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Sample records for altered neuromuscular control

  1. Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Stefan J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Methods 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. Results the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg (p Conclusion these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia.

  2. Cause of exercise associated muscle cramps (EAMC)--altered neuromuscular control, dehydration or electrolyte depletion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellnus, M P

    2009-06-01

    Exercise Associated Muscle Cramps (EAMC) is one of the most common conditions that require medical attention during or immediately after sports events. Despite the high prevalence of this condition the aetiology of EAMC in athletes is still not well understood. The purpose of this review is to examine current scientific evidence in support of (1) the "electrolyte depletion" and "dehydration" hypotheses and (2) the "altered neuromuscular control" hypothesis in the aetiology of EAMC. In this review, scientific evidence will, as far as possible, be presented using evidence-based medicine criteria. This is particularly relevant in this field, as the quality of experimental methodology varies considerably among studies that are commonly cited in support of hypotheses to explain the aetiology of EAMC. Scientific evidence in support of the "electrolyte depletion" and "dehydration" hypotheses for the aetiology of EAMC comes mainly from anecdotal clinical observations, case series totalling 18 cases, and one small (n = 10) case-control study. Results from four prospective cohort studies do not support these hypotheses. In addition, the "electrolyte depletion" and "dehydration" hypotheses do not offer plausible pathophysiological mechanisms with supporting scientific evidence that could adequately explain the clinical presentation and management of EAMC. Scientific evidence for the "altered neuromuscular control" hypothesis is based on evidence from research studies in human models of muscle cramping, epidemiological studies in cramping athletes, and animal experimental data. Whilst it is clear that further evidence to support the "altered neuromuscular control" hypothesis is also required, research data are accumulating that support this as the principal pathophysiological mechanism for the aetiology of EAMC.

  3. Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Wedderkopp, Niels; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-...

  4. Neuromuscular Control and Coordination during Cycling

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    Li, Li

    2004-01-01

    The neuromuscular control aspect of cycling has been investigated through the effects of modifying posture and cadence. These studies show that changing posture has a more profound influence on neuromuscular coordination than does changing slope. Most of the changes with standing posture occur late in the downstroke: increased ankle and knee joint…

  5. Muscle mechanics and neuromuscular control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the properties of the mechanical system, especially muscle elasticity and limb mass, to a large degree determine force output and movement. This makes the control demands of the central nervous system simpler and more robust. In human triceps surae, a

  6. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

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    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  7. Neuromuscular alterations in the dilated ileum of an adult patient with segmental lymphangiectasia.

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    Paggi, Silvia; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; de Rai, Paolo; Conte, Dario; Basilisco, Guido

    2008-09-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare condition, which is characterized by the dilation of small bowel lymphatics and presents with signs and symptoms of protein-losing enteropathy. Some patients have complained of occlusive symptoms attributable to the mechanical obstruction caused by the considerable mucosal edema associated with the lymphatic dilation. On the basis of the hypothesis that alterations in the neuromuscular structures controlling clearance function or gut tone may play a role in ileal dilation, we examined the resected ileum of a 48-year-old male patient with segmental lymphangiectasia histologically, immunohistochemically (for S100 protein, PGP 9.5, Bcl-2, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilaments, synaptophysin, and CD117/C-kit), and by means of electron microscopy. Histology showed pseudocystic dilation of the mucosal, submucosal, and muscular lymphatics with fragmentation of the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Hardly any neural expression of synaptophysin was observed, but the neural structures were otherwise morphologically normal and reacted normally to the other neural markers. This case shows that neuromuscular alterations can be found in the dilated ileum of patients with segmental lymphangiectasia.

  8. The role of neuromuscular changes in aging and knee osteoarthritis on dynamic postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint condition, with 30% of those over the age of 75 exhibiting severe radiographic disease. Nearly 50% of those with knee OA have experienced a fall in the past year. Falls are a considerable public health concern, with a high risk of serious injury and a significant socioeconomic impact. The ability to defend against a fall relies on adequate dynamic postural control, and alterations in dynamic postural control are seen with normal aging. Neuromuscular changes associated with aging may be responsible for some of these alterations in dynamic postural control. Even greater neuromuscular deficits, which may impact dynamic postural control and the ability to defend against a fall, are seen in people with knee OA. There is little evidence to date on how knee OA affects the ability to respond to and defend against falls and the neuromuscular changes that contribute to balance deficits. As a result, this review will: summarize the key characteristics of postural responses to an external perturbation, highlight the changes in dynamic postural control seen with normal aging, review the neuromuscular changes associated with aging that have known and possible effects on dynamic postural control, and summarize the neuromuscular changes and balance problems in knee OA. Future research to better understand the role of neuromuscular changes in knee OA and their effect on dynamic postural control will be suggested. Such an understanding is critical to the successful creation and implementation of fall prevention and treatment programs, in order to reduce the excessive risk of falling in knee OA.

  9. Alterations in neuromuscular function in girls with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Melcher, Jesper Sandfeld; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal joint pain. We investigated neuromuscular performance and muscle activation strategy. METHODS: Girls with GJH and non-GJH (NGJH) performed isometric knee flexions (90°,110°,130°), and extensions...... (90°) at 20 % Maximum Voluntary Contraction, and explosive isometric knee flexions while sitting. EMG was recorded from knee flexor and extensor muscles. RESULTS: Early rate of torque development was 53 % faster for GJH. Reduced hamstring muscle activation in girls with GJH was found while knee...... adaptation to compensate for hypermobility. Higher medial muscle activation indicated higher levels of medial knee joint compression in girls with GJH. Increased flexion-extension co-activation ratios in GJH were explained by decreased agonist drive to the hamstrings....

  10. Alterations of Neuromuscular Function after the World's Most Challenging Mountain Ultra-Marathon.

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    Jonas Saugy

    Full Text Available We investigated the physiological consequences of the most challenging mountain ultra-marathon (MUM in the world: a 330-km trail run with 24000 m of positive and negative elevation change. Neuromuscular fatigue (NMF was assessed before (Pre-, during (Mid- and after (Post- the MUM in experienced ultra-marathon runners (n = 15; finish time  = 122.43 hours ±17.21 hours and in Pre- and Post- in a control group with a similar level of sleep deprivation (n = 8. Blood markers of muscle inflammation and damage were analyzed at Pre- and Post-. Mean ± SD maximal voluntary contraction force declined significantly at Mid- (-13±17% and -10±16%, P<0.05 for knee extensor, KE, and plantar flexor muscles, PF, respectively, and further decreased at Post- (-24±13% and -26±19%, P<0.01 with alteration of the central activation ratio (-24±24% and -28±34% between Pre- and Post-, P<0.05 in runners whereas these parameters did not change in the control group. Peripheral NMF markers such as 100 Hz doublet (KE: -18±18% and PF: -20±15%, P<0.01 and peak twitch (KE: -33±12%, P<0.001 and PF: -19±14%, P<0.01 were also altered in runners but not in controls. Post-MUM blood concentrations of creatine kinase (3719±3045 Ul·(1, lactate dehydrogenase (1145±511 UI·L(-1, C-Reactive Protein (13.1±7.5 mg·L(-1 and myoglobin (449.3±338.2 µg·L(-1 were higher (P<0.001 than at Pre- in runners but not in controls. Our findings revealed less neuromuscular fatigue, muscle damage and inflammation than in shorter MUMs. In conclusion, paradoxically, such extreme exercise seems to induce a relative muscle preservation process due likely to a protective anticipatory pacing strategy during the first half of MUM and sleep deprivation in the second half.

  11. Fuzzy Control Method with Application for Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴怀宇; 周兆英; 熊沈蜀

    2001-01-01

    A fuzzy control technique is applied to a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) physicalmultiarticular muscle control system. The FNS multiarticular muscle control system based on the fuzzy controllerwas developed with the fuzzy control rule base. Simulation experiments were then conducted for the joint angletrajectories of both the elbow flexion and the wrist flexion using the proposed fuzzy control algorithm and aconventional PID control algorithm with the FNS physical multiarticular muscle control system. The simulationresults demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy control method is more suitable for the physiologicalcharacteristics than conventional PID control. In particular, both the trajectory-following and the stability of theFNS multiarticular muscle control system were greatly improved. Furthermore, the stimulating pulse trainsgenerated by the fuzzy controller were stable and smooth.``

  12. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Steib, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular traini

  13. Alterations in body composition and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation training in spinal cord injury

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    Louis Crowe, MB, BCh, BAO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this prospective cohort study was to investigate alterations in body composition variables and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES training in an adult population with spinal cord injury (SCI. Fourteen sedentary adults with SCI (thoracic [T]4–T11; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A/B; time since injury: 10.17 +/– 11.17 yr were recruited from the National SCI database. Four adhesive electrodes (175 cm2 each were placed bilaterally on the proximal and distal quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups and subtetanic contractions were elicited using a handheld NMES device. Lean body mass (LBM and other body composition variables were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Spasticity was measured using the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes (SCATs and visual analog scales. Verbal and written feedback was obtained to subjectively evaluate spasticity. LBM and spasticity measurements were taken before and after an 8 wk NMES training program in order to assess change. A statistically significant increase in lower-limb LBM, i.e., muscle tissue (p > 0.001, and a reduction in SCATs (p < 0.001 score, indicating reduced spasticity, was observed. Subjective responses were positive. Improvements in body composition and SCATs scores indicate that subtetanic NMES training elicits favorable responses and may have important clinical implications for an SCI population.

  14. Propiocepción y control neuromuscular en el fútblo infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Zarza, Cristían

    2014-01-01

    En el fútbol profesional la escasa utilización de la pierna no hábil hace que muchas situaciones de juego no se resuelvan eficazmente, además de predisponer a la aparición de lesiones. El presente estudio se concentró en determinar la influencia del entrenamiento propioceptivo y del control neuromuscular en las cualidades físicas y técnicas del miembro no hábil. Objetivo: Indagar el nivel propioceptivo y de control neuromuscular del miembro inferior no hábil en chicos que re...

  15. Acceleromyography and mechanomyography for establishing potency of neuromuscular blocking agents: a randomized-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Viby-Mogensen, J; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2009-01-01

    and opioid. Neuromuscular blockade was induced with rocuronium 100, 150, 200 or 250 microg/kg. Neuromuscular monitoring was performed with AMG (TOF-Watch SX) with pre-load (Hand Adapter) at one arm and MMG (modified TOF-Watch SX) on the other, using 0.1 Hz single twitch stimulation. Dose......) for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare AMG and MMG for establishing dose-response relationship and potency, using rocuronium as an example. METHODS: We included 40 adult patients in this randomized-controlled single-dose response study. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol...

  16. Valoració i entrenament del control neuromuscular per a la millora del rendiment esportiu

    OpenAIRE

    Fort Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara

    2010-01-01

    El control neuromuscular ha estat descrit com un important factor per a l'èxit en el rendiment esportiu. De la mateixa manera, també s'ha identificat com a clau en la prevenció i readaptació de les lesions esportives. El principal objectiu d'aquesta tesi doctoral és avaluar l'eficàcia de diferents tipus d'entrenament neuromuscular en esportistes.S'ha utilitzat una mostra de 81 esportistes sans entre els diferents estudis que s'hi presenten. Les diferents avaluacions realitzades han registrat ...

  17. Exercise-induced dehydration does not alter time trial or neuromuscular performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C J; Whyte, D G; Cannon, J; Wickham, J; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effect of exercise-induced dehydration by ~4% body mass loss on 5-km cycling time trial (TT) performance and neuromuscular drive, independent of hyperthermia. 7 active males were dehydrated on 2 occasions, separated by 7 d. Participants remained dehydrated (DEH, -3.8±0.5%) or were rehydrated (REH, 0.2±0.6%) over 2 h before completing the TT at 18-25 °C, 20-30% relative humidity. Neuromuscular function was determined before dehydration and immediately prior the TT. The TT started at the same core temperature (DEH, 37.3±0.3°C; REH, 37.0±0.2 °C (P>0.05). Neither TT performance (DEH, 7.31±1.5 min; REH, 7.10±1.3 min (P>0.05)) or % voluntary activation were affected by dehydration (DEH, 88.7±6.4%; REH, 90.6±6.1% (P>0.05)). Quadriceps peak torque was significantly elevated in both trials prior to the TT (Pperformance and neuromuscular function are not reduced by dehydration, independent of hyperthermia.

  18. Sex alters impact of repeated bouts of sprint exercise on neuromuscular activity in trained athletes.

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    Billaut, François; Smith, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized the effect of sex on neuromuscular activity during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Thirty-three healthy male and female athletes performed twenty 5-s cycle sprints separated by 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and integrated electromyograhs (iEMG) of 4 muscles of the dominant lower limb were calculated in every sprint. The iEMG signals from individual muscles were summed to represent overall electrical activity of these muscles (sum-iEMG). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of mechanical work and sum-iEMG for every sprint. Arterial oxygen saturation was estimated (SpO2) with pulse oximetry throughout the protocol. The sprint-induced work decrement (18.9% vs. 29.6%; p women than for the men. However, the sprints decreased NME (10.1%; p men, R2 = 0.87; women, R2 = 0.91; all p sprint exercise is not likely to be explained by a difference in muscle contractility impairment in men and women, but may be due to a sex difference in muscle recruitment strategy. We speculate that women would be less sensitive to arterial O2 desaturation than men, which may trigger lower neuromuscular adjustments to exhaustive exercise.

  19. Fatiguing exercise intensity influences the relationship between parameters reflecting neuromuscular function and postural control variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boyas

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of fatiguing exercise intensity on the nature and extent of fatigue-induced changes in neuromuscular function and postural stability in quiet standing. We also explored the contribution of selected neuromuscular mechanisms involved in force production to postural stability impairment observed following fatigue using an approach based on multivariate regressions. Eighteen young subjects performed 30-s postural trials on one leg with their eyes closed. Postural trials were performed before and after fatiguing exercises of different intensities: 25, 50 and 75% of maximal isometric plantarflexor torque. Fatiguing exercises consisted of sustaining a plantarflexor isometric contraction at the target intensity until task failure. Maximal isometric plantarflexor torque, electromyographic activity of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, activation level (twitch interpolation technique and twitch contractile properties of plantarflexors were used to characterize neuromuscular function. The 25% exercise was associated with greater central fatigue whereas the 50 and 75% exercises involved mostly peripheral fatigue. However, all fatiguing exercises induced similar alterations in postural stability, which was unexpected considering previous literature. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that fatigue-related changes in selected parameters related to neuromuscular function could explain more than half (0.51≤R(2≤0.82 of the changes in postural variables for the 25% exercise. On the other hand, regression models were less predictive (0.17≤R(2≤0.73 for the 50 and 75% exercises. This study suggests that fatiguing exercise intensity does not influence the extent of postural stability impairment, but does influence the type of fatigue induced and the neuromuscular function predictors explaining changes in postural variables.

  20. The use of "stabilization exercises" to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-06-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term "core stability" is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. "stabilization exercise", "motor control exercise"). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms "core stability" and "stabilization exercise", 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process.

  1. Time course of central and peripheral alterations after isometric neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced muscle damage.

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    Alexandre Fouré

    Full Text Available Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC, peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db(10 and 100 Hz (Db(100, its ratio (10:100, voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2 and four (D4 days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db(10 was higher than in Db(100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (-12% in the 10:100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (-5% and was still depressed at D4 (-5%. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6% and D4 (9%. Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db(100 were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage.

  2. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle–tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle–foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs. PMID:21502131

  3. Static stretching alters neuromuscular function and pacing strategy, but not performance during a 3-km running time-trial.

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    Mayara V Damasceno

    Full Text Available Previous studies report that static stretching (SS impairs running economy. Assuming that pacing strategy relies on rate of energy use, this study aimed to determine whether SS would modify pacing strategy and performance in a 3-km running time-trial.Eleven recreational distance runners performed a a constant-speed running test without previous SS and a maximal incremental treadmill test; b an anthropometric assessment and a constant-speed running test with previous SS; c a 3-km time-trial familiarization on an outdoor 400-m track; d and e two 3-km time-trials, one with SS (experimental situation and another without (control situation previous static stretching. The order of the sessions d and e were randomized in a counterbalanced fashion. Sit-and-reach and drop jump tests were performed before the 3-km running time-trial in the control situation and before and after stretching exercises in the SS. Running economy, stride parameters, and electromyographic activity (EMG of vastus medialis (VM, biceps femoris (BF and gastrocnemius medialis (GA were measured during the constant-speed tests.The overall running time did not change with condition (SS 11:35±00:31 s; control 11:28±00:41 s, p = 0.304, but the first 100 m was completed at a significantly lower velocity after SS. Surprisingly, SS did not modify the running economy, but the iEMG for the BF (+22.6%, p = 0.031, stride duration (+2.1%, p = 0.053 and range of motion (+11.1%, p = 0.0001 were significantly modified. Drop jump height decreased following SS (-9.2%, p = 0.001.Static stretch impaired neuromuscular function, resulting in a slow start during a 3-km running time-trial, thus demonstrating the fundamental role of the neuromuscular system in the self-selected speed during the initial phase of the race.

  4. Effect of jumping interval training on neuromuscular and physiological parameters: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache-Dias, Jonathan; Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Teixeira, Anderson S; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Moro, Antônio R P

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the effect of 4 weeks of jumping interval training (JIT), included in endurance training, on neuromuscular and physiological parameters. Eighteen recreational runners, randomized in control and experimental groups, performed 40 min of running at 70% of velocity at peak oxygen uptake, for 3 times per week. Additionally, the experimental group performed the JIT twice per week, which consisted of 4 to 6 bouts of continuous vertical jumps (30 s) with 5-min intervals. Three days before and after the training period, the countermovement (CMJ) and continuous jump (CJ30), isokinetic and isometric evaluation of knee extensors/flexors, progressive maximal exercise, and submaximal constant-load exercise were performed. The JIT provoked improvement in neuromuscular performance, indicated by (i) increased jump height (4.7%; effect size (ES) = 0.99) and power output (≈ 3.7%; ES ≈ 0.82) of CMJ and rate of torque development of knee extensors in isometric contraction (29.5%; ES = 1.02); (ii) anaerobic power and capacity, represented by the mean of jump height (7.4%; ES = 0.8), and peak power output (PPO) (5.6%; ES = 0.73) of the first jumps of CJ30 and the mean of jump height (10.2%, ES = 1.04) and PPO (9.5%, ES = 1.1), considering all jumps of CJ30; and (iii) aerobic power and capacity, represented by peak oxygen uptake (9.1%, ES = 1.28), velocity at peak oxygen uptake (2.7%, ES = 1.11), and velocity corresponding to the onset of blood lactate accumulation (9.7%, ES = 1.23). These results suggest that the JIT included in traditional endurance training induces moderate to large effects on neuromuscular and physiological parameters.

  5. Effects of regular Tai Chi practice and jogging on neuromuscular reaction during lateral postural control in older people.

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    Wang, Shao-Jun; Xu, Dong-Qing; Li, Jing-Xian

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of regular Tai Chi practice and jogging on the neuromuscular activity of the trunk, hip, and ankle joint muscles of older people during lateral postural perturbation. A total of 42 older people participated in the study and formed the Tai Chi, jogging, and sedentary control groups. Electromyography signals were collected from the peroneus longus, anterior tibialis, gluteus medius, and erector spinae during unpredictable mediolateral perturbation. The Tai Chi group exhibited significantly faster latencies of the tibialis anterior and erector spinae than the control group. The jogging group showed a significantly shorter neuromuscular reaction time of the erector spinae than the control group. No significant difference was observed between the Tai Chi and jogging groups. Long-term regular Tai Chi practice enhanced the neuromuscular reaction of the erector spinae and tibialis anterior to lateral perturbation and will help timely posture correction when lateral postural distributions occur.

  6. Athletic background is related to superior trunk proprioceptive ability, postural control, and neuromuscular responses to sudden perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glofcheskie, Grace O; Brown, Stephen H M

    2017-01-28

    Trunk motor control is essential for athletic performance, and inadequate trunk motor control has been linked to an increased risk of developing low back and lower limb injury in athletes. Research is limited in comparing relationships between trunk neuromuscular control, postural control, and trunk proprioception in athletes from different sporting backgrounds. To test for these relationships, collegiate level long distance runners and golfers, along with non-athletic controls were recruited. Trunk postural control was investigated using a seated balance task. Neuromuscular control in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations was measured using electromyography and kinematics. Proprioceptive ability was examined using active trunk repositioning tasks. Both athlete groups demonstrated greater trunk postural control (less centre of pressure movement) during the seated task compared to controls. Athletes further demonstrated faster trunk muscle activation onsets, higher muscle activation amplitudes, and less lumbar spine angular displacement in response to sudden trunk loading perturbations when compared to controls. Golfers demonstrated less absolute error and variable error in trunk repositioning tasks compared to both runners and controls, suggestive of greater proprioceptive ability. This suggests an interactive relationship between neuromuscular control, postural control, and proprioception in athletes, and that differences exist between athletes of various training backgrounds.

  7. Comparison of Twitch Responses During Current- or Voltage-Controlled Transcutaneous Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

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    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Löfler, Stefan; Kern, Helmut; Cortés R, Jorge A; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is an established method for functional restoration of muscle function, rehabilitation, and diagnostics. In this work, NMES was applied with surface electrodes placed on the anterior thigh to identify the main differences between current-controlled (CC) and voltage-controlled (VC) modes. Measurements of the evoked knee extension force and the myoelectric signal of quadriceps and hamstrings were taken during stimulation with different amplitudes, pulse widths, and stimulation techniques. The stimulation pulses were rectangular and symmetric biphasic for both stimulation modes. The electrode-tissue impedance influences the differences between CC and VC stimulation. The main difference is that for CC stimulation, variation of pulse width and amplitude influences the amount of nerve depolarization, whereas VC stimulation is only dependent on amplitude variations for pulse widths longer than 150 μs. An important remark is that these findings are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the electrode-skin interface. In our case, we used large stimulation electrodes placed on the anterior thigh, which cause higher capacitive effects. The controllability, voltage compliance, and charge characteristics of each stimulation technique should be considered during the stimulators design. For applications that require the activation of a large amount of nerve fibers, VC is a more suitable option. In contrast, if the application requires a high controllability, then CC should be chosen prior to VC.

  8. The Role of Musculoskeletal Dynamics and Neuromuscular Control in Stress Development in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWoody, Yssa

    1996-01-01

    The role of forces produced by the musculotendon units in the stress development of the long bones during gait has not been fully analyzed. It is well known that the musculotendons act as actuators producing the joint torques which drive the body. Although the joint torques required to perform certain motor tasks can be recovered through a kinematic analysis, it remains a difficult problem to determine the actual forces produced by each muscle that resulted in these torques. As a consequence, few studies have focused on the role of individual muscles in the development of stress in the bone. This study takes a control theoretic approach to the problem. A seven-link, eight degrees of freedom model of the body is controlled by various muscle groups on each leg to simulate gait. The simulations incorporate Hill-type models of muscles with activation and contraction dynamics controlled through neural inputs. This direct approach allows one to know the exact muscle forces exerted by each musculotendon throughout the gait cycle as well the joint torques and reaction forces at the ankle and knee. Stress and strain computed by finite element analysis on skeletal members will be related to these derived loading conditions. Thus the role of musculoskeletal dynamics and neuromuscular control in the stress development of the tibia during gait can be analyzed.

  9. Control of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis based on a neuromuscular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilenberg, Michael F; Geyer, Hartmut; Herr, Hugh

    2010-04-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses rely upon fixed torque-ankle state relationships obtained from measurements of intact humans walking at target speeds and across known terrains. Although effective at their intended gait speed and terrain, these controllers do not allow for adaptation to environmental disturbances such as speed transients and terrain variation. Here we present an adaptive muscle-reflex controller, based on simulation studies, that utilizes an ankle plantar flexor comprising a Hill-type muscle with a positive force feedback reflex. The model's parameters were fitted to match the human ankle's torque-angle profile as obtained from level-ground walking measurements of a weight and height-matched intact subject walking at 1 m/s. Using this single parameter set, clinical trials were conducted with a transtibial amputee walking on level ground, ramp ascent, and ramp descent conditions. During these trials, an adaptation of prosthetic ankle work was observed in response to ground slope variation, in a manner comparable to intact subjects, without the difficulties of explicit terrain sensing. Specifically, the energy provided by the prosthesis was directly correlated to the ground slope angle. This study highlights the importance of neuromuscular controllers for enhancing the adaptiveness of powered prosthetic devices across varied terrain surfaces.

  10. Acute effect of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and classic exercises in adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Yuruk, Zeliha Ozlem; Zeybek, Aslican; Gulsen, Mustafa; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to compare the initial effects of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and classic exercise interventions with physiotherapy modalities on pain, scapular dyskinesis, range of motion, and function in adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-three subjects were allocated to 3 groups: scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercies and physiotherapy modalities, classic exercise and physiotherapy modalities, and only physiotherapy modalities. The intervention was applied in a single session. The Visual Analog Scale, Lateral Scapular Slide Test, range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test were evaluated before and just after the one-hour intervention in the same session (all in one session). [Results] All of the groups showed significant differences in shoulder flexion and abduction range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test scores. There were statistically significant differences in Visual Analog Scale scores in the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and control groups, and no treatment method had significant effect on the Lateral Scapular Slide Test results. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, classic exercise, and physiotherapy modalities had immediate effects on adhesive capsulitis in our study. However, there was no additional benefit of exercises in one session over physiotherapy modalities. Also, an effective treatment regimen for shoulder rehabilitation of adhesive capsulitis patients should include scapular exercises.

  11. Mitochondrial defects and neuromuscular degeneration caused by altered expression of Drosophila Gdap1: implications for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Del Amo, Víctor; Seco-Cervera, Marta; García-Giménez, José Luís; Whitworth, Alexander J; Pallardó, Federico V; Galindo, Máximo Ibo

    2015-01-01

    One of the genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, an inherited peripheral neuropathy, is GDAP1. In this work, we show that there is a true ortholog of this gene in Drosophila, which we have named Gdap1. By up- and down-regulation of Gdap1 in a tissue-specific manner, we show that altering its levels of expression produces changes in mitochondrial size, morphology and distribution, and neuronal and muscular degeneration. Interestingly, muscular degeneration is tissue-autonomous and not dependent on innervation. Metabolic analyses of our experimental genotypes suggest that alterations in oxidative stress are not a primary cause of the neuromuscular degeneration but a long-term consequence of the underlying mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the role of mitochondria in CMT disease and pave the way to generate clinically relevant disease models to study the relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neurodegeneration.

  12. An investigation into the neuromuscular control at the level of the upper limbs of junior handball girls players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora-Mihaela Iconomescu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we want to present the development of upper limb muscle control in sportswomen handball. Thus at the beginning and end of championship players girls were tested with one MOVE 1 DU device type, then centralized data obtained and analyzed statistically. Handball players’ were 10 girls subjected search with the average age of 12.5 years, the average height of 165.5 cm. and an average weight of 57.7 kg. By centralizing data obtained we have seen an increase in upper limb neuromuscular control in final testing of statistically p <.05. Statistical analysis confirms the hypothesis that the means to improve neuromuscular control if applied properly and psychomotor functional somatic features specific age increases the competitive performance.

  13. The use of “stabilization exercises” to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term “core stability” is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. “stabilization exercise”, “motor control exercise”). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms “core stability” and “stabilization exercise”, 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process. PMID:24932016

  14. Adaptive control of functional neuromuscular stimulation-induced knee extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, B N; Glaser, R M; Couch, W; Figoni, S F; Rodgers, M M

    1991-01-01

    An automated system for exercising the paralyzed quadriceps muscles of spinal cord injured patients using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) has been developed. It induces smooth concentric and eccentric contractions in both limbs to enable bilateral 70 degree knee extensions in an asynchronous pattern. External load resistance is applied at the ankle level to "overload" the muscles and bring about training effects. The system uses adaptive control methods to adjust FNS current output (threshold level and the ramp slope) to the quadriceps muscles to maintain performance as the muscles fatigue. Feedback control signals for limb movement and knee extension angle are used to continuously adjust the FNS current parameters so that the external load is moved through the preset zero to 70 degree angle range. Typically, the threshold current level and the FNS current increase as the muscles fatigue to maintain performance with repetitive contractions. Fatigue is defined as the inability to extend the knee to 50 percent of the 70 degree target angle. When this occurs, FNS is automatically terminated for the fatigued leg, while the functioning leg continues to exercise. The automated nature of this system appears to be advantageous as compared to a manually operated system for subject safety, convenience, and uniformity of exercise bouts. Simulated safety problems, such as hyperextension of the knee joint, open circuitry, muscle spasms, and low battery power, were successfully detected by the logic circuitry, and the system followed appropriate safety procedures to minimize risk.

  15. EEG controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the upper limb for stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hock Guan; Shee, Cheng Yap; Kong, Keng He; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Wei Tech

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system and the experiments to allow post-acute (neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-assisted extension of the wrist/fingers, which are essential pre-requisites for useful hand function. EEG was recorded while subjects performed motor imagery of their paretic limb, and then analyzed to determine the optimal frequency range within the mu-rhythm, with the greatest attenuation. Aided by visual feedback, subjects then trained to regulate their mu-rhythm EEG to operate the BCI to trigger NMES of the wrist/finger. 6 post-acute stroke patients successfully completed the training, with 4 able to learn to control and use the BCI to initiate NMES. This result is consistent with the reported BCI literacy rate of healthy subjects. Thereafter, without the loss of generality, the controller of the NMES is developed and is based on a model of the upper limb muscle (biceps/triceps) groups to determine the intensity of NMES required to flex or extend the forearm by a specific angle. The muscle model is based on a phenomenological approach, with parameters that are easily measured and conveniently implemented.

  16. Effects of footwear comfort perception on the neuromuscular control of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of footwear comfort perception on the gain of the gastrocnemius H-reflex response during single leg balance tasks. Subjects performed single leg balance tasks while wearing aerobic sneakers with two different pairs of shoe insoles that were subjectively rated for comfort using a reliable 150 mm visual analog scale. The primary outcome was the consistency of decreasing the gain of the gastrocnemius H-reflex with increasing balance task complexity as a function of footwear comfort perception. Among the asymptomatic subjects (n = 11), H-reflex gain significantly decreased by 19% and 10% from balancing on a stable surface to an unstable surface for the shoe-brand and replacement insoles, respectively (p < .05). Among the subjects with musculoskeletal disorders (n = 13), H-reflex gain significantly decreased by 10% from balancing on a stable surface to an unstable surface when wearing custom-molded foot orthotics, but H-reflex gain significantly increased by 27% from balancing on a stable surface to an unstable surface when wearing replacement insoles (p < .05). Decreases in footwear comfort perception may negatively impact the attenuation of gastrocnemius H-reflex gain that contributes to the neuromuscular control of challenging balance tasks.

  17. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Christian eKlauer; Thomas eSchauer; Werner eReichenfelser; Jakob eKarner; Sven eZwicker; Marta eGandolla; Emilia eAmbrosini; Simona eFerrante; Marco eHack; Andreas eJedlitschka; Alexander eDuschau-Wicke; Margit eGfoehler; Alessandra ePedrocchi

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. Potential users of this system are patients with high-level spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative neuromuscular diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich ataxia, and multiple sclerosis. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to ena...

