammonium transporters were transcriptionally regulated by urea as well as key enzymes of the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. AtDUR3, a high-affinity urea transporter in Arabidopsis, was strongly up-regulated by urea. Moreover, our transcriptomic data suggest that other genes are also involved in urea influx.

  14. At first glance, transparency enhances assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Arno; de Weert, Charles M M; van Lier, Rob

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of transparency, perceptual grouping, and presentation time on perceived lightness. Both transparency and perceptual grouping have been found to result in assimilation effects, but only for ambiguous stimulus displays and with specific attentional instructions. By varying the presentation times of displays with two partly overlapping transparent E-shaped objects, we measured assimilation in unambiguous stimulus displays and without specific attentional instructions. The task was to judge which of two simultaneously presented E-shaped objects was darker. With unrestrained presentation times, if a transparency interpretation was possible, assimilation was not found. Inhibiting a transparency interpretation by occluding the local junctions between the two E-shaped objects, did lead to assimilation. With short presentation times, if a transparency interpretation was possible, assimilation was now also found. Thus, we conclude that, although transparency appears to enhance assimilation, with unambiguous stimulus displays and without specific attentional instructions, perceptual grouping is more important for assimilation to occur.

  15. Data Assimilation in Marine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendall, Jan

    a computational point of view, e.g. low storage cost, no linearizations of the numerical models, etc. However, this also gives rise to many unforeseen difficulties, e.g. the curse of dimensionality, huge computational costs, etc. The challenge faced in this thesis was finding filters that could handle...... assimilation concept into an atmospheric chemical transport model. This paper deals with the results and conclusions obtained through some of the first experiments with the Optimal Interpolation filter in a geophysical model. The second paper F, deals with the construction of a finite element solver......This thesis consists of six research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2006-2009 together with a summary report. The main topics of this thesis are nonlinear data assimilation techniques and estimation in dynamical models. The focus has been on the nonlinear filtering...

  16. Variational data assimilation with superparameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Grooms

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superparameterization (SP is a multiscale computational approach wherein a large scale atmosphere or ocean model is coupled to an array of simulations of small scale dynamics on periodic domains embedded into the computational grid of the large scale model. SP has been successfully developed in global atmosphere and climate models, and is a promising approach for new applications. The authors develop a 3D-Var variational data assimilation framework for use with SP; the relatively low cost and simplicity of 3D-Var in comparison with ensemble approaches makes it a natural fit for relatively expensive multiscale SP models. To demonstrate the assimilation framework in a simple model, the authors develop a new system of ordinary differential equations similar to the two-scale Lorenz-'96 model. The system has one set of variables denoted {Yi}, with large and small scale parts, and the SP approximation to the system is straightforward. With the new assimilation framework the SP model approximates the large scale dynamics of the true system accurately.

  17. Magnesium nitrate attenuates blood pressure rise in SHR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilskersts, Reinis; Kuka, Janis; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Gulbe, Anita; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2014-01-01

    The administration of magnesium supplements and nitrates/nitrites decreases arterial blood pressure and attenuates the development of hypertension-induced complications. This study was performed to examine the effects of treatment with magnesium nitrate on the development of hypertension and its complications in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Male SHR rats with persistent hypertension at the age of 12-13 weeks were allocated to two groups according to their arterial blood pressure. Rats from the control group received purified water, while the experimental animals from the second group received magnesium nitrate dissolved in purified water at a dose of 50 mg/kg. After four weeks of treatment, blood pressure was measured, the anatomical and functional parameters of the heart were recorded using an ultrasonograph, vascular reactivity was assayed in organ bath experiments and the cardioprotective effects of magnesium nitrate administration was assayed in an ex vivo experimental heart infarction model. Treatment with magnesium nitrate significantly increased the nitrate concentration in the plasma (from 62 ± 8 μmol/l to 111 ± 8 μmol/L), and attenuated the increase in the arterial blood pressure. In the control and magnesium nitrate groups, the blood pressure rose by 21 ± 3 mmHg and 6 ± 4 mmHg, respectively. The administration of magnesium nitrate had no effect on the altered vasoreactivity, heart function or the size of the heart infarction. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that magnesium nitrate effectively attenuates the rise in arterial blood pressure. However, a longer period of administration or earlier onset of treatment might be needed to delay the development of complications due to hypertension.

  18. Nitrate fertilisation does not enhance CO2 responses in two tropical seagrass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Y. X.; Vogel, N.; Collier, C. J.; Holtum, J. A. M.; Flores, F.; Uthicke, S.

    2016-03-01

    Seagrasses are often considered “winners” of ocean acidification (OA); however, seagrass productivity responses to OA could be limited by nitrogen availability, since nitrogen-derived metabolites are required for carbon assimilation. We tested nitrogen uptake and assimilation, photosynthesis, growth, and carbon allocation responses of the tropical seagrasses Halodule uninervis and Thalassia hemprichii to OA scenarios (428, 734 and 1213 μatm pCO2) under two nutrients levels (0.3 and 1.9 μM NO3-). Net primary production (measured as oxygen production) and growth in H. uninervis increased with pCO2 enrichment, but were not affected by nitrate enrichment. However, nitrate enrichment reduced whole plant respiration in H. uninervis. Net primary production and growth did not show significant changes with pCO2 or nitrate by the end of the experiment (24 d) in T. hemprichii. However, nitrate incorporation in T. hemprichii was higher with nitrate enrichment. There was no evidence that nitrogen demand increased with pCO2 enrichment in either species. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, nutrient increases to levels approximating present day flood plumes only had small effects on metabolism. This study highlights that the paradigm of increased productivity of seagrasses under ocean acidification may not be valid for all species under all environmental conditions.

  19. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  20. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Ivanko, S.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid and protein metabolism of roots of maize has been studied. The important role of the free amino acids and proteins of the roots as active agents in nitrogen assimilation is pointed out. Nitrogen supplied as nitrate is preferably incorporated into α-ketoglutaric acid, and then by tr...

  1. Global modeling of nitrate and ammonium aerosols using EQSAM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, particles suspending in air, are important as they affect human health, air quality, and visibility as well as climate. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium are among the most important inorganic aerosol species in the atmosphere. These compounds are hygroscopic and absorb water under almost all ambient environmental conditions. The uptake of water alters the aerosol size, and causes water to become the constituent with the largest atmospheric aerosol mass, especially when the aerosols grow into fog, haze or clouds. Furthermore, several global model studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in nitrogen emissions could produce enough nitrate in aerosols to offset the expected decline in sulfate forcing by 2100 for the extreme IPCC A2 scenario (Bauer et al., 2007). Although nitrate and ammonium were identified as significant anthropogenic sources of aerosols by a number of modeling studies, most global aerosol models still exclude ammonium-nitrate when the direct aerosol forcing is studied. In this study, the computationally efficient equilibrium model, EQSAM3, is incorporated into the UMICH-IMPACT-nitrate model using the hybrid dynamical solution method (Feng and Penner, 2007). The partitioning of nitrate and ammonium along with the corresponding water uptake is evaluated by comparing the model to the EQUISOLVE II method used in Feng and Penner (2007). The model is also evaluated by comparison with the AERONET data base and satellite-based aerosol optical depths.

  2. Potential testicular toxicity of sodium nitrate in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hamdy A A; Mansour, Ahmed M; Abo-Salem, Osama M; Abd-Ellah, Hala F; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2010-02-01

    Nitrate is a common contaminant in groundwater aquifers. Current study aimed at evaluating the potential testicular toxicity of sodium nitrate in rats. Sodium nitrate was given orally to rats at doses of 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for 60 consecutive days. Sperm count and motility, daily sperm production and testis weight were significantly decreased specially at high doses. Testicular activity of lactate dehydrogenase-X, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and acid phosphatase were inhibited in a dose-related manner. Lipid peroxides and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly increased in all treated animals. This was accompanied by inhibition of testicular activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. Fifty mg/kg of sodium nitrate did not significantly alter catalase or glutathione reductase activity. Glutathione was significantly decreased by sodium nitrate in a dose-related manner. The decrease in sperm count and motility and daily sperm production was confirmed by histopathological studies which indicated chromatolysis, pyknosis and necrosis in spermatocytes. In conclusion, subchronic exposure of rats to sodium nitrate results in testicular toxicity as evidenced by decreased sperm count and motility, daily sperm production and testis weight, inhibited activity of enzyme markers of spermatogenesis and induction of histopathological changes. These effects are attributed, at least partly, to testicular oxidative stress.

  3. Conditions for successful data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzfeld, M.; Chorin, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Many applications in science and engineering require that the predictions of uncertain models be updated by information from a stream of noisy data. The model and the data jointly define a conditional probability density function (pdf), which contains all the information one has about the process of interest and various numerical methods can be used to study and approximate this pdf, e.g. the Kalman filter, variational methods or particle filters. Given a model and data, each of these algorithms will produce a result. We are interested in the conditions under which this result is reasonable, i.e. consistent with the real-life situation one is modeling. In particular, we show, using idealized models, that numerical data assimilation is feasible in principle only if a suitably defined effective dimension of the problem is not excessive. This effective dimension depends on the noise in the model and the data, and in physically reasonable problems it can be moderate even when the number of variables is huge. In particular, we find that the effective dimension being moderate induces a balance condition between the noises in the model and the data; this balance condition is often satisfied in realistic applications or else the noise levels are excessive and drown the underlying signal. We also study the effects of the effective dimension on particle filters in two instances, one in which the importance function is based on the model alone, and one in which it is based on both the model and the data. We have three main conclusions: (1) the stability (i.e., non-collapse of weights) in particle filtering depends on the effective dimension of the problem. Particle filters can work well if the effective dimension is moderate even if the true dimension is large (which we expect to happen often in practice). (2) A suitable choice of importance function is essential, or else particle filtering fails even when data assimilation is feasible in principle with a sequential algorithm

  4. Transcriptomic analysis highlights reciprocal interactions of urea and nitrate for nitrogen acquisition by maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Zamboni, Anita; Monte, Rossella; Tomasi, Nicola; Varanini, Zeno; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Even though urea and nitrate are the two major nitrogen (N) forms applied as fertilizers in agriculture and occur concomitantly in soils, the reciprocal influence of these two N sources on the mechanisms of their acquisition are poorly understood. Therefore, molecular and physiological aspects of urea and nitrate uptake were investigated in maize (Zea mays), a crop plant consuming high amounts of N. In roots, urea uptake was stimulated by the presence of urea in the external solution, indicating the presence of an inducible transport system. On the other hand, the presence of nitrate depressed the induction of urea uptake and, at the same time, the induction of nitrate uptake was depressed by the presence of urea. The expression of about 60,000 transcripts of maize in roots was monitored by microarray analyses and the transcriptional patterns of those genes involved in nitrogen acquisition were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). In comparison with the treatment without added N, the exposure of maize roots to urea modulated the expression of only very few genes, such as asparagine synthase. On the other hand, the concomitant presence of urea and nitrate enhanced the overexpression of genes involved in nitrate transport (NRT2) and assimilation (nitrate and nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase 2), and a specific response of 41 transcripts was determined, including glutamine synthetase 1-5, glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase, shikimate kinase and arogenate dehydrogenase. Also based on the real-time RT-PCR analysis, the transcriptional modulation induced by both sources might determine an increase in N metabolism promoting a more efficient assimilation of the N that is taken up.

  5. Compensation for Complete Assimilation in Speech Perception: The Case of Korean Labial-to-Velar Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Holger; Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2013-01-01

    In connected speech, phonological assimilation to neighboring words can lead to pronunciation variants (e.g., "garden bench" [arrow right] "garde'm' bench"). A large body of literature suggests that listeners use the phonetic context to reconstruct the intended word for assimilation types that often lead to incomplete assimilations (e.g., a…

  6. Nitrogen assimilation in Citrus based on CitEST data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Wickert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Assimilation of nitrate and ammonium are vital procedures for plant development and growth. From these primary paths of inorganic nitrogen assimilation, this metabolism integrates diverse paths for biosynthesis of macromolecules, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and the central intermediate metabolism, like carbon metabolism and photorespiration. This paper reports research performed in the CitEST (Citrus Expressed Sequence Tag database for the main genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and those previously described in other organisms. The results show that a complete cluster of genes involved in the assimilation of nitrogen and the metabolisms of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine can be found in the CitEST data. The main enzymes found were nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamine synthetase (GS, glutamate synthetase (GOGAT, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT and asparagine synthetase (AS. The different enzymes involved in this metabolism have been shown to be highly conserved among the Citrus and Poncirus species. This work serves as a guide for future functional analysis of these enzymes in citrus.

  7. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  8. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2015-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  9. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  10. Data Assimilation - Advances and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of data assimilation (model calibration) for complex computer experiments. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Utilization of surrogate models and empirical adjustment for model form error in code calibration form the basis for the statistical methodology considered. The role of probabilistic code calibration in supporting code validation is discussed. Incorporation of model form uncertainty in rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) analyses is also addressed. Design criteria used within a batch sequential design algorithm are introduced for efficiently achieving predictive maturity and improved code calibration. Predictive maturity refers to obtaining stable predictive inference with calibrated computer codes. These approaches allow for augmentation of initial experiment designs for collecting new physical data. A standard framework for data assimilation is presented and techniques for updating the posterior distribution of the state variables based on particle filtering and the ensemble Kalman filter are introduced.

  11. Effect of ozone on growth and assimilate partitioning in parsley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, R.J.; Bennett, J.P.; Braegelmann, P.K.

    1978-05-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Nym. cv. Banquet) incurred leaf injury, reduced growth, and altered assimilate partitioning after exposures to 20 pphm ozone. Total plant dry weight and root dry weight were decreased 23% and 43% respectively, with little effect on leaves. The relative growth rate of fumigated plants was reduced after the initial ozone exposure but leveled off at a steady state above that of the control plants when plant dry weights reached about 4.5 g. Ozone appeared to have its greatest effect on growth during initial exposures. 15 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. Nitration of Polystyrene-Part II Effect of Nitrating Medium on Nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bajaj

    1968-04-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene has been nitrated in mixtures of anhydrous nitric and sulphuric acid (70 : 30 and 80 : 20 by volume. Degree of substitution of nitro group per benzene ring varies from 1 to 2 depending on the time, temperature and composition of the nitrating media. Effect of polar and non polar solvents on nitration has been studied by nitrating the polymer in (i fuming nitric acid and (iimixture of nitric and sulphuric acid in presence of dimethyl formamide (DMF and carbon tetrachloride (CCI/Sub4. MF increase the rate of nitration in fuming nitric acid whereas the rate of nitration is lowered in the presence of DMF in the nitrating mixtures. In the case of CCI/Sub4, however, the effect is just the opposite to that observed in DMF. The results have been explained from the mechanism of the formation of 'nitroniumion,NO/Sub2+ in various nitrating media. Degradation of the polymer has been found to be comparatively less in the presence of the organic solvents used in the study.

  13. The effect of Kuroshio Current on nitrate dynamics in the southern East China Sea revealed by nitrate isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Wu, Zaixing; Yuan, Yongquan; Zhou, Peng; Cao, Xihua

    2016-09-01

    In spring 2014 (May-June), in the southern East China Sea (ECS) and east of Taiwan, nutrient and isotope samples were collected and analyzed. Also, dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-a, and physical parameters were determined. The Kuroshio subsurface water intruded into the ECS and separated into two branches on the continental shelf: the nearshore Kuroshio branch current (NKBC) and the offshore Kuroshio branch current (OKBC). Nitrate concentration in the Kuroshio subsurface water slightly decreased east of Taiwan by assimilation and was supplied by upwelling currents northeast of Taiwan. The variations of DO, nitrate, and nitrogen isotopes in the bottom water showed that continuous nitrification occurred in the NKBC after intrusion into the ECS. This process might contribute to the hypoxia zone near the coast of Zhejiang Province, China. Our results also indicated that internal nitrogen cycles appeared in NKBC since the isotope fractionation ratio of oxygen and nitrogen (18ɛ:15ɛ) in NO3- was 1.40. The NO3- flux and budget were calculated in the NKBC via numerical simulations. It demonstrated that at least ˜0.52 kmol NO3-·s-1 was produced by nitrification from DH9 to DH5 transect, and ˜0.11 kmol NO3-·s-1 was consumed in the DH4 transect. Moreover, according to the Rayleigh model, primary production in most of southern ECS was supported by the intrusion of the Kuroshio subsurface water, causing 5‰ isotope fractionation. In some of nearshore stations which located in the northern investigated area, the assimilated nitrate was contributed from both the NKBC and coastal currents originated from the Changjiang diluted water.

  14. The Race Race: Assimilation in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Andrea; Aman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Can race and assimilation be taught? Interdisciplinary pedagogy provides a methodology, context, and use of nontraditional texts culled from American cultural history such as from, theater and historical texts. This approach and these texts prove useful for an examination of race and assimilation in America. The paper describes a course that while…

  15. The Effect of Errors in Snow Assimilation on Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian A.; Houser, Paul R.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate portrayal of the hydrological cycle is extremely important in land surface modeling. Central to this effort is the treatment of snow, as errors in the representation of this quantity can impact practically all other modeled quantities through alterations in the water and energy balances. Although land surface model (LSM) simulations can benefit from the assimilation of snow cover and snow depth observations, they can be negatively impacted if such observations contain errors or if a model bias exists in the simulation of surface or soil temperatures. Both cases may lead to excessive melting or growth of snow packs, and to large alterations in both the energy and water balances. Such problems in the snow assimilation process, made evident by the repeated melting and replenishing of snow pack over significant areas of the United States, exists in the Eta Data Assimilation System and is a product of the EDAS system's direct insertion assimilation of snow data. Occurring on a 24 hour cycle, the repeated melting infuses the soil column with a large quantity of water that upsets the hydrological cycle. In an effort to quantify the impacts of such errors in snow assimilation on water and energy budgets, a series of Mosaic LSM simulations were performed over the 12 month period covering October 1998 to October 1999.

  16. Data assimilation of physical and chlorophyll a observations in the California Current System using two biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Song, Hajoon; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Fiechter, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Biogeochemical numerical models coupled to physical ocean circulation models are commonly combined with data assimilation in order to improve the models' state or parameter estimates. Yet much still needs to be learned about important aspects of biogeochemical data assimilation, such as the effect of model complexity and the importance of more realistic model formulations on assimilation results. In this study, 4D-Var-based state estimation is applied to two biogeochemical ocean models: a simple NPZD model with 4 biogeochemical variables (including 1 phytoplankton, 1 zooplankton) and the more complex NEMURO model, containing 11 biogeochemical variables (including 2 phytoplankton, 3 zooplankton). Both models are coupled to a 3-dimensional physical ocean circulation model of the U.S. west coast based on the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS). Chlorophyll satellite observations and physical observations are assimilated into the model, yielding substantial improvements in state estimates for the observed physical and biogeochemical variables in both model formulations. In comparison to the simpler NPZD model, NEMURO shows a better overall fit to the observations. The assimilation also results in small improvements for simulated nitrate concentrations in both models and no apparent degradation of the output for other unobserved variables. The forecasting skill of the biogeochemical models is strongly linked to model performance without data assimilation: for both models, the improved fit obtained through assimilation degrades at similar relative rates, but drops to different absolute levels. Despite the better performance of NEMURO in our experiments, the choice of model and desired level of complexity should depend on the model application and the data available for assimilation.

  17. Data assimilation a mathematical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Law, Kody; Zygalakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic treatment of the mathematical underpinnings of work in data assimilation, covering both theoretical and computational approaches. Specifically the authors develop a unified mathematical framework in which a Bayesian formulation of the problem provides the bedrock for the derivation, development and analysis of algorithms; the many examples used in the text, together with the algorithms which are introduced and discussed, are all illustrated by the MATLAB software detailed in the book and made freely available online. The book is organized into nine chapters: the first contains a brief introduction to the mathematical tools around which the material is organized; the next four are concerned with discrete time dynamical systems and discrete time data; the last four are concerned with continuous time dynamical systems and continuous time data and are organized analogously to the corresponding discrete time chapters. This book is aimed at mathematical researchers interested in a sy...

  18. Agriculture causes nitrate fertilization of remote alpine lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundey, E. J.; Russell, S. D.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Moser, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Humans have altered Earth's nitrogen cycle so dramatically that reactive nitrogen (Nr) has doubled. This has increased Nr in aquatic ecosystems, which can lead to reduced water quality and ecosystem health. Apportioning sources of Nr to specific ecosystems, however, continues to be challenging, despite this knowledge being critical for mitigation and protection of water resources. Here we use Δ17O, δ18O and δ15N from Uinta Mountain (Utah, USA) snow, inflow and lake nitrate in combination with a Bayesian-based stable isotope mixing model, to show that at least 70% of nitrates in aquatic systems are anthropogenic and arrive via the atmosphere. Moreover, agricultural activities, specifically nitrate- and ammonium-based fertilizer use, are contributing most (~60%) Nr, and data from other North American alpine lakes suggest this is a widespread phenomenon. Our findings offer a pathway towards more effective mitigation, but point to challenges in balancing food production with protection of important water resources.

  19. Seasonal variations in nitrate isotope composition of three rivers draining into the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Deek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate loading of coastal ecosystems by rivers that drain industrialised catchments continues to be a problem in the South Eastern North Sea, in spite of significant mitigation efforts over the last 2 decades. To identify nitrate sources, sinks, and turnover in three German rivers that discharge into the German Bight, we determined δ 15N-NO3- and δ18O- NO3- in nitrate and δ 15N of particulate nitrogen for the period 2006–2009 (biweekly samples. The nitrate loads of Rhine, Weser and Ems varied seasonally in magnitude and δ 15N-NO3- (6.5–21‰, whereas the δ 18O-NO3- (-0.3–5.9‰ and δ 15N-PN (4–14‰ were less variable. Overall temporal patterns in nitrate mass fluxes and isotopic composition suggest that a combination of nitrate delivery from nitrification of soil ammonia in the catchment and assimilation of nitrate in the rivers control the isotopic composition of nitrate. Nitrification in soils as a source is indicated by low δ 18O-NO3- in winter, which traces the δ 18O of river water. Mean values of δ 18O-H2O were between –9.4‰ and –7.3‰; combined in a ratio of 2:1 with the atmospheric oxygen δ 18O of 23.5‰ agrees with the found δ 18O of nitrate in the rivers.

    Parallel variations of δ 15N-NO3- and δ 18O-NO3- within each individual river are caused by isotope effects associated with nitrate assimilation in the water column, the extent of which is determined by residence time in the river. Assimilation is furthermore to some extent mirrored both by the δ 15N of nitrate and particulate N. Although δ 15-NO3- observed in Rhine, Weser and Ems are reflected in

  20. A New Approach to Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bin; ZHAO Ying

    2006-01-01

    A significant attempt to design a timesaving and efficient four-dimensional variational data assimilation dimensional variational data assimilation of mapped observation (3DVM)' is proposed, based on the new concept of mapped observation and the new idea of backward 4DVar. Like the available 4DVar, 3DVM produces an optimal initial condition (IC) that is consistent with the prediction model due to the inclusion of model constraints and best fits the observations in the assimilation window through the model solution trajectory. Different from the 4DVar, the IC derived from 3DVM is located at the end of the assimilation window rather than at the beginning conventionally. This change greatly reduces the computing cost for the new approach, which is almost the same as that of the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVar). Especially, such a change is able to improve assimilation accuracy because it does not need the tangential linear and adjoint approximations to calculate the gradient of cost function. Therefore,in numerical test, the new approach produces better IC than 4DVar does for 72-h simulation of TY9914(Dan), by assimilating the three-dimensional fields of temperature and wind retrieved from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations. Meanwhile, it takes only 1/7 of the computing cost that the 4DVar requires for the same initialization with the same retrieved data.

  1. Nitrate transporters in leaves and their potential roles in foliar uptake of nitrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo eHu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While plant roots are specialized organs for the uptake and transport of water and nutrients, the absorption of gaseous or liquid mineral elements by aerial plant parts has been recognized since more than one century. Nitrogen (N is an essential macronutrient which generally absorbed either as nitrate (NO3- or ammonium (NH4+ by plant roots. Gaseous nitrogen pollutants like N dioxide (NO2 can also be absorbed by plant surfaces and assimilated via the NO3– assimilation pathway. The subsequent NO3– flux may induce or repress the expression of various NO3–-responsive genes encoding for instance, the transmembrane transporters, NO3–/NO2– (nitrite reductase, or assimilatory enzymes involved in N metabolism. Based on the existing information, the aim of this review was to theoretically analyze the potential link between foliar NO2 absorption and N transport and metabolism. For such purpose, an overview of the state of knowledge on the NO3– transporter genes identified in leaves or shoots of various species and their roles for NO3– transport across the tonoplast and plasma membrane, in addition to the process of phloem loading is briefly provided. It is assumed that a NO2-induced ac-cumulation of NO3–/NO2– may alter the expression of such genes, hence linking transmembrane NO3– transporters and foliar uptake of NO2. It is likely that NRT1/NRT2 gene expression and spe-cies-dependent apoplastic buffer capacity may be also related to the species-specific foliar NO2 uptake process. It is concluded that further work focusing on the expression of NRT1 (NRT1.1, NRT1.7, NRT1.11 and NRT1.12, NRT2 (NRT2.1, NRT2.4 and NRT2.5 and chloride channel family genes (CLCa and CLCd may help us elucidate the physiological and metabolic response of plants fumigated with NO2.

  2. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  3. The importance of peers: assimilation patterns among second-generation Turkish immigrants in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, S.; Fokkema, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The two dominant approaches to immigrant assimilation, segmented assimilation and "new" assimilation theories, have been successful at reporting and analyzing between-group differences in assimilation patterns. However, studies of assimilation generally do not address differences at the individual l

  4. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  5. Mutational analysis of the respiratory nitrate transporter NarK2 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Giffin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces nitrate reductase activity in response to decreasing oxygen levels. This is due to regulation of both the transcription and the activity of the nitrate transporter NarK2. A model of NarK2 structure is proposed containing 12 membrane spanning regions consistent with other members of the major facilitator superfamily. The role of the proton gradient was determined by exposing M. tuberculosis to uncouplers. Nitrite production decreased indicating that the importation of nitrate involved an H(+/nitrate symporter. The addition of nitrite before nitrate had no effect, suggesting no role for a nitrate/nitrite antiporter. In addition the NarK2 knockout mutant showed no defect in nitrite export. NarK2 is proposed to be a Type I H(+/nitrate symporter. Site directed mutagenesis was performed changing 23 amino acids of NarK2. This allowed the identification of important regions and amino acids of this transporter. Five of these mutants were inactive for nitrate transport, seven produced reduced activity and eleven mutants retained wild type activity. NarK2 is inactivated in the presence of oxygen by an unknown mechanism. However none of the mutants, including those with mutated cysteines, were altered in their response to oxygen levels. The assimilatory nitrate transporter NasA of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in the M. tuberculosis NarK2 mutant. It remained active during aerobic incubation showing that the point of oxygen control is NarK2.

  6. Data assimilation in integrated hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørn

    are assimilated significant improvements are obtained in both stream flow and groundwater modeling. However, the successfulness of both the state updating and the parameter estimation is conditioned on a sufficiently large ensemble size, as spurious correlations often had a negative impact on the performance...... of the data assimilation algorithm. To reduce the impact of spurious correlation, an adaptive localization method is applied, which significantly improved the performance of the assimilation while reducing the computational requirements. Finally, as observation bias is common in groundwater head observations...

  7. The Acceleration of Immigrant Unhealthy Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntella, Osea; Stella, Luca

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that immigrants tend to be healthier than US natives and that this advantage erodes with time spent in the USA. However, we know less about the heterogeneity of these trajectories among arrival cohorts. Recent studies have shown that later arrival cohorts of immigrants have lower entry wages and experience less economic assimilation. In this paper, we investigate whether similar cohort effects can be observed in the weight assimilation of immigrants in the USA. Focusing on obesity, we show that more recent immigrant cohorts arrive with higher obesity rates and experience a faster 'unhealthy assimilation' in terms of weight gain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Data assimilation experiments with MPIESM climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyaev Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Further development of data assimilation technique and its application in numerical experiments with state-of-the art Max Plank Institute Earth System model have been carried out. In particularly, the stability problem of assimilation is posed and discussed In the experiments the sea surface height data from archive Archiving, Validating and Interpolating Satellite Ocean have been used. All computations have been realized on cluster system of German Climate Computing Center. The results of numerical experiments with and without assimilation were recorded and analyzed. A special attention has been focused on the Arctic zone. It is shown that there is a good coincidence of model tendencies and independent data.

  9. Genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate in onion roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Mihaela ANTOFIE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to assess cyto- and genotoxic effects of sodium nitrate on Allium cepa root tips by using different concentrations (i.e. 0,1%; 1% and 5% for treating uniform healthy onion bulbs for three different periods of time: 6, 24 and 72 hours. In the end of the experiment the harvested root tips were prepared according to Feulgen’s squash technique using Schiff reagent and the investigations were realized according to Allium test. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nitrate were investigated by calculating the mitotic index and observing all chromosomes’ complement alterations during the mitosis. The phase rate of cells undergoing mitosis is also studied. For microscopy investigations a Novex Holland B microscope with digital camera included was used. The cytogenetic analysis of nitrate effects revealed a strong decrease in the mitotic index which is more intense with the concentration and time of exposure. Moreover, this effect is associated in case of the variant treated with 5% sodium nitrate acting for more than 24 hours, with the appearance of genotoxic effects such as chromosomal alterations, highly condensed chromatin expression easily identified during mitosis stages, sticky chromosomes and chromosomal bridges and laggards.

  10. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  11. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eKimura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect. The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC is paired with a blue outer contour (OC, yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and OC luminances (Experiment 1 as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2. The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminances (IC contrast was smaller than that of the OC (OC contrast, the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading. In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading. Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, e.g., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading [Grossberg, S. & Mingolla, E. (1985 Percept. Psychophys., 38, 141-171] and extended for the watercolor effect [Pinna, B., & Grossberg, S. (2005 J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22, 2207-2221]. However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading.

  12. IS ASSIMILATION THEORY DEAD? THE EFFECT OF ASSIMILATION ON ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Emily; Xie, Yu

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between assimilation and the well-being of immigrant children has been the focus of debate in the recent sociological literature. Much of this work has questioned whether classical theories of immigrant adaptation, which assumed assimilation to be an integral part of the process of upward mobility for immigrants, are still applicable to today’s immigrant children. This study reevaluates the applicability of classical assimilation theory with a comprehensive empirical assessme...

  13. Development of a data assimilation algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Per Grove; Zlatev, Zahari

    2008-01-01

    efficiently observations in a large-scale model (for example, in order to obtain more reliable initial values). Variational data assimilation techniques are based on a combination of three very important components • numerical methods for solving differential equations, • splitting procedures......It is important to incorporate all available observations when large-scale mathematical models arising in different fields of science and engineering are used to study various physical and chemical processes. Variational data assimilation techniques can be used in the attempts to utilize...... assimilation technique is applied. Therefore, it is important to study the interplay between the three components of the variational data assimilation techniques as well as to apply powerful parallel computers in the computations. Some results obtained in the search for a good combination of numerical methods...

  14. ITERATIVE ALGORITHMS FOR DATA ASSIMILATION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Iterative algorithms for solving the data assimilation problems are considered, based on the main and adjoint equations. Spectral properties of the control operators of the problem are studied, the iterative algorithms are justified.

  15. ERP ASSIMILATION: AN END-USER APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurbean Luminita

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the ERP adoption based on the IT assimilation theory. The ERP lifecycle is associated with the IT assimilation steps. We propose a distribution of these steps along the lifecycle. Derived from the findings in the reviewed literature we will focus the cultural factors, in particular those related to the end-users (determined as a major impact factor in our previous study: Negovan et al., 2011. Our empirical study is centred on the end-users perspective and it tries to determine if and how their behaviour affects the achievement of the ERP assimilation steps. The paper reasons that organizations that understand the IT assimilation steps correlated to the ERP implementation critical factors are more likely to implement and use ERP successfully.

