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Sample records for altered nitrate assimilation

  1. Phosphorus stress effects on assimilation of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to investigate alterations in uptake and assimilation of NO3- by phosphorus-stressed plants. Young tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum [L.], cv NC 2326) growing in solution culture were derived of an external phosphorus (P) supply for 12 days. On selected days, plants were exposed to 15NO3- during the 12 hour light period to determine changes in NO3- assimilation as the P deficiency progressed. Decreased whole-plant growth was evident after 3 days of P deprivation and became more pronounced with time, but root growth was unaffected until after day 6. Uptake of 15NO3- per gram root dry weight and translocation of absorbed 15NO3- out of the root were noticeably restricted in -P plants by day 3, and effects on both increased in severity with time. Whole-plant reduction of 15NO3- and 15N incorporation into insoluble reduced-N in the shoot decreased after day 3. Although the P limitation was associated with a substantial accumulation of amino acids in the shoot, there was no indication of excessive accumulation of soluble reduced-15N in the shoot during the 12 hour 15NO3- exposure periods. The results indicate that alterations in NO3- transport processes in the root system are the primary initial responses limiting synthesis of shoot protein in P-stressed plants. Elevated amino acid levels evidently are associated with enhanced degradation of protein rather than inhibition of concurrent protein synthesis

  2. Nitrate assimilation in plant shoots depends on photorespiration

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2004-01-01

    Photorespiration, a process that diminishes net photosynthesis by ≈25% in most plants, has been viewed as the unfavorable consequence of plants having evolved when the atmosphere contained much higher levels of carbon dioxide than it does today. Here we used two independent methods to show that exposure of Arabidopsis and wheat shoots to conditions that inhibited photorespiration also strongly inhibited nitrate assimilation. Thus, nitrate assimilation in both dicotyledonous and monocotyledono...

  3. Imbalance between vertical nitrate flux and nitrate assimilation on a continental shelf: Implications of nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Furuya, Ken; Kurotori, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Taketoshi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Endoh, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Ishizaka, Joji; Matsuno, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The nitrate assimilation rate and diapycnal nitrate flux were simultaneously determined on the continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS). Further, the archaeal amoA gene was quantified to examine the potential distribution of nitrification activity. Nitrate assimilation rates and distribution of the archaeal amoA gene were also investigated in the Philippine Sea and in the Kuroshio Current. At all the stations, while the surface nitrate was depleted (amoA was observed at shallower light depths, namely at or above 10% light depth, in the ECS than in other regions, suggesting that nitrification occurred within the euphotic zone in the ECS, especially on the shelf. Moreover, a station on the continental shelf of the ECS exhibited a considerable discrepancy between the nitrate assimilation rate (1500 μmolN m-2 d-1) and vertical nitrate flux (98 μmolN m-2 d-1). Here, 6.7 ± 3.1 × 103 and 2.5 ± 0.7 × 105 copies mL-1 of archaeal amoA were detected at 10% and 1% light depths relative to the surface, respectively. Thus nitrification within the euphotic zone would be attributed at least in part to the observed discrepancy between nitrate assimilation and vertical flux. These observations imply that the assumption of a direct relationship between new production, export production, and measured nitrate assimilation is misplaced, particularly regarding the continental shelf of the ECS.

  4. Nitrate assimilation and partitioning in detached culms of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detached wheat culms (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Doublcrop) collected from field-grown plants 16 days after anthesis were cultured for 5 days with nutrient solution containing glutamine (7.5 mM), K15NO3 (15mM), or glutamine (7.5 mM) plus K15NO3 (15mM). Kernel growth rate of cultured culms equaled or exceeded that of intact field-grown plants (1.46 mg kernel-1day-1). Net mobilization of reduced N from the peduncle occurred, but this accounted for less than 23% of the net increase in grain N after 5th day of culture, regardless of N source. Glutamine had no effect on the assimilation of (15N) nitrate or the partitioning of reduced (15N)-labelled products. Peduncles contained less than 4-8% of total reduced (15N) excess recovered in all plant parts. Grain accumulation of reduced (15N) was linear, as was solution depletion, and accounted for an increasing proportion of the total reduced (15N) excess in all culms parts. These results provide direct evidence for nitrate assimilation by spike components. (author)

  5. Regulation of Expression of Nitrate and Dinitrogen Assimilation by Anabaena Species

    OpenAIRE

    Meeks, John C.; Wycoff, Keith L.; Chapman, John S.; Enderlin, Carol S.

    1983-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain 7120 appeared more responsive to nitrogen control than A. cylindrica. Growth in the presence of nitrate strongly repressed the differentiation of heterocysts and fixation of dinitrogen in Anabaena sp. strain 7120, but only weakly in A. cylindrica. Nitrate assimilation by ammonium-grown cultures was strongly repressed in Anabaena sp. strain 7120, but less so in A. cylindrica. The repressive effect of nitrate on dinitrogen assimilation in Anabaena sp. strain 7120, compared t...

  6. ALTERED STATES OF LITERATURE: SHAMANIC ASSIMILATION AND ROMANTIC INSPIRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel de Lima Santos

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the connections between the assimilation of certain shamanic practices related to Romantic inspiration in English literature. The interest in the world of altered states of consciousness as a manifestation of the sacred is typical among Romantic writers in nineteenth-century England. These writers in fact sought the manifestation of the world of dreams by means of ingesting substances that alter consciousness, thus assimilating a practice that is likewise and primarily...

  7. Modification of potassium nitrate assimilation test for identification of clinically important yeasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, D H; Salkin, I F; Hurd, N J; Levy, I L; Kemna, M A

    1988-01-01

    The modification of an auxanographic method used in yeast species identification to determine potassium nitrate (KNO3) assimilation resulted in a simple and inexpensive KNO3 assimilation test medium. The medium provided accurate and reliable results in less than 24 h.

  8. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  9. Nitrite-Responsive Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Operon in Cyanobacteria Plays an Essential Role in Up-Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation Activities under Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Omata, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    NtcB of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 is a LysR family protein that enhances expression of the nitrate assimilation operon (nirA operon) in response to the presence of nitrite, an intermediate of assimilatory nitrate reduction. Inactivation of ntcB in this cyanobacterium specifically abolishes the nitrite responsiveness of nirA operon expression, but under nitrate-replete conditions (wherein negative feedback by intracellularly generated ammonium prevails over the...

  10. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J. T.; Goldman, B. S.; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilatio...

  11. Nitrate Assimilation Contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum Root Attachment, Stem Colonization, and Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Dalsing, Beth L.; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacear...

  12. Regulation of assimilatory nitrate reductase activity in soil by microbial assimilation of ammonium.

    OpenAIRE

    McCarty, G.W.; Bremner, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that assimilatory nitrate reductase (ANR) activity in soil is inhibited by ammonium (NH4+). To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied the effect of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of NH4+ assimilation by microorganisms, on assimilatory reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in aerated soil slurries treated with NH4+. We found that NH4+ strongly inhibited ANR activity in these slurries and that MSX eliminated this inhibition. We also found that MSX indu...

  13. ALTERED STATES OF LITERATURE: SHAMANIC ASSIMILATION AND ROMANTIC INSPIRATION

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    Marcel de Lima Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the connections between the assimilation of certain shamanic practices related to Romantic inspiration in English literature. The interest in the world of altered states of consciousness as a manifestation of the sacred is typical among Romantic writers in nineteenth-century England. These writers in fact sought the manifestation of the world of dreams by means of ingesting substances that alter consciousness, thus assimilating a practice that is likewise and primarily shamanic. This search is the object under investigation in this article, which aims at showing that, despite conspicuous cultural differences, there are indeed similarities that pervade shamanic practices and the Romantic ideal in their quests toward the sacred.

  14. Ammonium and potassium effect on nitrate assimilation in cucumber seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Buczek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ammonium present in the induction medium toghether with nitrate on the activity of nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamic acid dehydrogenase (GDH and absorption and accumulation of NO3- in cucumber seedlings were investigated. Maximum NR and NiR activity in the cotyledons was observed when seedlings were supplied with KNO3 as the sole source of nitrogen. When plants were supplied with NH4NO3 the presence of NH4+ in the induction medium repressed by about 50 per cent the activity of both reductases in the cotyledons. Addition of K+ to this medium abolished completely the inhibitory effect of NH4+. The effect of K+ cannot be replaced by that Na+ ions. On the other hand, ammonium has no effect on the level of NR activity in roots, while NiR was almost completely repressed. Under the experimental conditions ammonium, in the presence of nitrates, decreased the activity of GDH, but this diminution did not occur when the plants were supplied with K+ simultaneously. It has found that NH4+ ions reduced NO3- absorption but at the same time, the ratio of NO3- absorbed to that reduced was increased more than twice. The presumable mechanism of these phenomena is discussed.

  15. Concentration-dependence of the nitrate assimilation pathway in maize roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of nitrate concentration on uptake and assimilation of nitrate by dark-grown, decapitated maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings was examined. During the 12-h exposure period, twice as much nitrate was taken up from 20 mM as from 0.05 mM K15NO3(98.7 atom% 15N). The higher concentration had little effect on nitrate reduction, but nitrate translocation was more than doubled. Thus, partitioning to translocation accounted for 80% of the increased uptake which occurred from 20 mM nitrate. At both concentrations a relatively constant percentage, 22-27%, of the reduced-15N was incorporated into protein and other insoluble nitrogenous compounds. Concurrently, translocation of soluble reduced-15N increased from less than 10% of the total reduced-15N at 4 h to more than 50% at 12 h. Neither the translocation of reduced-15N nor its incorporation into protein was affected appreciably by the 400-fold difference in exogenous nitrate concentration. The results may be interpreted in one of two ways. At 0.05 mM, uptake occured mainly via 'mechanism 1' of ion uptake, whereas at 20 mM, 'mechanism 2' also contributed: nitrate reduction was predominantly associated with uptake via the former mechanism and nitrate translocation with the latter. Alternatively, it is possible that at the low nitrate concentration uptake occurred primarily via root cells which contained nitrate reductase (NR), whereas at the higher concentration, uptake occurred in addition via cells which were deficient in NR and from which translocation of unreduced nitrate was thus more likely. (author)

  16. Nitrates et agriculture. Du blocage à l'assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilles Schellenberger; Christophe Soulard

    1993-01-01

    [fre] Un projet de lutte contre la pollution par les nitrates d'origine agricole se met en place dans l'Yonne. En s'appuyant sur l'application de l'Article 19, il est prévu de demander aux agriculteurs de modifier leurs pratiques culturales. La recherche présentée vise à identifier les facteurs de résistances possibles des agriculteurs au projet. L'approche théorique est basée sur le concept de représentations sociales. Trois objets sont étudiés : les pratiques culturales, la pollution par le...

  17. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  18. [Dynamics of ultrastructure changes in sheet plate fiber flax with braking transport assimilate by nitrate-anion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrakhimov, F A; Batasheva, S N; Bakirova, G G; Chikov, V I

    2008-01-01

    Changes in leaf mesophyll cell ultrastructure under nitrate feeding into the apoplast of common flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) in the form of 50 mM KNO3 solution were studied. In 30 min after the beginning of nitrate feeding through the transpiration water stream, swelling of mitochondrial and microbodies, clarification of their matrices, and curling of dictyosome discs into annular structures were observed. These events characterized symplastic domain formed by mesophyll, bundle sheath and phloem parenchyma cells, and were not found in companion cell-sieve element complex. Simultaneously, formation of large central vacuoles in companion cells was noted. Restoration of organelle structures in assimilating cells and phloem parenchyma in 1-2 h after treatment was accompanied by enhancement of morphological changes in phloem elements and companion cells and signs of plasmolysis in the mesophyll cells. It was supposed that the two-phase character of changes in leaf organelle ultrastructure and photosynthesis might reflect duality of leaf cell response to nitrate ion. The rapid alterations of the structure can be coupled with direct influence of the anion on cell metabolism and(or) with signal-regulatory functions of oxidized nitrogen forms, while the slower ones reflect the result of suppression of photoassimilate export from leaves by the anion. PMID:18822790

  19. Ecological Physiology of Synechococcus sp. Strain SH-94-5, a Naturally Occurring Cyanobacterium Deficient in Nitrate Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Scott R.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain SH-94-5 is a nitrate assimilation-deficient cyanobacterium which was isolated from an ammonium-replete hot spring in central Oregon. While this clone could grow on ammonium and some forms of organic nitrogen as sole nitrogen sources, it could not grow on either nitrate or nitrite, even under conditions favoring passive diffusion. It was determined that this clone does not express functional nitrate reductase or nitrite reductase and that the lack of activity of either...

  20. NITRIFICATION OF UREA AND ASSIMILATION OF NITRATE IN SATURATED SOILS UNDER AEROBIC CONDITIONS

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    A. E. Ghaly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate nitrification activity of urea and the assimilation of nitrate in a well aerated soil using perfusion technique with addition of glucose as an energy and carbon source. In this study, urea was rapidly nitrified by the bacteria in the saturated soil but its course of transformation to NO3 was not linear. There was an initial increase in the concentration of nitrite during the nitrification experiment which indicated that the conversion of nitrite to nitrate was appreciably slower than the rate of conversion of urea to nitrite. The rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2- was faster than the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- in the first 12 days and as a result the nitrate concentration reached 2.72 µg/ml on the 12th day. After day 12, the concentration of NH4+ in solution declined significantly and the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- became faster than the rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2-. The concentration of NO2-N in the solution reached zero on the 23rd day. The nitrification curve has the character of a sigmoid curve whose midpoint, which representing the most rapid rate of nitrification, fell at the point of half conversion of urea to nitrite. The curve asymptotically approaches a nitrate value that represents 98% conversion of urea into nitrate. The rest of the urea (NH4 has presumably been synthesized into bacterial cells. The initial pH of the soil was 7.7 due to the presence of NH4 which decreased gradually due to the production of NO3 reaching 6.9 by day 23. A nitrate reduction was observed under aerobic conditions. Denitrification did not proceed according to the known fact that O2 prevents the denitrifying organisms from producing the enzyme responsible for the process. The alternative pathway for nitrate reduction could be by assimilatory reduction where nitrate was converted to ammonium and then to cells. The removal of nitrate and production of ammonium caused a rise in the pH. The

  1. An 15N study of the effects of nitrate, ammonium, and nitrate + ammonium nutrition on nitrogen assimilation in Zea mays L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the literature on the effects of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen sources on plant growth, and the assimilation of those nitrogen sources, has been presented. It was concluded that ammonium nutrition produces optimum growth, with nitrate + ammonium being a better nitrogen source than only nitrate. Leaf blade nitrate reductase activity exceeded that of the root in nitrate-fed plants, suggesting that the shoot is the major region of nitrate assimilation. This is further supported by the results of xylem exudate analysis, where 93% of the newly-absorbed nitrogen exported by the roots was detected as nitrate. Evidence in support of this hypothesis was also obtained by studying the distribution of 15N in the various nitrogenous compounds. The effects of nitrogen source on plant growth, organic nitrogen and inorganic nitrogen contents, and the rates of incorporation into nitrogenous compounds were studied. The observed differences were explained with reference to the effects of the various nitrogen sources on the physiology of the plants. The experimental techniques included assays of the enzymes nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase, whole plant growth studies, and the analysis of nitrogenous compounds of xylem exudate and those extracted from the leaf blade, leaf base, and root regions of maize plants after feeding with a nutrient solution containing nitrogen as 15N

  2. Sodium stimulates growth of Amaranthus tricolor L. plants through enhanced nitrate assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of Na application on the capacity of No3- assimilation were studied in Na-deficient Amaranthus tricolor L. cv Tricolor plants. On day 30 after germination, Na-deficient A. tricolor plants received either 0.5 millimolar NaCl or KCl. The level of nitrate reductase activity doubled within 24 hours by the addition of Na and the enhanced level was maintained thereafter. When the plants were exposed to 2 millimolar 15NO3-, total 15N taken up by the plants was greater in the Na-treated plants than in the K-treated plants within 24 hours of the Na treatment. Incorporation of 15N into the 80% ethanol-insoluble nitrogen fraction of the Na-treated plants in the light period was about 260% of those of the K-treated plants indicating greater capacity of NO3- assimilation in the Na-treated plants. From these results, it was demonstrated that Na application to the Na-deficient A. tricolor plants promoted NO3- reduction and its subsequent assimilation into protein, resulting in growth enhancement

  3. Identification and functional analysis of a nitrate assimilation operon nasACKBDEF from Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhihui; Gao, Jin; Ding, Xiaoming; Wang, Jin; Chiao, Juishen; Zhao, Guoping

    2011-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation has been well studied for Gram-negative bacteria but not so much in the Gram-positive actinomycetes up to date. In a rifamycin SV-producing actinomycete, Amycolatopsis mediterranei strain U32, nitrate not only can be used as a sole nitrogen source but also remarkably stimulates the antibiotic production along with regulating the related metabolic enzymes. A gene cluster of nasACKBDEF was cloned from a U32 genomic library by in situ hybridization screening with a heterogeneous nasB probe and confirmed later by whole genome sequence, corresponding to the protein coding genes of AMED_1121 to AMED_1127. These genes were co-transcribed as an operon, concomitantly repressed by ammonium while activated with supplement of either nitrate or nitrite. Genetic and biochemical analyses identified the essential nitrate/nitrite assimilation functions of the encoded proteins, orderly, the assimilatory nitrate reductase catalytic subunit (NasA), nitrate reductase electron transfer subunit (NasC), nitrate/nitrite transporter (NasK), assimilatory nitrite reductase large subunit (NasB) and small subunit (NasD), bifunctional uroporphyrinogen-III synthase (NasE), and an unknown function protein (NasF). Comparing rifamycin SV production and the level of transcription of nasB and rifE from U32 and its individual nas mutants in Bennet medium with or without nitrate indicated that nitrate assimilation function encoded by the nas operon played an essential role in the "nitrate stimulated" rifamycin production but had no effect upon the transcription regulation of the primary and secondary metabolic genes related to rifamycin biosynthesis. PMID:21424691

  4. The nitrate assimilation pathway is involved in the trap formation of Arthrobotrys oligospora, a nematode-trapping fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lianming; Liu, Zhiheng; Liu, Lu; Li, Jinzhou; Gao, Hong; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-07-01

    Nutrient conditions are important for trap formation and a switch from saprophytic to predacious lifestyle in nematode-trapping fungi. Arthrobotrys oligospora is a typical nematode-trapping fungus which can capture and kill nematodes by means of traps formed in response to the presence of their prey. A nutrient-limited environment was previously shown to be important for trap formation, which was induced by several inferior nitrogen sources, such as sodium nitrate, in the absence of the cell wall protein AoMad1 in A. oligospora. To characterize the role of nitrate in trap formation, we knocked out four genes in the nitrate assimilation pathway and assessed possible effect of nitrate, host nematode or both on the trap formation in the mutants and the wild type. The results showed that trap induction by nitrate used a distinct pathway that differed from induction by nematodes. Moreover, the nitrate facilitated trap formation in the presence of nematodes. Our findings revealed that the trap formation induced by nematodes or nitrate is influenced by the nitrate assimilation pathway. PMID:27174557

  5. Nitrate and nitrite-mediated transcription antitermination control of nasF (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pheumoniae M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1996-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources during aerobic growth. Nitrate is converted through nitrite to ammonium by assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductase, respectively. Enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon of K. pneumoniae; nasF operon expression is subject to both general nitrogen control and pathway-specific nitrate/nitrite induction, mediated by the NtrC and NasR proteins, respectively. Sequence inspection revealed a presumptive sigmaN (sigma54)-dependent promoter as well as two presumptive upstream NtrC protein binding sites. Site-specific mutational and primer extension analyses confirmed the identity of the sigmaN-dependent promoter. Deletions removing the apparent NtrC protein binding sites greatly reduced NtrC-dependent regulation, indicating that these sites are involved in general nitrogen control. However, deletions removing most of the sequence upstream of the promoter had little effect on nitrate/nitrite regulation, suggesting that the nasF leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation. The 119 nucleotide long transcribed leader region contains an apparent factor-independent transcription terminator. Promoter replacement experiments demonstrated that the leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression. Deletions removing the transcription terminator structure resulted in a nitrate-blind constitutive phenotype, indicating that the transcription terminator structure serves a negative function. Other deletions, removing proximal portions of the leader region, resulted in an uninducible phenotype, indicating that this region serves a positive function. These results indicate that nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcription attenuation mechanism. We hypothesize that in the absence of nitrate or nitrite, the terminator structure abrogates transcription readthrough into the nasF operon. In the

  6. Evaluation of the Role of Mixed Amino Acids in Nitrate Uptake and Assimilation in Leafy Radish by Using 15N-Labeled Nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xing-quan; CHEN Hui-yun; NI Qin-xue; Kyu Seung

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the role of mixed amino acids in nitrate uptake and assimilation was evaluated in leafy radish by using 15N labeled nitrate. The mixtures of alanine, (i-alanine, aspartic acid, asparagines, glutamic acid, glutamine, and glycine were sprayed to plant leaf two or four times. The activity of the enzymes related to the process of NO3- reduction (nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase) was affected differently depending on the application rate of mixed amino acids. Applying mixed amino acids increased the fresh weight, dry weight, and N yield. The NO3-content was reduced to 24-38%, but no significant differences were observed in amino acids and proteins. In addition, the nitrogen derived from fertilizer and the 15N-NO3-recovery rate increased to 2-8% and 15-47%, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the positive effect of mixed amino acids on nitrate uptake and assimilation might be attributed to the regulation on NO3- uptake and assimilation, but not to the preference for amino acids as sources of reduced nitrogen.

  7. An integrated biochemical system for nitrate assimilation and nitric oxide detoxification in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Juan J; Salas, Ana; Torres, María J; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Richardson, David J; Gates, Andrew J; Delgado, María J

    2016-02-01

    Rhizobia are recognized to establish N2-fixing symbiotic interactions with legume plants. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the symbiont of soybeans, can denitrify and grow under free-living conditions with nitrate (NO3 (-)) or nitrite (NO2 (-)) as sole nitrogen source. Unlike related bacteria that assimilate NO3 (-), genes encoding the assimilatory NO3 (-) reductase (nasC) and NO2 (-) reductase (nirA) in B. japonicum are located at distinct chromosomal loci. The nasC gene is located with genes encoding an ABC-type NO3 (-) transporter, a major facilitator family NO3 (-)/NO2 (-) transporter (NarK), flavoprotein (Flp) and single-domain haemoglobin (termed Bjgb). However, nirA clusters with genes for a NO3 (-)/NO2 (-)-responsive regulator (NasS-NasT). In the present study, we demonstrate NasC and NirA are both key for NO3 (-) assimilation and that growth with NO3 (-), but not NO2 (-) requires flp, implying Flp may function as electron donor to NasC. In addition, bjgb and flp encode a nitric oxide (NO) detoxification system that functions to mitigate cytotoxic NO formed as a by-product of NO3 (-) assimilation. Additional experiments reveal NasT is required for NO3 (-)-responsive expression of the narK-bjgb-flp-nasC transcriptional unit and the nirA gene and that NasS is also involved in the regulatory control of this novel bipartite assimilatory NO3 (-)/NO2 (-) reductase pathway. PMID:26564204

  8. Nitrate Effect on Rice Growth and Nitrogen Absorption and Assimilation at Different Growth Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ying-Hua; ZHANG Ya-Li; SHEN Qi-Rong; WANG Song-Wei

    2006-01-01

    The effect of nitrate (NO3-) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) growth as well as N absorption and assimilation during different growth stages was examined using three typical rice cultivars. Dry weight, yield, N uptake, nitrate reductase activity(NRA) in leaves, and glutamine synthetase activity (GSA) in roots and leaves during their entire growth periods, as well as the kinetic parameters of ammonium (NH4+) uptake at the seedling stage, were measured with solution culture experiments. Results indicated that addition of NH4+-N and NO3--N at a ratio of 75:25 (NH4++NO3- treatment) whencompared with that of NH4+-N alone (NH4+ treatment) increased the dry weight of 'Nanguang' cultivar by 30% and treatment compared to the NH4+ treatment, NRA in the leaves increased by 2.09 folds, and GSA increased by 92% in the roots and 52% in the leaves of the three cultivars. NO3- supply increased the maximum uptake rate (Vmax) in the uptake rate of NH4+ by rice. There was no effect on the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of the three cultivars.Thus, some replacement of NH4+ with NO3- could greatly improve the growth of rice plants, mainly on account of the increased uptake of NH4+ promoted by NO3-, and future studies should focus on the molecular mechanism of the increased uptake of NH4+ by NO3-.

  9. Altered NO3- assimilation in P-stressed plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine P stress effects on NO3- uptake and assimilation, young tobacco plants were deprived of external P for 12 days and at selected times exposed to 15NO3- for 12h uptake periods. In -P plants, tissue P concentrations and growth decreased progressively with time relative to controls. Uptake of 15NO3- per g root DW was restricted markedly, being 70% of the control rate on the day 3 and only 17% on day 9. Additional disruptions in the NO3- assimilation pathway were evident, as larger proportions of absorbed 15NO3- were retained in the root and soluble reduced-15N accumulated in leaves with increasing P stress. The results indicate that transport processes controlling NO3- uptake into the root symplasm and its release into the xylem are major points of regulations in plants responding to P deficiency

  10. General Nitrogen Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation Regulatory Gene nasR Expression in Klebsiella oxytoca M5al

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Stephen Qitu; Chai, Weihang; Lin, Janine T.; Stewart, Valley

    1999-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can assimilate nitrate and nitrite by using enzymes encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Expression of the nasF operon is controlled by general nitrogen regulation (Ntr) via the NtrC transcription activator and by pathway-specific nitrate and nitrite induction via the NasR transcription antiterminator. This paper reports our analysis of nasR gene expression. We constructed strains bearing single-copy Φ(nasR-lacZ) operon fusions within the chromosomal rhaBAD-rhaSR locus. The exp...

  11. Comparative effects of selenite and selenate on nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Harbit, K. B.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of SeO3= and SeO4= on NO3- assimilation in 8-d-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was studied over a 24-h period. Selenite at 0.1 mol m-3 in the uptake solutions severely inhibited the induction of NO3- uptake and active nitrate reductases. Selenate, at 1.0 mol m-3 in the nutrient solution, had little effect on induction of activities of these systems until after 12 h; however, when the seedlings were pretreated with 1.0 mol m-3 SeO4= for 24 h, subsequent NO3- uptake from SeO4(=) -free solutions was inhibited about 60%. Sulphate partially alleviated the inhibitory effect of SeO3= when supplied together in the ambient solutions, but had no effect in seedlings pretreated with SeO3=. By contrast, SO4= partially alleviated the inhibitory effect of SeO4= even in seedlings pretreated with SeO4=. Since uptake of NO3- by intact seedlings was also inhibited by SO3=, the percentage of the absorbed NO3- that was reduced was not affected. By contrast, SeO4=, which affected NO3- uptake much less, inhibited the percentage reduced of that absorbed. However, when supplied to detached leaves, both SeO3= and SeO4= inhibited the in vivo reduction of NO3- as well as induction of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities. Selenite was more inhibitory than SeO4= ; approximately a five to 10 times higher concentration of SeO4= than SeO3= was required to achieve similar inhibition. In detached leaves, the inhibitory effect of both SeO3= and SeO4= on in vivo NO3- reduction as well as on the induction of nitrate reductase activity was partially alleviated by SO4=. The inhibitory effects of Se salts on the induction of the nitrite reductase were, however, completely alleviated by SO4=. The results show that in barley seedlings SeO3= is more toxic than SeO4=. The reduction of SeO4= to SeO3= may be a rate limiting step in causing Se toxicity.

  12. Organic matrix based slow release fertilizer enhances plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod K; Singh, Rana P

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of organic matrix based slow release fertilizers (SRFs) on plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Brassica juncea L. cv, pusa bold. The agro-waste materials like cow dung, clay soil, neem leaves and rice bran were mixed together in 2:2:1:1 ratio and used as organic matrix for the immobilization of chemical fertilizer nutrients with commercial grade saresh (Acacia gum, 15% solution) as binder. Different fertilizer treatments were organic matrix based slow release fertilizers, SRF-I (542.0 kg ha(-1)); SRF-II (736.5 kg ha(-1)) and chemical fertilizer combinations, boron (3 kg ha(-1))+sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)) and boron (3 kg ha(-1)) + sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1))+phosphorus (15 kg ha(-1))+potassium (100 kg ha(-1)). Organic matrix based SRF-II released ammonium up to 50-d in wetsoil under laboratory conditions which showed maximum retention of the nutrients. Avery significant increase in plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield was recorded in organic matrix based SRF-II applied plants. The maximum percent increase in biomass production was observed with organic matrix based SRF-II (increase of 65.8% in root fresh weight, 38.0% in root dry weight, 45.9% in leaf fresh weight plant(-1) and 27.5 % in leaf dry weight plant(-1) in 60-d old plants). It also increased the acquisition and assimilation of nitrate from the plant's rhizosphere which was evident by 45.6% increase in nitrate, 27.5% in nitrite and 11.7% in nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of 45-d old plants over control. The organic matrix based SRF-II significantly increased the seed yield by 28% in Indian mustard. Cost analysis revealed thatthis formulation is cost effective as it is based on agro waste materials. PMID:22319878

  13. Nitrate enrichment alters a Daphnia–microparasite interaction through multiple pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Dallas, Tad; Drake, John M

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient pollution has the potential to alter many ecological interactions, including host–parasite relationships. One of the largest sources of nutrient pollution comes from anthropogenic alteration of the nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically the increased rate of nitrate (NO3-N) deposition to aquatic environments, potentially altering host–parasite relationships. This study aimed to assess the mechanisms through which nitrate may impact host–pathogen relationships using a fungal pathogen (Metsc...

  14. Biosensor Determination of the Microscale Distribution of Nitrate, Nitrate Assimilation, Nitrification, and Denitrification in a Diatom-Inhabited Freshwater Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzen, Jan; Larsen, Lars Hauer; Kjær, Thomas; Revsbech, Niels-Peter

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution NO3− profiles in freshwater sediment covered with benthic diatoms were obtained with a new microscale NO3− biosensor characterized by absence of interference from chemical species other than NO2− and N2O. Analysis of the microprofiles obtained indicated no nitrification during darkness, high rates of nitrification and a tight coupling between nitrification and denitrification during illumination, and substantial rates of NO3− assimilation during illumination. Nitrification dur...

  15. Assimilation of 15N-labelled urea nitrogen and ammonium nitrate nitrogen by plants in case of root and non-root fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assimilation of 15N labeled urea and ammonium nitrate in root and foliar application by spring wheat and barley has been studied during 1970-1973 period in a series of vegetative experiments at the Department of Agrochemistry, Timiryazev Agricultural Academy, and at D.N. Pryanishnikov Experimental Agrochemical Station. Additional fertilizer nitrogen applied at later ontogenesis stages (flowering and milky ripeness) is utilized mostly for protein synthesis in developing grains, thus leading to a significant increase in the relative grain protein content. A transfer of a part of nitrogen from the main ortion of fertilizer at later stages of nitrition results, at the same time, in a lower yield. Nitrogen utilization degree of urea and ammonium nitrate, when introduced before sowing or at the flowering stage is similar but in the latter case, however, additional assimilation of soil nitrogen is lower. The assimilation rate of nitrogen in root application is the lower the later the fertilizer is applied. When ammonium nitrate is additionally applied as nutrition to barley at the milky ripeness stage, ammonia and nitrate nitrogen are assimilated at the same rate and to the same extent but ammonia nitrogen is more rapidly used for protein synthesis and the rate of its transfer to the developing grains is higher. The rate of nitrogen assimilation at plant is much higher in foliar than in root application. Wheat utilizes more urea nitrogen at the flowering stage when root application is used but at the milky ripeness stage foliar application is more effective

  16. Effects of temperature and light intensity on the uptake and assimilation of 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate in Indica and Japonica rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of various environmental condition such as temperature and light intensity on the uptake and assimilation of ammonium and nitrate in 4-week-old Indica and Japonica rice plants were studied using the 15N tracer technique. Both temperature and light intensity profoundly affected the uptake and assimilation of ammonium and nitrate, and the effects were more apparent in the utilization of nitrate by both Indica and Japonica rice plants. The uptake as well as assimilation of the two forms of nitrogen were greatly inhibited at low temperature and low light intensity. On the other hand, although no significant difference in the effects of environmental conditions on the utilization of ammonium was observed between the Indica and Japonica rice plants, the former were more sensitive than the latter in the utilization of nitrate. At high temperature and high light intensity, the Indica rice plants absorbed, reduced, and assimilated nitrate more effectively than the Japonica, and this effect disappeared when the temperature or light intensity was reduced. (author)

  17. Genetic control of nitrate assimilation in Klebsiella oxytoca. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Valley J.

    2001-04-01

    Some microorganisms can use nitrate as the sole source of nitrogen for biosynthesis. This project focused on the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, an enterobacterium found in soil and water. Mutagenesis and molecular cloning identified the nasFEDCBA operon encoding enzymes for the uptake and reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium, and the adjacent nasR regulatory gene. Analysis of nasF operon expression revealed that transcription is activated by the Ntr (general nitrogen regulation ) system in response to nitrogen limitation. Transcription antitermination control in response to nitrate and nitrite is mediated by the NasR protein. Additional work established that the NasR protein is an RNA-binding protein that interacts with nasF operon leader RNA to control transcription readthrough.

  18. Genetic control of nitrate assimilation in Klebsiella oxytoca. Final technical report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some microorganisms can use nitrate as the sole source of nitrogen for biosynthesis. This project focused on the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, an enterobacterium found in soil and water. Mutagenesis and molecular cloning identified the nasFEDCBA operon encoding enzymes for the uptake and reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium, and the adjacent nasR regulatory gene. Analysis of nasF operon expression revealed that transcription is activated by the Ntr (general nitrogen regulation ) system in response to nitrogen limitation. Transcription antitermination control in response to nitrate and nitrite is mediated by the NasR protein. Additional work established that the NasR protein is an RNA-binding protein that interacts with nasF operon leader RNA to control transcription readthrough

  19. Assimilation of upwelled nitrate by small eukaryotes in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Sarah E.; Lomas, Michael W.; Casey, John R.; Ward, Bess B.; Sigman, Daniel M.

    2011-10-01

    Phytoplankton growth is potentially limited by the scarcity of biologically available forms of nitrogen such as nitrate and ammonium. In the subtropical ocean gyres, water column stratification impedes the upward flux of nitrate to surface waters. Phytoplankton in these waters are assumed to rely largely on ammonium and other forms of nitrogen recycled during the breakdown of organic matter. Here, we use flow cytometry to separate prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton collected from Sargasso Sea surface waters in the summers of 2008 and 2009, and to analyse their respective nitrogen isotope ratios. We show that prokaryotes have a uniformly low ratio of 15N to 14N, δ15N, consistent with their reliance on recycled nitrogen. In contrast, small eukaryotic phytoplankton, less than 30μm in size, have a higher and more variable δ15N, with a mean value similar to that of nitrate in underlying Subtropical Mode Water. For the summertime Sargasso Sea, we estimate that small eukaryotes obtain more than half of their nitrogen from upwelled nitrate. In addition, our data support the view that sinking material derives largely from eukaryotic, not prokaryotic, phytoplankton biomass.

  20. Evaluation of biochemical alterations produced by combined exposure of fenvalerate and nitrate in Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalpreet Kaur Gill

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluation of combined effect of fenvalerate and nitrate on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male buffalo calves were divided into four groups of four calves each. Group I receiving no treatment served as the control. Group II and III animals were orally administered with fenvalerate (1.0 mg/kg/day and sodium nitrate (20 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 21 consecutive days and were kept as positive control. Group IV animals were co-administered with fenvalerate and sodium nitrate at the above dose rates for 21 consecutive days. Biochemical parameters including Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, Glucose, Total protein, Albumin, Cholesterol, Blood urea nitrogen (BUN and Creatinine were determined on 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 day of treatment. Estimation of these parameters was also done on 7th day of post-treatment period. Results: Co-administration of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate produced significant increase in the plasma levels of AST, ALP, GGT, LDH, glucose, BUN, cholesterol and creatinine while significant decrease in the plasma levels of total proteins was observed. No significant alteration was observed in albumin levels. Extent of organ damage as evidenced by biochemical alterations was more pronounced in calves exposed to combination of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate as compared to their individual exposures. Conclusion: Fenvalerate and sodium nitrate co-administration potentiates the toxicological injury produced, in comparison to their individual exposure.

  1. General nitrogen regulation of nitrate assimilation regulatory gene nasR expression in Klebsiella oxytoca M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S Q; Chai, W; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1999-12-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can assimilate nitrate and nitrite by using enzymes encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Expression of the nasF operon is controlled by general nitrogen regulation (Ntr) via the NtrC transcription activator and by pathway-specific nitrate and nitrite induction via the NasR transcription antiterminator. This paper reports our analysis of nasR gene expression. We constructed strains bearing single-copy Phi(nasR-lacZ) operon fusions within the chromosomal rhaBAD-rhaSR locus. The expression of DeltarhaBS::[Phi(nasR-lacZ)] operon fusions was induced about 10-fold during nitrogen-limited growth. Induction was reduced in both ntrC and rpoN null mutants, indicating that Ntr control of nasR gene expression requires the NtrC and sigma(N) (sigma(54)) proteins. Sequence inspection of the nasR control region reveals an apparent sigma(N)-dependent promoter but no apparent NtrC protein binding sites. Analysis of site-specific mutations coupled with primer extension analysis authenticated the sigma(N)-dependent nasR promoter. Fusion constructs with only about 70 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the transcription initiation site exhibited patterns of beta-galactosidase expression indistinguishable from Phi(nasR-lacZ) constructs with about 470 nt upstream. Expression was independent of the Nac protein, implying that NtrC is a direct activator of nasR transcription. Together, these results indicate that nasR gene expression does not require specific upstream NtrC-binding sequences, as previously noted for argT gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium (G. Schmitz, K. Nikaido, and G. F.-L. Ames, Mol. Gen. Genet. 215:107-117, 1988). PMID:10572131

  2. Nitrogen regulation of nasA and the nasB operon, which encode genes required for nitrate assimilation in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, M M; Yang, F; Hardin, P; Zuber, P.

    1995-01-01

    The divergently transcribed nasA gene and nasB operon are required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Bacillus subtilis. The beta-galactosidase activity of transcriptional lacZ fusions from the nasA and nasB promoters was high when cells were grown in minimal glucose medium containing poor nitrogen sources such as nitrate, proline, or glutamate. The expression was very low when ammonium or glutamine was used as the sole nitrogen source. The repression of the genes during growth on good s...

  3. The effect of nitrates on the alteration of the cementitious material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRU waste includes various chemical compounds such as nitrates. The influence of the chemical compounds on the performance of the barrier system should be estimated. Since the temperature of the deep-underground is higher than that of the near surface and a part of the TRU waste generates the heat accompanied with the decay of the radioactive nuclides, the influences of the heat to the barrier material also should be taken into account. In this study, we estimated the influence of sodium nitrate and also that of the leachate from the ROBE-waste (borate-solidified body of concentrated low-level waste) to the degradation of the cementitious material. We also obtained the mineralogical data of cementitious mineral after alteration in elevated temperature conditions. Results in this year are described below. 1) Alteration of characteristics of cementitious material in nitrate solution were evaluated by the water permeation test using sodium nitrate solution. The enhancement of the alteration of cementitious material due to sodium nitrate was observed. The dissolution quantity of the calcium of sodium nitrate solution permeated sample was larger than that of deionized water permeated sample (denoted as 'blank' in following). Hydraulic conductivity of sodium nitrate solution permeated sample was lower than blank, but after changing permeation liquid from sodium nitrate solution to deionized water, hydraulic conductivity rose quickly. The increase of porosity and the decrease of compressive strength were observed in the case of sodium nitrate solution compared with blank. In the nitrate solution, sulfate type and carbonate type of AFm changed into the nitrate type AFm. The nitrate type AFm altered to the carbonate type AFm when the nitrate concentration was lowered. 2) The influence of the leachate from the two types of ROBE-waste on the dissolution of the cementitious material was evaluated by the leaching experiments. Dissolution of the calcium from the cementitious

  4. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2]. PMID:15819914

  5. Absorption et assimilation du nitrate et recyclage de l’azote organique chez les plantes : intérêt pour le colza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morot-Gaudry Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus (winter oilseed rape is an important agricultural crop cultivated for oil, which can be used as an edible product or for industrial application, bioester for example. Despite the very high capacity of oilseed rape to take up nitrate, many authors have reported a very low recovery of nitrogen in field-grown crops whatever the level of N fertilizer applied. In this manuscript we describe the main biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in nitrate uptake, reduction, assimilation and N recycling during the reproductive period to gain sufficient knowledge to determine the relative importance of environmental and genetic factors determining N management in plants. This understanding will provide the necessary background for improvement of oilseed rape varieties.