  18. No Neuromuscular Side-Effects of Scopolamine in Sensorimotor Control and Force-Generating Capacity Among Parabolic Fliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Freyler, Kathrin; Krause, Anne; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Scopolamine is used to counteract motion sickness in parabolic flight (PF) experiments. Although the drug's anticholinergic properties effectively impede vomiting, recent studies document other sensory side-effects in the central nervous system that may considerably influence sensorimotor performance. This study aimed to quantify such effects in order to determine if they are of methodological and operational significance for sensorimotor control. Ten subjects of a PF campaign received a weight-sex-based dose of a subcutaneous scopolamine injection. Sensorimotor performance was recorded before medication, 20min, 2h and 4h after injection in four space-relevant paradigms: balance control in one-leg stance with eyes open (protocol 1) and closed as well as force-generating capacity in countermovement jumps and hops (protocol 2). Postural sway, forces and joint angles were recorded. Neuromuscular control was assessed by electromyography and peripheral nerve stimulation; H-reflexes and M-waves were used to monitor spinal excitability of the Ia afferent reflex circuitry and maximal motor output. (1) H-reflex amplitudes, latencies and functional reflexes remained unchanged after scopolamine injection. (2) M-waves, neuromuscular activation intensities and antagonistic muscle coordination did not change with scopolamine administration. (3) Balance performance and force-generating capacity were not impeded by scopolamine. We found no evidence for changes in sensorimotor control in response to scopolamine injection. Sensory processing of daily relevant reflexes, spinal excitability, maximal motor output and performance parameters were not sensitive to the medication. We conclude that scopolamine administration can be used to counteract motion sickness in PF without methodological and operational concerns or interference regarding sensorimotor skills associated with neuromuscular control.

  19. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  20. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, Karen; Chreiteh, S S;

    2013-01-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population...... with and without SIS (n=16, No-SIS=15). Surface electromyography was measured from Serratus anterior (SA) and Trapezius during bilateral arm elevation (no-load, 1kg, 3kg). Mean relative muscle activity was calculated for SA and the upper (UT) and lower part of trapezius (LWT), in addition to activation ratio...... and time to activity onset. In spite of a tendency to higher activity among SIS 0.10-0.30 between-group differences were not significant neither in ratio of muscle activation 0.80-0.98 nor time to activity onset 0.53-0.98. The hypothesized between-group differences in neuromuscular activity of Trapezius...

  1. Static balance and function in children with cerebral palsy submitted to neuromuscular block and neuromuscular electrical stimulation: Study protocol for prospective, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazon Soráia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of botulinum toxin A (BT-A for the treatment of lower limb spasticity is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Following the administration of BT-A, physical therapy plays a fundamental role in potentiating the functionality of the child. The balance deficit found in children with CP is mainly caused by muscle imbalance (spastic agonist and weak antagonist. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES is a promising therapeutic modality for muscle strengthening in this population. The aim of the present study is to describe a protocol for a study aimed at analyzing the effects of NMES on dorsiflexors combined with physical therapy on static and functional balance in children with CP submitted to BT- A. Methods/Design Protocol for a prospective, randomized, controlled trial with a blinded evaluator. Eligible participants will be children with cerebral palsy (Levels I, II and III of the Gross Motor Function Classification System between five and 12 years of age, with independent gait with or without a gait-assistance device. All participants will receive BT-A in the lower limbs (triceps surae. The children will then be randomly allocated for either treatment with motor physical therapy combined with NMES on the tibialis anterior or motor physical therapy alone. The participants will be evaluated on three occasions: 1 one week prior to the administration of BT-A; 2 one week after the administration of BT-A; and 3 four months after the administration of BT-A (end of intervention. Spasticity will be assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale. Static balance will be assessed using the Medicapteurs Fusyo pressure platform and functional balance will be assessed using the Berg Balance Scale. Discussion The aim of this protocol study is to describe the methodology of a randomized, controlled, clinical trial comparing the effect of motor physical therapy combined with NMES on the tibialis anterior

  2. Hybrid neuroprosthesis for the upper limb: combining brain-controlled neuromuscular stimulation with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Grimm

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related range of motion and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD and electromyography (EMG activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e. induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p=0.028 or EMG (p=0.021 modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related range of motion (p=0.009 and the movement-related brain modulation (p=0

  3. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation neck pattern exercise on the ability to control the trunk and maintain balance in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Pil Neo; Don Kim, Kyoung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation neck pattern exercise on the ability to control the trunk and balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 30 study subjects were selected and randomly divided into an experimental group of 15 subjects, who received the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation neck pattern exercise, and a control group of 15 subjects, who received a traditional rehabilitation treatment. [Results] Statistically significant changes in all the items of the Trunk Impairment Scale, the Trunk Impairment Scale total score, and the Berg Balance Scale were observed in both the experimental group and the control group. significant between-group differences were found in all items among the subitems of the Trunk Impairment Scale except the static sitting balance. [Conclusion] Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation neck pattern exercise was shown to have a positive effect on increasing the ability to control the trunk and maintain balance in chronic stroke patients.

  4. Paraplegic standing controlled by functional neuromuscular stimulation: Part I--computer model and control-system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, G; Zajac, F E

    1989-09-01

    We have developed a planar computer model to investigate paraplegic standing induced by functional neuromuscular stimulation. The model consists of nonlinear musculotendon dynamics (pulse train activation dynamics and musculotendon actuator dynamics), nonlinear body-segmental dynamics, and a linear output-feedback control law. The model of activation dynamics is an analytic expression that characterizes the relation between the stimulus parameters (pulse width and interpulse interval) and the muscle activation. Hill's classic two-element muscle model was modified into a musculotendon actuator model in order to account for the effects of submaximal activation and tendon elasticity on development of force by the actuator. The three body-segmental, multijoint model accounts for the anterior-posterior movements of the head and trunk, the thigh, and the shank. We modeled arm movement as an external disturbance and imposed the disturbance to the body-segmental dynamics by means of a quasistatic analysis. Linearization, and at times linear approximation of the computer model, enabled us to compute a constant, linear feedback-gain matrix, whose output is the net activation needed by a dynamical joint-torque actuator. Motivated by an assumption that minimization of energy expenditure lessens muscle fatigue, we developed an algorithm that then computes how to distribute the net activation among all the muscles crossing the joint. In part II, the combined feedback control strategy is applied to the nonlinear model of musculotendon and body-segmental dynamics to study how well the body ought to maintain balance should the feedback control strategy be employed.

  5. Ankles back in randomized controlled trial (ABrCt: braces versus neuromuscular exercises for the secondary prevention of ankle sprains. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhagen Evert ALM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are the most common sports and physical activity related injury. There is extensive evidence that there is a twofold increased risk for injury recurrence for at least one year post injury. In up to 50% of all cases recurrences result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability, requiring prolonged medical care. Therefore ankle sprain recurrence prevention in athletes is essential. This RCT evaluates the effect of the combined use of braces and neuromuscular training (e.g. proprioceptive training/sensorimotor training/balance training against the individual use of either braces or neuromuscular training alone on ankle sprain recurrences, when applied to individual athletes after usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as three way randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain in the two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion. After subjects had finished ankle sprain treatment by means of usual care, they were randomised to any of the three study groups. Subjects in group 1 received an eight week neuromuscular training program, subjects in group 2 received a sports brace to be worn during all sports activities for the duration of one year, and group 3 received a combination of the neuromuscular training program and a sports brace to be worn during all sports activities for the duration of eight weeks. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months therafter. The primary outcome measure was incidence of ankle sprain recurrences. Secondary outcome measures included the direct and indirect costs of recurrent injury, the severity of recurrent injury, and the residual complaints during and after the intervention. Discussion The ABrCt is the first randomized controlled trial to directly compare the secondary preventive

  6. Genetic background alters the severity and onset of neuromuscular disease caused by the loss of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (usp14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Marshall

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and characterized an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU induced mutation in Usp14 (nmf375 that leads to adult-onset neurological disease. The nmf375 mutation causes aberrant splicing of Usp14 mRNA, resulting in a 95% reduction in USP14. We previously showed that loss of USP14 in ataxia (ax (J mice results in reduced ubiquitin levels, motor endplate disease, Purkinje cell axonal dystrophy and decreased hippocampal paired pulse facilitation (PPF during the first 4-6 weeks of life, and early postnatal lethality by two months of age. Although the loss of USP14 is comparable between the nmf375 and ax (J mice, the nmf375 mice did not exhibit these ax (J developmental abnormalities. However, by 12 weeks of age the nmf375 mutants present with ubiquitin depletion and motor endplate disease, indicating a continual role for USP14-mediated regulation of ubiquitin pools and neuromuscular junction (NMJ structure in adult mice. The observation that motor endplate disease was only seen after ubiquitin depletion suggests that the preservation of NMJ structure requires the stable maintenance of synaptic ubiquitin pools. Differences in genetic background were shown to affect ubiquitin expression and dramatically alter the phenotypes caused by USP14 deficiency.

  7. Consistency of Field-Based Measures of Neuromuscular Control Using Force-Plate Diagnostics in Elite Male Youth Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Paul J; Oliver, Jon L; Croix, Mark Ba De Ste; Myer, Gregory D; Lloyd, Rhodri S

    2016-12-01

    Read, P, Oliver, JL, Croix, MD, Myer, GD, and Lloyd, RS. Consistency of field-based measures of neuromuscular control using force-plate diagnostics in elite male youth soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3304-3311, 2016-Deficits in neuromuscular control during movement patterns such as landing are suggested pathomechanics that underlie sport-related injury. A common mode of assessment is measurement of landing forces during jumping tasks; however, these measures have been used less frequently in male youth soccer players, and reliability data are sparse. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of a field-based neuromuscular control screening battery using force-plate diagnostics in this cohort. Twenty-six pre-peak height velocity (PHV) and 25 post-PHV elite male youth soccer players completed a drop vertical jump (DVJ), single-leg 75% horizontal hop and stick (75%HOP), and single-leg countermovement jump (SLCMJ). Measures of peak landing vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF), time to stabilization, time to pVGRF, and pVGRF asymmetry were recorded. A test-retest design was used, and reliability statistics included change in mean, intraclass correlation coefficient, and coefficient of variation (CV). No significant differences in mean score were reported for any of the assessed variables between test sessions. In both groups, pVGRF and asymmetry during the 75%HOP and SLCMJ demonstrated largely acceptable reliability (CV ≤ 10%). Greater variability was evident in DVJ pVGRF and all other assessed variables, across the 3 protocols (CV range = 13.8-49.7%). Intraclass correlation coefficient values ranged from small to large and were generally higher in the post-PHV players. The results of this study suggest that pVGRF and asymmetry can be reliably assessed using a 75%HOP and SLCMJ in this cohort. These measures could be used to support a screening battery for elite male youth soccer players and for test-retest comparison.

  8. THE RELAXOMETER - A COMPLETE AND COMPREHENSIVE COMPUTER-CONTROLLED NEUROMUSCULAR-TRANSMISSION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM DEVELOPED FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH ON MUSCLE-RELAXANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROWAAN, CJ; VANDENBROM, RHG; WIERDA, JMKH

    1993-01-01

    The Relaxometer is a computer-controlled system developed for reliable clinical experimental measurements on neuromuscular block. This system is based on an adapted personal computer (Atari 1040 ST) with a monochrome monitor (Atari SM 124), and a microcomputer-driven slave unit (stimulator). There a

  9. The effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint motor control during sidecutting in female elite soccer and handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    and knee, and ground reaction forces were recorded during a sidecutting maneuver. Neuromuscular activity in the prelanding phase was obtained 10 and 50 ms before foot strike on a force plate and at 10 and 50 ms after foot strike on a force plate. RESULTS: Neuromuscular training markedly increased before...

  10. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Askari, MS; TeKang Chao; Ray D. de Leon, PhD; Deborah S. Won, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI) that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT). In this study, one group of rats (n = 6) was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibia...

  11. Using rolling to develop neuromuscular control and coordination of the core and extremities of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Voight, Michael L; Cook, Gray; Gill, Lance

    2009-05-01

    Rolling is a movement pattern seldom used by physical therapists for assessment and intervention with adult clientele with normal neurologic function. Rolling, as an adult motor skill, combines the use of the upper extremities, core, and lower extremities in a coordinated manner to move from one posture to another. Rolling is accomplished from prone to supine and supine to prone, although the method by which it is performed varies among adults. Assessment of rolling for both the ability to complete the task and bilateral symmetry may be beneficial for use with athletes who perform rotationally-biased sports such as golf, throwing, tennis, and twisting sports such as dance, gymnastics, and figure skating. Additionally, when used as intervention techniques, the rolling patterns have the ability to affect dysfunction of the upper quarter, core, and lower quarter. By applying proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) principles, the therapist may assist patients and clients who are unable to complete a rolling pattern. Examples given in the article include distraction/elongation, compression, and manual contacts to facilitate proper rolling. The combined experience of the four authors is used to describe techniques for testing, assessment, and treatment of dysfunction, using case examples that incorporate rolling. The authors assert that therapeutic use of the developmental pattern of rolling with techniques derived from PNF is a hallmark in rehabilitation of patients with neurologic dysfunction, but can be creatively and effectively utilized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation.

  12. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  13. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-peng Huang; Hong Pan; Hong-feng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inlfammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental au-toimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure pointsShou-sanli (LI10),Zusanli(ST36),Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was signiifcantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These ifndings suggest that “warmingyangand invigoratingqi” acu-puncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  14. When "altering brain function" becomes "mind control".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuniemi, Andrew; Otto, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. "Under what conditions does 'altering brain function' qualify as 'mind control'?" In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

  15. Effects of home-based resistance training and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce-Brand Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM weakness is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA and exercise programs that strengthen this muscle group can improve function, disability and pain. Traditional supervised resistance exercise is however resource intensive and dependent on good adherence which can be challenging to achieve in patients with significant knee OA. Because of the limitations of traditional exercise programs, interest has been shown in the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES to strengthen the QFM. We conducted a single-blind, prospective randomized controlled study to compare the effects of home-based resistance training (RT and NMES on patients with moderate to severe knee OA. Methods 41 patients aged 55 to 75 years were randomised to 6 week programs of RT, NMES or a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was functional capacity measured using a walk test, stair climb test and chair rise test. Additional outcomes were self-reported disability, quadriceps strength and cross-sectional area. Outcomes were assessed pre- and post-intervention and at 6 weeks post-intervention (weeks 1, 8 and 14 respectively. Results There were similar, significant improvements in functional capacity for the RT and NMES groups at week 8 compared to week 1 (p≤0.001 and compared to the control group (p  Conclusions Home-based NMES is an acceptable alternative to exercise therapy in the management of knee OA, producing similar improvements in functional capacity. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN85231954

  16. Center of mass acceleration feedback control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation against external postural perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the use of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback for improving performance of a functional neuromuscular stimulation control system to restore standing function to a subject with complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury. The approach for linearly relating changes in muscle stimulation to changes in COM acceleration was verified experimentally and subsequently produced data to create an input-output map driven by sensor feedback. The feedback gains were systematically tuned to reduce upper extremity (UE) loads applied to an instrumented support device while resisting external postural disturbances. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (>89% variance explained) using 3-D outputs of two accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, feedback control of stimulation reduced UE loading by 33%. COM acceleration feedback is advantageous in constructing a standing neuroprosthesis since it provides the basis for a comprehensive control synergy about a global, dynamic variable and requires minimal instrumentation. Future work should include tuning and testing the feedback control system during functional reaching activity that is more indicative of activities of daily living.

  17. When Altering Brain Function Becomes Mind Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Sanford Koivuniemi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. Under what conditions does ‘altering brain function’ qualify as ‘mind control’? In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

  18. Knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty are sex-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    The future of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery will involve planning that incorporates more patient-specific characteristics. Despite known biological, morphological, and functional differences between men and women, there has been little investigation into knee joint biomechanical and neuromuscular differences between men and women with osteoarthritis, and none that have examined sex-specific biomechanical and neuromuscular responses to TKA surgery. The objective of this study was to examine sex-associated differences in knee kinematics, kinetics and neuromuscular patterns during gait before and after TKA. Fifty-two patients with end-stage knee OA (28 women, 24 men) underwent gait and neuromuscular analysis within the week prior to and one year after surgery. A number of sex-specific differences were identified which suggest a different manifestation of end-stage knee OA between the sexes.

  19. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, K; Chreiteh, S S; Holtermann, A; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2013-10-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population with and without SIS (n=16, No-SIS=15). Surface electromyography was measured from Serratus anterior (SA) and Trapezius during bilateral arm elevation (no-load, 1kg, 3kg). Mean relative muscle activity was calculated for SA and the upper (UT) and lower part of trapezius (LWT), in addition to activation ratio and time to activity onset. In spite of a tendency to higher activity among SIS 0.10-0.30 between-group differences were not significant neither in ratio of muscle activation 0.80-0.98 nor time to activity onset 0.53-0.98. The hypothesized between-group differences in neuromuscular activity of Trapezius and Serratus was not confirmed. The tendency to a higher relative muscle activity in SIS could be due to a pain-related increase in co-activation or a decrease in maximal activation. The negative findings may display the variation in the specific muscle activation patterns depending on the criteria used to define the population of impingement patients, as well as the methodological procedure being used, and the shoulder movement investigated.

  20. Changes in Balance Strategy and Neuromuscular Control during a Fatiguing Balance Task—A Study in Perturbed Unilateral Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Freyler, Kathrin; Werkhausen, Amelie; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue impairs sensorimotor performance, reduces spinal reflexes and affects the interaction of antagonistic muscles in complex motor tasks. Although there is literature dealing with the interference of fatigue and postural control, the interpretation is confounded by the variety of paradigms used to study it. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of postural fatigue on balance control and strategy, as well as on neuromuscular modulation, in response to postural perturbation (PERT) during a fatiguing balance task. A fatigue protocol consisting of continuous exposure to perturbations until exhaustion was executed in 24 subjects. Number of failed attempts, paths of center of pressure displacement (COP), ankle, knee, and hip joint kinematics, electromyographic activity of the soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), and gluteus maximus muscles (GM) and spinal excitability of SOL at the peak of the short-latency responses (SLR) were recorded after posterior PERT. The co-contraction index (CCI) was calculated for TA_SOL, VL_BF and RF_GM. (1) The number of failed attempts significantly increased while COP amplitude and velocity, as well as angular excursion at the ankle, knee and hip joints, decreased with fatigue (P PERT. The reduction in spinal excitability may either be caused by fatigue itself or by an increase in reciprocal inhibition due to augmented TA activity. PMID:27378886

  1. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Michelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home

  2. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme P. T. Areas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elastic resistance bands (ERB combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. OBJECTIVES: The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. METHOD: Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10 or the control group (CG, n=10. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and inspiratory pressure (MIP were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. RESULTS: PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05. In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01 and ∆MEP (p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  3. Proximal versus distal control of two-joint planar reaching movements in the presence of neuromuscular noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2012-06-01

    Determining how the human nervous system contends with neuro-motor noise is vital to understanding how humans achieve accurate goal-directed movements. Experimentally, people learning skilled tasks tend to reduce variability in distal joint movements more than in proximal joint movements. This suggests that they might be imposing greater control over distal joints than proximal joints. However, the reasons for this remain unclear, largely because it is not experimentally possible to directly manipulate either the noise or the control at each joint independently. Therefore, this study used a 2 degree-of-freedom torque driven arm model to determine how different combinations of noise and/or control independently applied at each joint affected the reaching accuracy and the total work required to make the movement. Signal-dependent noise was simultaneously and independently added to the shoulder and elbow torques to induce endpoint errors during planar reaching. Feedback control was then applied, independently and jointly, at each joint to reduce endpoint error due to the added neuromuscular noise. Movement direction and the inertia distribution along the arm were varied to quantify how these biomechanical variations affected the system performance. Endpoint error and total net work were computed as dependent measures. When each joint was independently subjected to noise in the absence of control, endpoint errors were more sensitive to distal (elbow) noise than to proximal (shoulder) noise for nearly all combinations of reaching direction and inertia ratio. The effects of distal noise on endpoint errors were more pronounced when inertia was distributed more toward the forearm. In contrast, the total net work decreased as mass was shifted to the upper arm for reaching movements in all directions. When noise was present at both joints and joint control was implemented, controlling the distal joint alone reduced endpoint errors more than controlling the proximal joint

  4. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; ENDO, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking ...

  5. Effects of Tai Chi versus Proprioception Exercise Program on Neuromuscular Function of the Ankle in Elderly People: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Jing Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese medicine exercise used for improving neuromuscular function. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Tai Chi versus proprioception exercise program on neuromuscular function of the ankle in elderly people. Methods. Sixty elderly subjects were randomly allocated into three groups of 20 subjects per group. For 16 consecutive weeks, subjects participated in Tai Chi, proprioception exercise, or no structured exercise. Primary outcome measures included joint position sense and muscle strength of ankle. Subjects completed a satisfaction questionnaire upon study completion in Tai Chi and proprioception groups. Results. (1 Both Tai Chi group and proprioception exercise group were significantly better than control group in joint position sense of ankle, and there were no significant differences in joint position sense of ankle between TC group and PE group. (2 There were no significant differences in muscle strength of ankle among groups. (3 Subjects expressed more satisfaction with Tai Chi than with proprioception exercise program. Conclusions. None of the outcome measures on neuromuscular function at the ankle showed significant change posttraining in the two structured exercise groups. However, the subjects expressed more interest in and satisfaction with Tai Chi than proprioception exercise.

  6. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wilt Gert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared

  7. Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation Controlled by Surface Electromyographic Signals Produced by Volitional Activation of the Same Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Søren; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Andersen, Ole Trier

    1997-01-01

    In order to use the volitional electromyography (EMG) as a control signal for the stimulation of the same muscle, it is necessary to eliminate the stimulation artifacts and the muscle responses caused by the stimulation. The stimulation artifacts, caused by the electric field in skin and tissue...... generated by the stimulation current, are relatively easy to eliminate by shutting down the EMG-amplifier at the onset of the stimulation pulses. The muscle response is a nonstationary signal, therefore, an adaptive linear prediction filter is proposed. The filter is implemented and for three filter lengths...... the shut-down circuit and the adaptive filter both the stimulation artifacts and the muscle responses can be effectively eliminated from the EMG signal from a stimulated muscle. It is therefore possible to extract the volitional EMG from a partly paralyzed muscle and use it for controlling the stimulation...

  8. Load Dependency of Postural Control--Kinematic and Neuromuscular Changes in Response to over and under Load Conditions.

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    Ramona Ritzmann

    Full Text Available Load variation is associated with changes in joint torque and compensatory reflex activation and thus, has a considerable impact on balance control. Previous studies dealing with over (OL and under loading (UL used water buoyancy or additional weight with the side effects of increased friction and inertia, resulting in substantially modified test paradigms. The purpose of this study was to identify gravity-induced load dependency of postural control in comparable experimental conditions and to determine the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms.Balance performance was recorded under normal loading (NL, 1 g, UL (0.16 g 0.38 g and OL (1.8 g in monopedal stance. Center of pressure (COP displacement and frequency distribution (low 0.15-0.5 Hz (LF, medium 0.5-2 Hz (MF, high 2-6 Hz (HF as well as ankle, knee and hip joint kinematics were assessed. Soleus spinal excitability was determined by H/M-recruitment curves (H/M-ratios.Compared to NL, OL caused an increase in ankle joint excursion, COP HF domain and H/M-ratio. Concomitantly, hip joint excursion and COP LF decreased. Compared to NL, UL caused modulations in the opposite direction: UL decreased ankle joint excursions, COP HF and H/M-ratio. Collaterally, hip joint excursion and COP LF increased. COP was augmented both in UL and in OL compared to NL.Subjects achieved postural stability in OL and UL with greater difficulty compared to NL. Reduced postural control was accompanied by modified balance strategies and compensatory reflex activation. With increasing load, a shift from hip to ankle strategy was observed. Accompanying, COP frequency distribution shifted from LF to HF and spinal excitability was enhanced. It is suggested that in OL, augmented ankle joint torques are compensated by quick reflex-induced postural reactions in distal muscles. Contrarily, UL is associated with diminished joint torques and thus, postural equilibrium may be controlled by the proximal segments to adjust the center of

  9. Training for improved neuro-muscular control of balance in middle aged females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory S; Deluigi, Fabio; Belli, Guido; Tentoni, Claudio; Gaetz, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    This study examined improvements in static balance and muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity following a four week progressive training program in 16 middle aged females (mean age = 46.9 ± 8.7 yrs; height 161.1 ± 6.0 cm; weight 65.4 ± 11.2 kg). Participants trained 3 times per week for 4 weeks, for 50 min per session, progressing base of support, stability, vision, resistance and torque in each of six basic exercises. Pre and post training measures of balance included feet together standing, a tandem stance and a one-leg stand (unsupported leg in the saggital plane) performed with the eyes closed, and a Stork Stand (unsupported leg in the frontal plane) with both eyes open and closed. In each position postural deviations were tallied for each individual while muscle recruitment was determined using root mean squared (RMS) EMG activity for the soleus, biceps femoris, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles of the dominant foot side. Balance scores were significantly improved post training in both the Balance Error Score System (p core stability allowed participants to move from a hip to an ankle postural control strategy through improved coordination of muscles involved in balance and reduced body sway. The core muscles were able to control body position with less activity post training suggesting improved muscle coordination and efficiency. These results suggest that short term progressive floor to BOSU™ balance training can improve standing balance in middle aged women.

  10. Characteristics of Neuromuscular Control of the Scapula after Stroke: A First Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Liesbet; Jaspers, Ellen; Janssens, Luc; Van Deun, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize scapular muscle timing in stroke patients with and without shoulder pain. Muscle activity of upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, infraspinatus, and anterior deltoid (AD) was measured (Delsys Trigno surface EMG system, USA) in 14 healthy controls (dominant side) and 30 stroke patients (hemiplegic side) of whom 10 had impingement-like shoulder pain. Participants performed 45° and full range anteflexion, in two load conditions. The impact of group, anteflexion height, load condition, and muscle was assessed for onset and offset of the different muscles relative to the onset and offset of AD, using a 3 (group) × 2 (height) × 2 (load) × 4 (muscle) mixed model design. Recruitment patterns were additionally described. Across all load conditions and groups, serratus anterior had a significantly earlier onset and, together with lower trapezius, a significantly later offset in 45° compared to full range anteflexion tasks (p < 0.001). In stroke patients without pain, lower trapezius had furthermore a significantly earlier onset in comparison to stroke patients with shoulder pain (all tasks, p = 0.04). Serratus anterior also showed a significantly earlier offset in stroke patients with shoulder pain in comparison to controls (p = 0.01) and stroke patients without pain (p < 0.001). Analysis of muscle recruitment patterns indicated that for full range tasks, stroke patients without pain used early and prolonged activity of infraspinatus. In stroke patients with shoulder pain, recruitment patterns were characterized by delayed activation and early inactivity of serratus anterior. These timing results can serve as a reference frame for scapular muscle timing post-stroke, and when designing upper limb treatment protocols and clinical guidelines for shoulder pain after stroke. PMID:25477805

  11. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis, pain, and self

  12. The Effects of Plyometric Type Neuromuscular Training on Postural Control Performance of Male Team Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Abbas; Saez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Arazi, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are common in basketball athletes; common preventive programs for decreasing these injures may be enhancing postural control (PC) or balance with plyometric training. This study investigated the efficiency of plyometric training program within basketball practice to improve PC performance in young basketball players. Sixteen players were recruited and assigned either to a plyometric + basketball training group (PT) or basketball training group (BT). All players trained twice per week, but the PT + BT followed a 6-week plyometric program implemented within basketball practice, whereas the BT followed regular practice. The star excursion balance test (SEBT) at 8 directions (anterior, A; anteromedial, AM; anterolateral, AL; medial, M; lateral, L; posterior, P; posteromedial, PM; and posterolateral, PL) was measured before and after the 6-week period. The PT group induced significant improvement (p ≤ 0.05) and small to moderate effect size in the SEBT (A = 0.95, AM = 0.62, AL = 0.61, M = 0.36, L = 0.47, P = 0.27, PM = 0.25, PL = 0.24). No significant improvements were found in the BT group. Also, there were significant differences between groups in all directions except PM and PL. An integrated plyometric program within the regular basketball practice can lead to significant improvements in SEBT and consequently PC. It can be recommended that strength and conditioning professionals use PT to enhance the athletes' joint awareness and PC to reduce possible future injuries in the lower extremity.

  13. Modelagem e simulação do sistema neuromuscular responsável pelo controle do torque gerado na articulação do tornozelo.

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Abdala Elias

    2013-01-01

    O estudo do controle neurofisiológico do movimento tem sido realizado sob várias perspectivas. Experimentos com seres humanos são realizados durante a execução de uma dada tarefa motora e, frequentemente, mediante a aplicação de estímulos externos (elétrico, magnético ou mecânico) ao sistema neuromuscular. Estes experimentos fornecem uma grande quantidade de dados referentes ao funcionamento das redes neuronais e dos atuadores biomecânicos envolvidos nos procedimentos. Entretanto, alguns acha...

  14. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2012-01-01

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential...... to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have...

  15. A MusD retrotransposon insertion in the mouse Slc6a5 gene causes alterations in neuromuscular junction maturation and behavioral phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P Bogdanik

    Full Text Available Glycine is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and some brain regions. The presynaptic glycine transporter, GlyT2, is required for sustained glycinergic transmission through presynaptic reuptake and recycling of glycine. Mutations in SLC6A5, encoding GlyT2, cause hereditary hyperekplexia in humans, and similar phenotypes in knock-out mice, and variants are associated with schizophrenia. We identified a spontaneous mutation in mouse Slc6a5, caused by a MusD retrotransposon insertion. The GlyT2 protein is undetectable in homozygous mutants, indicating a null allele. Homozygous mutant mice are normal at birth, but develop handling-induced spasms at five days of age, and only survive for two weeks, but allow the study of early activity-regulated developmental processes. At the neuromuscular junction, synapse elimination and the switch from embryonic to adult acetylcholine receptor subunits are hastened, consistent with a presumed increase in motor neuron activity, and transcription of acetylcholine receptors is elevated. Heterozygous mice, which show no reduction in lifespan but nonetheless have reduced levels of GlyT2, have a normal thermal sensitivity with the hot-plate test, but differences in repetitive grooming and decreased sleep time with home-cage monitoring. Open-field and elevated plus-maze tests did not detect anxiety-like behaviors; however, the latter showed a hyperactivity phenotype. Importantly, grooming and hyperactivity are observed in mouse schizophrenia models. Thus, mutations in Slc6a5 show changes in neuromuscular junction development as homozygotes, and behavioral phenotypes as heterozygotes, indicating their usefulness for studies related to glycinergic dysfunction.