  16. At first glance, transparency enhances assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of transparency, perceptual grouping, and presentation time on perceived lightness. Both transparency and perceptual grouping have been found to result in assimilation effects, but only for ambiguous stimulus displays and with specific attentional instructions. By varying the presentation times of displays with two partly overlapping transparent E-shaped objects, we measured assimilation in unambiguous stimulus displays and without specific attentional instructions. T...

  17. Wage and Occupational Assimilation by Skill Level

    OpenAIRE

    Alcobendas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Planas, Núria; Vegas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using alternative datasets and methodologies, this paper provides evidence of a differential ...

  18. Balance of assimilative and dissimilative nitrogen processes in a diatom-rich tidal flat sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tidal flat sediments are subject to repetitive mixing and resuspension events. In a short-term (24 h 15N-labelling experiment, we investigated reactive nitrogen cycling in a tidal flat sediment following an experimentally induced resuspension event. We focused on (a the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and (b the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labelled substrate was added to homogenized sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into sediment and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN pools. Integration of results in a N-cycle model allowed us to quantify the proportion of major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment.

    Upon sediment disturbance, rates of dissimilatory processes like nitrification and denitrification were very high, but declined rapidly towards a steady state. Once this was reached, the balance between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat was mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: nitrate was utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium was rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to benthic microalgae (BMA. Benthic microalgae significantly affected the nitrogen recycling balance in sediments, because in the absence of BMA activity the recovering sediment turned from a net ammonium sink to a net source.

    The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Assimilatory pathways gain importance under stable conditions, with a substantial contribution of BMA to total assimilation.

  19. Data Assimilation: Making Sense of Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Albert Lahoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, air quality and environmental degradation are important societal challenges for the 21st Century. These challenges require an intelligent response from society, which in turn requires access to information about the Earth System. This information comes from observations and prior knowledge, the latter typically embodied in a model describing relationships between variables of the Earth System. Data assimilation provides an objective methodology to combine observational and model information to provide an estimate of the most likely state and its uncertainty for the whole Earth System. This approach adds value to the observations – by filling in the spatio-temporal gaps in observations; and to the model – by constraining it with the observations. In this review paper we motivate data assimilation as a methodology to fill in the gaps in observational information; illustrate the data assimilation approach with examples that span a broad range of features of the Earth System (atmosphere, including chemistry; ocean; land surface; and discuss the outlook for data assimilation, including the novel application of data assimilation ideas to observational information obtained using Citizen Science. Ultimately, a strong motivation of data assimilation is the many benefits it provides to users. These include: providing the initial state for weather and air quality forecasts; providing analyses and reanalyses for studying the Earth System; evaluating observations, instruments and models; assessing the relative value of elements of the Global Observing System (GOS; and assessing the added value of future additions to the GOS.

  20. Variational fine-grained data assimilation schemes for atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The paper concerns data assimilation problem for an atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models. Data assimilation is carried out within variation approach on a single time step of the approximated model. A control function is introduced into the model source term (emission rate) to provide flexibility to adjust to data. This function is evaluated as the minimum of the target functional combining control function norm to a misfit between measured and model-simulated analog of data. This provides a flow-dependent and physically-plausible structure of the resulting analysis and reduces the need to calculate model error covariance matrices that are sought within conventional approach to data assimilation. Extension of the atmospheric transport model with a chemical transformations module influences data assimilation algorithms performance. This influence is investigated with numerical experiments for different meteorological conditions altering convection-diffusion processes characteristics, namely strong, medium and low wind conditions. To study the impact of transformation and data assimilation, we compare results for a convection-diffusion model (without data assimilation), convection-diffusion with assimilation, convection-diffusion-reaction (without data assimilation) and convection-diffusion-reaction-assimilation models. Both high dimensionalities of the atmospheric chemistry models and a real-time mode of operation demand for computational efficiency of the algorithms. Computational issues with complicated models can be solved by using a splitting technique. As the result a model is presented as a set of relatively independent simple models equipped with a kind of coupling procedure. With regard to data assimilation two approaches can be identified. In a fine-grained approach data assimilation is carried out on the separate splitting stages [1,2] independently on shared measurement data. The same situation arises when constructing a hybrid model

  1. Differential growth response of Ulva lactuca to ammonium and nitrate assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-01-01

    as the nitrogen source. The NH4Cl and NaNO3 rich media (50 μM of N) accelerated U. lactuca growth to a maximum specific growth rate of 16.4 ± 0.18% day−1 and 9.4 ± 0.72% day−1, respectively. The highest biomass production rate obtained was 22.5 ± 0.24 mg DW m−2·day−1. The presence of ammonium apparently...

  2. Data assimilation for magnetohydrodynamics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, O. Barrero; de Moor, B.; Bernstein, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    Prediction of solar storms has become a very important issue due to the fact that they can affect dramatically the telecommunication and electrical power systems at the earth. As a result, a lot of research is being done in this direction, space weather forecast. Magnetohydrodynamics systems are being studied in order to analyse the space plasma dynamics, and techniques which have been broadly used in the prediction of earth environmental variables like the Kalman filter (KF), the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), the extended Kalman filter (EKF), etc., are being studied and adapted to this new framework. The assimilation of a wide range of space environment data into first-principles-based global numerical models will improve our understanding of the physics of the geospace environment and the forecasting of its behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to study the performance of nonlinear observers in magnetohydrodynamics systems, namely, the EnKF.The EnKF is based on a Monte Carlo simulation approach for propagation of process and measurement errors. In this paper, the EnKF for a nonlinear two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D-MHD) system is considered. For its implementation, two software packages are merged, namely, the Versatile Advection Code (VAC) written in Fortran and Matlab of Mathworks. The 2D-MHD is simulated with the VAC code while the EnKF is computed in Matlab. In order to study the performance of the EnKF in MHD systems, different number of measurement points as well as ensemble members are set.

  3. Haloarchaeal assimilatory nitrate-reducing communities from a saline alkaline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Zavala-Díaz de la Serna, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Revilla, Javier; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2009-09-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reduction (ANR) is a pathway wherein NO(3)(-) is reduced to NH(4)(+), an N species that can be incorporated into the biomass. There is little information about the ANR genes in Archaea and most of the known information has been obtained from cultivable species. In this study, the diversity of the haloarchaeal assimilatory nitrate-reducing community was studied in an extreme saline alkaline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico). Genes coding for the assimilatory nitrate reductase (narB) and the assimilatory nitrite reductase (nirA) were used as functional markers. Primers to amplify and detect partial narB and nirA were designed. The analysis of these amplicons by cloning and sequencing showed that the deduced protein fragments shared >45% identity with other NarB and NirA proteins from Euryarchaeota and <38% identity with other nitrate reductases from Bacteria and Crenarchaeota. Furthermore, these clone sequences were clustered within the class Halobacteria with strong support values in both constructed dendrograms, confirming that desired PCR products were obtained. The metabolic capacity to assimilate nitrate by these haloarchaea seems to be important given that at pH 10 and higher, NH(4)(+) is mostly converted to toxic and volatile NH(3), and NO(3)(-) becomes the preferable N source.

  4. The social context of assimilation: testing implications of segmented assimilation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between social context and assimilation on immigrant children's well-being. We then test the hypotheses using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analyses yield two main findings. First, for immigrant adolescents living in non-poverty neighborhoods, we find assimilation to be positively associated with educational achievement and psychological well-being but also positively associated with at-risk behavior. Second, there is little empirical evidence supporting our hypotheses derived from segmented assimilation theory. We interpret these results to mean that future research would be more fruitful focusing on differential processes of assimilation rather than differential consequences of assimilation.

  5. Assimilation of gridded GRACE terrestrial water storage estimates in the North American Land Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is to provide best-available estimates of near surface meteorological conditions and soil hydrological status for the Continental United States. The first two phases of NLDAS, however, have not included the assimilation of rem...

  6. IS ASSIMILATION THEORY DEAD? THE EFFECT OF ASSIMILATION ON ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Emily; Xie, Yu

    2008-03-01

    The relationship between assimilation and the well-being of immigrant children has been the focus of debate in the recent sociological literature. Much of this work has questioned whether classical theories of immigrant adaptation, which assumed assimilation to be an integral part of the process of upward mobility for immigrants, are still applicable to today's immigrant children. This study reevaluates the applicability of classical assimilation theory with a comprehensive empirical assessment of the relationship between assimilation and the well-being of Hispanic and Asian immigrant adolescents. Using Add Health data, we examine the effect of different aspects of assimilation on educational achievement, psychological well-being, and at-risk behaviors. We find that the effect of assimilation varies greatly depending on the ethnic group and outcome under consideration, but that it is generally related to both greater academic achievement and more at-risk behavior. We conclude that assimilation theory is still relevant, but suggest an interpretation that emphasizes a process of decreasing differences between groups rather than either detrimental or beneficial effects of assimilation.

  7. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, M.; Fenton, O.; Horan, B.; Hennessy, D.; Richards, K. G.; Jordan, P.; Goldscheider, N.; Butscher, C.; Blum, P.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e. rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in South Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and on the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD). In future, more research should focus on the high

  8. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huebsch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e., rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in south Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU Water Framework Directive (WFD. In future, more research should focus on

  9. Formation kinetics and abundance of organic nitrates in α-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Formation of organic nitrates affects the total atmospheric budget of oxidized nitrogen (NOy) and alters the total aerosol mass yield from secondary sources. We investigated the formation of organic nitrate species during ozonolysis of α-pinene and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) using the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N inside an aerosol flow reactor (Ammann et al., 2001). The results represent direct measurements of the organic nitrate content of α-pinene secondary aerosol and give insight into the kinetics of organic nitrate formation. Organic nitrates constituted up to 40 % of aerosol mass with a pronounced influence during the initial period of particle growth. Kinetic modelling, as well as additional experiments using OH scavengers and UV irradiation, suggests that organic peroxy radicals (RO2) from the reaction of α-pinene with secondarily produced OH are important intermediates in the organic nitrate formation process. Direct oxidation of α-pinene by NO3 was found to be a less efficient pathway for formation of particle phase nitrate. The organic nitrate content decreased very slightly with an increase of relative humidity on the experimental time scale. The experiments show a tight correlation between organic nitrate content and SOA number concentrations, implying that organic nitrates play an important role in nucleation and growth of nanoparticles. Since present in large amounts in organic aerosol, organic nitrates deposited in the lung might have implications for human health as they release nitric acid upon hydrolysis, especially in regions influenced by urban pollution and large sources of monoterpene SOA precursors. References Ammann et al. (2001) Radiochimica Acta 89, 831.

  10. Ammonium assimilation: An important accessory during aerobic denitrification of Pseudomonas stutzeri T13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yilu; Feng, Liang; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang

    2017-03-12

    The present study investigated effect of ammonium utilization on aerobic denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri T13. Per nitrogen balance calculation, all consumed ammonium was utilized as nitrogen source for cell propagation by assimilation rather than heterotrophic nitrification. Total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonium were necessary substrates to sustain heterotrophic propagation of P. stutzeri T13 at optimum proportion equal to seven. Under aerobic condition, nitrate was utilized as substitute nitrogen source when ammonium was completely exhausted. Biomass production effectively increased with increasing initial ammonium from 0mg/L to 100mg/L. Owing to enlarged biomass, average nitrate reduction rate increased from 7.36mgL(-1)h(-1) to 11.95mgL(-1)h(-1). Such process also successfully reduced nitrite accumulation from 121.8mg/L to 66.16mg/L during aerobic denitrification. As important accessory during aerobic denitrification, ammonium assimilation efficiently doubled total nitrogen (TN) removal from 54.97mg/L (no ammonium provided) to 113.1mg/L (100mg/L ammonium involved).

  11. Assimilation of Sea Color Data Into A Three Dimensional Biogeochemical Model: Sensitivity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevin, V.; Levy, M.; Memery, L.

    The assimilation of two dimensional sea color data fields into a 3 dimensional coupled dynamical-biogeochemical model is performed using a 4DVAR algorithm. The biogeochemical model includes description of nitrates, ammonium, phytoplancton, zooplancton, detritus and dissolved organic matter. A subset of the biogeochemical model poorly known parameters (for example,phytoplancton growth, mortality,grazing) are optimized by minimizing a cost function measuring misfit between the observations and the model trajectory. Twin experiments are performed with an eddy resolving model of 5 km resolution in an academic configuration. Starting from oligotrophic conditions, an initially unstable baroclinic anticyclone splits into several eddies. Strong vertical velocities advect nitrates into the euphotic zone and generate a phytoplancton bloom. Biogeochemical parameters are perturbed to generate surface pseudo-observations of chlorophyll,which are assimilated in the model in order to retrieve the correct parameter perturbations. The impact of the type of measurement (quasi-instantaneous, daily mean, weekly mean) onto the retrieved set of parameters is analysed. Impacts of additional subsurface measurements and of errors in the circulation are also presented.

  12. Influence of Forest Harvest on Nitrate Concentration in Temperate Streams—A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Mupepele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Forest harvest alters natural nutrient cycles, which is reflected in stream water run-off from harvested catchments. Nitrate is an essential nutrient for plant growth, but increased concentrations in rivers, lakes, and oceans have contributed to eutrophication and anoxic conditions. Based on a literature review, we assessed the impact of three different harvest methods—clearcut, patchcut, and selective harvest—on nitrate concentrations in temperate forest streams. In a meta-analysis, the influence of harvest methods and additional environmental variables was analysed. Nitrate concentrations are significantly influenced by harvest methods, forest composition, site altitude, and time passed after the harvesting. The remaining unexplained between-site variability is small compared to the between-site variability explained by the model, indicating the model’s validity. The effect of forest harvest is most pronounced in coniferous and deciduous forests, where clearcuts and patchcuts result in high nitrate run-off three to five years after harvest. Mixed forest plots can compensate for clearcut and patchcut, and do not show a significantly increased nitrate concentration after harvest. Selective harvest at low intensities succeeded in maintaining nitrate levels similar to control or pre-harvest levels in coniferous and mixed forests, and showed a positive but not significant trend in deciduous forests. Coniferous and deciduous monocultures clearly face the problem that nitrate wash-out cannot be minimized by reducing clearcut to patchcut harvest, whereas mixed forests are more suitable to diminish nitrate wash-out in both clearcut and patchcut.

  13. Chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, Willow; Cable, Jo; Maceda-Veiga, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Excessive fertilisation is one of the most pernicious forms of global change resulting in eutrophication. It has major implications for disease control and the conservation of biodiversity. Yet, the direct link between nutrient enrichment and disease remains largely unexplored. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease. Specifically, this study shows that nitrate concentrations ranging between 50 and 250mgNO3(-)/l reduce Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection intensity in two populations of Trinidadian guppies Poecilia reticulata, and that the highest nitrate concentration can even clean the parasites from the fish. This added to the fact that host nitrate pre-exposure altered the fish epidermal structure and reduced parasite intensity, suggests that nitrate protected the host against the disease. Nitrate treatments also caused fish mortality. As we used ecologically-relevant nitrate concentrations, and guppies are top-consumers widely used for mosquito bio-control in tropical and often nutrient-enriched waters, our results can have major ecological and social implications. In conclusion, this study advocates reducing nitrate level including the legislative threshold to protect the aquatic biota, even though this may control an ectoparasitic disease.

  14. Efficient Methods to Assimilate Satellite Retrievals Based on Information Content. Part 2; Suboptimal Retrieval Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Dee, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in data assimilation has been and continues to be how best to utilize satellite data while balancing the tradeoff between accuracy and computational cost. A number of weather prediction centers have recently achieved remarkable success in improving their forecast skill by changing the method by which satellite data are assimilated into the forecast model from the traditional approach of assimilating retrievals to the direct assimilation of radiances in a variational framework. The operational implementation of such a substantial change in methodology involves a great number of technical details, e.g., pertaining to quality control procedures, systematic error correction techniques, and tuning of the statistical parameters in the analysis algorithm. Although there are clear theoretical advantages to the direct radiance assimilation approach, it is not obvious at all to what extent the improvements that have been obtained so far can be attributed to the change in methodology, or to various technical aspects of the implementation. The issue is of interest because retrieval assimilation retains many practical and logistical advantages which may become even more significant in the near future when increasingly high-volume data sources become available. The central question we address here is: how much improvement can we expect from assimilating radiances rather than retrievals, all other things being equal? We compare the two approaches in a simplified one-dimensional theoretical framework, in which problems related to quality control and systematic error correction are conveniently absent. By assuming a perfect radiative transfer model and perfect knowledge of radiance and background error covariances, we are able to formulate a nonlinear local error analysis for each assimilation method. Direct radiance assimilation is optimal in this idealized context, while the traditional method of assimilating retrievals is suboptimal because it

  15. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  16. Reduction of nitrates in Cucumis sativus L. seedlings II. Influence of tungsten and vanadium on nitrate reductase and adenosine triphosphatase activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ATPases isolated from the roots of cucumber seedlings activated by Mg+2 ions in experiments in vitro, were fairly distinctly inhibited by Ca-2 ions, very slightly inhibited by fluorides and molybdenum ions while NO3- anions had no effect on the level of ATPase activity studied. Introduction into the nutrient of 10-4 M Na2WO4 or 10-3 M Na VO3 (inhibitors of nitrate reductase NR distinctly inhibited activity of the ATPase under study especially of fractions IIa and III, and inhibited NR activity and lowered uptake of NO3-. WO4-2 and VO3 inhibited to the same extent absorption and reduction of NO3- in the initial phase of NR induction, whereas at a later stage both inhibitors checked reduction to a greater degree than uptake of NO3-. The results indicate the possibility of certain ATPase participation in assimilating nitrates, and suggest that in the initial stage of biosynthesis of the NR enzyme system, activity of the enzyme is distinctly dependent upon NO3- transport and the level of NR activity limited by the amount of nitrate taken up. At a later an additional mechanism of NO3- transport probably functions, not connected with simultaneous reduction of nitrates. On the basis of results the Butz and Jackson (1977 hypothesis concerning a model for the absorption and reduction of NO3- by plant tissues is discussed.

  17. Efficiency of nitrate uptake in spinach : impact of external nitrate concentration and relative growth rate on nitrate influx and efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Steege, MW; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, PK; Posthumus, F; Vaalburg, W

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of nitrate influx and efflux in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Subito), was studied in short-term label experiments with N-13- and N-15-nitrate. Nitrate fluxes were examined in relation to the N demand for growth, defined as relative growth rate (RGR) times plant N concentration. Plan

  18. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultures used for production of traditional yoghurt, consisting of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, the quantity of assimilated cholesterol did not exceed 27% of its initial contents (0.7 g in 1 dm3. Starter cultures used for bioyoghurt production, containing also probiotic strains (came from Lactobacillus acidophilus species or Bifidobacterium genus assimilated from almost 18% to over 38% of cholesterol. For one monoculture of Lb. acidophilus, cholesterol assimilation ability of 49-55% was observed, despite that the number of bacterial cells in this culture was not different from number of bacteria in other cultures.

  19. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    elements in the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, Goa, India. During the month of September in the wet season nitrate concentration in the mid estuarine region of the Mandovi estuary increased from 4.4 mu M in the upstream region to 6.0 mu M. This increase could...

  20. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-05-11

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress.

  1. Carbon dioxide level and form of soil nitrogen regulate assimilation of atmospheric ammonia in young trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Salamanca-Jimenez, Alveiro; Doane, Timothy A; Horwath, William R

    2015-08-21

    The influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and soil fertility on the physiological performance of plants has been extensively studied, but their combined effect is notoriously difficult to predict. Using Coffea arabica as a model tree species, we observed an additive effect on growth, by which aboveground productivity was highest under elevated CO2 and ammonium fertilization, while nitrate fertilization favored greater belowground biomass allocation regardless of CO2 concentration. A pulse of labelled gases ((13)CO2 and (15)NH3) was administered to these trees as a means to determine the legacy effect of CO2 level and soil nitrogen form on foliar gas uptake and translocation. Surprisingly, trees with the largest aboveground biomass assimilated significantly less NH3 than the smaller trees. This was partly explained by declines in stomatal conductance in plants grown under elevated CO2. However, unlike the (13)CO2 pulse, assimilation and transport of the (15)NH3 pulse to shoots and roots varied as a function of interactions between stomatal conductance and direct plant response to the form of soil nitrogen, observed as differences in tissue nitrogen content and biomass allocation. Nitrogen form is therefore an intrinsic component of physiological responses to atmospheric change, including assimilation of gaseous nitrogen as influenced by plant growth history.

  2. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  3. Accurate and precise quantification of atmospheric nitrate in streams draining land of various uses by using triple oxygen isotopes as tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyauchi, Takanori; Ohyama, Takuya; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Obata, Yusuke; Sato, Keiichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    . We conclude that changes in population density and land use between each catchment area had little impact on the concentration of atmospheric nitrate and that the total nitrate concentration originated primarily from additional contributions of remineralised nitrate. By using the average stable isotopic compositions of atmospheric nitrate, we excluded the contribution of atmospheric nitrate from the determined δ15N and δ18O values of total nitrate and estimated the δ15N and δ18O values of the remineralised portion of nitrate in each stream to clarify the sources. We found that the remineralised portion of the nitrate in the streams could be explained by mixing between a natural source with values of (+4.4 ± 1.8) and (-2.3 ± 0.9) ‰ for δ15N and δ18O respectively and an anthropogenic source with values of (+9.2 ± 1.3) and (-2.2 ± 1.1) ‰ for δ15N and δ18O respectively. In addition, both the uniform absolute concentration of atmospheric nitrate and the low and uniform δ18O values of the remineralised portion of nitrate in the streams imply that in-stream removal of nitrate through assimilation or denitrification had little impact on the concentrations and stable isotopic compositions of nitrate in the streams, except for a few streams in summer with catchments of urban/suburban land uses.

  4. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Archna *; Surinder K. Sharma; Ranbir Chander Sobti

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion ex...

  5. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  6. Implicit assimilation for marine ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, B.; Miller, R.; Spitz, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    We use a new data assimilation method to estimate the parameters of a marine ecological model. At a given point in the ocean, the estimated values of the parameters determine the behaviors of the modeled planktonic groups, and thus indicate which species are dominant. To begin, we assimilate in situ observations, e.g., the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study, the Hawaii Ocean Time-series, and Ocean Weather Station Papa. From there, we estimate the parameters at surrounding points in space based on satellite observations of ocean color. Given the variation of the estimated parameters, we divide the ocean into regions meant to represent distinct ecosystems. An important feature of the data assimilation approach is that it refines the confidence limits of the optimal Gaussian approximation to the distribution of the parameters. This enables us to determine the ecological divisions with greater accuracy.

  7. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... and fertilizer blends containing more than 15% by weight ammonium nitrate, except liquid fertilizers... concerning the detonability of ammonium nitrate; Comments on how likely ammonium nitrate fertilizer users would be to use an alternative fertilizer that is potentially less detonable, such as Sulf-N...

  8. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  9. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  10. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  11. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  12. The effect of mindset on assimilative and contrastive social comparison outcomes and body image

    OpenAIRE

    Wanic, Rebekah Amelie

    2011-01-01

    Social comparisons can alter self-evaluations in multiple ways. Recent research highlights the role of an individual's mindset in moderating these comparison outcomes. Mussweiler's (2003) selective accessibility model (SAM) predicts that initial perceptions of either similarity or dissimilarity with the comparison target will lead to differential outcomes. A similarity mindset is predicted to move self-evaluations in the direction of the comparison target and promote assimilation whereas a di...

  13. Aerobic physiology of redox-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains modified in the ammonium assimilation for increased NADPH availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Maria Margarida M. dos; Thygesen, G.; Kotter, P.;

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant strains altered in the ammonium assimilation pathways were constructed with the purpose of increasing NADPH availability. The NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH1, which accounts for a major fraction of the NADPH consumption during growth on ammonium, was deleted...

  14. Elevated CO(2 modifies N acquisition of Medicago truncatula by enhancing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Guo

    Full Text Available The effects of elevated CO2 (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm were evaluated on nitrogen (N acquisition and assimilation by three Medicago truncatula genotypes, including two N-fixing-deficient mutants (dnf1-1 and dnf1-2 and their wild-type (Jemalong. The proportion of N acquisition from atmosphere and soil were quantified by (15N stable isotope, and N transportation and assimilation-related genes and enzymes were determined by qPCR and biochemical analysis. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrate uptake from soil in all three plant genotypes by down-regulating nitrate reductase (NR, nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and NR activity. Jemalong plant, however, produced more nodules, up-regulated N-fixation-related genes and enhanced percentage of N derived from fixation (%Ndf to increase foliar N concentration and N content in whole plant (Ntotal Yield to satisfy the requirement of larger biomass under elevated CO2. In contrast, both dnf1 mutants deficient in N fixation consequently decreased activity of glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT and N concentration under elevated CO2. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 is likely to modify N acquisition of M. truncatula by simultaneously increasing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil. We propose that elevated CO2 causes legumes to rely more on N fixation than on N uptake from soil to satisfy N requirements.

  15. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel, E-mail: jsavarino@lgge.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  16. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  17. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol A. Kulkarni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  18. Ensemble data assimilation for ocean biogeochemical state and parameter estimation at different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharamti, M. E.; Tjiputra, J.; Bethke, I.; Samuelsen, A.; Skjelvan, I.; Bentsen, M.; Bertino, L.

    2017-04-01

    We develop an efficient data assimilation system that aims at quantifying the uncertainties of various biogeochemical states and parameters. We explore the use of four different ensemble estimation techniques for tuning poorly constrained ecosystem parameters using a one-dimensional configuration of the Ocean Biogeochemical General Circulation Model. The schemes are all EnKF-based operating sequentially in time but have different correction equations. The 1D model is used to simulate the biogeochemical cycle at three different stations in mid and high latitudes. We assimilate monthly climatological profiles of nitrate, silicate, phosphate and oxygen in addition to seasonal surface pCO2 data, between 2006 and 2010. We use the data to optimize eleven ecosystem parameters in addition to all state variables of the model, describing the dynamical processes of the water column. Our assimilation results suggest the following: (1) Among all tested schemes, the one-step-ahead smoothing-based ensemble Kalman filter (OSA-EnKF) is robust and the most accurate, providing consistent and reliable state-parameter ensemble realizations. (2) Given the large uncertainties associated with the ecosystem parameters, estimating only the state variables is generally inconclusive and biased. (3) The OSA-EnKF successfully recovers the observed seasonal variability of the ecosystem dynamics at all stations and helps optimizing the parameters, eventually reducing the prediction errors of the nutrients' concentrations. (4) The estimates of the parameters may have some temporally correlated features and they can also vary spatially between different regions depending on the magnitude of the bias in the observed variables and other factors such as the intensity of the bloom period. We further show that the presented assimilation system has the potential to be used in global models.

  19. Metabolic plasticity of nitrogen assimilation by Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang K.; Kraemer, George P.; Yarish, Charles

    2012-12-01

    The physical stresses associated with emersion have long been considered major factors determining the vertical zonation of intertidal seaweeds. We examined Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing thalli from the vertical extremes in elevation of an intertidal population ( i.e. upper and lower intertidal zones) to determine whether Porphyra thalli acclimate to different vertical elevations on the shore with different patterns of nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities in response to different degrees of emersion stress. We found that the nitrate uptake and NR recovery in the emersed tissues took longer in lower intertidal sub-population than in upper intertidal sub-population; and GS activity was also significantly affected by emersion and, interestingly, such an activity was enhanced by emersion of thalli from both upper and lower intertidal zones. These results suggested that intra-population variability in post-emersion recovery of physiological functions such as nutrient uptake and NR activity enables local adaptation and contributes to the wide vertical distribution of P. umbilicalis. The high GS activity during periodic emersion stress may be a protective mechanism enabling P. umbilicalis to assimilate nitrogen quickly when it again becomes available, and may also be an evidence of photorespiration during emersion.

  20. Metabolic Plasticity of Nitrogen Assimilation by Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jang K.Kim; George P.Kraemer; Charles Yarish

    2012-01-01

    The physical stresses associated with emersion have long been considered major factors determining the vertical zonation of intertidal seaweeds.We examined Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing thalli from the vertical extremes in elevation of an intertidal population (i.e.upper and lower intertidal zones) to determine whether Porphyra thalli acclimate to different vertical elevations on the shore with different patterns of nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities in response to different degrees of emersion stress.We found that the nitrate uptake and NR recovery in the emersed tissues took longer in lower intertidal sub-population than in upper intertidal sub-population; and GS activity was also significantly affected by emersion and,interestingly,such an activity was enhanced by emersion of thalli from both upper and lower intertidal zones.These results suggested that intra-population variability in post-emersion recovery of physiological functions such as nutrient uptake and NR activity enables local adaptation and contributes to the wide vertical distribution of P.umbilicalis.The high GS activity during periodic emersion stress may be a protective mechanism enabling P.umbilicalis to assimilate nitrogen quickly when it again becomes available,and may also be an evidence of photorespiration during emersion.

  1. The importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the nitrogen cycle of coastal ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giblin, Anne E.; Tobias, Craig R.; Song, Bongkeun;

    2013-01-01

    be ignored. Measurements comparing the importance of denitrification vs. DNRA in 55 coastal sites found that DNRA accounted for more than 30% of the nitrate reduction at 26 sites. DNRA was the dominant pathway at more than one-third of the sites. Understanding what controls the relative importance......Until recently, it was believed that biological assimilation and gaseous nitrogen (N) loss through denitrification were the two major fates of nitrate entering or produced within most coastal ecosystems. Denitrification is often viewed as an important ecosystem service that removes reactive N from...... of denitrification and DNRA, and how the balance changes with increased nitrogen loading, is of critical importance for predicting eutrophication trajectories. Recent improvements in methods for assessing rates of DNRA have helped refine our understanding of the rates and controls of this process, but accurate...

  2. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  3. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  4. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...... enclose and regulate a small biogeochemical universe within their cell. Their transparent proteinaceous cell wall surrounds a complex matrix consisting of sediment, bacteria and nitrate which is concentrated to hundreds of mM in the gromiid cell. The nitrate is respired to dinitrogen, but in contrast...... to the findings of eukaryotic mediated nitrate reduction in some foraminifera and diatoms, nitrate respiration in gromiids seems to be mediated by bacterial endosymbionts. The role of endobionts in nitrate accumulating eukaryotes is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolutionary path...

  5. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  6. Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Anderson, D. N.; Codrescu, M.; Minter, C.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M.; Howe, B. M.

    2001-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic medium that can vary significantly from day to day and from hour to hour at a given location, and these variations can have detrimental effects on military and civilian systems. In an effort to minimize or circumvent the detrimental effects, a physics-based data assimilation model of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere is under development with funding from the DoD MURI program. Two university consortia are involved, with USU and USC as the lead institutions. When completed, the GAIM (Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements) model will provide specifications and forecasts on a spatial grid that can be global, regional, or local (50 km x 50 km). GAIM will use a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. Some of the data to be assimilated include in situ density measurements from satellites, ionosonde electron density profiles, occultation data, ground-based GPS TECs, TECs between ground stations and LEO satellites with radio beacons, and line-of-sight UV emissions from selected satellites. The resulting specifications and forecasts will be in the form of 3-dimensional electron density distributions from 90 km to geosynchronous altitude (35,000 km). An initial form of GAIM already exists and recent results from the USU consortium will be presented.