  6. Comparison of the uptake and assimilation of ammonium and nitrate in Indica and Japonica rice plants using the tracer 15N method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate and their assimilation in 4-week-old Indica and Japonica rice plants were studied during 24 hr exposure to 2 mM solutions of (15NH4)2SO4 and/or Na15NO3. Although there was no clear difference in the uptake and assimilation of 15NH4+, significant differences in the uptake and assimilation of 15NO3- by both varieties were observed. When NH4+ or NO3- was supplied exclusively, the Indica rice plants absorbed the latter more effectively than the Japonica. In addition, despite a preference for uptake of NH4+ rather than NO3- as shown by both varieties when both forms were supplied together, the relative amounts of NO3- uptake by the Indica were higher than those of Japonica. On the other hand, the Indica rice plants reduced the absorbed 15NO3- more rapidly than the Japonica. The incorporation 15NO3- into the ethanol insoluble nitrogen fraction of the Indica rice also exceeded that of the Japonica. These results suggest that the Indica has the ability to utilize NO3- as a nitrogen source more effectively than the Japonica rice plants. (author)

  7. Effects of altered carbohydrate availability on whole-plant assimilation of 15NO3-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relative changes in NO3- assimilatory processes which occurred in response to decreasing carbohydrate availability. Young tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum [L.], cv NC 2326) growing in solution culture were exposed to 1.0 millimolar 15NO3- for 6 hour intervals during a normal 12 hour light period and a subsequent period of darkness lasting 42 hours. Uptake of 15NO3- decreased to 71 to 83% of the uptake rate in the light during the initial 18 hours of darkness; uptake then decreased sharply over the next 12 hours of darkness to 11 to 17% of the light rate, coincident with depletion of tissue carbohydrate reserves and a marked decline in root respiration. Changes also occurred in endogenous 15NO3- assimilation processes, which were distinctly different than those in 15NO3- uptake. During the extended dark period, translocation of absorbed 15N out of the root to the shoot varied rhythmically. The adjustments were independent of 15NO3- uptake rate and carbohydrate status, but were reciprocally related to rhythmic adjustments in stomatal resistance and, presumably, water movement through the root system. Whole plant reduction of 15NO3- always was limited more than uptake. The assimilation of 15N into insoluble reduced-N in roots remained a constant proportion of uptake throughout, while assimilation in the shoot declined markedly in the first 18 hours of darkness before stabilizing at a low level. The plants clearly retained a capacity for 15NO3- reduction and synthesis of insoluble reduced-15N even when 15NO3- uptake was severely restricted and minimal carbohydrate reserves remained in the tissue

  8. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Robin C.; Pinchak, William E.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  9. Nitrogen assimilation and nitrate reductase activity in tomato seedlings. I. Comparative studies on the influence of the Ca:Mg ratio on nitrogen metabolism in relation to absorption of nitrates or ammonium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suder-Moraw

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A change in the Ca:Mg ratio in the nutrient solution from the value optimal for tomato growth (3:1 to an unsuitable value (3:30 increases several times Mg2+ accumulation with simultaneous reduction of Ca2+ accumulation independently from the absorption of mineral nitrogen from, viz. NO3 - or NH4,- ions. Tomato seedlings receiving nitrogen in the form of NH4 show a complete tolerance to the unsuitable Ca:Mg ratio in the nutrient solution, whereas those supplied with NO3 react by growth inhibition, reduced dry weight increment and protein weight and inhibition of nitrogen reductase (NR activity. It is suggested that the reaction of plants to an excess of Mg2+ in the nutrient solution in relation to Ca2+ depends above all on the form in which nitrogen is supplied to the plants. It was found that the reduction of dry weight increment and protein synthesis preceded in time NR activity inhibition. Accumulation of excess Mg2+ and decreased Ca2+ accumulation occur rather rapidly. It is, therefore, supposed that the excess of accumulated Mg2+ induces a physiological deficit of Ca2+ in the tissue of plants taking up NO3 nitrogen. This calcium deficit leads to inhibtion of nitrate assimilation.

  10. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, B. S.; Lin, J. T.; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immed...

  11. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. PMID:8051020

  12. Temporal variation of nitrate and phosphate transport in headwater catchments: the hydrological controls and landuse alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. Lee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oceania Rivers are hotspots of high DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen and DIP (dissolved inorganic phosphorus transport. However, the effects of hydrologic controls and land use alternation on the temporal variations of DIN and DIP are rarely documented. In this study, we monitored the nitrate and phosphate concentrations from three headwater catchments with different cultivation gradients at a 3-day interval. This sampling scheme was supplemented with a 3-h interval monitoring during typhoon periods. The results showed that the DIN and DIP yields in the pristine, moderately cultivated, and intensively cultivated watersheds were 7.52/0.31, 31.17/0.30, and 40.96/0.52 kg ha−1 yr−1, respectively. The high DIN yields are comparable to the intensively and extensively disturbed large rivers around the world. These N yields may be due to a high level of nitrogen deposition, rainfall-runoff, and fertilizer application. The importance of event sampling was indicated by the contribution of the three typhoons to the annual DIN and DIP fluxes, which were 30% and 60%, respectively. Both DIN and DIP fluxes significantly increased as the cultivation gradient increased. The DIN and DIP ratio varied from 54 to 230 depending on the decrease of the cultivation gradient. This value is higher than the global mean of ~18. Thus, we speculate that nitrogen saturation occurs in the headwater catchments of Oceania Rivers. The results obtained provide fundamental clues of DIN and DIP yield of Oceania Rivers, which are helpful in understanding the impact of human disturbance on headwater watersheds.

  13. Exotic grasses and nitrate enrichment alter soil carbon cycling along an urban-rural tropical forest gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Daniela F; Lee, Joseph K; McCleery, Taylor L; LeCroy, Chase S

    2015-12-01

    Urban areas are expanding rapidly in tropical regions, with potential to alter ecosystem dynamics. In particular, exotic grasses and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition simultaneously affect tropical urbanized landscapes, with unknown effects on properties like soil carbon (C) storage. We hypothesized that (H1) soil nitrate (NO3 (-) ) is elevated nearer to the urban core, reflecting N deposition gradients. (H2) Exotic grasslands have elevated soil NO3 (-) and decreased soil C relative to secondary forests, with higher N promoting decomposer activity. (H3) Exotic grasslands have greater seasonality in soil NO3 (-) vs. secondary forests, due to higher sensitivity of grassland soil moisture to rainfall. We predicted that NO3 (-) would be positively related to dissolved organic C (DOC) production via changes in decomposer activity. We measured six paired grassland/secondary forest sites along a tropical urban-to-rural gradient during the three dominant seasons (hurricane, dry, and early wet). We found that (1) soil NO3 (-) was generally elevated nearer to the urban core, with particularly clear spatial trends for grasslands. (2) Exotic grasslands had lower soil C than secondary forests, which was related to elevated decomposer enzyme activities and soil respiration. Unexpectedly, soil NO3 (-) was negatively related to enzyme activities, and was lower in grasslands than forests. (3) Grasslands had greater soil NO3 (-) seasonality vs. forests, but this was not strongly linked to shifts in soil moisture or DOC. Our results suggest that exotic grasses in tropical regions are likely to drastically reduce soil C storage, but that N deposition may have an opposite effect via suppression of enzyme activities. However, soil NO3 (-) accumulation here was higher in urban forests than grasslands, potentially related to of aboveground N interception. Net urban effects on C storage across tropical landscapes will likely vary depending on the mosaic of grass cover, rates of N

  14. 遮光下外源水杨酸对韭菜硝酸盐还原同化效应的研究%Effects of Exogenous Salicylic Acid on Nitrate Reduction and Assimilation in Chinese Chive Under Weak Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林妍; 王俊玲; 王梅; 高志奎

    2012-01-01

    effects of exogenous salicylic acid on nitrate reduction and assimilation. [Method] With Chinese chive as an experimental material, two treatment factors including SA (3.0 mmol·L-1) and light intensity (the weak light and natural light) were designed in the experiment. [Result] Under the weak light, exogenous SA pretreatment reduced the decrease in the key enzyme activity of nitrogen metabolism (nitrate reductase (NR), glufamine syntheta.se (GS), glutamic- oxaloacetic-transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (GPT)), while decreased nitrate accumulation. Compared with no SA treatments. NR and GS activities in SA treatments increased significantly , 23.7% and 12.3%, respectively. Also, the content of chlorophyll (Ch1), ETR , the content of free amino acids and soluble protein of weak light were enhanced after SA application. In addition, SA increased the content of most free amino acid components under weak light, with tryptophan and serine as the most effective, reaching 89.8% and 50.6%, respectively, and at the same time reduced the free amino acids and soluble protein ratio (A/P). [Conclusion] Weak light reduced the capacity of the nitrogen assimilation and material production, however, exogenous SA spraying on leaves obviously improved nitrate reduction and assimilation, which, meanwhile, brought transaminations into play vigorously, and promoted turning NO3- into free amino acid and dissolvable protein. Improvement of nitrate reduction and assimilation might be a key reason for reducing nitrate accumulating into the vacuole of Chinese chive under weak light.

  15. Inactivation of nitrate reductase alters metabolic branching of carbohydrate fermentation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Zhang, Shuyi; Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady M; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-05-01

    To produce cellular energy, cyanobacteria reduce nitrate as the preferred pathway over proton reduction (H2 evolution) by catabolizing glycogen under dark anaerobic conditions. This competition lowers H2 production by consuming a large fraction of the reducing equivalents (NADPH and NADH). To eliminate this competition, we constructed a knockout mutant of nitrate reductase, encoded by narB, in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. As expected, ΔnarB was able to take up intracellular nitrate but was unable to reduce it to nitrite or ammonia, and was unable to grow photoautotrophically on nitrate. During photoautotrophic growth on urea, ΔnarB significantly redirects biomass accumulation into glycogen at the expense of protein accumulation. During subsequent dark fermentation, metabolite concentrations--both the adenylate cellular energy charge (∼ATP) and the redox poise (NAD(P)H/NAD(P))--were independent of nitrate availability in ΔnarB, in contrast to the wild type (WT) control. The ΔnarB strain diverted more reducing equivalents from glycogen catabolism into reduced products, mainly H2 and d-lactate, by 6-fold (2.8% yield) and 2-fold (82.3% yield), respectively, than WT. Continuous removal of H2 from the fermentation medium (milking) further boosted net H2 production by 7-fold in ΔnarB, at the expense of less excreted lactate, resulting in a 49-fold combined increase in the net H2 evolution rate during 2 days of fermentation compared to the WT. The absence of nitrate reductase eliminated the inductive effect of nitrate addition on rerouting carbohydrate catabolism from glycolysis to the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway, indicating that intracellular redox poise and not nitrate itself acts as the control switch for carbon flux branching between pathways. PMID:26479976

  16. Elevated CO2-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase differentially affects nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis plants under different nitrate supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shaoting; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Huijun; Yan, Minggang; Chen, Ni; Xie, Huaqiang; Ke, Shouwei

    2016-02-01

    CO2 elevation often alters the plant's nitrate reductase (NR) activity, the first enzyme acting in the nitrate assimilation pathway. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. The association between elevated CO2-induced alterations of NR activity and nitric oxide (NO) was examined in Col-0 Arabidopsis fed with 0.2-10 mM nitrate, using NO donors, NO scavenger, and NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The noa1 mutant, in which most NOS activity was lost, and the NR activity-null mutant nia1 nia2 were also used to examine the above association. In response to CO2 elevation, NR activity increased in low-nitrate Col-0 plants but was inhibited in high-nitrate Col-0 plants. NO scavenger and NOS inhibitor could eliminate these two responses, whereas the application of NO donors mimicked these distinct responses in ambient CO2-grown Col-0 plants. Furthermore, in both low- and high-nitrate conditions, elevated CO2 increased NOS activity and NO levels in Col-0 and nia1 nia2 plants but had little effect on NO level and NR activity in noa1 plants. Considering all of these findings, this study concluded that, in response to CO2 elevation, either the NR activity induction in low-nitrate plants or the NR activity inhibition in high-nitrate plants is regulated by NOS-generated NO. PMID:26608644

  17. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  18. Assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikes, V; Chválová, H; Mátlová, L

    1991-01-01

    Two pathways serve for assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans. Glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) catalyzes the assimilation at a high NH4+ concentration. If nitrate serves as the nitrogen source, glutamate is synthesized by glutamate-ammonia ligase and glutamate synthase (NADPH). At a very low NH4+ concentration, all three enzymes are synthesized simultaneously. No direct relationship exists between glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) and glutamate-ammonia ligase in P. denitrificans, while the glutamate synthase (NADPH) activity changes in parallel with that of the latter enzyme. Ammonia does not influence the induction or repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+). The inner concentration of metabolites indicates a possible repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) by the high concentration of glutamine or its metabolic products as in the case when NH4+ is formed by assimilative nitrate reduction. No direct effect of the intermediates of nitrate assimilation on the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) was observed. PMID:1688163

  19. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. PMID:26508536

  20. Effect of ammonium nutrition on the nitrate utilization, nitrate reductase actvity and growth of Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Tatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of NH4+ ions on nitrate assimilation and growth of sterile Spirodela polyrrhiza cultures was investigated. S. polyrrhiza utilises both the nitrate and the ammonium form of nitrogen, it prefers, however, NH4+. Ammonium ions present in the nitrate medium inhibit the activity of nitrate reductase (NR, but they do not affect enzyme 'induction and only slightly reduce N03- uptake. These results sugest that the inhibitory effect of NH4+ on the NR activity is the main cause of the decrease in N03- assimilation by S. polyrrhiza cultures growing in nitrate-ammonium medium.

  1. Altered gene expression of hepatic lanosterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) in lead nitrate-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Misaki [Laboratory of Animal Gene Function, Department of Physiology and Genetic Regulation, Institute of Insect and Animal Sciences, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Kannondai 2-1-2, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Murai, Uta; Yoshimura, Nami; Ayabe, Yuko; Degawa, Masakuni [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Effects of lead nitrate (LN), a hepatic mitogen, on hepatic gene expressions of lanosterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) and the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and SREBP-2), which are thought to be transcription factors for hepatic CYP51 gene, were examined by the methods of Northern blot and/or real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In both immature (4-week-old) and mature (7-week-old) rats, LN treatment resulted in definite increases in hepatic gene expression of CYP51 at 12 h and in the liver weight at 48 h. As for transcription factors for the CYP51 gene, enhanced gene expression of SREBP-2 was observed 6-12 h after LN treatment, whereas no enhanced gene expression of other SREBPs, SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c, was observed at any time after the treatment; for SREBP-1a, there was no significant change; for SREPB-1c, there was a drastic decrease. In addition, the serum total cholesterol level was increased 12 h after LN treatment to 7-week-old rats, and the increased level was maintained at least up to 48 h later. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that LN, a heavy-metal ion, activates the expression of the SREBP-2 and CYP51 genes without decreasing the serum total cholesterol level and further suggest that only SREBP-2 among SREBPs might play an important role in the LN-enhanced CYP51 gene expression. (orig.)

  2. Nitrate absorption and strontium accumulation. Final report, 1 August 1973--31 December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two basic objectives of this study to determine how strontium translocation, and discrimination between strontium and calcium in plants are influenced by nitrate uptake, assimilation, and translocation, and to characterize the relationships between nitrate uptake, nitrate assimilation, and nitrate translocation. Results are reported from studies using maize seedlings in which 85Sr and 45Ca were used as tracers. A list is included of publications that report the results of related studies

  3. Experimental soil warming and cooling alters the partitioning of recent assimilates: evidence from a (14)C-labelling study at the alpine treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A; Hagedorn, F; Niklaus, P A

    2016-05-01

    Despite concerns about climate change effects on ecosystems functioning, little is known on how plant assimilate partitioning changes with temperature. Particularly, large temperature effects might occur in cold ecosystems where critical processes are at their temperature limit. In this study, we tested temperature effects on carbon (C) assimilate partitioning in a field experiment at the alpine treeline. We warmed and cooled soils of microcosms planted with Pinus mugo or Leucanthemopsis alpina, achieving daily mean soil temperatures (3-10 cm depth) around 5.8, 12.7 and 19.2 °C in cooled, control and warmed soils. We pulse-labelled these systems with (14)CO2 for one photoperiod and traced (14)C over the successive 4 days. Plant net (14)C uptake increased steadily with soil temperature. However, (14)C amounts in fungal hyphae, soil microbial biomass, soil organic matter, and soil respiration showed a non-linear response to temperature. This non-linear pattern was particularly pronounced in P. mugo, with five times higher (14)C activities in cooled compared to control soils, but no difference between warmed and control soil. Autoradiographic analysis of the spatial distribution of (14)C in soils indicated that temperature effects on the vertical label distribution within soils depended on plant species. Our results show that plant growth, in particular root metabolism, is limited by low soil temperature. As a consequence, positive temperature effects on net C uptake may not be paralleled by similar changes in rhizodeposition. This has important implications for predictions of soil C storage, because rhizodeposits and plant biomass vary strongly in their residence times. PMID:26314342

  4. Nitrogen uptake and assimilation by corn roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of nitrogen uptake in the apical root zone of corn was experimentally investigated. Two experiments were performed. The one is to see the assimilation of nitrate and ammonium and the effects of low temperature on it. The 4-day-old roots were treated with 15N-labelled inorganic nitrogen of 20 ppm N in 5 x 10-4M CaSO4 solution at 30 deg. C and 0 deg. C. The other is to see the nitrogen uptake at apical root zone and the utilization of newly absorbed nitrogen at the root top. The 4-day-old roots were transferred into 5 x 10-4M CaSO4 solution containing 15N-labelled ammonium nitrate of 40 ppm N. As a result, the effect of low temperature on the nitrogen uptake appeared to be more drastic in the case of nitrate than ammonium. The 15N content of amino acids indicates that ammonium is assimilated into amino acids even at 0 deg. C, but nitrate is not. The ammonium nitrogen seemed to be absorbed at both cell dividing and elongating zones. On the other hand, nitrate nitrogen seemed to be strongly absorbed at cell elongating zone. The nitrogen in the apical part may be supplied not only by direct absorption but also by translocation from the basal part. The clear difference was found in the utilization of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen at the root top when the root was elongating. This may be due to the difference of assimilation products of inorganic nitrogen. Newly absorbed ammonium nitrogen is more utilizable for the growth of root top than nitrate nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  5. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  6. Um método de investigação da assimilação heterotrófica do amônio e nitrato por organismos planctônicos A method for investigating the heterotrophic assimilation of ammonium and nitrate through planktonic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineu Bianchini-Júnior

    2000-05-01

    ammonium and nitrate is investigated for various predetermined concentrations of water samples extracted from the upper subsurface of the littoral zone of a small reservoir (Lake IAG in São Paulo, Brazil ( 23º39’ S and 46º37’ W. Five concentrations were predetermined for added ammonium: 300; 370; 440; 650; 1280 µg.N.L-1 and nitrate: 340; 590; 890; 1090; 1590 µg.N.L-1. The samples were maintained under dark and oxygenated at a controlled temperature of 20ºC ± 1ºC, for the period of 9 days for ammonium and 11 days for nitrate. Once a day the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in the flasks were analyzed colorimetric method. The highest uptake rate occurred at the initial concentrations of 300 µg.N.L-1 (k = 0,23 day-1 and 340 µg.N.L-1 (k = 0,25 day-1 for ammonium and nitrate respectively. These results indicate that the latter concentrations are close to the ideal conditions for assimilation of ammonium and nitrate by the microorganisms in the system. It is suggested therefore that these are the concentrations at which incubation processes should be started. In addition, concentrations above 500 µg.N.L-1 for ammonium and 600 µg.N.L-1 for nitrate are likely to cause inhibition of the assimilation process. The data do not follow a simple Michaelis-Menten equation, probably because some inhibition in the assimilation occurred.

  7. Applications of nitrate and ammonium fertilizers alter soil nematode food webs in a continuous cucumber cropping system in Southwestern Sichuan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiwen Pan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3--N and ammonium (NH4+-N fertilizers are the main forms of chemical inorganic nitrogen fertilizers that are widely used in agro-ecosystem for high yield. However, the responses of soil nematode food web to different forms and rates of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers are not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the responses of soil nematode food web to the applications of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers in a continuous cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cropping system. Nitrate (NaNO3 and ammonium (NH4HCO3 fertilizers were applied to cucumber plants at the nitrogen (N rate of 0, 67.5, 135.0 and 202.5 kg N hm-2 before planting. It was conducted in a randomized complete block design with 4 replications at Huaizi village, Leshan district, Sichuan province, Southwestern China. The effects were analyzed at the stages of seedling, blooming and fruiting, respectively. The results indicated that the numbers of nematodes were significantly higher in soils with the addition of 67.5 kg N hm-2 than the control at the seedling and blooming stages. Nematode number strongly increased at the seedling stage and decreased at the blooming and fruiting stages in nitrate-treated soils compared to the ammonium-treated. The percentage of herbivores to total nematodes significantly decreased while that of bacterivores increased with a fertilizer rate less than 135 kg N hm-2 at the seedling and fruiting stages. Nitrate significantly reduced the percentage of herbivores, and increased that of bacterivores to total nematodes by comparison with ammonium at the blooming and fruiting stages. The application of nitrate significantly increased nematode diversity and evenness, and decreased dominance at the blooming stage relative to ammonium. Nitrate significantly decreased the values of channel index at the blooming stage and maturity index at the seedling stage in comparison with ammonium, respectively. Enrichment index and structural index

  8. Keeping Nitrate in the Roots: An Unexpected Requirement for Cadmium Tolerance in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alain Gojon; Frédéric Gaymard

    2010-01-01

    @@ The nitrate ion (NO-3) is a major nitrogen source for higher plants. Following uptake from the soil solution into the plant, nitrate can be either stored in the vacuoles or assimilated to supply the nitrogen atom for amino acid biosynthesis. In many herbaceous species, nitrate assimilation occurs redominantly in the leaves (Andrews, 1986), where a large part of the reducing power needed for this process directLy originates from the photosystems.

  9. Mutagenesis and transformation of Aspergillus terreus based on the nitrate reductase pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraz, Elza; Lima, Nelson; Mota, M

    1996-01-01

    Aspergillus terreus is an efficient producer of different extracellular enzymes which are used in food industries. Thus, we are interested in developing a genetic transformation system based on the nitrate structural gene niaD. In order to develop this system the nitrate assimilation pathway in A. terreus was studied and spontaneous mutants defective in the genes required for nitrate assimilation were obtained on the basis of chlorate resistance. Of particular interest were ...

  10. Assimilation of Images

    OpenAIRE

    Vidard, Arthur; Titaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    International audience Data assimilation aims at determining as accurately as possible the state of a dynamical system by combining heterogeneous sources of information in an optimal way. Generally speaking, the mathematical methods of data assimilation describe algorithms for forming optimal combinations of observations of a system, a numerical model that describes its evolution, and appropriate prior information. Data assimilation has a long history of application to high-dimensional geo...

  11. Assimilation in multilingual cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Using the Public Use Microdata Files of the 2001 and 2006 Canadian Censuses, we study the determinants of the assimilation of language minorities into the city majority language. We show that official minority members (i.e. francophones in English-speaking cities and anglophones in French-speaking cities) assimilate less than the "allophones" (the individuals with a mother tongue other than English or French), and that immigrants generally assimilate less than natives. In addition, the langua...

  12. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l.) walp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation. (Author)

  13. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  14. Displacement Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, W Steven; Mariano, Arthur J; Restrepo, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information important. While the displacement transformation is not tied to any particular assimilation scheme, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  15. Assimilative Capacity Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2008-01-01

    Assimilative capacity is the ability of natural systems to assimilate humankind's wastes. Wastes (output) of some species in natural systems are the resources (input) of other species. Before the Industrial Revolution, this concept of input and output held true for human activity, but industrialization created wastes that were qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of natural systems. The unique nature of some persistent wastes that accumulate in organisms over long periods of ...

  16. Relationships between nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase activity in Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NR IgG fragments obtained after papain digestion of polyclonal antibodies gave the positive immunological reaction with both, a soluble and plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Anti-NR antibody as well as IgG fragments almost totally inhibited the nitrate reductase activity in cytosol proving a crossreaction of antibody with the catalytic site of a soluble NR. Anti-NR IgG fragments, but not undigested polyclonal antibodies affected the activity of the nitrate reductase associated with plasma membranes. Discrepancy in the action of intact antibodies and fragments obtained after they digestion were interpreted as a consequence of same differences in the ability of those molecules to the penetration through the membrane. Undigested anti-NR antibody have no effect on the nitrate uptake by intact plants, as well as by the right-side plasma membrane vesicles. On the other hand, IgG fragments of polyclonal antibodies abolished almost totally the nitrate uptake in the case of intact seedlings, but have only slight effect on the N03 uptake in plasma membranes. On the basis of above findings, some relations between nitrate uptake and its assimilation inside the cell are suggested. Since IgG fragments only slightly changed the N03 absorption in vesicles whereas the activity of plasmalemma associated nitrate reductase was strongly repressed, we concluded that the PM-NR is not structurally involved in the nitrate transport through the membrane.

  17. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanko, S.; Ingversen, J.

    1971-01-01

    The uptake and assimilation of nitrate and ammonia have been studied in Zea mays. Nitrogen-starved maize roots are capable of accumulating a potential capacity for nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Reestablishment of nitrogen supply leads to intense uptake, reaching 154 % of the reference variant...

  18. Paliperidonium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshui Ge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt (systematic name: 3-{2-[4-(6-fluoro-1,2-benzoxazol-3-ylpiperidin-1-yl]ethyl}-9-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,6,7,8,9,9a-hexahydropyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-one nitrate, C23H29FN4O3+·NO3−, the piperidine ring displays a chair conformation and its N atom is protonated; the N—H bond is in an axial orientation. The ring bearing the hydroxy group exhibits a half-chair conformation. The hydroxy group as well as the adjacent methylene group are disordered over two sets of sites in a 0.823 (5:0.177 (5 ratio. In the crystal, O—H...N, O—H...O, N—H...O and N—H...N hydrogen bonds connect the components into a three-dimensional network.

  19. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen. - Eutrophication has become a global threat for lichen diversity.

  20. Assimilation potential of water column biota: Mesocosm-based evaluations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Ansari, Z.A.; Sadhasivan, A.; Naik, S.; Sawkar, K.

    brought to set up mesocosms during pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon periods. Six different conditions - with organic nutrients (urea), inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate), and toxic responses of biotic components to altered situations. Several...

  1. The effect of glucose on nitrate assimilation by roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of exogenous glucose on the rates of 15NO3- uptake and reduction in the roots of light-grown corn seedlings was investigated. Under constant nutritional conditions, 5 mM glucose stimulated both 15NO3- uptake and reduction in roots. In contrast, exposure to 3-O-methyl-D-glucose stimulated 15NO3- uptake to a lesser degree, but had no effect on reduction. Tissue segments and isolated mitochondria from the roots of plants grown under the same conditions exhibited considerable SHAM-sensitive O2 uptake in the presence and absence of CN-. This indicated that respiration via the alternative pathway was occurring. The relationship between the effect of glucose on 15NO3- uptake/reduction and root energy status/respiration will be discussed

  2. Optimality in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey; Yatheendradas, Soni

    2016-04-01

    It costs a lot more to develop and launch an earth-observing satellite than it does to build a data assimilation system. As such, we propose that it is important to understand the efficiency of our assimilation algorithms at extracting information from remote sensing retrievals. To address this, we propose that it is necessary to adopt completely general definition of "optimality" that explicitly acknowledges all differences between the parametric constraints of our assimilation algorithm (e.g., Gaussianity, partial linearity, Markovian updates) and the true nature of the environmetnal system and observing system. In fact, it is not only possible, but incredibly straightforward, to measure the optimality (in this more general sense) of any data assimilation algorithm as applied to any intended model or natural system. We measure the information content of remote sensing data conditional on the fact that we are already running a model and then measure the actual information extracted by data assimilation. The ratio of the two is an efficiency metric, and optimality is defined as occurring when the data assimilation algorithm is perfectly efficient at extracting information from the retrievals. We measure the information content of the remote sensing data in a way that, unlike triple collocation, does not rely on any a priori presumed relationship (e.g., linear) between the retrieval and the ground truth, however, like triple-collocation, is insensitive to the spatial mismatch between point-based measurements and grid-scale retrievals. This theory and method is therefore suitable for use with both dense and sparse validation networks. Additionally, the method we propose is *constructive* in the sense that it provides guidance on how to improve data assimilation systems. All data assimilation strategies can be reduced to approximations of Bayes' law, and we measure the fractions of total information loss that are due to individual assumptions or approximations in the

  3. On Assimilation of English Sounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恩华

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a careful study of assimilation in English speaking, meanwhile a systematic knowledge of assimilation wil be helpful for the pronunciations of English learners, facilitate English fluency and improve listening comprehension.

  4. Utilization of urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate by crop plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Rains, D. W.; Qualset, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization of nitrogen compounds by crop plants is studied. The selection of crop varieties for efficient production using urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, and the assimilation of mixed nitrogen sources by cereal leaves and roots are discussed.

  5. Photosynthetic assimilation of 14C in isolated chloroplasts in the presence of NO3-, SO4- and NH4+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative changes in carbon photosynthesis assimilation occurring as an effect of varying nitrate, sulfate and ammonia ions in the incubation medium were studied in isolated chloroplasts of spinach. Carbon photosynthetic assimilation is enhanced under the influence of rising nitrate anion concentrations to a certain level. The percentage of 14C concent in the insoluble products is also raised while in glycolic acid it is reduced. The nitrate anion has an effect similar to that of the bicarbonic anion the same processes. Ammonium and sulfate ions have the opposite effect. It can be assumed that the established effect of the ions studied is due to the influence they have on photosynthetic phosphorylation. (author)

  6. Nitrogen assimilation in Citrus based on CitEST data mining

    OpenAIRE

    Ester Wickert; Jackson Marcondes; Manoel Victor Lemos; Lemos, Eliana G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Assimilation of nitrate and ammonium are vital procedures for plant development and growth. From these primary paths of inorganic nitrogen assimilation, this metabolism integrates diverse paths for biosynthesis of macromolecules, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and the central intermediate metabolism, like carbon metabolism and photorespiration. This paper reports research performed in the CitEST (Citrus Expressed Sequence Tag) database for the main genes involved in nitrogen metabolism ...

  7. RNA sequence requirements for NasR-mediated, nitrate-responsive transcription antitermination of the Klebsiella oxytoca M5al nasF operon leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, W; Stewart, V

    1999-09-17

    In Klebsiella oxytoca, enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Nitrate and nitrite induction of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcriptional antitermination mechanism, in which the nasR gene product responds to nitrate or nitrite and overcomes transcription termination at the factor-independent terminator site located in the nasF upstream leader region. Previous studies led to the hypothesis that the NasR protein mediates transcription antitermination through interaction with nasF leader RNA. Here, we report a DNA sequence comparison that reveals conserved 1:2 and 3:4 RNA secondary structures in the nasF leader RNAs from two Klebsiella species. Additionally, we found that specific binding of the NasR protein to nasF leader RNA was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite. We combined mutational analysis, in vivo and in vitro antitermination assays, and an RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay to define regions in the nasF leader that are essential for antitermination and for NasR-RNA interaction. Formation of the 1:2 stem structure and the specific sequence of the 1:2 hexanucleotide loop were required for both nitrate induction and for NasR-RNA interaction. Mutations in the 1:2 stem-loop region that abolished nitrate induction also interfered with NasR-leader RNA interaction. Finally, nucleotide alterations or additions in the linker region between the 1:2 and 3:4 stem-loops were deleterious to nasF operon induction but not to NasR-leader RNA interaction. We hypothesize that NasR protein recognizes the 1:2 stem-loop structure in the nasF leader RNA to mediate transcription antitermination in response to nitrate or nitrite. PMID:10493869

  8. Assimilation in multilingual cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Javier; Verdugo, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    International audience We characterise how the assimilation patterns of minorities into the strong and the weak language differ in a situation of asymmetric bilingualism. Using large variations in language composition in Canadian cities from the 2001 and 2006 Censuses, we show that the differences in the knowledge of English by immigrant allophones (i.e. the immigrants with a mother tongue other than English and French) in English-majority cities are mainly due to sorting across cities. In...

  9. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  10. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes meth

  11. High temperature interaction studies on equimolar nitrate mixture of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earths including gadolinium form a sizeable fraction of the fission products in the nuclear fission of fissile material in the reactor. These fission products can interact with uranium dioxide fuel and can form various compounds which can alter the thermal behavior of the fuel. The mixed oxide formed due to the high temperature interactions of mixture of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate (GdNH) has been studied using thermal and X- ray diffraction techniques. The equimolar mixture of UNH and GdNH was prepared by mixing the weighed amount of individual nitrates and grinding gently with mortar and pestle. Thermogravimetry (TG) measurements were carried out by separately heating 100 mg of mixture and individual nitrates at heating rate of 10°C min-1 using Netzsch thermal analyzer (Model No.: STA 409 PC Luxx) in high purity nitrogen atmosphere with a flow rate of 120 mL min-1. The XRD measurement was carried out on a Philips X-ray diffractometer (Model PW1710) using nickel-filtered Cu-Kα radiation

  12. Interactions between carbon metabolism and the uptake and assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corda) Ralfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate uptake in nitrogen-limited Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corba) Ralfs was found to be directly dependent on: (1) nitrate concentration; (2) the availability of carbon dioxide or recently synthesised carbon skeletons; (3) light intensity and (4) the presence of ammonium or metabolites of ammonium assimilation. Nitrate uptake was found to obey simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the absence of carbon dioxide, nitrate uptake was destabilised and resulted in nitrate efflux from the cells. If the cells were pre-adapted to high levels of carbon dioxide, a decrease in the concentration of supplied carbon dioxide resulted in only a transient suppression of nitrate uptake. These results indicate that carbon dioxide was required for the stabilisation of the nitrate uptake system and that nitrate uptake, reduction and assimilation could proceed if supplies of recently synthesised carbon skeletons were available for subsequent ammonium incorporation into amino acids. It was concluded that the mobilisation of storage carbohydrate could provide the necessary reducing potential and ATP for nitrate uptake. The addition of ammonium to A. falcatus cells accumulating nitrate resulted in the immediate cessation of nitrate uptake and subsequent nitrate efflux from the cells. Assays of nitrate reductase activity indicated that the activity of the enzyme increased under nitrogen-limitation. Nitrogen-limited, nitrate-growth and ammonium-grown cultures of A. falcatus were used to determine the effects of nitrate and ammonium addition on photosynthetic oxygen exchange, carbon fixation and the path of carbon flow. The addition of these species of inorganic nitrogen resulted in the suppression of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and carbon fixation. Labelling with 14C was used during the carbon fixation studies

  13. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  14. Hormonal control of sulfate uptake and assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones have a plethora of functions in control of plant development, stress response, and primary metabolism, including nutrient homeostasis. In the plant nutrition, the interplay of hormones with responses to nitrate and phosphate deficiency is well described, but relatively little is known about the interaction between phytohormones and regulation of sulfur metabolism. As for other nutrients, sulfate deficiency results in modulation of root architecture, where hormones are expected to play an important role. Accordingly, sulfate deficiency induces genes involved in metabolism of tryptophane and auxin. Also jasmonate biosynthesis is induced, pointing to the need of increase the defense capabilities of the plants when sulfur is limiting. However, hormones affect also sulfate uptake and assimilation. The pathway is coordinately induced by jasmonate and the key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is additionally regulated by ethylene, abscisic acid, nitric oxid, and other phytohormones. Perhaps the most intriguing link between hormones and sulfate assimilation is the fact that the main regulator of the response to sulfate starvation, SULFATE LIMITATION1 (SLIM1) belongs to the family of ethylene related transcription factors. We will review the current knowledge of interplay between phytohormones and control of sulfur metabolism and discuss the main open questions. PMID:26810064

  15. Quantifying nitrate dynamics in an oligotrophic lake using Δ17O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tanaka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopic compositions of nitrate, including the 17O anomalies (Δ17O, were determined twice in 1 yr (June and August 2007 in the oligotrophic water column of Lake Mashu, Japan. These data were then used to quantify the geochemical dynamics of nitrate in the lake, by using the deposition rate of the atmospheric nitrate onto the entire catchment area of the lake. The total amount of nitrate in the lake water decreased from 4.2 to 2.1 Mmol during the period between the observations, while the average Δ17O values remained uniform at +2.5‰. The Δ17O values corresponded to an small and uniform mixing ratio of atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate of 9.7 ± 0.8%. These results indicate that 0.52 ± 0.34 Mmol of the remineralized nitrate was fed into the water column through nitrification, while 2.6 ± 0.4 Mmol of nitrate was simultaneously removed from the water column by assimilation, during the period between the observations. The lake water dissolved nitrate was characterized by rapid removal through assimilation during summer until it was almost completely removed from the euphotic layer, as well as continuous feeding into the lake through nitrification (3.2 ± 0.3 Mmol a−1 and deposition (0.35 ± 0.2 Mmol a−1, regardless of the seasons. The 15N-depleted nitrogen isotopic compositions of nitrate were as low as −6.5‰ in June, which also indicates that in-lake nitrification is the major source of nitrate in the lake and suggests that there is low potential for denitrification in and around the lake. Atmospheric nitrate deposited into the lake will be assimilated quickly, having a mean residence time of 1.2 ± 0.1 yr. In addition, more than 90% of the assimilated nitrate will be remineralized to nitrate and re-assimilated via active nitrogen cycling in the lake.

  16. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model. In this thesis, the Kalman filter is used for data assimilation with a focus on groundwater modelling. However the developed techniques are general and can be applied also in other modelling domains. Mo...

  17. Assimilation: central and peripheral effects

    OpenAIRE

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Kruysbergen, N.A.W.H. van

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation and contrast have opposite effects: Contrast leads to an increase of perceived differences between neighbouring fields, whereas assimilation leads to a reduction. It is relatively easy to demonstrate these effects, but the precise localisation of these effects in the perceptual system is not yet possible. In an experiment the strength of assimilation effects was modified by adding spatial noise. By varying the localisation in perceived space of the added noise (by presentation of...

  18. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  19. The effect of spatial heterogeneity on nitrate reduction in soil systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Lu

    hand governed by formation by oxidation of ammonia-N, and on the other hand by removal a removal by two dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes:denitrification, in which nitrate is converted to the gaseous compounds dinitrogen and nitrous oxide, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA...... nitrate, and can be assimilated into organic matter, effectively bypassing both denitrification and dinitrogen fixation and conserving nitrogen in the ecosystem. It is well established that soil is an extremely heterogeneous environment, not merely on a macroscopic level, but also on a microscopic level...

  20. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) addresses the fundamental problem of command, control, and communications systems interoperability....

  1. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) is a middleware architecture that facilitates the incorporation of heterogeneous sensing and control devices...

  2. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  3. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  4. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, Christopher A.

    2015-01-03

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  5. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J

    2010-05-01

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics. PMID:20463875

  6. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  7. Data assimilation of depth-distributed satellite chlorophyll-α in two Mediterranean contrasting sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaroni, S.; Tsiaras, K.; Petihakis, G.; Hoteit, I.; Economou-Amilli, A.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2016-08-01

    A new approach for processing the remote sensing chlorophyll-α (Chl-α) before assimilating into an ecosystem model is applied in two contrasting, regarding productivity and nutrients availability, Mediterranean sites: the DYFAMED and POSEIDON E1-M3A fixed point open ocean observatories. The new approach derives optically weighted depth-distributed Chl-α profiles from satellite data based on the model simulated Chl-α vertical distribution and light attenuation coefficient. We use the 1D version of the operational ecological 3D POSEIDON model, based on the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The required hydrodynamic properties are obtained (off-line) from the POSEIDON operational 3D hydrodynamic Mediterranean basin scale model. The data assimilation scheme is the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, the ensemble variant of the singular evolutive extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. The performance of the proposed assimilation approach was evaluated against the Chl-α satellite data and the seasonal averages of available in situ data for nitrate, phosphate and Chl-α. An improvement of the model simulated near-surface and subsurface maximum Chl-α concentrations is obtained, especially at the DYFAMED site. Model nitrate is improved with assimilation, particularly with the new approach assimilating depth-distributed Chl-α, while model phosphate is slightly worse after assimilation. Additional sensitivity experiments were performed, showing a better performance of the new approach under different scenarios of model Chl-α deviation from pseudo-observations of surface Chl-α.

  8. Data assimilation of depth-distributed satellite chlorophyll-α in two Mediterranean contrasting sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kalaroni, S.

    2016-04-12

    A new approach for processing the remote sensing chlorophyll-α (Chl-α) before assimilating into an ecosystem model is applied in two contrasting, regarding productivity and nutrients availability, Mediterranean sites: the DYFAMED and POSEIDON E1-M3A fixed point open ocean observatories. The new approach derives optically weighted depth-distributed Chl-α profiles from satellite data based on the model simulated Chl-α vertical distribution and light attenuation coefficient. We use the 1D version of the operational ecological 3D POSEIDON model, based on the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The required hydrodynamic properties are obtained (off-line) from the POSEIDON operational 3D hydrodynamic Mediterranean basin scale model. The data assimilation scheme is the Singular Evolutive Interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, the ensemble variant of the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. The performance of the proposed assimilation approach was evaluated against the Chl-α satellite data and the seasonal averages of available in-situ data for nitrate, phosphate and Chl-α. An improvement of the model simulated near-surface and subsurface maximum Chl-α concentrations is obtained, especially at the DYFAMED site. Model nitrate is improved with assimilation, particularly with the new approach assimilating depth-distributed Chl-α, while model phosphate is slightly worse after assimilation. Additional sensitivity experiments were performed, showing a better performance of the new approach under different scenarios of model Chl-α deviation from pseudo-observations of surface Chl-α.