  16. Scoliosis and the impact in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    Scoliosis can alter respiratory mechanics by changing the orientation of the muscles and joints of the respiratory system and in severe forms can put a patient at risk of severe respiratory morbidity or respiratory failure. However, perhaps the most important factor in determining the pulmonary morbidity in scoliosis is the balance between the "load" or altered respiratory mechanics and the "pump" or the respiratory muscle strength. Therefore, scoliosis in patients with neuromuscular disease will both lead to increased "load" and a weakened "pump", an exceptionally unfortunate combination. While progressive neuromuscular disease by its nature does not respond favorably to attempts to improve respiratory muscle strength, the natural approach of early proactive management of the "load" and in the case of scoliosis a variety of different strategies have been tried with variable short term and long term results. Figuring this out requires both an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of a particular neuromuscular condition and the available options for and timing of surgical intervention.

  17. Doenças neuromusculares Neuromuscular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Umbertina C. Reed

    2002-01-01

    Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo). Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de h...

  18. Feedback Control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eKlauer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. Potential users of this system are patients with high-level spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative neuromuscular diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich ataxia, and multiple sclerosis. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm due to upper motor neuron lesions after spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e. a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 seconds.

  19. Correction of organophosphate-induced neuromuscular blockade by diphenhydramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, R M; Meyer, D J; Sundlof, S F; Rappaport, J J; Fossler, M E; Hubbell, J; Dorsey-Lee, M R

    1984-10-01

    Dogs exposed to topical organophosphate (fenthion) developed decreased plasma and muscle cholinesterase activities. After 2 doses were applied (1 week between doses), plasma concentrations declined 80% and muscle cholinesterase activity was reduced by 56%. Decremental responses to repetitive nerve stimulation developed after fenthion administration. Diphenhydramine, but not placebo, corrected the electrical abnormalities caused by organophosphate application, but without altering plasma or muscle cholinesterase activity. Control dogs housed in the same kennel demonstrated a slight decrease (18%) of plasma cholinesterase, which indicates that there may be potential cross contamination. Diphenydramine may be effective in treating organophosphate-induced neuromuscular weakness which is refractory to other forms of therapy.

  20. Neuromuscular adaptations to training, injury and passive interventions: implications for running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Jason; Chapman, Andrew; Blanch, Peter; Vicenzino, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Performance in endurance sports such as running, cycling and triathlon has long been investigated from a physiological perspective. A strong relationship between running economy and distance running performance is well established in the literature. From this established base, improvements in running economy have traditionally been achieved through endurance training. More recently, research has demonstrated short-term resistance and plyometric training has resulted in enhanced running economy. This improvement in running economy has been hypothesized to be a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics such as improved muscle power development and more efficient use of stored elastic energy during running. Changes in indirect measures of neuromuscular control (i.e. stance phase contact times, maximal forward jumps) have been used to support this hypothesis. These results suggest that neuromuscular adaptations in response to training (i.e. neuromuscular learning effects) are an important contributor to enhancements in running economy. However, there is no direct evidence to suggest that these adaptations translate into more efficient muscle recruitment patterns during running. Optimization of training and run performance may be facilitated through direct investigation of muscle recruitment patterns before and after training interventions. There is emerging evidence that demonstrates neuromuscular adaptations during running and cycling vary with training status. Highly trained runners and cyclists display more refined patterns of muscle recruitment than their novice counterparts. In contrast, interference with motor learning and neuromuscular adaptation may occur as a result of ongoing multidiscipline training (e.g. triathlon). In the sport of triathlon, impairments in running economy are frequently observed after cycling. This impairment is related mainly to physiological stress, but an alteration in lower limb muscle coordination during running after cycling

  1. Neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidon, Amanda C; Massey, E Wayne

    2012-08-01

    Preexisting and coincident neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy are challenging for clinicians because of the heterogeneity of disease and the limited data in the literature. Many questions arise regarding the effect of disease on the pregnancy, delivery, and newborn in addition to the effect of pregnancy on the course of disease. Each disorder has particular considerations and possible complications. An interdisciplinary team of physicians is essential. This article discusses the most recent literature on neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy including acquired root, plexus, and peripheral nerve lesions; acquired and inherited neuropathies and myopathies; disorders of the neuromuscular junction; and motor neuron diseases.

  2. Using the Hephaistos orthotic device to study countermeasure effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and dietary lupin protein supplementation, a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopen, Kathrin; Albracht, Kirsten; Gerlach, Darius A.; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated whether neuromuscular electrical stimulation for 20 min twice a day with an electrode placed over the soleus muscle and nutritional supplementation with 19 g of protein rich lupin seeds can reduce the loss in volume and strength of the human calf musculature during long term unloading by wearing an orthotic unloading device. Methods Thirteen healthy male subjects (age of 26.4 ± 3.7 years) wore a Hephaistos orthosis one leg for 60 days during all habitual activities. The leg side was randomly chosen for every subject. Six subjects only wore the orthosis as control group, and 7 subjects additionally received the countermeasure consisting of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles and lupin protein supplementation. Twenty-eight days before and on the penultimate day of the intervention cross-sectional images of the calf muscles were taken by magnetic resonance imaging (controls n = 5), and maximum voluntary torque (controls n = 6) of foot plantar flexion was estimated under isometric (extended knee, 90° knee flexion) and isokinetic conditions (extended knee), respectively. Results After 58 days of wearing the orthosis the percentage loss of volume in the entire triceps surae muscle of the control subjects (-11.9 ± 4.4%, mean ± standard deviation) was reduced by the countermeasure (-3.5 ± 7.2%, p = 0.032). Wearing the orthosis generally reduced plantar flexion torques values, however, only when testing isometric contraction at 90° knee ankle the countermeasure effected a significantly lower percentage decrease of torque (-9.7 ± 7.2%, mean ± SD) in comparison with controls (-22.3 ± 11.2%, p = 0.032). Conclusion Unloading of calf musculature by an orthotic device resulted in the expected loss of muscle volume and maximum of plantar flexion torque. Neuromuscular electrical muscle stimulation and lupin protein supplementation could significantly reduce the process of atrophy. Trial

  3. Doenças neuromusculares Neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina C. Reed

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo. Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de hipotonia muscular secundária ao comprometimento do sistema nervoso central ou a doenças sistêmicas não-neurológicas, são enfatizados, com base na experiência clínica vinda do atendimento a crianças com doenças neuromusculares durante os últimos 12 anos, no ambulatório de doenças neuromusculares do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina, da Universidade de São Paulo. A revisão bibliográfica foi efetuada através do Medline e do periódico Neuromuscular Disorders, publicação oficial da World Muscle Society. Síntese dos dados: nas crianças, a maior parte destas afecções é geneticamente determinada, sendo as mais comuns a distrofia muscular progressiva ligada ao sexo, de Duchenne, a amiotrofia espinal infantil, a distrofia muscular congênita, a distrofia miotônica de Steinert, e as miopatias congênitas, estruturais e não estruturais. Polineuropatias hereditárias, síndrome miastênica congênita e miopatias metabólicas são menos comuns, porém mostram correlação geno-fenotípica cada vez mais precisa. Conclusões: na década passada, inúmeros avanços da genética molecular facilitaram imensamente o diagnóstico e o aconselhamento genético das doenças neuromusculares mais comuns das crianças, inclusive possibilitando diagnóstico fetal e, adicionalmente, vieram permitir melhor caracterização fenotípica e classificação mais objetiva.Objective: to discuss the most important aspects for performing a

  4. Steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, JMKH; Mori, K; Ohmura, A; Toyooka, H; Hatano, Y; Shingu, K; Fukuda, K

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964 approximately 20 steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents have been evaluated clinically. Pancuronium, a bisquaternary compound designed on the drawingboard, was the first steroidal relaxant introduced into clinical practice worldwide in the 1970's. Although a major improvement, pancuroniu

  5. Bouncing on Mars and the Moon-the role of gravity on neuromuscular control: correlation of muscle activity and rate of force development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Freyler, Kathrin; Krause, Anne; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-11-01

    On our astronomical neighbors Mars and the Moon, bouncing movements are the preferred locomotor techniques. During bouncing, the stretch-shortening cycle describes the muscular activation pattern. This study aimed to identify gravity-dependent changes in kinematic and neuromuscular characteristics in the stretch-shortening cycle. Hence, neuromuscular control of limb muscles as well as correlations between the muscles' pre-activation, reflex components, and force output were assessed in lunar, Martian, and Earth gravity. During parabolic flights, peak force (Fmax), ground-contact-time, rate of force development (RFD), height, and impulse were measured. Electromyographic (EMG) activities in the m. soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) were assessed before (PRE) and during bounces for the reflex phases short-, medium-, and long-latency response (SLR, MLR, LLR). With gradually decreasing gravitation, Fmax, RFD, and impulse were reduced, whereas ground-contact time and height increased. Concomitantly, EMG_GM decreased for PRE, SLR, MLR, and LLR, and in EMG_SOL in SLR, MLR, and LLR. For SLR and MLR, Fmax and RFD were positively correlated to EMG_SOL. For PRE and LLR, RFD and Fmax were positively correlated to EMG_GM. Findings emphasize that biomechanically relevant kinematic adaptations in response to gravity variation were accompanied by muscle- and phase-specific modulations in neural control. Gravitational variation is anticipated and compensated for by gravity-adjusted muscle activities. Importantly, the pre-activation and reflex phases were differently affected: in SLR and MLR, SOL is assumed to contribute to the decline in force output with a decreasing load, and, complementary in PRE and LLR, GM seems to be of major importance for force generation.

  6. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  7. The response of cortical alpha activity to pain and neuromuscular changes caused by exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, K; Lambert, M I; Tam, N; Baumeister, J

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is characterized by pain, swelling, and shortening of the muscle; increased serum creatine kinase; decreased force output; and altered neuromuscular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EIMD to determine the relationship between the peripheral symptoms, neuromuscular changes, and delayed pain sensation during a submaximal movement of the biceps brachii on cortical alpha (α) activity. In contrast to the control (n = 12) group, the experimental (n = 16) group participated in an EIMD protocol, and both groups were monitored for 132 h post-EIMD protocol. At 12 h, neuromuscular functioning was already disturbed while the sensation of pain was perceived, but not fully developed. Muscle pain scores in the experimental group peaked after 36 h with the lowest torque reported at 12 h. α-1 activity increased significantly in the motor and somatosensory area 12 h post-EIMD while α-2 activity increased in the contralateral fronto-central area. At 36 h, pain had further increased and neuromuscular function improved while α-1 and α-2 activities had decreased. We hypothesize that α-1 activity over the motor and somatosensory cortex of the experimental group displays a compensatory increase in response to the changes in neuromuscular function during movement, while an increase in α-2 activity is related to the suppression of pain experienced within the first 12 h.

  8. Electrodiagnosis in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, Bethany M; Han, Jay J

    2012-08-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is an important diagnostic tool for the assessment of individuals with various neuromuscular diseases. It should be an extension of a thorough history and physical examination. Some prototypical characteristics and findings of EMG and nerve conduction studies are discussed; however, a more thorough discussion can be found in the textbooks and resources sited in the article. With an increase in molecular genetic diagnostics, EMG continues to play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with neuromuscular diseases and also provides a cost-effective diagnostic workup before ordering a battery of costly genetic tests.

  9. Effects of plyometric and pneumatic explosive strength training on neuromuscular function and dynamic balance control in 60-70year old males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Cronin, Neil J; Avela, Janne; Linnamo, Vesa

    2014-04-01

    The present study compared neuromuscular adaptations to 12weeks of plyometric (PLY) or pneumatic (PNE) power training and their effects on dynamic balance control. Twenty-two older adults aged 60-70 (PLY n=9, PNE n=11) participated in the study. Measurements were conducted at Pre, 4, 8 and 12weeks. Dynamic balance was assessed as anterior-posterior center of pressure (COP) displacement in response to sudden perturbations. Explosive isometric knee extension and plantar flexion maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed. Maximal drop jump performance from optimal dropping height was measured in a sledge ergometer. Increases in knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor torque and muscle activity were higher and occurred sooner in PNE, whereas in drop jumping, PLY showed a clearer increase in optimal drop height (24%, ptraining and soleus muscle activity after 12weeks of training. In spite of these training mode specific adaptations, both groups showed similar improvements in dynamic balance control after 4weeks of training (PLY 38%, ptraining may involve different neural adaptation mechanisms, both training modes can produce similar improvements in dynamic balance control in older individuals. As COP displacement was negatively correlated with rapid knee extension torque in both groups (PLY r=-0.775, ptraining, the results also highlight the importance of targeting rapid force production when training older adults to improve dynamic balance.

  10. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s.

  11. Electrodiagnosis of disorders of neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James F

    2013-02-01

    This article reviews the use of electrodiagnostic testing in disorders of neuromuscular transmission and discusses the differences between various presynaptic and postsynaptic disorders. Attention is paid to quality control issues that influence the sensitivity of repetitive nerve stimulation and single fiber electromyography. Electrodiagnostic testing, when used as an extension of the clinician's history and physical examination, will provide appropriate direction in establishing the diagnosis.

  12. Comparison of mechanomyography and acceleromyography for the assessment of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlinthout, L.E.H.; Booij, L.H.D.J.; Egmond, J. van; Robertson, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    We measured acceleromyography and mechanomyography simultaneously with monitoring of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in four patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Furthermore, we compared neuromuscular block measures from these patients with those from normal controls from previous studies

  13. Neuromuscular adaptation to actual and simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The chronic "unloading" of the neuromuscular system during spaceflight has detrimental functional and morphological effects. Changes in the metabolic and mechanical properties of the musculature can be attributed largely to the loss of muscle protein and the alteration in the relative proportion of the proteins in skeletal muscle, particularly in the muscles that have an antigravity function under normal loading conditions. These adaptations could result in decrements in the performance of routine or specialized motor tasks, both of which may be critical for survival in an altered gravitational field, i.e., during spaceflight and during return to 1 G. For example, the loss in extensor muscle mass requires a higher percentage of recruitment of the motor pools for any specific motor task. Thus, a faster rate of fatigue will occur in the activated muscles. These consequences emphasize the importance of developing techniques for minimizing muscle loss during spaceflight, at least in preparation for the return to 1 G after spaceflight. New insights into the complexity and the interactive elements that contribute to the neuromuscular adaptations to space have been gained from studies of the role of exercise and/or growth factors as countermeasures of atrophy. The present chapter illustrates the inevitable interactive effects of neural and muscular systems in adapting to space. It also describes the considerable progress that has been made toward the goal of minimizing the functional impact of the stimuli that induce the neuromuscular adaptations to space.

  14. [Characteristics of neuromuscular scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzier, M; Groß, C; Zahn, R K; Pumberger, M; Strube, P

    2016-06-01

    Usually, neuromuscular scolioses become clinically symptomatic relatively early and are rapidly progressive even after the end of growth. Without sufficient treatment they lead to a severe reduction of quality of life, to a loss of the ability of walking, standing or sitting as well as to an impairment of the cardiopulmonary system resulting in an increased mortality. Therefore, an intensive interdisciplinary treatment by physio- and ergotherapists, internists, pediatricians, orthotists, and orthopedists is indispensable. In contrast to idiopathic scoliosis the treatment of patients with neuromuscular scoliosis with orthosis is controversially discussed, whereas physiotherapy is established and essential to prevent contractures and to maintain the residual sensorimotor function.Frequently, the surgical treatment of the scoliosis is indicated. It should be noted that only long-segment posterior correction and fusion of the whole deformity leads to a significant improvement of the quality of life as well as to a prevention of a progression of the scoliosis and the development of junctional problems. The surgical intervention is usually performed before the end of growth. A prolonged delay of surgical intervention does not result in an increased height but only in a deformity progression and is therefore not justifiable. In early onset neuromuscular scolioses guided-growth implants are used to guarantee the adequat development. Because of the high complication rates, further optimization of these implant systems with regard to efficiency and safety have to be addressed in future research.

  15. Neuromuscular blockade in children Bloqueadores neuromusculares em crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fernando Lourenço de Almeida

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs have been widely used to control patients who need to be immobilized for some kind of medical intervention, such as an invasive procedure or synchronism with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this monograph is to review the pharmacology of the NMBAs, to compare the main differences between the neuromuscular junction in neonates, infants, toddlers and adults, and moreover to discuss their indications in critically ill pediatric patients. Continuous improvement of knowledge about NMBAs pharmacology, adverse effects, and the many other remaining unanswered questions about neuromuscular junction and neuromuscular blockade in children is essential for the correct use of these drugs. Therefore, the indication of these agents in pediatrics is determined with extreme judiciousness. Computorized (Medline 1990-2000 and active search of articles were the mechanisms used in this review.Os bloqueadores neuromusculares têm sido amplamente utilizados para controlar pacientes que necessitem imobilidade para algum tipo de intervenção médica, desde a realização de procedimentos invasivos até a obtenção de sincronismo com a ventilação mecânica. O objetivo básico desta monografia é revisar a farmacologia dos principais bloqueadores neuromusculares, analisar as diferenças existentes na junção neuromuscular de neonatos, lactentes, pré-escolares e adultos, além de discutir suas indicações em pacientes criticamente enfermos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica. Revisão computadorizada da literatura (Medline 1990-2000 associado a busca ativa de artigos compuseram o mecanismo de busca dos dados desta revisão.

  16. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities.

  17. Neuromuscular monitoring: old issues, new controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, Aaron F

    2009-03-01

    "Expert" editorial opinion suggests that objective or quantitative neuromuscular monitors should be used whenever nondepolarizing blocking agents are administered. It is clear that this advice has by and large fallen on deaf ears. A sizeable number of clinicians here (North America) and abroad (Europe) fail to use even conventional peripheral nerve stimulators routinely. This chapter will explore potential reasons for and consequences of this disconnect between academia and "the real world." Along the way, we will examine such questions as how do we define and measure adequate recovery from nondepolarizing block. What are the limitations of clinical tests of recovery such as the "head-lift test?" What is the incidence of undetected postoperative residual curarization (PORC)? Does neuromuscular monitoring reduce the frequency of PORC? How will the availability of sugammadex alter the above discussion?

  18. The effect of shoe design and lateral wedges on knee load and neuromuscular control in healthy subjects during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten Møller; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2013-01-01

    design/type on the effectiveness of lateral wedging has not been investigated so far. The Purpose of the present study was to explore alterations in knee loading due to lateral foot wedges in three different shoes. Methods: Thirteen healthy participants with no history of knee pain were tested using...... three-dimensional gait analysis. Barefoot walking, walking in a running shoe, an Oxford-type leather shoe, and a rocker shoe were analysed. The shoes were tested both with and without a 10-degree full-length laterally wedged insole. Results: There were significant shoe wedge interactions on the first...... and second peak knee adduction moments. However, the variability of this moment between shoe designs was of similar magnitude as the effect of laterally wedged insoles. Only marginal changes in muscle activity for gastrocnemius when walking with the wedged Oxford shoe were revealed. Conclusion: Lateral...

  19. Assessment of neuromuscular fatigue by frequency analysis of the electromyographic signal of the control subjects and patients suffering from temporomandibular disorders treated with occlusal splints resilient and rigid

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A incapacidade de produzir repetidamente no tempo um determinado nível de força ou potência muscular designa-se por fadiga neuromuscular. A etiologia da fadiga muscular tem atraído o interesse de pesquisadores há mais de um século. Contudo, os seus agentes e locais definitivos permanecem ainda por serem identificados. Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a fadiga neuromuscular por meio da análise de frequência do sinal eletromiográfico dos músculos masseter e temporal anterior de ambos os ...

  20. Plyometric type neuromuscular exercise is a treatment to postural control deficits of volleyball players: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asadi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: It can be recommend that strength and conditioning professionals in the field of volleyball do not perform other type of landing exercise in plyometric training sessions because of postural control impaired and consequently the probability of lower extremity injuries will increase.

  1. Resistance training alters the sensorimotor control of vasti muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y M; Ng, Gabriel

    2010-02-01

    The present study examined and compared two modes of weight training (bodybuilding and power-lifting) on the surface EMG of vasti muscles, knee joint position sense and isometric knee extension force in 48 able-bodied subjects. Subjects were randomly allocated into either a moderate loading and repetitions (bodybuilding) training or a high loading and low repetitions (power-lifting) training, or a no training control group. Training was conducted on alternate days with individual supervision. After 8 weeks of training, subjects from both training groups showed significantly earlier EMG onset timing and higher amplitude of vastus medialis obliquus relative to vastus lateralis (p=0.005 or 0.05) between the two training groups. The findings suggested that the neuromotor control of the vasti muscles could be altered by regular weight training.

  2. The Effect of Plyometric Training on Trunk Muscle Pre-activation in Active Females with Trunk Neuromuscular Control Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hadadnezhad

    2014-02-01

    Results: the results of independent sample T-test indicated that there are significant differences between post-test of control and experimental groups in regard to Gluteus Medius (p=0.021, Quadratus Lumborum (p=0.011, Transverse Abdominis/Internal oblique (p=0.006, External Oblique (p=0.023 muscles activations which reveals effectiveness of plyometric training on pre-activation of muscles. Conclusion: Based on the study results, plyometric training affects the activation of muscles and thus improving the pre-activation can prevent mechanisms related to anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, plyometric training can reduce incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  3. Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation Controlled by Surface Electromyographic Signals Produced by the Volitional Activation of the Same Muscle:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Søren; Fin, Biering-Sørensen; Andersen, Ole Trier

    1997-01-01

    Using the voluntary EMG as a control signal for the stimulation of the same muscle necessitates elimination of stimulus artifacts and the muscle response caused by the stimulation. The stimulus artifacts are easily eliminated by shutting down the amplifier during stimulation. The muscle response...... is a non-stationary signal, therefore an adaptive linear prediction filter is proposed. The filter is derived and tested for three filter lengths on both simulated and real data. The performance is compared with a conventional fixed comb filter. The simulations indicate that the adaptive filter...

  4. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week, home-based, physiotherapist-guided neuromuscular exercise program on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral knee load distribution) in people with a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the past 3-12 months. METHODS......: An assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial including people aged 30-50 years with no to mild pain following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was conducted. Participants were randomly allocated to either a 12-week neuromuscular exercise program that targeted neutral lower limb alignment...... or a control group with no exercise. The exercise program included eight individual sessions with one of seven physiotherapists in private clinics, together with home exercises. Primary outcomes were the peak external knee adduction moment during normal pace walking and during a one-leg sit-to-stand. Secondary...

  5. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseljen Ottar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM, conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173 were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal, and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6 for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6 for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1 for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a

  6. Altered kinetic strategy for the control of swing limb elevation over obstacles in unilateral below-knee amputee gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S W; Patla, A E; Ishac, M G; Adkin, A L; Supan, T J; Barth, D G

    1999-05-01

    Our goal was to document the kinetic strategies for obstacle avoidance in below-knee amputees. Kinematic data were collected as unilateral below-knee traumatic amputees stepped over obstacles of various heights in the walking path. Inverse dynamics were employed to calculate power profiles and work during the limb-elevation and limb-lowering phases. Limb elevation was achieved by employing a different strategy of intra-limb interaction for elevation of the prosthetic limb than for the sound limb, which was similar to that seen in healthy adult non-amputees. As obstacle height increased, prosthetic side knee flexion was increased by modulating the work done at the hip, and not the knee, as seen on the sound side. Although the strength of the muscles about the residual knee was preserved, the range of motion of that knee had previously been found to be somewhat limited. Perhaps more importantly, potential instability of the interface between the stump and the prosthetic socket, and associated discomfort at the stump could explain the altered limb-elevation strategy. Interestingly, the limb-lowering strategy seen in the sound limb and in non-amputees already features modulation of rotational and translational work at the hip, so an alternate strategy was not required. Thus, following a major insult to the sensory and neuromuscular system, the CNS is able to update the internal model of the locomotor apparatus as the individual uses the new limb in a variety of movements, and modify control strategies as appropriate.

  7. Neuromuscular complications of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J B; Layzer, R B; Levin, S R; Scheider, V; Campbell, M J; Sumner, A J

    1975-07-01

    Seventeen consecutive acromegalic patients were evaluated for evidence of neuromuscular dysfunction and followed for 1 year after hypophysectomy. Before treatment, four patients had both a myopathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome, five had myopathy alone, four had carpal tunnel syndrome alone, and four had neither. The myopathy was caracterized by mild, strictly promixal weakness and flabbiness of muscles; electromyography revealed typical myopathic abnormalities, but serum enzymes and muscle biopsy usually were normal. The presence of myopathy or the carpal tunnel syndrrome could not be correlated with the magnitude of growth hormone elevation or any secondary endocrine derangement, but myopathy was associated with a longer duration of acromegaly. Carpal tunnel symptoms usually improved in the first 6 weeks after hypophysectomy, while myopathy improved more slowly and sometimes was detectable 1 year later.

  8. Effects of avoiding neuromuscular blocking agents during maintenance of anaesthesia on recovery characteristics in patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial lesions: A randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi A Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Neuromuscular blocking agents have been one of the cornerstones of anaesthesia. With the advent of newer surgical, anaesthetic and neurological monitoring techniques, their utility in neuroanaesthesia practice seems dispensable. The aim of this prospective, comparative, randomised study was to determine whether neuromuscular blocking agents are required in patients undergoing supratentorial surgery when balanced anaesthesia with desflurane, dexmedetomidine and scalp block is used. Methods: Sixty patients with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged between 18 and 60 years were included in the study. All patients received anaesthesia including desflurane, dexmedetomidine and scalp block. The patients were randomly allocated to receive no neuromuscular blocking agent (Group A or atracurium infusion to keep train-of-four count 2 (Group B. The two groups were compared with respect to haemodynamic stability, brain relaxation scores and recovery characteristics. Haemodynamic parameters and time taken to achieve Aldrete score >9 and other secondary outcomes were analysed using Student's t-test. Non-parametric data were analysed using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The mean arterial pressure was comparable between the groups. The intraoperative heart rate was comparable; however, in the post-operative period, it remained higher in Group B for 30 min after extubation (P = 0.02. The brain relaxation scores were comparable among the two groups (P = 0.27. Tracheal extubation time, time taken for orientation and time required to reach Aldrete score ≥9 were comparable among the two groups. Conclusion: The present study suggests that balanced anaesthesia using desflurane, dexmedetomidine and scalp block can preclude the use of neuromuscular blocking agents in patients undergoing supratentorial surgery under intense haemodynamic monitoring.

  9. Effects of carbohydrates-BCAAs-caffeine ingestion on performance and neuromuscular function during a 2-h treadmill run: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over placebo-controlled study

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    Peltier Sébastien L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbohydrates (CHOs, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs and caffeine are known to improve running performance. However, no information is available on the effects of a combination of these ingredients on performance and neuromuscular function during running. Methods The present study was designed as a randomized double-blind cross-over placebo-controlled trial. Thirteen trained adult males completed two protocols, each including two conditions: placebo (PLA and Sports Drink (SPD: CHOs 68.6 g.L-1, BCAAs 4 g.L-1, caffeine 75 mg.L-1. Protocol 1 consisted of an all-out 2 h treadmill run. Total distance run and glycemia were measured. In protocol 2, subjects exercised for 2 h at 95% of their lowest average speeds recorded during protocol 1 (whatever the condition. Glycemia, blood lactate concentration and neuromuscular function were determined immediately before and after exercise. Oxygen consumption (V˙O2, heart rate (HR and rate of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded during the exercise. Total fluids ingested were 2 L whatever the protocols and conditions. Results Compared to PLA, ingestion of SPD increased running performance (p = 0.01, maintained glycemia and attenuated central fatigue (p = 0.04, an index of peripheral fatigue (p = 0.04 and RPE (p = 0.006. Maximal voluntary contraction, V˙O2, and HR did not differ between the two conditions. Conclusions This study showed that ingestion of a combination of CHOs, BCAAs and caffeine increased performance by about 2% during a 2-h treadmill run. The results of neuromuscular function were contrasted: no clear cut effects of SPD were observed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00799630

  10. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  11. Controlling a hurricane by altering its internal climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardhekar, D.

    2010-09-01

    Atmospheric hazards, like the fury of a hurricane, can be controlled by altering its internal climate. The hurricane controlling technique suggested is eco-friendly, compatible with hurricane size, has a sound scientific base and is practically possible. The key factor is a large scale dilution of the hurricane fuel, vapour, in the eye wall and spiral rain bands where condensation causing vapor volume reduction (a new concept which can be explained by Avogadro's law) and latent heat release drive the storm. This can be achieved by installing multiple storage tanks containing dry liquefied air on the onshore and offshore coastal regions and islands, preferably underground, in the usual path of a hurricane. Each storage tank is designed to hold and release dry liquefied air of around 100,000 tons. Satellite tracking of hurricanes can locate the eye wall and the spiral rain bands. The installed storage tanks coming under these areas will rapidly inject dry air in huge quantities thereby diluting the vapour content of the vapour-rich air in the eye wall and in the spiral rain bands. This will result in reduced natural input of vapour-rich air, reduced release of latent heat, reduced formation of the low pressure zone due to condensation and volume reduction of the vapor, expansion of the artificially introduced dry air as it goes up occupying a larger space with the diluted fuel, absorption of energy from the system by low temperature of the artificially introduced air. It will effect considerable condensation of the vapor near the sea surface thus further starving the hurricane of its fuel in its engine. Seeding materials, or microscopic dust as suggested by Dr. Daniel Rosenfeld in large quantities may also be introduced via the flow of the injected dry air in order to enhance the hurricane controlling ability. All the above factors are in favour of retarding the hurricane's wind speed and power. The sudden weakening of hurricane Lili was found to be partially caused

  12. Neuromuscular Manifestations of West Nile Virus Infection

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    A. Arturo eLeis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuromuscular manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV infection is a poliomyelitis syndrome with asymmetric paralysis variably involving one (monoparesis to four limbs (quadriparesis, with or without brainstem involvement and respiratory failure. This syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis may occur without overt fever or meningoencephalitis. Although involvement of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor neurons in the brainstem are the major sites of pathology responsible for neuromuscular signs, inflammation also may involve skeletal or cardiac muscle (myositis, myocarditis, motor axons (polyradiculitis, peripheral nerve (Guillain-Barré syndrome, brachial plexopathy. In addition, involvement of spinal sympathetic neurons and ganglia provides a plausible explanation for autonomic instability seen in some patients. Many patients also experience prolonged subjective generalized weakness and disabling fatigue. Despite recent evidence that WNV may persist long term in the central nervous system or periphery in animals, the evidence in humans is controversial. WNV persistence would be of great concern in immunosuppressed patients or in those with prolonged or recurrent symptoms. Support for the contention that WNV can lead to autoimmune disease arises from reports of patients presenting with various neuromuscular diseases that presumably involve autoimmune mechanisms (GBS, other demyelinating neu¬ropathies, myasthenia gravis, brachial plexopathies, stiff-person syndrome, and delayed or recurrent symptoms. Although there is no specific treatment or vaccine currently approved in humans, and the standard remains supportive care, drugs that can alter the cascade of immunobiochemical events leading to neuronal death may be potentially useful (high-dose corticosteroids, interferon preparations, and intravenous immune globulin containing WNV-specific antibodies. Human experience with these agents seems promising based on anecdotal

  13. Neuromuscular activity and knee kinematics in adolescents with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L.;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS).......This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  14. Direct and indirect measurement of neuromuscular fatigue in Canadian football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nick; Farthing, Jonathan P; Lanovaz, Joel L; Krentz, Joel R

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of a fatiguing game simulation (G-Sim) on the balance of collegiate Canadian football players. The purpose of the study was to evaluate postural control as a potential tool for monitoring neuromuscular fatigue (NMF) in collision-based team sports. Fifteen male Canadian football players were recruited (mean±SD: age 21.8±1.6 years, weight 97.6±14.7 kg). Indirect NMF measures (postural sway and countermovement jump (CMJ)) were performed 24 h before (TBase), immediately before (TPre) and after (TPost), and 24 h (T24) and 48 h after (T48) a Canadian football G-Sim. Peak isometric knee extensor torque of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrically evoked tetani at 20 Hz (P20) and 80 Hz (P80) were also recorded as direct NMF measures at TBase, TPre, TPost, and T48. At TPost, we observed significant declines in MVC, P20, and the MVC/P80 ratio (-15.3%, -15.7%, and -12.1%, respectively; n=12) along with reductions in CMJ takeoff velocity and peak power (-6.9% and -6.5%, respectively; n=12) and larger area of the center of pressure trajectory (95.2%; n=10) during a 60-s postural sway task. All variables were no longer different than baseline by T48. Acute neuromuscular impairment in this cohort is likely attributable to alterations in excitation-contraction coupling due to structural damage and central activation failure. Congruency between the direct and indirect measures of NMF suggests monitoring postural sway has the potential to identify both neuromuscular and somatosensory alterations induced by acute game-induced fatigue in collision-based team sports players.