  7. Phonological Assimilation and Visual Word Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Moreno, Miguel A.; Park, Hyeongsaeng; Carello, Claudia; Turvey, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Are the visual word-processing tasks of naming and lexical decision sensitive to systematic phonological properties that may or may not be specified in the spelling? Two experiments with Hangul, the alphabetic orthography of Korea, were directed at the effects of the phonological process of assimilation whereby one articulation changes to conform…

  8. At first glance, transparency enhances assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A.R.; Weert, C.M.M. de; Lier, R.J. van

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of transparency, perceptual grouping, and presentation time on perceived lightness. Both transparency and perceptual grouping have been found to result in assimilation effects, but only for ambiguous stimulus displays and with specific attentional instructions. By varying th

  9. Context effect in assimilation and contrast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Koning, A.R.; Lier, R.J. van

    2005-01-01

    We have systematically studied the change of lightness appearance in an ambiguous visual pattern. Fuchs (1923 Zeitschrift für Psychologie 92 249 - 325) found that differently coloured parts assimilate, whereas Agostini et al (1993 Perception 22 263 - 272) described the opposite effect: contrast betw

  10. Data Assimilation With Regional Lagrangian Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    Journal of Marine Systems . RESULTS We are able to fit the inviscid Lagrangian model with synthetic Lagrangian data for short periods of time (1-2 days...Mead and A.F. Bennett, 1999. Towards regional assimilation of data: The Lagrangian form of the reduced gravity model and its inverse, (submitted), Journal of Marine Systems .

  11. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN YueQi; ZHANG YaoCun; WANG YunFeng; YE Song; FANG HanXian

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H∞ filter" is Introduced based on H∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the assimilation capability of Monte Carlo H= filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations respectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustnesa than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  12. Ensemble Assimilation of Nonconventional Observations for Nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    microphysical fields (qc - cloud liquid water mixing ratio, qi – cloud ice mixing ratio, qr – rain water mixing ratio, qs – snow ice mixing ratio, and qg...L. Wei, W. Gu, J. Gong , and Q. Zhao, 2010: A 3.5-dimensional Variational Method for Doppler Radar Data Assimilation and Its Application to

  13. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  14. Lack of malate valve capacities lead to improved N-assimilation and growth in transgenic A. thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Jennifer; Scheibe, Renate

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the relationship between malate valve capacities, N-assimilation, and energy metabolism. We used transgenic plants either lacking the chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase or mutants with a decreased transcript level of the plastid-localized NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Plants were grown on nitrate or ammonium, respectively, as the sole N-source and transcripts were analyzed by qRT-PCR. We could show that the lack of malate valve capacities enhances N-assimilation and plastidial glycolysis by increasing transcript levels of Fd-GOGATs or NADH-GOGAT and plastidic NAD-GAPDHs (GapCps), respectively. Based on our results, we conclude that the lack of malate valve capacities is balanced by an increase of the activity of plastid-localized glycolysis in order to cover the high demand for plastidial ATP, stressing the importance of the plastids for energy metabolism in plant cells.

  15. Characterization of the rat oral microbiome and the effects of dietary nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Luk, Berkley; Cron, Stanley; Kusic, Lenka; McCue, Tyler; Bauch, Tonya; Kaplan, Heidi; Tribble, Gena; Petrosino, Joseph F; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-12-01

    The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway to nitric oxide (NO) production is a symbiotic pathway in mammals that is dependent on nitrate reducing oral commensal bacteria. Studies suggest that by contributing NO to the mammalian host, the oral microbiome helps maintain cardiovascular health. To begin to understand how changes in oral microbiota affect physiological functions such as blood pressure, we have characterized the Wistar rat nitrate reducing oral microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analysis we compare the native Wistar rat tongue microbiome to that of healthy humans and to that of rats with sodium nitrate and chlorhexidine mouthwash treatments. We demonstrate that the rat tongue microbiome is less diverse than the human tongue microbiome, but that the physiological activity is comparable, as sodium nitrate supplementation significantly lowered diastolic blood pressure in Wistar rats and also lowers blood pressure (diastolic and systolic) in humans. We also show for the first time that sodium nitrate supplementation alters the abundance of specific bacterial species on the tongue. Our results suggest that the changes in oral nitrate reducing bacteria may affect nitric oxide availability and physiological functions such as blood pressure. Understanding individual changes in human oral microbiome may offer novel dietary approaches to restore NO availability and blood pressure.

  16. Influence of dietary nitrate on the physiological determinants of exercise performance: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew M

    2014-09-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation, usually in the form of beetroot juice, has been heralded as a possible new ergogenic aid for sport and exercise performance. Early studies in recreationally active participants indicated that nitrate ingestion significantly reduces the O2 cost of submaximal exercise and improves performance during high-intensity endurance exercise. Subsequent studies have begun to address the physiological mechanisms underpinning these observations and to investigate the human populations in whom, and the exercise conditions (high- vs. low-intensity, long- vs. short-duration, continuous vs. intermittent, normoxic vs. hypoxic) under which, nitrate supplementation may be beneficial. Moreover, the optimal nitrate loading regimen in terms of nitrate dose and duration of supplementation has been explored. Depending on these factors, nitrate supplementation has been shown to exert physiological effects that could be conducive to exercise performance enhancement, at least in recreationally active or sub-élite athletes. This article provides a "state-of-the-art" review of the literature pertinent to the evaluation of the efficacy of nitrate supplementation in altering the physiological determinants of sport and exercise performance.

  17. Microbial and biogeochemical responses to projected future nitrate enrichment in the California upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal California is a dynamic upwelling region where nitrogen (N and iron (Fe can both limit productivity and influence biogeochemistry over different spatial and temporal scales. With global change, the flux of nitrate from upwelling is expected to increase over the next century, potentially driving additional oceanic regions toward Fe limitation. In this study we explored the effect of changes in Fe/N ratio on native phytoplankton from five currently Fe-replete sites near the major California upwelling centers at Bodega Bay and Monterey Bay using nutrient addition incubation experiments. Despite the high nitrate levels (13-30 M in the upwelled water, phytoplankton at three of the five sites showed increased growth when 10 M nitrate was added. None of the sites showed enhanced growth following addition of 10 nM Fe. Nitrate additions favored slow sinking single-celled diatoms over faster sinking chain-forming diatoms, suggesting that future increases in nitrate flux could affect carbon and silicate export and alter grazer populations. In particular, solitary cells of Cylindrotheca were more abundant than the toxin-producing genus Pseudonitzschia following nitrate addition. These responses suggest the biogeochemistry of coastal California could change in response to future increases in nitrate, and multiple stressors like ocean acidification and hypoxia may further result in ecosystem shifts.

  18. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  19. A flexible Open Data Assimilation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Nils; Ridler, Marc E.; Altaf, Umer; Madsen, Henrik; Heemink, Arnold; Dijkzeul, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time hydrological forecasts are essential for protection against water-related hazards, operation of infrastructure, and water resources management. Recent advances in radar rainfall estimation and forecasting, numerical weather predictions, satellite and in-situ monitoring, and faster computing facilities are opening up new opportunities in real-time hydrological forecasting. More effective use of the different information sources via data assimilation will provide the basis for producing more accurate and more reliable forecasts. In this regard, development and implementation of robust and computationally efficient data assimilation algorithms that are feasible for real-time applications remains one of the key challenges. The implementation of data assimilation techniques is traditionally in a model specific form. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to have in-depth knowledge of the numerical core computations and it does not allow to freely experiment with data assimilation algorithms and measurement sources without the need of additional programming. We present a more flexible approach to setup a forecasting system. The OpenDA data assimilation framework contains many state of the art data assimilation algorithms to easily set up a forecasting system. The setup of the framework allows users to select and experiment with various algorithms. OpenDA defines an interface between model and data assimilation algorithms. This interface only needs to be implemented once for a particular model. The OpenDA model interface is already implemented for various models. Besides these models it is very easy to couple models that are already implementing the Open Model Interface (OpenMI) to OpenDA using the generic OpenMI-OpenDA coupler. Using a synthetic test case we demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach using OpenMI and OpenDA. We use the MIKE SHE distributed and integrated hydrological modeling system to demonstrate how

  20. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  1. OpenDA-NEMO framework for ocean data assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Velzen, C.; Altaf, M.U.; Verlaan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Data assimilation methods provide a means to handle the modeling errors and uncertainties in sophisticated ocean models. In this study, we have created an OpenDA-NEMO framework unlocking the data assimilation tools available in OpenDA for use with NEMO models. This includes data assimilation methods

  2. Poplar trees for phytoremediation of high levels of nitrate and applications in bioenergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rodríguez, Vanessa; García-Gutiérrez, Angel; Canales, Javier; Cañas, Rafael A; Kirby, Edward G; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of high amounts of nitrate fertilizers for crop yield leads to nitrate pollution of ground and surface waters. In this study, we report the assimilation and utilization of nitrate luxuriant levels, 20 times more than the highest N fertilizer application in Europe, by transgenic poplars overexpressing a cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1). In comparison with the wild-type controls, transgenic plants grown under high N levels exhibited increased biomass (171.6%) and accumulated higher levels of proteins, chlorophylls and total sugars such as glucose, fructose and sucrose. These plants also exhibited greater nitrogen-use efficiency particularly in young leaves, suggesting that they are able to translocate most of the resources to the above-ground part of the plant to produce biomass. The transgenic poplar transcriptome was greatly affected in response to N availability with 1237 genes differentially regulated in high N, while only 632 genes were differentially expressed in untransformed plants. Many of these genes are essential in the adaptation and response against N excess and include those involved in photosynthesis, cell wall formation and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Cellulose production in the transgenic plants was fivefold higher than in control plants, indicating that transgenic poplars represent a potential feedstock for applications in bioenergy. In conclusion, our results show that GS transgenic poplars can be used not only for improving growth and biomass production but also as an important resource for potential phytoremediation of nitrate pollution.

  3. Direct assimilation of satellite radiance data in GRAPES variational assimilation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU GuoFu; XUE JiShan; ZHANG Hua; LIU ZhiQuan; ZHUANG ShiYu; HUANG LiPing; DONG PeiMing

    2008-01-01

    Variational method is capable of dealing with observations that have a complicated nonlinear relation with model variables representative of the atmospheric state, and so make it possible to directly as-similate such measured variables as satellite radiance, which have a nonlinear relation with the model variables. Assimilation of any type of observations requires a corresponding observation operator, which establishes a specific mapping from the space of the model state to the space of observation. This paper presents in detail how the direct assimilation of real satellite radiance data is implemented in the GRAPES-3DVar analysis system. It focuses on all the components of the observation operator for direct assimilation of real satellite radiance data, including a spatial interpolation operator that trans-forms variables from model grid points to observation locations, a physical transformation from model variables to observed elements with different choices of model variables, and a data quality control. Assimilation experiments, using satellite radiances such as NOAA17 AMSU-A and AMSU-B (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit), are carried out with two different schemes. The results from these experi-ments can be physically understood and clearly reflect a rational effect of direct assimilation of satellite radiance data in GRAPES-3DVar analysis system.

  4. Temporary storage or permanent removal? The division of nitrogen between biotic assimilation and denitrification in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G I Payne

    Full Text Available The long-term efficacy of stormwater treatment systems requires continuous pollutant removal without substantial re-release. Hence, the division of incoming pollutants between temporary and permanent removal pathways is fundamental. This is pertinent to nitrogen, a critical water body pollutant, which on a broad level may be assimilated by plants or microbes and temporarily stored, or transformed by bacteria to gaseous forms and permanently lost via denitrification. Biofiltration systems have demonstrated effective removal of nitrogen from urban stormwater runoff, but to date studies have been limited to a 'black-box' approach. The lack of understanding on internal nitrogen processes constrains future design and threatens the reliability of long-term system performance. While nitrogen processes have been thoroughly studied in other environments, including wastewater treatment wetlands, biofiltration systems differ fundamentally in design and the composition and hydrology of stormwater inflows, with intermittent inundation and prolonged dry periods. Two mesocosm experiments were conducted to investigate biofilter nitrogen processes using the stable isotope tracer 15NO3(- (nitrate over the course of one inflow event. The immediate partitioning of 15NO3(- between biotic assimilation and denitrification were investigated for a range of different inflow concentrations and plant species. Assimilation was the primary fate for NO3(- under typical stormwater concentrations (∼1-2 mg N/L, contributing an average 89-99% of 15NO3(- processing in biofilter columns containing the most effective plant species, while only 0-3% was denitrified and 0-8% remained in the pore water. Denitrification played a greater role for columns containing less effective species, processing up to 8% of 15NO3(-, and increased further with nitrate loading. This study uniquely applied isotope tracing to biofiltration systems and revealed the dominance of assimilation in stormwater

  5. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II-oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer eMIOT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is however thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had however never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidences of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasm encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a strategy of survival in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern

  6. Characteristic strategy of assimilation of various saccharides by Clostridium cellulovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takako; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans can effectively assimilate not only cellulose but also hemicellulose by producing cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes. However, little is known about how C. cellulovorans assimilates various saccharides in media containing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. In this research, we investigated the property of saccharide incorporation and assimilation by C. cellulovorans. Faster growth in media containing xylan and cellulose was achieved by switching polysaccharides, in which xylan was first assimilated, followed by cellulose. Furthermore, the presence of polysaccharides that can be easily degraded might increase the assimilation rate of lignocellulose by promoting growth. These properties of C. cellulovorans could be suitable for the effective utilization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Reviews of Nitrate Metabolism in Coffee Plants%咖啡硝态氮代谢研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林兴军; 陈鹏; 孙燕; 黄丽芳; 董云萍

    2015-01-01

    咖啡是一种对氮需求量高的作物,氮的吸收、同化对咖啡生长、发育和产量有重要的影响。进入植物体内的硝态氮只有在转化为铵态氮后才能被植物直接利用,这一代谢过程受外界光照、树龄、土壤pH值等因素的影响。综述近些年来有关环境因素对咖啡硝态氮代谢方面影响的研究进展,并讨论叶片和根系硝态氮代谢的差异以及根系硝态氮吸收的生理意义,为进一步开展咖啡施肥技术研究提供依据。%Coffee plants are highly N-demanding plants. Nitrogen assimilation is a vital process for plant growth, directly responsible for crop biomass production and grain yields. Within the plant, nitrate must be first reduced to ammonium before being assimilated into amino acids, the metabolism influenced by factors such as light, plant age, soil pH value.In this review, in order to provide the basis for the further study on the coffee fertilization technology, we summarize the influence of different factor on nitrate metabolism, and discuss the difference of nitrate metabolism between leaves and roots and the physiological significance of root nitrate assimilation.

  8. Gallium nitrate regulates rat osteoblast expression of osteocalcin protein and mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidon, P T; Salvatori, R; Bockman, R S

    1993-01-01

    Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, has been found to be clinically effective for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption in cancer-related hypercalcemia and Paget's disease. Here we report the effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein levels on the rat osteoblast-like cell line ROS 17/2.8. Gallium nitrate reduced both constitutive and vitamin D3-stimulated osteocalcin protein levels in culture medium by one-half and osteocalcin mRNA levels to one-third to one-tenth of control. Gallium nitrate also inhibited vitamin D3 stimulation of osteocalcin and osteopontin mRNA levels but did not affect constitutive osteopontin mRNA levels. Among several different metals examined, gallium was unique in its ability to reduce osteocalcin mRNA levels without decreasing levels of other mRNAs synthesized by ROS 17/2.8 cells. The effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein synthesis mimic those seen when ROS 17/2.8 cells are exposed to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1); however, TGF-beta 1 was not detected in gallium nitrate-treated ROS 17/2.8 cell media. Use of the RNA polymerase II inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that gallium nitrate did not alter the stability of osteocalcin mRNA. Transient transfection assays using the rat osteocalcin promoter linked to the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase indicated that gallium nitrate blocked reporter gene expression stimulated by the osteocalcin promoter. This is the first reported effect of gallium nitrate on isolated osteoblast cells.

  9. Interaction of neodymium nitrate with rubidium and cesium nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodkin, A.K.; Odinets, Z.K.; S' ' edina, T.V.; Ivanova, T.N. (Universitet Druzhby Narodov, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-12-01

    The Rb/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (1) and Cs/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (2) new complexes are prepared. The crystals 1 are isotropic, of cubic crystal system, Ng=1.570+-0.002; 2 - Ng=1.582+-0.002; Csub(Np)=0-9 degrees, of low crystal system (syngony). The bands of coordinated nitrate group, the ..delta nu..=..nu../sub 4/(B/sub 2/)-..nu../sub 1/(A/sub 1/) splitting value is respectively equal to 225 and 230 cm/sup -1/ are present in the infrared absorption spectra of the compounds. The interplane distances and corresponding intensities for the 1, 2 and hexahydrate of neodymium nitrate are determined. Derivatograms of the compounds are recorded, the final products of the thermolysis are correspondingly RbNdO/sub 2/ and Nd/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  10. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  11. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  12. KINETICS STUDY ON NITRATION OF METHYL RICINOLEATE

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Abdullah; Triyono, Triyono; Trisunaryanti, Wega; Haryadi, Winarto

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics parameter values of methyl ricinoleate nitration (rate constant, reaction order and the rate of reaction) have been determined. Nitration was carried out with both concentrations of HNO3 and acetic anhydride in excess to the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Thus, the kinetics parameter value was only affected by the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Based on kinetic study conducted, it could be concluded that the nitration follows pseudo first-order, and the reaction rate for ...

  13. Nitrate-Nitrogen, Landuse/Landcover, and Soil Drainage Associations at Multiple Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing non–point-source pollution of water requires knowledge of land use/land cover (LULC) influences at altering watershed scales. To gain improved understanding of relationships among LULC, soil drainage, and dissolved nitrate-N dynamics within the Calapooia River Basin in w...

  14. Helioseismic Data Assimilation in Solar Dynamo Models

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H

    2008-01-01

    An essential ingredient in kinematic dynamo models is the velocity field within the solar convection zone. In particular, the differential rotation is now well constrained by helioseismic observations. Helioseismology also gives us information about the depth-dependence of the meridional circulation in the near-surface layers. The typical velocity inputs used in solar dynamo models, however, continue to be an analytic fit to the observed differential rotation and a theoretically constructed meridional flow profile that matches only the peak flow speed at the surface. Here we take the first steps towards realistic helioseismic data assimilation, by presenting methodologies for constructing differential rotation and meridional circulation profiles that more closely conform to the observational constraints currently available. We also present simulations driven by the assimilated rotation and four plausible profiles for the internal meridional circulation -- all of which match the helioseismically inferred near-...

  15. Probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In this book the authors describe the principles and methods behind probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation. Instead of focusing on particular application areas, the authors adopt a general dynamical systems approach, with a profusion of low-dimensional, discrete-time numerical examples designed to build intuition about the subject. Part I explains the mathematical framework of ensemble-based probabilistic forecasting and uncertainty quantification. Part II is devoted to Bayesian filtering algorithms, from classical data assimilation algorithms such as the Kalman filter, variational techniques, and sequential Monte Carlo methods, through to more recent developments such as the ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble transform filters. The McKean approach to sequential filtering in combination with coupling of measures serves as a unifying mathematical framework throughout Part II. Assuming only some basic familiarity with probability, this book is an ideal introduction for graduate students in ap...

  16. Monitoring groundwater drought with GRACE data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Getirana, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater drought is a distinct class of drought, not a sub-class of meteorological, agricultural and hydrological drought and has profound impacts on natural environments and societies. Due to a deficiency of in situ measurements, we developed a groundwater drought indicator using groundwater change estimates derived by assimilating GRACE derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomalies into the NASA Catchment land surface model. Data assimilation enables spatial and temporal downscaling of coarse GRACE TWS observations (monthly and ~150,000 km2 effective spatial resolution) and extrapolation to near-real time. In this talk, we will present our latest progress on using GRACE satellite data for groundwater drought monitoring in the U.S. and globally. Characteristics of this groundwater drought indicator will be discussed, including its relationship with other types of drought and how they are influenced by model physics and climate conditions. Results are evaluated using in situ groundwater observations.

  17. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  18. Nitration of Phenol Catalyzed by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Rong-ji; HUANG Hui; TONG Bin; XIAO Sheng-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase, an acidic peroxidase from the horseradish, is one of the most important enzymes as analytical reagent.The enzymatic nitration of phenol by oxidation of nitrite was studied using horseradish peroxidase in the presence of H2O2.The results showed that nitration occur at 2- and 4- positions of phenol.There were also minor products of hydroquinone and catechol.The influence of various reaction parameters, including pH, organic solvent, and concentration of H2O2, on nitration products were discussed.The best nitration pH was 7.0, and H2O2 should be added to the reaction mixture slowly.

  19. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  20. Ocean Data Assimilation for Coupled Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    MODAS) developed at NRL Stennis, CODA now assimilates altimeter sea surface height ( SSH ) data, in the form of MODAS synthetic temperature and...The residual errors are time and space dependent and residual errors are at a minimum where the relationship between SSH , SST and temperature at depth...is well-defined (e.g. western boundary currents). In a CODA analysis, residual errors are combined with errors in the SST and SSH predictor fields to

  1. Variational Data Assimilation for the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a mixture of fore- cast and analysis error. Forecast errors result from initial condition, model, and atmospheric forcing deficiencies, while...are not lost . Second, when ensemble variances are imperfect the optimal error variance estimate is a linear combination of a climatological...Res 105:16803-16821 Martin MJ, Hines A, Bell MJ (2007) Data assimilation in the FOAM operational short-range ocean forecasting system: a

  2. Targeting iron assimilation to develop new antibacterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Timothy L.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Since the first application of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, the development and spread of resistance has been a persistent threat. An ever-evolving pipeline of next-generation therapeutics is required for modern medicine to remain one step ahead of pathogens. Areas covered in this review This review describes recent efforts to develop drugs that interrupt the assimilation of iron by bacteria, a process that is vital to cellular homeostasis and is not currently targeted by antibiotics used in the clinic. We cover the mechanisms through which bacteria acquire iron for their environment and detail efforts to intervene in these processes with small molecule inhibitors that target key steps in these pathways, with a special emphasis on recent advances published during the 2010–2012 period. Expert Opinion For decades, the routes used by bacteria to assimilate iron from host and environmental settings have been the subject of intense study. While numerous investigations have identified inhibitors of these pathways, many have stopped short of translating the in vitro results to in vivo proof of concept experiments. Extension of preliminary findings in this manner to validate the clinical potential of iron assimilation pathways for therapeutic development will significantly increase the impact of the field. PMID:22812521

  3. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H ∞ filter" is introduced based on H ∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the as- similation capability of Monte Carlo H ∞ filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations re- spectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H ∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustness than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  4. Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-05-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMÉE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets.The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: 1)collection of observational data; 2) analysis and interpretation; 3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; 4) quality control and re-analysis; and 5) data archiving and software documentation.The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement.Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include 1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, 2) diagnosis and theorectical studies, and 3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  5. Effects of Cerium Nitrate on Expression of CaM Ⅰ and PMCA Ca2+-ATPase mRNA in Rat Liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维东; 王艇; 刘洁生; 雷衡毅; 杨燕生

    2001-01-01

    The effect of cerium nitrate on expression of CaM Ⅰ and PMCA1b in rat liver was studied by means of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The result shows that neither a high dose (50 mg*kg-1) nor a low dose (1 mg*kg-1) of cerium nitrate induces any alterations of expression of CaM Ⅰ and PMCA 1b mRNA after recurrent intraperitoneal injection of cerium nitrate, which suggests that effect of cerium nitrate on CaM and Ca2+-ATPase might be at posttranscription level.

  6. A pilot study about speech changes after partial Tucker's laryngectomy: the reduction of regressive voicing assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, C; Lagier, A; Vercasson, C; Santini, L; Dessi, P; Giovanni, A; Fakhry, N

    2015-12-01

    Partial frontolateral laryngectomy (PL) is performed to remove larynx tumor while preserving its main functions. So far, the speech changes induced by difficulties of voicing and the alterations to the vocal tract due to PL have been seldom addressed. The goal of our study was to make an acoustic analysis of regressive voicing assimilation (RVA) among patients after PL and to study the relationship with rates of speech. A retrospective study was conducted from January to April 2013. 11 subjects treated by partial frontolateral laryngectomy, and ten healthy subjects were included. Functional recordings of voice were analyzed and compared. For assimilation sequences we found a significant modification of voicing ratio in healthy subjects (p vowel duration is significantly modified only for healthy subjects. For all subjects (PL patients and healthy) the duration of C1 consonant was not significantly modified. Our results highlight the presence of RVA in healthy subjects, but also in PL patients in the rapid speaking mode.

  7. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in Glacial Acetic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHABUL A MONDAL; DBASHIS MANDAL; KANCHAN MITRA

    2017-01-01

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  8. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  9. Nitrate removal under different ecological remediation measures in Taihu Lake: a 15N mass-balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dandan; Li, Zhengkui; Zhang, Wanguang

    2014-12-01

    Ecological remediation is an important measure for the protection of lake water quality in removing nutrients, such as nitrate (NO3 (-)). In this study, four bioremediation processes (bare sediment, immobilized nitrogen cycling bacteria (INCB) added, Elodea nuttallii added, E. nuttallii-INCB assemblage) were operated at a lab to elucidate the effect of macrophyte appearance and INCB addition on NO3 (-) removal and achieve the optimal processes for biomediation. (15) N-NO3 solution was added to microcosms to identify the key nitrogen transformation processes responsible for NO3 (-) removal. Results showed that nitrate removal was significantly enhanced after the addition of INCB and E. nuttallii. In the treatments with INCB added, E. nuttallii added, and INCB and E. nuttallii-INCB assemblage, nitrate removal ratio achieved 94.74, 98.76, and 99.15 %, respectively. In contrast, only 23.47 % added nitrate was removed in the control. Plant uptake and denitrification played an important role in nitrogen removal. The water quality was substantially improved by the addition of INCB and macrophyte that can accelerate denitrification and promote nitrogen assimilation of plants. The results indicated that plant uptake and microbial denitrification were key processes for nitrate removal.

  10. Satellite radiance data assimilation for rainfall prediction in Java Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagita, Novvria; Hidayati, Rini; Hidayat, Rahmat; Gustari, Indra

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the influence of satellite radiance data assimilation for predicting two days of heavy rainfall in the Java region. The first case occurred from 22 to 23 on January 2015 while the second case occurred from 1 to 2 on February 2015. The analysis examined before and after data assimilation in the two cases study. The Global Forecast System (GFS) data were used as initial condition which was assimilated with several data such as surface observation data, radiance data from AMSUA sensor, radiance data from HIRS sensor, and radiance data from MHS sensor. Weather Research and Forecasting Data Assimilation (WRFDA) is a tool which is used in this study for assimilating process with Three Dimensional Variation (3D-Var) method. The Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) skill was used to evaluate influence data assimilation for rainfall prediction. The result of the study obtained different rainfall prediction with different data assimilation. In general, the surface observation data assimilation has lower QPF skill than the satellite radiance data assimilation. Even thought radiance data assimilation has slightly contribution on rainfall prediction, but it gave better accuracy on rainfall prediction for two heavy rainfall cases.

  11. Evaluation of nitrates in albanian wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariola Morina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are important compounds in nature but not desirable if they are present in wine at increased amount. The high level of nitrate is attributed to the use of nitrogen fertilizers in the vineyards. Method of the reactive Gries I and Gries II was used for the determination of nitrates in wine. There were analyzed 45 white wines and 55 red wines produced in 2008 – 2010, as well as wines produced from Albanian grape varieties Shesh i Bardhë and Shesh i Zi in 2009 and 2010, as an authentic wines evidence with denominated origin. From the results of analyses was observed that, in 51 % of white wines was found that the content of nitrates were less than 5 mg/l, in 46% of them the nitrates level goes up to 10 mg/l and only in 3 % of them the amount of nitrates is up to 12 mg/l. None of white wine samples have the content of nitrates over 20 mg/l. In this case there is no doubt for water addition during wine preparation. In regards of red wines, in 34% of them the amount of nitrates is up to 5 mg/l, in 30% of them up to 10 mg/l, while in 26% of them the amount of nitrates is 20 mg/l. Only 10 % of red wines have nitrates content over 20 mg/l which raise dubiety for falsified wines where water and sugar is added in the red marc. The level of nitrates in wines with denominated origin was under 20 mg/L.

  12. Nitrate dual isotopic composition in the northern South China Sea and neighboring West Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Xu, M.; Wu, Y.; Dai, M.; Kao, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) were used to diagnose nitrate dynamics and the origins of water masses in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and West Philippine Sea (WPS) where water exchanges via the Luzon Strait at different depths. In the SCS, 1-3‰ greater upward increase in δ18ONO3 relative to corresponding δ15NNO3 was just observed in the lower euphotic zone (EZ), indicating a rapid internal cycle of nitrate assimilation and remineralization. Much lower nitrate concentration in the EZ of WPS does not allow us to measure its dual isotopes. From 500 m deep to the base of EZ in the WPS, non-proportional decreases in δ15NNO3 (from 6.4‰ to 2.1-2.6‰) and δ18ONO3 (from 3.0‰ to 1.1‰) accompanying with elevated N:P ratio anomalies (N* from -1.2 μM up to 2 μM), suggest the accumulation of atmospheric-derived N (e.g. N2 fixation and/or N deposition). This allochthonous N signal cumulated in the subsurface of WPS may regulate the δ15NNO3 in the SCS subsurface due to seasonal Kuroshio intrusion, which could supply isotopically light nitrate as newly fixed N source to the SCS. The higher (~0.5‰) δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values, associated with lower N* were detected in the WPS intermediate water (WPS-IW, σθ = 26.5~27.1 kg m-3) around depth of 600-800 m (especially at a southern site) when compared to those of the conventional water source coming from North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). By combining nitrate concentration, N* and δ15NNO3 as constraints, we propose that an additional southerly source other than NPIW may feed into the WPS-IW. On the other hand, the SCS intermediate water (SCS-IW, ~400-700 m), which supposedly sourced from WPS-IW along similar isopycnal levels, showed ~1‰ lower δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values. This reduction in nitrate duel isotopes indicates intense diapycnal mixing primarily due to basin-wide upwelling in the SCS interior. This is the first hand data in the SCS for deep profiles

  13. Gallium nitrate: effects on cartilage during limb regeneration in the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassava, Roy A; Mendenhall, Luciara; Apseloff, Glen; Gerber, Nicholas

    2002-09-01

    Gallium nitrate, a drug shown to have efficacy in Paget's disease of bone, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and a variety of experimental autoimmune diseases, also inhibits the growth of some types of cancer. We examined dose and timing of administration of gallium nitrate on limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. Administered by intraperitoneal injection, gallium nitrate inhibited limb regeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Gallium nitrate initially suppressed epithelial wound healing and subsequently distorted both anterior-posterior and proximo-distal chondrogenic patterns. Gallium nitrate given at three days after amputation severely inhibited regeneration at high doses (6.25 mg/axolotl) and altered the normal patterning of the regenerates at low doses (3.75 mg/axolotl). Administration of 6.25 mg of gallium nitrate at four or 14 days prior to amputation also inhibited regeneration. In amputated limbs of gallium-treated axolotls, the chondrocytes were lost from inside the radius/ulna. Limbs that regenerated after gallium treatment was terminated showed blastema formation preferentially over the ulna. New cartilage of the regenerate often attached to the sides of the existing radius/ulna proximally into the stump and less so to the distal cut ends. J. Exp. Zool. 293:384-394, 2002.

  14. Beban Pencemar Dan Kapasitas Asimilasi Amonium dan Nitrat Saat Pucak Musim Barat di Teluk Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulianto Suteja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jakarta Bay is a bay that has an important role in Jakarta, but the activity in this area lead to the potential for pollution mainly ammonium and nitrate. Pollution peaks generally occur during the rainy season (west monsoon. Pollution that enters the bay can be neutralized naturally by water as long as the amount does not exceed the asimilation capacity. This study aims to calculate the total input (load, assimilation capacity, and residence time of ammonium and nitrate in Jakarta Bay in the rainy season. Data from this study is derived from secondary data. For the total input of pollutants are calculated from the input stream, the atmosphere and the boundary. From the research found that the Jakarta Bay had a total load of pollutants NH4 at 115.8 x 109 mmol N /month and NO3 46.5 x 109 mmol N/month. The biggest contributor to the pollution comes from the boundary NH4 is 56.9% and NO3 from the river 70.1%. Load from Citarum river for NH4 around 3.8 x 1010 mmol N/month and NO3 around 3.0 x 1010 mmol N/month higher than Marunda, Priok and Angke the rivers. Assimilation capacity of Jakarta bay  for NH4 around 25.7 x 109 mmol N /month and NO3 of 24.1 x 109 mmol N /month. It shows the total load of pollutants entering the Jakarta Bay is greater than the assimilation capacity. The residence time of water in the Bay of Jakarta is 13.3 days longer than the residence time of NH4 and NO3 which were only 8.6 and 9.2 days.