  9. Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Ling Ruan; John W.Patrick; Hans Weber

    2010-01-01

    @@ It has been a pleasure to organize this special issue of Molecular Plant on 'Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development'. Assimilate, a collective term describing organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), is of paramount importance for plant development and realization of crop productivity.

  10. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model. In...

  11. Summer nitrate uptake and denitrification in an upper Mississippi River backwater lake: The role of rooted aquatic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiling, Rebecca M.; Richardson, W.B.; Cavanaugh, J.C.; Bartsch, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    In-stream nitrogen processing in the Mississippi River has been suggested as one mechanism to reduce coastal eutrophication in the Gulf of Mexico. Aquatic macrophytes in river channels and flood plain lakes have the potential to temporarily remove large quantities of nitrogen through assimilation both by themselves and by the attached epiphyton. In addition, rooted macrophytes act as oxygen pumps, creating aerobic microsites around their roots where coupled nitrification-denitrification can occur. We used in situ 15N-NO3- tracer mesocosm experiments to measure nitrate assimilation rates for macrophytes, epiphyton, and microbial fauna in the sediment in Third Lake, a backwater lake of the upper Mississippi River during June and July 2005. We measured assimilation over a range of nitrate concentrations and estimated a nitrate mass balance for Third Lake. Macrophytes assimilated the most nitrate (29.5 mg N m-2 d-1) followed by sediment microbes (14.4 mg N m-2 d-1) and epiphytes (5.7 mg N m-2d-1. Assimilation accounted for 6.8% in June and 18.6% in July of total nitrate loss in the control chambers. However, denitrification (292.4 mg N m-2 d-1) is estimated to account for the majority (82%) of the nitrate loss. Assimilation and denitrification rates generally increased with increasing nitrate concentration but denitrification rates plateaued at about 5 mg N L-1. This suggests that backwaters have the potential to remove a relatively high amount of nitrate but will likely become saturated if the load becomes too large. ?? 2010 US Government.

  12. Spatial Assimilation in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter

    2010-01-01

    In most European countries ethnic minorities have had a tendency to settle in certain parts of cities, and often in social housing, together with other immigrants in so-called multiethnic neighbourhoods. An explanation for this could be low income combined with lack of knowledge of the housing...... market and discrimination, which limits the housing possibilities for ethnic minorities. Another explanation could be that immigrants for different reasons choose to settle in so-called ethnic enclaves where they can find an ethnic social network, which can support them in their new country. In...... traditional research literature about immigration it has been shown that for many immigrants living in enclaves has been a temporary situation. The 'spatial assimilation theory' says that this situation ends when the family has become more integrated in the new society and then moves to other parts of the...

  13. Nonlinear data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on nonlinear data assimilation that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. Both contributions focus on so-called particle filters. The first contribution by Jan van Leeuwen focuses on the potential of proposal densities. It discusses the issues with present-day particle filters and explorers new ideas for proposal densities to solve them, converging to particle filters that work well in systems of any dimension, closing the contribution with a high-dimensional example. The second contribution by Cheng and Reich discusses a unified framework for ensemble-transform particle filters. This allows one to bridge successful ensemble Kalman filters with fully nonlinear particle filters, and allows a proper introduction of localization in particle filters, which has been lacking up to now.

  14. Field determination of nitrate using nitrate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.R.; Corrigan, J.S.; Campbell, W.H. [Nitrate Elimination Co., Inc., Lake Linden, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Nitrate is routinely measured in a variety of substrates - water, tissues, soils, and foods - both in the field and in laboratory settings. The most commonly used nitrate test methods involve the reduction of nitrate to nitrite via a copper-cadmium reagent, followed by reaction of the nitrite with the Griess dye reagents. The resulting color is translated into a nitrate concentration by comparison with a calibrated color chart or comparator, or by reading the absorbance in a spectrophotometer. This basic method is reliable and sufficiently sensitive for many applications. However, the cadmium reagent is quite toxic. The trend today is for continued increase in concern for worker health and safety; in addition, there are increasing costs and logistical problems associated with regulatory constraints on transport and disposal of hazardous materials. Some suppliers have substituted a zinc-based reagent powder for the cadmium in an effort to reduce toxicity. We describe here an enzyme-based nitrate detection method as an improvement on the basic Griess method that demonstrates equal or superior sensitivity, superior selectivity, and is more environmentally benign. Comparisons between the enzyme-based method and some standard field test kits being used today are made.

  15. Metabolic profiling reveals altered nitrogen nutrient regimes have diverse effects on the metabolism of hydroponically-grown tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-01-01

    The role of inorganic nitrogen assimilation in the production of amino acids is one of the most important biochemical processes in plants. For this reason, a detailed broad-range characterization of the metabolic response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves to the alteration of nitrate level was performed. Tomato plants were grown hydroponically in liquid culture under three different nitrate regimes: saturated (8 mM NO3-), replete (4 mM NO3-) and deficient (0.4 mM NO3-). All treatments were performed under varied light intensity, with leaf samples being collected after 7, 14, and 21 d. In addition, the short-term response (after 1, 24, 48, and 94 h) to varying nutrient status was evaluated at the higher light intensity. GC-MS analysis of the levels of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, sugars, sugar alcohols, and representative compounds of secondary metabolism revealed substantial changes under the various growth regimes applied. The data presented here suggest that nitrate nutrition has wide-ranging effects on plant leaf metabolism with nitrate deficiency resulting in decreases in many amino and organic acids and increases in the level of several carbohydrates and phosphoesters, as well as a handful of secondary metabolites. These results are compared with previously reported transcript profiles of altered nitrogen regimes and discussed within the context of current models of carbon nitrogen interaction. PMID:15596475

  16. Community profiling and gene expression of fungal assimilatory nitrate reductases in agricultural soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gorfer, Markus; Blumhoff, Marzena; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Urban, Alexander; Inselsbacher, Erich; Bandian, Dragana; Mitter, Birgit; Sessitsch, Angela; Wanek, Wolfgang; Strauss, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Although fungi contribute significantly to the microbial biomass in terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about their contribution to biogeochemical nitrogen cycles. Agricultural soils usually contain comparably high amounts of inorganic nitrogen, mainly in the form of nitrate. Many studies focused on bacterial and archaeal turnover of nitrate by nitrification, denitrification and assimilation, whereas the fungal role remained largely neglected. To enable research on the fungal contribution...

  17. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  18. WAVE ASSIMILATION AND NUMERICAL PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An adjoint variational method for wave data assimilation in the LAGFD-WAM wave model is proposed. The adjoint equation of the wavenumber energy spectrum balance equation is derived. And fortunately, its characteristic equations are the same as those in the LAGFD-WAM wave model. Simple experiments on the functional optimization and assimilation effectiveness during the prediction period indicated that the adjoint variational method is effective for wave assimilation and that the initial optimization of the wave model is important for the short-range wave prediction. All of this is under the assumption that the wind field is accurate, the method is the important first step for combined wind and wave data assimilation systems.

  19. Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is the system used by the Global Forecast System (GFS) model to place observations into a gridded model space for the...

  20. Global Land Data Assimilation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface...

  1. Characteristics of 36C103- influx into nitrate reductase deficient mutant E1 pisum sativum seedlings: evidence for restricted ''induction'' by nitrate compared with wild type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of nitrate uptake into seedlings of Pisum sativum L. cv. Rondo mutant E1 defective for nitrate reductase (NR) and of its parent variety Rondo have been investigated using 36C103- as an analogue for nitrate. The apparent Michaelis Menten constants (Km) for 36ClO3- influx measured over 10 min were similar for mutant E1 and the wild type (Wt). There was a 28% increase in 36C103- into Wt seedlings following nitrate pretreatment but this was not found when mutant seedlings were used. N starvation increased 36C103- influx into both mutant and Wt seedlings, and the rate of cycling E/I was also enhanced to a similar extent. The results are discussed in terms of current ideas on the regulation of nitrate uptake and assimilation. (author)

  2. Determination of the atomic C/N assimilation ratio values of a pure culture of dunaliella and samples from rivers in Terengganu using the sup 14 C tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C/N assimilation ratio has been defined by Chan and Raine as the ratio of carbon assimilated by a given algal population to that of the total inorganic nitrogen assimilated. The apparent carbon to nitrogen assimilation ratio for Dunaliella (pure algal culture) as well as subsurface water taken from some rivers in Terengganu was mainly attributed to the assimilation of the type of inorganic nitrogen, namely ammonium or nitrate found in the medium. The high C/N value for the various water samples was mainly attributed to the assimilation of ammonium nitrogen available in large amount in the tropical aquatic environment. The ammonium-nitrogen contents exceeds that of nitrate contents at the two stations

  3. Data Assimilation Applications in Hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Deliu, Ciprian; Giurma, Ion

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review some data assimilation applications in hydrology and we investigate the benefits of applying the ensemble Kalman filter methods on a specific hydrodynamic model of a river network using the MIKE 11 software. We explore the efects of assimilating measurements from different locations (generated by a reference model) into a model forced with erroneous boundary conditions and also examine the effect of using coloured noise for describing uncertainty in the upstream bounda...

  4. Ethnic goods and immigrant assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulloev, Ilhom; Epstein, Gil S.; Ira N. Gang

    2014-01-01

    Some immigrants try to keep their ethnicity hidden while others become ever deeply more mired in their home culture. We argue that among immigrants this struggle manifests itself in the ethnic goods they choose to consume. Different types of ethnic goods have vastly different effects on immigrant assimilation. We develop a simple theoretical model useful for capturing the consequences of this struggle, illustrating it with examples of Central Asian assimilation into the Muscovite economy.

  5. Initial kinetics of 15N-nitrate labelling of root and shoot N fractions of barley cultured at different relative addition rates of nitrate-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of absorbed nitrate in the root and N transport to the shoot were studied in young barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants growing at low external nitrate levels. Plants were grown at three relative addition rates (RA) of nitrate: 0.04, 0.09, and 0.14 d-1, which represent different degrees of growth limiting nitrate supply. Root nitrate reduction and N transport in situ were estimated using 15N labelled nitrate exposures ranging from 5 to 60 min. With increasing RA, nitrate uptake in absolute terms increased, but the proportion of absorbed 15N-nitrate that was reduced in the root decreased markedly. After 10-20 min of exposure to the label, 75, 49 and 27 % of the 15N taken up was recovered as reduced 15N in the root at RAs 0.04, 0.09, and 0.14 d-1, respectively. The response pattern was supported by root nitrate reductase activities and xylem sap nitrate measurements. The decreasing proportion of reduced 15N in the root with higher nitrate supply rates was matched by a relative increase in 15N-nitrate storage and, to some extent, an increase in N transport to the shoot. Although small amounts of 15N were rapidly transported to the shoot, the accumulation of label in the shoot at the end of the 60 min period remained a relatively small proportion of total 15N uptake, which indicates delayed movement of 15N out of the root. The results clearly indicate that differing degrees of adjustment occur in important nitrate assimilation processes throughout the N deficiency range. (author)

  6. Functional complementation of a nitrate reductase defective mutant of a green alga Dunaliella viridis by introducing the nitrate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Gao, Xiaoshu; Li, Qiyun; Zhang, Qingqi; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-08-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes NAD (P) H dependent reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Transformation systems have been established in several species of green algae by nitrate reductase gene functional complementation. In this report, an endogenous NR cDNA (3.4 kb) and a genomic fragment (14.6 kb) containing the NR gene (DvNIA1) were isolated from the D. viridis cDNA and genomic libraries respectively. Southern blot and Northern blot analyses showed that this gene exists as a single copy in D. viridis and is induced by nitrate. To obtain a NR defective mutant as a recipient strain, D. viridis cells were treated with a chemical mutagen and then cultured on a chlorate-containing plate to enrich chlorate tolerant mutants. Southern analysis showed that one isolate, B14, had a deletion in the DvNIA1 gene region. Using electroporation conditions determined in this laboratory, plasmid pDVNR containing the intact DvNIA1 gene has been electroporated into the defective mutant B14. Strains retaining a nitrate assimilation phenotype were obtained from nitrate plates after spreading the electroporated cells. In some individual strains, transcription of the introduced gene was detected. NR activity in these strains was slightly higher than that in the defective B14 cell, but excretion of nitrite into culture media was almost as high as that of the wild-type cell. Possible episomal presence of the introduced DNA in D. viridis is discussed. PMID:16797881

  7. The importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the nitrogen cycle of coastal ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giblin, Anne E.; Tobias, Craig R.; Song, Bongkeun;

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, it was believed that biological assimilation and gaseous nitrogen (N) loss through denitrification were the two major fates of nitrate entering or produced within most coastal ecosystems. Denitrification is often viewed as an important ecosystem service that removes reactive N fro...

  8. Comparison of different assimilation schemes in a sequential Kalman filter assimilation system

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yajing; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four assimilation schemes, including an intermittent assimilation scheme (INT) and three incremental assimilation schemes (IAU 0, IAU 50 and IAU 100), are compared in the same assimilation experiments with a nonlinear ocean circulation model using the Ensemble Kalman Filter as assimilation method. The three IAU schemes differ from each other in the position of the increment update window that has the same size as the assimilation window. 0, 50 and 100 correspond to the degree o...

  9. Reversible Oxidation of a Conserved Methionine in the Nuclear Export Sequence Determines Subcellular Distribution and Activity of the Fungal Nitrate Regulator NirA

    OpenAIRE

    Gallmetzer, Andreas; Silvestrini, Lucia; Schinko, Thorsten; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Hortschansky, Peter; Dattenböck, Christoph; Muro-Pastor, María Isabel; Kungl, Andreas; Brakhage, Axel A.; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a most important soil nitrogen source, is tightly regulated in microorganisms and plants. In Aspergillus nidulans, during the transcriptional activation process of nitrate assimilatory genes, the interaction between the pathway-specific transcription factor NirA and the exportin KapK/CRM1 is disrupted, and this leads to rapid nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NirA. In this work by mass spectrometry, we found that in the absence of nitrate, when ...

  10. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with ∼3 wt% NO3- solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200 degrees C to 350 degrees C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia ∼ methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics

  11. 15N studies on the in-vivo assay of nitrate reductase in leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the leaf disks of seven di- and two mono-cotyledonous species under the in-vivo assay conditions of nitrate reductase was studied using N-15 labeled substrates. The significant reduction of both nitrate and nitrite into ammonia and amino acids was detected in the atmosphere of air. In the atmosphere of N2 gas, anaerobic incubation enhanced the accumulation of nitrite, but the subsequent reduction to the basic nitrogen compounds was from 40 to 180 % of the aerobic rate. The present examination indicated that the in-vivo assay of nitrate reductase under aerobic condition may give greatly underestimated results due to nitrite reduction, and that the exclusion of oxygen from the in-vivo assay mixture is desirable. The addition of n- propanol may be desirable for the assay under aerobic condition. Significant difference was not observed in the reduction of nitrate supplied as sodium and potassium salts on the nitrite formation and on the incorporation of nitrate-N into basic fractions. The N-15 experiment on the dark assimilation of nitrate, nitrite and ammonia into amino acids in wheat leaves showed that these three nitrogen sources were assimilated through the same route, and that the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthetase pathway was the main route. By anaerobic treatment, the incorporation of nitrogen into alanine and serine was relatively high. (Kako, I.)

  12. Physically-based data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Levy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, a validation and assimilation scheme should maintain the physical principles embodied in the model and be able to evaluate and assimilate lower dimensional features (e.g., discontinuities contained within a bulk simulation, even when these features are not directly observed or represented by model variables. We present such a scheme and suggest its potential to resolve or alleviate some outstanding problems that stem from making and applying required, yet often non-physical, assumptions and procedures in common operational data assimilation. As proof of concept, we use a sea-ice model with remotely sensed observations of leads in a one-step assimilation cycle. Using the new scheme in a sixteen day simulation experiment introduces model skill (against persistence several days earlier than in the control run, improves the overall model skill and delays its drop off at later stages of the simulation. The potential and requirements to extend this scheme to different applications, and to both empirical and statistical multivariate and full cycle data assimilation schemes, are discussed.

  13. Physically-based data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Levy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, a validation and assimilation scheme should maintain the physical principles embodied in the model and be able to evaluate and assimilate lower dimensional features (e.g., discontinuities contained within a bulk simulation, even when these features are not directly observed or represented by model variables. We present such a scheme and suggest its potential to resolve or alleviate some outstanding problems that stem from making and applying required, yet often non-physical, assumptions and procedures in common operational data assimilation. As proof of concept, we use a sea-ice model with remotely sensed observations of leads in a one-step assimilation cycle. Using the new scheme in a sixteen day simulation experiment introduces model skill (against persistence several days earlier than in the control run, improves the overall model skill and delays its drop off at later stages of the simulation. The potential and requirements to extend this scheme to different applications, and to both empirical and statistical multivariate and full cycle data assimilation schemes, are discussed.

  14. Physically-based data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G.; Coon, M.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2010-11-01

    Ideally, a validation and assimilation scheme should maintain the physical principles embodied in the model and be able to evaluate and assimilate lower dimensional features (e.g., discontinuities) contained within a bulk simulation, even when these features are not directly observed or represented by model variables. We present such a scheme and suggest its potential to resolve or alleviate some outstanding problems that stem from making and applying required, yet often non-physical, assumptions and procedures in common operational data assimilation. As proof of concept, we use a sea-ice model with remotely sensed observations of leads in a one-step assimilation cycle. Using the new scheme in a sixteen day simulation experiment introduces model skill (against persistence) several days earlier than in the control run, improves the overall model skill and delays its drop off at later stages of the simulation. The potential and requirements to extend this scheme to different applications, and to both empirical and statistical multivariate and full cycle data assimilation schemes, are discussed.

  15. Storm surge variational assimilation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-li HUANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate errors caused by uncertainty of parameters and further improve capability of storm surge forecasting, the variational data assimilation method is applied to the storm surge model based on unstructured grid with high spatial resolution. The method can effectively improve the forecasting accuracy of storm surge induced by typhoon through controlling wind drag force coefficient parameter. The model is first theoretically validated with synthetic data. Then, the real storm surge process induced by the TC 0515 typhoon is forecasted by the variational data assimilation model, and results show the feasibility of practical application.

  16. Data assimilation the ensemble Kalman filter

    CERN Document Server

    Evensen, Geir

    2006-01-01

    Covers data assimilation and inverse methods, including both traditional state estimation and parameter estimation. This text and reference focuses on various popular data assimilation methods, such as weak and strong constraint variational methods and ensemble filters and smoothers.

  17. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (...

  18. Effect of leaf nutrition on 14C-prolin assimilation from wheat flag leaves and developing grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrelations between flag leaves, stems, and developing reproductive organs during wheat assimilation of exogenous proline have been investigated with the aim of elucidating the physiological and biochemical changes occuring in the plants as a result of late leaf feeding. Changing the place of nutrient medium 14C-proline application from flag leaves to the basis of the growing spikes proved that leaf feeding stimulated its assimilation and produced organ-specific changes leading to different interrelations between the two organs studied. Results showed that the flag leaves assimilated and metabolized the radioactive predecessor, and the positive effect of potassium nitrate on 14C-metabolite down flow depended on the phase of plant development. It was found that the assimilating functions of developing organs were enhanced as related with the pronounced increase in the rate of their protein synthesis

  19. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-01-01

    The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers), circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride), factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilizati...

  20. Transcriptomic analyses of nitrogen assimilation processes in a Chinese strain of Aureococcus anophagefferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aureococcus anophagefferens is a harmful alga that dominates plankton communities during brown tides in North America, Africa, and Asia. In order to figure out the processes of nitrogen assimilation in a Chinese strain of A. anophagefferens, RNA-seq technology was used to examine transcriptomic differences in A. anophagefferens that was grown on urea, nitrate, or a mixture of urea and nitrate, and that was under N-replete, limited and recovery conditions. We noted that transcripts upregulated by nitrate and N-limitation included those encoding proteins involved in amino acid, nucleotide and aminosugar transport, degradation of amides and cyanates, and nitrate assimilation pathway. The data suggest that A. anophagefferens possesses an ability to utilize a variety of dissolved organic nitrogen. Moreover, transcripts for synthesis of proteins, glutamate-derived amino acids, spermines and sterols were upregulated by urea. Transcripts encoding key enzymes that are involved in the ornithine–urea cycle (OUC and TCA cycle were differentially regulated by urea and nitrogen concentration, which suggests that the OUC may be linked to the TCA cycle and involved in reallocation of intracellular carbon and nitrogen. These genes regulated by urea may be crucial for the rapid proliferation of A. anophagefferens when urea is provided as the N source. Here, we provide the experimental procedures and analytical processes in detail. The data set is deposited in GEO with the accession number GSE60576.

  1. Assimilate partitioning during reproductive growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaves having various phyllotactic relationships to fruitlets were labeled for 1 hour with 10/sub r/Ci of 14CO2. Fruitlets were also labeled. Fruitlets did fix 14CO2. Translocation of radioactivity from the peel into the fruit occurred slowly and to a limited extent. No evidence of translocation out of the fruitlets was observed. Assimilate partitioning in avocado was strongly influenced by phyllotaxy. If a fruit and the labeled leaf had the same phyllotaxy then greater than 95% of the radiolabel was present in this fruit. When the fruit did not have the same phyllotaxy as the labeled leaf, the radiolabel distribution was skewed with 70% of the label going to a single adjacent position. Avocado fruitlets exhibit uniform labeling throughout a particular tissue. In avocado, assimilates preferentially move from leaves to fruits with the same phyllotaxy

  2. Assimilation, Criminality and Ethnic Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Indraneel; Mukherjee, Diganta

    2014-01-01

    We examine the consequences, of integrating large minorities into productivity-relevant majority ethno-linguistic norms, for distribution, ethnic conflict and crime. We develop a two-community model where such assimilation generates social gains by: (a) facilitating economic interaction, and (b) dampening religious or racial conflict over symbolic and normative contents of the public sphere. However, integration shifts the distribution of both material and symbolic goods against the minority....

  3. Financial assimilation of immigrants conference

    OpenAIRE

    anonymous

    2003-01-01

    On June 24, the Consumer and Community Affairs division of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago convened, “An Informed Discussion of the Financial Assimilation of Immigrants” in Des Moines, Iowa. The conference was part of the larger, long-term program by the Chicago Reserve Bank to study the ways and means by which immigrants to the United States access mainstream financial services. This Special Edition of PNV comprises summaries of each of the conference presentations.

  4. Hormones and nitrate: a two-way connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouk, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    During their sessile mode of life, plants need to endure variations in their environment such as a drastic variability in the nutrient concentration in soil solution. It is almost trivial to say that such fluctuations in the soil modify plant growth, development and phase transitions. However, the signaling pathways underlying the connections between nitrogen related signaling and hormonal signaling controlling growth are still poorly documented. This review is meant to present how nitrate/nitrogen controls hormonal pathways. Furthermore, it is very interesting to highlight the increasing evidence that the hormonal signaling pathways themselves seem to feed back control of the nitrate/nitrogen transport and assimilation to adapt nutrition to growth. This thus defines a feed-forward cycle that finely coordinates plant growth and nutrition. PMID:27003907

  5. Wavelet Approximation in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangborn, Andrew; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of the state of the atmosphere with the Kalman filter remains a distant goal because of high computational cost of evolving the error covariance for both linear and nonlinear systems. Wavelet approximation is presented here as a possible solution that efficiently compresses both global and local covariance information. We demonstrate the compression characteristics on the the error correlation field from a global two-dimensional chemical constituent assimilation, and implement an adaptive wavelet approximation scheme on the assimilation of the one-dimensional Burger's equation. In the former problem, we show that 99%, of the error correlation can be represented by just 3% of the wavelet coefficients, with good representation of localized features. In the Burger's equation assimilation, the discrete linearized equations (tangent linear model) and analysis covariance are projected onto a wavelet basis and truncated to just 6%, of the coefficients. A nearly optimal forecast is achieved and we show that errors due to truncation of the dynamics are no greater than the errors due to covariance truncation.

  6. Gas transport and sub-Tg relaxations in unmodified and nitrated polyarylethersulfones

    OpenAIRE

    Kamps, K.M.P.; Teunis, H.A.; Wessling, M.; Smolders, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Aromatic nitration has been used to modify the polymer main chain of polysulfone and polyethersulfone. Alteration in the gas separation characteristics of homogeneous membrane made out of these polymers could be observed upon nitration. Generally, separation factors for gas mixtures of CO2/CH4 increased while the permeability decreased. Remarkably, a decreasing diffusivity for both gases upon nitration could not be correlated with an increasing free-volume but was interpreted as an drasticall...

  7. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  8. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  9. An open framework for hydrological data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, H.; Ridler, M. E.; Velzen, N. V.; Hummel, S.; Sandholt, I.; Falk, A. K.; Heemink, A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time hydrological forecasts are essential for protection against water-related hazards, operation of infrastructure, and water resources management. Recent advances in radar rainfall estimation and forecasting, numerical weather predictions, satellite and in-situ monitoring, and faster computing facilities are opening up new opportunities in real-time hydrological forecasting. More effective use of the different information sources via data assimilation will provide the basis for producing more accurate and more reliable forecasts. In this regard, development and implementation of robust and computationally efficient data assimilation algorithms that are feasible for real-time applications remains one of the key challenges. Thus far, many of the efforts on implementation of data assimilation in hydrological modeling have been model specific. This requires access to as well as an in-depth knowledge of the numerical core of the models. A means to deal with the interaction between model and data assimilation algorithm in a more generic way is the use of the Open Model Interface (OpenMI). This open source standard interface allows models to exchange data during runtime, thus transforming a complex numerical model to a plug and play like component. For data assimilation, the OpenDA data assimilation toolbox is an open interface standard that includes a set of tools, assimilation algorithms, and numerical techniques to quickly implement data assimilation in numerical models. This paper presents a new generic data assimilation framework that uses OpenMI to interface models within OpenDA. This enables the many OpenMI hydrological models already available access to a robust and flexible data assimilation library. A synthetic test case is presented that highlights the potential of this new framework. An ensemble based Kalman filter is demonstrated for assimilation of groundwater levels in the MIKE SHE distributed and integrated hydrological

  10. Molecular and physiological interactions of urea and nitrate uptake in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Roberto; Tomasi, Nicola; Zanin, Laura

    2016-01-01

    While nitrate acquisition has been extensively studied, less information is available on transport systems of urea. Furthermore, the reciprocal influence of the two sources has not been clarified, so far. In this review, we will discuss recent developments on plant response to urea and nitrate nutrition. Experimental evidence suggests that, when urea and nitrate are available in the external solution, the induction of the uptake systems of each nitrogen (N) source is limited, while plant growth and N utilization is promoted. This physiological behavior might reflect cooperation among acquisition processes, where the activation of different N assimilatory pathways (cytosolic and plastidic pathways), allow a better control on the nutrient uptake. Based on physiological and molecular evidence, plants might increase (N) metabolism promoting a more efficient assimilation of taken-up nitrogen. The beneficial effect of urea and nitrate nutrition might contribute to develop new agronomical approaches to increase the (N) use efficiency in crops. PMID:26338073

  11. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers, circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride, factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilization (factors related to the plants, soil, clime, harvest methods, storage, agrotechnical measures, nitrates/nitrites toxicity (over 45 ppm nitrates in drinking water, over 0.5 g nitrate/100 g D.M fodder/diet, the factors that influence nitrates/nitrites toxicity ( species, age, rate of feeding, diet balance especially energetically, pathological effects and symptoms (irritation and congestions on digestive tract, resulting diarrhoea, transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin determining severe respiratory insufficiency, vascular collapse, low blood pressure inthe acute nitrates intoxication; hypotiroidism, hypovitaminosis A, reproductive disturbances(abortion, low rate of fertility, dead born offspring, diarrhoea and/or respiratory insufficiency in new born e.g. calves, immunosuppression, decrease of milk production in chronic intoxication. There were presented some suggestions concerning management practices to limit nitrate intoxication (analyze of nitrates/nitrites in water and fodders, good management of the situation of risk ,e .g. dilution of the diet with low nitrate content fodders, feeding with balanced diet in energy, protein, minerals and vitamins, accommodation to high nitrate level diet, avoid grazing one week after a frost period, avoid feeding chop green fodders stored a couple of days, monitoring of health status of animals fed with fodders containing nitrates at risk level, a.o..

  12. On the mathematics of data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Talagrand, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The problem of convergence of a “forward-backward” assimilation is considered for the most general dynamical system. Using elementary techniques of stability theory, it is shown that the variation, over one assimilation cycle, of the difference between the assimilating model and the state to be reconstructed is, to the first order, determined by a perfectly defined amplification matrix. This leads to a straightforward criterion for convergence, depending on the eigenvalues of that matrix. Th...

  13. Ensemble Data Assimilation: Algorithms and Software

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Ensemble data assimilation is nowadays applied to various problems to estimate a model state and model parameters by combining the model predictions with observational data. At the Alfred Wegener Institute, the assimilation focuses on ocean-sea ice models and coupled ocean-biogeochemical models. The high dimension of realistic models requires particularly efficient algorithms that are also usable on supercomputers. For the application of such filters, the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework ...

  14. Assimilation and integration of immigrants in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksynska, Mariya; ALGAN, Yann

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents assimilation of immigrants in European destinations along cultural, civic, and economic dimensions, distinguishing by immigrants' generation, duration of stay, and origin. Based on the European Social Survey, it suggests that assimilation may have multiple facets, and take place at different speed depending on the outcome in question. While assimilation along some economic and cultural outcomes may be correlated, such correlations are not systematic, and imply that progre...

  15. Outline of an Economic Theory of Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    In an age of mass immigration, assimilation is critical not only to the success of the immigrants but also to the success of their descendants and of the host society. This paper presents an outline for an economic theory of assimilation based on the assumption that both immigrants and natives invest in assimilation, that both may in fact move in the direction of the "other," and that the notion of "distance" is subjective and reversible.

  16. Immigrant Job Search Assimilation in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Bowlus, Audra J.; Miyairi, Masashi; Robinson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Immigrant assimilation is a major issue in many countries. While most of the literature studies assimilation through a human capital framework, we examine the role of job search assimilation. To do so, we estimate an equilibrium search model of immigrants operating in the same labor market as natives, where newly arrived immigrants have lower job offer arrival rates than natives but can acquire the same arrival rates according to a stochastic process. Using Canadian panel data, we find substa...

  17. Nitrate fertilisation does not enhance CO2 responses in two tropical seagrass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Y. X.; Vogel, N.; Collier, C. J.; Holtum, J. A. M.; Flores, F.; Uthicke, S.

    2016-03-01

    Seagrasses are often considered “winners” of ocean acidification (OA); however, seagrass productivity responses to OA could be limited by nitrogen availability, since nitrogen-derived metabolites are required for carbon assimilation. We tested nitrogen uptake and assimilation, photosynthesis, growth, and carbon allocation responses of the tropical seagrasses Halodule uninervis and Thalassia hemprichii to OA scenarios (428, 734 and 1213 μatm pCO2) under two nutrients levels (0.3 and 1.9 μM NO3‑). Net primary production (measured as oxygen production) and growth in H. uninervis increased with pCO2 enrichment, but were not affected by nitrate enrichment. However, nitrate enrichment reduced whole plant respiration in H. uninervis. Net primary production and growth did not show significant changes with pCO2 or nitrate by the end of the experiment (24 d) in T. hemprichii. However, nitrate incorporation in T. hemprichii was higher with nitrate enrichment. There was no evidence that nitrogen demand increased with pCO2 enrichment in either species. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, nutrient increases to levels approximating present day flood plumes only had small effects on metabolism. This study highlights that the paradigm of increased productivity of seagrasses under ocean acidification may not be valid for all species under all environmental conditions.

  18. Towards Operational Data Assimilation in the North and Baltic Seas with the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Loza, Svetlana; Schröter, Jens; Hiller, Wolfgang; F. Janssen

    2010-01-01

    Within the GMES-related project DeMarine Environment, the operational circulation model of the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) is extended into a data assimilation system. The aim of the data assimilation is to improve the forecast of sea surface height, temperatura, currents and salinity in the North and Baltic Seas. For the data assimilation component, the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (PDAF, http://pdaf.awi.de) is coupled to the operational circulation model. PDAF prov...

  19. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. PMID:27130094

  20. Data Assimilation in Marine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendall, Jan

    This thesis consists of six research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2006-2009 together with a summary report. The main topics of this thesis are nonlinear data assimilation techniques and estimation in dynamical models. The focus has been on the nonlinear filtering te...... for the Fokker-Planck equation on a 2 dimensional flexible mesh system. The report details the construction of the finite element solver and investigates the potential benefits of a parallel FORTRAN implementation through a series of experiments....

  1. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Ivanko, S.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid and protein metabolism of roots of maize has been studied. The important role of the free amino acids and proteins of the roots as active agents in nitrogen assimilation is pointed out. Nitrogen supplied as nitrate is preferably incorporated into α-ketoglutaric acid, and then by tr...

  2. Compensation for Complete Assimilation in Speech Perception: The Case of Korean Labial-to-Velar Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Holger; Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2013-01-01

    In connected speech, phonological assimilation to neighboring words can lead to pronunciation variants (e.g., "garden bench" [arrow right] "garde'm' bench"). A large body of literature suggests that listeners use the phonetic context to reconstruct the intended word for assimilation types that often lead to incomplete assimilations (e.g., a…

  3. Nitrogen assimilation in Citrus based on CitEST data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Wickert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Assimilation of nitrate and ammonium are vital procedures for plant development and growth. From these primary paths of inorganic nitrogen assimilation, this metabolism integrates diverse paths for biosynthesis of macromolecules, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and the central intermediate metabolism, like carbon metabolism and photorespiration. This paper reports research performed in the CitEST (Citrus Expressed Sequence Tag database for the main genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and those previously described in other organisms. The results show that a complete cluster of genes involved in the assimilation of nitrogen and the metabolisms of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine can be found in the CitEST data. The main enzymes found were nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamine synthetase (GS, glutamate synthetase (GOGAT, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT and asparagine synthetase (AS. The different enzymes involved in this metabolism have been shown to be highly conserved among the Citrus and Poncirus species. This work serves as a guide for future functional analysis of these enzymes in citrus.

  4. Data assimilation with inequality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, W. C.

    If values of variables in a numerical model are limited to specified ranges, these restrictions should be enforced when data are assimilated. The simplest option is to assimilate without regard for constraints and then to correct any violations without worrying about additional corrections implied by correlated errors. This paper addresses the incorporation of inequality constraints into the standard variational framework of optimal interpolation with emphasis on our limited knowledge of the underlying probability distributions. Simple examples involving only two or three variables are used to illustrate graphically how active constraints can be treated as error-free data when background errors obey a truncated multi-normal distribution. Using Lagrange multipliers, the formalism is expanded to encompass the active constraints. Two algorithms are presented, both relying on a solution ignoring the inequality constraints to discover violations to be enforced. While explicitly enforcing a subset can, via correlations, correct the others, pragmatism based on our poor knowledge of the underlying probability distributions suggests the expedient of enforcing them all explicitly to avoid the computationally expensive task of determining the minimum active set. If additional violations are encountered with these solutions, the process can be repeated. Simple examples are used to illustrate the algorithms and to examine the nature of the corrections implied by correlated errors.

  5. Data Assimilation - Advances and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of data assimilation (model calibration) for complex computer experiments. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Utilization of surrogate models and empirical adjustment for model form error in code calibration form the basis for the statistical methodology considered. The role of probabilistic code calibration in supporting code validation is discussed. Incorporation of model form uncertainty in rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) analyses is also addressed. Design criteria used within a batch sequential design algorithm are introduced for efficiently achieving predictive maturity and improved code calibration. Predictive maturity refers to obtaining stable predictive inference with calibrated computer codes. These approaches allow for augmentation of initial experiment designs for collecting new physical data. A standard framework for data assimilation is presented and techniques for updating the posterior distribution of the state variables based on particle filtering and the ensemble Kalman filter are introduced.

  6. The Effect of Errors in Snow Assimilation on Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian A.; Houser, Paul R.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate portrayal of the hydrological cycle is extremely important in land surface modeling. Central to this effort is the treatment of snow, as errors in the representation of this quantity can impact practically all other modeled quantities through alterations in the water and energy balances. Although land surface model (LSM) simulations can benefit from the assimilation of snow cover and snow depth observations, they can be negatively impacted if such observations contain errors or if a model bias exists in the simulation of surface or soil temperatures. Both cases may lead to excessive melting or growth of snow packs, and to large alterations in both the energy and water balances. Such problems in the snow assimilation process, made evident by the repeated melting and replenishing of snow pack over significant areas of the United States, exists in the Eta Data Assimilation System and is a product of the EDAS system's direct insertion assimilation of snow data. Occurring on a 24 hour cycle, the repeated melting infuses the soil column with a large quantity of water that upsets the hydrological cycle. In an effort to quantify the impacts of such errors in snow assimilation on water and energy budgets, a series of Mosaic LSM simulations were performed over the 12 month period covering October 1998 to October 1999.

  7. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A...

  8. The Race Race: Assimilation in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Andrea; Aman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Can race and assimilation be taught? Interdisciplinary pedagogy provides a methodology, context, and use of nontraditional texts culled from American cultural history such as from, theater and historical texts. This approach and these texts prove useful for an examination of race and assimilation in America. The paper describes a course that while…

  9. Potential effect of algal productivity in the San Joaquin River on nitrate concentrations and isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.; Volkmar, E. C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Borglin, S. E.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    The d15N of algae in nitrate-rich rivers is often about 4 to 5 permil lower than the d15N of the nitrate used by the algae. In cases where the algal productivity significantly depletes the available nitrate pool, the uptake of nitrate can cause significant increases in the d15N and d18O of the residual nitrate, resulting in isotope values similar to what would be expected for a major contribution of human or animal waste to the river. Furthermore, progressive algal uptake also causes nitrate d18O and d15N values that plot along slopes of about 1:2, consistent with assimilation and/or denitrification. One way to resolve the question of whether the high nitrate d15N and d18O values reflect a waste source, assimilation, or denitrification is to compare the simultaneous changes in nitrate concentrations, algal quality and loads, nitrate d15N and d18O, and the d15N, d13C, and C:N of the particulate organic matter, which is often dominated by algae in large rivers. As part of a recent investigation of nitrate and organic matter sources to the San Joaquin River (SJR), samples were collected twice-weekly to monthly for over 2 years from 7 mainstem sites (as well as many major and minor tributary sites) and analyzed for a wide range of chemical constituents and isotope ratios. The average nitrate d15N of mainstem sites was +11 permil, with a range of +2 to +17; the average d18O was +5 permil, with a range of -1 to +18. The potential impact of algal uptake on isotope ratios in the SJR was modeled using isotope and chemical data from 2 Lagrangian experiments in the San Luis Drain, a simple concrete-lined canal which drains into the SJR, has only a single input of water, and has algae similar to that in the SJR and a high productivity rate (Volkmar et al., in prep.).

  10. [1-(Carboxymethylcyclohexyl]methanaminium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise J. C. de Vries

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C9H18NO2+·NO3−, is an anhydrous nitrate salt of gabapentin, which is formed serendipitously in the presence of selected non-coordinating metals. The crystal structure involves extensive hydrogen bonding between the –NH3+ and –COOH groups and the nitrate anion.

  11. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream

  12. Data assimilation a mathematical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Law, Kody; Zygalakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic treatment of the mathematical underpinnings of work in data assimilation, covering both theoretical and computational approaches. Specifically the authors develop a unified mathematical framework in which a Bayesian formulation of the problem provides the bedrock for the derivation, development and analysis of algorithms; the many examples used in the text, together with the algorithms which are introduced and discussed, are all illustrated by the MATLAB software detailed in the book and made freely available online. The book is organized into nine chapters: the first contains a brief introduction to the mathematical tools around which the material is organized; the next four are concerned with discrete time dynamical systems and discrete time data; the last four are concerned with continuous time dynamical systems and continuous time data and are organized analogously to the corresponding discrete time chapters. This book is aimed at mathematical researchers interested in a sy...

  13. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  14. A New Approach to Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bin; ZHAO Ying

    2006-01-01

    A significant attempt to design a timesaving and efficient four-dimensional variational data assimilation dimensional variational data assimilation of mapped observation (3DVM)' is proposed, based on the new concept of mapped observation and the new idea of backward 4DVar. Like the available 4DVar, 3DVM produces an optimal initial condition (IC) that is consistent with the prediction model due to the inclusion of model constraints and best fits the observations in the assimilation window through the model solution trajectory. Different from the 4DVar, the IC derived from 3DVM is located at the end of the assimilation window rather than at the beginning conventionally. This change greatly reduces the computing cost for the new approach, which is almost the same as that of the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVar). Especially, such a change is able to improve assimilation accuracy because it does not need the tangential linear and adjoint approximations to calculate the gradient of cost function. Therefore,in numerical test, the new approach produces better IC than 4DVar does for 72-h simulation of TY9914(Dan), by assimilating the three-dimensional fields of temperature and wind retrieved from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations. Meanwhile, it takes only 1/7 of the computing cost that the 4DVar requires for the same initialization with the same retrieved data.