  15. Neuromuscular disruption with ultrashort electrical pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei; Kolb, Juergen F.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Dayton, Thomas; Comeaux, James; Ashmore, John; Beason, Charles

    2006-05-01

    Experimental studies on single cells have shown that application of pulsed voltages, with submicrosecond pulse duration and an electric field on the order of 10 kV/cm, causes sudden alterations in the intracellular free calcium concentration, followed by immobilization of the cell. In order to examine electrical stimulation and incapacitation with such ultrashort pulses, experiments on anesthetized rats have been performed. The effect of single, 450 nanosecond monopolar pulses have been compared with that of single pulses with multi-microsecond duration (TASER pulses). Two conditions were explored: 1. the ability to elicit a muscle twitch, and, 2. the ability to suppress voluntary movement by using nanosecond pulses. The second condition is relevant for neuromuscular incapacitation. The preliminary results indicate that for stimulation microsecond pulses are advantageous over nanosecond pulses, whereas for incapacitation, the opposite seems to apply. The stimulation effects seem to scale with electrical charge, whereas the disruption effects don't follow a simple scaling law. The increase in intensity (time of incapacitation) for a given pulse duration, is increasing with electrical energy, but is more efficient for nanosecond than for microsecond pulses. This indicates different cellular mechanisms for incapacitation, most likely subcellular processes, which have been shown to become increasingly important when the pulse duration is shortened into the nanosecond range. If further studies can confirm these initial results, consequences of reduced pulse duration are a reduction in weight and volume of the pulse delivery system, and likely, because of the lower required energy for neuromuscular incapacitation, reduced safety risks.

  16. Doenças neuromusculares

    OpenAIRE

    Umbertina C. Reed

    2002-01-01

    Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo). Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de h...

  17. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  18. Vocational perspectives and neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries, F; Wevers, CWJ; Wintzen, AR; Busch, HFM; Howeler, CJ; deJager, AEJ; Padberg, GW; deVisser, M; Wokke, JHJ

    1997-01-01

    The present study analyses the actual occupational situation, vocational handicaps and past labour career of a group of about 1000 Dutch patients suffering from a neuromuscular disorder (NMD). On the basis of the likelihood of a substantial employment history and sufficient numbers of patients, four

  19. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in th

  20. Neuromuscular hip biomechanics and pathology in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Michael R; Schenker, Mara L; Martin, Hal D; Hogoboom, Doug; Philippon, Marc J

    2006-04-01

    Although hip arthroscopic techniques have been developed and evolved over the last 5 to 10 years to help active athletes, the mechanisms of athletic hip injuries across various sports are not well understood. The purpose of this article is to review the literature related to the osseous and ligamentous support as well as the neuromuscular control strategies associated with hip joint mechanics. The neuromuscular contributions to hip stability and mobility with respect to gait will be provided because this data represents the largest body of knowledge regarding hip function. Further, this article will present and describe probable mechanisms of injury in sporting activities most often associated with hip injury in the young athlete.

  1. Neuromuscular Bandage: Neurophysiological Effects and the Role of Fascias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena María Villota Chicaíza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, neuromuscular bandage, a therapeutic application created in 1979 by doctor Kenzo Kase has been introduced in the management of many disorders of the musculo-skeletal system and even more so in the treatment of neurological disorders; This therapeutic tool which consists of a self adhesive elastic bandage allows recovery of the injured party without diminishing its bodily function. According to the existing literature on the physiological effects of this therapeutic application in the body, you could say that there is consensus. However in this article the author wants to highlight the significant although little highlighted role played by the fas¬cias on the therapeutic effects of neuromuscular bandage, analyzing from a reflective perspective the analgesic, neuromechanical and circulatory effects, as fundamental effects of neuromuscular bandage and fascias in the same function, trying to bring a global understanding on the way they relate to all connective tissues, aspects that are of great importance for the proper evaluation of alterations and prescription of neuromuscular bandage

  2. Tortuosity and anomalous diffusion in the neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Daniel J.

    2008-04-01

    The signal transfer from nerve to muscle occurs by diffusion across the neuromuscular junction. The continuum level analysis of diffusion processes is based on the diffusion equation, which in one dimension is ∂c/∂t=D(∂2c/∂x2) , where c is the molecular concentration and D is the diffusivity. However, in confined systems such as the neuromuscular junction, the diffusion equation may not be valid, and even if valid the value of D may be altered by the confinement. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations are used to probe diffusion at the molecular level in a realistic model of a neuromuscular junction. The results show that diffusion is anomalous (i.e., not described by the diffusion equation) for time scales less than ˜0.01s , which is the time scale relevant for signaling processes in the synapse. At longer time scales, the diffusion is normal (i.e., described by the diffusion equation), but with a value of D that is reduced by a factor of ˜5 times compared to the value for diffusion in open space. As the width of the synaptic cleft decreases, these effects become even more pronounced. The physical basis of these results is described in terms of the structure of the neuromuscular junction.

  3. Neuromuscular Activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Squamata: Elapidae Venom in Vitro

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    Alejandro Carbajal-Saucedo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have examined the neuromuscular activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Mexican coral snake venom (MLV in vertebrate isolated nerve-muscle preparations. In chick biventer cervicis preparations, the MLV induced an irreversible concentration- and time-dependent (1–30 µg/mL neuromuscular blockade, with 50% blockade occurring between 8 and 30 min. Muscle contractures evoked by exogenous acetylcholine were completely abolished by MLV, whereas those of KCl were also significantly altered (86% ± 11%, 53% ± 11%, 89% ± 5% and 89% ± 7% for one, three, 10 and 30 µg of venom/mL, respectively; n = 4; p < 0.05. In mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations, MLV (1–10 µg/mL promoted a slight increase in the amplitude of twitch-tension (3 µg/mL, followed by neuromuscular blockade (n = 4; the highest concentration caused complete inhibition of the twitches (time for 50% blockade = 26 ± 3 min, without exhibiting a previous neuromuscular facilitation. The venom (3 µg/mL induced a biphasic modulation in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs/min, causing a significant increase after 15 min, followed by a decrease after 60 min (from 17 ± 1.4 (basal to 28 ± 2.5 (t15 and 12 ± 2 (t60. The membrane resting potential of mouse diaphragm preparations pre-exposed or not to d-tubocurarine (5 µg/mL was also significantly less negative with MLV (10 µg/mL. Together, these results indicate that M. laticollaris venom induces neuromuscular blockade by a combination of pre- and post-synaptic activities.

  4. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  5. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  6. Exercise therapy and other types of physical therapy for patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cup, E.H.C.; Pieterse, A.J.; Broek-Pastoor, J.M. Ten; Munneke, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and critically appraise the available evidence on exercise therapy and other types of physical therapies for patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, CINAHL,

  7. Comparison of effects of static, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and Mulligan stretching on hip flexion range of motion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, M S; Ozyurek, S; Tosun, Oç; Uzer, S; Gelecek, N

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and Mulligan technique on hip flexion range of motion (ROM) in subjects with bilateral hamstring tightness. A total of 40 students (mean age: 21.5±1.3 years, mean body height: 172.8±8.2 cm, mean body mass index: 21.9±3.0 kg · m(-2)) with bilateral hamstring tightness were enrolled in this randomized trial, of whom 26 completed the study. Subjects were divided into 4 groups performing (I) typical static stretching, (II) PNF stretching, (III) Mulligan traction straight leg raise (TSLR) technique, (IV) no intervention. Hip flexion ROM was measured using a digital goniometer with the passive straight leg raise test before and after 4 weeks by two physiotherapists blinded to the groups. 52 extremities of 26 subjects were analyzed. Hip flexion ROM increased in all three intervention groups (pMulligan TSLR technique in comparison to typical static stretching (p=0.016 and p=0.02, respectively). No significant difference was found between Mulligan TSLR technique and PNF stretching (p=0.920). The initial-final assessment difference of hip flexion ROM was similar in typical static stretching and no intervention (p=0.491). A 4-week stretching intervention is beneficial for increasing hip flexion ROM in bilateral hamstring tightness. However, PNF stretching and Mulligan TSLR technique are superior to typical static stretching. These two interventions can be alternatively used for stretching in hamstring tightness.

  8. Allosteric control in a metalloprotein dramatically alters function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Elizabeth Leigh; Zuris, John A; Wang, Charles; Vo, Phu Luong T; Axelrod, Herbert L; Cohen, Aina E; Paddock, Mark L; Nechushtai, Rachel; Onuchic, Jose N; Jennings, Patricia A

    2013-01-15

    Metalloproteins (MPs) comprise one-third of all known protein structures. This diverse set of proteins contain a plethora of unique inorganic moieties capable of performing chemistry that would otherwise be impossible using only the amino acids found in nature. Most of the well-studied MPs are generally viewed as being very rigid in structure, and it is widely thought that the properties of the metal centers are primarily determined by the small fraction of amino acids that make up the local environment. Here we examine both theoretically and experimentally whether distal regions can influence the metal center in the diabetes drug target mitoNEET. We demonstrate that a loop (L2) 20 Å away from the metal center exerts allosteric control over the cluster binding domain and regulates multiple properties of the metal center. Mutagenesis of L2 results in significant shifts in the redox potential of the [2Fe-2S] cluster and orders of magnitude effects on the rate of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer to an apo-acceptor protein. These surprising effects occur in the absence of any structural changes. An examination of the native basin dynamics of the protein using all-atom simulations shows that twisting in L2 controls scissoring in the cluster binding domain and results in perturbations to one of the cluster-coordinating histidines. These allosteric effects are in agreement with previous folding simulations that predicted L2 could communicate with residues surrounding the metal center. Our findings suggest that long-range dynamical changes in the protein backbone can have a significant effect on the functional properties of MPs.

  9. Facial rehabilitation: a neuromuscular reeducation, patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanswearingen, Jessie

    2008-05-01

    Individuals with facial paralysis and distorted facial expressions and movements secondary to a facial neuromotor disorder experience substantial physical, psychological, and social disability. Previously, facial rehabilitation has not been widely available or considered to be of much benefit. An emerging rehabilitation science of neuromuscular reeducation and evidence for the efficacy of facial neuromuscular reeducation, a process of facilitating the return of intended facial movement patterns and eliminating unwanted patterns of facial movement and expression, may provide patients with disorders of facial paralysis or facial movement control opportunity for the recovery of facial movement and function. We provide a brief overview of the scientific rationale for facial neuromuscular reeducation in the structure and function of the facial neuromotor system, the neuropsychology of facial expression, and relations among expressions, movement, and emotion. The primary purpose is to describe principles of neuromuscular reeducation, assessment and outcome measures, approach to treatment, the process, including surface-electromyographic biofeedback as an adjunct to reeducation, and the goal of enhancing the recovery of facial expression and function in a patient-centered approach to facial rehabilitation.

  10. Reactive Balance Control in Response to Perturbation in Unilateral Stance: Interaction Effects of Direction, Displacement and Velocity on Compensatory Neuromuscular and Kinematic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Freyler

    Full Text Available Unexpected sudden perturbations challenge postural equilibrium and require reactive compensation. This study aimed to assess interaction effects of the direction, displacement and velocity of perturbations on electromyographic (EMG activity, centre of pressure (COP displacement and joint kinematics to detect neuromuscular characteristics (phasic and segmental and kinematic strategies of compensatory reactions in an unilateral balance paradigm. In 20 subjects, COP displacement and velocity, ankle, knee and hip joint excursions and EMG during short (SLR, medium (MLR and long latency response (LLR of four shank and five thigh muscles were analysed during random surface translations varying in direction (anterior-posterior (sagittal plane, medial-lateral (frontal plane, displacement (2 vs. 3 cm and velocity (0.11 vs. 0.18 m/s of perturbation when balancing on one leg on a movable platform. Phases: SLR and MLR were scaled to increased velocity (P<0.05; LLR was scaled to increased displacement (P<0.05. Segments: phasic interrelationships were accompanied by segmental distinctions: distal muscles were used for fast compensation in SLR (P<0.05 and proximal muscles to stabilise in LLR (P<0.05. Kinematics: ankle joints compensated for both increasing displacement and velocity in all directions (P<0.05, whereas knee joint deflections were particularly sensitive to increasing displacement in the sagittal (P<0.05 and hip joint deflections to increasing velocity in the frontal plane (P<0.05. COP measures increased with increasing perturbation velocity and displacement (P<0.05. Interaction effects indicate that compensatory responses are based on complex processes, including different postural strategies characterised by phasic and segmental specifications, precisely adjusted to the type of balance disturbance. To regain balance after surface translation, muscles of the distal segment govern the quick regain of equilibrium; the muscles of the proximal limb

  11. Impaired axonal Na+ current by hindlimb unloading: implication for disuse neuromuscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimeglkham eBanzrai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading, which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. Hindlimb unloading was performed in normal 6-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal’s cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes (2.2 ± 1.3 mV [HLU] vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV [Control], P = 0.03. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC and late subexcitability (recovery cycle than the controls (0.075 ± 0.01 [HLU] vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 [Control], P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 [HLU] vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % [Control], P = 0.01, respectively. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na+ currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na+ channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by hindlimb unloading. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy.

  12. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): Its Mechanisms and Effects on Range of Motion and Muscular Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Kayla B.; Whitcomb, Tyler J.; Briggs, Wyatt O.; Hong, Junggi

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is common practice for increasing range of motion, though little research has been done to evaluate theories behind it. The purpose of this study was to review possible mechanisms, proposed theories, and physiological changes that occur due to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. Four theoretical mechanisms were identified: autogenic inhibition, reciprocal inhibition, stress relaxation, and the gate control theory. The studies s...

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies.

  14. Calcium channels, neuromuscular synaptic transmission and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Pagani, Mario R; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2008-09-15

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are essential in neuronal signaling and synaptic transmission, and their functional alterations underlie numerous human disorders whether monogenic (e.g., ataxia, migraine, etc.) or autoimmune. We review recent work on Ca(V)2.1 or P/Q channelopathies, mostly using neuromuscular junction preparations, and focus specially on the functional hierarchy among the calcium channels recruited to mediate neurotransmitter release when Ca(V)2.1 channels are mutated or depleted. In either case, synaptic transmission is greatly compromised; evidently, none of the reported functional replacements with other calcium channels compensates fully.

  15. Information Fusion-Based Optimal Attitude Control for an Alterable Thrust Direction Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude control is the inner‐loop and the most important part of the automatic flight control system of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV. The information fusion‐based optimal control method is applied in a UAV flight control system in this work. Firstly, a nonlinear model of alterable thrust direction UAV (ATD‐UAV is established and linearized for controller design. The longitudinal controller and lateral controller are respectively designed based on information fusion‐based optimal control, and then the information fusion flight control system is built up. Finally, the simulation of a nonlinear model described as ATD‐UAV is carried out, the results of which show the superiority of the information fusion‐based control strategy when compared to the single‐loop design method. We also show that the ATD technique improves the anti‐disturbance capacity of the UAV.

  16. Radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration haloes in albite: implications for alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization and element mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, D. C.; Chaudhuri, T.

    2016-12-01

    Uraninite, besides occurring in other modes, occurs as inclusions in albite in feldspathic schist in the Bagjata uranium deposits, Singhbhum shear zone, India. The feldspathic schist, considered the product of Na-metasomatism, witnessed multiple hydrothermal events, the signatures of which are preserved in the alteration halo in albite surrounding uraninite. Here we report radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration halo in albite and its various geological implications. Microscopic observation and SRIM/TRIM simulations reveal that the dimension of the alteration halo is dependent collectively on the zone of maximum cumulative α dose that albite was subjected to and by the extent of dissolution of uraninite during alteration. In well-preserved alteration haloes, from uraninite to the unaltered part of albite, the alteration minerals are systematically distributed in different zones; zone-1: K-feldspar; zone-2: chlorite; zone-3: LREE-phase/pyrite/U-Y-silicate. Based on textures of alteration minerals in the alteration microdomain, we propose a generalized Na+➔K+➔H+ alteration sequence, which is in agreement with the regional-scale alteration pattern. Integrating distribution of ore and alteration minerals in the alteration zone and their geochemistry, we further propose multiple events of U, REE, and sulfide mineralization/mobilization in the Bagjata deposit. The alteration process also involved interaction of the hydrothermal fluid with uraninite inclusions resulting in resorption of uraninite, redistribution of elements, including U and Pb, and resetting of isotopic clock. Thus, our study demonstrates that alteration halo is a miniature scale-model of the regional hydrothermal alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization/mobilization. This study further demonstrates that albite is vulnerable to radiation damage and damage-controlled fluid-assisted alteration, which may redistribute metals, including actinides, from radioactive minerals

  17. The effects of roxatidine on neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, R; Chiericozzi, M; Galatulas, I; Salvatore, G; Teli, M; Baggio, G; Castelli, M

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the H2 receptor antagonist roxatidine on the neuromuscular transmission by using the sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation of the rat in vivo. Roxatidine, administered by i.v. injection, potentiates the neuromuscular blockade induced by d-tubocurarine, pancuronium and aminoglycoside antibiotic, kanamycin. Moreover, the drug alone is capable of producing a blockade on the preparation stimulated at high frequency. The neuromuscular blockade induced by roxatidine is partially reversed by 4-aminopyridine but not by dimaprit.

  18. Supervised neuromuscular exercise prior to hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Roos, Ewa M; Overgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are indications of beneficial short-term effect of pre-operative exercise in reducing pain and improving activity of daily living after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. Though, information from studies conducting longer follow-ups and economic...... evaluations of exercise prior to THR and TKR is needed. The aim of the study was to analyse 12-month clinical effect and cost-utility of supervised neuromuscular exercise prior to THR and TKR surgery. METHODS: The study was conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial including 165 patients scheduled...... for standard THR or TKR at a hospital located in a rural area of Denmark. The patients were randomised to replacement surgery with or without an 8-week preoperative supervised neuromuscular exercise program (Clinical Trials registration no.: NCT01003756). Clinical effect was measured with Hip disability...

  19. Neuregulin1 displayed on motor axons regulates terminal Schwann cell-mediated synapse elimination at developing neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Li, Yue; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schwab, Markus H; Thompson, Wesley J

    2016-01-26

    Synaptic connections in the nervous system are rearranged during development and in adulthood as a feature of growth, plasticity, aging, and disease. Glia are implicated as active participants in these changes. Here we investigated a signal that controls the participation of peripheral glia, the terminal Schwann cells (SCs), at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice. Transgenic manipulation of the levels of membrane-tethered neuregulin1 (NRG1-III), a potent activator of SCs normally presented on motor axons, alters the rate of loss of motor inputs at NMJs during developmental synapse elimination. In addition, NMJs of adult transgenic mice that expressed excess axonal NRG1-III exhibited continued remodeling, in contrast to the more stable morphologies of controls. In fact, synaptic SCs of these adult mice with NRG1-III overexpression exhibited behaviors evident in wild type neonates during synapse elimination, including an affinity for the postsynaptic myofiber surface and phagocytosis of nerve terminals. Given that levels of NRG1-III expression normally peak during the period of synapse elimination, our findings identify axon-tethered NRG1 as a molecular determinant for SC-driven neuromuscular synaptic plasticity.

  20. Smartphone app design for the wireless control of a neuromuscular electrical stimulator device with integrated randomization allocation process for RCT applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Dean; Quinlan, Leo R; OLaighin, Gearoid

    2015-08-01

    The use of NMES has evolved over the last five decades. Technological advancements have transformed these once complex systems into user-friendly devices with enhanced control functions, leading to new applications of NMES being investigated. The use of Randomized Control Trial (RCT) methodology in evaluating the effectiveness of new and existing applications of NMES is a demanding process adding time and cost to a translation into clinical practice. Poor quality trials may result in poor evidence of NMES effectiveness. In this paper some of the key challenges encountered in NMES clinical trials are identified with the aim of purposing a solution to address these challenges through the adoption of Smartphone technology. The design and evaluation of a smartphone application to provide automatic blind randomization control and facilitating the wireless temporal control of a portable Bluetooth enabled NMES is presented.

  1. Evaluation of neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using chin surface electromyography of polysomnography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guo-ping; YE Jing-ying; HAN De-min; WANG Xiao-yi; ZHANG Yu-huan; LI Yan-ru

    2013-01-01

    Background It is believed that defects in upper airway neuromuscular control play a role in sleep apnea pathogenesis.Currently,there is no simple and non-invasive method for evaluating neuromuscular activity for the purpose of screening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.This study was designed to assess the validity of chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography in evaluating the neuromuscular activity of obstructive sleep apnea subjects and probe the neuromuscular contribution in the pathogenesis of the condition.Methods The chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography during normal breathing and obstructive apnea were quantified in 36 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The change of chin surface electromyography from normal breathing to obstructive apnea was expressed as the percent compensated electromyography value,where the percent compensated electromyography value =(normal breath surface electromyography-apnea surface electromyography)/normal breath surface electromyography,and the percent compensated electromyography values among subjects were compared.The relationship between sleep apnea related parameters and the percent compensated electromyography value was examined.Results The percent compensated electromyography value of the subjects varied from 1% to 90% and had a significant positive correlation with apnea hypopnea index (R2=0.382,P <0.001).Conclusions Recording and analyzing chin surface electromyography by routine polysomnography is a valid way of screening the neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The neuromuscular contribution is different among subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

  2. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seesing, F.M.; Drost, G.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to-one appointment are addressed. T

  3. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

    OpenAIRE

    Harmanjit Singh Hira; Amandeep Kaur; Anuj Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete ...

  4. Cambios en el control neuromuscular de seis músculos de miembro inferior durante CMJ máximos realizados con fatiga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fábrica

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hay diferentes opiniones respecto a si existen cambios en el control muscular cuando saltos con contramovimiento (CMJ son realizados en condición de fatiga. Este trabajo evalúa si la actividad y la secuencia temporal de activación de seis músculos de miembro inferior durante CMJ cambian por causa de la fatiga. El nivel de actividad varió principalmente en los músculos biarticulares. Los tiempos de los picos de actividad eléctrica sugieren la existencia de grupos de acción muscular, si bien ocurren cambios en la secuencia de activación dentro de cada grupo. Fue posible establecer que existe un patrón general de control muscular durante el apoyo en los CMJ, con ajustes del nivel y tiempo de activación que dependen del periodo temporal analizado y el músculo considerado.

  5. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing.

  6. Cambios en el control neuromuscular de seis músculos de miembro inferior durante CMJ máximos realizados con fatiga

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Fábrica; Paula González Rodríguez; Jefferson Fagundes Loss

    2013-01-01

    Hay diferentes opiniones respecto a si existen cambios en el control muscular cuando saltos con contramovimiento (CMJ) son realizados en condición de fatiga. Este trabajo evalúa si la actividad y la secuencia temporal de activación de seis músculos de miembro inferior durante CMJ cambian por causa de la fatiga. El nivel de actividad varió principalmente en los músculos biarticulares. Los tiempos de los picos de actividad eléctrica sugieren la existencia de grupos de acción muscular, si bien o...

  7. Alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo: a teratogenic mechanism for anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Levin, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Maternal use of anticonvulsants during the first trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in the offspring. Whether the increased risk is caused by the specific pharmacological mechanisms of certain anticonvulsants, the underlying epilepsy, or common genetic or environmental risk factors shared by epilepsy and malformations has been controversial. We hypothesize that anticonvulsant therapies during pregnancy that attain more successful inhibition of neurotransmission might lead to both better seizure control in the mother and stronger alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo that result in structural malformations. We propose that development of pharmaceuticals that do not alter cell resting transmembrane voltage levels could result in safer drugs.

  8. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Reduced Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the studies done to reduce neuromuscular strength loss during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Since there are animals that undergo fairly long periods of muscular disuse without any or minimal muscular atrophy, there is an answer to that might be applicable to human in situations that require no muscular use to diminish the effects of muscular atrophy. Three sets of ULLS studies were reviewed indicated that muscle strength decreased more than the muscle mass. The study reviewed exercise countermeasures to combat the atrophy, including: ischemia maintained during Compound muscle action potential (CMAP), ischemia and low load exercise, Japanese kaatsu, and the potential for rehabilitation or situations where heavy loading is undesirable. Two forms of countermeasures to unloading have been successful, (1) high-load resistance training has maintained muscle mass and strength, and low load resistance training with blood flow restriction (LL(sub BFR)). The LL(sub BFR) has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength. There has been significant interest in Tourniquet training. An increase in Growth Hormone(GH) has been noted for LL(sub BFR) exercise. An experimental study with 16 subjects 8 of whom performed ULLS, and 8 of whom performed ULLS and LL(sub BFR) exercise three times per week during the ULLS. Charts show the results of the two groups, showing that performing LL(sub BFR) exercise during 30 days of ULLS can maintain muscle size and strength and even improve muscular endurance.

  9. Effect of resistance training on neuromuscular junctions of young and aged muscles featuring different recruitment patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Michael R; Sherman, E Grace; Roby, Mackenzie A; Glass, Emily K; Harris, M Brennan

    2015-03-01

    To examine the effects of aging on neuromuscular adaptations to resistance training (i.e., weight lifting), young (9 months of age) and aged (20 months of age) male rats either participated in a 7-week ladder climbing protocol with additional weight attached to their tails or served as controls (n = 10/group). At the conclusion, rats were euthanized and hindlimb muscles were quickly removed and frozen for later analysis. Longitudinal sections of the soleus and plantaris muscles were collected, and pre- and postsynaptic features of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) were visualized with immunofluorescence staining procedures. Cross-sections of the same muscles were histochemically stained to determine myofiber profiles (fiber type and size). Statistical analysis was by two-way ANOVA (main effects of age and treatment) with significance set at P ≤ 0.05. Results revealed that training-induced remodeling of NMJs was evident only at the postsynaptic endplate region of soleus fast-twitch myofibers. In contrast, aging was associated with pre- and postsynaptic remodeling in fast- and slow-twitch myofibers of the plantaris. Although both the soleus and the plantaris muscles failed to display either training or aging-related alterations in myofiber size, aged plantaris muscles exhibited an increased expression of type I (slow-twitch) myofibers in conjunction with a reduced percentage of type II (fast-twitch) myofibers, suggesting early stages of sarcopenia. These data demonstrate the high degree of specificity of synaptic modifications made in response to exercise and aging and that the sparsely recruited plantaris is more vulnerable to the effects of aging than the more frequently recruited soleus muscle.

  10. The alteration of gray matter volume and cognitive control in adolescents with internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Internet gaming disorder (IGD has been investigated by many behavioral and neuroimaging studies, for it has became one of the main behavior disorders among adolescents. However, few studies focused on the relationship between alteration of gray matter volume (GMV and cognitive control feature in IGD adolescents. Methods: Twenty-eight participants with IAD and twenty-eight healthy age and gender matched controls participated in the study. Brain morphology of adolescents with IGD and healthy controls was investigated using an optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM technique. Cognitive control performances were measured by Stroop task, and correlation analysis was performed between brain structural change and behavioral performance in IGD group. Results: The results showed that GMV of the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, precuneus, supplementary motor area (SMA, superior parietal cortex, left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, left insula, and bilateral cerebellum decreased in the IGD participants compared with healthy controls. Moreover, GMV of the ACC was negatively correlated with the incongruent response errors of Stroop task in IGD group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the alteration of GMV is associated with the performance change of cognitive control in adolescents with IGD, which indicating substantial brain image effects induced by IGD.

  11. An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, C E; Pierce, J E; Schwarz, N F; Chi, L; Weinberger, A L; Schaeffer, D J; Rodrigue, A L; Camchong, J; Allison, J D; Yanasak, N E; Liu, T; Davis, C L; McDowell, J E

    2014-01-03

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) children 8-11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children.

  12. Assessing neuromuscular mechanisms in human-exoskeleton interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, N; Bonnet, V; Venture, G; Armande, N; Fraisse, P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we propose to evaluate a 7 DOF exoskeleton in terms of motion control. Using criteria from the human motor control literature, inverse optimization was performed to assess an industrial screwing movement. The results of our study show that the hybrid composition of the free arm movement was accurately determined. At contrary, when wearing the exoskeleton, which produces an arbitrary determined torque compensation, the motion is different from the naturally adopted one. This study is part of the evaluation and comprehension of the complex neuromuscular mechanism resulting in wearing an exoskeleton several hours per day for industrial tasks assistance.

  13. Alterations in neuromuscular function in girls with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Melcher, Jesper Sandfeld; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld;

    2016-01-01

    (90°) at 20 % Maximum Voluntary Contraction, and explosive isometric knee flexions while sitting. EMG was recorded from knee flexor and extensor muscles. RESULTS: Early rate of torque development was 53 % faster for GJH. Reduced hamstring muscle activation in girls with GJH was found while knee...... extensor and calf muscle activation did not differ between groups. Flexion-extension and medial-lateral co-activation ratio during flexions were higher for girls with GJH than NGJH girls. CONCLUSIONS: Girls with GJH had higher capacity to rapidly generate force than NGJH girls which may reflect motor...... adaptation to compensate for hypermobility. Higher medial muscle activation indicated higher levels of medial knee joint compression in girls with GJH. Increased flexion-extension co-activation ratios in GJH were explained by decreased agonist drive to the hamstrings....

  14. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the “Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)” and the “International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)” recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased

  15. Protein defects in neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainzof M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined progressive disorders of the muscle with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from severe congenital forms with rapid progression to milder forms with later onset and a slower course. In recent years, several proteins from the sarcolemmal muscle membrane (dystrophin, sarcoglycans, dysferlin, caveolin-3, from the extracellular matrix (alpha2-laminin, collagen VI, from the sarcomere (telethonin, myotilin, titin, nebulin, from the muscle cytosol (calpain 3, TRIM32, from the nucleus (emerin, lamin A/C, survival motor neuron protein, and from the glycosylation pathway (fukutin, fukutin-related protein have been identified. Mutations in their respective genes are responsible for different forms of neuromuscular diseases. Protein analysis using Western blotting or immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies is of the utmost importance for the differential diagnosis and elucidation of the physiopathology of each genetic disorder involved. Recent molecular studies have shown clinical inter- and intra-familial variability in several genetic disorders highlighting the importance of other factors in determining phenotypic expression and the role of possible modifying genes and protein interactions. Developmental studies can help elucidate the mechanism of normal muscle formation and thus muscle regeneration. In the last fifteen years, our research has focused on muscle protein expression, localization and possible interactions in patients affected by different forms of muscular dystrophies. The main objective of this review is to summarize the most recent findings in the field and our own contribution.