  15. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  16. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  17. Isotopic and Chemical Analysis of Nitrate Source and Cycling in the San Joaquin River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Bemis, B.; Bergamaschi, B.; Kratzer, C.; Dileanis, P.; Erickson, D.; Avery, E.; Paxton, K.

    2001-12-01

    concentrations appears to be a function of dilution/evaporation, as river stage varied. For the minority of samples that fell below the dilution/evaporation trend (i.e. those with nitrate concentrations lower than predicted), delta 15N values indicated assimilation rather than denitrification as the cause of the lower concentration. With one notable exception, the pattern of delta 15N of the POM samples over time generally mirrored that of the RV samples and showed no correlation with nitrate or chlorophyll-a concentrations. This relationship indicates (1) that nitrate was an important and probably the primary nutrient for the plankton and (2) that nitrate concentrations remained too high for the delta 15N to be appreciably affected by phytoplankton growth. The delta 15N values of the RV samples averaged +14.4 per mil. The fairly high nitrate concentrations and lack of evidence for denitrification in the river suggests that the delta 15N values are a source signature. Although synthetic fertilizers are a likely source of nitrate in the area, the relatively high delta 15N values are consistent with a significant fraction originating from animal waste or sewage.

  18. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  19. 4-Methoxy-N,N′-diphenylbenzamidinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata S. Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium nitrate, C20H19N2O+·NO3−, comprises two independent N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium cations and two nitrate anions. The crystal structure features N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O contacts responsible for the packing.

  20. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  1. Ammonium formation and assimilation in P(SARK)∷IPT tobacco transgenic plants under low N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Wilhelmi, María del Mar; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Eva; Rosales, Miguel Angel; Blasco, Begoña; Rios, Juan Jose; Romero, Luis; Blumwald, Eduardo; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2012-01-15

    Wild Type (WT) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing isopentenyltransferase (IPT), a gene encoding the enzyme regulating the rate-limiting step in cytokinins (CKs) synthesis, were grown under limited nitrogen (N) conditions. We analyzed nitrogen forms, nitrogen metabolism related-enzymes, amino acids and photorespiration related-enzymes in WT and P(SARK)∷IPT tobacco plants. Our results indicate that the WT plants subjected to N deficiency displayed reduced nitrate (NO₃⁻) assimilation. However, an increase in the production of ammonium (NH₄⁺), by the degradation of proteins and photorespiration led to an increase in the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) cycle in WT plants. In these plants, the amounts of amino acids decreased with N deficiency, although the relative amounts of glutamate and glutamine increased with N deficiency. Although the transgenic plants expressing P(SARK)∷IPT and growing under suboptimal N conditions displayed a significant decline in the N forms in the leaf, they maintained the GS/GOGAT cycle at control levels. Our results suggest that, under N deficiency, CKs prevented the generation and assimilation of NH₄⁺ by increasing such processes as photorespiration, protein degradation, the GS/GOGAT cycle, and the formation of glutamine.

  2. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  3. Nitrogen assimilation system in maize is regulated by developmental and tissue-specific mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Plett, Darren

    2016-08-10

    Key message: We found metabolites, enzyme activities and enzyme transcript abundances vary significantly across the maize lifecycle, but weak correlation exists between the three groups. We identified putative genes regulating nitrate assimilation. Abstract: Progress in improving nitrogen (N) use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants has been hampered by the complexity of the N uptake and utilisation systems. To understand this complexity we measured the activities of seven enzymes and ten metabolites related to N metabolism in the leaf and root tissues of Gaspe Flint maize plants grown in 0.5 or 2.5 mM NO3 − throughout the lifecycle. The amino acids had remarkably similar profiles across the lifecycle except for transient responses, which only appeared in the leaves for aspartate or in the roots for asparagine, serine and glycine. The activities of the enzymes for N assimilation were also coordinated to a certain degree, most noticeably with a peak in root activity late in the lifecycle, but with wide variation in the activity levels over the course of development. We analysed the transcriptional data for gene sets encoding the measured enzymes and found that, unlike the enzyme activities, transcript levels of the corresponding genes did not exhibit the same coordination across the lifecycle and were only weakly correlated with the levels of various amino acids or individual enzyme activities. We identified gene sets which were correlated with the enzyme activity profiles, including seven genes located within previously known quantitative trait loci for enzyme activities and hypothesise that these genes are important for the regulation of enzyme activities. This work provides insights into the complexity of the N assimilation system throughout development and identifies candidate regulatory genes, which warrant further investigation in efforts to improve NUE in crop plants. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  4. Robust data assimilation using $L_1$ and Huber norms

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Vishwas; Sandu, Adrian; Ng, Michael; Nino-Ruiz, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Data assimilation is the process to fuse information from priors, observations of nature, and numerical models, in order to obtain best estimates of the parameters or state of a physical system of interest. Presence of large errors in some observational data, e.g., data collected from a faulty instrument, negatively affect the quality of the overall assimilation results. This work develops a systematic framework for robust data assimilation. The new algorithms continue to produce good analyse...

  5. Gallium nitrate inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating mesenchymal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A L; Ziecheck, W; Guidon, P; Doty, S B

    1993-02-01

    The effect of gallium nitrate on alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating chick limb-bud mesenchymal cell culture was monitored in order to gain insight into the observation that rachitic rats treated with gallium nitrate failed to show the expected increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Cultures maintained in media containing 15 microM gallium nitrate showed drastically decreased alkaline phosphatase activities in the absence of significant alterations in total protein synthesis and DNA content. However, addition of 15 microM gallium nitrate to cultures 18 h before assay for alkaline phosphatase activity had little effect. At the light microscopic and electron microscopic level, gallium-treated cultures differed morphologically from gallium-free cultures: with gallium present, there were fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes and cartilage nodules were flatter and further apart. Because of altered morphology, staining with an antibody against chick cartilage alkaline phosphatase appeared less extensive; however, all nodules stained equivalently relative to gallium-free controls. Histochemical staining for alkaline phosphatase activity was negative in gallium-treated cultures, demonstrating that the alkaline phosphatase protein present was not active. The defective alkaline phosphatase activity in cultures maintained in the presence of gallium was also evidenced when cultures were supplemented with the alkaline phosphatase substrate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta GP). The data presented suggest that gallium inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in this culture system and that gallium causes alterations in the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  6. Data assimilation techniques in modeling ocean processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Fernandes, A.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Nitrate NH4 Ammonium DON Dissolved organic Nitrogen There are different models used in the simulation studies of biogeochemical processes which link these state variables. For illustration, the flow diagram of Ken Denman's model is shown... and constant at large ones (QC). Other unlabelled fluxes are by default linear throughout their range. NO No Fig.(6.1) NPZ Model of Ken Denman. The main input of carbon to ocean carbon cycle described by the NPZ model (Fig.6...

  7. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  8. Data Assimilation Cycling for Weather Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This software package runs the atmospheric model MM5 in data assimilation cycling mode to produce an optimized weather analysis, including the ability to insert or adjust a hurricane vortex. The program runs MM5 through a cycle of short forecasts every three hours where the vortex is adjusted to match the observed hurricane location and storm intensity. This technique adjusts the surrounding environment so that the proper steering current and environmental shear are achieved. MM5cycle uses a Cressman analysis to blend observation into model fields to get a more accurate weather analysis. Quality control of observations is also done in every cycle to remove bad data that may contaminate the analysis. This technique can assimilate and propagate data in time from intermittent and infrequent observations while maintaining the atmospheric field in a dynamically balanced state. The software consists of a C-shell script (MM5cycle.driver) and three FORTRAN programs (splitMM5files.F, comRegrid.F, and insert_vortex.F), and are contained in the pre-processor component of MM5 called "Regridder." The model is first initialized with data from a global model such as the Global Forecast System (GFS), which also provides lateral boundary conditions. These data are separated into single-time files using splitMM5.F. The hurricane vortex is then bogussed in the correct location and with the correct wind field using insert_vortex.F. The modified initial and boundary conditions are then recombined into the model fields using comRegrid.F. The model then makes a three-hour forecast. The three-hour forecast data from MM5 now become the analysis for the next short forecast run, where the vortex will again be adjusted. The process repeats itself until the desired time of analysis is achieved. This code can also assimilate observations if desired.

  9. Variational data assimilation using targetted random walks

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, S. L.

    2011-02-15

    The variational approach to data assimilation is a widely used methodology for both online prediction and for reanalysis. In either of these scenarios, it can be important to assess uncertainties in the assimilated state. Ideally, it is desirable to have complete information concerning the Bayesian posterior distribution for unknown state given data. We show that complete computational probing of this posterior distribution is now within the reach in the offline situation. We introduce a Markov chain-Monte Carlo (MCMC) method which enables us to directly sample from the Bayesian posterior distribution on the unknown functions of interest given observations. Since we are aware that these methods are currently too computationally expensive to consider using in an online filtering scenario, we frame this in the context of offline reanalysis. Using a simple random walk-type MCMC method, we are able to characterize the posterior distribution using only evaluations of the forward model of the problem, and of the model and data mismatch. No adjoint model is required for the method we use; however, more sophisticated MCMC methods are available which exploit derivative information. For simplicity of exposition, we consider the problem of assimilating data, either Eulerian or Lagrangian, into a low Reynolds number flow in a two-dimensional periodic geometry. We will show that in many cases it is possible to recover the initial condition and model error (which we describe as unknown forcing to the model) from data, and that with increasing amounts of informative data, the uncertainty in our estimations reduces. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The effect of model errors in variational assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergen, Werner

    1992-08-01

    A linearized, one-dimensional shallow water model is used to investigate the effect of model errors in four-dimensional variational assimilation. A suitable initialization scheme for variational assimilation is proposed. Introducing deliberate phase speed errors in the model, the results from variational assimilation are compared to standard analysis/forecast cycle experiments. While the latter draws to the data and reflects the model errors only in the datavoid areas, variational assimilation with the model used as strong constraint is shown to distribute the model errors over the entire analysis domain. The implications for verification and diagnostics are discussed. Temporal weighting of the observations can reduce the errors towards the end of the assimilation period, but may deteriorate the subsequent forecasts. An extension to variational assimilation is proposed, which seeks not only to determine the initial state from the observations but also some of the tunable parameters of the model. The potentional usefulness of this approach for parameterization studies and for a separation of forecast errors into model- and analysis errors is discussed. Finally, variational assimilations with the model used as weak constraint are presented. While showing a good performance in the assimilation, forecasts can suffer severely if the extra term in the equations up to which the model is enforced are unable to compensate for the real model error. In the discussion, an overall appraisal of both assimilation methods is given.

  11. Application of altimetry data assimilation on mesoscale eddies simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscale eddy plays an important role in the ocean circulation. In order to improve the simulation accuracy of the mesoscale eddies, a three-dimensional variation (3DVAR) data assimilation system called Ocean Variational Analysis System (OVALS) is coupled with a POM model to simulate the mesoscale eddies in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. In this system, the sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) data by satellite altimeters are assimilated and translated into pseudo temperature and salinity (T-S) profile data. Then, these profile data are taken as observation data to be assimilated again and produce the three-dimensional analysis T-S field. According to the characteristics of mesoscale eddy, the most appropriate assimilation parameters are set up and testified in this system. A ten years mesoscale eddies simulation and comparison experiment is made, which includes two schemes: assimilation and non-assimilation. The results of comparison between two schemes and the observation show that the simulation accuracy of the assimilation scheme is much better than that of non-assimilation, which verified that the altimetry data assimilation method can improve the simulation accuracy of the mesoscale dramatically and indicates that it is possible to use this system on the forecast of mesoscale eddies in the future.

  12. On optimization of data assimilation in the HBM -circulation model

    OpenAIRE

    VÀhÀ-Piikkiö, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for optimizing the data assimilation system of the HIROMB-BOOS -model at the Finnish Meteorological Institute by finding an optimal time interval and an optimal grid for the data assimilation. This is needed to balance the extra time the data assimilation adds to the runtime of the model and the improved accuracy it provides. Data assimilation is the process of combining observations with a numerical model to improve the accuracy of the mod...

  13. An Ensemble Algorithm Based Component for Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Sun and Weijia Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic data assimilation is one of the most recent developments in geomagnetic studies. It combines geodynamo model outputs and surface geomagnetic observations to provide more accurate estimates of the core dynamic state and provide accurate geomagnetic secular variation forecasting. To facilitate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, we develop a stand-alone data assimilation component for the geomagnetic community. This component is used to calculate the forecast error covariance matrices and the gain matrix from a given geodynamo solution, which can then be used for sequential geomagnetic data assimilation. This component is very flexible and can be executed independently. It can also be easily integrated with arbitrary dynamo models.

  14. Aerodynamic Modeling with Heterogeneous Data Assimilation and Uncertainty Quantification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop an aerodynamic modeling tool that assimilates data from different sources and facilitates uncertainty quantification. The...

  15. Data assimilation for air quality models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    chemical and physical dynamics. Concentrations of atmospheric trace gases such as ozone, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide vary substantially in space and time, and this variation can be investigated by various methods including direct measurements, remote-sensing measurements and atmospheric chemistry......-dimensional optimal interpolation procedure (OI), an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), and a three-dimensional variational scheme (3D-var). The three assimilation procedures are described and tested. A multi-faceted approach is taken for the verification, using independent measurements from surface air...

  16. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs.

  17. 7. national sittings on household and assimilated wastes; 7. assises nationales des dechets menagers et assimiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This publication brings together several press releases written at the occasion of the 7. national sittings on household and assimilated wastes (Agen (France), September 10-11, 2002), by responsibles of national organizations, associations, companies and local authorities involved in the management and processing of municipal wastes. (J.S.)

  18. First assimilations of COSMIC radio occultation data into the Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Angling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground based measurements of slant total electron content (TEC can be assimilated into ionospheric models to produce 3-D representations of ionospheric electron density. The Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM has been developed for this purpose. Previous tests using EDAM and ground based data have demonstrated that the information on the vertical structure of the ionosphere is limited in this type of data. The launch of the COSMIC satellite constellation provides the opportunity to use radio occultation data which has more vertical information. EDAM assimilations have been run for three time periods representing quiet, moderate and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. For each run, three data sets have been ingested – only ground based data, only COSMIC data and both ground based and COSMIC data. The results from this preliminary study show that both ground and space based data are capable of improving the representation of the vertical structure of the ionosphere. However, the analysis is limited by the incomplete deployment of the COSMIC constellation and the use of auto-scaled ionosonde data. The first of these can be addressed by repeating this type of study once full deployment has been achieved. The latter requires the manual scaling of ionosonde data; ideally an agreed data set would be scaled and made available to the community to facilitate comparative testing of assimilative models.

  19. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  20. Cadmium accumulation retard activity of functional components of photo assimilation and growth of rice cultivars amended with vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) uptake mediated alterations in functional components of photo assimilation during conversion of cow dung and poultry cast to vermicompost were studied in two Indian rice cultivars; MO 16 and MTU 7029. It was found that higher amount of Cd accumulate in plants grown in soil amended with vermicompost which in turn damaged functional components in photo assimilation. Enhancement of root growth was recognized as reason for Cd accumulation. Metabolic alterations noticed among plants were not taken place during application of raw materials used for vermicomposting such as cow dung and poultry cast amendment. Rice varieties accumulated Cd differentially where MTU 7029 accumulated more Cd compare to MO 16. It was also noticed that existence of negative correlation between zinc status of the plant and Cd accumulation.

  1. Quality assessment and assimilation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR radiances into WRF assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Ojha, Satya P.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents an initial assessment of the quality of radiances measured from SAPHIR (Sounder for Probing Vertical Profiles of Humidity) on board Megha-Tropiques (Indo-French joint satellite), launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation on 12 October 2011. The radiances measured from SAPHIR are compared with those simulated by the radiative transfer model (RTM) using radiosondes measurements, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder retrievals, and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyzed fields over the Indian subcontinent, during January to November 2012. The radiances from SAPHIR are also compared with the similar measurements available from Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on board MetOp-A and NOAA-18/19 satellites, during January to November 2012. A limited comparison is also carried out between SAPHIR measured and the RTM computed radiances using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyzed fields, during May and November 2012. The comparison of SAPHIR measured radiances with RTM simulated and MHS observed radiances reveals that SAPHIR observations are of good quality. After the initial assessment of the quality of the SAPHIR radiances, these radiances have been assimilated within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational data assimilation system. Analysis/forecast cycling experiments with and without SAPHIR radiances are performed over the Indian region during the entire month of May 2012. The assimilation of SAPHIR radiances shows considerable improvements (with moisture analysis error reduction up to 30%) in the tropospheric analyses and forecast of moisture, temperature, and winds when compared to NCEP analyses and radiances measurement obtained from MHS, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A, and High Resolution Infrared Sounder. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiances also resulted in substantial improvement in the precipitation forecast skill when compared with satellite-derived rain. Overall

  2. Impact of Assimilation on Heavy Rainfall Simulations Using WRF Model: Sensitivity of Assimilation Results to Background Error Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, V.; Kantharao, B.

    2017-03-01

    Data assimilation is considered as one of the effective tools for improving forecast skill of mesoscale models. However, for optimum utilization and effective assimilation of observations, many factors need to be taken into account while designing data assimilation methodology. One of the critical components that determines the amount and propagation observation information into the analysis, is model background error statistics (BES). The objective of this study is to quantify how BES in data assimilation impacts on simulation of heavy rainfall events over a southern state in India, Karnataka. Simulations of 40 heavy rainfall events were carried out using Weather Research and Forecasting Model with and without data assimilation. The assimilation experiments were conducted using global and regional BES while the experiment with no assimilation was used as the baseline for assessing the impact of data assimilation. The simulated rainfall is verified against high-resolution rain-gage observations over Karnataka. Statistical evaluation using several accuracy and skill measures shows that data assimilation has improved the heavy rainfall simulation. Our results showed that the experiment using regional BES outperformed the one which used global BES. Critical thermo-dynamic variables conducive for heavy rainfall like convective available potential energy simulated using regional BES is more realistic compared to global BES. It is pointed out that these results have important practical implications in design of forecast platforms while decision-making during extreme weather events

  3. Field Detection of Chemical Assimilation in A Basaltic Lava Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S. P.; Williams, D. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies, including some completed by members of this team at the December 1974 lava flow, have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon and how pre-flow terrain can impact final channel morphology, but far fewer have focused on how the compositional characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was em-placed influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosi-ty, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied but less is known about the relationship between an older flow's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, mechanical erosion by flowing lava has been well-documented. Lava erosion by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves is also hypothesized to affect channel formation. However, there is only one previous field study that geochemically documents the process in recent basaltic flow systems.

  4. Sulfate assimilation mediates tellurite reduction and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Logg, Katarina; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sunnerhagen, Per; Käll, Mikael; Blomberg, Anders; Warringer, Jonas

    2010-10-01

    Despite a century of research and increasing environmental and human health concerns, the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of derivatives of the metalloid tellurium, Te, in particular the oxyanion tellurite, Te(IV), remains unsolved. Here, we provide an unbiased view of the mechanisms of tellurium metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring deviations in Te-related traits of a complete collection of gene knockout mutants. Reduction of Te(IV) and intracellular accumulation as metallic tellurium strongly correlated with loss of cellular fitness, suggesting that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity are causally linked. The sulfate assimilation pathway upstream of Met17, in particular, the sulfite reductase and its cofactor siroheme, was shown to be central to tellurite toxicity and its reduction to elemental tellurium. Gene knockout mutants with altered Te(IV) tolerance also showed a similar deviation in tolerance to both selenite and, interestingly, selenomethionine, suggesting that the toxicity of these agents stems from a common mechanism. We also show that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity in yeast is partially mediated via a mitochondrial respiratory mechanism that does not encompass the generation of substantial oxidative stress. The results reported here represent a robust base from which to attack the mechanistic details of Te(IV) toxicity and reduction in a eukaryotic organism.

  5. Different zinc sensitivity of Brassica organs is accompanied by distinct responses in protein nitration level and pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Gábor; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Lehotai, Nóra; Molnár, Árpád; Ördög, Attila; Bordé, Ádám; Laskay, Gábor; Erdei, László

    2016-03-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement, but its excess exerts toxic effects in plants. Heavy metal stress can alter the metabolism of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) leading to oxidative and nitrosative damages; although the participation of these processes in Zn toxicity and tolerance is not yet known. Therefore this study aimed to evaluate the zinc tolerance of Brassica organs and the putative correspondence of it with protein nitration as a relevant marker for nitrosative stress. Both examined Brassica species (B. juncea and B. napus) proved to be moderate Zn accumulators; however B. napus accumulated more from this metal in its organs. The zinc-induced damages (growth diminution, altered morphology, necrosis, chlorosis, and the decrease of photosynthetic activity) were slighter in the shoot system of B. napus than in B. juncea. The relative zinc tolerance of B. napus shoot was accompanied by moderate changes of the nitration pattern. In contrast, the root system of B. napus suffered more severe damages (growth reduction, altered morphology, viability loss) and slighter increase in nitration level compared to B. juncea. Based on these, the organs of Brassica species reacted differentially to excess zinc, since in the shoot system modification of the nitration pattern occurred (with newly appeared nitrated protein bands), while in the roots, a general increment in the nitroproteome could be observed (the intensification of the same protein bands being present in the control samples). It can be assumed that the significant alteration of nitration pattern is coupled with enhanced zinc sensitivity of the Brassica shoot system and the general intensification of protein nitration in the roots is attached to relative zinc endurance.

  6. Using data assimilation for systematic model improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew S.; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Browne, Phil

    2016-04-01

    In Numerical Weather Prediction parameterisations are used to simulate missing physics in the model. These can be due to a lack of scientific understanding or a lack of computing power available to address all the known physical processes. Parameterisations are sources of large uncertainty in a model as parameter values used in these parameterisations cannot be measured directly and hence are often not well known, and the parameterisations themselves are approximations of the processes present in the true atmosphere. Whilst there are many efficient and effective methods for combined state/parameter estimation in data assimilation, such as state augmentation, these are not effective at estimating the structure of parameterisations. A new method of parameterisation estimation is proposed that uses sequential data assimilation methods to estimate errors in the numerical models at each space-time point for each model equation. These errors are then fitted to predetermined functional forms of missing physics or parameterisations, that are based upon prior information. The method picks out the functional form, or that combination of functional forms, that bests fits the error structure. The prior information typically takes the form of expert knowledge. We applied the method to a one-dimensional advection model with additive model error, and it is shown that the method can accurately estimate parameterisations, with consistent error estimates. It is also demonstrated that state augmentation is not successful. The results indicate that this new method is a powerful tool in systematic model improvement.

  7. Assimilative modeling of low latitude ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chunining; Hajj, George A.; Rosen, I. Gary; Wilson, Brian D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an observation system simulation experiment for modeling low-latitude ionosphere using a 3-dimensional (3-D) global assimilative ionospheric model (GAIM). The experiment is conducted to test the effectiveness of GAIM with a 4-D variational approach (4DVAR) in estimation of the ExB drift and thermospheric wind in the magnetic meridional planes simultaneously for all longitude or local time sectors. The operational Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites and the ground-based global GPS receiver network of the International GPS Service are used in the experiment as the data assimilation source. 'The optimization of the ionospheric state (electron density) modeling is performed through a nonlinear least-squares minimization process that adjusts the dynamical forces to reduce the difference between the modeled and observed slant total electron content in the entire modeled region. The present experiment for multiple force estimations reinforces our previous assessment made through single driver estimations conducted for the ExB drift only.

  8. Assimilative Mapping of Interhemispheric Polar Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T.; Richmond, A. D.; Knipp, D. J.; McGranaghan, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's main magnetic field is asymmetric between hemispheres due to its non-dipolar component, leading to various hemispherical differences in the coupling among the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere. Manifestation of the asymmetric coupling through different electrodynamic parameters reported in past studies is considerably diverse. To fill the gap in our current understanding, obtained so far by analyzing individual parameters separately and comparing statistical behaviors of the parameters, we quantify the degree of instantaneous inter-hemispheric imbalance of electromagnetic energy deposition (Poynting flux), field-aligned currents, and convection electric fields though global and self-consistent analysis of electrodynamic variables at both polar regions, by means of data assimilation. Inter-hemispheric assimilative maps of different high-latitude electrodynamical parameters are obtained from simultaneous analysis of multiple types of space-based and ground-based observations made available though the AMPERE, SuperDARN, SuperMAG and DMSP programs with rigorous consideration of the uncertainty associated with each observation.

  9. Turbulent viscosity optimized by data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Leredde

    Full Text Available As an alternative approach to classical turbulence modelling using a first or second order closure, the data assimilation method of optimal control is applied to estimate a time and space-dependent turbulent viscosity in a three-dimensional oceanic circulation model. The optimal control method, described for a 3-D primitive equation model, involves the minimization of a cost function that quantifies the discrepancies between the simulations and the observations. An iterative algorithm is obtained via the adjoint model resolution. In a first experiment, a k + L model is used to simulate the one-dimensional development of inertial oscillations resulting from a wind stress at the sea surface and with the presence of a halocline. These results are used as synthetic observations to be assimilated. The turbulent viscosity is then recovered without the k + L closure, even with sparse and noisy observations. The problems of controllability and of the dimensions of the control are then discussed. A second experiment consists of a two-dimensional schematic simulation. A 2-D turbulent viscosity field is estimated from data on the initial and final states of a coastal upwelling event.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (numerical modelling · Oceanography: physical (turbulence · diffusion · and mixing processes

  10. Spatial and temporal trends in Precambrian nitrogen cycling: A Mesoproterozoic offshore nitrate minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Matthew C.; Stüeken, Eva E.; Kipp, Michael A.; Buick, Roger; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2017-02-01

    Fixed nitrogen is an essential nutrient for eukaryotes. As N2 fixation and assimilation of nitrate are catalyzed by metalloenzymes, it has been hypothesized that in Mesoproterozoic oceans nitrate was limited in offshore environments by low trace metal concentrations and high rates of denitrification in anoxic and episodically euxinic deep water masses, restricting eukaryotes to near-shore environments and limiting their evolutionary innovation. To date this hypothesis has only been tested in the Belt Supergroup (∼1.4 Ga), with results that support an onshore-offshore nitrate gradient as a potential control on eukaryote ecology. Here we present bulk nitrogen and organic carbon isotopic data from non-isochronous cross-basinal facies across the Bangemall (∼1.5 Ga) and the Roper (∼1.4-1.5 Ga) basins to better understand the extent and variability of onshore-offshore nitrogen isotope gradients in the Mesoproterozoic. Both basins show an average ∼1-2‰ enrichment in δ15Nbulk from deep to shallow facies, with a maximum range from -1‰ offshore to +7.5‰ onshore. Unlike the Belt basin, the Bangemall and Roper basins show some offshore δ15Nbulk values that are enriched beyond the isotopic range associated with biological N2 fixation alone. This suggests a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms offshore. In shallow waters, where δ15Nbulk enrichment peaks, an aerobic nitrogen cycle was evidently operating. Even though isotopic signatures of aerobic nitrogen cycling are seen in all parts of the Bangemall and Roper basins, our data are consistent with a lateral gradient in nitrate availability within the photic zone, with higher concentrations in near-shore environments than offshore. The variability in δ15Nbulk values in each depositional environment and the consistently low δ15Nbulk values from Mesoproterozoic units compared to the Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic suggest that nitrate concentrations in the global ocean were likely low. This trend is

  11. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  12. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Goel

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT, ammonium transporters (AMT, nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamine synthetase (GS, glutamate synthase (GOGAT, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, asparagines synthetase (ASN were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl, osmotic (250 mM Mannitol, cold (4°C and heat (42°C stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h, which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses.

  13. Properties of nitrogen fertilization are decisive in determining the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the activity of nitrate reductase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Du, Shaoting

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 is predicted to double by the end of this century. The response of higher plants to an increase in atmospheric CO2 often includes a change in nitrate reductase (NR) activity. In a recent study, we showed that, under elevated CO2 levels, NR induction in low-nitrate plants and NR inhibition in high-nitrate plants are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) generated via nitric oxide synthases. This finding provides an explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 levels, and suggests that the use of nitrogen fertilizers on soil will have a major influence on the nitrogen assimilation capacity of plants in response to CO2 elevation.

  14. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolami, R.J.; Chao, E.I.; Choi, W.M.; Johnson, B.R.; Varlet, J.L.P.

    1976-04-26

    Growth rates for the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas Stutzeri were studied to minimize the time necessary to start up a bacterial denitrification reactor. Batch experiments were performed in nine 250-ml Erlenmeyer flasks, a 7-liter fermentor, and a 67-liter fermentor. All reactors maintained an anaerobic environment. Initial microorganism inoculum concentration was varied over four orders of magnitude. Initial nitrate and substrate carbon concentrations were varied from 200 to 6000 ppm and from 56 to 1596 ppm, respectively, with a carbon-to-nitrogen weight ratio of 1.18. In all experiments, except those with the highest initial substrate-to-bacteria ratio, no growth was observed due to substrate depletion during the lag period. In those experiments which did exhibit an increase in bacterial population, growth also stopped due to substrate depletion. A model simulating microbe growth during the induction period was developed, but insufficient data were available to properly adjust the model constants. Because of this, the model does not accurately predict microbe growth. The metabolism of Pseudomonas Stutzeri was studied in detail. This resulted in a prediction of the denitrification stoichiometry during steady state reactor operation. Iron was found to be an important component for bacterial anabolism.

  15. Efficient recovery of nitrate and phosphate from wastewater by an amine-grafted adsorbent for cyanobacterial biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmin; Hwang, Min-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jun; Noh, Won; Kwon, Jung Min; Choi, Jin Soo; Kang, Chang-Min

    2016-04-01

    Various types of wastewater have been widely utilized in microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation for environmental and economic reasons. However, the problems of low cell growth and biomass contamination due to direct use of wastewater remain unresolved. In the present study, nitrate and phosphate were separated from wastewater by adsorption and subsequently used for cyanobacterial biomass production. To this end, an amine-grafted magnetic absorbent was synthesized. The synthesized absorbent recovered ca. 78% nitrate and 93% phosphate from wastewater. Regenerated medium was prepared using recovered nutrients as nitrogen and phosphate sources, which were efficiently assimilated by cyanobacterial culture. Compared to synthetic medium, there was no difference in growth and nutrient removal using regenerated medium. The proposed indirect method of wastewater utilization would prevent contamination of the produced biomass by unfavorable substances, which will broaden its potential applications.

  16. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute

    2006-01-01

    IMPACT OF SULFIDE ON NITRATE CONVERSION IN EUTROPHIC NITRATE-RICH MARINE SLUDGE C.U. Schwermer 1, B.U. Krieger 2, G. Lavik 1, A. Schramm 3, J. van Rijn 4, D. de Beer 1, D. Minz 5, E. Cytryn 4, M. Kuypers 1, A. Gieseke 1 1 Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany; 2 Dept...... nitrate conversion from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate-reduction to ammonium (DNRA). In situ microsensor profiling in stagnant sludge revealed the typical stratification of nitrate reduction on top of sulfate reduction. Increasing the bulk nitrate concentration lead to a downward shift....... Our results show that the presence of sulfide generally decreased growth rates but increased N2O production. We conclude that sulfide plays a key role in causing incomplete denitrification, presumably by inhibiting the N2O reductase, and enhancing DNRA compared to denitrification.  ...