  15. Skill Assessment in Ocean Biological Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Robinson, Allan R.; Rose, Kenneth A.; Schlitzer, Reiner; Thompson, Keith R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing recognition that rigorous skill assessment is required to understand the ability of ocean biological models to represent ocean processes and distributions. Statistical analysis of model results with observations represents the most quantitative form of skill assessment, and this principle serves as well for data assimilation models. However, skill assessment for data assimilation requires special consideration. This is because there are three sets of information in the free-run model, data, and the assimilation model, which uses Data assimilation information from both the flee-run model and the data. Intercom parison of results among the three sets of information is important and useful for assessment, but is not conclusive since the three information sets are intertwined. An independent data set is necessary for an objective determination. Other useful measures of ocean biological data assimilation assessment include responses of unassimilated variables to the data assimilation, performance outside the prescribed region/time of interest, forecasting, and trend analysis. Examples of each approach from the literature are provided. A comprehensive list of ocean biological data assimilation and their applications of skill assessment, in both ecosystem/biogeochemical and fisheries efforts, is summarized.

  16. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  17. Application of data assimilation methods for analysis and integration of observed and modeled Arctic Sea ice motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Walter Neil

    This thesis demonstrates the applicability of data assimilation methods to improve observed and modeled ice motion fields and to demonstrate the effects of assimilated motion on Arctic processes important to the global climate and of practical concern to human activities. Ice motions derived from 85 GHz and 37 GHz SSM/I imagery and estimated from two-dimensional dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models are compared to buoy observations. Mean error, error standard deviation, and correlation with buoys are computed for the model domain. SSM/I motions generally have a lower bias, but higher error standard deviations and lower correlation with buoys than model motions. There are notable variations in the statistics depending on the region of the Arctic, season, and ice characteristics. Assimilation methods are investigated and blending and optimal interpolation strategies are implemented. Blending assimilation improves error statistics slightly, but the effect of the assimilation is reduced due to noise in the SSM/I motions and is thus not an effective method to improve ice motion estimates. However, optimal interpolation assimilation reduces motion errors by 25--30% over modeled motions and 40--45% over SSM/I motions. Optimal interpolation assimilation is beneficial in all regions, seasons and ice conditions, and is particularly effective in regimes where modeled and SSM/I errors are high. Assimilation alters annual average motion fields. Modeled ice products of ice thickness, ice divergence, Fram Strait ice volume export, transport across the Arctic and interannual basin averages are also influenced by assimilated motions. Assimilation improves estimates of pollutant transport and corrects synoptic-scale errors in the motion fields caused by incorrect forcings or errors in model physics. The portability of the optimal interpolation assimilation method is demonstrated by implementing the strategy in an ice thickness distribution (ITD) model. This research presents an

  18. Prolonged root hypoxia effects on enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation pathway in tomato plants

    OpenAIRE

    Horchani, Faouzi; Aschi-Smiti, Samira

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of root hypoxia (1–2% oxygen) on the nitrogen (N) metabolism of tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Micro-Tom), a range of N compounds and N-assimilating enzymes were performed on roots and leaves of plants submitted to root hypoxia at the second leaf stage for three weeks. Obtained results showed that root hypoxia led to a significant decrease in dry weight (DW) production and nitrate content in roots and leaves. Conversely, shoot to root DW ratio a...

  19. Agriculture causes nitrate fertilization of remote alpine lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundey, E. J.; Russell, S. D.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Moser, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Humans have altered Earth's nitrogen cycle so dramatically that reactive nitrogen (Nr) has doubled. This has increased Nr in aquatic ecosystems, which can lead to reduced water quality and ecosystem health. Apportioning sources of Nr to specific ecosystems, however, continues to be challenging, despite this knowledge being critical for mitigation and protection of water resources. Here we use Δ17O, δ18O and δ15N from Uinta Mountain (Utah, USA) snow, inflow and lake nitrate in combination with a Bayesian-based stable isotope mixing model, to show that at least 70% of nitrates in aquatic systems are anthropogenic and arrive via the atmosphere. Moreover, agricultural activities, specifically nitrate- and ammonium-based fertilizer use, are contributing most (~60%) Nr, and data from other North American alpine lakes suggest this is a widespread phenomenon. Our findings offer a pathway towards more effective mitigation, but point to challenges in balancing food production with protection of important water resources.

  20. Nitrate reductase activity and its relationship with applied nitrogen in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments were conducted to study the nitrate reductase activity and its relationship to nitrogen by using frame tests (pot without bottom), sand culture and 15N-urea at transplanting in soybean variety Suinong 14. Results showed that the activity of nitrate reductase in leaf changed as a signal peak curve with the soybean growth, lower in vegetative growth phase, higher in reproductive growth period and reached the peak in blooming period, then decreased gradually. Nitrogen application showed obvious effect on the nitrate reductase activity. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves followed the order of N135 > N90 > N45 > N0 in vegetative growth stage, no clear regularity was found during the whole reproductive growth period. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves were accorded with the order of upper leaves > mid leaves > lower leaves, and it was very significant differences (P15N labeling method during beginning seed stage and full seed stage shown that 15N abundance in various organs at different node position also followed the same order, suggesting that high level of nitrate reductase activity at upper leaves of soybean promoted the assimilation of NO3-. (authors)

  1. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew;

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the ...

  2. Surface Temperature Assimilation in the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Radakovich, Jon D.; daSilva, Arlindo; Houser, Paul R.; Atlas, Robert M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is a global land parameterization that uses prescribed meteorology as forcing in order to determine regular gridded land surface states (temperature and moisture) and other properties (e.g. water and heat fluxes). In the present experiment, the assimilation of surface skin temperature is incorporated into the land parameterizations. The meteorological forcing was derived from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-3) Data Assimilation System (DAS) for the full year of 1998 GLDAS can use several land parameterizations, but here we use the Mosaic land surface model and the Common Land Model (CLM). TOVS surface temperature observations are assimilated into GLDAS. The TOVS observations are less frequent that observations used in previous experiments (ISCCP). The purpose of this presentation is to evaluate the impact of the TOVS assimilation on both Mosaic and CLM. We will especially consider the impact of coarse temporal observations on the assimilation and bias correction.

  3. Seasonal variations in nitrate isotope composition of three rivers draining into the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Deek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate loading of coastal ecosystems by rivers that drain industrialised catchments continues to be a problem in the South Eastern North Sea, in spite of significant mitigation efforts over the last 2 decades. To identify nitrate sources, sinks, and turnover in three German rivers that discharge into the German Bight, we determined δ 15N-NO3- and δ18O- NO3- in nitrate and δ 15N of particulate nitrogen for the period 2006–2009 (biweekly samples. The nitrate loads of Rhine, Weser and Ems varied seasonally in magnitude and δ 15N-NO3- (6.5–21‰, whereas the δ 18O-NO3- (-0.3–5.9‰ and δ 15N-PN (4–14‰ were less variable. Overall temporal patterns in nitrate mass fluxes and isotopic composition suggest that a combination of nitrate delivery from nitrification of soil ammonia in the catchment and assimilation of nitrate in the rivers control the isotopic composition of nitrate. Nitrification in soils as a source is indicated by low δ 18O-NO3- in winter, which traces the δ 18O of river water. Mean values of δ 18O-H2O were between –9.4‰ and –7.3‰; combined in a ratio of 2:1 with the atmospheric oxygen δ 18O of 23.5‰ agrees with the found δ 18O of nitrate in the rivers.

    Parallel variations of δ 15N-NO3- and δ 18O-NO3- within each individual river are caused by isotope effects associated with nitrate assimilation in the water column, the extent of which is determined by residence time in the river. Assimilation is furthermore to some extent mirrored both by the δ 15N of nitrate and particulate N. Although δ 15-NO3- observed in Rhine, Weser and Ems are reflected in

  4. Extraction of lanthanide (3) nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in decane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of lanthanide (3) nitrates (praseodymium (3) - lutetium (3)) by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in decane at T=298.15 K and pH2 is studied. The extraction isotherms are described with an account of formation of compounds of the (R4N)i(Ln(NO3)3+i) composition. Extraction constants values, which become reduced in the praseodymium (3)-lutetium (3) series, are calculated

  5. Rare earth(3) nitrates extraction with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of rare earth(3) nitrates [praseodymium(3)-lutetium(3)] with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in toluene at T = 298.15 K and pH 2 is studied. Extraction isotherms are described with regard to formation of compounds of (R4N)i[Ln(NO3)3+i] composition (i = 2, 3) in organic phase. Values of extraction constants are calculated, they are decreasing in the praseodymium(3) - lutetium(3) series

  6. Scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium nitrate from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry of scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium (MTAA) nitrate in toluene from nitrate solutions is studied. Methods of saturation, equilibrium shift, physicochemical analysis, isomolar series and UV-spectroscopy are used to determine the composition of extracted complexes. It is shown that with low saturation degrees of extractant (R4N)6Sc(NO3)9 complex is formed in organic phase and with saturation - (R4N)3xSc(NO3)6 complex

  7. Compensation for complete assimilation in speech perception: The case of Korean labial-to-velar assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitterer, H.; Kim, S.; Cho, T.

    2013-01-01

    In connected speech, phonological assimilation to neighboring words can lead to pronunciation variants (e.g., 'garden bench'→ "gardem bench"). A large body of literature suggests that listeners use the phonetic context to reconstruct the intended word for assimilation types that often lead to incomplete assimilations (e.g., a pronunciation of "garden" that carries cues for both a labial [m] and an alveolar [n]). In the current paper, we show that a similar context effect is observed for an as...

  8. Scalable sequential data assimilation with the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework PDAF

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Data assimilation applications with high-dimensional numerical models exhibit extreme requirements on computational resources. Good scalability of the assimilation system is necessary to make these applications feasible. Sequential data assimilation methods based on ensemble forecasts, like ensemble-based Kalman filters, provide such good scalability, because the forecast of each ensemble member can be performed independently. However, this parallelism has to be combined with the paralleli...

  9. IS ASSIMILATION THEORY DEAD? THE EFFECT OF ASSIMILATION ON ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Emily; Xie, Yu

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between assimilation and the well-being of immigrant children has been the focus of debate in the recent sociological literature. Much of this work has questioned whether classical theories of immigrant adaptation, which assumed assimilation to be an integral part of the process of upward mobility for immigrants, are still applicable to today’s immigrant children. This study reevaluates the applicability of classical assimilation theory with a comprehensive empirical assessme...

  10. Extending NEMO for ensemble data assimilation on supercomputers with the parallel data assimilation framework PDAF

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Kirchgessner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The NEMO model is a state-of-the-art ocean circulation model. For data assimilation applications with ensemble Kalman filters like the SEEK filter, e.g. for operational ocean forecasting, NEMO is typically run separately from the assimilation algorithm. Thus, NEMO is used to generate a set of restart files on disks that hold the ensemble of model forecasts providing the error covariance matrix information for the ensemble Kalman filter. These files need to be read by a separate assimilation p...

  11. THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF ASSIMILATION: TESTING IMPLICATIONS OF SEGMENTED ASSIMILATION THEORY*

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between s...

  12. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and the OC luminance (Experiment 1) as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2). The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance (IC contrast) was smaller in size than that of the OC (OC contrast), the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading). In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading). Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, i.e., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and the non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading (Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985) and extended for the watercolor effect (Pinna and Grossberg, 2005). However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading. PMID:25285074

  13. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eKimura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect. The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC is paired with a blue outer contour (OC, yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and OC luminances (Experiment 1 as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2. The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminances (IC contrast was smaller than that of the OC (OC contrast, the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading. In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading. Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, e.g., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading [Grossberg, S. & Mingolla, E. (1985 Percept. Psychophys., 38, 141-171] and extended for the watercolor effect [Pinna, B., & Grossberg, S. (2005 J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22, 2207-2221]. However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading.

  14. Data assimilation techniques in modeling ocean processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Fernandes, A.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Three main classes of procedures in data analysis and assimilation viz. Objective Analysis, Optimal Interpolation and variational method, used to process the observed data on atmospheric and ocean parameters are briefly reviewed. The variational...

  15. ERP ASSIMILATION: AN END-USER APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurbean Luminita

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the ERP adoption based on the IT assimilation theory. The ERP lifecycle is associated with the IT assimilation steps. We propose a distribution of these steps along the lifecycle. Derived from the findings in the reviewed literature we will focus the cultural factors, in particular those related to the end-users (determined as a major impact factor in our previous study: Negovan et al., 2011. Our empirical study is centred on the end-users perspective and it tries to determine if and how their behaviour affects the achievement of the ERP assimilation steps. The paper reasons that organizations that understand the IT assimilation steps correlated to the ERP implementation critical factors are more likely to implement and use ERP successfully.

  16. Management of potential transuranium assimilation cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals primarily with the duties of Health Protection personnel assigned to Savannah River's operatig facilities - as opposed to the role of bioassay and dosimetry specialists - in handling potential transuranium assimilation cases

  17. Data assimilation for air quality models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    higher uncertainties. It is possible, however, to combine information from measurements and models to more accurately estimate the state of the atmosphere using a statistically consistent framework known as “data assimilation”. In this study, three data assimilation schemes are implemented and evaluated....... The data assimilation schemes are coupled to the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), a large-scale three-dimensional off-line CTM, and the data ingested were retrievals of atmospheric composition from polar-orbiting satellites. The three assimilation techniques applied were: a three......-dimensional optimal interpolation procedure (OI), an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), and a three-dimensional variational scheme (3D-var). The three assimilation procedures are described and tested. A multi-faceted approach is taken for the verification, using independent measurements from surface air...

  18. ITERATIVE ALGORITHMS FOR DATA ASSIMILATION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Iterative algorithms for solving the data assimilation problems are considered, based on the main and adjoint equations. Spectral properties of the control operators of the problem are studied, the iterative algorithms are justified.

  19. Development of a data assimilation algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Per Grove; Zlatev, Zahari

    2008-01-01

    efficiently observations in a large-scale model (for example, in order to obtain more reliable initial values). Variational data assimilation techniques are based on a combination of three very important components • numerical methods for solving differential equations, • splitting procedures and......It is important to incorporate all available observations when large-scale mathematical models arising in different fields of science and engineering are used to study various physical and chemical processes. Variational data assimilation techniques can be used in the attempts to utilize...... assimilation technique is applied. Therefore, it is important to study the interplay between the three components of the variational data assimilation techniques as well as to apply powerful parallel computers in the computations. Some results obtained in the search for a good combination of numerical methods...

  20. A wildland fire model with data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Mandel, Jan; Bennethum, Lynn S.; Beezley, Jonathan D.; Coen, Janice L.; Douglas, Craig C.; Kim, Minjeong; Vodacek, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A wildfire model is formulated based on balance equations for energy and fuel, where the fuel loss due to combustion corresponds to the fuel reaction rate. The resulting coupled partial differential equations have coefficients that can be approximated from prior measurements of wildfires. An ensemble Kalman filter technique with regularization is then used to assimilate temperatures measured at selected points into running wildfire simulations. The assimilation technique is able to modify the...

  1. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Ziarno; Ewa Sękul; Alvaro Aguado Lafraya

    2007-01-01

    The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultu...

  2. Migration, Friendship Ties, and Cultural Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Facchini, Giovanni; Patacchini, Eleonora; Steinhardt, Max

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we contribute to the analysis of the assimilation process of migrants by analyzing the extent to which friendship with natives can be seen as a measure of cultural assimilation and investigating the formation of social ties in the host country. Using novel information from the German Socio-Economic Panel, we find that migrants with a German friend are more similar to natives than those without a local companion along several important dimensions, including concerns about the eco...

  3. Effective assimilation of global precipitation: simulation experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Guo-Yuan; Kalnay, Eugenia; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2013-01-01

    Past attempts to assimilate precipitation by nudging or variational methods have succeeded in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed values. However, the model forecasts tend to lose their additional skill after a few forecast hours. In this study, a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) is used to effectively assimilate precipitation by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights in the analysis. In addition, two other changes i...

  4. On errors in meteorological data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindskog, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Data assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) optimally blends observations with atmospheric model data in order to obtain the best possible initial state for an atmospheric model prediction. Specification of error characteristics is an important part of data assimilation. This thesis is concerned with representation of background error standard deviations, with handling of observations, and with observation error characteristics. The research includes both the study of basic assimi...

  5. Wage and occupational assimilation by skill level

    OpenAIRE

    Alcobendas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Planas, Núria; Vegas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using alternative datasets and methodologies, this paper provides evidence of a differential ...

  6. Computational methods for data evaluation and assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Data evaluation and data combination require the use of a wide range of probability theory concepts and tools, from deductive statistics mainly concerning frequencies and sample tallies to inductive inference for assimilating non-frequency data and a priori knowledge. Computational Methods for Data Evaluation and Assimilation presents interdisciplinary methods for integrating experimental and computational information. This self-contained book shows how the methods can be applied in many scientific and engineering areas. After presenting the fundamentals underlying the evaluation of experiment

  7. Evidence of New Immigrant Assimilation in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Mary L. Grant

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies of the labour market experience of male immigrants to Canada have uncovered two disturbing trends: declining entry earnings for successive new immigrant cohorts and low assimilation rates. These findings suggest that many of these cohorts may never assimilate. The 1991 Census provides a first look at the immigrant cohorts arriving in the 1980s. These immigrants appear to avoid the plight of their predecessors; entry earnings have stopped falling, and those immigrants arriving...

  8. Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zorlu, Aslan; Hartog, Joop

    2008-01-01

    This discussion Paper led to a publication in International Journal of Population Research , Vol. 2012, article ID 634276. Using two Dutch labour force surveys, employment assimilation of immigrants is examined. We observe marked differences between immigrants by source country. Non-western immigrants never reach parity with native Dutch. Even second generation immigrants never fully catch up. Caribbean immigrants, who share a colonial history with the Dutch, assimilate relatively quick compa...

  9. Immigrants on Welfare: Assimilation and Benefit Substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Ekhaugen, Tyra

    2005-01-01

    Non-western immigrants in Norway are shown to rely heavily on welfare transfers for several years after immigration. While refugee immigrants assimilate slightly out of welfare, other non-western immigrants assimilate rapidly into welfare. Re-migration is selective for both non-western and western immigrants, insofar as the probability of re-migration correlates negatively with the probability of receiving welfare. We argue that previous studies may have reached biased estimates of welfare as...

  10. The heterogeneity in immigrants unhealthy assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Paolo Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Immigrants upon their arrival in the United States are in better health condition with respect to their American counterpart however such advantage erodes over time. In this paper, we study the heterogeneity of such unhealthy behaviours assimilation among different arrival cohorts. We focus our analysis on binge drinking and cigarette consumption as a proxy for unhealthy behaviour assimilation by immigrants. Regarding binge drinking we show that more recent immigrant cohorts arriv...

  11. Interethnic Marriages and Economic Assimilation of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Kantarevic, Jasmin

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between interethnic marriages and economic assimilation among immigrants in the United States. Two competing hypotheses are evaluated: the productivity hypothesis, according to which immigrants married to native-born spouses assimilate faster than comparable immigrants married to foreign-born spouses because spouses play an integral role in the human capital accumulation of their partners; and the selection hypothesis, according to which the relationship b...

  12. The Acceleration of Immigrant Unhealthy Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Giuntella, Osea; Stella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that immigrants tend to be healthier than US natives and that this advantage erodes with time spent in the US. However, we know less about the heterogeneity of these trajectories among arrival cohorts. Recent studies have shown that later arrival cohorts of immigrants have lower entry wages and experience less economic assimilation. In this paper, we investigate whether similar cohort effects can be observed in the weight assimilation of immigrants in the US. Focusing on obes...

  13. Biological denitrification of nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriched uranium wastes are purified in the Y-12 Plant, and the uranium product is recycled. One purification method involves dissolving the waste in nitric acid followed by solvent extraction to recover uranium. The process generates nitrate waste solutions which must be discarded. For many years, these wastes were stored in unlined ponds. In 1976 a recycle process was installed, and about half of the wastes were recovered and reused. A biological process (stirred tank) was installed, and the remaining nitrate wastes were biologically decomposed to produce nitrogen gas. Some additional nitrate wastes, generated in other parts of the plant, continued to be placed in the open ponds which must now be decommissioned. In 1983 an in-situ biological process was developed and tested whereby the open ponds were successfully biologically treated. This paper describes the results of the stirred tank and the in-situ pond treatment processes used in the plant to decompose nitrate ions

  14. Data Assimilation: Making Sense of Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WilliamAlbertLahoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, air quality and environmental degradation are important societal challenges for the 21st Century. These challenges require an intelligent response from society, which in turn requires access to information about the Earth System. This information comes from observations and prior knowledge, the latter typically embodied in a model describing relationships between variables of the Earth System. Data assimilation provides an objective methodology to combine observational and model information to provide an estimate of the most likely state and its uncertainty for the whole Earth System. This approach adds value to the observations – by filling in the spatio-temporal gaps in observations; and to the model – by constraining it with the observations. In this review paper we motivate data assimilation as a methodology to fill in the gaps in observational information; illustrate the data assimilation approach with examples that span a broad range of features of the Earth System (atmosphere, including chemistry; ocean; land surface; and discuss the outlook for data assimilation, including the novel application of data assimilation ideas to observational information obtained using Citizen Science. Ultimately, a strong motivation of data assimilation is the many benefits it provides to users. These include: providing the initial state for weather and air quality forecasts; providing analyses and reanalyses for studying the Earth System; evaluating observations, instruments and models; assessing the relative value of elements of the Global Observing System (GOS; and assessing the added value of future additions to the GOS.

  15. Mutational analysis of the respiratory nitrate transporter NarK2 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Giffin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces nitrate reductase activity in response to decreasing oxygen levels. This is due to regulation of both the transcription and the activity of the nitrate transporter NarK2. A model of NarK2 structure is proposed containing 12 membrane spanning regions consistent with other members of the major facilitator superfamily. The role of the proton gradient was determined by exposing M. tuberculosis to uncouplers. Nitrite production decreased indicating that the importation of nitrate involved an H(+/nitrate symporter. The addition of nitrite before nitrate had no effect, suggesting no role for a nitrate/nitrite antiporter. In addition the NarK2 knockout mutant showed no defect in nitrite export. NarK2 is proposed to be a Type I H(+/nitrate symporter. Site directed mutagenesis was performed changing 23 amino acids of NarK2. This allowed the identification of important regions and amino acids of this transporter. Five of these mutants were inactive for nitrate transport, seven produced reduced activity and eleven mutants retained wild type activity. NarK2 is inactivated in the presence of oxygen by an unknown mechanism. However none of the mutants, including those with mutated cysteines, were altered in their response to oxygen levels. The assimilatory nitrate transporter NasA of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in the M. tuberculosis NarK2 mutant. It remained active during aerobic incubation showing that the point of oxygen control is NarK2.

  16. Balance of assimilative and dissimilative nitrogen processes in a diatom-rich tidal flat sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tidal flat sediments are subject to repetitive mixing and resuspension events. In a short-term (24 h 15N-labelling experiment, we investigated reactive nitrogen cycling in a tidal flat sediment following an experimentally induced resuspension event. We focused on (a the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and (b the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labelled substrate was added to homogenized sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into sediment and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN pools. Integration of results in a N-cycle model allowed us to quantify the proportion of major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment.

    Upon sediment disturbance, rates of dissimilatory processes like nitrification and denitrification were very high, but declined rapidly towards a steady state. Once this was reached, the balance between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat was mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: nitrate was utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium was rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to benthic microalgae (BMA. Benthic microalgae significantly affected the nitrogen recycling balance in sediments, because in the absence of BMA activity the recovering sediment turned from a net ammonium sink to a net source.

    The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Assimilatory pathways gain importance under stable conditions, with a substantial contribution of BMA to total assimilation.

  17. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    OpenAIRE

    F. Paulot; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; L. J. Donner; S. Fan; Lin, M; J. Mao; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting th...

  18. Assessing Immigrant Assimilation: New Empirical and Theoretical Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Mary; Jimenez, Tomas R.

    2005-01-01

    This review examines research on the assimilation of immigrant groups. We review research on four primary benchmarks of assimilation: socioeconomic status, spatial concentration, language assimilation, and intermarriage. The existing literature shows that today's immigrants are largely assimilating into American society along each of these dimensions. This review also considers directions for future research on the assimilation of immigrant groups in new southern and midwestern gateways and h...

  19. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Ivanko, S.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid and protein metabolism of roots of maize has been studied. The important role of the free amino acids and proteins of the roots as active agents in nitrogen assimilation is pointed out. Nitrogen supplied as nitrate is preferably incorporated into α-ketoglutaric acid, and then by tr...... trans-aminases transferred to other ketoacids. In the case of ammonia supply the function of a nitrogen-accumulating assimilation system leading to the formation of Arg, Glu-NH2 and Asp-NH2 is shown....

  20. Modelling crop root development and nitrate uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural areas is a political and environmental issue at both local scale in Denmark and at global scale. Plant-available nitrogen and nitrate in the rooting zone in the growing season is necessary in order to obtain satisfactory crop yields. However, surplus nitrogen leads to a risk of nitrate losses through leaching and denitrification. In addition to artificial applications of nitrate, nitrate is produced by mineralisation processes in the soil from plant residues...

  1. ACUTE TOXICITY OF LEAD NITRATE ON FRESHWATER CRAB BARYTELPHUSA GUERINI

    OpenAIRE

    DUBE, KAUSHAL V

    2012-01-01

    Industrial effluents contributing to aquatic pollution contain vast array of toxic substances including heavy metals.  Indiscriminate discharge of these wastes alters the quality of water and cause hazards to aquatic fauna including important members of food chain of man. Hence, in present investigation the freshwater crab, Barytelphusa guerini was exposed to acute toxicity of lead nitrate for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours exposure. The percentage mortality of crab was studied and the LC50 deter...

  2. Effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2011-05-01

    The effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared with unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting that the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration that was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting that either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates the growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  3. The social context of assimilation: testing implications of segmented assimilation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between social context and assimilation on immigrant children's well-being. We then test the hypotheses using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analyses yield two main findings. First, for immigrant adolescents living in non-poverty neighborhoods, we find assimilation to be positively associated with educational achievement and psychological well-being but also positively associated with at-risk behavior. Second, there is little empirical evidence supporting our hypotheses derived from segmented assimilation theory. We interpret these results to mean that future research would be more fruitful focusing on differential processes of assimilation rather than differential consequences of assimilation. PMID:21572546

  4. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  5. Differential growth response of Ulva lactuca to ammonium and nitrate assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-01-01

    Controlled cultivation of marine macroalgal biomass such as Ulva species, notably Ulva lactuca, is currently studied for production of biofuels or functional food ingredients. In a eutrophic environment, this macrophyte is exposed to varying types of nutrient supply, including different and fluct...

  6. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultures used for production of traditional yoghurt, consisting of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, the quantity of assimilated cholesterol did not exceed 27% of its initial contents (0.7 g in 1 dm3. Starter cultures used for bioyoghurt production, containing also probiotic strains (came from Lactobacillus acidophilus species or Bifidobacterium genus assimilated from almost 18% to over 38% of cholesterol. For one monoculture of Lb. acidophilus, cholesterol assimilation ability of 49-55% was observed, despite that the number of bacterial cells in this culture was not different from number of bacteria in other cultures.

  7. Estimating Evapotranspiration with Land Data Assimilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S. V.; Mocko, D. M.; Tian, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in both land surface models (LSM) and land surface data assimilation, especially over the last decade, have substantially advanced the ability of land data assimilation systems (LDAS) to estimate evapotranspiration (ET). This article provides a historical perspective on international LSM intercomparison efforts and the development of LDAS systems, both of which have improved LSM ET skill. In addition, an assessment of ET estimates for current LDAS systems is provided along with current research that demonstrates improvement in LSM ET estimates due to assimilating satellite-based soil moisture products. Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Land Information System, we assimilate both NASA and Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) soil moisture products into the Noah LSM Version 3.2 with the North American LDAS phase 2 (NLDAS-2) forcing to mimic the NLDAS-2 configuration. Through comparisons with two global reference ET products, one based on interpolated flux tower data and one from a new satellite ET algorithm, over the NLDAS2 domain, we demonstrate improvement in ET estimates only when assimilating the LPRM soil moisture product.

  8. Nitrogen Assimilation, Abiotic Stress and Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: The Full Circle of Reductants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) is well-known as the main regulatory enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) in living organisms. Namely, in Planta, different G6PDH isoforms may occur, generally localized in cytosol and plastids/chloroplasts. These enzymes are differently regulated by distinct mechanisms, still far from being defined in detail. In the last decades, a pivotal function for plant G6PDHs during the assimilation of nitrogen, providing reductants for enzymes involved in nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation, has been described. More recently, several studies have suggested a main role of G6PDH to counteract different stress conditions, among these salinity and drought, with the involvement of an ABA depending signal. In the last few years, this recognized vision has been greatly widened, due to studies clearly showing the non-conventional subcellular localization of the different G6PDHs, and the peculiar regulation of the different isoforms. The whole body of these considerations suggests a central question: how do the plant cells distribute the reductants coming from G6PDH and balance their equilibrium? This review explores the present knowledge about these mechanisms, in order to propose a scheme of distribution of reductants produced by G6PDH during nitrogen assimilation and stress. PMID:27187489

  9. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH3, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250 degree C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs 3 or NH4NO3 is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO3 to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions

  10. Numerical analysis of cumulative impact of phytoplankton photoresponses to light variation on carbon assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, S.; Botte, V.; Iudicone, D.; Ribera d'Alcala, M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Light variation in temporal and spatial domains is a key constraint on the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton. The most obvious responses are the modification of cell pigment content either to improve photocapture or to mitigate photo-damage. Very few studies have analyzed whether light variation significantly alters carbon assimilation, especially in a fluctuating light environment as in the mixed layer of the ocean. We addressed the question using a modeling app...

  11. The effect of mindset on assimilative and contrastive social comparison outcomes and body image

    OpenAIRE

    Wanic, Rebekah Amelie

    2011-01-01

    Social comparisons can alter self-evaluations in multiple ways. Recent research highlights the role of an individual's mindset in moderating these comparison outcomes. Mussweiler's (2003) selective accessibility model (SAM) predicts that initial perceptions of either similarity or dissimilarity with the comparison target will lead to differential outcomes. A similarity mindset is predicted to move self-evaluations in the direction of the comparison target and promote assimilation whereas a di...

  12. Aerobic physiology of redox-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains modified in the ammonium assimilation for increased NADPH availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Maria Margarida M. dos; Thygesen, G.; Kotter, P.;

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant strains altered in the ammonium assimilation pathways were constructed with the purpose of increasing NADPH availability. The NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH1, which accounts for a major fraction of the NADPH consumption during growth on ammonium, was deleted, a...

  13. Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate nitrogen removal from polluted source water with ozonation and BAC processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the removal of ammonia-, nitrite-, and nitrate nitrogen with ozonation (O3), sand filtration (SF), biological activated carbon (BAC), SF-BAC, and/or O3-BAC processes were carried out in two pilot plants and a full scale plant, respectively. The results showed that all of the tested processes exhibited certain nitrogen removal efficiencies, of which both the O3-SF-BAC and O3-BAC processes were most effective and efficient in removing ammonia nitrogen, with mean removal efficiencies of some 90 and 80 percent, respectively. Ozonation was found able to oxidize some organic nitrogen into ammonia, and nitrite ion into nitrate ion. It was also found out, with interest, that the O3-BAC process can carry the nitrification process to the end under sufficient DO content, as well as more hydrocarbon substrates through ozonation that are more easily assimilated by some strains of nitrobacter that can multiply heterotrophically in its carbon beds. In the BAC process, both the DO and easily assimilated substrate contents were too low in its carbon beds due to no ozonation to sustain nitrobacter growth; but the nitrite conversion bacteria, like nitrosomas, can survive under such conditions. As a result, nitrite or nitrate ion content increased multiply in the effluents from BAC or O3-BAC processes over their influents, respectively. The removal mechanisms of various processes for the three forms of nitrogen were studied and discussed, and the optimum design parameters were determined as well

  14. On Variational Data Assimilation in Continuous Time

    CERN Document Server

    Bröcker, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Variational data assimilation in continuous time is revisited. The central techniques applied in this paper are in part adopted from the theory of optimal nonlinear control. Alternatively, the investigated approach can be considered as a continuous time generalisation of what is known as weakly constrained four dimensional variational assimilation (WC--4DVAR) in the geosciences. The technique allows to assimilate trajectories in the case of partial observations and in the presence of model error. Several mathematical aspects of the approach are studied. Computationally, it amounts to solving a two point boundary value problem. For imperfect models, the trade off between small dynamical error (i.e. the trajectory obeys the model dynamics) and small observational error (i.e. the trajectory closely follows the observations) is investigated. For (nearly) perfect models, this trade off turns out to be (nearly) trivial in some sense, yet allowing for some dynamical error is shown to have positive effects even in th...

  15. Dark Matter Assimilation into the Baryon Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Thaler, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called "assimilation", which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  16. Formation kinetics and abundance of organic nitrates in α-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Formation of organic nitrates affects the total atmospheric budget of oxidized nitrogen (NOy) and alters the total aerosol mass yield from secondary sources. We investigated the formation of organic nitrate species during ozonolysis of α-pinene and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) using the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N inside an aerosol flow reactor (Ammann et al., 2001). The results represent direct measurements of the organic nitrate content of α-pinene secondary aerosol and give insight into the kinetics of organic nitrate formation. Organic nitrates constituted up to 40 % of aerosol mass with a pronounced influence during the initial period of particle growth. Kinetic modelling, as well as additional experiments using OH scavengers and UV irradiation, suggests that organic peroxy radicals (RO2) from the reaction of α-pinene with secondarily produced OH are important intermediates in the organic nitrate formation process. Direct oxidation of α-pinene by NO3 was found to be a less efficient pathway for formation of particle phase nitrate. The organic nitrate content decreased very slightly with an increase of relative humidity on the experimental time scale. The experiments show a tight correlation between organic nitrate content and SOA number concentrations, implying that organic nitrates play an important role in nucleation and growth of nanoparticles. Since present in large amounts in organic aerosol, organic nitrates deposited in the lung might have implications for human health as they release nitric acid upon hydrolysis, especially in regions influenced by urban pollution and large sources of monoterpene SOA precursors. References Ammann et al. (2001) Radiochimica Acta 89, 831.

  17. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huebsch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e., rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in south Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU Water Framework Directive (WFD. In future, more research should focus on

  18. Bridging across nations. The social capital of diversity, brokerage and closure in transnational migrant networks: a study on assimilation patterns in Milan and Barcelona

    OpenAIRE

    Vacca,, C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the network effects on immigrant assimilation: how the composition and structure of migrants' personal networks affect patterns of assimilation in host societies. A personal network is the set of all current and active social contacts that a focal individual (Ego) has, including family, friends and acquaintances. It is operationalized here as the list of 45 alters who were mentioned by Ego (the migrant) as people with whom he had some kind of contact in the las...

  19. Correction of deposition predictions with data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model predictions for rapid assessment and prognosis of possible radiological consequences after an accidental release of radionuclides play an important role in nuclear emergency management. Radiological measurements (e. g., dose rate measurements) can be used to improve such model predictions. This paper describes a method for combining model predictions and measurements (data assimilation) in the deposition model of the European radiological decision support system RODOS. The data assimilation approach is based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter, a Monte Carlo variant of the Kalman filter. (orig.)

  20. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  1. Temporal analysis of spring water data to assess nitrate inputs to groundwater in an agricultural area (Osona, NE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy-Roura, Mercè; Menció, Anna; Mas-Pla, Josep

    2013-05-01

    Non-point agricultural pollution is a major concern in groundwater management. To investigate nitrate input to the subsurface through groundwater recharge, thirteen natural springs were sampled. Discharge, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate concentration, pH value and water temperature were monitored every two weeks from January 2010 till February 2011 at selected springs in the Osona region (NE Spain). Two extensive hydrochemical analyses were also conducted at the beginning and at the end of the survey. Springs are classified in four groups describing their hydrological response, based on discharge, EC and nitrate data. Geostatistical analysis provides an additional insight into the discharge and nitrate temporal pattern. Even though discharge and EC can be related to specific hydrogeological behaviours, nitrate content shows uniform values in most of the springs with only a minor influence from external factors such as rainfall events, fertilisation regimes and geological traits. Such evenness of outflow might be attributed to a homogenisation of the subsurface processes that determine nitrate infiltration after decades of intensive fertilisation using pig manure. Accumulated nitrate mass load and variograms confirm this result. Assuming that spring data are representative of nitrate leaching towards the underlying aquifer, nitrate content of infiltrating recharge in shallow aquifers should therefore show a steady value over time with only small fluctuations due to natural processes. Nevertheless, temporal fluctuations in nitrate content in aquifers could be also attributed to flow regime alterations due to human groundwater withdrawal. PMID:23567097

  2. Differentiation between Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum by sorbitol assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Rezusta, A; Rubio, M C; Alejandre, M C

    1991-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum was easily differentiated from T. mentagrophytes by its ability to assimilate sorbitol with an API 20C AUX strip. One hundred percent of 36 T. rubrum strains and none of 147 T. mentagrophytes strains assimilated sorbitol.

  3. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...

  4. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  5. Economic and Cultural Assimilation and Integration of Immigration in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Mariya Aleksynska; Yann Algan

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents assimilation of immigrants in 16 European countries along cultural, civic, and economic dimensions, distinguishing by immigrants’ generation, duration of stay, and origin. It suggests that assimilation may have multiple facets, and take place at different speed depending on the outcome in question. While assimilation along some economic outcomes may be correlated with assimilation along some cultural outcomes, such correlations are not systematic, and imply that progress ...

  6. Assimilation violation and spoken-language processing: A supplementary report

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that spoken-language processing is inhibited by violation of obligatory regressive assimilation. Weber (2001) replicated this inhibitory effect in a phoneme-monitoring study examining regressive place assimilation of nasals, but found facilitation for violation of progressive assimilation. German listeners detected the velar fricative [x] more quickly when fricative assimilation was violated (e.g., *[bIxt] or *[blInx@n]) than when no violation occurred (e.g., [baxt...

  7. ASSIMILATION SYSTEM AT DHMZ: DEVELOPMENT AND FIRST VERIFICATION RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Stanešić, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, a description of the setup for a local assimilation system for a limited area model, ALADIN (Aire Limiteé Adaptation Dynamique dévelopement InterNational), is given with a comprehensive description of the assimilation techniques used. The assimilation system at DHMZ (Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia) consisted of two parts: the surface assimilation, which was used to change the state of a model land surface variables, and the upper air assimilatio...

  8. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  9. Data ingestion and assimilation in ionospheric models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Nava, B.; Galkin, I.; Angling, M.; Stankov, S. M.; Coisson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3/4 (2009), s. 235-253. ISSN 1593-5213 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1356; GA MŠk OC 091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : ionosphere * models * data assimilation * data ingestion Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2009

  10. The Silent Minority: Assimilated or Marginal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gladys David

    In this paper, the concept of "invisible ethnic" is used to refer to an individual who is identified as different by dominant members of society and who is caught between an ancestral identity and culture on the one hand, and a wish to be assimilated, on the other. This concept is discussed in relation to Stonequist's "marginal man" and the social…

  11. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN YueQi; ZHANG YaoCun; WANG YunFeng; YE Song; FANG HanXian

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H∞ filter" is Introduced based on H∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the assimilation capability of Monte Carlo H= filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations respectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustnesa than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  12. Metabolic Plasticity of Nitrogen Assimilation by Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jang K.Kim; George P.Kraemer; Charles Yarish

    2012-01-01

    The physical stresses associated with emersion have long been considered major factors determining the vertical zonation of intertidal seaweeds.We examined Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing thalli from the vertical extremes in elevation of an intertidal population (i.e.upper and lower intertidal zones) to determine whether Porphyra thalli acclimate to different vertical elevations on the shore with different patterns of nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities in response to different degrees of emersion stress.We found that the nitrate uptake and NR recovery in the emersed tissues took longer in lower intertidal sub-population than in upper intertidal sub-population; and GS activity was also significantly affected by emersion and,interestingly,such an activity was enhanced by emersion of thalli from both upper and lower intertidal zones.These results suggested that intra-population variability in post-emersion recovery of physiological functions such as nutrient uptake and NR activity enables local adaptation and contributes to the wide vertical distribution of P.umbilicalis.The high GS activity during periodic emersion stress may be a protective mechanism enabling P.umbilicalis to assimilate nitrogen quickly when it again becomes available,and may also be an evidence of photorespiration during emersion.

  13. Metabolic plasticity of nitrogen assimilation by Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang K.; Kraemer, George P.; Yarish, Charles

    2012-12-01

    The physical stresses associated with emersion have long been considered major factors determining the vertical zonation of intertidal seaweeds. We examined Porphyra umbilicalis (Linnaeus) Kützing thalli from the vertical extremes in elevation of an intertidal population ( i.e. upper and lower intertidal zones) to determine whether Porphyra thalli acclimate to different vertical elevations on the shore with different patterns of nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities in response to different degrees of emersion stress. We found that the nitrate uptake and NR recovery in the emersed tissues took longer in lower intertidal sub-population than in upper intertidal sub-population; and GS activity was also significantly affected by emersion and, interestingly, such an activity was enhanced by emersion of thalli from both upper and lower intertidal zones. These results suggested that intra-population variability in post-emersion recovery of physiological functions such as nutrient uptake and NR activity enables local adaptation and contributes to the wide vertical distribution of P. umbilicalis. The high GS activity during periodic emersion stress may be a protective mechanism enabling P. umbilicalis to assimilate nitrogen quickly when it again becomes available, and may also be an evidence of photorespiration during emersion.