  16. Effects of neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure admitted to ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Araújo Carlos José Soares

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromuscular electrostimulation has become a promising issue in cardiovascular rehabilitation. However there are few articles published in the literature regarding neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure during hospital stay. Methods This is a randomized controlled pilot trial that aimed to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrostimulation in the walked distance by the six-minute walking test in 30 patients admitted to ward for heart failure treatment in a tertiary cardiology hospital. Patients in the intervention group performed a conventional rehabilitation and neuromuscular electrostimulation. Patients underwent 60 minutes of electrostimulation (wave frequency was 20 Hz, pulse duration of 20 us two times a day for consecutive days until hospital discharge. Results The walked distance in the six-minute walking test improved 75% in the electrostimulation group (from 379.7 ± 43.5 to 372.9 ± 46.9 meters to controls and from 372.9 ± 62.4 to 500 ± 68 meters to electrostimulation, p Conclusion The neuromuscular electrostimulation group showed greater improvement in the walked distance in the six-minute walking test in patients admitted to ward for compensation of heart failure.

  17. Stathmin is required for stability of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Ethan R; Heerssen, Heather M; Wright, Christina M; Davis, Graeme W; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2011-10-19

    Synaptic connections can be stably maintained for prolonged periods, yet can be rapidly disassembled during the developmental refinement of neural circuitry and following cytological insults that lead to neurodegeneration. To date, the molecular mechanisms that determine whether a synapse will persist versus being remodeled or eliminated remain poorly understood. Mutations in Drosophila stathmin were isolated in two independent genetic screens that sought mutations leading to impaired synapse stability at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we demonstrate that Stathmin, a protein that associates with microtubules and can function as a point of signaling integration, is necessary to maintain the stability of the Drosophila NMJ. We show that Stathmin protein is widely distributed within motoneurons and that loss of Stathmin causes impaired NMJ growth and stability. In addition, we show that stathmin mutants display evidence of defective axonal transport, a common feature associated with neuronal degeneration and altered synapse stability. The disassembly of the NMJ in stathmin includes a predictable sequence of cytological events, suggesting that a common program of synapse disassembly is induced following the loss of Stathmin protein. These data define a required function for Stathmin during synapse maintenance in a model system in which there is only a single stathmin gene, enabling future genetic investigation of Stathmin function with potential relevance to the cause and progression of neuromuscular degenerative disease.

  18. Research highlights of partial neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the latest progression on neuromuscular disorders for clinicians, this review screened and systemized the papers on neuromuscular disorders which were collected by PubMed from January 2013 to February 2014. This review also introduced the clinical diagnosis and treatment hightlights on glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ (GSD Ⅱ, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The important references will be useful for clinicians. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.004

  19. Neuromuscular action of crotalid venom: preliminar data

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dorvalina Silva; Luiz Antônio L. Resende; Anete Kimuni Ueda; Benedito Barraviera; Mendes, R P; Montenegro, Mário Rubens G. [UNESP

    1996-01-01

    Estudamos 6 pacientes, 2 cães e um coelho com intoxicação crotálica. Avaliamos a condução nervosa periférica sensitiva e motora, a transmissão neuromuscular e eletromiografias. As biópsias de músculo foram processadas por histoquímica. Os 6 pacientes apresentaram mononeuropatia sensitiva no nervo periférico adjacente ao local da inoculação do veneno e encontramos evidências histoquímicas de miopatia mitocondrial. Os defeitos da transmissão neuromuscular foram mínimos. A maioria dos autores ad...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that...

  1. Active zone stability: insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotransmitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efficacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By studying a model synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephosphorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our findings and their implications for future research.

  2. Volitional regulation of emotions produces distributed alterations in connectivity between visual, attention control, and default networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Kessler, Daniel; Phan, K Luan; Liberzon, Israel; Evans, Gary W; Welsh, Robert C; Kim, Pilyoung; Swain, James E

    2014-04-01

    The ability to volitionally regulate emotions is critical to health and well-being. While patterns of neural activation during emotion regulation have been well characterized, patterns of connectivity between regions remain less explored. It is increasingly recognized that the human brain is organized into large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) whose interrelationships are altered in characteristic ways during psychological tasks. In this fMRI study of 54 healthy individuals, we investigated alterations in connectivity within and between ICNs produced by the emotion regulation strategy of reappraisal. In order to gain a comprehensive picture of connectivity changes, we utilized connectomic psychophysiological interactions (PPI), a whole-brain generalization of standard single-seed PPI methods. In particular, we quantified PPI connectivity pair-wise across 837 ROIs placed throughout the cortex. We found that compared to maintaining one's emotional responses, engaging in reappraisal produced robust and distributed alterations in functional connections involving visual, dorsal attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Visual network in particular increased connectivity with multiple ICNs including dorsal attention and default networks. We interpret these findings in terms of the role of these networks in mediating critical constituent processes in emotion regulation, including visual processing, stimulus salience, attention control, and interpretation and contextualization of stimuli. Our results add a new network perspective to our understanding of the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation, and highlight that connectomic methods can play a valuable role in comprehensively investigating modulation of connectivity across task conditions.

  3. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Comparison of mechanomyography and acceleromyography for the assessment of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlinthout, L E H; Booij, L H D J; van Egmond, J; Robertson, E N

    2010-06-01

    We measured acceleromyography and mechanomyography simultaneously with monitoring of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in four patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Furthermore, we compared neuromuscular block measures from these patients with those from normal controls from previous studies. In myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients, the dose-response curve obtained with acceleromyography was steeper and right-shifted compared with that obtained using mechanomyography. However, the effective doses to produce 95% neuromuscular block determined with both acceleromyography and mechanomyography were similar to each other and to values found in normal patients. In the three myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients with mild to moderate disease, times to recovery from block were similar to those observed in normal controls. In both patients and normal controls, neuromuscular block recovered faster with acceleromyography. However, in one patient with severe muscle wasting, recovery of neuromuscular block was prolonged. We conclude that mechanomyography and acceleromyography cannot be used interchangeably to monitor neuromuscular block in myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

  5. Postoperative effects of neuromuscular exercise prior to hip or knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    neuromuscular exercise prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA) of the hip or knee did not confer additional benefits 3 months postoperatively compared with TJA alone. However, the intervention group experienced a statistically significant short-term benefit in ADL and pain, suggesting an earlier onset......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the postoperative efficacy of a supervised programme of neuromuscular exercise prior to hip or knee arthroplasty. METHODS: In this assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial, we included 165 patients scheduled for hip or knee arthroplasty due to severe osteoarthritis (OA......). An 8-week preoperative neuromuscular supervised exercise programme was delivered twice a week for 1 h as adjunct treatment to the standard arthroplasty procedure and compared with the standard arthroplasty procedure alone. The primary outcome was self-reported physical function measured...

  6. Prevalence of complications in neuromuscular scoliosis surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Shallu; Wu, Chunsen; Andersen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our objectives were primarily to review the published literature on complications in neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) surgery and secondarily, by means of a meta-analysis, to determine the overall pooled rates (PR) of various complications associated with NMS surgery. METHODS: PubMed and Em...

  7. Neuromuscular Effects of Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Pekoz

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: There is no evoked potential studies performed in organophosphate poisoning althoung electroneurography repetitive and P300 studies exist in literature. More further studies are needed to evaluate the cardiac and neuromuscular effects of organophosphate poisoning. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 795-800

  8. CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS OF NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING-DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AGOSTON, S; VANDENBROM, RHG; WIERDA, JMKH

    1992-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents provide muscle relaxation for a great variety of surgical procedures with light planes of general anaesthesia. Besides having a significant impact in the development of anaesthesia and surgery, these agents continue to play an important role as pharmacological tools in

  9. Altered resting-state frontoparietal control network in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiang-Yuan; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Matsuo, Kayako; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2015-04-01

    The frontoparietal control network, anatomically and functionally interposed between the dorsal attention network and default mode network, underpins executive control functions. Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) commonly exhibit deficits in executive functions, which are mainly mediated by the frontoparietal control network. Involvement of the frontoparietal control network based on the anterior prefrontal cortex in neurobiological mechanisms of ADHD has yet to be tested. We used resting-state functional MRI and seed-based correlation analyses to investigate functional connectivity of the frontoparietal control network in a sample of 25 children with ADHD (7-14 years; mean 9.94 ± 1.77 years; 20 males), and 25 age-, sex-, and performance IQ-matched typically developing (TD) children. All participants had limited in-scanner head motion. Spearman's rank correlations were used to test the associations between altered patterns of functional connectivity with clinical symptoms and executive functions, measured by the Conners' Continuous Performance Test and Spatial Span in the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Compared with TD children, children with ADHD demonstrated weaker connectivity between the right anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the right ventrolateral PFC, and between the left anterior PFC and the right inferior parietal lobule. Furthermore, this aberrant connectivity of the frontoparietal control network in ADHD was associated with symptoms of impulsivity and opposition-defiance, as well as impaired response inhibition and attentional control. The findings support potential integration of the disconnection model and the executive dysfunction model for ADHD. Atypical frontoparietal control network may play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of ADHD.

  10. O uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares no Brasil El uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares en Brasil Neuromuscular blockers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Simões de Almeida

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Dados estatísticos referentes ao uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares no Brasil são desconhecidos. Este trabalho se propõe a análise estatística desse tópico. MÉTODO: Foram compiladas 831 respostas de um questionário preenchido em parte por anestesiologistas presentes ao 48º Congresso Brasileiro de Anestesiologia em Recife, 2001 e em parte via Internet, por anestesiologistas cujos endereços eletrônicos constam na página da Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia (www.sba.com.br. Foram analisados os seguintes dados: tempo de contato com a especialidade, região onde atuam os anestesiologistas, uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares (BNM em ordem de preferência, indicações do uso de succinilcolina, uso do monitor da transmissão neuromuscular, critérios para se considerar o paciente descurarizado, uso de neostigmina, forma de administração dos BNM e descrição de complicações observadas. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos anestesiologistas em questão exerce a profissão há mais de 11 anos e o maior número de respostas foi proveniente da região sudeste do Brasil. O BNM mais empregado é o atracúrio, seguido de pancurônio e succinilcolina. A succinilcolina é mais empregada na indução rápida e em crianças (80% e 25% respectivamente. Monitores da transmissão neuromuscular, 53% dos anestesiologistas nunca usam, e como critério de recuperação, 92% consideram o paciente descurarizado mediante sinais clínicos. Em 45% das vezes os profissionais empregam a neostigmina de forma rotineira, e 94% administra os BNM sob forma de bolus. Cerca de 30% registra ter havido complicação decorrente do uso de BNM. As complicações mais apontadas foram o bloqueio prolongado, o broncoespasmo grave e a curarização residual. CONCLUSÕES: O atracúrio é o bloqueador neuromuscular mais empregado no Brasil, há percentual alto de uso da succinilcolina em situações não emergenciais, o uso de monitores da transmiss

  11. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sina; Chao, TeKang; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI) that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT). In this study, one group of rats (n = 6) was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibialis anterior [TA]) muscle timed according to robot-controlled hind-limb position (FES+RTT group); a second group (n = 5) received a similarly patterned stimulation, randomly timed with respect to the rats' hind-limb movements, while they were in their cages (randomly timed stimulation [RS] group). After 4 wk of training, we tested treadmill stepping ability and compared kinematic measures of hind-limb movement and electromyography (EMG) activity in the TA. The FES+RTT group stepped faster and exhibited TA EMG profiles that better matched the applied stimulation profile during training than the RS group. The shape of the EMG profile was assessed by "gamma," a measure that quantified the concentration of EMG activity during the early swing phase of the gait cycle. This gamma measure was 112% higher for the FES+RTT group than for the RS group. The FES+RTT group exhibited burst-to-step latencies that were 41% shorter and correspondingly exhibited a greater tendency to perform ankle flexion movements during stepping than the RS group, as measured by the percentage of time the hind limb was either dragging or in withdrawal. The results from this study support the hypothesis that locomotor training consisting of FES timed to hind-limb movement improves the activation of hind-limb muscle more so than RS alone. Our rodent FES+RTT system can serve as a tool to help further develop this combined therapy to target appropriate neurophysiological changes for locomotor control.

  12. The effect of timing electrical stimulation to robotic-assisted stepping on neuromuscular activity and associated kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Askari, MS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of previous studies raise the question of how timing neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (FES to limb movements during stepping might alter neuromuscular control differently than patterned stimulation alone. We have developed a prototype FES system for a rodent model of spinal cord injury (SCI that times FES to robotic treadmill training (RTT. In this study, one group of rats (n = 6 was trained with our FES+RTT system and received stimulation of the ankle flexor (tibialis anterior [TA] muscle timed according to robot-controlled hind-limb position (FES+RTT group; a second group (n = 5 received a similarly patterned stimulation, randomly timed with respect to the rats’ hind-limb movements, while they were in their cages (randomly timed stimulation [RS] group. After 4 wk of training, we tested treadmill stepping ability and compared kinematic measures of hind-limb movement and electromyography (EMG activity in the TA. The FES+RTT group stepped faster and exhibited TA EMG profiles that better matched the applied stimulation profile during training than the RS group. The shape of the EMG profile was assessed by "gamma," a measure that quantified the concentration of EMG activity during the early swing phase of the gait cycle. This gamma measure was 112% higher for the FES+RTT group than for the RS group. The FES+RTT group exhibited burst-to-step latencies that were 41% shorter and correspondingly exhibited a greater tendency to perform ankle flexion movements during stepping than the RS group, as measured by the percentage of time the hind limb was either dragging or in withdrawal. The results from this study support the hypothesis that locomotor training consisting of FES timed to hind-limb movement improves the activation of hind-limb muscle more so than RS alone. Our rodent FES+RTT system can serve as a tool to help further develop this combined therapy to target appropriate neurophysiological changes for locomotor control.

  13. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  14. Effect of exercise therapy on neuromuscular activity and knee strength in female adolescents with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S.; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L.;

    2016-01-01

    . A random subsample of 57 female adolescents was included and tested at baseline and after 3months. Neuromuscular control of the knee was quantified as the complexity of surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis during stair descent. Secondary outcomes were complexity of knee...

  15. Electromyographic and Neuromuscular Force Patterns Associated with Unexpectedly Loaded Rapid Limb Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Charles; Simmons, Roger W.

    Bi-articular, unidirectional arm movements were studied to evaluate the electromyographic (EMG) and neuromuscular force patterns that occur when a limb is unexpectedly perturbed. A series of training trials were continued with a control load spring attached to the apparatus until a pre-specified criterion for learning was attained. The limb was…

  16. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  17. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

  18. Effects of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular adaptations in adults with poststroke hemiparesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Zeeman, Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen R

    2011-01-01

    the effect of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular and functional adaptations in outpatients suffering from hemiparesis after stroke. A within-subject repeated-measures design with the paretic leg as the experimental leg and the nonparetic leg as the control leg was used. Eleven outpatients...

  19. Comparison between two different neuromuscular electrical stimulation protocols for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial Comparação de diferentes procedimentos de estimulação elétrica neuromuscular utilizados no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço feminina: ensaio clínico randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila G. J. M. Alves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES is widely treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI but there is no consensus in literature regarding the most effective treatment parameters. OBJECTIVE: To compare two NMESintra-vaginal protocols for the treatment of SUI in women. METHODS: The study included 20 volunteers with an average age of 55.55±6.51 years and with the clinical diagnosis of SUI. Volunteers were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 (G1 received NMES with medium-frequency current and group 2 (G2 received NMES with low-frequency current. Functional assessments of pelvic floor muscles (PFM were performed by perineometry. The severity of signs and symptoms were objectively evaluated using the 1 hour pad test and subjectively evaluated using a visual analog scale that measured the discomfort caused by the SUI. Shapiro-Wilk test was used to analyze data normality, and the Friedman test was used to analyze nonparametric data. For analysis of symptoms related to SUI the Fisher exact test and the Mann-Whitney test were used. Significance level of 5% was set for all data analysis. RESULTS: No significant differences (p>0.05 were found between groups for any of the variable assessed. The within group analysis of initial and final evaluations (after NMES demonstrated significant differences (pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A estimulação elétrica neuromuscular (EENM é amplamente utilizada no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE, no entanto não há consenso na literatura sobre os parâmetros de tratamento mais eficazes. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os procedimentos de EENM intravaginal no tratamento de mulheres com IUE. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 20 voluntárias com idade média de 55,55±6,51 anos, com diagnóstico clínico de IUE. As voluntárias foram divididas aleatoriamente em dois grupos: grupo 1 (G1, que recebeu EENM com corrente de média frequência, e grupo 2 (G2, com corrente de baixa frequência. A

  20. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  1. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  2. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockers in development of critical illness neuromuscular abnormalities: A historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Susan R

    2017-02-01

    Weakness is common in critically ill patients, associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation and increased mortality. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockade (NMB) administration have been implicated as etiologies of acquired weakness in the intensive care unit. Medical literature since the 1970s is replete with case reports and small case series of patients with weakness after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, prolonged NMB, or both. Several risk factors for weakness appear in the early literature, including large doses of steroids, the dose and duration of NMB, hyperglycemia, and the duration of mechanical ventilation. With improved quality of data, however, the association between weakness and steroids or NMB wanes. This may reflect changes in clinical practice, such as a reduction in steroid dosing, use of cisatracurium besylate instead of aminosteroid NMBs, improved glycemic control, or trends in minimizing mechanical ventilatory support. Thus, based on the most recent and high-quality literature, neither corticosteroids in commonly used doses nor NMB is associated with increased duration of mechanical ventilation, the greatest morbidity of weakness. Minimizing ventilator support as soon as the patient's condition allows may be associated with a reduction in weakness-related morbidity.

  3. Man-machine interface system for neuromuscular training and evaluation based on EMG and MMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  4. Man-Machine Interface System for Neuromuscular Training and Evaluation Based on EMG and MMG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System, a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS. In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  5. Adducin at the Neuromuscular Junction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Hanging on for Dear Life

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    Charles eKrieger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS/motor neurone disease (MND is associated with defective nerve-muscle contacts early in the disease suggesting that perturbations of cell adhesion molecules linking the pre- and post-synaptic components of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ are involved. To search for candidate proteins implicated in this degenerative process, researchers have studied the Drosophila larval NMJ and find that the cytoskeleton-associated protein, adducin, is ideally placed to regulate synaptic contacts. By controlling the levels of synaptic proteins, adducin can de-stabilize synaptic contacts. Interestingly, elevated levels of phosphorylated adducin have been reported in ALS patients and in a mouse model of the disease. Adducin is regulated by phosphorylation through protein kinase C (PKC, some isoforms of which exhibit Ca2+-dependence, raising the possibility that changes in intracellular Ca2+ might alter PKC activation and secondarily influence adducin phosphorylation. Furthermore, adducin has interactions with the alpha subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, the phosphorylation of adducin may secondarily influence synaptic stability at the NMJ and so influence pre- and post-synaptic integrity at the NMJ in ALS.

  6. Neurovascular alterations in chronic hepatitis C: a case-control study

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    Valentina Vedovetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis C is a major health problem: approximately 170 million people are infected with the hepatitis C virus worldwide. It is unclear whether chronic hepatitis C affects atherosclerosis and whether it can cause endothelial and/or autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction. Materials and methods: From April 2008 through April 2009, we studied 76 patients with biopsyconfirmed chronic hepatitis C and no evidence of cirrhosis, ascites, portal hypertension, encephalopathy, or hepatocellular carcinoma. The age-, sex-, BMI- and cardiovascular risk factor- matched control group comprised 76 healthy, HCV-negative individuals with no evidence of liver, autoimmune, or immunoproliferative diseases and no history of cardiovascular events. Twenty five of the hepatitis C patients were treatment-naive; the other 51 had been treated with interferon (but only 25 had persistent virological responses. Color Doppler sonography was used to measure the intima-media-thickness (IMT of the common and internal carotid arteries. Endothelial function was assessed in the brachial artery with the flow-mediated-dilatation (FMD test. The ANS was assessed with the tilt, laying to standing, Valsalva, hand grip, deep breath, and stroop tests. Results: The case group (mean age 52 + 13 years had a significantly higher internal carotid IMT (0.86 + 0.3 vs 0.67 + 0.1 mmfor controls; p = 0.002. Chronic hepatitis C was also associated with an odds ratio for carotid plaque formation (reflected by an IMT > 1.3 mm of 2.15. Cases also had significantly reduced FMD in the brachial artery (0.46 + 0.9 vs 0.76 + 0.7 for controls; p = 0.005 and significantly altered sympathetic and parasympathetic function (p = 0.001 vs controls in the Valsalva, hand grip, deep breath, and stroop tests. Within the case group, all alterations were more severe in patients with significant viremia. Discussion: Our findings suggest that chronic hepatitis C may be a nonclassic cardiovascular risk

  7. Sarcocystis fayeri in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica; Shapiro, Karen; Sisó, Silvia; Williams, Diane C; Rejmanek, Daniel; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of Sarcocystis fayeri-induced toxicity in people consuming horse meat warrant investigation on the prevalence and molecular characterization of Sarcocystis spp. infection in horses. Sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses have been commonly regarded as an incidental finding. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease. Our findings indicated that S. fayeri infection was common in young mature horses with neuromuscular disease and could be associated with myopathic and neurogenic processes. The number of infected muscles and number of sarcocysts per muscle were significantly higher in diseased than in control horses. S. fayeri was predominantly found in low oxidative highly glycolytic myofibers. This pathogen had a high glycolytic metabolism. Common clinical signs of disease included muscle atrophy, weakness with or without apparent muscle pain, gait deficits, and dysphagia in horses with involvement of the tongue and esophagus. Horses with myositis were lethargic, apparently painful, stiff, and reluctant to move. Similar to humans, sarcocystosis and cardiomyopathy can occur in horses. This study did not establish causality but supported a possible association (8.9% of cases) with disease. The assumption of Sarcocysts spp. being an incidental finding in every case might be inaccurate.

  8. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight...... would provide a better surgical workspace. METHODS: This was an investigator-initiated, assessor- and patient-blinded randomised cross-over study. A total of 34 patients with planned laparoscopic umbilical, incisional and linea alba herniotomy were studied. Patients would be randomised to receive deep......'s rating of surgical conditions during suturing, duration of surgery and duration of the suturing of the hernia. CONCLUSION: This randomised cross-over study investigated a potential effect on the surgical workspace in laparoscopic ventral herniotomy using deep NMB compared with no NMB. The study may...

  9. DNA Methylation Changes Separate Allergic Patients from Healthy Controls and May Reflect Altered CD4(+) T-Cell Population Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Nestor, Colm E; Fredrik Barrenäs; Hui Wang; Antonio Lentini; Huan Zhang; Sören Bruhn; Rebecka Jörnsten; Langston, Michael A.; Gary Rogers; Mika Gustafsson; Mikael Benson

    2014-01-01

    Altered DNA methylation patterns in CD4(+) T-cells indicate the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. However, the identification of these alterations is complicated by the heterogeneity of most inflammatory diseases. Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) is an optimal disease model for the study of DNA methylation because of its well-defined phenotype and etiology. We generated genome-wide DNA methylation (N(patients) = 8, N(controls) = 8) and gene expression (N(patients) ...

  10. Ação neuro-muscular do veneno crotálico: dados preliminares Neuromuscular action of crotalid venom: preliminar data

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    Maria Dorvalina Silva

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos 6 pacientes, 2 cães e um coelho com intoxicação crotálica. Avaliamos a condução nervosa periférica sensitiva e motora, a transmissão neuromuscular e eletromiografias. As biópsias de músculo foram processadas por histoquímica. Os 6 pacientes apresentaram mononeuropatia sensitiva no nervo periférico adjacente ao local da inoculação do veneno e encontramos evidências histoquímicas de miopatia mitocondrial. Os defeitos da transmissão neuromuscular foram mínimos. A maioria dos autores admite que veneno crotálico determina síndrome miastênica. Nossos achados indicam que ptose palpebral, facies miastênico e fraqueza muscular observados após acidente crotálico, correspondem provavelmente a miopatia mitocondrial, muitas vezes transitória e reversível.We studied 6 patients and 2 dogs that have been bitten by South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus and one rabbit inoculated with crotalid venom. We analized sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction, repetitive stimulation for studying neuromuscular transmission and electromyographies. Muscle biopsies were processed by histochemistry. All patients had peripheral mononeuropathy of the closest sensitive nerve to the area of snakebite. The neuromuscular transmission alterations were minimal. Muscle histochemistry of 4 patients, 2 dogs and 1 rabbit showed findings of mitochondrial myopathy. The majority of authors admit that crotalid venom causes myastenic syndrome. Our findings suggest that palpebral ptosis, myastenic facies and muscular weakness observed after crotalid poisoning are, probably, due to transient and reversible mitochondrial myopathy. As far as we know, this is the first report on the ability of the venom of this rattlesnake to cause local sensitive mononeuropathy and the first muscle histochemistry showing mitochondrial myopathy in humans poisoned by crotalid venom.

  11. Controlled meal frequency without caloric restriction alters peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production

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    Longo Dan L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent fasting (IF improves healthy lifespan in animals by a mechanism involving reduced oxidative damage and increased resistance to stress. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of controlled meal frequency on immune responses in human subjects. Objective A study was conducted to establish the effects of controlled diets with different meal frequencies, but similar daily energy intakes, on cytokine production in healthy male and female subjects. Design In a crossover study design with an intervening washout period, healthy normal weight middle-age male and female subjects (n = 15 were maintained for 2 months on controlled on-site one meal per day (OMD or three meals per day (TMD isocaloric diets. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs culture supernatants from subjects were analyzed for the presence of inflammatory markers using a multiplex assay. Results There were no significant differences in the inflammatory markers in the serum of subjects on the OMD or TMD diets. There was an increase in the capacity of PBMCs to produce cytokines in subjects during the first month on the OMD or TMD diets. Lower levels of TNF-α, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were produced by PBMCs from subjects on the OMD versus TMD diet. Conclusions PBMCs of subjects on controlled diets exhibit hypersensitivities to cellular stimulation suggesting that stress associated with altered eating behavior might affect cytokine production by immune cells upon stimulation. Moreover, stimulated PBMCs derived from healthy individuals on a reduced meal frequency diet respond with a reduced capability to produce cytokines.

  12. Judicial Control over Althingi: Altered Balance of Powers in the Constitutional System

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    Björg Thorarensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on how the control of the judiciary over the legislature has increased in the last decades and the reasons for altered balance of powers in the Icelandic constitutional system are explored. Earlier theories of parliamentary precedence over other branches of state power are in transition. There is a growing trend towards the balancing of powers, in which the courts monitor that legislation complies with the constitution. A comparison is made with the developments in the constitutional systems of Denmark and Norway which points at the same direction. The European Convention on Human Rights and constitutional amendments in 1995 have affected the interpretation methods of the Icelandic courts and strengthened their supervisory role. Ideas underlying constitutional democracy, rule of law and effective remedies for individuals are prevailing over the idea of preferred position of the legislative power vis-à-vis the judiciary. The courts see it as a constitutional duty to adjudicate whether a legislative act conforms with constitutional human rights. The Supreme Court of Iceland has referred to the wide discretion of the legislature in the field of fiscal powers, such as regarding taxation and the social security system. However, even where legislation aims at the implementation of important political policies, the discretion of Althingi is subject to certain limits. The effective judicial control requires that Althingi must assess carefully whether legislation which limits constitutionally protected human rights conforms with the principles of equality and proportionality.

  13. Neuromuscular Junctions as Key Contributors and Therapeutic Targets in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boido, Marina; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive autosomal neuromuscular disease, representing the most common fatal pediatric pathology. Even though, classically and in a simplistic way, it is categorized as a motor neuron (MN) disease, there is an increasing general consensus that its pathogenesis is more complex than expected. In particular, neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are affected by dramatic alterations, including immaturity, denervation and neurofilament accumulation, associated to impaired synaptic functions: these abnormalities may in turn have a detrimental effect on MN survival. Here, we provide a description of NMJ development/maintenance/maturation in physiological conditions and in SMA, focusing on pivotal molecules and on the time-course of pathological events. Moreover, since NMJs could represent an important target to be exploited for counteracting the pathology progression, we also describe several therapeutic strategies that, directly or indirectly, aim at NMJs. PMID:26869891

  14. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

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    Thiel Cora S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space.

  15. The effects of pentoxifylline on skeletal muscle contractility and neuromuscular transmission during hypoxia

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    Simsek-Duran Fatma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX, a drug that is mainly used for indications related to tissue hypoxia, on hypoxia-induced inhibition of skeletal muscle contractility and neuromuscular transmission in mice. We hypothesized that chronic PTX treatment alters skeletal muscle contractility and hypoxia-induced dysfunction. Materials and Methods : Mice were treated with 50 mg/kg PTX or saline intraperitoneally for a week. Following ether anesthesia, diaphragm muscles were removed; isometric muscle contractions and action potentials were recorded. Time to reach neuromuscular blockade and the rate of recovery of muscle contractility were assessed during hypoxia and re-oxygenation. Results : The PTX group displayed 90% greater twitch amplitudes (P < 0.01. Hypoxia depressed twitch contractions and caused neuromuscular blockade in both groups. However, neuromuscular blockade occurred earlier in PTX-treated animals (P < 0.05. Muscle contractures developed during hypoxia were more pronounced in the PTX group (P < 0.05. Re-oxygenation reduced contracture and indirect muscle contractions resumed. The rate of recovery of contractions was faster (P < 0.05 and the amplitude of contractions was greater (P < 0.01 in the PTX group. PTX treatment increased amplitude (P < 0.05 and shortened action potential (P < 0.05 without altering resting membrane potential, excitation threshold, and neurotransmitter release. Conclusion : Chronic PTX treatment increases diaphragm contractility, but amplifies hypoxia-induced contractile dysfunction in mice. These results may implicate important clinical consequences for clinical usage of PTX in hypoxia-related conditions.

  16. Influence of intense neuromuscular blockade on surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Donatsky, Anders Meller; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2015-01-01

    neuromuscular block on surgical conditions with a subjective rating scale, force needed to close the fascia, incidences of abdominal contractions while suctioning the lungs, width of the wound diastase and operating time as outcome parameters. RESULTS: In all six pigs no abdominal contractions occurred while......, operating time and subjective ratings using a four-point rating scale when comparing no neuromuscular block with intense neuromuscular block. However, these outcomes were related to the order of the suturing round. CONCLUSION: Intense neuromuscular block prevented abdominal muscle contractions but did...