  17. An adaptive ensemble Kalman filter for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a 19-year twin experiment for the Red-Arkansas river basin we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture retrievals into the NASA Catchment land surface model. We demonstrate how poorly specified model and observation error parameters affect the quality of the assimilation products. In particul...

  18. Assimilation as Attraction: Computing Distance, Similarity, and Locality in Phonology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, Adam

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores similarity effects in assimilation, proposing an Attraction Framework to analyze cases of parasitic harmony where a trigger-target pair only results in harmony if the trigger and target agree on other features. Attraction provides a natural model of these effects by relating the pressure for assimilation to the…

  19. Trace Gas Assimilation in Preparation for Future Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. A.; Lewis, S. R.; Patel, M. R.; Clancy, R. T.

    2014-07-01

    This work aims to set up a framework for assimilation of trace gas species into a Martian Global Circulation Model. Presented here is total column ozone observations combined with the LMD/UK MGCM by data assimilation to study the annual ozone cycle.

  20. Multivariate hydrological data assimilation of soil moisture and groundwater head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Kidmose, Jacob; Jensen, Karsten H.; Refsgaard, Jens C.

    2016-10-01

    Observed groundwater head and soil moisture profiles are assimilated into an integrated hydrological model. The study uses the ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) data assimilation method with the MIKE SHE hydrological model code. The method was firstly tested on synthetic data in a catchment of less complexity (the Karup catchment in Denmark), and later implemented using data from real observations in a larger and more complex catchment (the Ahlergaarde catchment in Denmark). In the Karup model, several experiments were designed with respect to different observation types, ensemble sizes and localization schemes, to investigate the assimilation performance. The results showed the necessity of using localization, especially when assimilating both groundwater head and soil moisture. The proposed scheme with both distance localization and variable localization was shown to be more robust and provide better results. Using the same assimilation scheme in the Ahlergaarde model, groundwater head and soil moisture were successfully assimilated into the model. The hydrological model with assimilation showed an overall improved performance compared to the model without assimilation.

  1. Global change accelerates carbon assimilation by a wetland ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S.; Hager, Rachel N.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Mozdzer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-01

    The primary productivity of coastal wetlands is changing dramatically in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, nitrogen (N) enrichment, and invasions by novel species, potentially altering their ecosystem services and resilience to sea level rise. In order to determine how these interacting global change factors will affect coastal wetland productivity, we quantified growing-season carbon assimilation (≈gross primary productivity, or GPP) and carbon retained in living plant biomass (≈net primary productivity, or NPP) of North American mid-Atlantic saltmarshes invaded by Phragmites australis (common reed) under four treatment conditions: two levels of CO2 (ambient and +300 ppm) crossed with two levels of N (0 and 25 g N added m-2 yr-1). For GPP, we combined descriptions of canopy structure and leaf-level photosynthesis in a simulation model, using empirical data from an open-top chamber field study. Under ambient CO2 and low N loading (i.e., the Control), we determined GPP to be 1.66 ± 0.05 kg C m-2 yr-1 at a typical Phragmites stand density. Individually, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 44 and 60%, respectively. Changes under N enrichment came largely from stimulation to carbon assimilation early and late in the growing season, while changes from CO2 came from stimulation during the early and mid-growing season. In combination, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 95% over the Control, yielding 3.24 ± 0.08 kg C m-2 yr-1. We used biomass data to calculate NPP, and determined that it represented 44%-60% of GPP, with global change conditions decreasing carbon retention compared to the Control. Our results indicate that Phragmites invasions in eutrophied saltmarshes are driven, in part, by extended phenology yielding 3.1× greater NPP than native marsh. Further, we can expect elevated CO2 to amplify Phragmites productivity throughout the growing season, with potential implications including accelerated spread

  2. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Cyanobacteria: Quantitative Assessment of Factors Influencing Nitrate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Qiang; Westerhoff, Paul; Vermaas, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically removing nitrate from groundwater was tested by using cyanobacterial cultures in batch mode under laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated that nitrate-contaminated groundwater, when supplemented with phosphate and some trace elements, can be used as growth medium supporting vigorous growth of several strains of cyanobacteria. As cyanobacteria grew, nitrate was removed from the water. Of three species tested, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 displayed the h...

  3. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  4. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, C.A.;

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  5. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  6. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  7. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... Administrative Review: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate (Ammonium Nitrate) from the Russian...

  8. Morphine causes persistent induction of nitrated neurofilaments in cortex and subcortex even during abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A; Das, S

    2015-04-16

    Morphine has a profound role in neurofilament (NF) expression. However, there are very few studies on the fate of NFs during morphine abstinence coinciding with periods of relapse. Mice were treated chronically with morphine to render them tolerant to and dependent on morphine and sacrificed thereafter while another group, treated similarly, was left for 2 months without morphine. A long-lasting alteration in the stoichiometric ratio of the three NFs was observed under both conditions in both the cortex and subcortex. Morphine abstinence caused significant alterations in the phosphorylated and nitrated forms of the three NF subunits. Nitrated neurofilament light polypeptide chain (NFL) was significantly increased during chronic morphine treatment which persisted even after 2 months of morphine withdrawal. Mass spectrometric analysis following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE)-gel electrophoresis of cytoskeleton fractions of both cortex and subcortex regions identified enzymes associated with energy metabolism, cytoskeleton-associated proteins as well as NFs which showed sustained regulation even after abstinence of morphine for 2 months. It is suggestive that alteration in the levels of some of these proteins may be instrumental in the increased nitration of NFL during morphine exposure. Such gross alteration in NF dynamics is indicative of a concerted biological process of neuroadaptation during morphine abstinence.

  9. Protective effects of sodium selenite on lead nitrate-induced hepatotoxicity in diabetic and non-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Suna; Apaydin, Fatma Gökçe; Baş, Hatice; Kalender, Yusuf

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effect of sodium selenite on lead induced toxicity was studied in Wistar rats. Sodium selenite and lead nitrate were administered orally for 28 days to streptozotocin induced diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Eight groups of rats were used in the study: control, sodium selenite, lead nitrate, lead nitrate+sodium selenite, streptozotocin-induced diabetic-control, diabetic-sodium selenite, diabetic-lead nitrate, diabetic-lead nitrate+sodium selenite groups. Serum biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and histopathological changes in liver tissues were investigated in all groups. There were statistically significant changes in liver function tests, antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in lead nitrate and sodium selenite+lead nitrate treated groups, also in diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Furthermore, histopathological alterations were demonstrated in same groups. In the present study we found that sodium selenite treatment did not show completely protective effect on diabetes mellitus caused damages, but diabetic rats are more susceptible to lead toxicity than non-diabetic rats.

  10. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Michael D; Best, Catherine T; Faber, Alice; Levitt, Andrea G

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: the Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and native language assimilation (categorization and goodness rating) tests on six nonnative vowel contrasts. Discrimination was consistent with PAM assimilation types, but asymmetries predicted by NRV were only observed for single-category assimilations, suggesting that perceptual assimilation might modulate the effects of vowel peripherality on non-native vowel perception.

  11. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Michael D.; Best, Catherine T.; Faber, Alice; Levitt, Andrea G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: The Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and L1-assimilation (categorization and goodness rating) tests on six non-native vowel contrasts. Discrimination was consistent with PAM assimilation types, but asymmetries predicted by NRV were only observed for single-category assimilations, suggesting that perceptual assimilation might modulate the effects of vowel peripherality on non-native vowel perception. PMID:24923313

  12. SST data assimilation experiments using an adaptive variational method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An adaptive variational data assimilation method is proposed by Zhu and Kamachi[1]. This method can adaptively adjust the model state without knowing explicitly the model error covariance matrix. The method enables very flexible ways to form some reduced order problems. A proper reduced order problem not only reduces computational burden but also leads to corrections that are more consistent with the model dynamics that trends to produce better forecast. These features make the adaptive variational method a good candidate for SST data assimilation because the model error of an ocean model is usually difficult to estimate. We applied this method to an SST data assimilation problem using the LOTUS data sets and an ocean mixed layer model (Mellor-Yamada level 2.5). Results of assimilation experiments showed good skill of improvement subsurface temperatures by assimilating surface observation alone.

  13. A variational formulation for translation and assimilation of coherent structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The assimilation of observations from teledetected images in geophysical models requires one to develop algorithms that would account for the existence of coherent structures. In the context of variational data assimilation, a method is proposed to allow the background to be translated so as to fit structure positions deduced from images. Translation occurs as a first step before assimilating all the observations using a classical assimilation procedure with specific covariances for the translated background. A simple validation is proposed using a dynamical system based on the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg–Landau equation in a regime prone to phase and amplitude errors. Assimilation of observations after background translation leads to better scores and a better representation of extremas than the method without translation.

  14. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  15. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  16. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  17. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitution...

  18. Chemical Data Assimilation &Optimized Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lary, D.

    2003-04-01

    Issues such as ozone depletion, acid rain, and photochemical smog are all of considerable environmental importance. These issues are studied using the dual approach of observations and numerical modelling. In making balanced assessments of these issues it is vital to make the best use of all the information available to us, both theoretical and observational. This is a non-trivial task. The technique of "data assimilation" is a powerful tool which allows us to address this issue. It is revolutionising the way we can study atmospheric chemistry. Data assimilation allows us to simultaneously make good use of however many observations are available to us, our theoretical understanding, and any apriori information we have, within a mathematical framework. It even allows us to infer information about chemical constituents which are not observed. It is a technique which is set to grow in importance. It is also applicable to any system for which we have both observations, a deterministic model, and estimates of uncertainty. Such applications could be from laboratory kinetics to metabolic pathways. Looking ahead we can envision Data assimilation as part of a Optimized Earth Observation System by developing a dynamic data retrieval control system. The dynamic data retrieval control system will dynamically adapt the what, where, and when for the observations made in an online fashion to maximize information content, minimize uncertainty in characterizing the system’s state vector, and minimize both the required storage and data processing time for a given observation capability (with the possibility of even directing unmanned sub-orbital platforms, drones, to make additional observations). This is particularly desirable to facilitate the dynamic tracking of evolving sharp gradients, for example, those in chemical tracer fields often located at the polar vortex edge, the tropopause and the day-night division. The basic idea is the desire for symbiotic communication to

  19. The Arabidopsis ATNRT2.7 nitrate transporter controls nitrate content in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Franck; Orsel, Mathilde; Dorbe, Marie-France; Chardon, Fabien; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Miller, Anthony J; Krapp, Anne; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2007-05-01

    In higher plants, nitrate is taken up by root cells where Arabidopsis thaliana NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (ATNRT2.1) chiefly acts as the high-affinity nitrate uptake system. Nitrate taken up by the roots can then be translocated from the root to the leaves and the seeds. In this work, the function of the ATNRT2.7 gene, one of the seven members of the NRT2 family in Arabidopsis, was investigated. High expression of the gene was detected in reproductive organs and peaked in dry seeds. beta-Glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression driven by the ATNRT2.7 promoter confirmed this organ specificity. We assessed the capacity of ATNRT2.7 to transport nitrate in Xenopus laevis oocytes or when it is expressed ectopically in mutant plants deficient in nitrate transport. We measured the impact of an ATNRT2.7 mutation and found no difference from the wild type during vegetative development. By contrast, seed nitrate content was affected by overexpression of ATNRT2.7 or a mutation in the gene. Finally, we showed that this nitrate transporter protein was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Our results demonstrate that ATNRT2.7 plays a specific role in nitrate accumulation in the seed.

  20. Organic nitrates and nitrate tolerance--state of the art and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic and antiischemic effects of nitroglycerin (GTN) are lost upon chronic administration due to the rapid development of nitrate tolerance. The mechanism of this phenomenon has puzzled several generations of scientists, but recent findings have led to novel hypotheses. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the mitochondria and the subsequent inhibition of the nitrate-bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) appear to play a central role, at least for GTN, that is, bioactivated by ALDH-2. Importantly, these findings provide the opportunity to reconcile the two "traditional" hypotheses of nitrate tolerance, that is, the one postulating a decreased bioactivation and the concurrent one suggesting a role of oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent animal and human experimental studies suggest that the organic nitrates are not a homogeneous group but demonstrate a broad diversity with regard to induction of vascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and other side effects. In the past, attempts to avoid nitrate-induced side effects have focused on administration schedules that would allow a "nitrate-free interval"; in the future, the role of co-therapies with antioxidant compounds and of activation of endogeneous protective pathways such as the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) will need to be explored. However, the development of new nitrates, for example, tolerance-free aminoalkyl nitrates or combination of nitrate groups with established cardiovascular drugs like ACE inhibitors or AT(1)-receptor blockers (hybrid molecules) may be of great clinical interest.

  1. Relationship between photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown with sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín, M Carmen; Fiasconaro, M Laura; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-10-15

    Sewage sludge has been used as N fertilizer because it contains some of inorganic N, principally as nitrate and ammonium ions. However, sewage sludge addition to legumes could result in impaired nodule metabolism due to the presence of inorganic N from sludge. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to examine the effects of sewage sludge on growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón). Plants were grown in pots with a mixture of perlite and vermiculite (2:1, v/v). The experiment included three treatments: (1) plants inoculated with rhizobia and amended with sewage sludge at rate of 10% (w/w) (RS); (2) plants inoculated with rhizobia without any amendment (R); and (3) non-inoculated plants fed with ammonium nitrate (N). N(2)-fixing plants had lower growth and sucrose phosphate synthase activity but higher photosynthesis than nitrate-fed plants because they compensated the carbon cost of the rhizobia. However, sewage sludge-treated plants evidenced a loss of carbon sink strength due to N(2) fixation by means of decreased photosynthetic capacity, leaf chlorophylls and N concentration in comparison to untreated plants. Sewage sludge did no affect nodulation but decreased nodule enzyme activities involved in carbon and N metabolisms that may lead to accumulation of toxic N-compounds.

  2. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  3. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  4. Ensemble data assimilation in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2014-08-01

    We present results pertaining to the assimilation of real lower, middle, and upper atmosphere observations in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The ability to assimilate lower atmosphere observations of aircraft and radiosonde temperature and winds, satellite drift winds, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate refractivity along with middle/upper atmosphere temperature observations from SABER and Aura MLS is demonstrated. The WACCM+DART data assimilation system is shown to be able to reproduce the salient features, and variability, of the troposphere present in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Re-Analysis. In the mesosphere, the fit of WACCM+DART to observations is found to be slightly worse when only lower atmosphere observations are assimilated compared to a control experiment that is reflective of the model climatological variability. This differs from previous results which found that assimilation of lower atmosphere observations improves the fit to mesospheric observations. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that due to the gravity wave drag parameterizations, the model climatology differs significantly from the observations in the mesosphere, and this is not corrected by the assimilation of lower atmosphere observations. The fit of WACCM+DART to mesospheric observations is, however, significantly improved compared to the control experiment when middle/upper atmosphere observations are assimilated. We find that assimilating SABER observations reduces the root-mean-square error and bias of WACCM+DART relative to the independent Aura MLS observations by ˜50%, demonstrating that assimilation of middle/upper atmosphere observations is essential for accurate specification of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in WACCM+DART. Last, we demonstrate that

  5. DART: New Research Using Ensemble Data Assimilation in Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey; Raeder, Kevin; Hoar, Tim; Collins, Nancy; Romine, Glen; Barre, Jerome; Gaubert, Benjamin; Arellano, Ave; Wuerth, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is a community facility for ensemble data assimilation developed and supported by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. DART provides a comprehensive suite of software, documentation, examples and tutorials that can be used for ensemble data assimilation research, operations, and education. Scientists and software engineers from the Data Assimilation Research Section at NCAR are available to actively support DART users who want to use existing DART products or develop their own new applications. Current DART users range from university professors teaching data assimilation, to individual graduate students working with simple models, through national laboratories doing operational prediction with large state-of-the-art models. DART runs efficiently on many computational platforms ranging from laptops through thousands of cores on the newest supercomputers. This poster focuses on several recent research activities using DART with geophysical models: 1). Using CAM/DART to understand whether OCO-2 Total Precipitable Water observations can be useful in numerical weather prediction. 2). Impacts of the synergistic use of Infra-red CO retrievals (MOPITT, IASI) in CAMCHEM/DART assimilations. 3). Assimilation and Analysis of Observations of Amazonian Biomass Burning Emissions by MOPITT (aerosol optical depth), MODIS (carbon monoxide) and MISR (plume height). 4). Long term evaluation of the chemical response of MOPITT-CO assimilation in CAM-CHEM/DART OSSEs for satellite planning and emission inversion capabilities. 5). Improved forward observation operators for land models that have multiple land use/land cover segments in a single grid cell, enabling studies of the inherent variability in a single gridcell. Future enhancements are also discussed: 1). The CICE component of the Community Earth System Model will be added to the existing suite of components, which can be used for data assimilation. 2). Fully coupled

  6. A record of ozone variability in South Pole Antarctic snow: Role of nitrate oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Justin R.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Savarino, Joel

    2007-06-01

    The information contained in polar nitrate has been an unresolved issue for over a decade. Here we demonstrate that atmospheric nitrate's oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O-NO3) reflects stratospheric chemistry in winter and tropospheric chemistry in summer. Surface snow isotope mass balance indicates that nitrate oxygen isotopic composition is the result of a mixture of 25% stratospheric and 75% tropospheric origin. Analysis of trends in Δ17O-NO3 in a 6 m snow pit that provides a 26-year record reveals a strong 2.70-year cycle that anticorrelates (R = -0.77) with October-November-December column ozone. The potential mechanisms linking the records are either denitrification or increased boundary layer photochemical ozone production. We suggest that the latter is dominating the observed trend and find that surface ozone and Δ17O-NO3 correlate well before 1991 (R = 0.93). After 1991, however, the records show no significant relationship, indicating an altered oxidative environment consistent with current understanding of a highly oxidizing atmosphere at the South Pole. The disappearance of seasonal Δ17O-NO3 trends in the surface layer at depth remain unresolved and demand further investigation of how postdepositional processes affect nitrate's oxygen isotope composition. Overall, the findings of this study present a new paleoclimate technique to investigate Antarctic nitrate records that appear to reflect trends in stratospheric ozone depletion by recording tropospheric surface ozone variability.

  7. Incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme based on Lorenz model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xidong; XU Dongfeng; XU Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional variational(4D-VAR) data assimilation method is a perfect data assimilation solution in theory, but the compu- tational issue is quite difficult in operational implementation. The incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme is set up in order to re- duce the computational cost. It is shown that the accuracy of the observations, the length of the assimilation window and the choice of the first guess have an important influence on the assimilation outcome through the contrast experiment. Compared with the standard 4D-VAR assimilation scheme, the incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme shows its advantage in the computation speed through an assimilation experiment.

  8. Effects of sample density on the assimilation performance of an explicit four-dimensional variational data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of sample sphere radius and sample density are proposed in this paper to help illustrate that different vector transformations result in diverse sample density with the same sample ensemble, which finally affects their assimilation performance. Several numerical experiments using a onedimensional (1-D) soil water equation and synthetic observations are conducted to evaluate this new theory in land data assimilation.

  9. Continuous Data Assimilation Using General Interpolant Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Azouani, Abderrahim; Titi, Edriss S

    2013-01-01

    We present a new continuous data assimilation algorithm based on ideas that have been developed for designing finite-dimensional feedback controls for dissipative dynamical systems, in particular, in the context of the incompressible two-dimensional Navier--Stokes equations. These ideas are motivated by the fact that dissipative dynamical systems possess finite numbers of determining parameters (degrees of freedom) such as modes, nodes and local spatial averages which govern their long-term behavior. Therefore, our algorithm allows the use of any type of measurement data for which a general type of approximation interpolation operator exists. Our main result provides conditions, on the finite-dimensional spatial resolution of the collected data, sufficient to guarantee that the approximating solution, obtained by our algorithm from the measurement data, converges to the unknown reference solution over time. Our algorithm is also applicable in the context of signal synchronization in which one can recover, asy...

  10. Tracer studies of nitrogen assimilation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABRAMS, R; HAMMARSTEN, E

    1949-01-01

    By using N(15) as a tracer the assimilation of ammonia by the yeast, Torulopsis utilis, has been studied. It has been shown that: 1. There was no measurable incorporation of N in the protein or polynucleotide purine of carbon-starved yeast. 2. When ammonia is added to nitrogen-starved yeast there is a long lag period before division begins during which the yeast rapidly synthesizes protein, this process being accompanied by a turnover of polynucleotide purine. There was no significant dilution of the N(15)H(4) (+) of the medium by ordinary NH(4) (+). 3. When yeast containing N(15) is allowed to divide and grow in ordinary ammonia, the total amount of N(15) in the yeast remains constant. The dicarboxylic amino acids are most diluted, while arginine and nucleic acid guanine are not diluted at all.

  11. Recent immigration and studies of ethnic assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeuber, A F; Taeuber, K E

    1967-06-01

    Studies of ethnic assimilation are frequently based upon status comparisons between the foreign born and their "children," the second generation. The assumption that recent immigration has been negligible and that the foreign born represent a closed population is implicit in that procedure. However, analysis of official statistics indicates that immigrants who arrived since World War II now comprise a substantial share of the foreign-born population, while the foreign born who arrived before quota restrictions are rapidly being depleted by mortality. Recent immigrants, as intended by quota legislation, are of much higher socioeconomic status than immigrants who arrived before World War 1. Hence, characteristics of both recent immigrants and earlier arrivals are confounded in data for the foreign-born population. Existing data do not permit rigorous assessment of this confusion or adequate control for it. This paper suggests that tabulations of the foreign born by "year of arrival" would improve the sociological utility of data for ethnic groups.

  12. Warming can boost denitrification disproportionately due to altered oxygen dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraart, A.J.; Klein, de J.J.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Global warming and the alteration of the global nitrogen cycle are major anthropogenic threats to the environment. Denitrification, the biological conversion of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen, removes a substantial fraction of the nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems, and can therefore help to

  13. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  14. Sensitivity of simulated terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration to different stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haishan [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing (China); Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dickinson, Robert E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Geological Sciences, Austin, TX (United States); Dai, Yongjiu [Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, School of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing (China); Zhou, Liming [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Accurate simulations of terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration are needed for both climate modeling and vegetation dynamics. Coupled stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation (A - g{sub s}) models have been widely used as part of land surface parameterizations in climate models to describe the biogeophysical and biogeochemical roles of terrestrial vegetation. Differences in various A - g{sub s} schemes produce substantial differences in the estimation of carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration, as well as in other land-atmosphere fluxes. The terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration simulated by two different representative A - g{sub s} schemes, a simple A-g{sub s} scheme adopted from the treatments of the NCAR model (Scheme I) and a two-big-leaf A - g{sub s} scheme newly developed by Dai et al. (J Clim 17:2281-2299, 2004) (Scheme II), are compared via some sensitivity experiments to investigate impacts of different A - g{sub s} schemes on the simulations. Major differences are found in the estimate of canopy carbon assimilation rate, canopy conductance and canopy transpiration between the two schemes, primarily due to differences in (a) functional forms used to estimate parameters for carbon assimilation sub-models, (b) co-limitation methods used to estimate carbon assimilation rate from the three limiting rates, and (c) leaf-to-canopy scaling schemes. On the whole, the differences in the scaling approach are the largest contributor to the simulation discrepancies, but the different methods of co-limitation of assimilation rate also impact the results. Except for a few biomes, the residual effects caused by the different parameter estimations in assimilation sub-models are relatively small. It is also noted that the two-leaf temperature scheme produces distinctly different sunlit and shaded leaf temperatures but has negligible impacts on the simulation of the carbon assimilation. (orig.)

  15. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme on four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanski, Dušanka

    1993-10-01

    A tangent linear and an adjoint of the large-scale precipitation and the cumulus convection processes in the National Meteorological Center's NMC/ETA regional forecast model are developed. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme are examined and applicability of derivative minimization methods in four-dimensional variational (4D VAR) data assimilation is considered. It is demonstrated that discontinuities present in the control Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme increase linearization errors to a large extent and have adverse effects on 4D VAR data assimilation. In the experiments performed, discontinuities in the cumulus convection scheme have the most serious effect in low layers. These problems can be reduced by modifying the scheme to make it more continuous in low layers. Positive effects of inclusion of cumulus convection in 4D VAR data assimilation are found in upper layers, especially in humidity fields. The "observations" used are optimal interpolation analyses of temperature, surface pressure, wind and specific humidity. By inclusion of other data, more closely related to the convective processes, such as precipitation and clouds, more benefits should be expected. Even with the difficulties caused by discontinuities, derivative minimization techniques appear to work for the data assimilation problems. In order to get more general conclusions, more experiments are needed with different synoptic situations. The inclusion of other important physical processes such as radiation, surface friction and turbulence in the forecast and the corresponding adjoint models could alter the results since they may reinforce the effects of discontinuities.

  16. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  17. Assimilation efficiency of PBDE congeners in Chinook salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Joseph P; Strickland, Stacy A; Hutchinson, Greg P; Van Gaest, Ahna L; Krupkin, Alex B; Ylitalo, Gina M; Arkoosh, Mary R

    2015-03-17

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are environmental contaminants that can accumulate in biota. PBDE accumulation in an organism depends on exposure, assimilation efficiency, and elimination/metabolism. Net assimilation efficiency represents the fraction of the contaminant that is retained in the organism after exposure. In the present study, congener-specific estimates of net PBDE assimilation efficiencies were calculated from dietary exposures of juvenile Chinook salmon. The fish were exposed to one to eight PBDE congeners up to 1500 ng total PBDEs/g food. Mean assimilation efficiencies varied from 0.32 to 0.50 for BDE congeners 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, and 154. The assimilation efficiency of BDE49 was significantly greater than 100%, suggesting biotransformation from higher brominated congeners. Whole body concentrations of BDE49 significantly increased with both exposure to increasing concentrations of BDE99 and decreasing fish lipid levels, implying lipid-influenced debromination of BDE99 to BDE49. Excluding BDE49, PBDE assimilation efficiency was not significantly related to the numbers of congeners in the diets, or congener hydrophobicity, but was greater in foods with higher lipid levels. Estimates of PBDE assimilation efficiency can be used in bioaccumulation models to assess threats from PBDE exposure to Chinook salmon health and recovery efforts, as well as to their predators.

  18. Data assimilation of Argo profiles in a northwestern Pacific model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyi; Storto, Andrea; Pinardi, Nadia; Liu, Guimei; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Based on a novel estimation of background-error covariances for assimilating Argo profiles, an oceanographic three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation scheme was developed for the northwestern Pacific Ocean model (NwPM) for potential use in operational predictions and maritime safety applications. Temperature and salinity data extracted from Argo profiles from January to December 2010 were assimilated into the NwPM. The results show that the average daily temperature (salinity) root mean square error (RMSE) decreased from 0.99 °C (0.10 psu) to 0.62 °C (0.07 psu) in assimilation experiments throughout the northwestern Pacific, which represents a 37.2 % (27.6 %) reduction in the error. The temperature (salinity) RMSE decreased by ˜ 0.60 °C ( ˜ 0.05 psu) for the upper 900 m (1000 m). Sea level, temperature and salinity were in better agreement with in situ and satellite datasets after data assimilation than before. In addition, a 1-month experiment with daily analysis cycles and 5-day forecasts explored the performance of the system in an operational configuration. The results highlighted the positive impact of the 3DVAR initialization at all forecast ranges compared to the non-assimilative experiment. Therefore, the 3DVAR scheme proposed here, coupled to ROMS, shows a good predictive performance and can be used as an assimilation scheme for operational forecasting.

  19. Multivariate data assimilation in an integrated hydrological modelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhang, Donghua; Ridler, Marc; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The immensely increasing availability of in-situ and remotely sensed hydrological data has offered new opportunities for monitoring and forecasting water resources by combining observation data with hydrological modelling. Efficient multivariate data assimilation in integrated groundwater - surface water hydrological modelling systems are required to fully utilize and optimally combine the different types of observation data. A particular challenge is the assimilation of observation data of different hydrological variables from different monitoring instruments, representing a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and different levels of uncertainty. A multivariate data assimilation framework has been implemented in the MIKE SHE integrated hydrological modelling system by linking the MIKE SHE code with a generic data assimilation library. The data assimilation library supports different state-of-the-art ensemble-based Kalman filter methods, and includes procedures for localisation, joint state, parameter and model error estimation, and bias-aware filtering. Furthermore, it supports use of different stochastic error models to describe model and measurement errors. Results are presented that demonstrate the use of the data assimilation framework for assimilation of different data types in a catchment-scale MIKE SHE model.

  20. Observations of Alkyl Nitrates during ARCTAS: Investigation of the low NOx Chemistry of Isoprene Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Min, K.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W. H.; Fried, A.; Ren, X.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Team, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    During numerous ground and airborne experiments alkyl and multifunctional nitrates, measured by Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence, have been shown to represent a significant fraction of oxidized nitrogen. It is postulated that a large fraction of these nitrates, particularly in forested environments, are isoprene-derived nitrates. The formation of these nitrates is important in terminating photochemical ozone production. However, it is still highly uncertain if these nitrates serve as a permanent termination step or only as a temporary sink that upon further oxidation, releases NO2 back into the atmosphere. The summer portion of the NASA ARCTAS experiment allows us to investigate the role of alkyl nitrates in photochemical ozone production in a new regime: the low NOx of the summer boreal forest. This data set also represents the first time that vertical profiles of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein were obtained along with total alkyl nitrates. We use these measurements to investigate and constrain the low NOx chemistry of isoprene nitrates. We compare these measurements to past airborne and laboratory studies.

  1. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. Complete denitrification could not be achieved at this C/N ratio, even after one week of reactor operation as the nitrite levels continued to accumulate. In order to improve denitrification performance, the reactor was fed with nitrate concentrations of 1354 mg L(-1), while keeping C/N ratio at 2. Subsequently, nitrate concentration in the feed was increased in a step-wise manner to establish complete denitrification of 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. The results show that substrate concentration plays an important role in denitrification of high strength nitrate by influencing nitrite accumulation. Complete denitrification of high strength nitrates can be achieved at lower substrate concentrations, by an appropriate acclimatization strategy.

  2. Effects of heat shock, stannous chloride, and gallium nitrate on the rat inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    House, S.D.; Guidon, P T; Perdrizet, G.A.; Rewinski, M.; Kyriakos, R.; Bockman, R S; Mistry, T.; Gallagher, P.A.; Hightower, L E

    2001-01-01

    Heat and a variety of other stressors cause mammalian cells and tissues to acquire cytoprotection. This transient state of altered cellular physiology is nonproliferative and antiapoptotic. In this study, male Wistar rats were stress conditioned with either stannous chloride or gallium nitrate, which have immunosuppressive effects in vivo and in vitro, or heat shock, the most intensively studied inducer of cytoprotection. The early stages of inflammation in response to topical suffusion of me...

  3. Recent Developments in Helioseismic Analysis Methods and Solar Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Schad, Ariane; Duvall, Tom L; Roth, Markus; Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    We review recent advances and results in enhancing and developing helioseismic analysis methods and in solar data assimilation. In the first part of this paper we will focus on selected developments in time-distance and global helioseismology. In the second part, we review the application of data assimilation methods on solar data. Relating solar surface observations as well as helioseismic proxies with solar dynamo models by means of the techniques from data assimilation is a promising new approach to explore and to predict the magnetic activity cycle of the Sun.