  14. Strengths and Limitations of Data Assimilation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (USU-GAIM) program, we developed two Kalman filter data assimilation models of the global ionosphere, including Gauss-Markov (GM) and Full Physics (FP) models. Our Gauss-Markov model uses a physics-based ionospheric model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating the measurements. The physics-based model is the Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM), which is a multi-ion global model that covers the E-region, F-region, and topside from 90 to 1400 km. The GM model has both regional and global capabilities and the output of the model is a 3-dimensional Ne distribution at specified times. With the GM model the ionospheric densities obtained from the IFM constitute a background ionospheric density field on which perturbations are superimposed based on the available data sources and their errors. The density perturbations and the associated errors evolve over time via a statistical Gauss-Markov process. Our full physics data assimilation model is more sophisticated than the Gauss-Markov model. This model is based on a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere-polar wind model, which includes six ion species (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+, and He+) and covers the low-mid latitudes from 90 to 20,000 km. In addition to the global Ne distribution, the full physics model also provides global distributions of the self-consistent drivers (neutral winds and composition, electric fields, and particle precipitation). Both models can assimilate in situ electron densities from 4 DMSP satellites, bottomside Ne profiles from 30 ionosondes, slant TECs from up to 1000 ground GPS/TEC receivers, occultation data and line-of-sight UV emissions. The USU-GAIM models are now being widely used, but as with all physics-based data assimilation models, care must be exercised because these models have both strengths and limitations. Some of the important issues relate to the quality, amount and distribution of the data, the ability to obtain

  15. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  16. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  17. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Eiji eKimura; Mikako eKuroki

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effe...

  18. The Parallel Data Assimilation Framework PDAF - a flexible software framework for ensemble data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Ensemble filter algorithms can be implemented in a generic way such that they can be applied with various models with only a minimum amount of recoding. This is possible due to the fact that ensemble filters can operate on abstract state vectors and require only limited information about the numerical model and the observational data used for a data assimilation application. To build an assimilation system, the analysis step of a filter algorithm needs to be connected to t...

  19. Elevated CO(2 modifies N acquisition of Medicago truncatula by enhancing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Guo

    Full Text Available The effects of elevated CO2 (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm were evaluated on nitrogen (N acquisition and assimilation by three Medicago truncatula genotypes, including two N-fixing-deficient mutants (dnf1-1 and dnf1-2 and their wild-type (Jemalong. The proportion of N acquisition from atmosphere and soil were quantified by (15N stable isotope, and N transportation and assimilation-related genes and enzymes were determined by qPCR and biochemical analysis. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrate uptake from soil in all three plant genotypes by down-regulating nitrate reductase (NR, nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and NR activity. Jemalong plant, however, produced more nodules, up-regulated N-fixation-related genes and enhanced percentage of N derived from fixation (%Ndf to increase foliar N concentration and N content in whole plant (Ntotal Yield to satisfy the requirement of larger biomass under elevated CO2. In contrast, both dnf1 mutants deficient in N fixation consequently decreased activity of glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT and N concentration under elevated CO2. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 is likely to modify N acquisition of M. truncatula by simultaneously increasing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil. We propose that elevated CO2 causes legumes to rely more on N fixation than on N uptake from soil to satisfy N requirements.

  20. Nitrate Uptake, Nitrate Reductase Distribution and their Relation to Proton Release in Five Nodulated Grain Legumes

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, X. H.; Tang, C; RENGEL, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and net proton release were compared in five grain legumes grown at 0·2 and 2 mm nitrate in nutrient solution. Nitrate treatments, imposed on 22‐d‐old, fully nodulated plants, lasted for 21 d. Increasing nitrate supply did not significantly influence the growth of any of the species during the treatment, but yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) had a higher growth rate than the other species examined. At 0·2 mm nitrate supply, nitrate uptake rates ran...

  1. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel, E-mail: jsavarino@lgge.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  2. In folio isotopic tracing demonstrates that nitrogen assimilation into glutamate is mostly independent from current CO2 assimilation in illuminated leaves of Brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen assimilation in leaves requires primary NH2 acceptors that, in turn, originate from primary carbon metabolism. Respiratory metabolism is believed to provide such acceptors (such as 2-oxoglutarate), so that day respiration is commonly seen as a cornerstone for nitrogen assimilation into glutamate in illuminated leaves. However, both glycolysis and day respiratory CO2 evolution are known to be inhibited by light, thereby compromising the input of recent photosynthetic carbon for glutamate production. In this study, we carried out isotopic labelling experiments with 13CO2 and 15N-ammonium nitrate on detached leaves of rapeseed (Brassica napus), and performed 13C- and 15N-nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. Our results indicated that the production of 13C-glutamate and 13C-glutamine under a 13CO2 atmosphere was very weak, whereas 13C-glutamate and 13C-glutamine appeared in both the subsequent dark period and the next light period under a 12CO2 atmosphere. Consistently, the analysis of heteronuclear (13C-15N) interactions within molecules indicated that most 15N-glutamate and 15N-glutamine molecules were not 13C labelled after 13C/15N double labelling. That is, recent carbon atoms (i.e. 13C) were hardly incorporated into glutamate, but new glutamate molecules were synthesized, as evidenced by 15N incorporation. We conclude that the remobilization of night-stored molecules plays a significant role in providing 2-oxoglutarate for glutamate synthesis in illuminated rapeseed leaves, and therefore the natural day: night cycle seems critical for nitrogen assimilation. (authors)

  3. Temporary storage or permanent removal? The division of nitrogen between biotic assimilation and denitrification in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G I Payne

    Full Text Available The long-term efficacy of stormwater treatment systems requires continuous pollutant removal without substantial re-release. Hence, the division of incoming pollutants between temporary and permanent removal pathways is fundamental. This is pertinent to nitrogen, a critical water body pollutant, which on a broad level may be assimilated by plants or microbes and temporarily stored, or transformed by bacteria to gaseous forms and permanently lost via denitrification. Biofiltration systems have demonstrated effective removal of nitrogen from urban stormwater runoff, but to date studies have been limited to a 'black-box' approach. The lack of understanding on internal nitrogen processes constrains future design and threatens the reliability of long-term system performance. While nitrogen processes have been thoroughly studied in other environments, including wastewater treatment wetlands, biofiltration systems differ fundamentally in design and the composition and hydrology of stormwater inflows, with intermittent inundation and prolonged dry periods. Two mesocosm experiments were conducted to investigate biofilter nitrogen processes using the stable isotope tracer 15NO3(- (nitrate over the course of one inflow event. The immediate partitioning of 15NO3(- between biotic assimilation and denitrification were investigated for a range of different inflow concentrations and plant species. Assimilation was the primary fate for NO3(- under typical stormwater concentrations (∼1-2 mg N/L, contributing an average 89-99% of 15NO3(- processing in biofilter columns containing the most effective plant species, while only 0-3% was denitrified and 0-8% remained in the pore water. Denitrification played a greater role for columns containing less effective species, processing up to 8% of 15NO3(-, and increased further with nitrate loading. This study uniquely applied isotope tracing to biofiltration systems and revealed the dominance of assimilation in stormwater

  4. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  5. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration*

    OpenAIRE

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an α-nitronaphthalene to β-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aroma...

  6. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Richard E-mail: ortega@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Suda, Asami; Deves, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 {mu}m diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  7. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  8. Deconstructing nitrate isotope dynamics in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The natural abundance N and O stable isotope ratios of nitrate provide an invaluable tool to differentiate N sources to the environment, track their dispersal, and monitor their attenuation by biological transformations. The interpretation of patterns in isotope abundances relies on knowledge of the isotope ratios of the source end-members, as well as on constraints on the isotope discrimination imposed on nitrate by respective biological processes. Emergent observations from mono-culture experiments of denitrifying bacteria reveal nitrate fractionation trends that appear at odds with trends ascribed to denitrification in soils and aquifers. This discrepancy raises the possibility that additional biological N transformations may be acting in tandem with denitrification. Here, the N and O isotope enrichments associated with nitrate removal by denitrification in aquifers are posited to bear evidence of coincident biological nitrate production - from nitrification and/or from anammox. Simulations are presented from a simple time-dependent one-box model of a groundwater mass ageing that is subject to net nitrate loss by denitrification with coincident nitrate production by nitrification or anammox. Within boundary conditions characteristic of freshwater aquifers, the apparent slope of the parallel enrichments in nitrate N and O isotopes associated with net N loss to denitrification can vary in proportion to the nitrate added simultaneous by oxidative processes. Pertinent observations from nitrate plumes in suboxic to anoxic aquifers are examined to validate this premise. In this perspective, nitrate isotope distributions suggest that we may be missing important N fluxes inherent to most aquifers.

  9. Microbial and biogeochemical responses to projected future nitrate enrichment in the California upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal California is a dynamic upwelling region where nitrogen (N and iron (Fe can both limit productivity and influence biogeochemistry over different spatial and temporal scales. With global change, the flux of nitrate from upwelling is expected to increase over the next century, potentially driving additional oceanic regions toward Fe limitation. In this study we explored the effect of changes in Fe/N ratio on native phytoplankton from five currently Fe-replete sites near the major California upwelling centers at Bodega Bay and Monterey Bay using nutrient addition incubation experiments. Despite the high nitrate levels (13-30 M in the upwelled water, phytoplankton at three of the five sites showed increased growth when 10 M nitrate was added. None of the sites showed enhanced growth following addition of 10 nM Fe. Nitrate additions favored slow sinking single-celled diatoms over faster sinking chain-forming diatoms, suggesting that future increases in nitrate flux could affect carbon and silicate export and alter grazer populations. In particular, solitary cells of Cylindrotheca were more abundant than the toxin-producing genus Pseudonitzschia following nitrate addition. These responses suggest the biogeochemistry of coastal California could change in response to future increases in nitrate, and multiple stressors like ocean acidification and hypoxia may further result in ecosystem shifts.

  10. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  11. Collection of Nitrate in a Denuder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Feig

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Data are given for aerosol nitrate (NO3- size distributions in the atmosphere as recorded by a cascade impactor and by an annular denuder. Using this data, our goal is to find the percent of nitrate in the atmosphere that the denuder is able to detect. This requires that we find the size distribution of nitrate that enters the denuder. From these data and calculations, we find that 32.8% of nitrate in the atmosphere can be detected by the denuder. Nitrate was measured to study its affects on seagrass in the Tampa Bay and to compare nitrate levels with seagrass growth and decline. Using a denuder for routine measurements will not allow scientists to accurately compare nitrate data to seagrass levels.

  12. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Several experimental studies have been carried out in this study in order to assess quantitatively water conductivity of bentonite which is altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling for previous results is carried out and several requirements to be defined are proposed. The conclusion of this study is summarized as below. Secondary minerals of bentonite alteration due to hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) CSH and CAH were observed corresponding to solving montmorillonite in AWN solution. 2) Na2O Al2O3 1.68SiO2 generated from 90 days in batch experiment and it was observed in 360 days. Assessment of swelling and water conductivity changing by hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) Little changing of water conductivity of bentonite was observed by saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and hyper alkaline solution. The conductivity significantly increased by penetrating sodium nitrate solution. 2) Water conductivity of ion exchanged bentonite by hyper alkaline solution significantly increased. It increased more by penetrating AWN solution. Modeling of tuff alteration by hyper alkaline solution: 1) Flow through test is proposed since soluble velocity to hyper alkaline solution should be defined. (author)

  13. 5-Chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seik Weng Ng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium cation in the the title ion pair, C9H7ClNO+·NO3−, is approximately coplanar with the nitrate anion [dihedral angle = 16.1 (1°]. Two ion pairs are hydrogen bonded (2 × O—H...O and 2 × N—H...O about a center of inversion, generating an R44(14 ring.

  14. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  15. Salinity and Salicylic Acid Interactions in Affecting Nitrogen Assimilation, Enzyme Activity, Ions Content and Translocation Rate of Maize Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to establish the relationship between nitrogen metabolism, enzyme activity, ions concentration as well as the translocation rate (TR) of carbohydrates and salicylic acid (SA) in salt-stressed maize (Zea mays L). Salicylic acid plus salinity treatment highly significantly increased: nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), protein content, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and nitrate reductase (NR) and inhibited nucleases (DNase and RNase) activities compared with Na CI-treated plants. In addition, the ionic levels of potassium (K), phosphorus (P), nitrate (NO3) and the translocation rate of the labelled photo assimilates have also been stimulated while sodium (Na) ions content was decreased. It is concluded that, salinazid maize plants might show an enhancement in their growth pattern upon salicylic acid application

  16. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  17. Electrolytic production of uranous nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient production of uranous nitrate is important in nuclear fuel reprocessing because U(IV) acts as a plutonium reductant in solvent extraction and can be coprecipitated with plutonium and/or throium as oxalates during fuel reprocessing. Experimental conditions are described for the efficient electrolytic production of uranous nitrate for use as a reductant in the SRP Purex process. The bench-scale, continuous-flow, electrolysis cell exhibits a current efficiency approaching 100% in combination with high conversion rates of U(VI) to U(IV) in simulated and actual SRP Purex solutions. High current efficiency is achieved with a voltage-controlled mercury-plated platinum electrode and the use of hydrazine as a nitrite scavenger. Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) proceeds at 100% efficiency. Cathodic gas generation is minimal. The low rate of gas generation permits a long residence time within the cathode, a necessary condition for high conversions on a continuous basis. Design proposals are given for a plant-scale, continuous-flow unit to meet SRP production requirements. Results from the bench-scale tests indicate that an 8-kW unit can supply sufficient uranous nitrate reductant to meet the needs of the Purex process at SRP

  18. Effect of S-07 on 14CO2 assimilation and distribution of assimilates during ripening stage of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of S-07 (S-3307, uniconazole) on 14CO2 assimilation and distribution of assimilates during ripening stage of wheat was studied. The experimental results showed that the amount of 14Co2 assimilates in leaves of the wheat plant sprayed with 10∼40 ppm S-07 at heading stage was higher than that of the control. The distribution of 14CO2 assimilates in ear and root of wheat plant increased. It is also found that S-07 treatment made more assimilates transferring from primary stem to tillers

  19. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  20. Dietary nitrate improves vascular function in patients with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Shanti; Gan, Jasmine Ming; Rathod, Krishnaraj S; Khambata, Rayomand S; Ghosh, Suborno M; Hartley, Amy; Van Eijl, Sven; Sagi-Kiss, Virag; Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Curtis, Mike; Kuhnle, Gunter GC; Wade, William G; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial cardiovascular effects of vegetables may be underpinned by their high inorganic nitrate content. Objective: We sought to examine the effects of a 6-wk once-daily intake of dietary nitrate (nitrate-rich beetroot juice) compared with placebo intake (nitrate-depleted beetroot juice) on vascular and platelet function in untreated hypercholesterolemics. Design: A total of 69 subjects were recruited in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study. The primary endpoint was the change in vascular function determined with the use of ultrasound flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups, with primary outcome data available for 67 patients. Dietary nitrate resulted in an absolute increase in the FMD response of 1.1% (an ∼24% improvement from baseline) with a worsening of 0.3% in the placebo group (P 1% of this change, with the proportions of Rothia mucilaginosa trending to increase and Neisseria flavescens (P < 0.01) increased after nitrate treatment relative to after placebo treatment. Conclusions: Sustained dietary nitrate ingestion improves vascular function in hypercholesterolemic patients. These changes are associated with alterations in the oral microbiome and, in particular, nitrate-reducing genera. Our findings provide additional support for the assessment of the potential of dietary nitrate as a preventative strategy against atherogenesis in larger cohorts. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01493752. PMID:26607938

  1. An artificial self-sufficient cytochrome P450 directly nitrates fluorinated tryptophan analogs with a different regio-selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Yi; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Mehta, Mishal; Dedic, Evelina; Bruner, Steven D; Loria, Rosemary; Ding, Yousong

    2016-05-01

    Aromatic nitration is an immensely important industrial process to produce chemicals for a variety of applications, but it often suffers from multiple unsolved challenges. Enzymes as biocatalysts have been increasingly used for organic chemistry synthesis due to their high selectivity and environmental friendliness, but nitration has benefited minimally from the development of biocatalysis. In this work, we aimed to develop TxtE as practical biocatalysts for aromatic nitration. TxtE is a unique class I cytochrome P450 enzyme that nitrates the indole of l-tryptophan. To develop cost-efficient nitration processes, we fused TxtE with the reductase domains of CYP102A1 (P450BM3) and of P450RhF to create class III self-sufficient biocatalysts. The best engineered fusion protein was comparable with wild type TxtE in terms of nitration performance and other key biochemical properties. To demonstrate the application potential of the fusion enzyme, we nitrated 4-F-dl-tryptophan and 5-F-l-tryptophan in large scale enzymatic reactions. Tandem MS/MS and NMR analyses of isolated products revealed altered nitration sites. To our knowledge, these studies represent the first practice in developing biological nitration approaches and lay a solid basis to the use of TxtE-based biocatalysts for the production of valuable nitroaromatics. PMID:26743860

  2. Nitrate ammonification by Nautilia profundicola AmH: experimental evidence consistent with a free hydroxylamine intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Hanson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of nitrate reduction via nitrite controls the fate and bioavailability of mineral nitrogen within ecosystems; i.e. whether it is retained as ammonium (ammonification or lost as nitrous oxide or dinitrogen (denitrification. Here, we present experimental evidence for a novel pathway of microbial nitrate reduction, the reverse hydroxylamine:ubiquinone reductase module (reverse-HURM pathway. Instead of a classical ammonia-forming nitrite reductase that performs a 6 electron-transfer process, the pathway is thought to employ two catalytic redox modules operating in sequence: the reverse-HURM reducing nitrite to hydroxylamine followed by a hydroxylamine reductase that converts hydroxylamine to ammonium. Experiments were performed on Nautilia profundicola strain AmH, whose genome sequence led to the reverse-HURM pathway proposal. N. profundicola produced ammonium from nitrate, which was assimilated into biomass. Furthermore, genes encoding the catalysts of the reverse-HURM pathway were preferentially expressed during growth of N. profundicola on nitrate as an electron acceptor relative to cultures grown on polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Finally, nitrate-grown cells of N. profundicola were able to rapidly and stoichiometrically convert high concentrations of hydroxylamine to ammonium in resting cell assays. These experiments are consistent with the reverse-HURM pathway and a free hydroxylamine intermediate, but could not definitively exclude direct nitrite reduction to ammonium by the reverse-HURM with hydroxylamine as an off-pathway product. N. profundicola and related organisms are models for a new pathway of nitrate ammonification that may have global impact due to the wide distribution of these organisms in hypoxic environments and symbiotic or pathogenic associations with animal hosts.

  3. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  4. The "textbook Gibson": The assimilation of dissidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, Alan; Morris, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We examine how the textbooks have dealt with one of psychology's most eminent dissidents, James Gibson (1904-1979). Our review of more than a hundred textbooks, dating from the 1950s to the present, reveals fundamental and systematic misrepresentations of Gibson. Although Gibson continues to figure in most of the textbooks, his work is routinely assimilated to theoretical positions he emphatically rejected: cue theory, stimulus-response psychology, and nativism. As Gibson's one-time colleague, Ulric Neisser, pointed out, psychologists are especially prone to trying to understand new proposals "by mapping it on to some existing scheme," and warned that when "an idea is really new, that strategy fails" (Neisser, 1990, p. 749). The "Textbook Gibson" is an example of such a failure, and perhaps also of the more general importance of assimilation-"shadow history"-within the actual history of psychology. PMID:25664882

  5. Complexity Computational Environment: Data Assimilation SERVOGrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Fox, Geoffrey; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; McLeod, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    We are using Web (Grid) service technology to demonstrate the assimilation of multiple distributed data sources (a typical data grid problem) into a major parallel high-performance computing earthquake forecasting code. Such a linkage of Geoinformatics with Geocomplexity demonstrates the value of the Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory (SERVO) Grid concept, and advance Grid technology by building the first real-time large-scale data assimilation grid Here we develop the next steps for both the SERVO concept and the identified need for a Solid Earth problem-solving environment. We use a challenging motivating problem of importance to NASA namely integrating NASA space geodetic observations with numerical simulations of a changing earth.

  6. Probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In this book the authors describe the principles and methods behind probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation. Instead of focusing on particular application areas, the authors adopt a general dynamical systems approach, with a profusion of low-dimensional, discrete-time numerical examples designed to build intuition about the subject. Part I explains the mathematical framework of ensemble-based probabilistic forecasting and uncertainty quantification. Part II is devoted to Bayesian filtering algorithms, from classical data assimilation algorithms such as the Kalman filter, variational techniques, and sequential Monte Carlo methods, through to more recent developments such as the ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble transform filters. The McKean approach to sequential filtering in combination with coupling of measures serves as a unifying mathematical framework throughout Part II. Assuming only some basic familiarity with probability, this book is an ideal introduction for graduate students in ap...

  7. Ethnic Persistence, Assimilation and Risk Proclivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bonin, Holger; Constant, Amelie; Tatsiramons, Konstantinos; Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    2007-01-01

    The paper investigates the role of social norms as a determinant of individual attitudes by analyzing risk proclivity reported by immigrants and natives in a unique representative German survey. We employ factor analysis to construct measures of immigrants' ethnic persistence and assimilation. The estimated effect of these measures on risk proclivity suggests that adaptation to the attitudes of the majority population closes the immigrant-native gap in risk proclivity, while stronger commitme...

  8. Immigrants and Gender Roles: Assimilation vs. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Francine D. Blau

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines evidence on the role of assimilation versus source country culture in influencing immigrant women's behavior in the United States – looking both over time with immigrants' residence in the United States and across immigrant generations. It focuses particularly on labor supply but, for the second generation, also examines fertility and education. We find considerable evidence that immigrant source country gender roles influence immigrant and second generation women's behavi...

  9. Downscaling in the Context of Data Assimilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juruš, Pavel

    Praha : Ústav informatiky AV ČR & MATFYZPRESS, 2006 - (Hakl, F.), s. 35-43 ISBN 80-86732-87-8. [Doktorandský den '06. Monínec (CZ), 20.09.2006-22.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400300414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : data assimilation * model output statistics * probabilistic forecast

  10. National Identity and Immigrants’ Assimilation in France

    OpenAIRE

    Gabin Langevin; Pascaline Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Determination and changes of immigrants' identity resulting from intercultural contacts impact their socio-economic integration. To precisely assess individuals’ identity, we propose a continuous index which aims to overcome interpretation troubles faced by usual measures of ethnic identity. Then, we investigate the determinants of immigrants' ethnic identity in France. We compare our composite and continuous index exhibiting individuals' assimilation with a usual measure of ethnic identity –...

  11. Immigrant Assimilation, Trust and Social Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, James C.; Orman, Wafa Hakim

    2010-01-01

    Trust is a crucial component of social capital. We use an experimental moonlighting game with a representative sample of the U.S. population, oversampling immigrants, to study trust, positive, and negative reciprocity between first-generation immigrants and native-born Americans as a measure of immigrant assimilation. We also survey subjects in order to relate trusting and trustworthy behavior with demographic characteristics and traditional, survey-based measures of social capital. We find t...

  12. Assimilation and cohort effects for German immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Gundel, Sebastian; Peters, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Demographic change and the rising demand for highly qualified labor in Germany attracts notice to the analysis of immigration. In addition, the pattern of immigration changed markedly during the past decades. Therefore we use the latest data of the German Socioeconomic Panel up to the year 2006 in order to investigate the economic performance of immigrants. We perform regressions of three pooled cross sections (1986, 1996, 2006) to estimate assimilation and quality of immigrants as reflected ...

  13. Wage Assimilation of Immigrants in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Zenón Jiménez-Ridruejo; Carlos Borondo Arribas

    2011-01-01

    In this study we quantify the effect of the years of residence in Spain on the earnings of immigrants. We take sex, origin, education and age into account. The results are clearly positive, the longer the length of residence the more earnings, confirming the hypothesis of wage assimilation of immigrants as their human capital is adapted to the Spanish labor market. The information used comes from the Social Security’s Continuous Sample of Working Lives 2007. Additionally, we merge the earning...

  14. Intermarriage and the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Meng; Robert G Gregory

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the assimilation role of intermarriage between immigrants and natives. Intermarried immigrants earn significantly higher incomes than endogamously married immigrants, even after we take account of human capital endowments and endogeneity of intermarriage. The premium does not appear to be a reward for unobservable individual characteristics. Natives who intermarry do not receive this premium, nor do immigrants who intermarry into another ethnic group. The premium is ...

  15. IMMIGRANT ASSIMILATION:DO NEIGHBORHOODS MATTER?

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha T. Duncan; Waldorf, Brigitte S.

    2008-01-01

    The United States provides a path to citizenship for its newcomers. Unlike other immigration countries, however, the United States does not have policies that ease assimilation or directly promote naturalization such as easily accessible and widely advertised language and civic instruction courses. Immigrants are by and large left on their own when facing legal and financial barriers or seeking instruction to pass the citizenship test. Not surprisingly, thus, we find that immigrants’ attribut...

  16. Services innovation: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and integration

    OpenAIRE

    Gallouj, FaÏz

    2002-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide a review of the literature on innovation in services and to focus on the analytical strategies carried out in order to fill in the innovation gap in the service economy (i.e. the difference between what the traditional innovation indicators are capable of capturing, and the reality of innovation activities undertaken in a given economy). Four analytical perspectives are distinguished in this chapter, which are labeled: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and ...

  17. Precision variational approximations in statistical data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation transfers information from observations of a complex system to physically-based system models with state variables x(t. Typically, the observations are noisy, the model has errors, and the initial state of the model is uncertain, so the data assimilation is statistical. One can thus ask questions about expected values of functions ⟨G(X⟩ on the path X = {x(t0, ..., x(tm} of the model as it moves through an observation window where measurements are made at times {t0, ..., tm}. The probability distribution on the path P(X = exp[−A0(X] determines these expected values. Variational methods seeking extrema of the "action" A0(X, widely known as 4DVar (Talagrand and Courtier, 1987; Evensen, 2009,, are widespread for estimating ⟨G(X ⟩ in many fields of science. In a path integral formulation of statistical data assimilation, we consider variational approximations in a standard realization of the action where measurement and model errors are Gaussian. We (a discuss an annealing method for locating the path X0 giving a consistent global minimum of the action A0(X0, (b consider the explicit role of the number of measurements at each measurement time in determining A0(X0, and (c identify a parameter regime for the scale of model errors which allows X0 to give a precise estimate of ⟨G(X0⟩ with computable, small higher order corrections.

  18. SMAP Data Assimilation at the GMAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission has been providing L-band (1.4 GHz) passive microwave brightness temperature (Tb) observations since April 2015. These observations are sensitive to surface(0-5 cm) soil moisture. Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of deeper-layer, root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture, which is not directly measured by SMAP. The NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) contributes to SMAP by providing Level 4 data, including the Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture(L4_SM) product, which is based on the assimilation of SMAP Tb observations in the ensemble-based NASA GEOS-5 land surface data assimilation system. The L4_SM product offers global data every three hours at 9 km resolution, thereby interpolating and extrapolating the coarser- scale (40 km) SMAP observations in time and in space (both horizontally and vertically). Since October 31, 2015, beta-version L4_SM data have been available to the public from the National Snow and Ice Data Center for the period March 31, 2015, to near present, with a mean latency of approx. 2.5 days.

  19. Middle Atmosphere Transport Properties of Assimilated Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Rood, Richard

    1999-01-01

    One of the most compelling reasons for performing data assimilation in the middle atmosphere is to obtain global, balanced datasets for studies of trace gas transport and chemistry. This is a major motivation behind the Goddard Earth observation System-Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS). Previous studies have shown that while this and other data assimilation systems can generally obtain good estimates of the extratropical rotational velocity field, the divergent part of the dynamical field is deficient; this impacts the "residual circulation" and leads to spurious trace gas transport on seasonal and interannual timescales. These problems are impacted by the quality and the method of use of the observational data and by deficiencies in the atmospheric general circulation model. Whichever the cause at any place and time, the "solution" is to introduce non-physical forcing terms into the system (the so-called incremental analysis updates); these can directly (thermal) or indirectly (mechanical) affect the residual circulation. This paper will illustrate how the divergent circulation is affected by deficiencies in both observations and models. Theoretical considerations will be illustrated with examples from the GEOS-DAS and from simplified numerical experiments. These are designed to isolate known problems, such as the inability of models to sustain a quasi-biennial oscillation and sparse observational constraints on tropical dynamics, or radiative inconsistencies in the presence of volcanic aerosols.

  20. Middle Atmospheric Transport Properties of Assimilated Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Rood, Richard

    1999-01-01

    One of the most compelling reasons for performing data assimilation in the middle atmosphere is to obtain global, balanced datasets for studies of trace gas transport and chemistry. This is a major motivation behind the Goddard Earth observation System-Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS). Previous studies have shown that while this and other data assimilation systems can generally obtain good estimates of the extratropical rotational velocity field, the divergent part of the dynamical field is deficient; this impacts the "residual circulation" and leads to spurious trace gas transport on seasonal and interannual timescales. These problems are impacted by the quality and the method of use of the observational data and by deficiencies in the atmospheric general circulation model. Whichever the cause at any place and time, the "solution" is to introduce non-physical forcing terms into the system (the so-called incremental analysis updates); these can directly (thermal) or indirectly (mechanical) affect the residual circulation. This paper will illustrate how the divergent circulation is affected by deficiencies in both observations and models. Theoretical considerations will be illustrated with examples from the GEOS-DAS and from simplified numerical experiments. These are designed to isolate known problems, such as the inability of models to sustain a quasi-biennial oscillation and sparse observational constraints on tropical dynamics, or radiative inconsistencies in the presence of volcanic aerosols.

  1. Data assimilation and model evaluation experiment datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Cheng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMEE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets. The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: (1) collection of observational data; (2) analysis and interpretation; (3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; (4) quality control and re-analysis; and (5) data archiving and software documentation. The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement. Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include (1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, (2) diagnosis and theoretical studies, and (3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  2. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H ∞ filter" is introduced based on H ∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the as- similation capability of Monte Carlo H ∞ filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations re- spectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H ∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustness than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  3. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  4. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  5. Data assimilation in a marine ecosystem model coupled to a mixed layer model of the ligurian sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, S.; Brasseur, P.; Lacroix, G.

    2003-04-01

    Data assimilation have been conducted in a one-dimensional, coupled physical ecosystem model of the upper ocean to characterize the observability properties of in situ observing systems. The assimilation method is based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter, in which the error sub-space is decomposed into multivariate orthogonal functions of the system's variability. The coupled model simulates the primary production in a coastal zone of the Ligurian Sea, where oligotrophic conditions prevail. The ecosystem dynamics is represented by 12 interacting compartments expressed in nitrogen units. The coupling with an hydrodynamic model determines the physical constraints associated to the development of a seasonal mixed layer. The stratification of the water column, according to the computation of the vertical turbulent diffusivities, is a key parameter of the evolution of the marine ecosystem. The coupled system have been developped and validated on the basis of field data collected during the FRONTAL compains between 1984 and 1988. Firstly, twin experiments have been performed to approach the observability properties, i.e. to study if the available data are sufficient to control the spatio-temporal evolution of the biological state variables. Experiments have been also performed where two quantities are observed simultaneously. For that, vertical temperature and salinity profiles on the one hand, and vertical nitrate and chlorophyll profiles on the other hand, have been assimilated with different spatial sampling strategies ( 'complete' profiles along the water column - 'pseudo-profiles' FRONTAL taking into account the spatial sampling of FRONTAL campains). These experiments allow to know if FRONTAL data are appropriately sampled to be assimilated, or if it is necessary to take into account new strategies for futures campains. Secondly, applying lessons learned from twin assimilation experiments, physical and biological profiles of in situ data

  6. The Importance of Peers: Assimilation Patterns among Second-generation Turkish Immigrants in Western Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, S; Fokkema, T.

    2015-01-01

    The two dominant approaches to immigrant assimilation, segmented assimilation and "new" assimilation theories, have been successful at reporting and analyzing between-group differences in assimilation patterns. However, studies of assimilation generally do not address differences at the individual level. Current theories of assimilation cannot answer the simple question that gets to the heart of individual-level differences: how do you account for siblings in the same family assimilating in d...

  7. Assessing the sources and magnitude of diurnal nitrate variability in the San Joaquin River (California) with an in situ optical nitrate sensor and dual nitrate isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, B.A.; Downing, B.D.; Kendall, C.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Kraus, T.E.C.; Saraceno, J.; Spencer, R.G.M.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    1. We investigated diurnal nitrate (NO3-) concentration variability in the San Joaquin River using an in situ optical NO3- sensor and discrete sampling during a 5-day summer period characterized by high algal productivity. Dual NO3- isotopes (??15NNO3 and ??18O NO3) and dissolved oxygen isotopes (??18O DO) were measured over 2 days to assess NO3- sources and biogeochemical controls over diurnal time-scales. 2. Concerted temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and ??18ODO were consistent with photosynthesis, respiration and atmospheric O2 exchange, providing evidence of diurnal biological processes independent of river discharge. 3. Surface water NO3- concentrations varied by up to 22% over a single diurnal cycle and up to 31% over the 5-day study, but did not reveal concerted diurnal patterns at a frequency comparable to DO concentrations. The decoupling of ??15NNO3 and ??18ONO3 isotopes suggests that algal assimilation and denitrification are not major processes controlling diurnal NO3- variability in the San Joaquin River during the study. The lack of a clear explanation for NO 3- variability likely reflects a combination of riverine biological processes and time-varying physical transport of NO3- from upstream agricultural drains to the mainstem San Joaquin River. 4. The application of an in situ optical NO3- sensor along with discrete samples provides a view into the fine temporal structure of hydrochemical data and may allow for greater accuracy in pollution assessment. ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  9. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  10. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239Pu(NO3)4, in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. The authors have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 4 tables

  11. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239Pu(NO3)4, in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. They have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 3 tables

  12. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  13. Water Pollution with Nitrates from Agricultural Sources

    OpenAIRE

    FLESERIU A.; OROIAN I.

    2010-01-01

    One of the biggest water pollution problem is created by nitrates resulted from agriculture. This paper is areview aimin to emphasiz the main water pollution problems produced by nitrates in Romania and EU. The excessnitrates can accumulate in soil in several ways. First, manure effluents containing both ammonia and organic forms ofnitrogen. Organic nitrogen can be converted to ammonia in the soil. The ammonia, together with any ammoniafertilizer applied, is converted to nitrate by soil bacte...

  14. Nitrification in the euphotic zone as evidenced by nitrate dual isotopic composition: Observations from Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, C.; Pennington, J.T.; Chavez, F.P.; Paytan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coupled measurements of nitrate (NO3-), nitrogen (N), and oxygen (O) isotopic composition (??15NNO3 and ??18ONO3) were made in surface waters of Monterey Bay to investigate multiple N cycling processes occurring within surface waters. Profiles collected throughout the year at three sites exhibit a wide range of values, suggesting simultaneous and variable influence of both phytoplankton NO3- assimilation and nitrification within the euphotic zone. Specifically, increases ??18ONO3 were consistently greater than those in ??15NN03. A coupled isotope steady state box model was used to estimate the amount of NO3- supplied by nitrification in surface waters relative to that supplied from deeper water. The model highlights the importance of the branching reaction during ammonium (NH4+) consumption, in which NH4+ either serves as a substrate for regenerated production or for nitrification. Our observations indicate that a previously unrecognized proportion of nitrate-based productivity, on average 15 to 27%, is supported by nitrification in surface waters and should not be considered new production. This work also highlights the need for a better understanding of isotope effects of NH4+ oxidation, NH4+ assimilation, and NO4+ assimilation in marine environments.

  15. Ensemble-Based Assimilation of Aerosol Observations in GEOS-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    MERRA-2 is the latest Aerosol Reanalysis produced at NASA's Global Modeling Assimilation Office (GMAO) from 1979 to present. This reanalysis is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model radiatively coupled to GOCART aerosols and includes assimilation of bias corrected Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from AVHRR over ocean, MODIS sensors on both Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR over bright surfaces and AERONET data. In order to assimilate lidar profiles of aerosols, we are updating the aerosol component of our assimilation system to an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) type of scheme using ensembles generated routinely by the meteorological assimilation. Following the work performed with the first NASA's aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero), we first validate the vertical structure of MERRA-2 aerosol assimilated fields using CALIOP data over regions of particular interest during 2008.

  16. Construction and Experiment of Hierarchical Bayesian Network in Data Assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hierarchical Bayesian Network Algorithm (HBN) is developed for data assimilation and tested with an instance of soil moisture assimilation from hydrological model and ground observations. In this work, data assimilation separates into data level, process level and parameter level, and conditional probability models are defined for each level. The data model mainly deals with the scale differences between multiple data, while the process model is designed to take account of non-stationary process. Soil moisture from Soil Moisture Experiment in 2003 and Variable Infiltration Capacity Model is sequentially assimilated with HBN. The result shows that the assimilation with HBN provides spatial and temporal distribution information of soil moisture and the assimilation result agrees well with the ground observations

  17. Segmented assimilation, neighborhood disadvantage, and Hispanic immigrant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akresh, Ilana Redstone; Do, D Phuong; Frank, Reanne

    2016-01-01

    We use a subset of Hispanics from the New Immigrant Survey, a nationally representative data set on immigrants recently granted legal permanent residency (n = 2245), to examine whether the relationship between assimilation and health is modified by neighborhood disadvantage and, in doing so, carry out an empirical test of the segmented assimilation hypothesis. Results indicate that assimilation in the least disadvantaged neighborhoods can be protective against poor health. Specifically, more assimilated men and women in the lowest disadvantage neighborhoods have a lower likelihood of self-reported poorer health and being overweight, respectively; no link was found in higher disadvantage neighborhoods. Assimilation was not found to be associated with self-reported health for women or BMI for men, regardless of neighborhood disadvantage level. Overall, we find some evidence supporting the hypothesis that the effects of assimilation on health depend on the context in which immigrants experience it. PMID:26708247

  18. Denitration of Uranyl Nitrate Using Tridodecyl Amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate extraction from uranyl nitrate using extractant tridodecyl amine and paraffin has been carried out. The aim of this research was to prepare uranyl nitrate with low nitrate content (acid deficiency uranyl nitrate/ADUN). ADUN is a raw material for making kernels uranium oxide in a spherical from which cannot easily be broken/cracked. This ADUN was prepared by extracting nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution with tridodecyl amine (TDA) and paraffin. Nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution moved into organic phase due to the complex formation with TDA. The aqueous phase was ADUN, it was than analyzed its nitric and uranium contents using titration method. Tree variables were observed, i.e. uranium contents (80-125 g/l), process temperature (50-100 oC) and TDA/Nitrate molar ratio (0.5-1). Experiment results showed that optimum condition accurate at uranium content of 100 g/l, temperature extraction 60-70 oC and TDA to Nitrate molar ratio 0.75-0.80 with an efficiency of 77 %. (author)

  19. Water Pollution with Nitrates from Agricultural Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLESERIU A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest water pollution problem is created by nitrates resulted from agriculture. This paper is areview aimin to emphasiz the main water pollution problems produced by nitrates in Romania and EU. The excessnitrates can accumulate in soil in several ways. First, manure effluents containing both ammonia and organic forms ofnitrogen. Organic nitrogen can be converted to ammonia in the soil. The ammonia, together with any ammoniafertilizer applied, is converted to nitrate by soil bacteria in a process called nitrification. Nitrification is importantbecause plants can only use nitrogen as nitrate. It is equally harmful in both, animals and humans.