  17. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions: an educational review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this educational review is to provide an overview of the clinical application of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the extremities in patients with upper motor neurone lesions. In general two methods of electrical stimulation can be distinguished: (i) therapeutic electrical stimulation, and (ii) functional electrical stimulation. Therapeutic electrical stimulation improves neuromuscular functional condition by strengthening muscles, increasing motor control, reducing spasticity, decreasing pain and increasing range of motion. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation may be used for neuromuscular electrical stimulation inducing repetitive muscle contraction, electromyography-triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation, position-triggered electrical stimulation and subsensory or sensory transcutaneous electric stimulation. Functional electrical stimulation provokes muscle contraction and thereby produces a functionally useful movement during stimulation. In patients with spinal cord injuries or stroke, electrical upper limb neuroprostheses are applied to enhance upper limb and hand function, and electrical lower limb neuroprostheses are applied for restoration of standing and walking. For example, a dropped foot stimulator is used to trigger ankle dorsiflexion to restore gait function. A review of the literature and clinical experience of the use of therapeutic electrical stimulation as well as of functional electrical stimulation in combination with botulinum toxin, exercise therapy and/or splinting are presented. Although the evidence is limited we conclude that neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality to improve function, and that combination with other treatments has an additive therapeutic effect.

  18. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception.

  19. Mindfulness meditation training alters stress-related amygdala resting state functional connectivity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taren, Adrienne A; Gianaros, Peter J; Greco, Carol M; Lindsay, Emily K; Fairgrieve, April; Brown, Kirk Warren; Rosen, Rhonda K; Ferris, Jennifer L; Julson, Erica; Marsland, Anna L; Bursley, James K; Ramsburg, Jared; Creswell, J David

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that mindfulness meditation training interventions reduce stress and improve stress-related health outcomes, but the neural pathways for these effects are unknown. The present research evaluates whether mindfulness meditation training alters resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the amygdala, a region known to coordinate stress processing and physiological stress responses. We show in an initial discovery study that higher perceived stress over the past month is associated with greater bilateral amygdala-subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) rsFC in a sample of community adults (n = 130). A follow-up, single-blind randomized controlled trial shows that a 3-day intensive mindfulness meditation training intervention (relative to a well-matched 3-day relaxation training intervention without a mindfulness component) reduced right amygdala-sgACC rsFC in a sample of stressed unemployed community adults (n = 35). Although stress may increase amygdala-sgACC rsFC, brief training in mindfulness meditation could reverse these effects. This work provides an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training promotes functional neuroplastic changes, suggesting an amygdala-sgACC pathway for stress reduction effects.

  20. The origins of neuromuscular fatigue post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, S; Ivanova, T D; Doherty, T J; Campbell, J A; Garland, S J

    2011-10-01

    Fatigue post-stroke is a disabling and persistent symptom affecting many stroke survivors. Despite its high prevalence, the pathophysiology underlying this phenomenon remains obscure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the origins of neuromuscular fatigue post-stroke. Ten chronic stroke survivors and 10 controls sustained an isometric contraction at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with the ankle dorsiflexors. Motor evoked potential (MEP), cortical silent period (SP), voluntary activation, M wave and contractile properties were evaluated before, during and after fatigue among the paretic, non-paretic and control limbs. The pattern of response to fatigue in the non-paretic and control limbs was comparable; therefore, results are presented between the paretic and non-paretic limbs. Before fatigue, reduced MVC peak torque and MEP amplitude were observed on the paretic side in comparison with the non-paretic side. During fatigue, the cortical SP duration increased significantly in both limbs, whereas the MEP amplitude significantly increased only in the non-paretic limb. After fatigue, MVC peak torque decreased significantly in both limbs. Significant reductions in M wave and twitch peak torque were observed in both limbs, pointing to the development of peripheral fatigue. However, central fatigue, evident by a significant reduction in voluntary activation, was greater in the paretic than in the non-paretic limb. After stroke, an inability to increase central excitability in response to an increased cortical inhibition associated with the fatiguing contraction may contribute to central fatigue observed in the paretic limb, which may also be linked to increased self-reported fatigue during activities of daily living. These findings advance our understanding of the neuromuscular basis of fatigue post-stroke.

  1. Autonomic control of the heart is altered in Sprague-Dawley rats with spontaneous hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gilliam-Davis, Shea; Kock, Nancy D; Diz, Debra I

    2011-06-01

    The renal medulla plays an important role in cardiovascular regulation, through interactions with the autonomic nervous system. Hydronephrosis is characterized by substantial loss of renal medullary tissue. However, whether alterations in autonomic control of the heart are observed in this condition is unknown. Thus we assessed resting hemodynamics and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate in urethane/chloralose-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with normal or hydronephrotic kidneys. While resting arterial pressure was similar, heart rate was higher in rats with hydronephrosis (290 ± 12 normal vs. 344 ± 11 mild/moderate vs. 355 ± 13 beats/min severe; P < 0.05). The evoked BRS to increases, but not decreases, in pressure was lower in hydronephrotic rats (1.06 ± 0.06 normal vs. 0.72 ± 0.10 mild/moderate vs. 0.63 ± 0.07 ms/mmHg severe; P < 0.05). Spectral analysis methods confirmed reduced parasympathetic function in hydronephrosis, with no differences in measures of indirect sympathetic activity among conditions. As a secondary aim, we investigated whether autonomic dysfunction in hydronephrosis is associated with activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). There were no differences in circulating angiotensin peptides among conditions, suggesting that the impaired autonomic function in hydronephrosis is independent of peripheral RAS activation. A possible site for angiotensin II-mediated BRS impairment is the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). In normal and mild/moderate hydronephrotic rats, NTS administration of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist candesartan significantly improved the BRS, suggesting that angiotensin II provides tonic suppression to the baroreflex. In contrast, angiotensin II blockade produced no significant effect in severe hydronephrosis, indicating that at least within the NTS baroreflex suppression in these animals is independent of angiotensin II.

  2. Altered Transcriptional Control Networks with Trans-Differentiation of Isogenic Mutant KRas NSCLC Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Haley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe capacity of cancer cells to undergo epithelial mesenchymal trans-differentiation has been implicated as a factor driving metastasis, through the acquisition of enhanced migratory/invasive cell programs and the engagement of anti-apoptotic mechanisms promoting drug and radiation resistance. Our aim was to define molecular signaling changes associated with mesenchymal trans-differentiation in two KRas mutant NSCLC models. We focused on central transcription and epigenetic regulators predicted to be important for mesenchymal cell survival.Experimental designWe have modeled trans-differentiation and cancer stemness in inducible isogenic mutant KRas H358 and A549 non-small cell lung cell backgrounds. We employed large-scale quantitative phospho-proteomic, proteomic, protein-protein interaction, RNA-Seq and network function prediction approaches to dissect the molecular events associated with the establishment and maintenance of the mesenchymal state.ResultsGene set enrichment and pathway prediction indicated BMI1, KDM5B, RUNX2, MYC/MAX, NFkB, LEF1, and HIF1 target networks were significantly enriched in the trans-differentiation of H358 and A549 NSCLC models. Physical overlaps between multiple networks implicate NR4A1 as an overlapping control between TCF and NFkB pathways. Enrichment correlations also indicated marked decrease in cell cycling, which occurred early in the EMT process. RNA abundance time course studies also indicated early expression of epigenetic and chromatin regulators, including CITED4, RUNX3, CMBX1 and SIRT4. ConclusionsMultiple transcription and epigenetic pathways where altered between epithelial and mesenchymal tumor cell states, notably the polycomb repressive complex-1, HP1g and BAF/Swi-Snf. Network analysis suggests redundancy in the activation and inhibition of pathway regulators, notably factors controlling epithelial cell state.

  3. Active zone stability:insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolin Tian; Chunlai Wu

    2015-01-01

    The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotrans-mitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efifcacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By study-ing a model synapse, theDrosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephos-phorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our ifndings and their implications for future research.

  4. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmanjit Singh Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete hemogram, kidney and liver functions, serum electrolytes, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK were tested. In addition, two patients underwent nerve conduction velocity (NCV test and electromyography. Results: Twelve patients were included in the present study. Their age was between 18 and 34 years. Fever, myalgia, and motor weakness of limbs were most common presenting symptoms. Motor weakness developed on 2 nd to 4 th day of illness in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient, it developed on 10 th day of illness. Ten of 12 showed hypokalemia. One was of Guillain-Barré syndrome and other suffered from myositis; they underwent NCV and electromyography. Serum CPK and SGOT raised in 8 out of 12 patients. CPK of patient of myositis was 5098 IU. All of 12 patients had thrombocytopenia. WBC was in normal range. Dengue virus was isolated in three patients, and it was of serotype 1. CSF was normal in all. Within 24 hours, those with hypokalemia recovered by potassium correction. Conclusions: It was concluded that the dengue virus infection led to acute neuromuscular weakness because of hypokalemia, myositis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It was suggested to look for presence of hypokalemia in such patients.

  5. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijkoningen, D.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Leunissen, I.; Linden, C. van der; Leemans, A.; Sunaert, S.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Swinnen, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importanc

  6. [Transition experience of patients with neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greif, Valeria; Ugo, Florencia; de Castro Pérez, M Fernanda; Mozzoni, Julieta; Aguerre, Verónica; Saldías, Milagros; Monges, M Soledad

    2017-02-01

    Neuromuscular diseases are mostly genetic disorders, with chronic and progressive course. Affected people are at high risk of developing physical and emotional disabilities. In the last decades, the advance in technology and science has increased chronic pediatric patients survival rate, thus requiring an ongoing assistance in adult hospitals, making the transition a necessity and a challenge. This article reports the clinical practice designed between Hospital Garrahan and Hospital Ramos Mejía for the transition of 27 adolescents during 2015, setting achievements, findings and challenges resulting from this experience.

  7. Desarrollo neuromuscular en la atrofia muscular espinal

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Hernàndez, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La atrofia muscular espinal (AME) es una enfermedad neuromuscular infantil caracterizada por la muerte de las neuronas motoras del asta anterior de la médula espinal. Como consecuencia de ello hay una degeneración y atrofia muscular, por lo que los pacientes mueren a menudo de insuficiencias respiratorias graves. La AME se clasifica en tres tipos principales según el grado de gravedad, la edad de aparición y las pautas motoras. Se trata de una enfermedad con patrón de herencia a...

  8. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Unilateral vs. Bilateral Strength Training in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, Cíntia E; Radaelli, Regis; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Rech, Anderson; Brown, Lee E; Pinto, Ronei S

    2016-07-01

    Botton, CE, Radaelli, R, Wilhelm, EN, Rech, A, Brown, LE, and Pinto, RS. Neuromuscular adaptations to unilateral vs. bilateral strength training in women. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1924-1932, 2016-Considering the bilateral deficit, the sum of forces produced by each limb in a unilateral condition is generally greater than that produced by them in a bilateral condition. Therefore, it can be speculated that performing unilateral strength exercises may allow greater training workloads and subsequently greater neuromuscular adaptations when compared with bilateral training. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare neuromuscular adaptations with unilateral vs. bilateral training in the knee extensor muscles. Forty-three recreationally active young women were allocated to a control, unilateral (UG) or bilateral (BG) training group, which performed 2 times strength training sessions a week for 12 weeks. Knee extension one repetition maximum (1RM), maximal isometric strength, muscle electrical activity, and muscle thickness were obtained before and after the study period. Muscle strength was measured in unilateral (right + left) and bilateral tests. Both UG and BG increased similarly their unilateral 1RM (33.3 ± 14.3% vs. 24.6 ± 11.9%, respectively), bilateral 1RM (20.3 ± 6.8% vs. 28.5 ± 12.3%, respectively), and isometric strength (14.7 ± 11.3% vs. 13.1 ± 12.5%, respectively). The UG demonstrated greater unilateral isometric strength increase than the BG (21.4 ± 10.5% vs. 10.3 ± 11.1%, respectively) and only the UG increased muscle electrical activity. Muscle thickness increased similarly for both training groups. Neither group exhibited pretesting 1RM bilateral deficit values, but at post-testing, UG showed a significant bilateral deficit (-6.5 ± 7.8%) whereas BG showed a significant bilateral facilitation (5.9 ± 9.0%). Thus, performing unilateral or bilateral exercises was not a decisive factor for improving morphological adaptations and bilateral

  9. Neuromuscular consequences of an extreme mountain ultra-marathon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Y Millet

    Full Text Available We investigated the physiological consequences of one of the most extreme exercises realized by humans in race conditions: a 166-km mountain ultra-marathon (MUM with 9500 m of positive and negative elevation change. For this purpose, (i the fatigue induced by the MUM and (ii the recovery processes over two weeks were assessed. Evaluation of neuromuscular function (NMF and blood markers of muscle damage and inflammation were performed before and immediately following (n = 22, and 2, 5, 9 and 16 days after the MUM (n = 11 in experienced ultra-marathon runners. Large maximal voluntary contraction decreases occurred after MUM (-35% [95% CI: -28 to -42%] and -39% [95% CI: -32 to -46%] for KE and PF, respectively, with alteration of maximal voluntary activation, mainly for KE (-19% [95% CI: -7 to -32%]. Significant modifications in markers of muscle damage and inflammation were observed after the MUM as suggested by the large changes in creatine kinase (from 144 ± 94 to 13,633 ± 12,626 UI L(-1, myoglobin (from 32 ± 22 to 1,432 ± 1,209 µg L(-1, and C-Reactive Protein (from <2.0 to 37.7 ± 26.5 mg L(-1. Moderate to large reductions in maximal compound muscle action potential amplitude, high-frequency doublet force, and low frequency fatigue (index of excitation-contraction coupling alteration were also observed for both muscle groups. Sixteen days after MUM, NMF had returned to initial values, with most of the recovery process occurring within 9 days of the race. These findings suggest that the large alterations in NMF after an ultra-marathon race are multi-factorial, including failure of excitation-contraction coupling, which has never been described after prolonged running. It is also concluded that as early as two weeks after such an extreme running exercise, maximal force capacities have returned to baseline.

  10. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  11. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1117, HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kley, Rudolf A. [Klinken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University, Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Centre Ruhrgebiet, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Dirk [University Hospital of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Basel, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. (orig.)

  12. NEUROMUSCULAR AND CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF NEOSTIGMINE AND METHYL-ATROPINE ADMINISTERED AT DIFFERENT DEGREES OF ROCURONIUM-INDUCED NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBROEK, L; PROOST, JH; WIERDA, JMKH; NJOO, MD; HENNIS, PJ

    1994-01-01

    The neuromuscular and cardiovascular effects of neostigmine, 40 mug kg-1, and methyl-atropine, 7 mug kg-1, administered at different degrees of rocuronium-induced (600 mug kg-1) neuromuscular block were evaluated. In one group of patients spontaneous recovery was awaited (Group A; n = 20). Neostigmi

  13. DNA methylation changes separate allergic patients from healthy controls and may reflect altered CD4+ T-cell population structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm E Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered DNA methylation patterns in CD4(+ T-cells indicate the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. However, the identification of these alterations is complicated by the heterogeneity of most inflammatory diseases. Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR is an optimal disease model for the study of DNA methylation because of its well-defined phenotype and etiology. We generated genome-wide DNA methylation (N(patients = 8, N(controls = 8 and gene expression (N(patients = 9, Ncontrols = 10 profiles of CD4(+ T-cells from SAR patients and healthy controls using Illumina's HumanMethylation450 and HT-12 microarrays, respectively. DNA methylation profiles clearly and robustly distinguished SAR patients from controls, during and outside the pollen season. In agreement with previously published studies, gene expression profiles of the same samples failed to separate patients and controls. Separation by methylation (N(patients = 12, N(controls = 12, but not by gene expression (N(patients = 21, N(controls = 21 was also observed in an in vitro model system in which purified PBMCs from patients and healthy controls were challenged with allergen. We observed changes in the proportions of memory T-cell populations between patients (N(patients = 35 and controls (N(controls = 12, which could explain the observed difference in DNA methylation. Our data highlight the potential of epigenomics in the stratification of immune disease and represents the first successful molecular classification of SAR using CD4(+ T cells.

  14. Combined application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and voluntary muscular contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) and voluntary muscle contraction (VC) constitute different modes of muscle activation and induce different acute physiological effects on the neuromuscular system. Long-term application of each mode of muscle activation can produce different muscle adaptations. It seems theoretically possible to completely or partially cumulate the muscle adaptations induced by each mode of muscle activation applied separately. This work consisted of examining the literature concerning the muscle adaptations induced by long-term application of the combined technique (CT) [i.e. EMS is combined with VC - non-simultaneously] compared with VC and/or EMS alone in healthy subjects and/or athletes and in post-operative knee-injured subjects. In general, CT induced greater muscular adaptations than VC whether in sports training or rehabilitation. This efficiency would be due to the fact that CT can facilitate cumulative effects of training completely or partially induced by VC and EMS practiced alone. CT also provides a greater improvement of the performance of complex dynamic movements than VC. However, EMS cannot improve coordination between different agonistic and antagonistic muscles and thus does not facilitate learning the specific coordination of complex movements. Hence, EMS should be combined with specific sport training to generate neuromuscular adaptations, but also allow the adjustment of motor control during a voluntary movement. Likewise, in a therapeutic context, CT was particularly efficient to accelerate recovery of muscle contractility during a rehabilitation programme. Strength loss and atrophy inherent in a traumatism and/or a surgical operation would be more efficiently compensated with CT than with VC. Furthermore, CT also restored more functional abilities than VC. Finally, in a rehabilitation context, EMS is complementary to voluntary exercise because in the early phase of rehabilitation it elicits a strength increase, which is necessary

  15. Neuromuscular anatomy and evolution of the cetacean forelimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Dawson, Susan D; Reidenberg, Joy S; Berta, Annalisa

    2007-09-01

    The forelimb of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) has been radically modified during the limb-to-flipper transition. Extant cetaceans have a soft tissue flipper encasing the manus and acting as a hydrofoil to generate lift. The neuromuscular anatomy that controls flipper movement, however, is poorly understood. This study documents flipper neuromuscular anatomy and tests the hypothesis that antebrachial muscle robustness is related to body size. Data were gathered during dissections of 22 flippers, representing 15 species (7 odontocetes, 15 mysticetes). Results were compared with published descriptions of both artiodactyls and secondarily aquatic vertebrates. Results indicate muscle robustness is best predicted by taxonomic distribution and is not a function of body size. All cetaceans have atrophied triceps muscles, an immobile cubital joint, and lack most connective tissue structures and manus muscles. Forelimbs retain only three muscle groups: triceps (only the scapular head is functional as the humeral heads are vestigal), and antebrachial extensors and flexors. Well-developed flexor and extensor muscles were found in mysticetes and basal odontocetes (i.e., physeterids, kogiids, and ziphiids), whereas later diverging odontocetes (i.e., monodontids, phocoenids, and delphinids) lack or reduce these muscles. Balaenopterid mysticetes (e.g., fin and minke whales) may actively change flipper curvature, while basal odontocetes (e.g., sperm and beaked whales) probably stiffen the flipper through isometric contraction. Later diverging odontocetes lack musculature supporting digital movements and are unable to manipulate flipper curvature. Cetacean forelimbs are unique in that they have lost agility and several soft tissue structures, but retain sensory innervations.

  16. Two- and 6-minute walk tests assess walking capability equally in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Kahr; Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    to participate on 2 test days, each consisting of 1 2MWT and 1 6MWT separated by a minimum 30-minute period of rest. The order of the walk tests was randomly assigned via sealed envelopes. A group of 38 healthy controls completed 1 6MWT. RESULTS: The mean walking distance for the 2MWT was 142.8 meters......OBJECTIVE: This methodologic study investigates if the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) can be a valid alternative to the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to describe walking capability in patients with neuromuscular diseases. METHODS: Patients (n = 115) with different neuromuscular diseases were invited...... and for the 6MWT 405.3 meters. The distance walked in the 2MWT was highly correlated to the distance walked in the 6MWT (r = 0.99, p minute in the 6MWT, both among patients and healthy controls, which was not evident in the 2MWT...

  17. Effects of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular adaptations in adults with poststroke hemiparesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Zeeman, Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen R;

    2011-01-01

    with hemiparesis after stroke participated in 12 weeks of intensive physical rehabilitation comprising unilateral high-intensity strength training with near-maximal loads (4-12 repetition maximum) and body weight supported treadmill training. At baseline and 12-week follow-up, the patients went through testing...... the effect of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular and functional adaptations in outpatients suffering from hemiparesis after stroke. A within-subject repeated-measures design with the paretic leg as the experimental leg and the nonparetic leg as the control leg was used. Eleven outpatients...... observed in the nonparetic control leg. Gait performance increased 52-68%. In conclusion, intensive physical rehabilitation after stroke leads to clinically relevant neuromuscular improvements, leading to increased voluntary strength during a wide range of contraction modes and velocities, and improved...

  18. Respiratory motor training and neuromuscular plasticity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkin, Alexander V; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Ovechkina, Elena N; Aslan, Sevda C; Pitts, Teresa; Folz, Rodney J

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a full-scale investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of COPD-induced respiratory neuromuscular control deficits. Characterization of respiratory single- and multi-muscle activation patterns using surface electromyography (sEMG) were assessed along with functional measures at baseline and following 21±2 (mean±SD) sessions of respiratory motor training (RMT) performed during a one-month period in four patients with GOLD stage II or III COPD. Pre-training, the individuals with COPD showed significantly increased (prespiratory muscle activity and disorganized multi-muscle activation patterns in association with lowered spirometrical measures and decreased fast- and slow-twitch fiber activity as compared to healthy controls (N=4). Following RMT, functional and respiratory sEMG activation outcomes during quite breathing and forced expiratory efforts were improved suggesting that functional improvements, induced by task-specific RMT, are evidence respiratory neuromuscular networks re-organization.

  19. Contribución del soporte nutricional al tratamiento de las alteraciones neuro-musculares del paciente crítico Contribution of nutritional support to treatment neuromuscular impairments of critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Montejo González

    2006-01-01

    Las alteraciones neuromusculares que tienen lugar en el paciente crítico han sido atribuidas a factores como la situación séptica, la liberación de mediadores inflamatorioso el empleo de fármacos que afectan desfavorablemente a la función neuro-muscular. El papel de factores metabólicos y nutricionales en el desarrollo de esta patología ha recibido poca atención. En la actualidad, el empleo de protocolos de control intensivo de la glucemia podría tener gran interés en la prevención de las alt...

  20. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-08-15

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precede the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development.

  1. [Critical study of radiculomedullary and neuromuscular complications of ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serratrice, G; Acquaviva, P; Pouget, J; Guerra, L

    1987-03-01

    Medullo-radicular and neuro-muscular involvements of ankylosing spondylarthritis, often reported in an analytic fashion in the literature, deserve to be the subject of a critical study. Various neurological manifestations secondary to exceptional atlo-occipital and sometimes axis-atlas subluxations and medullary lesions as well as syndromes of the cauda equina. The medullary lesions have an epidural origin (3 cases in the literature, 2 cases from the authors) or are secondary to a spondylodiscitis (4 cases in the literature) or secondary to both (1 case reported by the authors). As for syndromes of the cauda equina the authors report 3 cases to be added to the 55 published previously. It concerns always old spondylarthritis. The lesions combine posterior diverticula and lesions of the lamina. The treatment is usually ineffective. A special case is represented by forms with trophic disorders. More debatable are the radicular lesions, which, except for intercostal pain, should be linked to local pain. Electromyographic abnormalities are of no significance. Alterations of the paravertebral muscles viewed on the scanner X have, for now, an uncertain significance. Finally, various associations, without significance such as multiple sclerosis, diffuse muscular lesions and the classic spondylotic pseudo-tabes, should be rejected.

  2. Design of low-cost general purpose microcontroller based neuromuscular stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, S; Rahmi Canal, M; Güler, I

    2000-04-01

    In this study, a general purpose, low-cost, programmable, portable and high performance stimulator is designed and implemented. For this purpose, a microcontroller is used in the design of the stimulator. The duty cycle and amplitude of the designed system can be controlled using a keyboard. The performance test of the system has shown that the results are reliable. The overall system can be used as the neuromuscular stimulator under safe conditions.

  3. Does perioperative tactile evaluation of the train-of-four response influence the frequency of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T; Viby-Mogensen, J; Bang, U

    1990-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the usefulness of perioperative manual evaluation of the response to train-of-four (TOF) nerve stimulation. A total of 80 patients were divided into four groups of 20 each. For two groups (one given vecuronium and one...... pancuronium), the anesthetists assessed the degree of neuromuscular blockade during operation and during recovery from neuromuscular blockade by manual evaluation of the response to TOF nerve stimulation. In the other two groups, one of which received vecuronium and the other pancuronium, the anesthetists...

  4. Effects of evidence-based prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in adolescent female athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Brandt, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescent female football and handball players are among the athletes with the highest risk of sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. AIM: This study evaluated the effects of evidence-based lower extremity injury prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical...... risk factors for non-contact ACL injury. METHODS: 40 adolescent female football and handball players (15-16 years) were randomly allocated to a control group (CON, n=20) or neuromuscular training group (NMT, n=20). The NMT group performed an injury prevention programme as a warm-up before their usual...

  5. Activity-dependent neurotransmitter-receptor matching at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2007-01-02

    Signaling in the nervous system requires matching of neurotransmitter receptors with cognate neurotransmitters at synapses. The vertebrate neuromuscular junction is the best studied cholinergic synapse, but the mechanisms by which acetylcholine is matched with acetylcholine receptors are not fully understood. Because alterations in neuronal calcium spike activity alter transmitter specification in embryonic spinal neurons, we hypothesized that receptor expression in postsynaptic cells follows changes in transmitter expression to achieve this specific match. We find that embryonic vertebrate striated muscle cells normally express receptors for glutamate, GABA, and glycine as well as for acetylcholine. As maturation progresses, acetylcholine receptor expression prevails. Receptor selection is altered when early neuronal calcium-dependent activity is perturbed, and remaining receptor populations parallel changes in transmitter phenotype. In these cases, glutamatergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic synaptic currents are recorded from muscle cells, demonstrating that activity regulates matching of transmitters and their receptors in the assembly of functional synapses.

  6. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  7. Neuromuscular fatigue following isometric contractions with similar torque time integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozand, V; Cattagni, T; Theurel, J; Martin, A; Lepers, R

    2015-01-01

    Torque time integral (TTI) is the combination of intensity and duration of a contraction. The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular alterations following different isometric sub-maximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles but with similar TTI. Sixteen participants performed 3 sustained contractions at different intensities (25%, 50%, and 75% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) torque) with different durations (68.5±33.4 s, 35.1±16.8 s and 24.8±12.9 s, respectively) but similar TTI value. MVC torque, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave characteristics and potentiated doublet amplitude were assessed before and immediately after the sustained contractions. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and -rectus femoris (RF) muscles was recorded during the sustained contractions. MVC torque reduction was similar in the 3 conditions after the exercise (-23.4±2.7%). VAL decreased significantly in a similar extent (-3.1±1.3%) after the 3 sustained contractions. Potentiated doublet amplitude was similarly reduced in the 3 conditions (-19.7±1.5%), but VL and RF M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. EMG activity of VL and RF muscles increased in the same extent during the 3 contractions (VL: 54.5±40.4%; RF: 53.1±48.7%). These results suggest that central and peripheral alterations accounting for muscle fatigue are similar following isometric contractions with similar TTI. TTI should be considered in the exploration of muscle fatigue during sustained isometric contractions.

  8. Effects of sugammadex on incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brueckmann, B; Sasaki, N; Grobara, P;

    2015-01-01

    by randomized allocation to sugammadex (2 or 4 mg kg(-1)) or usual care (neostigmine/glycopyrrolate, dosing per usual care practice) for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Timing of reversal agent administration was based on the providers' clinical judgement. Primary endpoint was the presence of residual......BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate whether reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex reduced the incidence of residual blockade and facilitated operating room discharge readiness. METHODS: Adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery received rocuronium, followed...... neuromuscular blockade at PACU admission, defined as a train-of-four (TOF) ratio

  9. Neuromuscular ultrasound findings in polyneuropathy secondary to disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sarah L; Cartwright, Michael S; Panea, Oana R; Vann, Ryan C; Magruder, John L; Walker, Francis O

    2014-12-01

    Disulfiram toxicity can cause multiple neurologic problems, including a reversible distal sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Although electrodiagnosis and biopsy results have been described in the diagnosis and management of patients with disulfiram associated polyneuropathy, neuromuscular ultrasound findings have not been reported. The authors present a case of electrodiagnostically confirmed axonal polyneuropathy with relative sural sparing secondary to disulfiram and describe the neuromuscular ultrasound findings in this individual. Ultrasound demonstrated distal enlargement with slight side-to-side asymmetry and normal proximal cross-sectional area in the lower extremity nerves. Neuromuscular ultrasound is another diagnostic modality that may be used to assist in the diagnosis of patients with polyneuropathy secondary to disulfiram.

  10. Neuromuscular impairment following backpack load carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Sam D; Fallowfield, Joanne L; Bilzon, James L J; Willems, Mark E T

    2013-01-01

    Load Carriage using backpacks is an occupational task and can be a recreational pursuit. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for changes in neuromuscular function of the m. quadriceps femoris following load carriage. The physiological responses of 10 male participants to voluntary and electrically stimulated isometric contractions were measured before and immediately after two hours of treadmill walking at 6.5 km•h(-1) during level walking with no load [LW], and level walking with load carriage (25 kg backpack) [LC]. Maximal voluntary contraction force decreased by 15 ± 11 % following LC (p=0.006), with no change following LW (p=0.292). Voluntary activation decreased after LW and LC (p=0.033) with no difference between conditions (p=0.405). Doublet contraction time decreased after both LW and LC (p=0.002), with no difference between conditions (p=0.232). There were no other changes in electrically invoked doublet parameters in either condition. The 20:50 Hz ratio did not change following LW (p=0.864) but decreased from 0.88 ± 0.04 to 0.84 ± 0.04 after LC (p=0.011) indicating reduced Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during excitation contraction coupling. In conclusion, two hours of load carriage carrying a 25 kg back pack caused neuromuscular impairment through a decrease in voluntary activation (i.e. central drive) and fatigue or damage to the peripheral muscle, including impairment of the excitation contraction coupling process. This may reduce physical performance and increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury.

  11. Visual and tactile assessment of neuromuscular fade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brull, S J; Silverman, D G

    1993-08-01

    The accuracy of visual and tactile assessment of the neuromuscular fade in response to train-of-four (TOF) and double-burst stimulation (DBS) were compared to assess their relative utility in the clinical setting. For each of 74 data sets with a mechanographic TOF ratio less than 0.70, an observer (blinded to the presence or degree of fade) performed visual and tactile assessments of fade in response to TOF, DBS3,3, and DBS3,2 stimuli at low current (20 and 30 mA) and high current (50 and 60 mA). For the range of mechanographic TOF ratios between 0.41 and 0.70, visual assessment failed to identify TOF, DBS3,3, and DBS3,2 fade in 46%, 18%, and 14% of cases at high current and in 23%, 5%, and 0% of cases at low current, respectively. Tactile assessments failed to identify fade in 55%, 23%, and 14% of cases at high current and in 23%, 14%, and 14% of cases at low current. Overall, the ability to detect fade was comparable for visual and tactile assessments regardless of the method of neurostimulation (P = NS with paired t-test). However, the degree of overestimation of the fade ratio (i.e., quantitative assessment) tended to be less when using tactile means; the difference achieved significance for TOF at low current and DBS3,3 at both low and high currents. We conclude that the differences between the visual and tactile means of assessment are relatively small compared to the differences among the TOF and DBS patterns of neurostimulation. Both subjective techniques are often inadequate in settings in which assurance of full recovery of neuromuscular function is critical.