  4. Microbial Reduction of Chromate in the presence of Nitrate by Three Nitrate Respiring Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eChovanec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the bioremediation of toxic metals is the co-occurrence of nitrate, as it can inhibit metal transformation. Geobacter metallireducens, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, and Sulfurospirillum barnesii are three soil bacteria that can reduce chromate (Cr(VI and nitrate, and may be beneficial for developing bioremediation strategies. All three organisms respire through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA, employing different nitrate reductases but similar nitrite reductase (Nrf. G. metallireducens reduces nitrate to nitrite via the membrane bound nitrate reductase (Nar, while S. barnesii and D. desulfuricans strain 27774 have slightly different forms of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap. We investigated the effect of DNRA growth in the presence of Cr(VI in these three organisms and the ability of each to reduce Cr(VI to Cr(III, and each organisms responded differently. Growth of G. metallireducens on nitrate was completely inhibited by Cr(VI. Cultures of D. desulfuricans on nitrate media was initially delayed (48 h in the presence of Cr(VI, but ultimately reached comparable cell yields to the non-treated control. This prolonged lag phase accompanied the transformation of Cr(VI to Cr(III. Viable G. metallireducens cells could reduce Cr(VI, whereas Cr(VI reduction by D. desulfuricans during growth, was mediated by a filterable and heat stable extracellular metabolite. S. barnesii growth on nitrate was not affected by Cr(VI, and Cr(VI was reduced to Cr(III. However, Cr(VI reduction activity in S. barnesii, was detected in both the cell free spent medium and cells, indicating both extracellular and cell associated mechanisms. Taken together, these results have demonstrated that Cr(VI affects DNRA in the three organisms differently, and that each have a unique mechanism for Cr(VI reduction.

  5. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  6. Nitrate transceptor(s) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojon, Alain; Krouk, Gabriel; Perrine-Walker, Francine; Laugier, Edith

    2011-04-01

    The availability of mineral nutrients in the soil dramatically fluctuates in both time and space. In order to optimize their nutrition, plants need efficient sensing systems that rapidly signal the local external concentrations of the individual nutrients. Until recently, the most upstream actors of the nutrient signalling pathways, i.e. the sensors/receptors that perceive the extracellular nutrients, were unknown. In Arabidopsis, increasing evidence suggests that, for nitrate, the main nitrogen source for most plant species, a major sensor is the NRT1.1 nitrate transporter, also contributing to nitrate uptake by the roots. Membrane proteins that fulfil a dual nutrient transport/signalling function have been described in yeast and animals, and are called 'transceptors'. This review aims to illustrate the nutrient transceptor concept in plants by presenting the current evidence indicating that NRT1.1 is a representative of this class of protein. The various facets, as well as the mechanisms of nitrate sensing by NRT1.1 are considered, and the possible occurrence of other nitrate transceptors is discussed.

  7. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  8. Assimilation of MODIS Snow Cover Through the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Community Land Model Version 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Fei; Hoar, Tim J.; Yang, Zong-Liang; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Toure, Ally M.; Rodell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    To improve snowpack estimates in Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover fraction (SCF) was assimilated into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) via the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The interface between CLM4 and DART is a flexible, extensible approach to land surface data assimilation. This data assimilation system has a large ensemble (80-member) atmospheric forcing that facilitates ensemble-based land data assimilation. We use 40 randomly chosen forcing members to drive 40 CLM members as a compromise between computational cost and the data assimilation performance. The localization distance, a parameter in DART, was tuned to optimize the data assimilation performance at the global scale. Snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth are adjusted via the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter, particularly in regions with large SCF variability. The root-mean-square error of the forecast SCF against MODIS SCF is largely reduced. In DJF (December-January-February), the discrepancy between MODIS and CLM4 is broadly ameliorated in the lower-middle latitudes (2345N). Only minimal modifications are made in the higher-middle (4566N) and high latitudes, part of which is due to the agreement between model and observation when snow cover is nearly 100. In some regions it also reveals that CLM4-modeled snow cover lacks heterogeneous features compared to MODIS. In MAM (March-April-May), adjustments to snowmove poleward mainly due to the northward movement of the snowline (i.e., where largest SCF uncertainty is and SCF assimilation has the greatest impact). The effectiveness of data assimilation also varies with vegetation types, with mixed performance over forest regions and consistently good performance over grass, which can partly be explained by the linearity of the relationship between SCF and SWE in the model ensembles. The updated snow depth was compared to the Canadian Meteorological

  9. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high-nitrate supplement but not by high-nitrate foods in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary D; Marsh, Anthony P; Dove, Robin W; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/nitric oxide cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs high-nitrate diet, with and without a high-nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics and blood pressure using a randomized 4-period crossover controlled design. We hypothesized that the high-nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and lower blood pressure compared with the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were 8 normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5 ± 4.7 years old) with no overt disease or medications that affect nitric oxide metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured before and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet + supplement (P < .001 and P = .017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high-nitrate diet + supplement (P = .001 and P = .002), but not for control diet (P = .713 and P = .741) or high-nitrate diet (P = .852 and P = .500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2-hour postmeal follow-up time points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high-nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction.

  10. Stochastic Controls on Nitrate Transport and Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, G.; Settin, T.; Alessi Celegon, E.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, the impact of nutrient inputs on basin-scale nitrates losses is investigated in a probabilistic framework by means of a continuous, geomorphologically based, Montecarlo approach, which explicitly tackles the random character of the processes controlling nitrates generation, transformation and transport in river basins. This is obtained by coupling the stochastic generation of climatic and rainfall series with simplified hydrologic and biogeochemical models operating at the hillslope scale. Special attention is devoted to the spatial and temporal variability of nitrogen sources of agricultural origin and to the effect of temporally distributed rainfall fields on the ensuing nitrates leaching. The influence of random climatic variables on bio-geochemical processes affecting the nitrogen cycle in the soil-water system (e.g. plant uptake, nitrification and denitrification, mineralization), is also considered. The approach developed has been applied to a catchment located in North-Eastern Italy and is used to provide probabilistic estimates of the NO_3 load transferred downstream, which is received and accumulated in the Venice lagoon. We found that the nitrogen load introduced by fertilizations significantly affects the pdf of the nitrates content in the soil moisture, leading to prolonged risks of increased nitrates leaching from soil. The model allowed the estimation of the impact of different practices on the probabilistic structure of the basin-scale hydrologic and chemical response. As a result, the return period of the water volumes and of the nitrates loads released into the Venice lagoon has been linked directly to the ongoing climatic, pluviometric and agricultural regimes, with relevant implications for environmental planning activities aimed at achieving sustainable management practices.

  11. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Samoa: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at approximately 3-km resolution....

  12. The Culure Assimilator: An Approach to Cross-Cultural Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Evaluates the cultural assimilator, a kind of training manual to help members of one culture understand and adjust to another culture. Describes those constructed for the Arab countries, Iran, Thailand, Central America, and Greece. (MB)

  13. Data Assimilation in Hydrodynamic Models of Continental Shelf Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jacob Viborg Tornfeldt

    2004-01-01

    and forecast skill in the Inner Danish Waters. The framework for combining data assimilation and off-line error correction techniques is discussed and presented. Early results show a potential for such an approach, but a more elaborate investigation is needed to further develop the idea. Finally, work has been......This thesis consists of seven research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2002-2004 together with a summary report. The thesis mainly deals with data assimilation of tide gauge data in two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of the continental shelf seas....... Assimilation of sea surface temperature and parameter estimation in hydrodynamic models are also considered. The main focus has been on the development of robust and efficient techniques applicable in real operational settings. The applied assimilation techniques all use a Kalman filter approach. They consist...

  14. Implicit particle methods and their connection with variational data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Ethan; Chorin, Alexandre J

    2012-01-01

    The implicit particle filter is a sequential Monte Carlo method for data assimilation that guides the particles to the high-probability regions via a sequence of steps that includes minimizations. We present a new and more general derivation of this approach and extend the method to particle smoothing as well as to data assimilation for perfect models. We show that the minimizations required by implicit particle methods are similar to the ones one encounters in variational data assimilation and explore the connection of implicit particle methods with variational data assimilation. In particular, we argue that existing variational codes can be converted into implicit particle methods at a low cost, often yielding better estimates, that are also equipped with quantitative measures of the uncertainty. A detailed example is presented.

  15. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Main Hawaiian Islands: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the main Hawaiian islands at approximately 4-km...

  16. HYCOM Consortium for Data-Assimilation Ocean Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-30

    for data assimilation in oceanography. Journal of Marine Systems , 16, 323-340. Wang, Y.M., 2000: The satellite altimeter data derived mean sea surface GSFC98, Geophysical Research Letters, 27, 701-704. 6

  17. Assimilation potential of water column biota: Mesocosm-based evaluations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Ansari, Z.A.; Sadhasivan, A.; Naik, S.; Sawkar, K.

    -toxic. It reveals the findings of mesocosm experiments, conducted to evaluate the assimilation potential of water column biota (bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton). Bulk water quantities from coastal locations, characterized by intense tourist activity, were...

  18. North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is to construct quality-controlled, and spatially and temporally consistent, land-surface model...

  19. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  20. A Simple Lightning Assimilation Technique For Improving Retrospective WRF Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convective rainfall is often a large source of error in retrospective modeling applications. In particular, positive rainfall biases commonly exist during summer months due to overactive convective parameterizations. In this study, lightning assimilation was applied in the Kain...

  1. Emulator-assisted data assimilation in complex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margvelashvili, Nugzar Yu; Herzfeld, Mike; Rizwi, Farhan; Mongin, Mathieu; Baird, Mark E.; Jones, Emlyn; Schaffelke, Britta; King, Edward; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Emulators are surrogates of complex models that run orders of magnitude faster than the original model. The utility of emulators for the data assimilation into ocean models is still not well understood. High complexity of ocean models translates into high uncertainty of the corresponding emulators which may undermine the quality of the assimilation schemes based on such emulators. Numerical experiments with a chaotic Lorenz-95 model are conducted to illustrate this point and suggest a strategy to alleviate this problem through the localization of the emulation and data assimilation procedures. Insights gained through these experiments are used to design and implement data assimilation scenario for a 3D fine-resolution sediment transport model of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia.

  2. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): CNMI: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)...

  3. Expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase variant in tobacco reduces tobacco-specific nitrosamine accumulation in cured leaves and cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianli; Zhang, Leichen; Lewis, Ramsey S; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Jack, Anne M; Crutchfield, James D; Ji, Huihua; Dewey, Ralph E

    2016-07-01

    Burley tobaccos (Nicotiana tabacum) display a nitrogen-use-deficiency phenotype that is associated with the accumulation of high levels of nitrate within the leaf, a trait correlated with production of a class of compounds referred to as tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Two TSNA species, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), have been shown to be strong carcinogens in numerous animal studies. We investigated the potential of molecular genetic strategies to lower nitrate levels in burley tobaccos by overexpressing genes encoding key enzymes of the nitrogen-assimilation pathway. Of the various constructs tested, only the expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase (NR) dramatically decreased free nitrate levels in the leaves. Field-grown tobacco plants expressing this NR variant exhibited greatly reduced levels of TSNAs in both cured leaves and mainstream smoke of cigarettes made from these materials. Decreasing leaf nitrate levels via expression of a constitutively active NR enzyme represents an exceptionally promising means for reducing the production of NNN and NNK, two of the most well-documented animal carcinogens found in tobacco products.

  4. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  5. Implicit Sampling, with Application to Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandre J.CHORIN; Matthias MORZFELD; Xuemin TU

    2013-01-01

    There are many computational tasks,in which it is necessary to sample a given probability density function (or pdf for short),i.e.,to use a computer to construct a sequence of independent random vectors xi (i =1,2,...),whose histogram converges to the given pdf.This can be difficult because the sample space can be huge,and more importantly,because the portion of the space,where the density is significant,can be very small,so that one may miss it by an ill-designed sampling scheme.Indeed,Markovchain Monte Carlo,the most widely used sampling scheme,can be thought of as a search algorithm,where one starts at an arbitrary point and one advances step-by-step towards the high probability region of the space.This can be expensive,in particular because one is typically interested in independent samples,while the chain has a memory.The authors present an alternative,in which samples are found by solving an algebraic equation with a random right-hand side rather than by following a chain; each sample is independent of the previous samples.The construction in the context of numerical integration is explained,and then it is applied to data assimilation.

  6. Hybrid Data Assimilation without Ensemble Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office is preparing to upgrade its three-dimensional variational system to a hybrid approach in which the ensemble is generated using a square-root ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the variational problem is solved using the Grid-point Statistical Interpolation system. As in most EnKF applications, we found it necessary to employ a combination of multiplicative and additive inflations, to compensate for sampling and modeling errors, respectively and, to maintain the small-member ensemble solution close to the variational solution; we also found it necessary to re-center the members of the ensemble about the variational analysis. During tuning of the filter we have found re-centering and additive inflation to play a considerably larger role than expected, particularly in a dual-resolution context when the variational analysis is ran at larger resolution than the ensemble. This led us to consider a hybrid strategy in which the members of the ensemble are generated by simply converting the variational analysis to the resolution of the ensemble and applying additive inflation, thus bypassing the EnKF. Comparisons of this, so-called, filter-free hybrid procedure with an EnKF-based hybrid procedure and a control non-hybrid, traditional, scheme show both hybrid strategies to provide equally significant improvement over the control; more interestingly, the filter-free procedure was found to give qualitatively similar results to the EnKF-based procedure.

  7. Assimilate partitioning in avocado, Persea americana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finazzo, S.; Davenport, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Assimilate partitioning is being studied in avocado, Persea americana cv. Millborrow in relation to fruit set. Single leaves on girdled branches of 10 year old trees were radiolabeled for 1 hr with 13..mu..Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. The source leaves were sampled during the experiment to measure translocation rates. At harvest the sink tissues were dissected and the incorporated radioactivity was measured. The translocation of /sup 14/C-labelled compounds to other leaves was minimal. Incorporation of label into fruitlets varied with the tissue and the stage of development. Sink (fruitlets) nearest to the labelled leaf and sharing the same phyllotaxy incorporated the most /sup 14/C. Source leaves for single non-abscising fruitlets retained 3X more /sup 14/C-labelled compounds than did source leaves for 2 or more fruitlets at 31 hrs. post-labelling. Export of label decreased appreciably when fruitlets abscised. If fruitlets abscised within 4 days of labeling then the translocation pattern was similar to the pattern for single fruitlets. If the fruitlet abscised later, the translocation pattern was intermediate between the single and double fruitlet pattern.

  8. 9-Amino­acridinium nitrate monohydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Sanaei Ataabadi, Somayyeh; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; A. Leyva Ramírez, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The pyridine N atom of the cation in the title hydrated salt, C13H11N2 +·NO3 −·H2O, is protonated; the N atom of the NH2 group shows a planar conformation. The former N atom is hydrogen bonded to a water mol­ecule. The amino group is involved in three N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with two neighboring nitrate anions. The water mol­ecule is hydrogen bonded to two adjacent nitrate anions. In the crystal, this results in a layered network.

  9. 9-Amino­acridinium nitrate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Sanaei Ataabadi, Somayyeh; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; A. Leyva Ramírez, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The pyridine N atom of the cation in the title hydrated salt, C13H11N2 +·NO3 −·H2O, is protonated; the N atom of the NH2 group shows a planar conformation. The former N atom is hydrogen bonded to a water mol­ecule. The amino group is involved in three N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with two neighboring nitrate anions. The water mol­ecule is hydrogen bonded to two adjacent nitrate anions. In the crystal, this results in a layered network. PMID:21522328

  10. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  11. Biodegradation of glycidol and glycidyl nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D L; Cornell, J H; Kaplan, A M

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative.

  12. Assimilating compact phase space retrievals of atmospheric composition with WRF-Chem/DART: a regional chemical transport/ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Arthur P.; Arellano, Avelino F., Jr.; Edwards, David P.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Pfister, Gabriele G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry/Data Assimilation Research Testbed (WRF-Chem/DART) chemical transport forecasting/data assimilation system together with the assimilation of compact phase space retrievals of satellite-derived atmospheric composition products. WRF-Chem is a state-of-the-art chemical transport model. DART is a flexible software environment for researching ensemble data assimilation with different assimilation and forecast model options. DART's primary assimilation tool is the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. WRF-Chem/DART is applied to the assimilation of Terra/Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) carbon monoxide (CO) trace gas retrieval profiles. Those CO observations are first assimilated as quasi-optimal retrievals (QORs). Our results show that assimilation of the CO retrievals (i) reduced WRF-Chem's CO bias in retrieval and state space, and (ii) improved the CO forecast skill by reducing the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and increasing the Coefficient of Determination (R2). Those CO forecast improvements were significant at the 95 % level. Trace gas retrieval data sets contain (i) large amounts of data with limited information content per observation, (ii) error covariance cross-correlations, and (iii) contributions from the retrieval prior profile that should be removed before assimilation. Those characteristics present challenges to the assimilation of retrievals. This paper addresses those challenges by introducing the assimilation of compact phase space retrievals (CPSRs). CPSRs are obtained by preprocessing retrieval data sets with an algorithm that (i) compresses the retrieval data, (ii) diagonalizes the error covariance, and (iii) removes the retrieval prior profile contribution. Most modern ensemble assimilation algorithms can efficiently assimilate CPSRs. Our results show that assimilation of MOPITT CO CPSRs reduced the number of observations (and assimilation computation

  13. Nitrate stimulation of indigenous nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacterial community in wastewater anaerobic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-de-Lomas, Juan; Corzo, Alfonso; Carmen Portillo, M; Gonzalez, Juan M; Andrades, Jose A; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesáreo; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    The role of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacteria (NR-SOB) in the nitrate-mediated inhibition of sulfide net production by anaerobic wastewater biofilms was analyzed in two experimental bioreactors, continuously fed with the primary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, one used as control (BRC) and the other one supplemented with nitrate (BRN). This study integrated information from H(2)S and pH microelectrodes, RNA-based molecular techniques, and the time course of biofilm growth and bioreactors water phase. Biofilms were a net source of sulfide for the water phase (2.01 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) in the absence of nitrate dosing. Nitrate addition effectively led to the cessation of sulfide release from biofilms despite which a low rate of net sulfate reduction activity (0.26 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) persisted at a deep layer within the biofilm. Indigenous NR-SOB including Thiomicrospira denitrificans, Arcobacter sp., and Thiobacillus denitrificans were stimulated by nitrate addition resulting in the elimination of most sulfide from the biofilms. Active sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) represented comparable fractions of total metabolically active bacteria in the libraries obtained from BRN and BRC. However, we detected changes in the taxonomic composition of the SRB community suggesting its adaptation to a higher level of NR-SOB activity in the presence of nitrate.

  14. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a ’halide for nitrate’ substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile ‘key building blocks’ (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, ’off the shelf’ materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an ‘allylic halide for allylic nitrate’ substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates (‘isoprene nitrates’) in 66–80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon–carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our ‘halide for nitrate’ substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  15. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: The Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and L1-assimilation (categorization and goodnes...

  16. Variational Data Assimilation for Optimizing Boundary Conditions in Ocean Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Christine; Tolstykh, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The review describes the development of ideas Gury Ivanovich Marchuk in the field of variational data assimilation for ocean models applied in particular in coupled models for long-range weather forecasts. Particular attention is paid to the optimization of boundary conditions on rigid boundaries. As idealized and realistic model configurations are considered. It is shown that the optimization allows us to determine the most sensitive model operators and bring the model solution closer to the assimilated data.

  17. Carbon Assimilation Profiles as a Tool for Identification of Zygomycetes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Patrick; Lortholary, Olivier; Dromer, Françoise; Dannaoui, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Identification of Zygomycetes is difficult and time-consuming by standard microbiological procedures. Carbon assimilation profiles are commonly used for yeast-and bacterial-species identification but rarely for filamentous-fungus identification. Carbon assimilation profiles were evaluated using the commercialized kits ID32C and API 50 CH, which contain 31 and 49 tests, respectively, to serve as simple tools for species identification of Zygomycetes in clinical microbiology laboratories. Fifty...

  18. Immigrants'assimilation process in a segmented labor market

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Planas, Núria; Alcobendas, Miguel Angel

    2010-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using data from the 2000 to 2008 Labor Force Survey, we find that immigrants are more occupat...

  19. A Memory-Process Model of Symbolic Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-04-01

    p AD/A-004 331 A MEMORY- PROCESS MODEL OF SYMBOLIC ASSIMILATION William C. Mann Carnegie-Mellon University Prepared for...performing all of the tasksj. ■ - -- —-■■■--■’- - . — ^ - - - - - - - "’ " A MEMORY- PROCESS MODEL OF SYMBOLIC ASSIMILATION William C. Minn...This contrasts with process models of human perception which m st receive their stimulus information one whole stimulus at a time. The system is

  20. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  1. Quantifying the impacts of snow on surface energy balance through assimilating snow cover fraction and snow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal snow plays an important part in Earth's climate system. Snow cover regulates the land surface energy balance through altering the albedo of the land surface. To utilize the satellite-retrieved snow cover fraction (SCF) and snow depth (SD) data sufficiently and avoid inconsistency, this paper developed a very simple but robust quality control method to assimilate Fengyun satellite-retrieved SCF and SD simultaneously. The results show that the assimilation method which this paper implemented can not only utilize the satellite-retrieved SCF and SD data sufficiently but also avoid the inconsistency of them. Two experiments were designed and performed to quantify the impacts of snow on land surface energy balance using the integrated urban land model. With the increase of the SCF and SD, the net radiation decreased significantly during the day and increased a little at night; the sensible heat flux decreased significantly during the day; the evapotranspiration and ground heat flux decreased during the day too.

  2. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55 mg/1010 cfu in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33 mg/1010 cfu of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  3. Short-term induction of assimilation and accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, Bernhard; Bermeitinger, Christina; Greve, Werner; Meyer, Birgit; Arnold, Manuel; Pielniok, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    The dual-process model of developmental regulation distinguishes two processes of self-regulation (assimilation = tenacious goal pursuit, and accommodation = flexible goal adjustment) that depend on differing conditions, but both contribute to successful development. Four experiments were conducted to investigate whether assimilation and accommodation can be induced or at least shifted by sensorimotor and cognitive manipulations. Experiment 1 investigated the relation between body manipulation and self-regulation. It was shown that assimilation could be triggered when participants were asked to hold on to golf balls as compared to being asked to drop them. Experiment 2 showed that a semantic priming of "let go" or "hold on" via instructions influenced the processes of self-regulation. Experiment 3 and Experiment 4 investigated the role of cognitive sets (divergent thinking) and motivational processes (thinking about one's action resources) in enhancing accommodation or assimilation. As expected, accommodation was triggered by an intervention activating divergent thought, and participants were more assimilative when they thought about their action resources. In sum, the results indicate that assimilation and accommodation can be induced experimentally; they were systematically dependent on physical, cognitive, and motivational states. The implications of the findings were discussed in the light of the dual-process model.

  4. Recent Advances in the GRACE Data Assimilation System (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Rodell, M.; Kumar, S.; Reichle, R. H.; Bolten, J. D.; Bergaoui, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalies in Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission have been used effectively to study hydrologic variability and trends at basin scale across diverse climatic and geologic conditions. Many hydrology and water resources applications, however, require water storage estimates at higher spatial resolution, greater temporal frequency, and with greater physical specificity (e.g., groundwater versus soil moisture versus snow) than GRACE alone can offer. The GRACE Data Assimilation System (GRACE-DAS) was developed to merge GRACE information on large-scale TWS anomalies with physically-based advanced Land Surface Models in order to improve model simulation of water storage while disaggregating and downscaling the raw GRACE TWS estimate. The primary assimilation algorithm is a variant of the ensemble Kalman Smoother. In recent years the system has been applied to studies of water resources and drought monitoring over four different continents. These experiences have led to refinements in the assimilation system that include modifications to land surface model parameters and the treatment of irrigation withdrawals, adjustments in the assimilation algorithm for snow updates, and, most recently, the implementation of a gridded observation assimilation capability that allows for a more flexible application of the system. This presentation will provide an overview of current GRACE-DAS capabilities, report on recent innovations in the modeling system, and describe future directions in GRACE data assimilation research and applications.

  5. Assimilate transport in phloem sets conditions for leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu; Hari, Pertti; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki; Sevanto, Sanna; Vesala, Timo

    2013-03-01

    Carbon uptake and transpiration in plant leaves occurs through stomata that open and close. Stomatal action is usually considered a response to environmental driving factors. Here we show that leaf gas exchange is more strongly related to whole tree level transport of assimilates than previously thought, and that transport of assimilates is a restriction of stomatal opening comparable with hydraulic limitation. Assimilate transport in the phloem requires that osmotic pressure at phloem loading sites in leaves exceeds the drop in hydrostatic pressure that is due to transpiration. Assimilate transport thus competes with transpiration for water. Excess sugar loading, however, may block the assimilate transport because of viscosity build-up in phloem sap. Therefore, for given conditions, there is a stomatal opening that maximizes phloem transport if we assume that sugar loading is proportional to photosynthetic rate. Here we show that such opening produces the observed behaviour of leaf gas exchange. Our approach connects stomatal regulation directly with sink activity, plant structure and soil water availability as they all influence assimilate transport. It produces similar behaviour as the optimal stomatal control approach, but does not require determination of marginal cost of water parameter.

  6. The evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has reprogrammed the regulation of carbon assimilation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandai, Doblin; Yin, Zhikang; Selway, Laura; Stead, David; Walker, Janet; Leach, Michelle D; Bohovych, Iryna; Ene, Iuliana V; Kastora, Stavroula; Budge, Susan; Munro, Carol A; Odds, Frank C; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P

    2012-12-11

    Microbes must assimilate carbon to grow and colonize their niches. Transcript profiling has suggested that Candida albicans, a major pathogen of humans, regulates its carbon assimilation in an analogous fashion to the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, repressing metabolic pathways required for the use of alterative nonpreferred carbon sources when sugars are available. However, we show that there is significant dislocation between the proteome and transcriptome in C. albicans. Glucose triggers the degradation of the ICL1 and PCK1 transcripts in C. albicans, yet isocitrate lyase (Icl1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) are stable and are retained. Indeed, numerous enzymes required for the assimilation of carboxylic and fatty acids are not degraded in response to glucose. However, when expressed in C. albicans, S. cerevisiae Icl1 (ScIcl1) is subjected to glucose-accelerated degradation, indicating that like S. cerevisiae, this pathogen has the molecular apparatus required to execute ubiquitin-dependent catabolite inactivation. C. albicans Icl1 (CaIcl1) lacks analogous ubiquitination sites and is stable under these conditions, but the addition of a ubiquitination site programs glucose-accelerated degradation of CaIcl1. Also, catabolite inactivation is slowed in C. albicans ubi4 cells. Ubiquitination sites are present in gluconeogenic and glyoxylate cycle enzymes from S. cerevisiae but absent from their C. albicans homologues. We conclude that evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has meant that following glucose exposure, C. albicans retains key metabolic functions, allowing it to continue to assimilate alternative carbon sources. This metabolic flexibility may be critical during infection, facilitating the rapid colonization of dynamic host niches containing complex arrays of nutrients. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic microbes must assimilate a range of carbon sources to grow and colonize their hosts. Current views about carbon assimilation in the

  7. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H(13)CO3(-) and H(12)CO3(-) as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H(13)CO3(-), demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the (13)C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment.

  8. Assimilation of IRS-P4 (MSMR) meteorological data in the NCMRWF global data assimilation system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupa Kamineni; S R H Rizvi; S C Kar; U C Mohanty; R K Paliwal

    2002-09-01

    Oceansat-1 was successfully launched by India in 1999, with two payloads, namely Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) and Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) to study the biological and physical parameters of the ocean. The MSMR sensor is configured as an eight-channel radiometer using four frequencies with dual polarization. The MSMR data at 75km resolution from the Oceansat-I have been assimilated in the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) data assimilation forecast system. The operational analysis and forecast system at NCMRWF is based on a T80L18 global spectral model and Spectral Statistical Inter-polation (SSI) scheme for data analysis. The impact of the MSMR data is seen globally, however it is significant over the oceanic region where conventional data are rare. The dry-nature of the control analyses have been removed by utilizing the MSMR data. Therefore, the total precipitable water data from MSMR has been identified as a very crucial parameter in this study. The impact of surface wind speed from MSMR is to increase easterlies over the tropical Indian Ocean. Shifting of the positions of westerly troughs and ridges in the south Indian Ocean has contributed to reduction of temperature to around 30°S.

  9. Assimilating ESA-CCI Soil Moisture into the JULES-EMPIRE Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, T. L.; Black, E.; Browne, P.; Lewis, J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface models, such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES, the land surface component of the Hadley Centre models) are used in a wide variety of applications, such as climate modelling, flood prediction and crop yield forecasting. However, how best to implement Data Assimilation (DA) for these models remains an open question. At a fundamental level these models are very different from atmospheric models for which traditional DA was developed. This poster describes the integration of JULES with the EMPIRE framework. EMPIRE (Employing MPI for Researching Ensembles) implements a test bed for ensemble based DA techniques that makes use of MPI message passing to exploit all available processing power. In particular EMPIRE contains several flavours of Particle Filter which show promise for the land surface DA problem. Examples of assimilating soil moisture observations from the ESA CCI data set into JULES are given for a number of sites in Africa. The model ensemble is generated by considering uncertainty in the driving data taken from the TAMSAT operational rainfall product. The results show considerable improvement in the modelled soil moisture and in particular the seasonal timing of the soil wetness.

  10. Gene Expression and Silencing Studies in Phytophthora infestans Reveal Infection-Specific Nutrient Transporters and a Role for the Nitrate Reductase Pathway in Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Fong, Audrey M. V.; Davis, Carol; Andreeva, Kalina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2016-01-01

    To help learn how phytopathogens feed from their hosts, genes for nutrient transporters from the hemibiotrophic potato and tomato pest Phytophthora infestans were annotated. This identified 453 genes from 19 families. Comparisons with a necrotrophic oomycete, Pythium ultimum var. ultimum, and a hemibiotrophic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, revealed diversity in the size of some families although a similar fraction of genes encoded transporters. RNA-seq of infected potato tubers, tomato leaves, and several artificial media revealed that 56 and 207 transporters from P. infestans were significantly up- or down-regulated, respectively, during early infection timepoints of leaves or tubers versus media. About 17 were up-regulated >4-fold in both leaves and tubers compared to media and expressed primarily in the biotrophic stage. The transcription pattern of many genes was host-organ specific. For example, the mRNA level of a nitrate transporter (NRT) was about 100-fold higher during mid-infection in leaves, which are nitrate-rich, than in tubers and three types of artificial media, which are nitrate-poor. The NRT gene is physically linked with genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which mobilize nitrate into ammonium and amino acids. All three genes were coregulated. For example, the three genes were expressed primarily at mid-stage infection timepoints in both potato and tomato leaves, but showed little expression in potato tubers. Transformants down-regulated for all three genes were generated by DNA-directed RNAi, with silencing spreading from the NR target to the flanking NRT and NiR genes. The silenced strains were nonpathogenic on leaves but colonized tubers. We propose that the nitrate assimilation genes play roles both in obtaining nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis and protecting P. infestans from natural or fertilization-induced nitrate and nitrite toxicity. PMID:27936244

  11. The Path to Nitrate Salt Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The topic is presented in a series of slides arranged according to the following outline: LANL nitrate salt incident as thermal runaway (thermally sensitive surrogates, full-scale tests), temperature control for processing, treatment options and down selection, assessment of engineering options, anticipated control set for treatment, and summary of the overall steps for RNS.

  12. Reinforced Sisal Fiber with Ferric Nitrate Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Jehan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ferric oxide synthesized through annealing route. The present research work deals with ferrite composite prepared using chemical reactions. Ferric nitrates and ammonium chloride doped with sisal fiber has been prepared. The structural behavior of aluminum oxide was studied in XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR & dielectric measurement. This behavior showed ferrite nature of the sample.

  13. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy;

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  14. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  15. Detonation characteristics of ammonium nitrate products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, R.J.A.; Hengel, E.I.V. van den; Steen, A.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) products depend on many factors and are therefore, despite the large amount of information on this topic, difficult to assess. In order to further improve the understanding of the safety properties of AN, the European Fertilizer Manufacturers Associ

  16. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  17. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration.