  20. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  1. High dose potassium-nitrate chemical dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dosimeter is used to control 10 kGY-order doses (1 Mrad). Nitrate suffers a radiolitic reduction phenomena, which is related to the given dose. The method to use potassium nitrate as dosimeter is described, as well as effects of the temperature of irradiation, pH, nitrate concentration and post-irradiation stability. Nitrate powder was irradiated at a Semi-Industrial Plant, at Centro Atomico Ezeiza, and also in a Gammacell-220 irradiator. The dose rates used were 2,60 and 1,80 KGY/hour, and the given doses varied between 1,0 and 150 KGY. The uncertainty was +-3% in all the range. (author)

  2. Nitrogen assimilation and transpiration: key processes conditioning responsiveness of wheat to elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Iván; Aroca, Ricardo; Garnica, María; Zamarreño, Ángel M; García-Mina, José M; Serret, Maria D; Parry, Martin; Irigoyen, Juan J; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-11-01

    Although climate scenarios have predicted an increase in [CO(2)] and temperature conditions, to date few experiments have focused on the interaction of [CO(2)] and temperature effects in wheat development. Recent evidence suggests that photosynthetic acclimation is linked to the photorespiration and N assimilation inhibition of plants exposed to elevated CO(2). The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of interacting [CO(2)] and temperature on leaf photorespiration, C/N metabolism and N transport in wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions. For this purpose, wheat plants were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (400 vs 700 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (ambient vs ambient + 4°C) in CO(2) gradient greenhouses during the entire life cycle. Although at the agronomic level, elevated temperature had no effect on plant biomass, physiological analyses revealed that combined elevated [CO(2)] and temperature negatively affected photosynthetic performance. The limited energy levels resulting from the reduced respiratory and photorespiration rates of such plants were apparently inadequate to sustain nitrate reductase activity. Inhibited N assimilation was associated with a strong reduction in amino acid content, conditioned leaf soluble protein content and constrained leaf N status. Therefore, the plant response to elevated [CO(2)] and elevated temperature resulted in photosynthetic acclimation. The reduction in transpiration rates induced limitations in nutrient transport in leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature, led to mineral depletion and therefore contributed to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity. PMID:25958969

  3. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  4. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Bidart Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB using sodium nitrate (NaNO3 in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3 as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  5. Data Assimilation in Forest Inventory: First Empirical Results

    OpenAIRE

    Mattias Nyström; Nils Lindgren; Jörgen Wallerman; Anton Grafström; Anders Muszta; Kenneth Nyström; Jonas Bohlin; Erik Willén; Johan E.S. Fransson; Sarah Ehlers; Håkan Olsson; Göran Ståhl

    2015-01-01

    Data assimilation techniques were used to estimate forest stand data in 2011 by sequentially combining remote sensing based estimates of forest variables with predictions from growth models. Estimates of stand data, based on canopy height models obtained from image matching of digital aerial images at six different time-points between 2003 and 2011, served as input to the data assimilation. The assimilation routines were built on the extended Kalman filter. The study was conducted in hemi-bor...

  6. Data assimilation in forest inventory: first empirical results

    OpenAIRE

    Nyström, Mattias; Lindgren, Nils; Wallerman, Jörgen; Grafström, Anton; Muszta, Anders; Nyström, Kenneth; Bohlin, Jonas; Fransson, Johan E. S.; Ehlers, Sarah; Olsson, Håkan; Ståhl, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Data assimilation techniques were used to estimate forest stand data in 2011 bysequentially combining remote sensing based estimates of forest variables with predictions fromgrowth models. Estimates of stand data, based on canopy height models obtained from imagematching of digital aerial images at six different time-points between 2003 and 2011, served asinput to the data assimilation. The assimilation routines were built on the extended Kalman filter.The study was conducted in hemi-boreal f...

  7. Evaluation of an ensemble-based incremental variational data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yin; Robinson, Cordelia; Heitz, Dominique; Mémin, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we aim at studying ensemble based optimal control strategies for data assimilation. Such formulation nicely combines the ingredients of ensemble Kalman filters and variational data assimilation (4DVar). In the same way as variational assimilation schemes, it is formulated as the minimization of an objective function, but similarly to ensemble filter, it introduces in its objective function an empirical ensemble-based background-error covariance and works in an off-line smoothing...

  8. The effect of model errors in variational assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Wergen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    A linearized, one-dimensional shallow water model is used to investigate the effect of model errors in four-dimensional variational assimilation. A suitable initialization scheme for variational assimilation is proposed. Introducing deliberate phase speed errors in the model, the results from variational assimilation are compared to standard analysis/forecast cycle experiments. While the latter draws to the data and reflects the model errors only in the datavoid areas, variational assimilatio...

  9. Assimilation of GNSS radio occultation observations in GRAPES

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y; Xue, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations assimilation in the Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration, including the choice of data to assimilate, the data quality control, the observation operator, the tuning of observation error, and the results of the observation impact experiments. The results indicate that RO data have a significantly ...

  10. Using ensemble data assimilation to forecast hydrological flumes

    OpenAIRE

    Amour, I.; Mussa, Z.; Bibov, A.; Kauranne, T.

    2013-01-01

    Data assimilation, commonly used in weather forecasting, means combining a mathematical forecast of a target dynamical system with simultaneous measurements from that system in an optimal fashion. We demonstrate the benefits obtainable from data assimilation with a dam break flume simulation in which a shallow-water equation model is complemented with wave meter measurements. Data assimilation is conducted with a Variational Ensemble Kalman Filter (VEnKF) algorithm. The resu...

  11. Organizational assimilation of collaborative information technologies: Global comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Bawja, Deepinder S.; Lewis, L. Floyd; Pervan, Graham; Lai, Vincent; Munkvold, Bjørn E.; Schwabe, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a global initiative to investigate the assimilation of collaborative information technologies (CITs) in task-oriented collaboration. The two classes of CITs explored include conferencing and groupware technologies. Based upon the level of technology access/availability and utilization, four assimilation states are identified. Data collected from 538 organizations in the US, Australia, Hong Kong, Norway, and Switzerland is mapped in the four CIT assimilation states. The r...

  12. Robust data assimilation using $L_1$ and Huber norms

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Vishwas; Sandu, Adrian; Ng, Michael; Nino-Ruiz, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Data assimilation is the process to fuse information from priors, observations of nature, and numerical models, in order to obtain best estimates of the parameters or state of a physical system of interest. Presence of large errors in some observational data, e.g., data collected from a faulty instrument, negatively affect the quality of the overall assimilation results. This work develops a systematic framework for robust data assimilation. The new algorithms continue to produce good analyse...

  13. An Ensemble Algorithm Based Component for Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhibin Sun and Weijia Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Geomagnetic data assimilation is one of the most recent developments in geomagnetic studies. It combines geodynamo model outputs and surface geomagnetic observations to provide more accurate estimates of the core dynamic state and provide accurate geomagnetic secular variation forecasting. To facilitate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, we develop a stand-alone data assimilation component for the geomagnetic community. This component is used to calculate the forecast error covariance mat...

  14. Negative and Positive Assimilation, Skill Transferability, and Linguistic Distance

    OpenAIRE

    Chiswick, Barry R; Paul W. Miller

    2012-01-01

    There are two complementary models of immigrants' economic and social adjustment - the positive assimilation model of Chiswick (1978, 1979), and the negative assimilation model of Chiswick and Miller (2011). The negative assimilation model is applicable for immigrants from countries that are very similar in terms of the transferability of skills, culture, and labor market institutions to the host country, and has been tested previously primarily using migration among the English-speaking deve...

  15. ASSIMILATION CHOICES AMONG IMMIGRANT FAMILIES: DOES SCHOOL CONTEXT MATTER?

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Emily

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between social context, measured in terms of school characteristics, and the assimilation of immigrant adolescents. First, it develops a measure of assimilation based on comparing immigrant adolescents to native peers within the same school. Second, it investigates whether immigrant adolescents’ degree of assimilation varies systematically according to school SES. Third, it explores the role of parental and adolescent behavior in creating such variation. R...

  16. The negative assimilation of immigrants: a special case

    OpenAIRE

    Chiswick, Barry R; Paul W. Miller

    2008-01-01

    Research on the economic or labor market assimilation of immigrants has to date focused on the degree of improvement in their economic status with duration in the destination. The theoretical underpinning for this finding is the international transferability of skills. This paper addresses whether positive assimilation will be found if skills are very highly transferable internationally. It outlines the conditions for “negative” assimilation in the context of the traditional immigration assim...

  17. Assimilation Effects on Poverty Among Immigrants in Norway.

    OpenAIRE

    Galloway, Taryn Ann; Aaberge, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of whether or not the high incidence of poverty among immigrants in Norway persists even after immigrants have been in the country for a long period, i.e. after they have had the opportunity to integrate and adapt their skills to the expectations in their new home. While similar to traditional studies of wage assimilation, a study of assimilation in relation to poverty propensity nevertheless measures something different than labor market assimilation, and th...

  18. Satellite data assimilation to improve forecasts of volcanic ash concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai-Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; SEGERS Arjo; Prata, Fred; Lu, Sha

    2016-01-01

    Data assimilation is a powerful tool that requires available observations to improve model forecast accuracy. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations into the assimilation scheme. However, these satellite-retrieved data are often two-dimensional (2D), and cannot be easily combined with a three-dimensional (3D) volcanic ash model to continuously improve the volcanic ash state in a data assimilation system. By integrating available data...

  19. Negative and Positive Assimilation By Prices and By Quantities

    OpenAIRE

    Barry R. Chiswick; Paul W. Miller

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the labor market assimilation of immigrants in terms of earnings and employment (employment probability, unemployment probability, and hours worked per week). Using the 2006 Australian Census of Population and Housing the analyses are performed separately by gender, and separately by whether or not the origin is an English-speaking developed country (ESDC). Among men in general, 'negative assimilation' is found for immigrants from the ESDC, and positive assimilation for o...

  20. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  1. Application of altimetry data assimilation on mesoscale eddies simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscale eddy plays an important role in the ocean circulation. In order to improve the simulation accuracy of the mesoscale eddies, a three-dimensional variation (3DVAR) data assimilation system called Ocean Variational Analysis System (OVALS) is coupled with a POM model to simulate the mesoscale eddies in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. In this system, the sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) data by satellite altimeters are assimilated and translated into pseudo temperature and salinity (T-S) profile data. Then, these profile data are taken as observation data to be assimilated again and produce the three-dimensional analysis T-S field. According to the characteristics of mesoscale eddy, the most appropriate assimilation parameters are set up and testified in this system. A ten years mesoscale eddies simulation and comparison experiment is made, which includes two schemes: assimilation and non-assimilation. The results of comparison between two schemes and the observation show that the simulation accuracy of the assimilation scheme is much better than that of non-assimilation, which verified that the altimetry data assimilation method can improve the simulation accuracy of the mesoscale dramatically and indicates that it is possible to use this system on the forecast of mesoscale eddies in the future.

  2. On optimization of data assimilation in the HBM -circulation model

    OpenAIRE

    VÀhÀ-Piikkiö, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for optimizing the data assimilation system of the HIROMB-BOOS -model at the Finnish Meteorological Institute by finding an optimal time interval and an optimal grid for the data assimilation. This is needed to balance the extra time the data assimilation adds to the runtime of the model and the improved accuracy it provides. Data assimilation is the process of combining observations with a numerical model to improve the accuracy of the mod...

  3. Development of airborne remote sensing data assimilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an airborne remote sensing data assimilation system for China Airborne Remote Sensing System is introduced. This data assimilation system is composed of a land surface model, data assimilation algorithms, observation data and fundamental parameters forcing the land surface model. In this data assimilation system, Variable Infiltration Capacity hydrologic model is selected as the land surface model, which also serves as the main framework of the system. Three-dimensional variation algorithm, four-dimensional variation algorithms, ensemble Kalman filter and Particle filter algorithms are integrated in this system. Observation data includes ground observations and remotely sensed data. The fundamental forcing parameters include soil parameters, vegetation parameters and the meteorological data

  4. Spatial dependence of color assimilation by the watercolor effect

    OpenAIRE

    Devinck, Frédéric; Delahunt, Peter B.; Hardy, Joseph L.; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Color assimilation with bichromatic contours was quantified for spatial extents ranging from von Bezold-type color assimilation to the watercolor effect. The magnitude and direction of assimilative hue change was measured as a function of the width of a rectangular stimulus. Assimilation was quantified by hue cancellation. Large hue shifts were required to null the color of stimuli ≤ 9.3 min of arc in width, with an exponential decrease for stimuli increasing up to 7.4 deg. When stimuli were ...

  5. Aerodynamic Modeling with Heterogeneous Data Assimilation and Uncertainty Quantification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop an aerodynamic modeling tool that assimilates data from different sources and facilitates uncertainty quantification. The...

  6. Testbed model and data assimilation for ARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this contract are to further develop and test the ALFA (AER Local Forecast and Assimilation) model originally designed at AER for local weather prediction and apply it to three distinct but related purposes in connection with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program: (a) to provide a testbed that simulates a global climate model in order to facilitate the development and testing of new cloud parametrizations and radiation models; (b) to assimilate the ARM data continuously at the scale of a climate model, using the adjoint method, thus providing the initial conditions and verification data for testing parameumtions; (c) to study the sensitivity of a radiation scheme to cloud parameters, again using the adjoint method, thus demonstrating the usefulness of the testbed model. The data assimilation will use a variational technique that minimizes the difference between the model results and the observation during the analysis period. The adjoint model is used to compute the gradient of a measure of the model errors with respect to nudging terms that are added to the equations to force the model output closer to the data. The radiation scheme that will be included in the basic ALFA model makes use of a gen two-stream approximation, and is designed for vertically inhonogeneous, multiple-scattering atmospheres. The sensitivity of this model to the definition of cloud parameters will be studied. The adjoint technique will also be used to compute the sensitivities. This project is designed to provide the Science Team members with the appropriate tools and modeling environment for proper testing and tuning of new radiation models and cloud parametrization schemes

  7. Variational data assimilation using targetted random walks

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, S. L.

    2011-02-15

    The variational approach to data assimilation is a widely used methodology for both online prediction and for reanalysis. In either of these scenarios, it can be important to assess uncertainties in the assimilated state. Ideally, it is desirable to have complete information concerning the Bayesian posterior distribution for unknown state given data. We show that complete computational probing of this posterior distribution is now within the reach in the offline situation. We introduce a Markov chain-Monte Carlo (MCMC) method which enables us to directly sample from the Bayesian posterior distribution on the unknown functions of interest given observations. Since we are aware that these methods are currently too computationally expensive to consider using in an online filtering scenario, we frame this in the context of offline reanalysis. Using a simple random walk-type MCMC method, we are able to characterize the posterior distribution using only evaluations of the forward model of the problem, and of the model and data mismatch. No adjoint model is required for the method we use; however, more sophisticated MCMC methods are available which exploit derivative information. For simplicity of exposition, we consider the problem of assimilating data, either Eulerian or Lagrangian, into a low Reynolds number flow in a two-dimensional periodic geometry. We will show that in many cases it is possible to recover the initial condition and model error (which we describe as unknown forcing to the model) from data, and that with increasing amounts of informative data, the uncertainty in our estimations reduces. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Data Assimilation Cycling for Weather Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This software package runs the atmospheric model MM5 in data assimilation cycling mode to produce an optimized weather analysis, including the ability to insert or adjust a hurricane vortex. The program runs MM5 through a cycle of short forecasts every three hours where the vortex is adjusted to match the observed hurricane location and storm intensity. This technique adjusts the surrounding environment so that the proper steering current and environmental shear are achieved. MM5cycle uses a Cressman analysis to blend observation into model fields to get a more accurate weather analysis. Quality control of observations is also done in every cycle to remove bad data that may contaminate the analysis. This technique can assimilate and propagate data in time from intermittent and infrequent observations while maintaining the atmospheric field in a dynamically balanced state. The software consists of a C-shell script (MM5cycle.driver) and three FORTRAN programs (splitMM5files.F, comRegrid.F, and insert_vortex.F), and are contained in the pre-processor component of MM5 called "Regridder." The model is first initialized with data from a global model such as the Global Forecast System (GFS), which also provides lateral boundary conditions. These data are separated into single-time files using splitMM5.F. The hurricane vortex is then bogussed in the correct location and with the correct wind field using insert_vortex.F. The modified initial and boundary conditions are then recombined into the model fields using comRegrid.F. The model then makes a three-hour forecast. The three-hour forecast data from MM5 now become the analysis for the next short forecast run, where the vortex will again be adjusted. The process repeats itself until the desired time of analysis is achieved. This code can also assimilate observations if desired.

  9. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  10. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate compounds have recently received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of nitrate-coated mineral particles in an individual particle scale in field study. The sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes occurred between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. The sizes, morphologies, and compositions of mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. 92% of the internally mixed mineral particles analyzed are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The major coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with less sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings strongly relate with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite within individual mineral particles. Calcium sulfate particles with the diameter from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO32 and Mg(NO32 coatings. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic coatings tend to be more spherical and larger. Such changes enhance their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  11. Nitrate dual isotopic composition in the northern South China Sea and neighboring West Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Xu, M.; Wu, Y.; Dai, M.; Kao, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) were used to diagnose nitrate dynamics and the origins of water masses in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and West Philippine Sea (WPS) where water exchanges via the Luzon Strait at different depths. In the SCS, 1-3‰ greater upward increase in δ18ONO3 relative to corresponding δ15NNO3 was just observed in the lower euphotic zone (EZ), indicating a rapid internal cycle of nitrate assimilation and remineralization. Much lower nitrate concentration in the EZ of WPS does not allow us to measure its dual isotopes. From 500 m deep to the base of EZ in the WPS, non-proportional decreases in δ15NNO3 (from 6.4‰ to 2.1-2.6‰) and δ18ONO3 (from 3.0‰ to 1.1‰) accompanying with elevated N:P ratio anomalies (N* from -1.2 μM up to 2 μM), suggest the accumulation of atmospheric-derived N (e.g. N2 fixation and/or N deposition). This allochthonous N signal cumulated in the subsurface of WPS may regulate the δ15NNO3 in the SCS subsurface due to seasonal Kuroshio intrusion, which could supply isotopically light nitrate as newly fixed N source to the SCS. The higher (~0.5‰) δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values, associated with lower N* were detected in the WPS intermediate water (WPS-IW, σθ = 26.5~27.1 kg m-3) around depth of 600-800 m (especially at a southern site) when compared to those of the conventional water source coming from North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). By combining nitrate concentration, N* and δ15NNO3 as constraints, we propose that an additional southerly source other than NPIW may feed into the WPS-IW. On the other hand, the SCS intermediate water (SCS-IW, ~400-700 m), which supposedly sourced from WPS-IW along similar isopycnal levels, showed ~1‰ lower δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values. This reduction in nitrate duel isotopes indicates intense diapycnal mixing primarily due to basin-wide upwelling in the SCS interior. This is the first hand data in the SCS for deep profiles

  12. Improving carbon model phenology using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exrayat, Jean-François; Smallman, T. Luke; Bloom, A. Anthony; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    Carbon cycle dynamics is significantly impacted by ecosystem phenology, leading to substantial seasonal and inter-annual variation in the global carbon balance. Representing inter-annual variability is key for predicting the response of the terrestrial ecosystem to climate change and disturbance. Existing terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs) often struggle to accurately simulate observed inter-annual variability. TEMs often use different phenological models based on plant functional type (PFT) assumptions. Moreover, due to a high level of computational overhead in TEMs they are unable to take advantage of globally available datasets to calibrate their models. Here we describe the novel CARbon DAta MOdel fraMework (CARDAMOM) for data assimilation. CARDAMOM is used to calibrate the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon version 2 (DALEC2) model using Bayes' Theorem within a Metropolis Hastings - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MH-MCMC). CARDAMOM provides a framework which combines knowledge from observations, such as remotely sensed LAI, and heuristic information in the form of Ecological and Dynamical Constraints (EDCs). The EDCs are representative of real world processes and constrain parameter interdependencies and constrain carbon dynamics. We used CARDAMOM to bring together globally spanning datasets of LAI and the DALEC2 and DALEC2-GSI models. These analyses allow us to investigate the sensitivity ecosystem processes to the representation of phenology. DALEC2 uses an analytically solved model of phenology which is invariant between years. In contrast DALEC2-GSI uses a growing season index (GSI) calculated as a function of temperature, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and photoperiod to calculate bud-burst and leaf senescence, allowing the model to simulate inter-annual variability in response to climate. Neither model makes any PFT assumptions about the phenological controls of a given ecosystem, allowing the data alone to determine the impact of the meteorological

  13. Effective actions for statistical data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data assimilation is a problem in estimating the fixed parameters and state of a model of an observed dynamical system as it receives inputs from measurements passing information to the model. Using methods developed in statistical physics, we present effective actions and equations of motion for the mean orbits associated with the temporal development of a dynamical model when it has errors, there is uncertainty in its initial state, and it receives information from noisy measurements. If there are statistical dependences among errors in the measurements they can be included in this approach.

  14. Data assimilation in integrated hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørn

    Integrated hydrological models are useful tools for water resource management and research, and advances in computational power and the advent of new observation types has resulted in the models generally becoming more complex and distributed. However, the models are often characterized by a high...... degree of parameterization which results in significant model uncertainty which cannot be reduced much due to observations often being scarce and often taking the form of point measurements. Data assimilation shows great promise for use in integrated hydrological models , as it allows for observations to...

  15. Data assimilation approaches in the EURANOS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, J.C.; Gering, F.; Astrup, Poul;

    2010-01-01

    Within the EURANOS project data assimilation (DA) approaches have been successfully applied in two areas to improve the predictive power of simulation models used in the RODOS and ARGOS decision support systems. For the areas of atmospheric dispersion modelling and of modelling the fate of radio...... the radioactive contamination in inhabited areas, predictions of a large scale deposition model have been combined with hypothetical measurements on a local scale. In both examples the accuracy of the model predictions has been improved and the uncertainties have been reduced. © EDP Sciences, 2010...

  16. Arabidopsis NRT1.5 Mediates the Suppression of Nitrate Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence by Modulating Foliar Potassium Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shuan; Peng, Jia-Shi; He, Ya-Ni; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yi, Hong-Ying; Fu, Yan-Lei; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen deficiency induces leaf senescence. However, whether or how nitrate might affect this process remains to be investigated. Here, we report an interesting finding that nitrate-instead of nitrogen-starvation induced early leaf senescence in nrt1.5 mutant, and present genetic and physiological data demonstrating that nitrate starvation-induced leaf senescence is suppressed by NRT1.5. NRT1.5 suppresses the senescence process dependent on its function from roots, but not the nitrate transport function. Further analyses using nrt1.5 single and nia1 nia2 nrt1.5-4 triple mutant showed a negative correlation between nitrate concentration and senescence rate in leaves. Moreover, when exposed to nitrate starvation, foliar potassium level decreased in nrt1.5, but adding potassium could essentially restore the early leaf senescence phenotype of nrt1.5 plants. Nitrate starvation also downregulated the expression of HAK5, RAP2.11, and ANN1 in nrt1.5 roots, and appeared to alter potassium level in xylem sap from nrt1.5. These data suggest that NRT1.5 likely perceives nitrate starvation-derived signals to prevent leaf senescence by facilitating foliar potassium accumulation. PMID:26732494

  17. First assimilations of COSMIC radio occultation data into the Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Angling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground based measurements of slant total electron content (TEC can be assimilated into ionospheric models to produce 3-D representations of ionospheric electron density. The Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM has been developed for this purpose. Previous tests using EDAM and ground based data have demonstrated that the information on the vertical structure of the ionosphere is limited in this type of data. The launch of the COSMIC satellite constellation provides the opportunity to use radio occultation data which has more vertical information. EDAM assimilations have been run for three time periods representing quiet, moderate and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. For each run, three data sets have been ingested – only ground based data, only COSMIC data and both ground based and COSMIC data. The results from this preliminary study show that both ground and space based data are capable of improving the representation of the vertical structure of the ionosphere. However, the analysis is limited by the incomplete deployment of the COSMIC constellation and the use of auto-scaled ionosonde data. The first of these can be addressed by repeating this type of study once full deployment has been achieved. The latter requires the manual scaling of ionosonde data; ideally an agreed data set would be scaled and made available to the community to facilitate comparative testing of assimilative models.

  18. Evaluation of nitrates in albanian wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariola Morina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are important compounds in nature but not desirable if they are present in wine at increased amount. The high level of nitrate is attributed to the use of nitrogen fertilizers in the vineyards. Method of the reactive Gries I and Gries II was used for the determination of nitrates in wine. There were analyzed 45 white wines and 55 red wines produced in 2008 – 2010, as well as wines produced from Albanian grape varieties Shesh i Bardhë and Shesh i Zi in 2009 and 2010, as an authentic wines evidence with denominated origin. From the results of analyses was observed that, in 51 % of white wines was found that the content of nitrates were less than 5 mg/l, in 46% of them the nitrates level goes up to 10 mg/l and only in 3 % of them the amount of nitrates is up to 12 mg/l. None of white wine samples have the content of nitrates over 20 mg/l. In this case there is no doubt for water addition during wine preparation. In regards of red wines, in 34% of them the amount of nitrates is up to 5 mg/l, in 30% of them up to 10 mg/l, while in 26% of them the amount of nitrates is 20 mg/l. Only 10 % of red wines have nitrates content over 20 mg/l which raise dubiety for falsified wines where water and sugar is added in the red marc. The level of nitrates in wines with denominated origin was under 20 mg/L.

  19. Nitrate pollution of a karstic groundwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bohemian karst, an extensive karst area formed by Devonian and Silurian limestone, is located SW of Prague. The largest of the karstic springs discharges in the village of Svaty Jan pod Skalou. With about 19 L/s of average discharge, the spring was formerly an important source of good quality drinking water in the ares. Because of increasing agricultural activity after World War II, both shallow and deep water resources, including the karstic systems, have been contaminated by infiltrating nitrates. The nitrate content of the Svaty Jan spring now varies from 40 mg/L to 60 mg/L. To specify the sources of nitrate pollution and collect sufficient data for possible prediction of future development, an extensive study of the spring was initiated in 1994. Flow dynamics, chemical, and isotopic composition (δ18O in water, δ15N in nitrate) are monitored in the spring and precipitation in the recharge area together with possible sources of nitrates (fertilizers, solutes in soil profile). The spring discharge responds to precipitation events very quickly but with a small amplitude and a low variability in δ18O (∼2 per mille). This reflects the large volume of the karstic system that dumps infiltrating precipitation and the low contribution of the direct discharge component. Even more contrasting is the relation between the low variability of nitrate content and periodic changes in δ15N of nitrate (from 5 per mille to 2 per mille). With regard to the specifics of the karstic groundwater system (piston-like flow) two alternative hypotheses of nitrate generation are suggested: (1) different rates of nitrate production in the recharge area and (2) different sources of nitrate localized along the recharge area. To verify the hypotheses, the record of fertilizer applied in the recharge area was studied together with actual nitrate content and its isotopic composition in deep soil profiles. (author)

  20. Isotopic and Chemical Analysis of Nitrate Source and Cycling in the San Joaquin River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Bemis, B.; Bergamaschi, B.; Kratzer, C.; Dileanis, P.; Erickson, D.; Avery, E.; Paxton, K.

    2001-12-01

    concentrations appears to be a function of dilution/evaporation, as river stage varied. For the minority of samples that fell below the dilution/evaporation trend (i.e. those with nitrate concentrations lower than predicted), delta 15N values indicated assimilation rather than denitrification as the cause of the lower concentration. With one notable exception, the pattern of delta 15N of the POM samples over time generally mirrored that of the RV samples and showed no correlation with nitrate or chlorophyll-a concentrations. This relationship indicates (1) that nitrate was an important and probably the primary nutrient for the plankton and (2) that nitrate concentrations remained too high for the delta 15N to be appreciably affected by phytoplankton growth. The delta 15N values of the RV samples averaged +14.4 per mil. The fairly high nitrate concentrations and lack of evidence for denitrification in the river suggests that the delta 15N values are a source signature. Although synthetic fertilizers are a likely source of nitrate in the area, the relatively high delta 15N values are consistent with a significant fraction originating from animal waste or sewage.

  1. Can supplemental nitrate in cured meats be used as a means of increasing residual and dietary nitrate and subsequent potential for physiological nitric oxide without affecting product properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usinger, Emily L; Larson, Elaine M; Niebuhr, Steven E; Fedler, Christine A; Prusa, Kenneth J; Dickson, James S; Tarté, Rodrigo; Sebranek, Joseph G

    2016-11-01

    The effects of formulated sodium nitrate plus supplemental nitrate (SN) from celery juice powder on residual nitrite, residual nitrate, rancidity, microbial growth, color, sensory properties, and proximate composition of frankfurters, cotto salami and boneless ham during storage (1°C) were studied. The products were assigned one of two treatments, which were each replicated twice: control (156ppm sodium nitrite) or SN (156ppm sodium nitrite and 1718ppm sodium nitrate in combination with 2% VegStable 502). Sensory parameters and proximate composition were measured once for each replication. All other analytical measurements were conducted at regular intervals for 97-98days. The SN showed no increase in residual nitrite compared to the control. No changes (P>0.05) were observed in residual nitrate during storage for any of the products. The results showed that addition of SN did not significantly alter most physical, chemical or microbial properties of cured meat products during refrigerated storage, but some product dependent sensory effects were observed. PMID:27411075

  2. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  3. Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase distribution and their relation to proton release in five nodulated grain legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X H; Tang, C; Rengel, Z

    2002-09-01

    Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and net proton release were compared in five grain legumes grown at 0.2 and 2 mM nitrate in nutrient solution. Nitrate treatments, imposed on 22-d-old, fully nodulated plants, lasted for 21 d. Increasing nitrate supply did not significantly influence the growth of any of the species during the treatment, but yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) had a higher growth rate than the other species examined. At 0.2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake rates ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: yellow lupin > field pea (Pisum sativum) > chickpea (Cicer arietinum) > narrow-leafed lupin (L angustifolius) > white lupin (L albus). At 2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake ranged from 1.7 to 8.2 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: field pea > chickpea > white lupin > yellow lupin > narrow-leafed lupin. Nitrate reductase activity increased with increased nitrate supply, with the majority of NRA being present in shoots. Field pea and chickpea had much higher shoot NRA than the three lupin species. When 0.2 mM nitrate was supplied, narrow-leafed lupinreleased the most H+ per unit root biomass per day, followed by yellow lupin, white lupin, field pea and chickpea. At 2 mM nitrate, narrow-leafed lupin and yellow lupin showed net proton release, whereas the other species, especially field pea, showed net OH- release. Irrespective of legume species and nitrate supply, proton release was negatively correlated with nitrate uptake and NRA in shoots, but not with NRA in roots. PMID:12234143

  4. 15NO3 assimilation and its inhibitory effect on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in peanut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the inhibitory effect of nitrate on the contribution of symbiotic N fixation to total plant N, cultivars of different nodulation capacity were monitored in a growth chamber study. Plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC 70.1 were grown in a nutrient solution containing 0, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM NO3 enriched with 2.5 atom % 15N. Plant harvests at 30 and 60 DAP provided tissue for measurement of growth, total N, NO3 and 15N partitioning. Nitrogenase activity was estimated via C2H2 reduction. Data indicates that plant growth was associated to NO3 concentration. Average nodule weight and N plant-1 decreased in excess of 2.5mM NO3. Specific nitrogenase activity diminished markedly with application of NO3 with a decline from 40.2 to 25.0 μmoles C2H2 g hr-1 at 0 and 2.5mM NO3, respectively. Nitrate and fixed N assimilation patterns will be elucidated by 15N analysis

  5. Aerobic physiology of redox-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains modified in the ammonium assimilation for increased NADPH availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Maria Margarida M. dos; Thygesen, G.; Kotter, P.;

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant strains altered in the ammonium assimilation pathways were constructed with the purpose of increasing NADPH availability. The NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH1, which accounts for a major fraction of the NADPH consumption during growth on ammonium, was deleted, a...... through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway downstream of glucose 6-phosphate. No redox effect was observed in a strain containing a deletion of GLR1, encoding glutathione reductase, an enzyme that is NADPH-consuming....

  6. Multigrid solvers and multigrid preconditioners for the solution of variational data assimilation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreu, Laurent; Neveu, Emilie; Simon, Ehouarn; Le Dimet, Francois Xavier; Vidard, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    In order to lower the computational cost of the variational data assimilation process, we investigate the use of multigrid methods to solve the associated optimal control system. On a linear advection equation, we study the impact of the regularization term on the optimal control and the impact of discretization errors on the efficiency of the coarse grid correction step. We show that even if the optimal control problem leads to the solution of an elliptic system, numerical errors introduced by the discretization can alter the success of the multigrid methods. The view of the multigrid iteration as a preconditioner for a Krylov optimization method leads to a more robust algorithm. A scale dependent weighting of the multigrid preconditioner and the usual background error covariance matrix based preconditioner is proposed and brings significant improvements. [1] Laurent Debreu, Emilie Neveu, Ehouarn Simon, François-Xavier Le Dimet and Arthur Vidard, 2014: Multigrid solvers and multigrid preconditioners for the solution of variational data assimilation problems, submitted to QJRMS, http://hal.inria.fr/hal-00874643 [2] Emilie Neveu, Laurent Debreu and François-Xavier Le Dimet, 2011: Multigrid methods and data assimilation - Convergence study and first experiments on non-linear equations, ARIMA, 14, 63-80, http://intranet.inria.fr/international/arima/014/014005.html

  7. Inhibition of nitrogen and photosynthetic carbon assimilation of maize seedlings by exposure to a combination of salt stress and potassium-deficient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chunxiang; Liu, Chao; Ze, Yuguan; Gong, Xiaolan; Hong, Mengmeng; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2011-12-01

    The main aim of this work is to identify how the combined stresses affect the interdependent nitrogen and photosynthetic carbon assimilations in maize. Maize plants were cultivated in Meider's solution. They were subjected to salt stress and potassium deficiency in the K-present Meider's media and K-deficient Meider's media. After 5 weeks, we measured chlorophyll a fluorescence and the activities of several enzymes in metabolic checkpoints coordinating primary nitrogen and carbon assimilation in the leaves of maize. The study showed that the combination of salt stress and potassium-deficient stress more significantly decreased nitrate uptake, plant growth, the activities of nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase, urease, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, glutamic-oxaloace transaminase, sucrose-phosphate synthase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and the synthesis of free amino acids, chlorophyll, and protein than those of each individual stress, respectively. However, the combined stresses significantly increased the accumulation of ammonium and carbohydrate products. The combined stresses also significantly decreased the oxygen evolution, the electron transport, and the efficiency of photochemical energy conversion by photosystem II in maize seedlings. Taken together, a combination of salt stress and potassium-deficient stress impaired the assimilations of both nitrogen and carbon and decreased the photosystem II activity in maize. PMID:21455705

  8. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate. PMID:25976309

  9. An ionospheric assimilation model along a meridian plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huijun; Liu, Libo; Ren, Zhipeng; Hu, Lianhuan; Chen, Yiding; Wan, Weixing

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-dimensional ionospheric assimilation model that assimilates the observations of peak electron density of F2-layer (NmF2) and the peak height of F2-layer (hmF2) derived from five ionosonde stations along the 120°E meridian, using three-dimensional variation techniques (3DVAR) based on a physics-based ionosphere theoretical model. The assimilation system can well produce the assimilated results along the 120°E meridian plane by using the data of NmF2 and hmF2 at five ionosonde stations from Mohe (52.0°N) to Sanya (18.3°N). The root mean square error (RMSE) between the analysis results of the assimilation model and the ionosonde observations is much lower than that between the results from international reference ionosphere (IRI) and the ionosonde observations. In addition, we carried out the assimilation test by taking the IRI results as the observations to check the assimilated results in the regions without observations. The assimilated result in the southern hemisphere (RMSE=0.29) is much worse than that in the northern hemisphere (RMSE=0.10) because no observations in the southern hemisphere were used. If the data derived from the four ionosonde stations in Australia are used, the assimilated result in the southern hemisphere would be much more accurate. In addition to NmF2 and hmF2, the assimilation model can also adjust the total electron content (TEC). The RMSE between the TEC after assimilation and the observed GPS TEC is much lower than that between the TEC from the IRI model and the observed GPS TEC.

  10. Data Assimilation by delay-coordinate nudging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazo, Diego; Lopez, Juan Manuel; Carrassi, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    A new nudging method for data assimilation, delay-coordinate nudging, is presented. Delay-coordinate nudging makes explicit use of present and past observations in the formulation of the forcing driving the model evolution at each time-step. Numerical experiments with a low order chaotic system show that the new method systematically outperforms standard nudging in different model and observational scenarios, also when using an un-optimized formulation of the delay-nudging coefficients. A connection between the optimal delay and the dominant Lyapunov exponent of the dynamics is found based on heuristic arguments and is confirmed by the numerical results, providing a guideline for the practical implementation of the algorithm. Delay-coordinate nudging preserves the easiness of implementation, the intuitive functioning and the reduced computational cost of the standard nudging, making it a potential alternative especially in the field of seasonal-to-decadal predictions with large Earth system models that limit the use of more sophisticated data assimilation procedures.

  11. Climate Field Reconstruction via Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, N. J.; Hakim, G. J.; Steig, E. J.; Battisti, D. S.; Roe, G.

    2012-12-01

    We illustrate the utility of a data assimilation (DA) technique in producing climate field reconstructions (CFR) of surface temperature. Our "off-line" DA technique assimilates time-averaged observations with a novel Ensemble Square-root Filter. We perform several pseudoproxy experiments with both general circulation model (GCM) and 20th Century Reanalysis data (20CR). These experiments highlight some advantages of our DA approach with reference to a conventional CFR approach based on Principal Component Analysis. We find important agreements as well as disparities: both approaches reproduce GCM global mean temperature with similar magnitudes and correlation coefficients; DA improves GCM temperature reconstructions around isolated pseudoproxies; DA has much higher correlations in the global mean and in most geographical regions when reconstructing 20CR temperatures. Our results suggest that pseudoproxy experiments which rely solely on GCM data may give a false impression of reconstruction skill. Additionally, we present CFRs with our DA approach based on actual proxy data and discuss the results. While we employ "off-line" DA via the "state-update" step, our DA technique can be extended to "live" climate models.

  12. Continuous data assimilation with stochastically noisy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the performance of a data-assimilation algorithm based on a linear feedback control when used with observational data that contains measurement errors. Our model problem consists of dynamics governed by the two-dimensional incompressible Navier–Stokes equations, observational measurements given by finite volume elements or nodal points of the velocity field and measurement errors which are represented by stochastic noise. Under these assumptions, the data-assimilation algorithm consists of a system of stochastically forced Navier–Stokes equations. The main result of this paper provides explicit conditions on the observation density (resolution) which guarantee explicit asymptotic bounds, as the time tends to infinity, on the error between the approximate solution and the actual solutions which is corresponding to these measurements, in terms of the variance of the noise in the measurements. Specifically, such bounds are given for the limit supremum, as the time tends to infinity, of the expected value of the L2-norm and of the H1 Sobolev norm of the difference between the approximating solution and the actual solution. Moreover, results on the average time error in mean are stated. (paper)

  13. Using data assimilation for systematic model improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew S.; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Browne, Phil

    2016-04-01

    In Numerical Weather Prediction parameterisations are used to simulate missing physics in the model. These can be due to a lack of scientific understanding or a lack of computing power available to address all the known physical processes. Parameterisations are sources of large uncertainty in a model as parameter values used in these parameterisations cannot be measured directly and hence are often not well known, and the parameterisations themselves are approximations of the processes present in the true atmosphere. Whilst there are many efficient and effective methods for combined state/parameter estimation in data assimilation, such as state augmentation, these are not effective at estimating the structure of parameterisations. A new method of parameterisation estimation is proposed that uses sequential data assimilation methods to estimate errors in the numerical models at each space-time point for each model equation. These errors are then fitted to predetermined functional forms of missing physics or parameterisations, that are based upon prior information. The method picks out the functional form, or that combination of functional forms, that bests fits the error structure. The prior information typically takes the form of expert knowledge. We applied the method to a one-dimensional advection model with additive model error, and it is shown that the method can accurately estimate parameterisations, with consistent error estimates. It is also demonstrated that state augmentation is not successful. The results indicate that this new method is a powerful tool in systematic model improvement.

  14. Assimilation of GRACE Hydrology Data: Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Li, Bailing; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Reichle, Rolf; van Dam, Tonie

    2010-05-01

    GRACE is unique among remote sensing systems in its ability to detect changes in total terrestrial water storage (TWS; the sum of groundwater, soil moisture, surface water, and snow). However, three factors have limited the value of GRACE data for hydrological research and applications: (1) low spatial and temporal resolutions relative to other observations; (2) product latency; (3) TWS is an unfamiliar quantity. Land surface models (LSMs) simulate the redistribution of water and energy incident on the land surface, but their accuracy is a function of the quality of the input data used to parameterize and force the models, the model developers' understanding of the physics involved, and the simplifications necessary to depict the Earth system economically. The advantages of GRACE and other observations and LSMs can be harnessed via data assimilation, which synthesizes discontinuous and imperfect observations with our knowledge of physical processes, as represented in a LSM. The model fills observational gaps, provides quality control, and enables data from disparate measurement systems to be merged, while the observations anchor the results in reality. Previously we have demonstrated assimilation of GRACE derived TWS anomalies into the Catchment LSM over the Mississippi River basin, using an Ensemble Smoother approach. We are now improving that capability, extending it to other parts of the world, evaluating the results, and applying the technique for scientific research and socially relevant applications. Here we describe recent progress in these areas.

  15. Assimilative Mapping of Interhemispheric Polar Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T.; Richmond, A. D.; Knipp, D. J.; McGranaghan, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's main magnetic field is asymmetric between hemispheres due to its non-dipolar component, leading to various hemispherical differences in the coupling among the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere. Manifestation of the asymmetric coupling through different electrodynamic parameters reported in past studies is considerably diverse. To fill the gap in our current understanding, obtained so far by analyzing individual parameters separately and comparing statistical behaviors of the parameters, we quantify the degree of instantaneous inter-hemispheric imbalance of electromagnetic energy deposition (Poynting flux), field-aligned currents, and convection electric fields though global and self-consistent analysis of electrodynamic variables at both polar regions, by means of data assimilation. Inter-hemispheric assimilative maps of different high-latitude electrodynamical parameters are obtained from simultaneous analysis of multiple types of space-based and ground-based observations made available though the AMPERE, SuperDARN, SuperMAG and DMSP programs with rigorous consideration of the uncertainty associated with each observation.