  12. Enhancement of Neuromuscular Activity by Natural Specimens and Cultured Mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. P.; Meena, H. S.; Negi, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of natural specimen and laboratory cultured mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis on neuromuscular activity in mice. The powder of natural specimen and laboratory cultured Cordyceps sinensis was orally administered at the dose rate of 100, 300 and 500 mg/kg for 30 days. Natural specimen and in vitro propagated Cordyceps sinensis showed significant (P<0.05) enhancement in neuromuscular endurance and antidepressant activity at 300 and 500 mg/kg as compared to the control group. However, the fungus did not proved to be as effective as fluoxetine in exhibiting antidepressant action. Muscular endurance was determined on a Rota rod apparatus while antidepressant (mood elevating) activity was measured on a photoactometer in Swiss albino mice. The effects produced by both natural specimens and laboratory cultured Cordyceps sinensis were comparable and showed almost equal potency. PMID:25425763

  13. Reactive Neuromuscular Training: A Multi-level Approach to Rehabilitation of the Unstable Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, John A; Stemm, John

    2007-05-01

    In this clinical commentary, the use of reactive neuromuscular training (RNT) will be discussed as part of an overall functional rehabilitation program in the treatment of the unstable glenohumeral joint. The RNT program is designed to restore the synchrony and synergy of muscle firing patterns about the shoulder, which are required for dynamic joint stability and fine motor control. Reactive neuromuscular training allows the clinician to bridge the gap between the achievement of clinical based goals and a return to athletic competition. The possible effects of RNT on central nervous system (CNS) programming to establish appropriate reflex responses and functional stability at the glenohumeral joint will be explored. The issues reviewed in this article will highlight the need for future research in this area.

  14. Neuromuscular exercise improves functional performance in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    . Randomized controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01003756). 84 patients, 51% female, mean age 68.6±7.8 years, BMI 28.7±4.7 scheduled for total hip replacement at Svendborg Community Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Denmark were included. Intervention. Participants were randomized...... to an eight-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX-TJR) intervention or care-as-usual (verbal and written preoperative information). Intervention was supervised and offered twice a week with each session lasting one hour. The program is considered feasible and safe in this patient group and previously described......±4 sessions (Table 1). In favor of the intervention group, the between-group difference was significant for 20-m walk (2.2 seconds, p=.009), chair stands (1.7 seconds, p=.022) and leg extension for the non operated leg (.17 W/kg, p=.049) (Table 2). Conclusion. Eight weeks neuromuscular exercise according...

  15. Controlled Environments Enable Adaptive Management in Aquatic Ecosystems Under Altered Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are impacted by altered environment conditions resulting from climate, drought, and land use changes. Gaps in the science knowledge base regarding plant community response to these novel and rapid changes limit both science understanding and management of ecosystems. We describe how CE Technologies have enabled the rapid supply of gap-filling science, development of ecosystem simulation models, and remote sensing assessment tools to provide science-informed, adaptive management methods in the impacted aquatic ecosystem of the California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The Delta is the hub for California's water, supplying Southern California agriculture and urban communities as well as the San Francisco Bay area. The changes in environmental conditions including temperature, light, and water quality and associated expansion of invasive aquatic plants negatively impact water distribution and ecology of the San Francisco Bay/Delta complex. CE technologies define changes in resource use efficiencies, photosynthetic productivity, evapotranspiration, phenology, reproductive strategies, and spectral reflectance modifications in native and invasive species in response to altered conditions. We will discuss how the CE technologies play an enabling role in filling knowledge gaps regarding plant response to altered environments, parameterization and validation of ecosystem models, development of satellite-based, remote sensing tools, and operational management strategies.

  16. Role of calcium and vesicle-docking proteins in remobilising dormant neuromuscular junctions in desert frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavidis, Nickolas A; Hudson, Nicholas J; Choy, Peng T; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Franklin, Craig E

    2008-01-01

    Despite prolonged immobility the desert frog, Cyclorana alboguttata, suffers little impairment in muscle function. To determine compensatory mechanisms at neuromuscular junctions, transmitter release was examined along primary terminals in C. alboguttata iliofibularis muscle. Using extracellular recording we found the amplitudes of evoked endplate currents were significantly smaller in dormant frogs. In active frogs we identified two negatively sloping proximal-distal gradients of transmitter frequency and quantal content; a shallow proximal-distal gradient with low probability of transmitter release (0.6). During aestivation, only a shallow gradient was identified. The high probability release sites in control frogs were inhibited during aestivation by a mechanism that could be reversed by (1) increasing the extracellular calcium concentration, and (2) increasing the frequency of stimulation. This suggests that transmitter vesicles are available during aestivation but not released. We quantified expression of messenger RNA transcripts coding for the transmitter vesicle-docking proteins synaptotagmin 1, syntaxin 1B and UNC-13. All three were rare transcripts maintained at control values during aestivation. Neuromuscular remobilisation after dormancy in C. alboguttata is more likely a product of rapidly reversible physiologic mechanisms than reorganisations of the neuromuscular transcriptome.

  17. Structural and alteration controls on gold mineralization the of the amphibolite facies Detour Lake Deposit, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosq, Renelle; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    The 15M oz Detour Lake deposit is a Neoarchean orogenic gold ore body located in the northern most region of the Abitibi district within the Superior Province. The mine is an open pit design in the high strain zone of the Sunday Lake Deformation Zone (SLDZ). The ductile-brittle SLDZ parallels the broadly E-W Abitibi greenstone belt and the deposit is situated in a dilation zone between volcanoclastic rocks of the Caopatina Assemblage and Lower Detour Lake Formation, consisting of ultramafic talc-chlorite-sericite schist. The Upper Detour Lake Formation consists of pillowed and massive flows and hyloclastic units crosscut by minor felsic to intermediate dykes. All of the formations are sub-vertical, north-dipping units with stretching lineations indicating dip-slip motion. The Detour deposit differs from other classic ore deposits in the dominantly greenschist facies Abitibi Subprovince by possessing an amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblage of actinolite-biotite-plagioclase-almandine. Consequently, the typical indicator minerals used to identify alteration and mineralization, such as secondary biotite, may not be useful. Petrological and geochemical analyses have revealed at least four populations of biotite: 1) large euhedral crystals located within quartz-carbonate veins, 2) small, euhedral zoned crystals present as alteration haloes, 3) very small, anhedral to subhedral indistinct crystal present in mafic volcanic host rock, and 4) large euhedral crystals defining the main metamorphic foliation in the metasediments. Extensive examination of mineral assemblages, alteration products, and vein structure in rock core across barren and mineralized zones has documented over a dozen vein types which can be grouped into two main categories: 1) sulfidized quartz-carbonate veins associated with biotite alteration and 2) late carbonate veins. Gold grades do not prove to be dependent on vein type but rather on the host rock composition: the highest ore grades are present

  18. Neuromuscular fatigue after maximal exercise in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, J M; Gruet, M; Mely, L; Pensini, M; Brisswalter, J

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), despite their ventilatory limitation, would develop neuromuscular fatigue of quadriceps muscles following a maximal cycling exercise. Eleven adults with CF (age=26.8±6.9years; forced expiratory volume in 1s=54.1±12.8% predicted) and 11 age-matched healthy subjects performed a maximal incremental cycle test with respiratory gas exchange measurements. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis muscle were recorded before and after exercise. Neural and contractile properties of the quadriceps were also investigated using femoral nerve electrical stimulation. Patients had lower exercise capacity, peak oxygen uptake and MVC than controls. MVC fell significantly postexercise in both groups (CF: -20±10%, controls: -19±6%; ppattern (-38.4±14.4%, -42.1±14.7% and -15±20.4%) but the statistical significance was not reached for the maximal rate of twitch torque relaxation. In conclusion, CF patients demonstrated lower limb fatigue following symptom-limited cycle exercise, which was comparable to that exhibited by healthy controls. This fatigue may be due to contractile impairments and not to transmission failure. Further studies should be conducted in a larger sample to confirm these preliminary results.

  19. Effect of nimodipine and flunarizine on neuromuscular function in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil B. Kaikade

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Nimodipine has significant dose dependent depressant action on neuromuscular function while flunarizine has no effect on the above mentioned parameter. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1524-1527

  20. Exploring employment in consultation reports of patients with neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, Yvonne; Kuyk-Minis, Marie Antoinette van; Cup, Edith; Engels, Josephine; Engelen, Baziel van; Oostendorp, Rob

    2012-01-01

    To explore consultation reports for patient and employment characteristics and recommendations on employment regarding patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMDs). Eighty percent of the included consultation reports contained information on employment. Less than half the patients with NMD were emplo

  1. Genetics of Pediatric-Onset Motor Neuron and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy; Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease; Muscular Dystrophy; Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress 1; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Motor Neuron Disease; Neuromuscular Disease; Peroneal Muscular Atrophy; Fragile X Syndrome

  2. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  3. 10 Hz rTMS over right parietal cortex alters sense of agency during self-controlled movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Karabanov, Anke N; Christensen, Mark Schram;

    2014-01-01

    A large body of fMRI and lesion-literature has provided evidence that the Inferior Parietal Cortex (IPC) is important for sensorimotor integration and sense of agency (SoA). We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to explore the role of the IPC during a validated SoA detection...... of an observed movement. Subjects completed three sessions, in which subjects received online rTMS over the right IPC (active condition), over the vertex (CZ) (sham condition) or no TMS but a sound-matched control. We found that rTMS over right IPC significantly altered SoA of the non-perturbed movements....... Following IPC stimulation subjects were more likely to experience self-controlled movements as being externally perturbed compared to the control site (P = 0.002) and the stimulation-free control (P = 0.042). The data support the importance of IPC activation during sensorimotor comparison in order...

  4. Altered Dynamic Postural Control during Step Turning in Persons with Early-Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooeun Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons with early-stage Parkinson’s disease (EPD do not typically experience marked functional deficits but may have difficulty with turning tasks. Studies evaluating turning have focused on individuals in advanced stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to compare postural control strategies adopted during turning in persons with EPD to those used by healthy control (HC subjects. Fifteen persons with EPD, diagnosed within 3 years, and 10 HC participated. Participants walked 4 meters and then turned 90°. Dynamic postural control was quantified as the distance between the center of pressure (COP and the extrapolated center of mass (eCOM. Individuals with EPD demonstrated significantly shorter COP-eCOM distances compared to HC. These findings suggest that dynamic postural control during turning is altered even in the early stages of PD.

  5. The sagital balance in idiopatic and neuromuscular scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Borges,Paulo Alvim; Ocampos, Guilherme Pereira; Mancuso Filho,José Antonio; Letaif,Olavo Biraghi; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the distribution of spinopelvic parameters (SPP) in a Brazilian population with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) and neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS), and evaluate the association between pelvic incidence (PI) and lumbar lordosis (LL). METHOD: Medical records investigation was performed. Sagital balance angles were measured in patients with neuromuscular and idiopathic scoliosis. RESULTS: IS sample means (in degrees): PI 55.55; Sacral Slope (SS) 45.35; Pelvic Tilt (P...

  6. Voluntary control of breathing does not alter vagal modulation of heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Eckberg, D. L.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in respiratory pattern influence the heart rate spectrum. It has been suggested, hence, that metronomic respiration should be used to correctly assess vagal modulation of heart rate by using spectral analysis. On the other hand, breathing to a metronome has been reported to increase heart rate spectral power in the high- or respiratory frequency region; this finding has led to the suggestion that metronomic respiration enhances vagal tone or alters vagal modulation of heart rate. To investigate whether metronomic breathing complicates the interpretation of heart rate spectra by altering vagal modulation, we recorded the electrocardiogram and respiration from eight volunteers during three breathing trials of 10 min each: 1) spontaneous breathing (mean rate of 14.4 breaths/min); 2) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 15, 18, and 21 breaths/min for 2, 6, and 2 min, respectively; and 3) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 18 breaths/min for 10 min. Data were also collected from eight volunteers who breathed spontaneously for 20 min and breathed metronomically at each subject's mean spontaneous breathing frequency for 20 min. Results from the three 10-min breathing trials showed that heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region was smaller during metronomic breathing than during spontaneous breathing. This decrease could be explained fully by the higher breathing frequencies used during trials 2 and 3 of metronomic breathing. When the subjects breathed metronomically at each subject's mean breathing frequency, the heart rate powers during metronomic breathing were similar to those during spontaneous breathing. Our results suggest that vagal modulation of heart rate is not altered and vagal tone is not enhanced during metronomic breathing.

  7. Phenobarbital influence on neuromuscular block produced by rocuronium in rats Influência do fenobarbital no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo rocurônio em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica de Fátima de Assunção Braga

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro and in vivo neuromuscular blockade produced by rocuronium in rats treated with Phenobarbital and to determine cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 concentrations in hepatic microsomes. METHODS: Thirty rats were included in the study and distributed into 6 groups of 5 animals each. Rats were treated for seven days with phenobarbital (20 mg/kg and the following parameters were evaluated: 1 the amplitude of muscle response in the preparation of rats exposed to phenobarbital; 2 rocuronium effect on rat preparation exposed or not to phenobarbital; 3 concentrations of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats exposed or not to phenobarbital. The concentration and dose of rocuronium used in vitro and in vivo experiments were 4 µg/mL and 0,6 mg/kg, respectively. RESULTS: Phenobarbital in vitro and in vivo did not alter the amplitude of muscle response. The neuromuscular blockade in vitro produced by rocuronium was significantly different (p=0.019 between exposed (20% and not exposed (60% rats; the blockade in vivo was significantly greater (p=0.0081 in treated rats (93.4%. The enzymatic concentrations were significantly greater in rats exposed to phenobarbital. CONCLUSIONS: Phenobarbital alone did not compromise neuromuscular transmission. It produced enzymatic induction, and neuromuscular blockade in vivo produced by rocuronium was potentiated by phenobarbital.OBJETIVO: Avaliar in vitro e in vivo o bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo rocurônio em ratos tratados com fenobarbital e determinar as concentrações de citocromo P450 e b5 em microssomos hepáticos. MÉTODOS: Trinta ratos foram incluídos no estudo e distribuídos em seis grupos de cinco animais cada. Ratos foram tratados por sete dias com fenobarbital (20 mg/kg e avaliou-se: 1 amplitude das respostas musculares em preparação de ratos expostos ao fenobarbital; 2 o efeito do rocurônio em preparações de ratos expostos ou n

  8. Myosin VI contributes to synaptic transmission and development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Shelagh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin VI, encoded by jaguar (jar in Drosophila melanogaster, is a unique member of the myosin superfamily of actin-based motor proteins. Myosin VI is the only myosin known to move towards the minus or pointed ends of actin filaments. Although Myosin VI has been implicated in numerous cellular processes as both an anchor and a transporter, little is known about the role of Myosin VI in the nervous system. We previously recovered jar in a screen for genes that modify neuromuscular junction (NMJ development and here we report on the genetic analysis of Myosin VI in synaptic development and function using loss of function jar alleles. Results Our experiments on Drosophila third instar larvae revealed decreased locomotor activity, a decrease in NMJ length, a reduction in synaptic bouton number, and altered synaptic vesicle localization in jar mutants. Furthermore, our studies of synaptic transmission revealed alterations in both basal synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity at the jar mutant neuromuscular synapse. Conclusions Altogether these findings indicate that Myosin VI is important for proper synaptic function and morphology. Myosin VI may be functioning as an anchor to tether vesicles to the bouton periphery and, thereby, participating in the regulation of synaptic vesicle mobilization during synaptic transmission.

  9. Exploring the Altered Dynamics of Mammalian Central Carbon Metabolic Pathway in Cancer Cells: A Classical Control Theoretic Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Paul

    Full Text Available In contrast with normal cells, most of the cancer cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for energy production in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP bypassing mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, compared to normal cells, cancer cells exhibit higher consumption of glucose with higher production of lactate. Again, higher rate of glycolysis provides the necessary glycolytic intermediary precursors for DNA, protein and lipid synthesis to maintain high active proliferation of the tumor cells. In this scenario, classical control theory based approach may be useful to explore the altered dynamics of the cancer cells. Since the dynamics of the cancer cells is different from that of the normal cells, understanding their dynamics may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies.We have developed a model based on the state space equations of classical control theory along with an order reduction technique to mimic the actual dynamic behavior of mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM pathway in normal cells. Here, we have modified Michaelis Menten kinetic equation to incorporate feedback mechanism along with perturbations and cross talks associated with a metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we have perturbed the proposed model to reduce the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thereafter, we have connected proportional-integral (PI controller(s with the model for tuning it to behave like the CCM pathway of a cancer cell. This methodology allows one to track the altered dynamics mediated by different enzymes.The proposed model successfully mimics all the probable dynamics of the CCM pathway in normal cells. Moreover, experimental results demonstrate that in cancer cells, a coordination among enzymes catalyzing pentose phosphate pathway and intermediate glycolytic enzymes along with switching of pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform plays an important role to maintain their altered dynamics.

  10. Safe neuromuscular electrical stimulator designed for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Matthias; Haller, Michael; Bijak, Manfred; Unger, Ewald; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    A stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was designed, especially suiting the requirements of elderly people with reduced cognitive abilities and diminished fine motor skills. The aging of skeletal muscle is characterized by a progressive decline in muscle mass, force, and condition. Muscle training with NMES reduces the degradation process. The discussed system is intended for evoked muscle training of the anterior and posterior thigh. The core of the stimulator is based on a microcontroller with two modular output stages. The system has two charge-balanced biphasic voltage-controlled stimulation channels. Additionally, the evoked myoelectric signal (M-wave) and the myokinematic signal (surface acceleration) are measured. A central controller unit allows using the stimulator as a stand-alone device. To set up the training sequences and to evaluate the compliance data, a personal computer is connected to the stimulator via a universal serial bus. To help elderly people handle the stimulator by themselves, the user interface is kept very simple. For safety reasons, the electrode impedance is monitored during stimulation. A comprehensive compliance management with included measurements of muscle activity and stimulation intensity enables a scientific use of the stimulator in clinical trials.

  11. Putative role of the NTS in alterations in neural control of the circulation following exercise training in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Patrick J; Hasser, Eileen M

    2006-02-01

    Exercise training (ExTr) has been associated with alterations in neural control of the circulation, including effects on arterial baroreflex function. The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the primary termination site of cardiovascular afferents and critical in the regulation of baroreflex-mediated changes in heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nervous system outflow. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether ExTr is associated with alterations in neurotransmitter regulation of neurons involved in control of cardiovascular function at the level of the NTS. We hypothesized that ExTr would increase glutamatergic and reduce GABAergic transmission in the NTS and that, collectively, these changes would result in a greater overall sympathoinhibitory drive from the NTS in ExTr animals. To test these hypotheses, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treadmill trained or maintained under sedentary conditions for 8-10 wk. NTS microinjections were performed in Inactin-anesthetized animals instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA). Generalized activation of the NTS with unilateral microinjections of glutamate (1-10 mM, 30 nl) produced dose-dependent decreases in MAP, HR, and LSNA that were unaffected by ExTr. Bilateral inhibition of NTS with the GABAA agonist muscimol (1 mM, 90 nl) produced increases in MAP and LSNA that were blunted by ExTr. In contrast, pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses to bilateral microinjections of the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenate (40 mM, 90 nl), were similar between groups. Bradycardic responses to bilateral microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (0.1 mM, 90 nl) were attenuated by ExTr. These data indicate that alterations in neurotransmission at the level of the NTS contribute importantly to regulation of HR and LSNA in ExTr animals. In addition to alterations at NTS, these experiments suggest indirectly that changes in other cardiovascular

  12. The role of laminins in the organization and function of neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert S; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle is known as the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Proper alignment of presynaptic and post-synaptic structures of motor neurons and muscle fibers, respectively, is essential for efficient motor control of skeletal muscles. The synaptic cleft between these two cells is filled with basal lamina. Laminins are heterotrimer extracellular matrix molecules that are key members of the basal lamina. Laminin α4, α5, and β2 chains specifically localize to NMJs, and these laminin isoforms play a critical role in maintenance of NMJs and organization of synaptic vesicle release sites known as active zones. These individual laminin chains exert their role in organizing NMJs by binding to their receptors including integrins, dystroglycan, and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Disruption of these laminins or the laminin-receptor interaction occurs in neuromuscular diseases including Pierson syndrome and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS). Interventions to maintain proper level of laminins and their receptor interactions may be insightful in treating neuromuscular diseases and aging related degeneration of NMJs.

  13. Research to support sterile-male-release and genetic alteration techniques for sea lamprey control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Twohey, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated pest management of sea lampreys in the Laurentian Great Lakes has recently been enhanced by addition of a sterile-male-release program, and future developments in genetic approaches may lead to additional methods for reducing sea lamprey reproduction. We review the development, implementation, and evaluation of the sterile-male-release technique (SMRT) as it is being applied against sea lampreys in the Great Lakes, review the current understanding of SMRT efficacy, and identify additional research areas and topics that would increase either the efficacy of the SMRT or expand its geographic potential for application. Key areas for additional research are in the sterilization process, effects of skewed sex ratios on mating behavior, enhancing attractiveness of sterilized males, techniques for genetic alteration of sea lampreys, and sources of animals to enhance or expand the use of sterile lampreys.

  14. Neuromuscular Fatigue During 200 M Breaststroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Conceição

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were: i to analyze activation patterns of four upper limb muscles (duration of the active and non-active phase in each lap of 200m breaststroke, ii quantify neuromuscular fatigue, with kinematics and physiologic assessment. Surface electromyogram was collected for the biceps brachii, deltoid anterior, pectoralis major and triceps brachii of nine male swimmers performing a maximal 200m breaststroke trial. Swimming speed, SL, SR, SI decreased from the 1st to the 3rd lap. SR increased on the 4th lap (35.91 ± 2.99 stroke·min-1. Peak blood lactate was 13.02 ± 1.72 mmol·l-1 three minutes after the maximal trial. The EMG average rectified value (ARV increased at the end of the race for all selected muscles, but the deltoid anterior and pectoralis major in the 1st lap and for biceps brachii, deltoid anterior and triceps brachii in the 4th lap. The mean frequency of the power spectral density (MNF decreased at the 4th lap for all muscles. These findings suggest the occurrence of fatigue at the beginning of the 2nd lap in the 200m breaststroke trial, characterized by changes in kinematic parameters and selective changes in upper limb muscle action. There was a trend towards a non-linear fatigue state.

  15. Neuromuscular dentistry: Occlusal diseases and posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Toseef; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Zahid, Syed Naved; Chaudhary, Prabhat K

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular dentistry has been a controversial topic in the field of dentistry and still remains debatable. The issue of good occlusion and sound health has been repeatedly discussed. Sometimes we get complains of sensitive teeth and sometimes of tired facial muscles on getting up in the morning. Owing to the intimate relation of masticatory apparatus with the cranium and cervico-scapular muscular system, the disorders in any system, draw attention from concerned clinicians involved in management, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for the suffering patients. There may be patients reporting to the dental clinics after an occlusal restoration or extraction, having pain in or around the temporomandibular joint, headache or neck pain. Although their esthetic demands must not be undermined during the course of treatment plan, whenever dental treatment of any sort is planned, occlusion/bite should be given prime importance. Very few dentist are able to diagnose the occlusal disease and of those who diagnose many people resort to aggressive treatment modalities. This paper aims to report the signs of occlusal disease, and discuss their association with TMDs and posture.

  16. Diagnostic Certified Assay: Neuromuscular and Cardiac Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Valaperta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of the specific trinucleotide sequence, [CTG], is the molecular pathological mechanism responsible for the clinical manifestations of DM1. Many studies have described different molecular genetic techniques to detect DM1, but as yet there is no data on the analytical performances of techniques used so far in this disease. We therefore developed and validated a molecular method, “Myotonic Dystrophy SB kit,” to better characterize our DM1 population. 113 patients were examined: 20 DM1-positive, 11 DM1/DM2-negative, and13 DM1-negative/DM2-positive, who had a previous molecular diagnosis, while 69 were new cases. This assay correctly identified 113/113 patients, and all were confirmed by different homemade assays. Comparative analysis revealed that the sensitivity and the specificity of the new kit were very high (>99%. Same results were obtained using several extraction procedures and different concentrations of DNA. The distribution of pathologic alleles showed a prevalence of the “classical” form, while of the 96 nonexpanded alleles 19 different allelic types were observed. Cardiac and neuromuscular parameters were used to clinically characterize our patients and support the new genetic analysis. Our findings suggest that this assay appears to be a very robust and reliable molecular test, showing high reproducibility and giving an unambiguous interpretation of results.

  17. Assessment of Motor Units in Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    The motor unit comprises the anterior horn cell, its axon, and the muscle fibers that it innervates. Although the true number of motor units is unknown, the number of motor units appears to vary greatly between different muscles and between different individuals. Assessment of the number and function of motor units is needed in diseases of the anterior horn cell and other motor nerve disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most important disease of anterior horn cells. The need for an effective biomarker for assessing disease progression and for use in clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has stimulated the study of methods to measure the number of motor units. Since 1970 a number of different methods, including the incremental, F-wave, multipoint, and statistical methods, have been developed but none has achieved widespread applicability. Two methods (MUNIX and the multipoint incremental method) are in current use across multiple centres and are discussed in detail in this review, together with other recently published methods. Imaging with magnetic resonance and ultrasound is increasingly being applied to this area. Motor unit number estimates have also been applied to other neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, compression neuropathies, and prior poliomyelitis. The need for an objective measure for the assessment of motor units remains tantalizingly close but unfulfilled in 2016.

  18. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-01

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  19. Neuromuscular disorders in chronic alcohol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Emelyanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the present-day Russian and foreign literature on neuromuscular disorders in chronic alcohol intoxication. The most common manifestations of alcohol disease include alcoholic polyneuropathy (PNP and alcohol-induced skeletal muscle injury. The clinical polymorphism of alcoholic PNP is discussed. The paper considers a chronic sensory automatic form due to the direct toxic effects of ethanol and its metabolites during long-term alcohol intoxication, as well as acute/subacute sensorimotor neuropathy, the basis for the pathogenesis of which is B group vitamins, predominantly thiamine, deficiency that develops in the presence of drinking bouts concurrent with malnutrition and/or alcohol-related gastrointestinal tract diseases. In addition to nonuse of alcohol and a properly balanced diet, antioxidant therapy with alphalipoic acid and neurotropic B group vitamins is considered to be pathogenetic therapy for neuropathy. The most common and least studied clinicalform of alcohol-induced musculoskeletal injury is chronic alcoholic myopathy (AM, the diagnostic standard for which is morphometricand immunohistochemical examination of a muscle biopsy specimen. The morphological base for this form of myopathy is predominantly type 2 muscle fiber atrophy caused by impaired protein synthesis and a decreased regenerative potential of muscle fiber. The efficacy of antioxidants and leucine-containing amino acid mixtures in the treatment of chronic AM is discussed.

  20. Detecting altered postural control after cerebral concussion in athletes with normal postural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanaugh, J; Guskiewicz, K.; Giuliani, C.; Marshall, S.; Mercer, V; Stergiou, N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine if approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from non-linear dynamics, could detect changes in postural control during quiet standing in athletes with normal postural stability after cerebral concussion.

  1. Power spectrum scale invariance as a neural marker of cocaine misuse and altered cognitive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime S. Ide

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest disrupted connectivity dynamics in the fronto-parietal areas in association with post-signal behavioral adjustment in cocaine addicts. These new findings support PSSI as a neural marker of impaired cognitive control in cocaine addiction.

  2. Caffeine ingestion reverses the circadian rhythm effects on neuromuscular performance in highly resistance-trained men.

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    Ricardo Mora-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether caffeine ingestion counteracts the morning reduction in neuromuscular performance associated with the circadian rhythm pattern. METHODS: Twelve highly resistance-trained men underwent a battery of neuromuscular tests under three different conditions; i morning (10:00 a.m. with caffeine ingestion (i.e., 3 mg kg(-1; AM(CAFF trial; ii morning (10:00 a.m. with placebo ingestion (AM(PLAC trial; and iii afternoon (18:00 p.m. with placebo ingestion (PM(PLAC trial. A randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo controlled experimental design was used, with all subjects serving as their own controls. The neuromuscular test battery consisted in the measurement of bar displacement velocity during free-weight full-squat (SQ and bench press (BP exercises against loads that elicit maximum strength (75% 1RM load and muscle power adaptations (1 m s(-1 load. Isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC(LEG and isometric electrically evoked strength of the right knee (EVOK(LEG were measured to identify caffeine's action mechanisms. Steroid hormone levels (serum testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone were evaluated at the beginning of each trial (PRE. In addition, plasma norepinephrine (NE and epinephrine were measured PRE and at the end of each trial following a standardized intense (85% 1RM 6 repetitions bout of SQ (POST. RESULTS: In the PM(PLAC trial, dynamic muscle strength and power output were significantly enhanced compared with AM(PLAC treatment (3.0%-7.5%; p≤0.05. During AM(CAFF trial, muscle strength and power output increased above AM(PLAC levels (4.6%-5.7%; p≤0.05 except for BP velocity with 1 m s(-1 load (p = 0.06. During AM(CAFF, EVOK(LEG and NE (a surrogate of maximal muscle sympathetic nerve activation were increased above AM(PLAC trial (14.6% and 96.8% respectively; p≤0.05. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that caffeine ingestion reverses the morning neuromuscular declines in highly resistance

  3. Influência da lidocaína no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo rocurônio: estudo em preparação nervo frênico-diafragma de rato Influencia de la lidocaína en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el rocuronio: estudio en preparación nervio frénico-diafragma de ratón Influence of lidocaine on the neuromuscular block produced by rocuronium: study in rat phrenic-diaphragmatic nerve preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Christina S. Loyola

    2006-04-01

    el antagonismo parcial de neostigmina.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The action mechanism of local anesthetics (LA on neuromuscular junction motivated several studies. When administered at low doses, they do not interfere on neuromuscular transmission. But high doses may compromise neuromuscular transmission and increase the effects of neuromuscular blockers. The objective of this study was to evaluate lidocaine interaction with rocuronium on rat diaphragm through its influence on neuromuscular block degree. METHODS: Rats, weighing between 250 and 300 g, were used. Preparation was set according to the technique described by Bulbring. Groups were formed (n = 5 according to the drug being studied: lidocaine - 20 µg.mL-1 (Group I; rocuronium - 4 µg.mL-1 (Group II, and rocuronium - 4 µg.mL-1 with lidocaine - 20 µg.mL-1 (Group III. The following items were assessed: 1 the extent of diaphragm muscle responses to indirect stimulation, both before and 60 minutes after adding lidocaine and a neuromuscular blocker; 2 membrane potentials (MP and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPP; 3 the effectiveness of neostigmine, and 4 aminopyridine on neuromuscular blockage reversal. RESULTS: When administered separately, lidocaine did not alter the extent of muscular responses. With the previous use of lidocaine, rocuronium neuromuscular blockage was 82.8% ± 1.91%, with a significant difference (p = 0.0079 when compared to the group with isolated rocuronium (57.8% ± 1.9%. Blockage was both partially and fully reverted by neostigmine and 4-aminopyridine, respectively. Lidocaine did not alter membrane potential and caused an initial increase on MEPP, followed by a blockage. CONCLUSIONS: Lidocaine increases the neuromuscular blocking produced by rocuronium. MEPP modifications identify a presynaptic action. The complete antagonism of 4-aminopyridine indicates a presynaptic component. This idea is supported by the partial antagonism through neostigmine.