  18. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Variational assimilation of satellite cloud water/ice path and microphysics scheme sensitivity to the assimilation of a rainfall case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaodeng; Zhang, Ruizhi; Meng, Deming; Min, Jinzhong; Zhang, Lina

    2016-10-01

    Hydrometeor variables (cloud water and cloud ice mixing ratios) are added into the WRF three-dimensional variational assimilation system as additional control variables to directly analyze hydrometeors by assimilating cloud observations. In addition, the background error covariance matrix of hydrometeors is modeled through a control variable transform, and its characteristics discussed in detail. A suite of experiments using four microphysics schemes (LIN, SBU-YLIN, WDM6 and WSM6) are performed with and without assimilating satellite cloud liquid/ice water path. We find analysis of hydrometeors with cloud assimilation to be significantly improved, and the increment and distribution of hydrometeors are consistent with the characteristics of background error covariance. Diagnostic results suggest that the forecast with cloud assimilation represents a significant improvement, especially the ability to forecast precipitation in the first seven hours. It is also found that the largest improvement occurs in the experiment using the WDM6 scheme, since the assimilated cloud information can sustain for longer in this scheme. The least improvement, meanwhile, appears in the experiment using the SBU-YLIN scheme.

  20. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  1. Dietary Nitrate Is a Modifier of Vascular Gene Expression in Old Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Rammos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging leads to a number of disadvantageous changes in the cardiovascular system. Deterioration of vascular homoeostasis with increase in oxidative stress, chronic low-grade inflammation, and impaired nitric oxide bioavailability results in endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, and compromised arterial-ventricular interactions. A chronic dietary supplementation with the micronutrient nitrate has been demonstrated to improve vascular function. Healthy dietary patterns may regulate gene expression profiles. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The changes that occur at the gene expression level and transcriptional profile following a nutritional modification with nitrate have not been elucidated. To determine the changes of the vascular transcriptome, we conducted gene expression microarray experiments on aortas of old mice, which were treated with dietary nitrate. Our results highlight differentially expressed genes overrepresented in gene ontology categories. Molecular interaction and reaction pathways involved in the calcium-signaling pathway and the detoxification system were identified. Our results provide novel insight to an altered gene-expression profile in old mice following nitrate supplementation. This supports the general notion of nutritional approaches to modulate age-related changes of vascular functions and its detrimental consequences.

  2. Benefits of Safer Drinking Water: The Value of Nitrate Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Crutchfield, Stephen R.; Cooper, Joseph C.; Hellerstein, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates in drinking water, which may come from nitrogen fertilizers applied to crops, are a potential health risk. This report evaluates the potential benefits of reducing human exposure to nitrates in the drinking water supply. In a survey, respondents were asked a series of questions about their willingness to pay for a hypothetical water filter, which would reduce their risk of nitrate exposure. If nitrates in the respondent's drinking water were to exceed the EPA minimum safety standard,...

  3. Direct measurements of in-stream nitrate uptake with automated high frequency sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Hensley, Robert; Brase, Lisa; Borchardt, Dietrich; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Decades of nutrient studies have unveiled the importance of river networks in nutrient cycling. Still, direct methods to quantify instream removal in defined reaches have so far been limited to small streams. In rivers, where isotope tracer additions have been impracticable, uptake rates could only very rarely be measured and therefore have been mostly modelled by upscaling. Recently, the expanding availability of high resolution stream solute signals from automated sensors offers new possibilities for uptake kinetic studies. Cohen et al (2012) assessed assimilation and denitrification rates based on daily nitrate amplitudes and longitudinal concentration gradients in spring- fed chemostatic rivers. In higher order streams, overlapping of network, onsite and upstream signals require additional conceptual and methodological adaptation. Here we present a new combined longitudinal lagrangian and mass balance approach with continuous measurements of nitrate uptake rates in the German lowland river Weiße Elster, to our knowledge the first direct measurement of nitrate kinetics with continues high frequency sensors. We used 10 minutes time step NO3-N, pH, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature and chlorophyl-a measurements and supplementing low frequency 15N isotope manual sampling. Longitudinal lagrangian measurements were conducted during day and night. Our data from two morphologically highly contrasting reaches indicate that local, seasonal or even day to day changes in uptake kinetics can be of several orders of magnitude and that the disregard of intermediate storage and dispersion can lead to high errors. The natural river reach revealed considerably higher N uptake than the channelized river reach. Furthermore, river bottom related N-uptake rates were in the same order than those found in agricultural head water streams. Besides depicting prospects and limits, we also provide important considerations for the set-up of measurement stations and for

  4. Ectomycorrhizal fungi enhance nitrogen and phosphorus nutrition of Nothofagus dombeyi under drought conditions by regulating assimilative enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Drought stress conditions (DC) reduce plant growth and nutrition, restraining the sustainable reestablishment of Nothofagus dombeyi in temperate south Chilean forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal symbioses have been documented to enhance plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake under drought, but the regulation of involved assimilative enzymes remains unclear. We studied 1-year-old N. dombeyi (Mirb.) Oerst. plants in association with the ectomycorrhizal fungi Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch. and Descolea antartica Sing. In greenhouse experiments, shoot and root dry weights, mycorrhizal colonization, foliar N and P concentrations, and root enzyme activities [glutamate synthase (glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT), EC 1.4.1.13-14), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.2-4), nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1), and acid phosphomonoesterase (PME, EC 3.1.3.1-2)] were determined as a function of soil-water content. Inoculation of N. dombeyi with P. tinctorius and D. antartica significantly stimulated plant growth and increased plant foliar N and P concentrations, especially under DC. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation increased the activity of all studied enzymes relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought. We speculate that GDH is a key enzyme involved in the enhancement of ectomycorrhizal carbon (C) availability by fuelling the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under conditions of drought-induced carbon deficit. All studied assimilative enzymes of the ectomycorrhizal associations, involved in C, N, and P transfers, are closely interlinked and interdependent. The up-regulation of assimilative enzyme activities by ectomycorrhizal fungal root colonizers acts as a functional mechanism to increase seedling endurance to drought. We insist upon incorporating ectomycorrhizal inoculation in existing Chilean afforestation programs.

  5. Impacts of data assimilation on the global ocean carbonate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visinelli, L.; Masina, S.; Vichi, M.; Storto, A.; Lovato, T.

    2016-06-01

    In an ocean reanalysis, historical observations are combined with ocean and biogeochemical general circulation models to produce a reconstruction of the oceanic properties in past decades. This is one possible method to better constrain the role of the ocean carbon cycle in the determination of the air-sea CO2 flux. In this work, we investigate how the assimilation of physical variables and subsequently the combined assimilation of physical data and inorganic carbon variables - namely dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity - affect the modelling of the marine carbonate system and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes. The performance of the two assimilation exercises are quantitatively assessed against the assimilated DIC and alkalinity data and the independent ocean surface pCO2 observations from global datasets. We obtain that the assimilation of physical observations has contrasting effects in different ocean basins when compared with the DIC and alkalinity data: it reduces the root-mean square error against the observed pCO2 in the Atlantic and Southern oceans, while increases the model error in the North Pacific and Indian Oceans. In both cases the corrected evaporation rates are the major factor determining the changes in concentrations. The assimilation of inorganic carbon variables on top of the physical data gives a generalized improvement in the model error of inorganic carbon variables, also improving the annual mean and spatial distribution of air-sea fluxes in agreement with other published estimates. These results indicate that data assimilation of physical and inorganic carbon data does not guarantee the improvement of the simulated pCO2 in all the oceanic regions; nevertheless, errors in pCO2 are reduced by a factor corresponding to those associated with the air-sea flux formulations.

  6. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  7. Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone From Assimilation of Aura Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bowman, K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone is an atmospheric trace gas with multiple impacts on the environment. Global ozone fields are needed for air quality predictions, estimation of the ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface, climate-radiation studies, and ozone may also have an impact on longer-term weather predictions. We estimate global ozone fields in the stratosphere and troposphere by combining the data from the EOS Aura satellite with an ozone model using data assimilation. Ozone exhibits a large temporal variability in the lower stratosphere. Our previous work showed that assimilation of satellite data from limb-sounding geometry helps constrain ozone profiles in that region. We assimilated ozone data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) into the ozone system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). Ozone is transported within a general circulation model (GCM) which includes parameterizations for stratospheric photochemistry, tropospheric chemistry, and a simple scheme for heterogeneous ozone loss. The focus of this study is on the representation of ozone in the lower stratosphere and tropospheric ozone columns. We plan to extend studies of tropospheric ozone distribution through assimilation of ozone data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Comparisons with ozone sondes and occultation data show that assimilation of Aura data provides a good representation of ozone gradients and variability in the lower stratosphere. We proceed by separating the contributions to temporal changes in the ozone field into those that are due to the model and those that are due to the assimilation of Aura data. We discuss the impacts of Aura data and their role in the representation of ozone variability in the lower stratosphere and troposphere.

  8. DART: A Community Facility for Ensemble Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoar, T. J.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Collins, N.; Liu, H.; Romine, G.; Arellano, A. F.; Lawson, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is a mature community software facility providing researchers access to state-of-the-art ensemble data assimilation tools. The freely-available DART distribution includes fully functional low-order and high-order models, support for commonly available observations, hooks to easily add both new models and observation types, diagnostic programs to interpret the results, and a full tutorial suitable for self-study or teaching data assimilation concepts, including exercises using the models distributed with DART. DART is used regularly with a number of geophysical models including NCAR's WRF and CAM atmospheric models. DART/WRF is being used for tropical storm analysis and prediction in the Pacific and Atlantic and was used to produce real-time predictions during the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season. DART/CAM has played an integral part in the development of the new CAM version 4 that will be used for NCAR's contribution to the next IPCC. DART/CAM has been run for many model configurations to evaluate CAM systematic errors and parameterization options. DART is also in use for chemical assimilation in the WRF-CHEM and CAM-CHEM versions of these models. New models, both small and large continue to be added to the set compatible with DART. During 2009, DART assimilation was developed for the POP (Parallel Ocean Program) ocean general circulation model that is being used for decadal coupled atmosphere/ocean predictions at NCAR. The newest version of the Planet WRF model, configured for Martian data assimilation, is also now in use with DART. Novel observation types also continue to be added to DART. For instance, assimilation capabilities for radiance observations from the COSMIC and MOPITT instruments on earth and from TES on Mars have been added in 2009.

  9. A new assimilation method with physical mechanism to estimate evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen; Xu, Xinyi

    2016-04-01

    The accurate estimation of regional evapotranspiration has been a research hotspot in the field of hydrology and water resources both in domestic and abroad. A new assimilation method with physical mechanism was proposed to estimate evapotranspiration, which was easier to apply. Based on the evapotranspiration (ET) calculating method with soil moisture recurrence relations in the Distributed Time Variant Gain Model (DTVGM) and Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), it constructed an assimilation system for recursive calculation of evapotranspiration in combination with "observation value" by the retrieval data of evapotranspiration through the Two-Layer Remote Sensing Model. By updating the filter in the model with assimilated evapotranspiration, synchronization correction to the model estimation was achieved and more accurate time continuous series values of evapotranspiration were obtained. Through the verification of observations in Xiaotangshan Observatory and hydrological stations in the basin, the correlation coefficient of remote sensing inversion evapotranspiration and actual evapotranspiration reaches as high as 0.97, and the NS efficiency coefficient of DTVGM model was 0.80. By using the typical daily evapotranspiration from Remote Sensing and the data from DTVGM Model, we assimilated the hydrological simulation processes with DTVGM Model in Shahe Basin in Beijing to obtain continuous evapotranspiration time series. The results showed that the average relative error between the remote sensing values and DTVGM simulations is about 12.3%, and for the value between remote sensing retrieval data and assimilation values is 4.5%, which proved that the assimilation results of Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) were closer to the "real" data, and was better than the evapotranspiration simulated by DTVGM without any improvement. Keyword Evapotranspiration assimilation Ensemble Kalman Filter Distributed hydrological model Two-Layer Remote Sensing Model

  10. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  11. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L. [RUST - Clemson Technical Center, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  12. A nitrate sensitive planar optode; performance and interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a newly developed nitrate sensitive planar optode. It exhibits a linear response to nitrate from 1 to 50 mM at pH 8.0, a fast response time below 10 s and a good lifetime, allowing for fast two dimensional nitrate measurements over long periods of time. Interference from nitrite...

  13. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... antidumping duty order on certain ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or... Publication 4396 (May 2013), entitled Certain Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Investigation No....

  14. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  15. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, A.M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought

  18. 76 FR 49449 - Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... duty investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian... and the ITC instituted a second sunset review of the ammonium nitrate suspended investigation....

  19. 76 FR 23569 - Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation and Notice of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import Administration... (``AD'') Investigation on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate from the Russian Federation (``the... determine whether imports of solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from Russia...

  20. Solid state interaction studies on binary nitrate mixtures of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalekar, Bhupesh; Raje, Naina; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2017-02-01

    Interaction behavior of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate (LaNH) have been investigated on the mixtures in different molar ratios of the two precursors and monitoring the reactions at elevated temperatures with thermoanalytical and X-ray diffraction measurement techniques. During the decomposition of equimolar mixture of LaNH and UNH, formation of lanthanum uranate (U0.5La0.5)O2, was seen by the temperature of 500 °C along with lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and uranium trioxide (UO3). By the temperature of 700 °C, the formation of uranium sesquioxide (U3O8) was observed along with (U0.5La0.5)O2 as end products in uranium rich mixtures. Lanthanum rich compositions decomposed by the temperature of 700 °C to give (U0.5La0.5)O2 and La2O3 as end products.

  1. Glycerol assimilation and production of 1,3-propanediol by Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainala, Satish Kumar; Ashok, Somasundar; Ko, Yeounjoo; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-06-01

    Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19 (Y19) was isolated because of its ability for carbon monoxide-dependent hydrogen production (water-gas shift reaction). This paper reports the assimilation of glycerol and the production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) by Y19. Genome sequencing revealed that Y19 contained the genes for the utilization of glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (pdu operon) along with those for the synthesis of coenzyme B12 (cob operon). On the other hand, it did not possess the genes for the fermentative metabolism of glycerol of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which consists of both the oxidative (dhaD and dhaK) and reductive (dhaB and dhaT) pathways. In shake-flask cultivation under aerobic conditions, Y19 could grow well with glycerol as the sole carbon source and produced 1,3-PDO. The level of 1,3-PDO production was improved when vitamin B12 was added to the culture medium under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, cell growth and 1,3-PDO production on glycerol was also possible, but only when an exogenous electron acceptor, such as nitrate or fumarate, was added. This is the first report of the glycerol metabolism and 1,3-PDO production by C. amalonaticus Y19.

  2. Assimilation of Altimeter Data into a Quasigeostrophic Model of the Gulf Stream System. Part 2; Assimilation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capotondi, Antonietta; Holland, William R.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola

    1995-01-01

    The improvement in the climatological behavior of a numerical model as a consequence of the assimilation of surface data is investigated. The model used for this study is a quasigeostrophic (QG) model of the Gulf Stream region. The data that have been assimilated are maps of sea surface height that have been obtained as the superposition of sea surface height variability deduced from the Geosat altimeter measurements and a mean field constructed from historical hydrographic data. The method used for assimilating the data is the nudging technique. Nudging has been implemented in such a way as to achieve a high degree of convergence of the surface model fields toward the observations. Comparisons of the assimilation results with available in situ observations show a significant improvement in the degree of realism of the climatological model behavior, with respect to the model in which no data are assimilated. The remaining discrepancies in the model mean circulation seem to be mainly associated with deficiencies in the mean component of the surface data that are assimilated. On the other hand, the possibility of building into the model more realistic eddy characteristics through the assimilation of the surface eddy field proves very successful in driving components of the mean model circulation that are in relatively good agreement with the available observations. Comparisons with current meter time series during a time period partially overlapping the Geosat mission show that the model is able to 'correctly' extrapolate the instantaneous surface eddy signals to depths of approximately 1500 m. The correlation coefficient between current meter and model time series varies from values close to 0.7 in the top 1500 m to values as low as 0.1-0.2 in the deep ocean.

  3. Effect of Sodium Nitrate and Nitrate Reducing Bacteria on In vitro Methane Production and Fermentation with Buffalo Rumen Liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Pillanatham Civalingam; Kamra, Devki Nandan; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, Lal Chandra

    2012-06-01

    Nitrate can serve as a terminal electron acceptor in place of carbon dioxide and inhibit methane emission in the rumen and nitrate reducing bacteria might help enhance the reduction of nitrate/nitrite, which depends on the type of feed offered to animals. In this study the effects of three levels of sodium nitrate (0, 5, 10 mM) on fermentation of three diets varying in their wheat straw to concentrate ratio (700:300, low concentrate, LC; 500:500, medium concentrate, MC and 300:700, high concentrate, HC diet) were investigated in vitro using buffalo rumen liquor as inoculum. Nitrate reducing bacteria, isolated from the rumen of buffalo were tested as a probiotic to study if it could help in enhancing methane inhibition in vitro. Inclusion of sodium nitrate at 5 or 10 mM reduced (pfeed reduced (pfeeding and introduced individually (3 ml containing 1.2 to 2.3×10(6) cfu/ml) into in vitro incubations containing the MC diet with 10 mM sodium nitrate. Addition of live culture of NRBB 57 resulted in complete removal of nitrate and nitrite from the medium with a further reduction in methane and no effect on IVTD compared to the control treatments containing nitrate with autoclaved cultures or nitrate without any culture. The data revealed that nitrate reducing bacteria can be used as probiotic to prevent the accumulation of nitrite when sodium nitrate is used to reduce in vitro methane emissions.

  4. An integrated GIS application system for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Shen, Runping; Huang, Xiaolong; Shi, Chunxiang

    2014-11-01

    The gaps in knowledge and existing challenges in precisely describing the land surface process make it critical to represent the massive soil moisture data visually and mine the data for further research.This article introduces a comprehensive soil moisture assimilation data analysis system, which is instructed by tools of C#, IDL, ArcSDE, Visual Studio 2008 and SQL Server 2005. The system provides integrated service, management of efficient graphics visualization and analysis of land surface data assimilation. The system is not only able to improve the efficiency of data assimilation management, but also comprehensively integrate the data processing and analysis tools into GIS development environment. So analyzing the soil moisture assimilation data and accomplishing GIS spatial analysis can be realized in the same system. This system provides basic GIS map functions, massive data process and soil moisture products analysis etc. Besides,it takes full advantage of a spatial data engine called ArcSDE to effeciently manage, retrieve and store all kinds of data. In the system, characteristics of temporal and spatial pattern of soil moiture will be plotted. By analyzing the soil moisture impact factors, it is possible to acquire the correlation coefficients between soil moisture value and its every single impact factor. Daily and monthly comparative analysis of soil moisture products among observations, simulation results and assimilations can be made in this system to display the different trends of these products. Furthermore, soil moisture map production function is realized for business application.

  5. Assimilation of GNSS radio occultation observations in GRAPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xue, J.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the development of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations assimilation in the Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration, including the choice of data to assimilate, the data quality control, the observation operator, the tuning of observation error, and the results of the observation impact experiments. The results indicate that RO data have a significantly positive effect on analysis and forecast at all ranges in GRAPES not only in the Southern Hemisphere where conventional observations are lacking but also in the Northern Hemisphere where data are rich. It is noted that a relatively simple assimilation and forecast system in which only the conventional and RO observation are assimilated still has analysis and forecast skill even after nine months integration, and the analysis difference between both hemispheres is gradually reduced with height when compared with NCEP (National Centers for Enviromental Prediction) analysis. Finally, as a result of the new onboard payload of the Chinese FengYun-3 (FY-3) satellites, the research status of the RO of FY-3 satellites is also presented.

  6. Effects of bisphenol A on ammonium assimilation in soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2013-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), which is ubiquitous in the environment, is an example of an endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC). Ammonium assimilation has an important function in plant growth and development. However, insufficient information on the potential effect of BPA on ammonium assimilation in plants is available. In this study, the effects of BPA on ammonium assimilation in roots of soybean seedlings were investigated. During the stress period, 1.5 mg L(-1) of BPA improved glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) cycle and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) pathway in ammonium assimilation. The amino acid and the soluble protein contents increased in the soybeans. At 17.2 and 50.0 mg L(-1) of BPA, the GS/GOGAT cycle was inhibited and the GDH pathway was promoted. The amino acid content increased and the soluble protein content decreased. During the recovery period, the GS/GOGAT cycle and the GDH pathway recovered at 1.5 and 17.2 mg L(-1) of BPA but not at 50.0 mg L(-1) of BPA. The amino acid content continuously increased and the soluble protein content decreased compared with those in the control treatment. In summary, BPA treatment could affect the contents of soluble protein and amino acid in the soybean roots by regulating ammonium assimilation.

  7. Assimilation impacts on Arctic Ocean circulation, heat and freshwater budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hao; Mugford, Ruth I.; Haines, Keith; Smith, Gregory C.

    We investigate the Arctic basin circulation, freshwater content (FWC) and heat budget by using a high-resolution global coupled ice-ocean model implemented with a state-of-the-art data assimilation scheme. We demonstrate that, despite a very sparse dataset, by assimilating hydrographic data in and near the Arctic basin, the initial warm bias and drift in the control run is successfully corrected, reproducing a much more realistic vertical and horizontal structure to the cyclonic boundary current carrying the Atlantic Water (AW) along the Siberian shelves in the reanalysis run. The Beaufort Gyre structure and FWC and variability are also more accurately reproduced. Small but important changes in the strait exchange flows are found which lead to more balanced budgets in the reanalysis run. Assimilation fluxes dominate the basin budgets over the first 10 years (P1: 1987-1996) of the reanalysis for both heat and FWC, after which the drifting Arctic upper water properties have been restored to realistic values. For the later period (P2: 1997-2004), the Arctic heat budget is almost balanced without assimilation contributions, while the freshwater budget shows reduced assimilation contributions compensating largely for surface salinity damping, which was extremely strong in this run. A downward trend in freshwater export at the Canadian Straits and Fram Strait is found in period P2, associated with Beaufort Gyre recharge. A detailed comparison with observations and previous model studies at the individual Arctic straits is also included.

  8. OpenDA-NEMO framework for ocean data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Nils; Altaf, Muhammad Umer; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Data assimilation methods provide a means to handle the modeling errors and uncertainties in sophisticated ocean models. In this study, we have created an OpenDA-NEMO framework unlocking the data assimilation tools available in OpenDA for use with NEMO models. This includes data assimilation methods, automatic parallelization, and a recently implemented automatic localization algorithm that removes spurious correlations in the model based on uncertainties in the computed Kalman gain matrix. We have set up a twin experiment where we assimilate sea surface height (SSH) satellite measurements. From the experiments, we can conclude that the OpenDA-NEMO framework performs as expected and that the automatic localization significantly improves the performance of the data assimilation algorithm by successfully removing spurious correlations. Based on these results, it looks promising to extend the framework with new kinds of observations and work on improving the computational speed of the automatic localization technique such that it becomes feasible to include large number of observations.

  9. Architecting Service Based Sensor Networks for the Intelligent Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Ponmagal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose an architectural model for assimilating distributed sensor networks through cloud paradigm. This strategy can be applied to monitor and control the physical parameters such as temperature, pressure, and level. It is proposed to consider the use of service oriented architecture to program and deploy the sensed parameters. The service oriented architecture for sensor network has been implemented in such a way that, for every specific requirement of the monitor center, the assimilation agent invokes the services of the sensors through a registry and the specific changes in the sensed parameters are also notified as auditable event using push interaction pattern of SOA. The assimilation agent serves as an intelligent component by providing authentication services. This SOA is extended to integrate different types of sensor networks through cloud environment. Hence several sensors can be networked together to monitor different process parameters and they have been assimilated with Internet by registering them as services, hence a complete distributed assimilation environment is exploited.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of carbon and nitrogen assimilation mechanisms in three indigenous bioleaching bacteria: predictions and validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenfeld Nicole

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon and nitrogen fixation are essential pathways for autotrophic bacteria living in extreme environments. These bacteria can use carbon dioxide directly from the air as their sole carbon source and can use different sources of nitrogen such as ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, or even nitrogen from the air. To have a better understanding of how these processes occur and to determine how we can make them more efficient, a comparative genomic analysis of three bioleaching bacteria isolated from mine sites in Chile was performed. This study demonstrated that there are important differences in the carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation mechanisms among bioleaching bacteria that coexist in mining environments. Results In this study, we probed that both Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans incorporate CO2 via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle; however, the former bacterium has two copies of the Rubisco type I gene whereas the latter has only one copy. In contrast, we demonstrated that Leptospirillum ferriphilum utilizes the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. Although all the species analyzed in our study can incorporate ammonia by an ammonia transporter, we demonstrated that Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans could also assimilate nitrate and nitrite but only Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans could fix nitrogen directly from the air. Conclusion The current study utilized genomic and molecular evidence to verify carbon and nitrogen fixation mechanisms for three bioleaching bacteria and provided an analysis of the potential regulatory pathways and functional networks that control carbon and nitrogen fixation in these microorganisms.

  11. Assimilating surface observations in a four-dimensional variational Doppler radar data assimilation system to improve the analysis and forecast of a squall line case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingchao; Zhao, Kun; Sun, Juanzhen; Zhou, Bowen; Lee, Wen-Chau

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines how assimilating surface observations can improve the analysis and forecast ability of a fourdimensional Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS). Observed surface temperature and winds are assimilated together with radar radial velocity and reflectivity into a convection-permitting model using the VDRAS four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system. A squall-line case observed during a field campaign is selected to investigate the performance of the technique. A single observation experiment shows that assimilating surface observations can influence the analyzed fields in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The surface-based cold pool, divergence and gust front of the squall line are all strengthened through the assimilation of the single surface observation. Three experiments—assimilating radar data only, assimilating radar data with surface data blended in a mesoscale background, and assimilating both radar and surface observations with a 4DVAR cost function—are conducted to examine the impact of the surface data assimilation. Independent surface and wind profiler observations are used for verification. The result shows that the analysis and forecast are improved when surface observations are assimilated in addition to radar observations. It is also shown that the additional surface data can help improve the analysis and forecast at low levels. Surface and low-level features of the squall line—including the surface warm inflow, cold pool, gust front, and low-level wind—are much closer to the observations after assimilating the surface data in VDRAS.

  12. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  13. Bismuth Basic Nitrate as a Novel Adsorbent for Azo Dye Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth basic nitrate (BBN and its TiO2-Ag modified sorbent, PTBA were successfully synthesized via a precipitation method. The structural characteristics of prepared sorbents were determined through different analytical techniques. The potential use of prepared sorbents for organic compounds' removal was evaluated using Methyl Orange and Sunset Yellow dyes as model pollutants in aqueous solutions. The experimental results showed that the presence of TiO2 and Ag particles during the crystal growth of bismuth basic nitrate has an effect on the crystal structure, point of zero charge (pHpzc, pore volume and diameter. The lower binding energy of Ti 2p core level peak indicates the octahedral coordination of TiO2 particles on the PTBA surface. The alteration of hydrophilic-hydrophobic characteristics of sorbent's surface improves the adsorptive performance of the modified sorbent and provides an efficient route for organic contaminants' removal from aqueous solutions.

  14. Nitrate intake from drinking water on Tenerife island (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Mesa, J M; Rubio Armendáriz, C; Hardisson de la Torre, A

    2003-01-20

    Although meat and vegetable products contain higher concentrations of nitrate, drinking water is the fastest and most direct form of nitrate consumption by the population. It becomes contaminated with nitrates when sea water infiltrates fresh water aquifers and when rain and irrigation water wash through soils that have been excessively treated with nitrated fertilizers. Nitrates are of great toxicological interest as they are involved in the origin of nitrites and nitrosamines and the development of metahaemoglobinaemia in infants. The objective of this study was to determine the quantities of NO(3)(-) in the water supply of each of the Island's municipalities and in the leading brands of bottled waters consumed by the population of Tenerife. This parameter is necessary for the determination of Acceptable Daily Intake (A.D.I.) of nitrates from drinking water. With one unremarkable exception, the nitrate levels found in the water analyzed were optimum for human consumption and amply complied with current European Legislation.

  15. Nitrate removal by microbial enhancement in a riparian wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yuansheng; Yang, Zhifeng; Tian, Binghui

    2010-07-01

    A riparian wetland (RW) was constructed in a river bend to study the effect of the addition of Bacillus subtilis FY99-01 on nitrate removal. Nitrate was removed more efficiently in the summer than in the winter owing to integrated hydraulic, microbial and environmental effects. The maximal nitrate removal and the mean nitrate loss rate in the RW were 36.1% and 50.5 g/m(2)/yr, respectively. Statistic analyses indicated that the redox potential was very significant to denitrification while organic matter in the outflow, temperature and nitrate in the inflow significantly affected nitrate removal. These results suggest that an RW can be a cost-effective approach to enhance microbial nitrate removal and can potentially be extended to similar river bends.

  16. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  17. Correcting biased observation model error in data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Harlim, John

    2016-01-01

    While the formulation of most data assimilation schemes assumes an unbiased observation model error, in real applications, model error with nontrivial biases is unavoidable. A practical example is the error in the radiative transfer model (which is used to assimilate satellite measurements) in the presence of clouds. As a consequence, many (in fact 99\\%) of the cloudy observed measurements are not being used although they may contain useful information. This paper presents a novel nonparametric Bayesian scheme which is able to learn the observation model error distribution and correct the bias in incoming observations. This scheme can be used in tandem with any data assimilation forecasting system. The proposed model error estimator uses nonparametric likelihood functions constructed with data-driven basis functions based on the theory of kernel embeddings of conditional distributions developed in the machine learning community. Numerically, we show positive results with two examples. The first example is des...

  18. Storm surge model based on variational data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-li HUANG; Jian XU; De-guan WANG; Dong-yan LU

    2010-01-01

    By combining computation and observation information,the variational data assimilation method has the ability to eliminate errors caused by the uncertainty of parameters in practical forecasting.It was applied to a storm surge model based on unstructured grids with high spatial resolution meant for improving the forecasting accuracy of the storm surge.By controlling the wind stress drag coefficient,the variation-based model was developed and validated through data assimilation tests in an actual storm surge induced by a typhoon.In the data assimilation tests,the model accurately identified the wind stress drag coefficient and obtained results close to the true state.Then,the actual storm surge induced by Typhoon 0515 was forecast by the developed model,and the results demonstrate its efficiency in practical application.