  16. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs. PMID:23332676

  17. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. PMID:27212387

  18. Translocation of labelled assimilates, ion uptake and nucleic acids contents in zea mays plants as influenced by application of the herbicide dual and the bioregulaators GA3 and kinetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize seedlings, grown hydroponic for one month, were undertaken o investigate the effect of dual (metolachlor), bio regulators (GA3 and kinetin) and their interaction with dual on translocation rate of assimilates, nucleic acids content. ion uptake and the activities of protease and nitrate reductase enzymes. Dual at all concentrations decreased the rate of assimilates translocation and nucleic acids levels. Also reduction in the ability of the treated plants to absorb ions from the growth medium as well as the activities of nitrate reductase and protease enzymes were retarded upon dual application. The results also revealed that treatment with either GA3 or kinetin in combination with dual, reversed the adverse action of the herbicide on zea mays plants

  19. Global change accelerates carbon assimilation by a wetland ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S.; Hager, Rachel N.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Mozdzer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-01

    The primary productivity of coastal wetlands is changing dramatically in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, nitrogen (N) enrichment, and invasions by novel species, potentially altering their ecosystem services and resilience to sea level rise. In order to determine how these interacting global change factors will affect coastal wetland productivity, we quantified growing-season carbon assimilation (≈gross primary productivity, or GPP) and carbon retained in living plant biomass (≈net primary productivity, or NPP) of North American mid-Atlantic saltmarshes invaded by Phragmites australis (common reed) under four treatment conditions: two levels of CO2 (ambient and +300 ppm) crossed with two levels of N (0 and 25 g N added m-2 yr-1). For GPP, we combined descriptions of canopy structure and leaf-level photosynthesis in a simulation model, using empirical data from an open-top chamber field study. Under ambient CO2 and low N loading (i.e., the Control), we determined GPP to be 1.66 ± 0.05 kg C m-2 yr-1 at a typical Phragmites stand density. Individually, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 44 and 60%, respectively. Changes under N enrichment came largely from stimulation to carbon assimilation early and late in the growing season, while changes from CO2 came from stimulation during the early and mid-growing season. In combination, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 95% over the Control, yielding 3.24 ± 0.08 kg C m-2 yr-1. We used biomass data to calculate NPP, and determined that it represented 44%-60% of GPP, with global change conditions decreasing carbon retention compared to the Control. Our results indicate that Phragmites invasions in eutrophied saltmarshes are driven, in part, by extended phenology yielding 3.1× greater NPP than native marsh. Further, we can expect elevated CO2 to amplify Phragmites productivity throughout the growing season, with potential implications including accelerated spread

  20. Data assimilation in the decision support system RODOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Palma, C.; Madsen, H.; Gering, F.; Puch, R.; Turcanu, C.; Astrup, P.; Müller, H.; Richter, K.; Zheleznyak, M.; Treebushny, D.; Kolomeev, M.; Kamaev, D.; Wynn, H.

    2003-01-01

    . The process of combining model predictions and observations, usually referred to as data assimilation, is described in this article within the framework of the real time on-line decision support system (RODOS) for off-site nuclear emergency management in Europe. Data assimilation capabilities, based...

  1. A Cross-Linguistic Examination of Assimilation Context Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, David W. Jr.; Im, Aaron M.

    2004-01-01

    Language-specific phonological processes routinely affect the pronunciation of words spoken in context, but do not appear to interfere with spoken word recognition. Five experiments are presented in which native and non-speakers of Hungarian and Korean monitored for segments in assimilated and non-assimilated control contexts related to…

  2. An adaptive ensemble Kalman filter for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a 19-year twin experiment for the Red-Arkansas river basin we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture retrievals into the NASA Catchment land surface model. We demonstrate how poorly specified model and observation error parameters affect the quality of the assimilation products. In particul...

  3. SST data assimilation experiments using an adaptive variational method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An adaptive variational data assimilation method is proposed by Zhu and Kamachi[1]. This method can adaptively adjust the model state without knowing explicitly the model error covariance matrix. The method enables very flexible ways to form some reduced order problems. A proper reduced order problem not only reduces computational burden but also leads to corrections that are more consistent with the model dynamics that trends to produce better forecast. These features make the adaptive variational method a good candidate for SST data assimilation because the model error of an ocean model is usually difficult to estimate. We applied this method to an SST data assimilation problem using the LOTUS data sets and an ocean mixed layer model (Mellor-Yamada level 2.5). Results of assimilation experiments showed good skill of improvement subsurface temperatures by assimilating surface observation alone.

  4. Are modeling uncertainties properly considered in neutronics data assimilation analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data assimilation employs the body of available experimental data to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. The assimilation algorithm is based on the assumption that nuclear data constitute the major source of simulation uncertainty, implying that modeling uncertainties are negligible. This manuscript questions this basic assumption and proposes a further extension of the assimilation algorithm to allow one to differentiate between modeling and nuclear data-introduced uncertainties. This is particularly important when the objective of the analysis is to improve predictions at reactor conditions that are not covered by the available body of experimental data, e.g., prediction of hot reactor conditions based on the assimilation of cold benchmark experiments. We employ representative BWR pin cell models to demonstrate the challenges of the current assimilation algorithm, and compare its performance to the proposed algorithm. (author)

  5. Comparative proteomics of root plasma membrane proteins reveals the involvement of calcium signalling in NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Lingling; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Chen, Xianyang; Guo, Jie; Lv, Sulian; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Yinxin

    2015-08-01

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) use efficiency under salinity is essential for the development of sustainable agriculture in marginal lands. Salicornia europaea is a succulent euhalophyte that can survive under high salinity and N-deficient habitat conditions, implying that a special N assimilation mechanism may exist in this plant. In this study, phenotypic and physiological changes of S. europaea were investigated under different nitrate and NaCl levels. The results showed that NaCl had a synergetic effect with nitrate on the growth of S. europaea. In addition, the shoot nitrate concentration and nitrate uptake rate of S. europaea were increased by NaCl treatment under both low N and high N conditions, suggesting that nitrate uptake in S. europaea was NaCl facilitated. Comparative proteomic analysis of root plasma membrane (PM) proteins revealed 81 proteins, whose abundance changed significantly in response to NaCl and nitrate. These proteins are involved in metabolism, cell signalling, transport, protein folding, membrane trafficking, and cell structure. Among them, eight proteins were calcium signalling components, and the accumulation of seven of the above-mentioned proteins was significantly elevated by NaCl treatment. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was significantly elevated in S. europaea under NaCl treatment. The application of the Ca(2+) channel blocker LaCl3 not only caused a decrease in nitrate uptake rate, but also attenuated the promoting effects of NaCl on nitrate uptake rates. Based on these results, a possible regulatory network of NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in S. europaea focusing on the involvement of Ca(2+) signalling was proposed. PMID:25956883

  6. DART: New Research Using Ensemble Data Assimilation in Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey; Raeder, Kevin; Hoar, Tim; Collins, Nancy; Romine, Glen; Barre, Jerome; Gaubert, Benjamin; Arellano, Ave; Wuerth, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is a community facility for ensemble data assimilation developed and supported by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. DART provides a comprehensive suite of software, documentation, examples and tutorials that can be used for ensemble data assimilation research, operations, and education. Scientists and software engineers from the Data Assimilation Research Section at NCAR are available to actively support DART users who want to use existing DART products or develop their own new applications. Current DART users range from university professors teaching data assimilation, to individual graduate students working with simple models, through national laboratories doing operational prediction with large state-of-the-art models. DART runs efficiently on many computational platforms ranging from laptops through thousands of cores on the newest supercomputers. This poster focuses on several recent research activities using DART with geophysical models: 1). Using CAM/DART to understand whether OCO-2 Total Precipitable Water observations can be useful in numerical weather prediction. 2). Impacts of the synergistic use of Infra-red CO retrievals (MOPITT, IASI) in CAMCHEM/DART assimilations. 3). Assimilation and Analysis of Observations of Amazonian Biomass Burning Emissions by MOPITT (aerosol optical depth), MODIS (carbon monoxide) and MISR (plume height). 4). Long term evaluation of the chemical response of MOPITT-CO assimilation in CAM-CHEM/DART OSSEs for satellite planning and emission inversion capabilities. 5). Improved forward observation operators for land models that have multiple land use/land cover segments in a single grid cell, enabling studies of the inherent variability in a single gridcell. Future enhancements are also discussed: 1). The CICE component of the Community Earth System Model will be added to the existing suite of components, which can be used for data assimilation. 2). Fully coupled

  7. Diverse Applications of Occultation Data in Ozone Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, A.; Uttley, P.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone profiles from solar occultation instruments provide invaluable information that can be used to evaluate the quality of assimilated ozone fields, from case studies to long-term phenomena. Occultation data can also be applied to include physical constraints while developing components of an assimilation system. Conversely, assimilation of occultation data can help in their validation, and it provides a framework for evaluation of the impact of occultation data on constraining global ozone fields within models. We illustrate these diverse applications by a series of examples using the ozone assimilation system at NASA/Goddard. In a case study, low ozone in the lower stratosphere due to transport of air from the Tropics to northern high latitudes that was captured by assimilation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) data, was found to agree with SAGE III data. For long-term monitoring, the quality of a multi-year SBUV-only assimilation was evaluated using monthly-mean time series of POAM, HALOE, and SAGE I1 data. We found realism in the representation of the annual cycle in ozone and in some aspects of interannual variability. Assimilation of POAM data was shown to improve the representation of lower stratospheric ozone, especially over Antarctica. More recently, we assimilated ILAS II ozone data in order to help in their validation. Solar occultation data are used to estimate parameters in a new model for forecast error variances that is being developed. These examples demonstrate the importance of occultation data for ozone assimilation, and potential of assimilation to increase the impact and the value of occultation data.

  8. Incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme based on Lorenz model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xidong; XU Dongfeng; XU Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional variational(4D-VAR) data assimilation method is a perfect data assimilation solution in theory, but the compu- tational issue is quite difficult in operational implementation. The incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme is set up in order to re- duce the computational cost. It is shown that the accuracy of the observations, the length of the assimilation window and the choice of the first guess have an important influence on the assimilation outcome through the contrast experiment. Compared with the standard 4D-VAR assimilation scheme, the incremental 4D-VAR assimilation scheme shows its advantage in the computation speed through an assimilation experiment.

  9. Effects of sample density on the assimilation performance of an explicit four-dimensional variational data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of sample sphere radius and sample density are proposed in this paper to help illustrate that different vector transformations result in diverse sample density with the same sample ensemble, which finally affects their assimilation performance. Several numerical experiments using a onedimensional (1-D) soil water equation and synthetic observations are conducted to evaluate this new theory in land data assimilation.

  10. Comparative evaluation of nitrate removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the extensive application of artificial nitrogen-based fertilizers and animal manure on land, many water agencies face problems of increasing concentrations of nitrate in groundwater. The contamination of groundwater by nitrate may pose a significant public health problem. The threat of methemoglobinemia is well documented and reflected in the U.S. drinking water standard of 10 mg/L as nitrate-nitrogen. Approximately 45% of Saskatchewan's population use groundwater for drinking purposes, out of which, approximately 23% (230,000) are rural residents. The water used is made available from over 48,000 privately owned wells in regions where there is an extensive application of chemical fertilizers. Biological denitrification, ion exchange and reveres osmosis (RO) processes were selected for further study. Field studies were conducted on these processes. The sulfur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) process was selected to achieve biological removal of nitrate from groundwater. The feasibility of the system was evaluated under anaerobic conditions. An ion exchange study was conducted using Ionac A554 which is strong anion exchange resins. In the case of groundwater containing low sulfate concentrations, A554 offered high nitrate removal. However, the disposal of regenerant brine can be a problem. A reverse osmosis unit with Filmtec membrane elements (FT30-Element Family) was used in the study on nitrate removal. The unit effluent average nitrate concentration was less than the maximum allowable concentration. (author)

  11. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED. TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite. CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO32 and Mg(NO32. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on

  12. Ensemble Data Assimilation Without Ensembles: Methodology and Application to Ocean Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele M.; Kovach, Robin M.; Vernieres, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Two methods to estimate background error covariances for data assimilation are introduced. While both share properties with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), they differ from it in that they do not require the integration of multiple model trajectories. Instead, all the necessary covariance information is obtained from a single model integration. The first method is referred-to as SAFE (Space Adaptive Forecast error Estimation) because it estimates error covariances from the spatial distribution of model variables within a single state vector. It can thus be thought of as sampling an ensemble in space. The second method, named FAST (Flow Adaptive error Statistics from a Time series), constructs an ensemble sampled from a moving window along a model trajectory. The underlying assumption in these methods is that forecast errors in data assimilation are primarily phase errors in space and/or time.

  13. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3) (Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the summary of JNC-TJ--8400-2005-002. 1) Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to as. exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  14. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  15. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  16. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  17. The Assimilation Process of Mexican Immigrants in New York City: From Assimilation to Integration

    OpenAIRE

    González Salazar, Ada Elvira

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the assimilation process of Mexican immigrants in New York City, taking as a case study the work of Tepeyac Association of New York. This case was chosen because Tepeyac Association has been able to mobilize the largest number of Mexican immigrants in that city, serving as a liaison between them and the City's social, economic and political life. The hypothesis is that Mexican immigrants' ideal relation to American life, as compared to that of earli...

  18. Improving information assimilation by modeling warfighter context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaientz, Jack D.; Wood, Scott D.; Hawkins, Robert L.

    2005-05-01

    In order to wage successful campaigns, the next generation of intelligence analysts and battle commanders will need to assimilate an enormous amount of information that will come from a wide range of heterogeneous data sources. Complicating this problem further is the fact that warfighters need to be able to manage information in an environment of rapidly changing events and priorities. The consequence of not addressing this problem, or not addressing it as effectively as hostile forces do, is a potential loss of assets, personnel, or tactical advantage. To design effective information displays there needs to be an extensible framework that models the warfighters context including characteristics of the information sources being displayed, the current Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (ISR) picture or Common Operating Picture (COP), the warfighters current state and task, and the state of the information display. BINAH (Battlespace Information and Notification through Adaptive Heuristics) uses an agent-based modeling approach coupled with research into temporal and spatial reasoning, novel display management techniques, and development of a formal high-level language for describing model-based information configuration. The result is an information configuration pipeline designed to provide perceptual and cognitive analysis support to Air Force analysts engaged in Time-Critical Targeting target nomination. It has been integrated with the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) XML-based Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) combat information management system and combines JBI delivered sensor data with a local user model and display strategies to configure a geospatial information display. The BINAH framework will provide a firm grounding for developing new C4ISR displays that maximize the ability of warfighters to assimilate the information presented.

  19. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  20. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  1. Assimilation of stratospheric ozone in the chemical transport model STRATAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grassi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a sequential assimilation approach useful for assimilating tracer measurements into a three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM of the stratosphere. The numerical code, developed largely according to Kha00, uses parameterizations and simplifications allowing assimilation of sparse observations and the simultaneous evaluation of analysis errors, with reasonable computational requirements. Assimilation parameters are set by using χ2 and OmF (Observation minus Forecast statistics. The CTM used here is a high resolution three-dimensional model. It includes a detailed chemical package and is driven by UKMO (United Kingdom Meteorological Office analyses. We illustrate the method using assimilation of Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS/MLS ozone observations for three weeks during the 1996 antarctic spring. The comparison of results from the simulations with TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer measurements shows improved total ozone fields due to assimilation of MLS observations. Moreover, the assimilation gives indications on a possible model weakness in reproducing polar ozone values during springtime.

  2. Historic nitrate storage in groundwater system - a non-negligible process in nitrate water pollution management

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Ward, Robert; Stuart, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate water pollution is not only an environmental issue but also a threat to the economy and human health. It remains an international problem and has been identified as a major threat to water quality and the delivery of the EU Water Framework and Nitrates Directives targets. It could take decades for nitrate derived from historic fertiliser application, which leaches into groundwater, to travel through thick unsaturated zones (UZs) and saturated zones, and arrive at rivers and boreho...

  3. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  4. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to assess quantitatively permeability of bentonite altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling is progressed based on experimental results. The following results are obtained. 1) Consolidation test was carried out in 3 types of bentonite and 30 % sand mixture in which cation exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  5. Introduction to the nitrate in groundwater papers

    OpenAIRE

    Gooddy, Daren; Besien, T.

    2007-01-01

    Escalating concentrations of nitrate in groundwater supplies resulting from major changes in post-WWII agricultural production were first widely recognised in the 1970s, prompting discussion on the ‘nitrate time-bomb’ problem. The implications of this problem are now becoming clear with increasing numbers of water company groundwater abstractions needing expensive and energy intensive treatment. Since the 1970s, considerable research effort has been directed towards understanding and pred...

  6. Nitrate Concentration in Groundwater in Isfahan Province

    OpenAIRE

    S.F Mousavi; M. Afyuni; A. Jafari Malekabadi; Khosravi, A.

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nitrogen fertilizers has increased irrespective of their effects on soil properties, agricultural products and, particularly, on environmental pollution. Nitrate easily leaches from soils into groundwater. The objective of this study was to determine temporal and spatial nitrate concentrations in groundwater in agricultural, industrial and urban regions in some parts of Isfahan Province. Water samples were collected monthly from 75 agricultural, industrial, and u...

  7. Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater: Determinants and Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is an important input to agricultural production but also detrimentally affects the environmental quality of air, soil and water. Identifying the determinants of nitrate pollution and in turn defining sensible performance indicators to design, enforce and monitor regulatory policies is therefore of utmost importance. Using data on more than 1000 Austrian municipalities, we provide a detailed econometric analysis of (1) the determinants of nitrate concentration in groundwater, and (2)...

  8. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Mohsenipour; Shamsuddin Shahid; Kumars Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112...

  9. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ∼4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT. PMID:26988767

  10. Nitrate concentrations in the Morestead borehole, Twyford

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M.E.; Chilton, P J; Newell, A. J.; Butcher, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at Morestead, Twyford as part of a BGS research project “Nitrate Mass Balance in the Saturated Zone”. The project aimed to evaluate the role of the diffusive exchange of nitrate between fracture water and porewater in the saturated zone of the aquifer. The approach adopted attempted to obtain a mass balance for the catchment to a public supply borehole by comparing nitrogen released from the soil with nitrogen held in the aquifer and nitro...

  11. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  12. European Community Measures to Reduce Nitrate Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Al-hedny, Suhad

    2010-01-01

    Water protection proves to be a difficult task, whether it is dealt with through legislation or the implementation of a process to reduce further pollution. This study considers how the issue of water pollution from nitrates in agricultural practices has become better understood through the reforms of the common agriculture policy (CAP) and the enactment of various regulations and directives by EU. The implementation of the EC Nitrate Directive is a main focus of this study because it was a m...

  13. Bio nitrate Project: a new technology for water nitrate elimination by means of ionic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ion exchange resins for nitrate elimination from water generates a waste containing a sodium chloride mixture plus the retained nitrates. this waste must be correctly disposed. In this project, the resin ionic form is modified to be regenerated with other compounds, different from the common salt, which are interesting because of the presence of mineral nutrition. So, with Bio nitrate Project, nitrates are recovered and the regeneration waste is apt to be use as fertilizer, for agricultural uses, or as complementary contribution of nutrients in biological water treatment. (Author) 27 refs.

  14. Phase relations in the lanthanum nitrate (copper nitrate) - poly(vinylpyrrolidone) - water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room-temperature isothermal sections of the phase diagrams of lanthanum nitrate-poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-water and copper nitrate-poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-water systems were studied. The following features were found: a wide region of homogeneous water-polymer solutions, liquid-liquid phase separation field, and a three-phase region in which two liquids coexist with salt crystals. In the lanthanum nitrate system, liquid-liquid phase separation has a lower critical solution point (polythermal sections were studied); in the copper nitrate system, it has an upper critical solution point. The type of diagram for unstudied systems is predicted based on the analysis of polymer-salt phase diagrams

  15. Solvent extraction of rare earth (3) nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate from multicomponent solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of rare earth (3) [praseodymium-lutetium, yttrium (3)] nitrates 0.4-1.10 mol/dm3 by solution of trialkyl-methylammonium in kerosene was studied. It is found that di- and trisolvates of rare earth (3) nitrates is formed in organic phase, extraction constants are determined. Physicochemical and mathematical models descriptive of distribution of metal (3) nitrates in binary and multicomponent systems are given. Optimum field of concentrations of rare earth mixture in rare earths was established during use of solutions of trialkylmethyl-ammonium nitrate in diluent

  16. Riparian invasive alters stream nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineau, M.; Baxter, C.; Marcarelli, A.; Minshall, G.

    2008-12-01

    Invasive species may be most likely to have strong effects on the ecosystem they invade when they contribute a new function such as nitrogen (N) fixation. Russian olive (Eleagnus angustifolia) is a non-native invasive tree which is rapidly spreading along riparian corridors in the American West. Russian olive is a nitrogen fixing plant due to a symbiotic relationship with Actinomycetes and is invading systems that frequently lack a strong native N fixer. The contribution of reactive N by these invasive riparian plants to soils may also be altering N cycling and processing in the adjacent streams. We measured nutrient limitation via periphyton growth on nutrient diffusing substrates and nitrate uptake using short term nitrate additions in Deep Creek, ID. Measurements were made in three reaches along a Russian olive invasion gradient, with an upstream reference reach that has no Russian olive and two downstream invaded reaches, one with moderate density and one with high density. Periphyton growth in Deep Creek was significantly N limited in the reference reach while the moderately invaded reach showed no significant limitation and the highly invaded reach was significantly P limited. The nitrate uptake velocity (Vf) for both of the invaded reaches was an order of magnitude less than the reference reach, implying that biological demand for nitrate is significantly less in the invaded reaches than the reference. Considering the current extent of Russian olive invasion and its continued rapid spread, possible alteration of N cycling in waterways may have important implications for the management of both this invasive species and management of nutrient pollution in waters of the western U.S.

  17. Recent Developments in Helioseismic Analysis Methods and Solar Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Schad, Ariane; Duvall, Tom L; Roth, Markus; Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    We review recent advances and results in enhancing and developing helioseismic analysis methods and in solar data assimilation. In the first part of this paper we will focus on selected developments in time-distance and global helioseismology. In the second part, we review the application of data assimilation methods on solar data. Relating solar surface observations as well as helioseismic proxies with solar dynamo models by means of the techniques from data assimilation is a promising new approach to explore and to predict the magnetic activity cycle of the Sun.

  18. Assimilation characteristics of vanadium ferroalloys in liquid steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assimilation characteristics of various vanadium ferroalloys were identified in a ''dynamic way'' using the load cell technique. The ferrovanadium alloys which have a vanadium content less than 68 wt % belong to class 1 ferroalloys. They utilize a melting mechanism during their assimilation in liquid steel. The ferrovanadium alloys which have a vanadium content greater than 68 wt % belong to class 2 ferroalloys. These follow a dissolution mechanism during their assimilation in liquid steel. Their mass transfer kinetics is at least seven times slower than the previously mentioned ferrovanadium alloys

  19. Assimilative Learning with the Aid of Cognitive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Läge

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Assimilative learning is understood asintegrating new information into existing knowledge orcognitive structures without restructuring the currentschema. If new information causes inconsistencies, cognitiveefforts are necessary to reorganize or to accommodate theold knowledge. Thus, assimilative learning is more efficientand economic. Nonetheless a stable and most notably acorrect memory representation which “spans” theknowledge space is essential. The current article highlightsthe logic of assimilative learning and shows how buildingelaborately a basic structure as well as the assimilativeintegration of new information can be eased with the aid ofcognitive maps. Such a didactical scenario can be easilyimplemented in the field of eLearning and thus, isadaptively and automatically supporting the learningprocess.

  20. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and neodymium nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of uranyl nitrate and neodymium nitrate salts from a mixture was investigated in the present study using Sc-CO2 modified with various ligands such as organophosphorous compounds, amides, and diketones. Preferential extraction of uranyl nitrate over neodymium nitrate was demonstrated using Sc-CO2 modified with amide, di-(2ethylhexyl) isobutyramide (D2EHIBA). (author)

  1. Ammonium assimilation in rice based on the occurrence of 15N and inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assimilation of ammonium (NH4) into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen (N) was monitored in both roots and shoots of two-week old rice seedlings supplied with 5 mM 99% (15NH4)2SO4 in aerated hydroponic culture with or without a 2 h preincubation with 1 mM methionine sulfoximine (MSX) an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. 15NH4 was not assimilated into amino acids when the GS/GOGAT (glutamate synthase) cycle was inhibited by MSX. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in roots with MSX increased both the amount of NH4 and the abundance of 15N labeled NH4. In contrast, the amount of Gln and Glu, and their proportions as 15N, decreased in roots when GS activity was inhibited. This research confirms the importance of GS/GOGAT in NH4 assimilation in rice roots. 15N-labeled studies indicate that NH4 ions incorporated by roots of rice are transformed primarily into glutamine (Gin) and glutamic acid (Glu) before being converted to other amino acids through transamination. The formation of amino acids such as aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala) directly from free NH4 in roots also has been reported. Translocation of free NH4 to plant shoots, based on the concentration of free NH4 in xylem exudate, has been reported in tomato, although NH4 in shoots primarily originates from nitrate reduction in the shoot. Photorespiration also can contribute to the accumulation of NH4 in leaves. The GS/GOGAT cycle appears to be primarily responsible for the assimilation of exogenously supplied NH4 and NH4 derived from nitrate reduction in leaves, as well as NH4 derived from photorespiration. Genetic evidence cited to support this conclusion includes the lethal effect of photorespiratory conditions on plant mutants deficient in chloroplast-localized GS and GOGAT activities, and the rapid accumulation of free NH4 in GS-deficient mutants under photorespiratory conditions. The present study was initiated to quantify the in vivo amino acid synthesis in rice

  2. Groundwater nitrate pollution in intensively farmed regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Intensified agricultural practices that have developed during the past century have helped improve food security for many people but have also added to nitrate pollution in water supply. Balancing the water needs for agriculture with the need for clean groundwater for drinking requires understanding factors such as the routes by which nitrate enters the water supply and how long nitrate remains in the water. The Thames River catchment provides a good study example because the water quality in the river, which supplies drinking water to millions of people, has been monitored for the past 140 years, and the region has undergone significant agricultural development over the past century. Howden et al. studied nitrate transport from agricultural land to water in the Thames basin using a simple model that considers an estimate of the amount of nitrate that could leach the groundwater based on land use practices along with an algorithm that determines the route nitrate would take to reach surface water or groundwater from agricultural areas.

  3. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  4. Denitrification inhibition by high nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of radioactive metal products at nuclear weapons plants and research labs has produced wastewaters containing high concentrations of nitrate, often greater than 50,000 mg/l N. The adaptation of activated sludge and inhibition of denitrification at high nitrate concentrations was studied using pH controlled bench-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), operated with 50% of the SBR volume recycled (recycle volume = influent volume). Denitrification of 1,350 and 2,700 mg/l NO3--N was completed after approximately 5 hours and 15 hours, respectively. No denitrification of 5,400 mg/l NO3--N was observed. These results suggest that there is a progressive inhibition of denitrification as nitrate concentrations increase from 1,350 to 5,400 mg/l NO3--N. In a subsequent series of experiments at an initial reactor nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, a significant accumulation of nitrate was observed, resulting once in destabilization with loss of denitrification and once in successful adaptation of the activated sludge. At a nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, the adaptation of activated sludge appears to be unstable, resulting sometimes in stable denitrification and sometimes in biomass washout

  5. Assimilation of MODIS Snow Cover Through the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Community Land Model Version 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Fei; Hoar, Tim J.; Yang, Zong-Liang; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Toure, Ally M.; Rodell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    To improve snowpack estimates in Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover fraction (SCF) was assimilated into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) via the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The interface between CLM4 and DART is a flexible, extensible approach to land surface data assimilation. This data assimilation system has a large ensemble (80-member) atmospheric forcing that facilitates ensemble-based land data assimilation. We use 40 randomly chosen forcing members to drive 40 CLM members as a compromise between computational cost and the data assimilation performance. The localization distance, a parameter in DART, was tuned to optimize the data assimilation performance at the global scale. Snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth are adjusted via the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter, particularly in regions with large SCF variability. The root-mean-square error of the forecast SCF against MODIS SCF is largely reduced. In DJF (December-January-February), the discrepancy between MODIS and CLM4 is broadly ameliorated in the lower-middle latitudes (2345N). Only minimal modifications are made in the higher-middle (4566N) and high latitudes, part of which is due to the agreement between model and observation when snow cover is nearly 100. In some regions it also reveals that CLM4-modeled snow cover lacks heterogeneous features compared to MODIS. In MAM (March-April-May), adjustments to snowmove poleward mainly due to the northward movement of the snowline (i.e., where largest SCF uncertainty is and SCF assimilation has the greatest impact). The effectiveness of data assimilation also varies with vegetation types, with mixed performance over forest regions and consistently good performance over grass, which can partly be explained by the linearity of the relationship between SCF and SWE in the model ensembles. The updated snow depth was compared to the Canadian Meteorological

  6. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Pristane by Nitrate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K. S.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    In recent sediments, microbial biodegradation provides a control on the long-term preservation of organic matter, through the preferential loss of certain biomolecules and the alteration and concentration of other more recalcitrant molecules. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons derived from membrane lipids, has been demonstrated by both aerobic and strictly anaerobic culturing experiments. The isoprenoid pristane, once considered stable under anaerobic conditions, is in fact degraded by a denitrifying microcosm (BREGNARD et al., 1997) and a methanogenic, sulphate-reducing enrichment culture (GROSSI, 2000). We recently demonstrated pristane biodegradation and accompanying loss of nitrate by an activated sludge isolate. The measured nitrate consumption accounts for a 7.1 +/- 0.4 mg loss of pristane, 4.74% of the initial substrate, in 181 days, assuming pristane conversion to CO2. We have characterized the microorganisms active in the biodegradation process, through the creation of a 16S rDNA clone library, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Experiments are in progress to enrich cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria that utilize pristane as a sole carbon source and to characterize reaction mechanisms in pristane-oxidizing pathways.

  7. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Wittbrodt, B. T.; Squires, D. A.; Walbeck, J.; Campbell, E.; Campbell, W. H.; Pearce, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitra...

  8. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Melike; Anniet M Laverman; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nit...

  9. Differential Micronuclei Induction in Human Lymphocyte Cultures by Imidacloprid in the Presence of Potassium Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Polychronis Stivaktakis; Dimitris Vlastos; Evangelos Giannakopoulos; Matthopoulos, Demetrious P.

    2010-01-01

    Humans are exposed to pesticides as a consequence of their application in farming or their persistence in a variety of media, including food, water, air, soil, plants, animals, and smoke. The interaction of pesticides with environmental factors may result in the alteration of their physicochemical properties. Square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-CSV), a technique that simulates electrodynamically the cellular membrane, is used to investigate whether the presence of potassium nitrate...

  10. Impact of organic pig production systems on CO2 emission, C sequestration and nitrate pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Halberg, Niels; Hermansen, John E.; Kristensen, Ib Sillebak; Eriksen, Jørgen; Tvedegaard, Niels; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    2010-01-01

    Organic rules for grazing and access to outdoor area in pig production may be met in different ways, which express compromises between considerations for animal welfare, feed self-reliance and negative environmental impact such as greeehouse gas emissions and nitrate pollution. This article compares environmental impact of the main organic pig systems in Denmark. Normally sows are kept in huts on grassland and finishing pigs are being raised in stables with access to an outdoor run. One alter...

  11. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  12. The assimilation of elements ingested by marine copepods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency with which a variety of ingested elements (Ag, Am, C, Cd, P, S, Se, and Zn) were assimilated in marine calanoid copepods fed uniformly radiolabeled diatoms ranged from 0.9% for Am to 97.1% for Se. Assimilation efficiencies were directly related to the cytoplasmic content of the diatoms. This relation indicates that the animals obtained nearly all their nutrition from this source. The results suggest that these zooplankton, which have short gut residence times, have developed a gut lining and digestive strategy that provides for assimilation of only soluble material. Because the fraction of total cellular protein in the cytoplasm of the diatoms increased markedly with culture age, copepods feeding on senescent cells should obtain more protein than those feeding on rapidly dividing cells. Elements that are appreciably incorporated into algal cytoplasm and assimilated in zooplankton should be recycled in surface waters and have longer oceanic residence times than elements bound to cell surfaces

  13. North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) is to construct quality-controlled, and spatially and temporally consistent, land-surface model...

  14. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Oahu: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 2-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the island of Oahu at approximately 1-km resolution....

  15. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): CNMI: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)...

  16. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Main Hawaiian Islands: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the main Hawaiian islands at approximately 4-km...

  17. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Samoa: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at approximately 3-km resolution....

  18. Assimilating compact phase space retrievals of atmospheric composition with WRF-Chem/DART: a regional chemical transport/ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Arthur P.; Arellano, Avelino F., Jr.; Edwards, David P.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Pfister, Gabriele G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry/Data Assimilation Research Testbed (WRF-Chem/DART) chemical transport forecasting/data assimilation system together with the assimilation of compact phase space retrievals of satellite-derived atmospheric composition products. WRF-Chem is a state-of-the-art chemical transport model. DART is a flexible software environment for researching ensemble data assimilation with different assimilation and forecast model options. DART's primary assimilation tool is the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. WRF-Chem/DART is applied to the assimilation of Terra/Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) carbon monoxide (CO) trace gas retrieval profiles. Those CO observations are first assimilated as quasi-optimal retrievals (QORs). Our results show that assimilation of the CO retrievals (i) reduced WRF-Chem's CO bias in retrieval and state space, and (ii) improved the CO forecast skill by reducing the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and increasing the Coefficient of Determination (R2). Those CO forecast improvements were significant at the 95 % level. Trace gas retrieval data sets contain (i) large amounts of data with limited information content per observation, (ii) error covariance cross-correlations, and (iii) contributions from the retrieval prior profile that should be removed before assimilation. Those characteristics present challenges to the assimilation of retrievals. This paper addresses those challenges by introducing the assimilation of compact phase space retrievals (CPSRs). CPSRs are obtained by preprocessing retrieval data sets with an algorithm that (i) compresses the retrieval data, (ii) diagonalizes the error covariance, and (iii) removes the retrieval prior profile contribution. Most modern ensemble assimilation algorithms can efficiently assimilate CPSRs. Our results show that assimilation of MOPITT CO CPSRs reduced the number of observations (and assimilation computation

  19. Hybrid Data Assimilation without Ensemble Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office is preparing to upgrade its three-dimensional variational system to a hybrid approach in which the ensemble is generated using a square-root ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the variational problem is solved using the Grid-point Statistical Interpolation system. As in most EnKF applications, we found it necessary to employ a combination of multiplicative and additive inflations, to compensate for sampling and modeling errors, respectively and, to maintain the small-member ensemble solution close to the variational solution; we also found it necessary to re-center the members of the ensemble about the variational analysis. During tuning of the filter we have found re-centering and additive inflation to play a considerably larger role than expected, particularly in a dual-resolution context when the variational analysis is ran at larger resolution than the ensemble. This led us to consider a hybrid strategy in which the members of the ensemble are generated by simply converting the variational analysis to the resolution of the ensemble and applying additive inflation, thus bypassing the EnKF. Comparisons of this, so-called, filter-free hybrid procedure with an EnKF-based hybrid procedure and a control non-hybrid, traditional, scheme show both hybrid strategies to provide equally significant improvement over the control; more interestingly, the filter-free procedure was found to give qualitatively similar results to the EnKF-based procedure.

  20. Kimberlite ascent by assimilation-fuelled buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James K; Porritt, Lucy A; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B

    2012-01-19

    Kimberlite magmas have the deepest origin of all terrestrial magmas and are exclusively associated with cratons. During ascent, they travel through about 150 kilometres of cratonic mantle lithosphere and entrain seemingly prohibitive loads (more than 25 per cent by volume) of mantle-derived xenoliths and xenocrysts (including diamond). Kimberlite magmas also reputedly have higher ascent rates than other xenolith-bearing magmas. Exsolution of dissolved volatiles (carbon dioxide and water) is thought to be essential to provide sufficient buoyancy for the rapid ascent of these dense, crystal-rich magmas. The cause and nature of such exsolution, however, remains elusive and is rarely specified. Here we use a series of high-temperature experiments to demonstrate a mechanism for the spontaneous, efficient and continuous production of this volatile phase. This mechanism requires parental melts of kimberlite to originate as carbonatite-like melts. In transit through the mantle lithosphere, these silica-undersaturated melts assimilate mantle minerals, especially orthopyroxene, driving the melt to more silicic compositions, and causing a marked drop in carbon dioxide solubility. The solubility drop manifests itself immediately in a continuous and vigorous exsolution of a fluid phase, thereby reducing magma density, increasing buoyancy, and driving the rapid and accelerating ascent of the increasingly kimberlitic magma. Our model provides an explanation for continuous ascent of magmas laden with high volumes of dense mantle cargo, an explanation for the chemical diversity of kimberlite, and a connection between kimberlites and cratons. PMID:22258614

  1. Variational assimilation of Lagrangian data in oceanography

    CERN Document Server

    Nodet, Maëlle

    2008-01-01

    We consider the assimilation of Lagrangian data into a primitive equations circulation model of the ocean at basin scale. The Lagrangian data are positions of floats drifting at fixed depth. We aim at reconstructing the four-dimensional space-time circulation of the ocean. This problem is solved using the four-dimensional variational technique and the adjoint method. In this problem the control vector is chosen as being the initial state of the dynamical system. The observed variables, namely the positions of the floats, are expressed as a function of the control vector via a nonlinear observation operator. This method has been implemented and has the ability to reconstruct the main patterns of the oceanic circulation. Moreover it is very robust with respect to increase of time-sampling period of observations. We have run many twin experiments in order to analyze the sensitivity of our method to the number of floats, the time-sampling period and the vertical drift level. We compare also the performances of th...

  2. Assimilate partitioning in avocado, Persea americana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finazzo, S.; Davenport, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Assimilate partitioning is being studied in avocado, Persea americana cv. Millborrow in relation to fruit set. Single leaves on girdled branches of 10 year old trees were radiolabeled for 1 hr with 13..mu..Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. The source leaves were sampled during the experiment to measure translocation rates. At harvest the sink tissues were dissected and the incorporated radioactivity was measured. The translocation of /sup 14/C-labelled compounds to other leaves was minimal. Incorporation of label into fruitlets varied with the tissue and the stage of development. Sink (fruitlets) nearest to the labelled leaf and sharing the same phyllotaxy incorporated the most /sup 14/C. Source leaves for single non-abscising fruitlets retained 3X more /sup 14/C-labelled compounds than did source leaves for 2 or more fruitlets at 31 hrs. post-labelling. Export of label decreased appreciably when fruitlets abscised. If fruitlets abscised within 4 days of labeling then the translocation pattern was similar to the pattern for single fruitlets. If the fruitlet abscised later, the translocation pattern was intermediate between the single and double fruitlet pattern.

  3. Simplified aerosol modeling for variational data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chevallier

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simplified aerosol model together with its tangent linear and adjoint versions for variational assimilation of aerosol optical depth with the aim to optimize aerosol emissions over the globe. The model was derived from the general circulation model LMDz; it groups together the 24 aerosol species simulated in LMDz into 4 species, namely gaseous precursors, fine mode aerosols, coarse mode desert dust and coarse mode sea salt. The emissions have been kept as in the original model. Modifications, however, were introduced in the computation of aerosol optical depth and in the processes of sedimentation, dry and wet deposition and sulfur chemistry to ensure consistency with the new set of species and their composition.

    The simplified model successfully manages to reproduce the main features of the aerosol distribution in LMDz. Differences between the original and simplified models are mainly associated to the new deposition and sedimentation velocities consistent with the definition of species in the simplified model and the simplification of the sulfur chemistry. Furthermore, simulated aerosol optical depth remains within the variability of AERONET observations for all aerosol types and all sites throughout most of the year.

    Sensitivity analyses with the tangent linear version show that the simplified sulfur chemistry is the dominant process responsible for the strong non-linearity of the model.

  4. Assimilate partitioning in avocado, Persea americana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assimilate partitioning is being studied in avocado, Persea americana cv. Millborrow in relation to fruit set. Single leaves on girdled branches of 10 year old trees were radiolabeled for 1 hr with 13μCi of 14CO2. The source leaves were sampled during the experiment to measure translocation rates. At harvest the sink tissues were dissected and the incorporated radioactivity was measured. The translocation of 14C-labelled compounds to other leaves was minimal. Incorporation of label into fruitlets varied with the tissue and the stage of development. Sink (fruitlets) nearest to the labelled leaf and sharing the same phyllotaxy incorporated the most 14C. Source leaves for single non-abscising fruitlets retained 3X more 14C-labelled compounds than did source leaves for 2 or more fruitlets at 31 hrs. post-labelling. Export of label decreased appreciably when fruitlets abscised. If fruitlets abscised within 4 days of labeling then the translocation pattern was similar to the pattern for single fruitlets. If the fruitlet abscised later, the translocation pattern was intermediate between the single and double fruitlet pattern

  5. Discharge assimilation in a distributed flood forecasting model

    OpenAIRE

    RABUFFETTI, D

    2006-01-01

    In the field of operational flood forecasting, uncertainties linked to hydrological forecast are often crucial. In this work, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve hydrological variable estimates coming from numerical simulations using all the available real-time water level measurements. The proposed assimilation scheme, a classical Kalman filter extension to non-linear systems, is applied in a rainfall-runoff distributed model based on the SCS-CN approach. The complex hydrolo...