  19. The Impact of the Assimilation of Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity Data in the GEOS Ocean Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieres, Guillaume Rene Jean; Kovach, Robin M.; Keppenne, Christian L.; Akella, Santharam; Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel Phillippe

    2014-01-01

    Ocean salinity and temperature differences drive thermohaline circulations. These properties also play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. With the availability of L-band space-borne observations, it becomes possible to provide global scale sea surface salinity (SSS) distribution. This study analyzes globally the along-track (Level 2) Aquarius SSS retrievals obtained using both passive and active L-band observations. Aquarius alongtrack retrieved SSS are assimilated into the ocean data assimilation component of Version 5 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) assimilation and forecast model. We present a methodology to correct the large biases and errors apparent in Version 2.0 of the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm and map the observed Aquarius SSS retrieval into the ocean models bulk salinity in the topmost layer. The impact of the assimilation of the corrected SSS on the salinity analysis is evaluated by comparisons with insitu salinity observations from Argo. The results show a significant reduction of the global biases and RMS of observations-minus-forecast differences at in-situ locations. The most striking results are found in the tropics and southern latitudes. Our results highlight the complementary role and problems that arise during the assimilation of salinity information from in-situ (Argo) and space-borne surface (SSS) observations

  20. Methemoglobinaemia in Cardiac Patients on Nitrate Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Aziz A. Ghanem

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methaemoglobinaemia refers to the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron within the haemoglobin molecule, which occurs following oxidative stresses. The subsequent impairment in oxygen transport may lead to progressive hypoxia that is highly dangerous condition especially in borderline patients like the cardiac patient.Objectives: In the present work, authors explore the extent of methaemoglobinaemia in cardiac patients receiving nitrate therapy.Methodology: The study included 970 cardiac patients presented in cardiology department, Mansoura Specialised Medical Hospital, Egypt, in the period from February to July 2009. Patients were taking oral, sublingual, dermal preparation or a combination of two preparations.Results: cases of the study had methemoglobin level 1.1782 ± 0.3476 g/dL with insignificant difference between males and females. Methemoglobin showed positive correlation with carboxyhemogloin and negative correlation with O2 content and O2 saturation. It was significantly higher in cardiac patient with chest infection, anaemia and diabetic patients but didn't differ in hepatic or non hepatic cardiac patients. 3.2% of cardiac patients who receive more than one nitrate preparation (either oral and dermal or oral and sublingual therapy have methemoglobin level significantly higher than those who receive single preparation. There is significant difference in methemoglobin level in cardiac patients complaining of myocardial infarction “MI”, unstable Angina, atrial fibrillation “AF” and hypertensive heart disease “HTN”.Conclusions: It is concluded that commonly used dosages of nitrates are capable of causing elevations of methemoglobin ranged from 0.9 – 5.3 g/dl. Although the elevation in methaemoglobin (MetHb levels was not of routine clinical significance, there was statistically significant increase in MetHb levels in cardiac patients with another pathologic condition as anaemia, diabetes mellitus or chest

  1. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammos, Christos; Luedike, Peter; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Rassaf, Tienush

    2015-10-26

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of microRNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system.

  2. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos; Rammos; Peter; Luedike; Ulrike; Hendgen-Cotta; Tienush; Rassaf

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide(NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of micro RNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system.

  3. Nitrate uptake varies with tide height and nutrient availability in the intertidal seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Kylla M; Bracken, Matthew E S

    2016-10-01

    Intertidal seaweeds must cope with a suite of stressors imposed by aerial exposure at low tide, including nutrient limitation due to emersion. Seaweeds can access nutrients only when submerged, so individuals living higher compared to lower on the shore may have adaptations allowing them to acquire sufficient amounts of nutrients to survive and maintain growth. Using a combination of observations and experiments, we aimed to identify intraspecific variation in nitrate uptake rates across the intertidal distribution of F. vesiculosus, as well as test for acclimation in response to a change in tide height. We replicated our study at sites spanning nearly the entire Gulf of Maine coastline, to examine how local environmental variability may alter intraspecific variation in nitrate uptake. We found that average nitrate uptake rates were ~18% higher in upper compared to lower intertidal Fucus vesiculosus. Furthermore, we found evidence for both acclimation and adaptation to tide height during a transplant experiment. F. vesiculosus transplanted from the lower to the upper intertidal zone was characterized by increased nitrate uptake, but individuals transplanted from the upper to the lower intertidal zone retained high uptake rates. Our observations differed among Gulf of Maine regions and among time points of our study. Importantly, these differences may reflect associations between nitrate uptake rates and abiotic environmental conditions and seaweed nutrient status. Our study highlights the importance of long-term variation in ambient nutrient supply in driving intraspecific variation of seaweeds across the intertidal gradient and local and seasonal variation in ambient nutrient levels in mediating intraspecific differences.

  4. Nitrogen isotopes in ice core nitrate linked to anthropogenic atmospheric acidity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lei; Alexander, Becky; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Steig, Eric J.; Savarino, Joël; Sofen, Eric D.; Schauer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in Greenland snow nitrate and in North American remote lake sediments has decreased gradually beginning as early as ∼1850 Christian Era. This decrease was attributed to increasing atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic nitrate, reflecting an anthropogenic impact on the global nitrogen cycle, and the impact was thought to be amplified ∼1970. However, our subannually resolved ice core records of δ15N and major ions (e.g., , ) over the last ∼200 y show that the decrease in δ15N is not always associated with increasing concentrations, and the decreasing trend actually leveled off ∼1970. Correlation of δ15N with H+, , and HNO3 concentrations, combined with nitrogen isotope fractionation models, suggests that the δ15N decrease from ∼1850–1970 was mainly caused by an anthropogenic-driven increase in atmospheric acidity through alteration of the gas−particle partitioning of atmospheric nitrate. The concentrations of and also leveled off ∼1970, reflecting the effect of air pollution mitigation strategies in North America on anthropogenic NOx and SO2 emissions. The consequent atmospheric acidity change, as reflected in the ice core record of H+ concentrations, is likely responsible for the leveling off of δ15N ∼1970, which, together with the leveling off of concentrations, suggests a regional mitigation of anthropogenic impact on the nitrogen cycle. Our results highlight the importance of atmospheric processes in controlling δ15N of nitrate and should be considered when using δ15N as a source indicator to study atmospheric flux of nitrate to land surface/ecosystems. PMID:24711383

  5. Assimilation scheme of the Mediterranean Forecasting System: operational implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Demirov

    Full Text Available This paper describes the operational implementation of the data assimilation scheme for the Mediterranean Forecasting System Pilot Project (MFSPP. The assimilation scheme, System for Ocean Forecast and Analysis (SOFA, is a reduced order Optimal Interpolation (OI scheme. The order reduction is achieved by projection of the state vector into vertical Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF. The data assimilated are Sea Level Anomaly (SLA and temperature profiles from Expandable Bathy Termographs (XBT. The data collection, quality control, assimilation and forecast procedures are all done in Near Real Time (NRT. The OI is used intermittently with an assimilation cycle of one week so that an analysis is produced once a week. The forecast is then done for ten days following the analysis day. The root mean square (RMS between the model forecast and the analysis (the forecast RMS is below 0.7°C in the surface layers and below 0.2°C in the layers deeper than 200 m for all the ten forecast days. The RMS between forecast and initial condition (persistence RMS is higher than forecast RMS after the first day. This means that the model improves forecast with respect to persistence. The calculation of the misfit between the forecast and the satellite data suggests that the model solution represents well the main space and time variability of the SLA except for a relatively short period of three – four weeks during the summer when the data show a fast transition between the cyclonic winter and anti-cyclonic summer regimes. This occurs in the surface layers that are not corrected by our assimilation scheme hypothesis. On the basis of the forecast skill scores analysis, conclusions are drawn about future improvements.

    Key words. Oceanography; general (marginal and semi-enclosed seas; numerical modeling; ocean prediction

  6. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eKorte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702, as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605 that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance.

  7. Volatile abundances and oxygen isotopes in basaltic to dacitic lavas on mid-ocean ridges: The role of assimilation at spreading centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Wallace, P.J.; Grimes, Craig B.; Klein, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low- to moderate-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts. However, our geochemical data from MOR high-silica glasses, including new volatile and oxygen isotope data, suggest that assimilation of altered crustal material plays a significant role in the petrogenesis of dacites and may be important in the formation of basaltic lavas at MOR in general. MOR high-silica andesites and dacites from diverse areas show remarkably similar major element trends, incompatible trace element enrichments, and isotopic signatures suggesting similar processes control their chemistry. In particular, very high Cl and elevated H2O concentrations and relatively light oxygen isotope ratios (~ 5.8‰ vs. expected values of ~ 6.8‰) in fresh dacite glasses can be explained by contamination of magmas from a component of ocean crust altered by hydrothermal fluids. Crystallization of silicate phases and Fe-oxides causes an increase in δ18O in residual magma, but assimilation of material initially altered at high temperatures results in lower δ18O values. The observed geochemical signatures can be explained by extreme fractional crystallization of a MOR basalt parent combined with partial melting and assimilation (AFC) of amphibole-bearing altered oceanic crust. The MOR dacitic lavas do not appear to be simply the extrusive equivalent of oceanic plagiogranites. The combination of partial melting and assimilation produces a distinct geochemical signature that includes higher incompatible trace element abundances and distinct trace element ratios relative to those observed in plagiogranites.

  8. Nitrogen transporter and assimilation genes exhibit developmental stage-selective expression in maize (Zea mays L.) associated with distinct cis-acting promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Bi, Yong-Mei; Downs, Gregory S; Wu, Wenqing; Signorelli, Tara; Lu, Guangwen; Chen, Xi; Bondo, Eddie; Zhu, Tong; Lukens, Lewis N; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen is considered the most limiting nutrient for maize (Zea mays L.), but there is limited understanding of the regulation of nitrogen-related genes during maize development. An Affymetrix 82K maize array was used to analyze the expression of ≤ 46 unique nitrogen uptake and assimilation probes in 50 maize tissues from seedling emergence to 31 d after pollination. Four nitrogen-related expression clusters were identified in roots and shoots corresponding to, or overlapping, juvenile, adult, and reproductive phases of development. Quantitative real time PCR data was consistent with the existence of these distinct expression clusters. Promoters corresponding to each cluster were screened for over-represented cis-acting elements. The 8-bp distal motif of the Arabidopsis 43-bp nitrogen response element (NRE) was over-represented in nitrogen-related maize gene promoters. This conserved motif, referred to here as NRE43-d8, was previously shown to be critical for nitrate-activated transcription of nitrate reductase (NIA1) and nitrite reductase (NIR1) by the NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6 (NLP6) in Arabidopsis. Here, NRE43-d8 was over-represented in the promoters of maize nitrate and ammonium transporter genes, specifically those that showed peak expression during early-stage vegetative development. This result predicts an expansion of the NRE-NLP6 regulon and suggests that it may have a developmental component in maize. We also report leaf expression of putative orthologs of nitrite transporters (NiTR1), a transporter not previously reported in maize. We conclude by discussing how each of the four transcriptional modules may be responsible for the different nitrogen uptake and assimilation requirements of leaves and roots at different stages of maize development.

  9. Organic Nitrates: A Complex Family of Atmospheric Trace Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballschmiter, K.; Fischer, R. G.; Grünert, A.; Kastler, J.; Schneider, M.; Woidich, S.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic and geogenic hydrocarbons are the precursors of organic nitrates that are formed as tropospheric photo-oxidation products in the presence of NOx. Air chemistry leads to a very complex pattern of nitric acid esters: alkyl nitrates, aryl-alkyl nitrates, and bifunctional nitrates like alkyl dinitrates, hydroxy alkyl nitrates and carbonyl alkyl nitrates. We have analyzed the pattern of organic nitrates in air samples after adsorption/thermal desorption (low volume sampling-LVS) or adsorption/solvent desorption (high volume sampling-HVS) by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) using air aliquotes of 100 up to 3000 liters on column. The complexity of the organic nitrates found in air requires a group pre-separation by normal phase liquid chromatography. A detection limit per compound of 0.005 ppt(v) is achieved by our approach. We have synthesized a broad spectrum of organic nitrates as reference compounds. Air samples were taken from central Europe, the US West (Utah, Nevada, California), and the North- and South Atlantic including Antarctica. Levels and patterns of the regional and global occurrence of the various groups of C1-C12 organic nitrates including dinitrates and hydroxy nitrates and nitrates of isoprene (2-methylbutadiene) are presented. Werner G., J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds" Angewandte Chemie - International Edition (1999) 38: 1634-1637. Woidich S., O. Froescheis, O. Luxenhofer, K. Ballschmiter: "EI- and NCI-mass spectrometry of arylalkyl nitrates and their occurrence in urban air" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (1999) 364 : 91-99. Kastler, J; Jarman, W; Ballschmiter, K.: "Multifunctional organic nitrates as constituents in European and US urban photo-smog" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (2000) 368:244-249. Schneider M., K. Ballschmiter: "C3-C14 alkyl nitrates in remote South Atlantic air" Chemosphere (1999) 38: 233-244. Fischer

  10. Estimating Hydrologic Fluxes, Crop Water Use, and Agricultural Land Area in China using Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tiziana; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Hoisungwan, Piyatida

    2016-04-01

    Crop production has significantly altered the terrestrial environment by changing land use and by altering the water cycle through both co-opted rainfall and surface water withdrawals. As the world's population continues to grow and individual diets become more resource-intensive, the demand for food - and the land and water necessary to produce it - will continue to increase. High-resolution quantitative data about water availability, water use, and agricultural land use are needed to develop sustainable water and agricultural planning and policies. However, existing data covering large areas with high resolution are susceptible to errors and can be physically inconsistent. China is an example of a large area where food demand is expected to increase and a lack of data clouds the resource management dialogue. Some assert that China will have insufficient land and water resources to feed itself, posing a threat to global food security if they seek to increase food imports. Others believe resources are plentiful. Without quantitative data, it is difficult to discern if these concerns are realistic or overly dramatized. This research presents a quantitative approach using data assimilation techniques to characterize hydrologic fluxes, crop water use (defined as crop evapotranspiration), and agricultural land use at 0.5 by 0.5 degree resolution and applies the methodology in China using data from around the year 2000. The approach uses the principles of water balance and of crop water requirements to assimilate existing data with a least-squares estimation technique, producing new estimates of water and land use variables that are physically consistent while minimizing differences from measured data. We argue that this technique for estimating water fluxes and agricultural land use can provide a useful basis for resource management modeling and policy, both in China and around the world.

  11. Impact of Glider Data Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model 6. AUTHOR(S) Igor Shulman, Clark Rowley, Stephanie Anderson, Sergio DeRada, John Kindle, Paul Martin, James...Impact of glider data assimilation on the Monterey Bay model Igor Shulman3*, Clark Rowley3, Stephanie Andersona, Sergio DeRadaa, John Kindlea, Paul ...support of the AOSN-II field campaign. Deep-Sea Research II, this issue |doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2008 08.009). Kundu. P.K.. 1976. Ekman veering observed

  12. Assimilation of radar-based nowcast into HIRLAM NWP model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Getreuer; Petersen, Claus; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a nowcast scheme that assimilates radar extrapolation data (RED) into a nowcasting version of the high resolution limited area model (HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model covering the area of Denmark. The RED are based on the Co-TREC (tracking radar echoes...... by correlation) methodology and are generated from cleaned radar mosaics from the Danish weather radar network. The assimilation technique is a newly developed method that increases model precipitation by increasing low-level convergence and decreasing convergence aloft in order to increase the vertical velocity...

  13. Dynamics of vowel-to-vowel assimilation in French.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Vowel-to-vowel assimilation in French is described as an anticipatory process affecting non-final mid vowels (V1) : [e], [E], [ø], [œ], [o], [O] that assimilate in height to the final tonic vowel (V2). The non-final mid vowel tend to be mid-high before a high or mid-high vowel (e. g. aimer [eme] 'to love'), and mid-low before a low or mid-low vowel (aimable [Emabl] 'kind')[1, 4, 6]. The present study investigates the nature of vowel harmony (VH) in French. Does vowel a...

  14. Perceptual assimilation of Dutch vowels by Peruvian Spanish listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Paola; Williams, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Many cross-language and L2 speech perception studies have been conducted on English sounds and a limited number of speakers or synthetic tokens have been used for auditory stimuli. The Spanish listeners of the present study were presented with natural tokens of Dutch vowels produced by males and females selected from the corpus reported in Adank et al. [(2004) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 1729-1738]. The results show that single category assimilations are common and that certain Dutch vowels frequently assimilate to Spanish diphthongs. Predictions are made for Spanish learners' initial stage in the acquisition of the Dutch vowel system.

  15. What Can Data Assimilation Tell Us about Our Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Data assimilation is a process of combining information from imperfect models and imperfect observations. To the extent that models used for data assimilation are probabilistic to account for epistemic uncertainty, we expect data assimilation to attenuate the effect of model errors on estimates of hydrologic states and fluxes. Intuitively, if data assimilation can mitigate model deficiencies, we would expect it to be informative of the nature of these deficiencies. We address two related questions. The first is about how to store information gained via data assimilation into the structure of the model so that this information is not lost outside the period of observation. We show the general (theoretical) strategy for storing this information, and propose a practical algorithm based on the EnFK. Doing this results in improved forecasts of energy and carbon fluxes from land surface models, as well as improved estimates of streamflow in a rainfall-runoff model. Storing information in a model structure is done purely by statistical analysis of DA innovations, and so provides no insight about the adequacy of model hypotheses. We show that this type of insight can be gained by measuring how data assimilation changes the way information moves within the model. By treating the model as an information processing system, we can visualize explicitly how assimilating observations changes strengths and time-scales of couplings between modeled variables. The insight is that measuring Shannon-type information fluxes instead of mass and energy fluxes allows us to relate any variable with any other at any time-scale. We produce a concise set of statistics that are easily interpreted and directly highlight how DA effectively changes the way that the model behaves. We applied these techniques to the Noah LSM after assimilating both in situ (FluxNet, SCAN) and remote sensing (AMSR-E, MODIS) observations. Results indicate that major deficiencies in the way that Noah translates

  16. HOW DO IMMIGRANTS SPEND THEIR TIME?: THE PROCESS OF ASSIMILATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamermesh, Daniel S; Trejo, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    Sharp differences in time use by nativity emerge when activities are distinguished by incidence and intensity in recent U.S. data. A model with daily fixed costs for assimilating activities predicts immigrants are less likely than natives to undertake such activities on a given day; but those who do will spend relatively more time on them. Activities such as purchasing, education, and market work conform to the model. Other results suggest that fixed costs for assimilating activities are higher for immigrants with poor English proficiency or who originate in less developed countries. An analysis of comparable Australian data yields similar results.

  17. Data assimilation in the decision support system RODOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Palma, C.; Madsen, H.; Gering, F.;

    2003-01-01

    Model predictions for a rapid assessment and prognosis of possible radiological consequences after an accidental release of radionuclides play an important role in nuclear emergency management. Radiological observations, e.g. dose rate measurements. can be used to improve such model predictions....... The process of combining model predictions and observations, usually referred to as data assimilation, is described in this article within the framework of the real time on-line decision support system (RODOS) for off-site nuclear emergency management in Europe. Data assimilation capabilities, based on Kalman...

  18. SMAP Data Assimilation at NASA SPoRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay B.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center maintains a near-real- time run of the Noah Land Surface Model within the Land Information System (LIS) at 3-km resolution. Soil moisture products from this model are used by several NOAA/National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices for flood and drought situational awareness. We have implemented assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Soil Moisture Active/ Passive (SMAP) satellites, and are now evaluating the SMAP assimilation. The SMAP-enhanced LIS product is planned for public release by October 2016.

  19. [Assimilation test of Malassezia furfur isolated from the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, R; Nishimura, K; Kamei, K; Murayama, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The lipophilic yeasts Malassezia species are the causative agents of tinea versicolor and known also to be a member of normal skin flora. They are commonly isolated from the skin of humans and animals, but not from the environment. This is the first report of the isolation of Malassezia sp. from the environment (a hospital floor). The results of assimilation tests of lipids and karyotyping showed that these isolates were M. furfur. They assimilated not only lipids including floor wax and car wax but also some ointments (except antifungal agents) used clinically. The results suggest that we need to take care when using such ointments to treat skin diseases.

  20. Data assimilation as a nonlinear dynamical systems problem: stability and convergence of the prediction-assimilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrassi, Alberto; Ghil, Michael; Trevisan, Anna; Uboldi, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    We study prediction-assimilation systems, which have become routine in meteorology and oceanography and are rapidly spreading to other areas of the geosciences and of continuum physics. The long-term, nonlinear stability of such a system leads to the uniqueness of its sequentially estimated solutions and is required for the convergence of these solutions to the system's true, chaotic evolution. The key ideas of our approach are illustrated for a linearized Lorenz system. Stability of two nonlinear prediction-assimilation systems from dynamic meteorology is studied next via the complete spectrum of their Lyapunov exponents; these two systems are governed by a large set of ordinary and of partial differential equations, respectively. The degree of data-induced stabilization is crucial for the performance of such a system. This degree, in turn, depends on two key ingredients: (i) the observational network, either fixed or data-adaptive, and (ii) the assimilation method.

  1. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  2. Dacite petrogenesis on mid-ocean ridges: Evidence for oceanic crustal melting and assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Klein, E.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the majority of eruptions at oceanic spreading centers produce lavas with relatively homogeneous mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions, the formation of tholeiitic andesites and dacites at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) is a petrological enigma. Eruptions of MOR high-silica lavas are typically associated with ridge discontinuities and have produced regionally significant volumes of lava. Andesites and dacites have been observed and sampled at several locations along the global MOR system; these include propagating ridge tips at ridge-transform intersections on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and eastern Gal??pagos spreading center, and at the 9??N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise. Despite the formation of these lavas at various ridges, MOR dacites show remarkably similar major element trends and incompatible trace element enrichments, suggesting that similar processes are controlling their chemistry. Although most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts, our geochemical data for MOR dacitic glasses suggest that contamination from a seawater-altered component is important in their petrogenesis. MOR dacites are characterized by elevated U, Th, Zr, and Hf, low Nb and Ta concentrations relative to rare earth elements (REE), and Al2O3, K2O, and Cl concentrations that are higher than expected from low-pressure fractional crystallization alone. Petrological modeling of MOR dacites suggests that partial melting and assimilation are both integral to their petrogenesis. Extensive fractional crystallization of a MORB parent combined with partial melting and assimilation of amphibole-bearing altered crust produces a magma with a geochemical signature similar to a MOR dacite. This supports the hypothesis that crustal assimilation is an important process in the formation of highly evolved MOR lavas and may be significant in the generation of evolved MORB in

  3. Note on the effect of high nitrate concentration and light intensity on the growth and uptake rates of Phaeovactylum tricornutum (Bohlin culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Schmidt

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high nitrate concentration and light intensity on chlorophyll-a synthesis, cell number and nitrate assimilation on P. tJt¿coh,nuutum culture, was determined. Growth and uptake rates were determined as a function of nitrate concentration ranging from 0.40 to 35.40 µg/l. The Ks showed high values, when compared with those obtained with lower nitrate concentration. The percentual variation of Ks was greater than that of Vmax.Foi determinado o efeito dc ama alta concentração de nitrato e alta incensidade luminosa na síntese de clorofila-α, número de células e assimilação nitrato em uma cultura de P. triconotum. As velocidade de crescimento e de assimilação foram determinados em função de concentrações de nitrato variando de 0,40 a 35,40 µg-at/l e intensidade luminosa de 12 KLUX. A Ks e a Vmax apresentaram valores altos, comparativamente com valores obtidos em concentrações mais baixas de nitrato e menor intensidade luminosa. A variação porcentual da Ks foi maior que a variação porcentual da Vmax.

  4. Comparative analysis of various real-time data assimilation approaches for assimilating streamflow into a hydrologic routing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seong Jin; Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Lee, Haksu; Liu, Yuqiong; Seo, Dong Jun; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Reliable water depth estimation is an extremely important issue in operational early flood warning systems. Different water system models have been implemented in the last decades, and, in parallel, data assimilation approaches have been introduced in order to reduce the uncertainty of such models. The goal of this study is to compare the performances of a distributed hydrologic routing model with streamflow assimilation using six different data assimilation methods, including direct insertion, nudging, Kalman filter, Ensemble Kalman filter, Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter and variational method. The model used in this study is a 3-parameter Muskingum (O'Donnell 1985) which was implemented in the Trinity River, within the Dallas-Fort-Worth Metroplex area in Texas, USA. The first methodological step is to discretize the river reach into multiple 1-km sub-reaches in order to estimate water depth in a distributed fashion. Then, different data assimilation approaches were implemented using the state-space approach formulation of the Muskingum model proposed by Georgakakos (1990). Finally, streamflow observations were assimilated at two points where flow sensors are located. The results of this work pointed out that assimilation of streamflow observations can noticeably improve the hydrologic routing model prediction and that ensemble definition is particularly important for both Ensemble Kalman filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter. This study is part of the FP7 European Project WeSenseIt Citizen Water Observatory (www.http://wesenseit.eu/) and NSF Project Integrated Sensing and Prediction of urban Water for Sustainable Cities (http://ispuw.uta.edu/nsf)

  5. Carbonyl Alkyl Nitrates as Trace Constituents in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidich, S.; Gruenert, A.; Ballschmiter, K.

    2003-04-01

    Organic nitrates, esters of nitric acid, significantly contribute to the entire pool of odd nitrogen (NOY) in the atmosphere. Organic nitrates are formed in NO rich air by degradation of alkanes and alkenes initiated by OH and NO3 radicals during daytime and nighttime, respectively. Bifunctional organonitrates like the alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates are formed primarily from alkenes. The two main sources for Alkenes are traffic emissions and naturally occurring terpenes. So far a broad spectrum of alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates including six different isoprene nitrates has been identified in urban and marine air (1-3). We report here for the first time about the group of C4 C7 carbonyl alkyl nitrates as trace constituents in urban air collected on the campus of the University of Ulm Germany, and in the downtown area of Salt Lake City, Utah. Air sampling was done by high volume sampling (flow rate 25 m3/h) using a layer of 100 g silica gel (particle diameter 0.2 - 0.5 mm) as adsorbent. The organic nitrates were eluted from the silica gel by pentane/acetone (4:1, w/w) and the extract was concentrated to a volume of 500 µL for a group separation using normal phase HPLC. Final analysis was performed by high resolution capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection as well as by mass selective detection in the (CH4)NCI mode using NO2- = m/e 46 as the indicator mass. The carbonyl alkyl nitrates were identified by self synthesized reference standards . So far we have identified eight non-branched a-carbonyl alkyl nitrates (vicinal carbonyl alkyl nitrates), two b-carbonyl alkyl nitrates and one g-carbonyl alkyl nitrate with carbon chains ranging from C4 to C7. The mixing ratios are between 0.05 and 0.30 ppt(v) for daytime samples and are two to three times higher for samples taken at night. (1) M. Schneider, O. Luxenhofer, Angela Deißler, K. Ballschmiter: 2C1-C15 Alkyl Nitrates, Benzyl Nitrate, and Bifunctional Nitrates

  6. [Nitrate removal by a strain of nitrate-dependent Fe (II) -oxidizing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Ji, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Chong; Tian, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterial strain, named W5, was isolated from the sediment of the East Lake in Wuhan. Strain W5 was studied for its characteristics of denitrification and nitrogen removal. According to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain W5 was identified as Microbacterium sp. The optimal denitrification performance can be obtained under conditions of NO3(-) -N 40 mg x L(-1), Fe2+ 500 mg x L(-1) and pH 6.8-7.0. After one week of cultivation under optimal conditions, nitrate removal percentage reached 87.0%. During the process of the culture, the nitrite nitrogen concentration was no more than 0.31 mg x L(-1) and there was no ammonia nitrogen production. It was indicated that the nitrate was mostly converted into N2. The consumption rate of Fe2+ was 95.2%.

  7. Diversity of assimilatory nitrate reductase genes from plankton and epiphytes associated with a seagrass bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhitya, Anita; Thomas, Florence I M; Ward, Bess B

    2007-11-01

    Tampa Bay NR clone libraries contained sequences that exhibited phylogenetic similarity with sequences from coastal New Jersey and Monterey Bay, USA. For both NR and nasA, the sequences formed phylogenetic clusters containing nitrate reductase gene fragments that were common to both plankton and epiphyte components, and sequences that were unique to just one component. The implication that some organisms may be differentially represented in epiphytic versus planktonic components of the community suggests that local environmental conditions may have ramifications for regulation of nitrate assimilation processes, community composition, and ecosystem function.

  8. A parsimonious land data assimilation system for the SMAP/GPM satellite era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land data assimilation systems typically require complex parameterizations in order to: define required observation operators, quantify observing/forecasting errors and calibrate a land surface assimilation model. These parameters are commonly defined in an arbitrary manner and, if poorly specified,...

  9. A primer for data assimilation with ecological models using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobitz, J M; Desai, A R; Moore, D J P; Chadwick, M A

    2011-11-01

    Data assimilation, or the fusion of a mathematical model with ecological data, is rapidly expanding knowledge of ecological systems across multiple spatial and temporal scales. As the amount of ecological data available to a broader audience increases, quantitative proficiency with data assimilation tools and techniques will be an essential skill for ecological analysis in this data-rich era. We provide a data assimilation primer for the novice user by (1) reviewing data assimilation terminology and methodology, (2) showcasing a variety of data assimilation studies across the ecological, environmental, and atmospheric sciences with the aim of gaining an understanding of potential applications of data assimilation, and (3) applying data assimilation in specific ecological examples to determine the components of net ecosystem carbon uptake in a forest and also the population dynamics of the mayfly (Hexagenia limbata, Serville). The review and examples are then used to provide guiding principles to newly proficient data assimilation practitioners.

  10. Metabolic engineering of ammonium assimilation in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyes cerevisiae improves ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Cofactor imbalance impedes xylose assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. To improve cofactor use, we modified ammonia assimilation in recombinant S. cerevisiae by deleting GDH1, which encodes an NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase...

  11. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  12. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  13. Nitrate removal using different carbon substrates in a laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Ebrahim; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural fields have been frequently identified as major contributors of nitrate leaching into surface and ground waters. Tile drains can act as direct pathways, transferring leached nitrate to surface water. Bioreactor filters are useful for the removal of nitrate from drainage waters; however, these filters require an external carbon supply to sustain denitrification. In this study, four organic carbon sources including wood, barley straw, rice husks, and date palm leaf, were used to enhance denitrification and the effects of water velocity and influent nitrate concentration on the nitrate removal were evaluated. Cumulative nitrate removal was highest for the date palm leaf treatments and was lowest for the wood treatments. The effects were in decreasing order for date palm leaf, barley straw, rice husks, and wood, respectively. The performance of the biofilters improved with increasing influent nitrate concentration and decreasing water velocity, allowing for high nitrate removal rates to be achieved. The results showed that all of the treatments had reduced the effluent nitrate concentrations below the USEPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water of 45 mg L(-1) nitrate at the end of the study.

  14. Nitrate removal using Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486 from ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, S; Selvakumar, R; Sathishkumar, M; Swaminathan, K; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P; Singh, A; Jain, S K

    2009-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486, isolated from marine soil of coastal area of Trivandrum, Kerala, was used for biological removal of nitrate from ground water collected from Kar village of Pali district, Rajasthan. The organism was found to be resistance for nitrate up to 10,000 mg L(-1). The optimum growth conditions for biological removal of nitrate were established in batch culture. The effect of carbon sources on nitrate removal was investigated using mineral salt medium (MSM) containing 500 mg L(-1) of nitrate to select the most effective carbon source. Among glucose and starch as carbon source, glucose at 1% concentration increased the growth (182+/-8.24 x 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) and induced maximum nitrate reduction (86.4%) at 72 h. The ground water collected from Kar village, Pali district of Rajasthan containing 460+/-5.92 mg L(-1) of nitrate was subjected to three different treatment processes in pilot scale (T1 to T3). Higher removal of nitrate was observed in T2 process (88%) supplemented with 1% glucose. The system was scaled up to 10 L pilot scale treatment plant. At 72 h the nitrate removal was observed to be 95% in pilot scale plant. The residual nitrate level (23+/-0.41 mg L(-1)) in pilot scale treatment process was found to be below the permissible limit of WHO.

  15. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  16. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  18. Protein nitration in biological aging: proteomic and tandem mass spectrometric characterization of nitrated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Schöneich, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Proteomic techniques for the identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins in various biological systems are described with emphasis on the direct mass spectrometric detection and sequencing of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing peptides. Strengths and weaknesses of various separation and mass spectrometric techniques are discussed. Some examples for the MS/MS analysis of nitrated peptides obtained from aging rat heart and skeletal muscle are provided, such as nitration of Tyr105 of the mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein and Tyr14 of creatine kinase.

  19. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  20. An Operational Technology for Assimilating Lagrangian Data Based on Dynamical Systems Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    An Operational Technology for Assimilating Lagrangian Data Based on Dynamical Systems Techniques Christopher K. R. T. Jones Department of... technology for assimilating Lagrangian data. This new Lagrangian data assimilation platform is expected to be particularly effective in ocean regions where...COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Operational Technology for Assimilating Lagrangian Data Based on Dynamical Systems