  6. Assimilation of Remote Sensed Data for River Hydraulic Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Monnier, Jerome; Honnorat, Marc; Lai, Xijun; Le Dimet, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    In river hydraulics, observations are available only in very small quantities. Consequently, in order to take full advantages of data assimilation for river and flooding models, we think to use remote sensing data which can bring extra information on the flow. Here, we present two studies related to variationnal data assimilation methods for river flows when remote sensed data are available: 1) a real flood event (Moselle river) where we identify inflow discharge when one satellite image and ...

  7. Enhanced ensemble-based 4DVar scheme for data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yin; Robinson, Cordelia; Heitz, Dominique; Mémin, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    International audience Ensemble based optimal control schemes combine the components of ensemble Kalman filters and variational data assimilation (4DVar). They are trendy because they are easier to implement than 4DVar. In this paper, we evaluate a modified version of an ensemble based optimal control strategy for image data assimilation. This modified method is assessed with a Shallow Water model combined with synthetic data and original incomplete experimental depth sensor observations. ...

  8. Von Bezold assimilation effect reverses in stereoscopic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Galmonte, Alessandro; Agostini, Tiziano

    2010-01-01

    Lightness contrast and lightness assimilation are opposite phenomena: in contrast, grey targets appear darker when bordering bright surfaces (inducers) rather than dark ones; in assimilation, the opposite occurs. The question is: which visual process favours the occurrence of one phenomenon over the other? Researchers provided three answers to this question. The first asserts that both phenomena are caused by peripheral processes; the second attributes their occurrence to centr...

  9. Sensitivity tests for an ensemble Kalman filter for aerosol assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    N. A. J. Schutgens; T. Miyoshi; Takemura, T.; Nakajima, T

    2010-01-01

    We present sensitivity tests for a global aerosol assimilation system utilizing AERONET observations of AOT (aerosol optical thickness) and AAE (aerosol Ångström exponent). The assimilation system employs an ensemble Kalman filter which requires optimization of three numerical parameters: ensemble size nens, local patch size npatch and inflation factor ρ. In addition, experiments are performed to test ...

  10. Economic assimilation of immigrants : a comparison between Norway and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The economic assimilation of immigrants in Norway is analyzed in this thesis. Since Norway and Canada have different immigration policies, the economic assimilations of immigrants in these two countries are compared. Unlike Norway, Canada uses a “point system” to target economic and demographic growth which results in a large class of economic immigrants. The entry effect, the years effect, the cohort effect and the period effect, as defined in previous academic literature, are considered....

  11. Absorptive Capacity and Contextual Factors that Influence Green IT Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa A Cooper; Alemayehu Molla

    2014-01-01

    The first wave of research in Green IT has often focused on organisational adoption. As Green IT matures in organisations it is important to look beyond adoption and to investigate the assimilation of Green IT. To this end we draw from and compare two theories – contextual theory and absorptive capacity – and investigate which of the two theories better explains the level of Green IT assimilation in organisations. Results from an international survey of 148 large organisations show that both ...

  12. Socioeconomic assimilation and wealth accumulation of migrants in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Vaira-Lucero, Matias; Nahm, Daehoon; Tani, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent the wealth accumulation of immigrants is explained by their degree of assimilation, defined as the immigrants' capacity to become more similar over time to the local people in terms of their norms, values, behaviours, and socioeconomic characteristics. The existing practice to measure assimilation is the use of a time-dimensioned variable like years since migration, which reflects the individual's adaptation to the host country through the implied acquis...

  13. Variational Data Assimilation for Optimizing Boundary Conditions in Ocean Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Christine; Tolstykh, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The review describes the development of ideas Gury Ivanovich Marchuk in the field of variational data assimilation for ocean models applied in particular in coupled models for long-range weather forecasts. Particular attention is paid to the optimization of boundary conditions on rigid boundaries. As idealized and realistic model configurations are considered. It is shown that the optimization allows us to determine the most sensitive model operators and bring the model solution closer to the assimilated data.

  14. Data assimilation: Particle filter and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work is to present the performance of the Neural Network Multilayer Perceptrons trained to emulate a Particle Filter in the context of data assimilation. Techniques for data assimilation are applied for the Lorenz system, which presents a strong nonlinearity and chaotic nature. The cross validation method was used for training the network. Good results were obtained applying the multilayer perceptrons neural network.

  15. Autoregressive Models of Background Errors for Chemical Data Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Emil M.; Chai, Tianfeng; Sandu, Adrian; Gregory R. Carmichael

    2006-01-01

    The task of providing an optimal analysis of the state of the atmosphere requires the development of dynamic data-driven systems that efficiently integrate the observational data and the models. Data assimilation (DA) is the process of adjusting the states or parameters of a model in such a way that its outcome (prediction) is close, in some distance metric, to observed (real) states. It is widely accepted that a key ingredient of successful data assimilation is a realistic estimation of th...

  16. Endogenous assimilation and immigrant adjustment in longitudinal data

    OpenAIRE

    Beenstock, Michael; Chiswick, Barry R; Paltiel, Ari

    2005-01-01

    We create a longitudinal data set by matching immigrants in Israel's censuses for 1983 and 1995. These panel data reject the Immigrant Assimilation Hypothesis (IAH), which predicts that immigrants with shorter durations in 1983 should have experienced faster earnings growth between 1983 and 1995. By contrast, IAH is corroborated by the synthetic cohort methodology (SCM) over the same period. We suggest that SCM is subject to survivor bias, which increases the apparent degree of assimilation. ...

  17. Labor Market Assimilation of Recent Immigrants in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina; de la Rica, Sara

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the employment and occupational assimilation of recent immigrant waves to the Spanish labor market as their residencies lengthen. Using Spanish data from the 2001 Population Census and the 2002 Earnings Structure Survey, we find evidence of immigrant employment and occupational assimilation significantly varying by gender, origin and educational attainment. For instance, EU15 immigrants do not display an employment or occupational gap with respect...

  18. Immigrant quality and assimilation: A review of the US literature

    OpenAIRE

    T. Paul Schultz

    1998-01-01

    Empirical research on US immigrants is reviewed: their productivity and assimilation; their contribution and use of public services; and their impact on native Americans. I discuss the characteristics of cohorts of immigrants that enter the United States at different times, and then quantify the assimilation of immigrants, typically in terms of economic productivity of immigrants compared with natives. Few have found quantifiable negative effects of immigrants on native wages or unemployment ...

  19. Does better pre-migration performance accelerate immigrants' wage assimilation?

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Boris; Jahn, Elke J.; Toomet, Ott; Hochfellner, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes wage assimilation of ethnic German immigrants to Germany. We use unique administrative data that include a standardized measure of immigrants' pre-migration wage based on occupation, industry, tenure, qualification, and the German wage structure. We find that immigrants experience a substantial initial wage disadvantage compared to natives. During their first 15 years in the host country they manage to close a considerable part of this gap, though assimilation is only part...

  20. Immigrants'assimilation process in a segmented labor market

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Planas, Núria; Alcobendas, Miguel Angel

    2010-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using data from the 2000 to 2008 Labor Force Survey, we find that immigrants are more occupat...

  1. How do immigrants spend their time? The process of assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamermesh, Daniel S; Trejo, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Using 2004-2008 data from the American Time Use Survey, we show that sharp differences between the time use of immigrants and natives become noticeable when activities are distinguished by incidence and intensity. We develop a theory of the process of assimilation – what immigrants do with their time – based on the notion that assimilating activities entail fixed costs. The theory predicts that immigrants will be less likely than natives to undertake such activities, but conditional on undert...

  2. Immigrants' Assimilation Process In A Segmented Labor Market

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Ángel Alcobendas; Núria Rodríquez-Planas

    2010-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using data from the 2000 to 2008 Labor Force Survey, we find that immigrants are more occupat...

  3. Ionian Sea circulation as clarified by assimilation of glider observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dobricic, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia; Pinardi, N.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia; Testor, P.; Send, U.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia

    2008-01-01

    Glider observations of temperature and salinity in the Ionian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean Sea), made in the period October 2004-December 2004, were assimilated into an operational forecasting model together with other in-situ and satellite observations. The impact of glider data on the estimation of the circulation is studied and it is found that the assimilation of glider data significantly improve the vertical structure of temperature and salinity fields and remove biases. The...

  4. How Do Immigrants Spend Time?: The Process of Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamermesh, Daniel S.; Stephen J. Trejo

    2010-01-01

    Using 2004-2008 data from the American Time Use Survey, we show that sharp differences between the time use of immigrants and natives become noticeable when activities are distinguished by incidence and intensity. We develop a theory of the process of assimilation--what immigrants do with their time--based on the notion that assimilating activities entail fixed costs. The theory predicts that immigrants will be less likely than natives to undertake such activities, but conditional on undertak...

  5. Assimilative learning with the aid of cognitive maps

    OpenAIRE

    D. Läge; Oberholzer, R; Egli, S.; R. Streule

    2008-01-01

    Assimilative learning is understood as integrating new information into existing knowledge or cognitive structures without restructuring the current schema. If new information causes inconsistencies, cognitive efforts are necessary to reorganize or to accommodate the old knowledge. Thus, assimilative learning is more efficient and economic. Nonetheless a stable and most notably a correct memory representation which “spans” the knowledge space is essential. The current article highlights the l...

  6. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an α-nitronaphthalene to β-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (σ complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  7. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, G A; Narang, S C; Olah, J A

    1981-06-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an alpha-nitronaphthalene to beta-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (sigma complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  8. Nitrate removal and denitrification affected by soil characteristics in nitrate treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2007-03-01

    Several small-scale surface flow constructed wetlands unplanted and planted (monoculture) with various macrophytes (Phragmites australis, Typha orientalis, Pennisetum purpureum, Ipomoea aquatica, and Pistia stratiotes) were established to continuously receive nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Soil characteristics and their effects on nitrate removal and soil denitrification were investigated. The results showed that planted wetland cells exhibited significantly higher (P < 0.05) nitrate removal efficiencies (70-99%) and soil denitrification rates (3.78-15.02 microg N2O-N/g dry soil/h) than an unplanted covered wetland cell (1%, 0.11 microg N2O-N/g/h). However, the unplanted uncovered wetland cell showed a nitrate removal efficiency (55%) lower than but a soil denitrification rate (9.12 microg N2O-N/g/h) comparable to the planted cells. The nitrate removal rate correlated closely and positively with the soil denitrification rate for the planted cells, indicating that soil denitrification is an important process for removing nitrate in constructed wetlands. The results of nitrogen budget revealed that around 68.9-90.7% of the overall nitrogen removal could be attributed to the total denitrification. The soil denitrification rate was found to correlate significantly (P < 0.01) with the extractable organic carbon, organic matter, and in situ-measured redox potential of wetland soil, which accordingly were concluded as suitable indicators of soil denitrification rate and nitrate removal rate in nitrate treatment wetlands. PMID:17365317

  9. Applicability of anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Carlson, Han K; Coates, John D

    2013-08-01

    Microbial processes that produce solid-phase minerals could be judiciously applied to modify rock porosity with subsequent alteration and improvement of floodwater sweep in petroleum reservoirs. However, there has been little investigation of the application of this to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we investigate a unique approach of altering reservoir petrology through the biogenesis of authigenic rock minerals. This process is mediated by anaerobic chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms that precipitate iron minerals from the metabolism of soluble ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) coupled to the reduction of nitrate. This mineral biogenesis can result in pore restriction and reduced pore throat diameter. Advantageously and unlike biomass plugs, these biominerals are not susceptible to pressure or thermal degradation. Furthermore, they do not require continual substrate addition for maintenance. Our studies demonstrate that the biogenesis of insoluble iron minerals in packed-bed columns results in effective hydrology alteration and homogenization of heterogeneous flowpaths upon stimulated microbial Fe(2+) biooxidation. We also demonstrate almost 100% improvement in oil recovery from hydrocarbon-saturated packed-bed columns as a result of this metabolism. These studies represent a novel departure from traditional microbial EOR approaches and indicate the potential for nitrate-dependent Fe(2+) biooxidation to improve volumetric sweep efficiency and enhance both the quality and quantity of oil recovered. PMID:23799785

  10. Cholesterol assimilation by Lactobacillus probiotic bacteria: an in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Jones, Mitchell L; Shah, Divya; Jain, Poonam; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18±0.55 mg/10(10) cfu) in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70±63.33 mg/10(10) cfu) of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic. PMID:25295259

  11. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55 mg/1010 cfu in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33 mg/1010 cfu of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  12. Balanced Data Assimilation For Improving Zonal Equatorial Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, G.; Balmaseda, M. A.; Vossepoel, F. C.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.; van Leeuwen, P. J.

    Assimilation schemes that are used for seasonal prediction can have a problem in estimating zonal velocities near the equator. This is the case for OI schemes that use density information for updating only the model density field. In some situations, this leads to a detoriation of the zonal velocity field around the equator. The problem is studied first for the assimilation of height observations in a simple linear 1.5 layer shallow-water model of the equatorial Pacific. It is found that equa- torial zonal velocities can be degraded if velocity is not updated in the assimilation procedure, even if the assimilation increments for height are spread over time. Adding updates to the zonal velocity which are related by geostrophic balance to the height updates is shown to be a simple remedy for the shallow-water model. A straightforward generalisation of the balanced data assimilation method has been implemented in the ocean circulation model of the ECMWF seasonal forecasting sys- tem. First tests are encouraging: upper-ocean surface currents are improved, and cou- pled hindcasts are improved if balanced assimilation is used for the ocean analyses.

  13. A diagnostic statistical cloud scheme for data assimilation purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, A. M.; Janiskova, M.

    2003-04-01

    The task of assimilating cloud and rainfall information is steadily increasing in importance with a new generation of observing platforms. The inherent non-linearity of many cloud related processes exacerbates the archetypical assimilation dilemma. Overly simplistic schemes may not represent the physical cloud processes adequately for assimilation purposes. At the other extreme, many current cloud schemes used in forecast or climate models are simply too complex for the tangent linear and adjoint codes to be constructed. Even if the latter is achievable, the full schemes in forecast models often contain discrete switches and non linear processes to maximize forecast performance, but render the linear approximation invalid for perturbations of the magnitude of typical analysis increments. This may cause convergence problems over typical assimilation windows (currently 12 hours) in 4D variational assimilation (4DVAR). The existing ECMWF cloud scheme used in the assimilating model is deficient since there is no connection between diagnosed cloud cover, water/ice and precipitation generation. We thus present a new non-linear diagnostic cloud scheme for which the tangent linear and adjoint codes have been constructed. The scheme is based on prognostic humidity and temperature variables and a diagnostic assumption concerning subgrid variability is used to derive cloud water, ice and cover characteristics. Results using the new scheme are shown.

  14. Forecasting the Solar Photosphere's Magnetic Flux with Local Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmann, K. S.; Godinez, H. C.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of the photospheric magnetic flux are important since the photosphere provides the driving bound-ary conditions for the Corona and Solar wind which impact near Earth space weather. These space weather phenomenaeffect satellite trajectories and communication systems as well as safety on manned space missions. In this presen-tation we detail our recent improvements to the data assimilation mechanisms in the Air Force Data AssimilativePhotospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model. These include implementation of the local ensemble transform Kalmanfilter (LETKF) for the assimilation of satellite observations. In the past non-local ensemble methods have been usedto assimilate data into photosphere models. Due to the small ensemble sizes allowed for Solar forecasts spuriouscorrelations were introduced in the sample covariance, causing model divergence from observations. With our imple-mentation of the LETKF in ADAPT this ensemble divergence has been reduced. In addition multi-scale techniqueshave been implemented in ADAPT to deal with the lack of active region creation in the photosphere model. Lackof large scale active region creation in the ADAPT model caused ensemble bias when assimilating observations ofnewly created regions using ensemble Kalman methods. Separating the scales at which active regions occur allowsobservational noise for such regions to be controlled independently. We show that our consideration of the multi-scalenature of photosphere flux transport has allowed more accurate assimilation of large active regions.

  15. A multimodel data assimilation framework via the ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2014-05-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used data assimilation method that has the capacity to sequentially update system parameters and states as new observations become available. One noticeable feature of the EnKF is that it not only can provide real-time updates of model parameters and state variables, but also can give the uncertainty associated with them in each assimilation step. The natural system is open and complex, rendering it prone to multiple interpretations and mathematical descriptions. In this paper, a multimodel data assimilation method is proposed by embedding the EnKF into the Bayesian model averaging framework to account for the uncertainty stemming from the model itself. An illustrative example, considering both hydrogeological and groundwater flow uncertainties, is employed to demonstrate the proposed multimodel data assimilation approach via the EnKF. Results show that statistical bias and uncertainty underestimation can occur when the data assimilation process relies on a single postulated model. The posterior model weight can adjust itself dynamically in time according to its consistency with observations. The performances of log conductivity estimation and head prediction are compared to the standard EnKF method based on the postulated single model and the proposed multimodel EnKF method. Comparisons show that the multimodel EnKF performs better in terms of statistical measures, such as log score and coverage, when sufficient observations have been assimilated in this case.

  16. A comparison of two operational wave assimilation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Voorrips, A C

    1997-01-01

    A comparison is carried out between two operational wave forecasting/assimilation models for the North Sea, with the emphasis on the assimilation schemes. One model is the WAM model, in combination with an optimal interpolation method (OIP). The other model, DASWAM, consists of the third generation wave model PHIDIAS in combination with an approximate implementation of the adjoint method. In an experiment over the period February 19 - March 30, 1993, the models are driven by the same wind field (HIRLAM analysis winds), and the same observation data set is assimilated. This set consists of a) spectra from three pitch-and-roll buoys and b) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spectra from the ERS-1 satellite. Three analysis/forecast runs are performed: one without assimilation, one with assimilation of buoy measurements only, and one with all data assimilated. For validation, observations from four buoys, altimeter data from ERS-1 and Topex-Poseidon, and scatterometer data from ERS-1 are used. A detailed analysis of ...

  17. Investigation of microbial nitrate reduction processes in Boom Clay slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. At the moment, many countries are considering geological disposal of nuclear waste in a clay formation. In Belgium, the Boom Clay is currently studied as a potential host formation, due to its interesting physicochemical properties, which cause a delay and spread in time of the migration of leached radionuclides. However, waste disposal will have a certain impact on the barrier function of the clay. Emplacement of the Belgian bituminized waste, Eurobitum, which contains 20 to 30 weight% NaNO3, is expected to result in certain perturbations of the clay barrier. Both a mechanical disturbance due to an osmotically induced pressure increase and a physico-chemical disturbance caused by the leaching of NaNO3 from the Eurobitum into the clay can be expected. One of these chemical perturbations is the microbial reduction (assimilatory and/or dissimilatory) of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay. Assimilation of nitrate or nitrite leads to the formation of R-NH2, while denitrification (dissimilatory pathway) results in gas production (NO, N2O and N2). In some bacterial species, a dissimilative reduction of nitrite into ammonia can also occur, followed by the excretion of NH3 into the medium. A high gas pressure could result in a gas-driven transport of pore water (i.e. two-phase transport), and hence of radionuclides, and possibly in a fracturing of the clay (i.e. gas breakthrough). Besides these microbial reduction processes, abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by Boom Clay components cannot be excluded. The oxidation of Boom Clay components would result in a less reducing capacity towards redox-sensitive radionuclides, and thus could increase their migration rate in the oxidized Boom Clay. To study the microbial reduction processes of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay, batch reactor tests were performed. In a first series of tests, Boom Clay slurries (solid/liquid weight ratio 2/3 g/ml) were mixed in two reactors to

  18. A hybrid variational ensemble data assimilation for the HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM)

    OpenAIRE

    N. Gustafsson; J. Bojarova; O. Vignes

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid variational ensemble data assimilation has been developed on top of the HIRLAM variational data assimilation. It provides the possibility of applying a flow-dependent background error covariance model during the data assimilation at the same time as full rank characteristics of the variational data assimilation are preserved. The hybrid formulation is based on an augmentation of the assimilation control variable with localised weights to be assigned to a set of ense...

  19. Use and calibration of a wall-assimilated TDR probe for various soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaknin, H.; Meyouhas, Y.; Furman, A.; Weisbrod, N.

    2012-12-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is a simple method for measuring soil water content. The TDR measures the average of the dielectric permittivity of the soil along and around a probe, leading to an oval sampling volume. Using Topp's equation, one can translate the dielectric permittivity to water content. In some cases the presence of TDR in-situ is not desired as it can influence the flow regime and create biased measurement above or underneath the probe that in turn alter the process under investigation. We present here an assimilated three rod TDR probe, embedded in a Perspex wall under laboratory conditions. The measurement of such configuration averages of the dielectric permittivity of the Perspex wall and the dynamic dielectric permittivity of the soil. The shape of the sampling volume is oval around the probe, where its exact size and shape depends on the rods configuration. A laboratory experiment was conducted, comparing assimilated TDR measurement with that of a regular TDR probe. For this experiment a Perspex box was build with dimensions of 10x10x20 cm. In one of its walls three half circular slots of 15 cm long and a diameter of 0.3 cm where carved with 1.8 cm in between the slots. In each slot a stainless steel rod was assimilated. The TDR electrode was connected to TDR100 system. Five different soils were explored (sand, pure quarts, Hamra (red loamy sand), loess, and clayey soil). Each soil was packed manually in the customized measurement chamber. A measurement was then taken by the assimilated electrode and then by the "traditional" reference electrode. The waves where saved, and analyzed later using WinTDR. For each soil different water content and three repetitions starting at 5% volumetric water content and up to saturation were tested. A linear relation between the water content as measured by the assimilated probe and the free probe was found for all the lighter soils (clayey soil is analyzed at time of abstract submission) and the same

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  1. Assimilation of IRS-P4 (MSMR) meteorological data in the NCMRWF global data assimilation system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupa Kamineni; S R H Rizvi; S C Kar; U C Mohanty; R K Paliwal

    2002-09-01

    Oceansat-1 was successfully launched by India in 1999, with two payloads, namely Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) and Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) to study the biological and physical parameters of the ocean. The MSMR sensor is configured as an eight-channel radiometer using four frequencies with dual polarization. The MSMR data at 75km resolution from the Oceansat-I have been assimilated in the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) data assimilation forecast system. The operational analysis and forecast system at NCMRWF is based on a T80L18 global spectral model and Spectral Statistical Inter-polation (SSI) scheme for data analysis. The impact of the MSMR data is seen globally, however it is significant over the oceanic region where conventional data are rare. The dry-nature of the control analyses have been removed by utilizing the MSMR data. Therefore, the total precipitable water data from MSMR has been identified as a very crucial parameter in this study. The impact of surface wind speed from MSMR is to increase easterlies over the tropical Indian Ocean. Shifting of the positions of westerly troughs and ridges in the south Indian Ocean has contributed to reduction of temperature to around 30°S.

  2. Reduced light and moderate water deficiency sustain nitrogen assimilation and sucrose degradation at low temperature in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majláth, Imre; Darko, Eva; Palla, Balázs; Nagy, Zoltán; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    The rate of carbon and nitrogen assimilation is highly sensitive to stress factors, such as low temperature and drought. Little is known about the role of light in the simultaneous effect of cold and drought. The present study thus focused on the combined effect of mild water deficiency and different light intensities during the early cold hardening in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum L.) cultivars with different levels of cold sensitivity. The results showed that reduced illumination decreased the undesirable effects of photoinhibition in the case of net photosynthesis and nitrate reduction, which may help to sustain these processes at low temperature. Mild water deficiency also had a slight positive effect on the effective quantum efficiency of PSII and the nitrate reductase activity in the cold. Glutamine synthesis was affected by light rather than by water deprivation during cold stress. The invertase activity increased to a greater extent by water deprivation, but an increase in illumination also had a facilitating effect on this enzyme. This suggests that both moderate water deficiency and light have an influence on nitrogen metabolism and sucrose degradation during cold hardening. A possible rise in the soluble sugar content caused by the invertase may compensate for the decline in photosynthetic carbon assimilation indicated by the decrease in net photosynthesis. The changes in the osmotic potential can be also correlated to the enhanced level of invertase activity. Both of them were regulated by light at normal water supply, but not at water deprivation in the cold. However, changes in the metabolic enzyme activities and osmotic adjustment could not be directly contributed to the different levels of cold tolerance of the cultivars in the early acclimation period. PMID:26788956

  3. Expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase variant in tobacco reduces tobacco-specific nitrosamine accumulation in cured leaves and cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianli; Zhang, Leichen; Lewis, Ramsey S; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Jack, Anne M; Crutchfield, James D; Ji, Huihua; Dewey, Ralph E

    2016-07-01

    Burley tobaccos (Nicotiana tabacum) display a nitrogen-use-deficiency phenotype that is associated with the accumulation of high levels of nitrate within the leaf, a trait correlated with production of a class of compounds referred to as tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Two TSNA species, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), have been shown to be strong carcinogens in numerous animal studies. We investigated the potential of molecular genetic strategies to lower nitrate levels in burley tobaccos by overexpressing genes encoding key enzymes of the nitrogen-assimilation pathway. Of the various constructs tested, only the expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase (NR) dramatically decreased free nitrate levels in the leaves. Field-grown tobacco plants expressing this NR variant exhibited greatly reduced levels of TSNAs in both cured leaves and mainstream smoke of cigarettes made from these materials. Decreasing leaf nitrate levels via expression of a constitutively active NR enzyme represents an exceptionally promising means for reducing the production of NNN and NNK, two of the most well-documented animal carcinogens found in tobacco products. PMID:26800860

  4. The structure of the NasR transcription antiterminator reveals a one-component system with a NIT nitrate receptor coupled to an ANTAR RNA-binding effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudes, Marion; Lazar, Noureddine; Graille, Marc; Durand, Dominique; Gaidenko, Tatiana A; Stewart, Valley; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2012-08-01

    The nitrate- and nitrite-sensing NIT domain is present in diverse signal-transduction proteins across a wide range of bacterial species. NIT domain function was established through analysis of the Klebsiella oxytoca NasR protein, which controls expression of the nasF operon encoding enzymes for nitrite and nitrate assimilation. In the presence of nitrate or nitrite, the NasR protein inhibits transcription termination at the factor-independent terminator site in the nasF operon transcribed leader region. We present here the crystal structure of the intact NasR protein in the apo state. The dimeric all-helical protein contains a large amino-terminal NIT domain that associates two four-helix bundles, and a carboxyl-terminal ANTAR (AmiR and NasR transcription antitermination regulator) domain. The analysis reveals unexpectedly that the NIT domain is structurally similar to the periplasmic input domain of the NarX two-component sensor that regulates nitrate and nitrite respiration. This similarity suggests that the NIT domain binds nitrate and nitrite between two invariant arginyl residues located on adjacent alpha helices, and results from site-specific mutagenesis showed that these residues are critical for NasR function. The resulting structural movements in the NIT domain would provoke an active configuration of the ANTAR domains necessary for specific leader mRNA binding. PMID:22690729

  5. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    vertical component of the water transport was modeled since, in contrast to rates along flow lines, the vertical rates are close to constant as required by the one-dimensional model. Average vertical transport rates of water in the saturated zone were obtained by tritium dating. The modeling process is a......Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content of...

  6. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy;

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  7. Extraction of metal nitrates and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered are the effects of uranyl nitrate extraction with diethyl ether (DE) from binary and ternary solutions. Data are presented describing the extraction of uranyl nitrate at 25 deg C and a characteristic is given for the effect of salinators (NaNO3, Mg(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, Sr(NO3)2, Co(NO3)2, Zn(NO3)2 and Cd(NO3)2) on the extraction. A possibility is shown of describing the equilibrium in extraction of micro- and macro-quantities of uranyl nitrate from its binary and ternary solutions. Thermodynamic extraction and distribution constants have been calculated and tabulated basing on the assumption of the nonstochiometric hydration of solvates in organic phase

  8. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning; Larsen, Flemming

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate......-contaminated groundwater emanate from the agricultural areas and spread through the aquifer. The aquifer can be subdivided into an upper 10- to 15-m thick oxic zone that contains O2 and NO3-, and a lower anoxic zone characterized by Fe2+-rich waters. The redox boundary is very sharp, which suggests that reduction...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content of...

  9. A study on the aerosol optical properties over East Asia using a combination of CMAQ-simulated aerosol optical properties and remote-sensing data via a data assimilation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R.; Song, C. H.; Park, M.; Han, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    For the purpose of producing the accurate aerosol optical properties, AOD over East Asia was first investigated in this study. The CMAQ model simulations were conducted for the entire year, 2006, and were improved in several ways including the evaluations of emission inventories, the adoption of Malm and Hand (2007)'s algorithm and the data assimilations of meteorological wind fields and AOD. The results from the CMAQ model simulations (without assimilation) were improved greatly, compared to the previous study (Song et al., 2008) (e.g., from R=0.48-0.68 to R=0.77-0.89 for four seasons, R is correlation coefficient between CMAQ-simulated and MODIS-retrieved AODs). It was also found that there were great matches between the vertical profiles of CMAQ-simulated σext and LIDAR-derived σext. The contributions of sulfate in summer, nitrate in winter, sea-salt in winter and dust in spring were large in East Asia. Especially, the large contribution of nitrate in winter to the AOD distribution over East Asia is remarkable compared to the previous study (Chung et al., 2010). In order to produce more accurate AOD products, the CMAQ-simulated AOD was assimilated with MODIS-retrieved AOD. Both the assimilated and AERONET AODs were better correlated with each other, compared to the correlation between CMAQ-simulated AOD and AERONET AODs (e.g., from R=0.59-0.79 to R=0.71-0.8 for four seasons: R is correlation between the assimilated or CMAQ-simulated AOD and AERONET AOD). The obvious benefits for this study are that, with the improved aerosol optical properties, particulate pollution or PM forecasting over East Asia (e.g., AOD can be served as a proxy to PM2.5) and direct radiative forcing by aerosols can be much better estimated in future.

  10. Assimilative domain proficiency and performance in chemistry coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Scott William

    The assimilation and synthesis of knowledge is essential for students to be successful in chemistry, yet not all students synthesize knowledge as intended. The study used the Learning Preference Checklist to classify students into one of three learning modalities -- visual, auditory, or kinesthetic (VAK). It also used the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (KLSI), which utilizes four learning domains - Converging, Accommodating, Diverging, and Assimilating - to explain the students' maturation process by showing shift from any domain towards the Assimilating domain. A shift approaching this domain was considered as improvement in the assimilation and synthesis of knowledge. This pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest study was used to test the hypothesis that modifying a high school chemistry curriculum to accentuate a student's learning preference would result in a shift towards the Assimilative domain on the KLSI and if there was a correlation between the improvement in student learning and a shift towards the KLSI Assimilating domain. Forty-two high school students were issued the VAK and provided with differentiated instruction via homologous cooperative learning groups. Pre- and post-KLSI and chemistry concepts tests were administered. T test analyses showed no significant shift towards the Assimilating domain. Further Pearson's r analyses showed no significant correlation between the KLSI and exam scores. This study contributes to social change by providing empirical evidence related to the effectiveness infusing learning styles into the science curriculum and the integration of the KLSI to monitor cognitive development as tools in raising standardized test scores and enhancing academic achievement. Results from the study can also inform future research into learning styles through their incorporation into the science curriculum.

  11. Data Assimilation in Forest Inventory: First Empirical Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Nyström

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation techniques were used to estimate forest stand data in 2011 by sequentially combining remote sensing based estimates of forest variables with predictions from growth models. Estimates of stand data, based on canopy height models obtained from image matching of digital aerial images at six different time-points between 2003 and 2011, served as input to the data assimilation. The assimilation routines were built on the extended Kalman filter. The study was conducted in hemi-boreal forest at the Remningstorp test site in southern Sweden (lat. 13°37′ N; long. 58°28′ E. The assimilation results were compared with two other methods used in practice for estimation of forest variables: the first was to use only the most recent estimate obtained from remotely sensed data (2011 and the second was to forecast the first estimate (2003 to the endpoint (2011. All three approaches were validated using nine 40 m radius validation plots, which were carefully measured in the field. The results showed that the data assimilation approach provided better results than the two alternative methods. Data assimilation of remote sensing time series has been used previously for calibrating forest ecosystem models, but, to our knowledge, this is the first study with real data where data assimilation has been used for estimating forest inventory data. The study constitutes a starting point for the development of a framework useful for sequentially utilizing all types of remote sensing data in order to provide precise and up-to-date estimates of forest stand parameters.

  12. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  13. Development of an EUV data assimilation technique for plasmasphere modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The structure of the plasmasphere is strongly controlled by the electric field imposed on the magnetosphere. In order to model the dynamics of the plasmasphere, it is important to know the spatial structure of the electric potential in the inner magnetosphere. However, since it is difficult to know the global electric potential distribution in the magnetosphere due to the lack of observation, it is difficult to grasp the dynamics of the plasmasphere using in-situ measurements. Recently we have developed a data assimilation technique which incorporates a remote observation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the IMAGE satellite into a ring current model. This ENA data assimilation technique provides estimates of the distributions of the ring current ions and electric potential in the inner magnetosphere. The present study is conducted aiming at applying a similar approach for modeling the plasmasphere. We are now engaged in the development of a data assimilation technique for providing estimates of the spatial structures of the plasmasphere and electric potential. The estimation is performed by incorporating remote imaging data of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) from the IMAGE satellite into a simulation model of the plasmasphere. We assume the magnetospheric electric potential distribution to be unknown, and estimate it in the course of the assimilation process. The plasmaspheric ion distribution is estimated according to the estimated electric potential and the plasmasphere simulation model. At present, we are conducting data assimilation experiments using artificial EUV data sets to evaluate the EUV data assimilation approach. The experimental result suggests that the data assimilation of the EUV imaging data provides useful information for understanding the temporal and spatial variations of the plasmasphere.

  14. Impacts of data assimilation on the global ocean carbonate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visinelli, L.; Masina, S.; Vichi, M.; Storto, A.; Lovato, T.

    2016-06-01

    In an ocean reanalysis, historical observations are combined with ocean and biogeochemical general circulation models to produce a reconstruction of the oceanic properties in past decades. This is one possible method to better constrain the role of the ocean carbon cycle in the determination of the air-sea CO2 flux. In this work, we investigate how the assimilation of physical variables and subsequently the combined assimilation of physical data and inorganic carbon variables - namely dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity - affect the modelling of the marine carbonate system and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes. The performance of the two assimilation exercises are quantitatively assessed against the assimilated DIC and alkalinity data and the independent ocean surface pCO2 observations from global datasets. We obtain that the assimilation of physical observations has contrasting effects in different ocean basins when compared with the DIC and alkalinity data: it reduces the root-mean square error against the observed pCO2 in the Atlantic and Southern oceans, while increases the model error in the North Pacific and Indian Oceans. In both cases the corrected evaporation rates are the major factor determining the changes in concentrations. The assimilation of inorganic carbon variables on top of the physical data gives a generalized improvement in the model error of inorganic carbon variables, also improving the annual mean and spatial distribution of air-sea fluxes in agreement with other published estimates. These results indicate that data assimilation of physical and inorganic carbon data does not guarantee the improvement of the simulated pCO2 in all the oceanic regions; nevertheless, errors in pCO2 are reduced by a factor corresponding to those associated with the air-sea flux formulations.

  15. Isotope tracing of nitrate : lessons from Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Timothy; Stuart, Marianne; Sapiano, M.; Micallef Sultana, M.

    2010-01-01

    Average concentrations of nitrate in Malta’s groundwaters are probably the highest among EU member states. This compromises the quality of an important resource -almost 60% of Malta’s water supply being provided by groundwater. An 15N/14N + 18O/16O isotope study was undertaken as a core part of wide-ranging investigations into the potential sources of the nitrate pollution, its likely future trends, and possible ameliorative actions. The dual isotope (15N/14N + 18O/16O) approach was important...

  16. Factors controlling nitrate cracking of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrite and hydroxide ions inhibit the growth of nitrate stress corrosion cracks in mild steel. Crack growth measurements showed that sufficient concentrations of nitrite and hydroxide ions can prevent crack growth; however, insufficient concentrations of these ions did not influence the Stage II growth rate or the threshold stress intensity, but extended the initiation time. Stage III growth was discontinuous. Oxide formed in the grain boundaries ahead of the crack tip and oxide dissolution (Stage II) and fracture (Stage III) are the proposed mechanisms of nitrate stress corrosion crack growth

  17. Ectomycorrhizal fungi enhance nitrogen and phosphorus nutrition of Nothofagus dombeyi under drought conditions by regulating assimilative enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Drought stress conditions (DC) reduce plant growth and nutrition, restraining the sustainable reestablishment of Nothofagus dombeyi in temperate south Chilean forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal symbioses have been documented to enhance plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake under drought, but the regulation of involved assimilative enzymes remains unclear. We studied 1-year-old N. dombeyi (Mirb.) Oerst. plants in association with the ectomycorrhizal fungi Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch. and Descolea antartica Sing. In greenhouse experiments, shoot and root dry weights, mycorrhizal colonization, foliar N and P concentrations, and root enzyme activities [glutamate synthase (glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT), EC 1.4.1.13-14), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.2-4), nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1), and acid phosphomonoesterase (PME, EC 3.1.3.1-2)] were determined as a function of soil-water content. Inoculation of N. dombeyi with P. tinctorius and D. antartica significantly stimulated plant growth and increased plant foliar N and P concentrations, especially under DC. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation increased the activity of all studied enzymes relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought. We speculate that GDH is a key enzyme involved in the enhancement of ectomycorrhizal carbon (C) availability by fuelling the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under conditions of drought-induced carbon deficit. All studied assimilative enzymes of the ectomycorrhizal associations, involved in C, N, and P transfers, are closely interlinked and interdependent. The up-regulation of assimilative enzyme activities by ectomycorrhizal fungal root colonizers acts as a functional mechanism to increase seedling endurance to drought. We insist upon incorporating ectomycorrhizal inoculation in existing Chilean afforestation programs. PMID:19470091

  18. Characterizing the thermodynamic and chemical composition factors controlling PM2.5 nitrate: Insights gained from two years of online measurements in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Stephen M.; Huang, X. H. Hilda; Louie, P. K. K.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the seasonal, diurnal, and episodic characteristics of aerosol nitrate concentrations in PM2.5 at a suburban receptor site in Hong Kong using an hourly MARGA sampled dataset. At the site, large spikes in the NO3- concentration have been observed in all seasons, and are easily overlooked in datasets examining 24 h average concentrations. As a key component to PM2.5, nitrate constituted between 5 and 12% of the mass concentration on average per month, but contributed up to 25% during some episodic cases spanning only a few hours. Seasonal variations of PM2.5 nitrate concentrations at the site were driven by temperature and excess [NH4+] in the aerosol, defined as the amount of ammonium in excess of that required for satisfying [NH4+]/[SO42-] = 1.5. The vast majority of winter nitrate data was associated with ammonium-rich aerosols ([NH4+]/[SO42-] > 1.5), with the diurnal variation tracking the availability of excess [NH4+]. Distinctly different than winter conditions, the summer nitrate data was in ammonium-poor regime and tracked nitric acid concentrations, a photochemical tracer. A regression analysis of measured nitrate with the excess [NH4+] shows good correlation in spring, summer and winter (R2: 0.72-0.81), with slopes greater than 0.7 indicating the majority of excess NH4+ is associated with PM2.5 nitrate. It was found that measured nitrate exceeded excess [NH4+] in samples of low excess [NH4+] availability, leading to our finding that nitric acid attaching to sea salt and crustal particles in the fine mode is a non-negligible route (constituting up to ∼20% of the PM2.5 nitrate in this study) to assimilate nitrate into the PM2.5 aerosol. Accounting for both this minor route and the ammonia + nitric acid route may prove useful in modeling efforts to capture PM2.5 nitrate measurement fluctuations, particularly during events of a large influx of alkali particles, such as dust storms.

  19. Determination of the total nitrate content of thorium nitrate solution with a selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrate content of thorium nitrate solutions is determined with a liquid membrane nitrate selective electrode utilizing the known addition method in 0.1 M potassium fluoride medium as ionic strength adjustor. It is studied the influence of pH and the presence of chloride, sulphate, phosphate, meta-silicate, thorium, rare earths, iron, titanium, uranium and zirconium at the same concentrations as for the aqueous feed solutions in the thorium purification process. The method is tested in synthetic samples and in samples proceeding from nitric dissolutions of thorium hidroxide and thorium oxicarbonate utilized as thorium concentrates to be purified

  20. Architecting Service Based Sensor Networks for the Intelligent Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Ponmagal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose an architectural model for assimilating distributed sensor networks through cloud paradigm. This strategy can be applied to monitor and control the physical parameters such as temperature, pressure, and level. It is proposed to consider the use of service oriented architecture to program and deploy the sensed parameters. The service oriented architecture for sensor network has been implemented in such a way that, for every specific requirement of the monitor center, the assimilation agent invokes the services of the sensors through a registry and the specific changes in the sensed parameters are also notified as auditable event using push interaction pattern of SOA. The assimilation agent serves as an intelligent component by providing authentication services. This SOA is extended to integrate different types of sensor networks through cloud environment. Hence several sensors can be networked together to monitor different process parameters and they have been assimilated with Internet by registering them as services, hence a complete distributed assimilation environment is exploited.