  4. Constraining eye movement when redirecting walking trajectories alters turning control in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Ambati, V N; Murray, Nicholas G; Saucedo, Fabricio; Powell, Douglas W; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2013-05-01

    Humans use a specific steering synergy, where the eyes and head lead rotation to the new direction, when executing a turn or change in direction. Increasing evidence suggests that eye movement is critical for turning control and that when the eyes are constrained, or participants have difficulties making eye movements, steering control is disrupted. The purpose of the current study was to extend previous research regarding eye movements and steering control to a functional walking and turning task. This study investigated eye, head, trunk, and pelvis kinematics of healthy young adults during a 90° redirection of walking trajectory under two visual conditions: Free Gaze (the eyes were allowed to move naturally in the environment), and Fixed Gaze (participants were required to fixate the eyes on a target in front). Results revealed significant differences in eye, head, and trunk coordination between Free Gaze and Fixed Gaze conditions (p segments moved together with no significant differences between segment onset times. In addition, the sequence of segment rotation during Fixed Gaze suggested a bottom-up postural perturbation control strategy in place of top-down steering control seen in Free Gaze. The results of this study support the hypothesis that eye movement is critical for the release of the steering synergy for turning control.

  5. Some aspects of the neuromuscular system of Ascaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, J; Rivera, A; Solórzano, S; Serrato, J

    1989-12-01

    1. The structure and physiological properties of the somatic neuromuscular system of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides var. suum are discussed taking into account early work from this laboratory, the results of other workers, and experiments in progress. 2. Anatomically, the central feature of the somatic musculature is the presence of a specialized muscular, but not contractile, structure: the syncytium or sarcopile, formed by the terminal processes of the muscle cell arms that contact the nerve cord. In this region, they are electrically coupled to one another and form chemical synapses with the nerve fibres. 3. The syncytium serves, primarily, as a nerve-muscle manifold, or device which allows the neural control of the muscle fields with great economy in the amount of nervous tissue, numbers of chemical junctions and quantities of synaptic transmitters. 4. The structure of the syncytium is being studied with the scanning electron microscope. The results reveal the convergence of the arms on discrete sites as they approach the cords, as well as a longitudinal arrangement of the terminal processes as they course over the cords, at least in the posterior region of the animal. 5. The characteristics of the electrical coupling between the muscle cells are being investigated. A pattern has been observed that is dependent on the position of the cell pairs with respect to the longitudinal axis of the animal. 6. A study of signal propagation in the arms has revealed that the morphology of the muscle cells contributes to the extent and preferential direction of propagation.

  6. 10 Hz rTMS over right parietal cortex alters sense of agency during self-controlled movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Karabanov, Anke N.; Christensen, Mark S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    A large body of fMRI and lesion-literature has provided evidence that the Inferior Parietal Cortex (IPC) is important for sensorimotor integration and sense of agency (SoA). We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to explore the role of the IPC during a validated SoA detection task. 12 healthy, right-handed adults were included. The effects of rTMS on subjects' SoA during self-controlled movements were explored. The experiment consisted of 1/3 self-controlled movements and 2/3 computer manipulated movements that introduced uncertainty as to whether the subjects were agents of an observed movement. Subjects completed three sessions, in which subjects received online rTMS over the right IPC (active condition), over the vertex (CZ) (sham condition) or no TMS but a sound-matched control. We found that rTMS over right IPC significantly altered SoA of the non-perturbed movements. Following IPC stimulation subjects were more likely to experience self-controlled movements as being externally perturbed compared to the control site (P = 0.002) and the stimulation-free control (P = 0.042). The data support the importance of IPC activation during sensorimotor comparison in order to correctly determine the agent of movements. PMID:25009489

  7. Evaluation of counseling environmental alteration on pharmacy-patient communication qualifications: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lulu; Jin, Rui; Li, Fang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhengzheng

    2016-12-01

    The closed pharmaceutical counseling room was so hard to be established for most of hospitals in China since limited space in the out-patient lobby, which dramatically affected the qualification of medication consultant. Few reports studied the importance of closed pharmaceutical counseling room construction.To investigate the necessary of closed pharmaceutical counseling room construction in the outpatient lobby.The closed pharmaceutical counseling room was established and equipped with hospital electronic information system, patient education flashes, and we-Chat in web. We collected the pharmaceutical counseling records before and after counseling room establishment and analyzed the results systematically.After the consulting venue transferred to the closed space, methods adopted by pharmacists in patient educations were diversification. Numbers of counseling people were increasing 4 folds after room establishment and questions were transferred from drug information supply to high professional pharmaceutical relation such as the usage of respiratory devices, drug-drug interaction, and so on.The alterations of consultant space provided a powerful platform on security, properly and suitable of patients' medication usage, keep the medication errors and poor compliance out of the serious consequence, and improve hospital satisfaction. Therefore, it is necessary in outpatient lobby to develop the independent room for medication service.

  8. Upper limb functions regained in quadriplegia: a hybrid computerized neuromuscular stimulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, R H; Ohry, A

    1990-05-01

    A new, computerized neuromuscular stimulation system was applied to the upper limbs of two patients with complete quadriplegia below the C4 level. The stimulation-generated movements were integrated and augmented by residual, voluntary shoulder girdle movements and mechanical splinting. Up to 12 muscles were stimulated individually with high-resolution surface electrodes; coordination and control of the stimulation was effected by microcomputer. Simple vocal commands to the computer triggered preprogrammed hand prehensions, arm motion, and other functions, giving the patient complete control over the system. In pilot clinical trials of six weeks, writing, eating, and drinking, including picking up and replacing the pen or cup, were achieved.

  9. Movement-related cortical potential amplitude reduction after cycling exercise relates to the extent of neuromuscular fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eSpring

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP, which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 seconds before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 minutes at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence.The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (-10±8% and the time trial (-21±9%. The voluntary activation level (VAL (-6±8% and -12±10%, peak twitch (Pt (-21±16% and -32±17% and paired stimuli (P100Hz (-7±11% and -12±13% were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100Hz (r=0.61, and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r=0.64.In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction.

  10. Alterations in Neural Control of Constant Isometric Contraction with the Size of Error Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Lin, Yen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Min; Yang, Zong-Ru; Hu, Chia-Ling; Chen, Yi-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Discharge patterns from a population of motor units (MUs) were estimated with multi-channel surface electromyogram and signal processing techniques to investigate parametric differences in low-frequency force fluctuations, MU discharges, and force-discharge relation during static force-tracking with varying sizes of execution error presented via visual feedback. Fourteen healthy adults produced isometric force at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction through index abduction under three visual conditions that scaled execution errors with different amplification factors. Error-augmentation feedback that used a high amplification factor (HAF) to potentiate visualized error size resulted in higher sample entropy, mean frequency, ratio of high-frequency components, and spectral dispersion of force fluctuations than those of error-reducing feedback using a low amplification factor (LAF). In the HAF condition, MUs with relatively high recruitment thresholds in the dorsal interosseous muscle exhibited a larger coefficient of variation for inter-spike intervals and a greater spectral peak of the pooled MU coherence at 13–35 Hz than did those in the LAF condition. Manipulation of the size of error feedback altered the force-discharge relation, which was characterized with non-linear approaches such as mutual information and cross sample entropy. The association of force fluctuations and global discharge trace decreased with increasing error amplification factor. Our findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence that favors motor training using error-augmentation feedback. Amplification of the visualized error size of visual feedback could enrich force gradation strategies during static force-tracking, pertaining to selective increases in the discharge variability of higher-threshold MUs that receive greater common oscillatory inputs in the β-band. PMID:28125658

  11. Control of Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Altering the Geometry of Nanofibers

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    Satoshi Fujita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is required for clinical applications. To control MSC differentiation, induction media containing different types of soluble factors have been used to date; however, it remains challenging to obtain a uniformly differentiated population of an appropriate quality for clinical application by this approach. We attempted to develop nanofiber scaffolds for effective MSC differentiation by mimicking anisotropy of the extracellular matrix structure, to assess whether differentiation of these cells can be controlled by using geometrically different scaffolds. We evaluated MSC differentiation on aligned and random nanofibers, fabricated by electrospinning. We found that induction of MSCs into adipocytes was markedly more inhibited on random nanofibers than on aligned nanofibers. In addition, adipoinduction on aligned nanofibers was also inhibited in the presence of mixed adipoinduction and osteoinduction medium, although osteoinduction was not affected by a change in scaffold geometry. Thus, we have achieved localized control over the direction of differentiation through changes in the alignment of the scaffold even in the presence of a mixed medium. These findings indicate that precise control of MSC differentiation can be attained by using scaffolds with different geometry, rather than by the conventional use of soluble factors in the medium.

  12. Altered postural control strategies and sensory organization in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Tsang, William W N; Ng, Gabriel Y F

    2012-10-01

    The postural control of children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) was compared under conditions of reduced or conflicting sensory input. Twenty-two children with DCD (16 males, 6 females; mean age 7 years 6 months, SD 1 year 5 months) and 19 children with normal motor development were tested (13 males, 6 females; mean age 6 years 11 months, SD 1 year 1 month). Standing balance, sensory organization and motor control strategy were evaluated using the sensory organization test (SOT). The results revealed that children with DCD had lower composite equilibrium scores (pchildren in the control group. No significant between-group difference in their average somatosensory ratio was observed. Additionally, children with DCD had lower motor strategy scores (swayed more on their hips) than the normal children when forced to depend on vestibular cues alone to balance (pchildren with DCD had deficits in standing balance control in conditions that included reduced or conflicting sensory signals. The visual and vestibular systems tended to be more involved in contributing to the balance deficits than the somatosensory system. Moreover, children with DCD tended to use hip strategy excessively when forced to rely primarily on vestibular signals to maintain postural stability.

  13. ALTERED SYMPATHETIC CONTROL OF NUTRIENT MOBILIZATION DURING PHYSICAL EXERCISE AFTER LESIONS IN THE VMH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkan, B.; Strubbe, J.H.; Bruggink, J.E.; Steffens, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    To study the impact of obesity on sympathetic nervous regulation of nutrient mobilization, obese rats and lean controls were subjected to physical exercise. Male Wistar rats, rendered obese by bilateral electrolytic lesions of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) were subjected to 15 min swimming. Pe

  14. Altered activation and functional connectivity of neural systems supporting cognitive control of emotion in psychosis proneness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Emotion regulation processes, such as reappraisal, are thought to operate through interactions between prefrontal emotion-control regions and subcortical emotion-generation regions such as the amygdala. Impairments in emotional processing and regulation have been reported in schizophrenia and at-ris

  15. Brain Oscillatory Correlates of Altered Executive Functioning in Positive and Negative Symptomatic Schizophrenia Patients and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Barbara; Minarik, Tamas; Griesmayr, Birgit; Stelzig-Schoeler, Renate; Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Sauseng, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Working Memory and executive functioning deficits are core characteristics of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Electrophysiological research indicates that altered patterns of neural oscillatory mechanisms underpinning executive functioning are associated with the psychiatric disorder. Such brain oscillatory changes have been found in local amplitude differences at gamma and theta frequencies in task-specific cortical areas. Moreover, interregional interactions are also disrupted as signified by decreased phase coherence of fronto-posterior theta activity in schizophrenia patients. However, schizophrenia is not a one-dimensional psychiatric disorder but has various forms and expressions. A common distinction is between positive and negative symptomatology but most patients have both negative and positive symptoms to some extent. Here, we examined three groups—healthy controls, predominantly negative, and predominantly positive symptomatic schizophrenia patients—when performing a working memory task with increasing cognitive demand and increasing need for executive control. We analyzed brain oscillatory activity in the three groups separately and investigated how predominant symptomatology might explain differences in brain oscillatory patterns. Our results indicate that differences in task specific fronto-posterior network activity (i.e., executive control network) expressed by interregional phase synchronization are able to account for working memory dysfunctions between groups. Local changes in the theta and gamma frequency range also show differences between patients and healthy controls, and more importantly, between the two patient groups. We conclude that differences in oscillatory brain activation patterns related to executive processing can be an indicator for positive and negative symptomatology in schizophrenia. Furthermore, changes in cognitive and especially executive functioning in patients are expressed by alterations in a task

  16. Brain oscillatory correlates of altered executive functioning in positive and negative symptomatic schizophrenia patients and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBerger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Working Memory and executive functioning deficits are core characteristics of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Electrophysiological research indicates that altered patterns of neural oscillatory mechanisms underpinning executive functioning are associated with the psychiatric disorder. Such brain oscillatory changes have been found in local amplitude differences at gamma and theta frequencies in task-specific cortical areas. Moreover, interregional interactions are also disrupted as signified by decreased phase coherence of fronto-posterior theta activity in schizophrenia patients. However, schizophrenia is not a one-dimensional psychiatric disorder but has various forms and expressions. A common distinction is between positive and negative symptomatology but most patients have both negative and positive symptoms to some extent. Here, we examined three groups – healthy controls, predominantly negative and predominantly positive symptomatic schizophrenia patients – when performing a working memory task with increasing cognitive demand and increasing need for executive control. We analysed brain oscillatory activity in the three groups separately and investigated how predominant symptomatology might explain differences in brain oscillatory patterns. Our results indicate that differences in task specific fronto-posterior network activity (i.e. executive control network expressed by interregional phase synchronisation are able to account for working memory dysfunctions between groups. Local changes in the theta and gamma frequency range also show differences between patients and healthy controls, and more importantly, between the two patient groups. We conclude that differences in oscillatory brain activation patterns related to executive processing can be an indicator for positive and negative symptomatology in schizophrenia. Furthermore, changes in cognitive and especially executive functioning in patients are expressed by alterations in

  17. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients

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    David Drijkoningen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks and at completion of training (8 weeks together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  18. Neuromuscular monitoring and postoperative residual curarisation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, M; Kopman, A F; Ensor, J E

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of intraoperative monitoring of neuromuscular function on the incidence of postoperative residual curarisation (PORC). PORC has been considered present when a patient has a train-of-four (TOF) ratio of < 0.7 or < 0.9. We analysed data from 24 trials (3375 patients) that were published between 1979 and 2005. We excluded data on mivacurium from this meta-analysis because only three studies had examined the incidence of PORC associated with its use. Long- and intermediate-acting neuromuscular blocking drugs had been given to 662 and 2713 patients, respectively. Neuromuscular function was monitored in 823 patients (24.4%). A simple peripheral nerve stimulator was used in 543 patients, and an objective monitor was used in 280. The incidence of PORC was found to be significantly lower after the use of intermediate neuromuscular blocking drugs. We could not demonstrate that the use of an intraoperative neuromuscular function monitor decreased the incidence of PORC.

  19. Current Status of Neuromuscular Reversal and Monitoring: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brull, Sorin J; Kopman, Aaron F

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative residual neuromuscular block has been recognized as a potential problem for decades, and it remains so today. Traditional pharmacologic antagonists (anticholinesterases) are ineffective in reversing profound and deep levels of neuromuscular block; at the opposite end of the recovery curve close to full recovery, anticholinesterases may induce paradoxical muscle weakness. The new selective relaxant-binding agent sugammadex can reverse any depth of block from aminosteroid (but not benzylisoquinolinium) relaxants; however, the effective dose to be administered should be chosen based on objective monitoring of the depth of neuromuscular block.To guide appropriate perioperative management, neuromuscular function assessment with a peripheral nerve stimulator is mandatory. Although in many settings, subjective (visual and tactile) evaluation of muscle responses is used, such evaluation has had limited success in preventing the occurrence of residual paralysis. Clinical evaluations of return of muscle strength (head lift and grip strength) or respiratory parameters (tidal volume and vital capacity) are equally insensitive at detecting neuromuscular weakness. Objective measurement (a train-of-four ratio greater than 0.90) is the only method to determine appropriate timing of tracheal extubation and ensure normal muscle function and patient safety.

  20. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles (Buz); Reisman, Darcy S.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 2...

  1. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBehrens

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after eight weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0-100, 100-200 ms and isometric maximum voluntary contraction of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave, peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that the endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue

  2. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Martin; Weippert, Matthias; Wassermann, Franziska; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC) and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after 8 weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0-100, 100-200 ms) and iMVC of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave), peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that cycling endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue resistance.

  3. Early life trauma is associated with altered white matter integrity and affective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Vincent; Amick, Melissa A; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) has been shown to impair affective control and attention well into adulthood. Neuroimaging studies have further shown that ELT was associated with decreased white matter integrity in the prefrontal areas in children and adults. However, no study to date has looked at the relationship between white matter integrity and affective control in individuals with and without a history of ELT. To examine this, we tested 240 Veterans with (ELT N = 80) and without (NoELT N = 160) a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse or family violence. Affective control was measured with the Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) and attention was indexed with the Test of Variable Attention (TOVA). White matter integrity was measured using fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed greater number of errors on the AGN in ELT compared to NoELT. There was no difference on the TOVA. While there were no mean differences in FA, there was an interaction between FA and reaction time to positive stimuli on the AGN where the ELT group showed a positive relationship between FA and reaction time in right frontal and prefrontal areas, whereas the NoELT group showed a negative or no association between FA and reaction time. This suggests that ELT may be associated with a distinct brain-behavior relationship that could be related to other determinants of FA than those present in healthy adults.

  4. Altered Innate Immune Responses in Neutrophils from Patients with Well- and Suboptimally Controlled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca S. M. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations where neutrophilic inflammation dominates and is associated with steroid refractory asthma. Structural airway cells in asthma differ from nonasthmatics; however it is unknown if neutrophils differ. We investigated neutrophil immune responses in patients who have good (AGood and suboptimal (ASubopt asthma symptom control. Methods. Peripheral blood neutrophils from AGood (ACQ 0.75, n=7, and healthy controls (HC (n=9 were stimulated with bacterial (LPS (1 μg/mL, fMLF (100 nM, and viral (imiquimod (3 μg/mL, R848 (1.5 μg/mL, and poly I:C (10 μg/mL surrogates or live rhinovirus (RV 16 (MOI1. Cell-free supernatant was collected after 1 h for neutrophil elastase (NE and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 measurements or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results. Constitutive NE was enhanced in AGood neutrophils compared to HC. fMLF stimulated neutrophils from ASubopt but not AGood produced 50% of HC levels. fMLF induced MMP-9 was impaired in ASubopt and AGood compared to HC. fMLF stimulated CXCL8 but not MMP-9 was positively correlated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. ASubopt and AGood responded similarly to other stimuli. Conclusions. Circulating neutrophils are different in asthma; however, this is likely to be related to airflow limitation rather than asthma control.

  5. Effects of hindlimb unloading on neuromuscular development of neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstorf, B. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Bain, J. L.; Reiser, P. M.; Sedlak, F. R.; Wong-Riley, M. T.; Riley, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that hindlimb suspension unloading of 8-day-old neonatal rats would disrupt the normal development of muscle fiber types and the motor innervation of the antigravity (weightbearing) soleus muscles but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Five rats were suspended 4.5 h and returned 1.5 h to the dam for nursing on a 24 h cycle for 9 days. To control for isolation from the dam, the remaining five littermates were removed on the same schedule but not suspended. Another litter of 10 rats housed in the same room provided a vivarium control. Fibers were typed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry and immunostaining for embryonic, slow, fast IIA and fast IIB isomyosins. The percentage of multiple innervation and the complexity of singly-innervated motor terminal endings were assessed in silver/cholinesterase stained sections. Unique to the soleus, unloading accelerated production of fast IIA myosin, delayed expression of slow myosin and retarded increases in standardized muscle weight and fiber size. Loss of multiple innervation was not delayed. However, fewer than normal motor nerve endings achieved complexity. Suspended rats continued unloaded hindlimb movements. These findings suggest that motor neurons resolve multiple innervation through nerve impulse activity, whereas the postsynaptic element (muscle fiber) controls endplate size, which regulates motor terminal arborization. Unexpectedly, in the EDL of unloaded rats, transition from embryonic to fast myosin expression was retarded. Suspension-related foot drop, which stretches and chronically loads EDL, may have prevented fast fiber differentiation. These results demonstrate that neuromuscular development of both weightbearing and non-weightbearing muscles in rats is dependent upon and modulated by hindlimb loading.

  6. Smoking and the developing brain: altered white matter microstructure in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ewijk, Hanneke; Groenman, Annabeth P; Zwiers, Marcel P; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Faraone, Stephen V; Hartman, Catharina A; Luman, Marjolein; Greven, Corina U; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Brain white matter (WM) tracts, playing a vital role in the communication between brain regions, undergo important maturational changes during adolescence and young adulthood, a critical period for the development of nicotine dependence. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with increased smoking and widespread WM abnormalities, suggesting that the developing ADHD brain might be especially vulnerable to effects of smoking. This study aims to investigate the effect of smoking on (WM) microstructure in adolescents and young adults with and without ADHD. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in an extensively phenotyped sample of nonsmokers (n = 95, 50.5% ADHD), irregular smokers (n = 41, 58.5% ADHD), and regular smokers (n = 50, 82.5% ADHD), aged 14-24 years. A whole-brain voxelwise approach investigated associations of smoking, ADHD and their interaction, with WM microstructure as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Widespread alterations in FA and MD were found for regular smokers compared to irregular and nonsmokers, mainly located in the corpus callosum and WM tracts surrounding the basal ganglia. Several regions overlapped with regions of altered FA for ADHD versus controls, albeit in different directions. Irregular and nonsmokers did not differ, and ADHD and smoking did not interact. Results implicate that smoking and ADHD have independent effects on WM microstructure, and possibly do not share underlying mechanisms. Two mechanisms may play a role in the current results. First, smoking may cause alterations in WM microstructure in the maturing brain. Second, pre-existing WM microstructure differences possibly reflect a risk factor for development of a smoking addiction.

  7. Light stimuli control neuronal migration by altering of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Komuro, Yutaro; Fahrion, Jennifer K; Hu, Taofang; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Fenner, Kathleen B; Wooton, Jessica; Raoult, Emilie; Galas, Ludovic; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2012-02-14

    The role of genetic inheritance in brain development has been well characterized, but little is known about the contributions of natural environmental stimuli, such as the effect of light-dark cycles, to brain development. In this study, we determined the role of light stimuli in neuronal cell migration to elucidate how environmental factors regulate brain development. We show that in early postnatal mouse cerebella, granule cell migration accelerates during light cycles and decelerates during dark cycles. Furthermore, cerebellar levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are high during light cycles and low during dark cycles. There are causal relationships between light-dark cycles, speed of granule cell migration, and cerebellar IGF-1 levels. First, changes in light-dark cycles result in corresponding changes in the fluctuations of both speed of granule cell migration and cerebellar IGF-1 levels. Second, in vitro studies indicate that exogenous IGF-1 accelerates the migration of isolated granule cells through the activation of IGF-1 receptors. Third, in vivo studies reveal that inhibiting the IGF-1 receptors decelerates granule cell migration during light cycles (high IGF-1 levels) but does not alter migration during dark cycles (low IGF-1 levels). In contrast, stimulating the IGF-1 receptors accelerates granule cell migration during dark cycles (low IGF-1 levels) but does not alter migration during light cycles (high IGF-1 levels). These results suggest that during early postnatal development light stimuli control granule cell migration by altering the activity of IGF-1 receptors through modification of cerebellar IGF-1 levels.

  8. Neuromuscular fatigue is not different between constant and variable frequency stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papaiordanidou

    Full Text Available This study compared fatigue development of the triceps surae induced by two electrical stimulation protocols composed of constant and variable frequency trains (CFTs, VFTs, 450 trains, 30 Hz, 167 ms ON, 500 ms OFF and 146 ms ON, 500 ms OFF respectively. For the VFTs protocol a doublet (100 Hz was used at the beginning of each train. The intensity used evoked 30% of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and was defined using CFTs. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and after each protocol. Changes in excitation-contraction coupling were assessed by analysing the M-wave [at rest (Mmax and during MVC (Msup] and associated peak twitch (Pt. H-reflex [at rest (Hmax and during MVC (Hsup] and the motor evoked potential (MEP during MVC were studied to assess spinal and corticospinal excitability of the soleus muscle. MVC decrease was similar between the protocols (-8%, P<0.05. Mmax, Msup and Pt decreased after both protocols (P<0.01. Hmax/Mmax was decreased (P<0.05, whereas Hsup/Msup and MEP/Msup remained unchanged after both protocols. The results indicate that CFTs and VFTs gave rise to equivalent neuromuscular fatigue. This fatigue resulted from alterations taking place at the muscular level. The finding that cortical and spinal excitability remained unchanged during MVC indicates that spinal and/or supraspinal mechanisms were activated to compensate for the loss of spinal excitability at rest.

  9. Neuromuscular Responses to 14 Weeks of Traditional and Daily Undulating Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, B; Holzinger, S; Soleimani, M; Pelzer, T; Stening, J; Pfeiffer, M

    2015-06-01

    This study compared traditional (TP) and daily undulating (DUP) periodization on muscle strength, EMG-estimated neural drive and muscle architecture of the quadriceps femoris (QF). 10 non-athletic females (24.4±3.2 years) performed 14 weeks of isometric training for the QF exercising 1 leg using TP and the contralateral leg using DUP. Intensities varied from 60% to 80% of MVC and the intensity zones and training volume were equated for each leg. Knee extension MVC, maximal voluntary QF-EMG activity and vastus lateralis (VL) muscle architecture were measured in both legs before, after 6 weeks and after 14 weeks of training using dynamometry, surface EMG and ultrasonography. Isometric MVC and maximal QF-EMG remained unaltered after 6 weeks of training, but were significantly (PMVC: TP 24%, DUP 23%; QF-EMG: TP 45%, DUP 46%). VL-architecture remained unchanged following 6 weeks of training, but VL-muscle thickness (TP 17%, DUP 16%) and fascicle length (TP 16%, DUP 17%) displayed significant (P<0.05) enlargements after 14 weeks in both legs. Importantly, these temporal neuromuscular alterations displayed no significant differences between the training legs. Therefore, periodization may not act as a key trigger for neuromuscular adaptations.

  10. Deficient grip force control in schizophrenia: behavioral and modeling evidence for altered motor inhibition and motor noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G; Maier, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5 N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit.

  11. Effects of neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in severe primary hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Nilsdotter, Anna; Kosek, Eva;

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled bef...... before-and-after study were to compare baseline status to an age-matched population-based reference group and to examine the effects of neuromuscular training on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in patients with severe primary OA of the hip or knee.......The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled...

  12. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...... with muscle wasting due to neuromuscular conditions, however, a common belief has been that physical activity could accelerate degeneration of the diseased muscle and a careful approach to training has therefore been suggested. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about physical training...

  13. Perceived pain and temporomandibular disorders in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael J; Riedlinger, Kathrin; Schoser, Benedikt; Bernateck, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in neuromuscular diseases. Inpatients (N = 134) with neuromuscular disorder diagnoses were given questionnaires to estimate pain localization and intensity. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Temporomandibular Index (TMI) were utilized to assess TMD. Pain was reported by 116 patients (86%). Legs (52%) and arms (33%) were the most common locations for pain localization, but the highest Pearson correlations (TMI vs. perceived pain) appeared for pain located in the trunk and arms (0.861, P < 0.01). No correlation between TMI and diagnosis group existed except for "acquired myopathy" and "miscellaneous neuromuscular diseases." These results suggest that the degree of TMD does not correlate with pain according to disease, although common mechanisms might be responsible for pain development in specific body regions connected with TMD. Most important, higher levels of TMD are associated with higher levels of perceived pain.

  14. Negative stereotype activation alters interaction between neural correlates of arousal, inhibition and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Cox, Christine L; Schmader, Toni; Ryan, Lee

    2012-10-01

    Priming negative stereotypes of African Americans can bias perceptions toward novel Black targets, but less is known about how these perceptions ultimately arise. Examining how neural regions involved in arousal, inhibition and control covary when negative stereotypes are activated can provide insight into whether individuals attempt to downregulate biases. Using fMRI, White egalitarian-motivated participants were shown Black and White faces at fast (32 ms) or slow (525 ms) presentation speeds. To create a racially negative stereotypic context, participants listened to violent and misogynistic rap (VMR) in the background. No music (NM) and death metal (DM) were used as control conditions in separate blocks. Fast exposure of Black faces elicited amygdala activation in the NM and VMR conditions (but not DM), that also negatively covaried with activation in prefrontal regions. Only in VMR, however, did amygdala activation for Black faces persist during slow exposure and positively covary with activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while negatively covarying with activation in orbitofrontal cortex. Findings suggest that contexts that prime negative racial stereotypes seem to hinder the downregulation of amygdala activation that typically occurs when egalitarian perceivers are exposed to Black faces.

  15. Altered monocyte activation markers in Tourette’s syndrome: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matz Judith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections and immunological processes are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of Tourette’s syndrome (TS. To determine possible common underlying immunological mechanisms, we focused on innate immunity and studied markers of inflammation, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cytokines. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we used current methods to determine the number of monocytes and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in 46 children, adolescents, and adult patients suffering from TS and in 43 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, interleukin 6 (IL-6, soluble CD14 (sCD14, IL1-receptor antagonist (IL1-ra, and serum neopterin were detected by immunoassays. Results We found that CRP and neopterin levels and the number of monocytes were significantly higher in TS patients than in healthy controls. Serum concentrations of TNF-alpha, sIL1-ra, and sCD14 were significantly lower in TS patients. All measured values were within normal ranges and often close to detection limits. Conclusions The present results point to a monocyte dysregulation in TS. This possible dysbalance in innate immunity could predispose to infections or autoimmune reactions.

  16. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solé-Padullés

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7-19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27, offspring of patients with BD (N = 39 and offspring of community control parents (N = 40. We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence.

  17. Train-of-four fade during onset of neuromuscular block with nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, F M; Mirakhur, R K

    1989-04-01

    Fade in the train-of-four (TOF) responses during onset of neuromuscular block was studied following administration of atracurium (225 or 450 micrograms/kg), vecuronium (40 or 80 micrograms/kg), pancuronium (60 or 120 micrograms/kg) and tubocurarine (450 micrograms/kg). TOF ratios were measured at approximate heights of T1 (first response in the TOF) of 75, 50 and 25%. Fade in TOF increased as the height of T1 decreased, with maximum fade being observed at T1 of 25%. The greatest difference between relaxants was observed at T1 of 25%, vecuronium showing the least fade and pancuronium, atracurium and tubocurarine showing increasing fade, in that order. The difference between atracurium and tubocurarine or between vecuronium and pancuronium was not significant, but the degree of TOF fade was significantly greater with atracurium and tubocurarine in comparison to vecuronium or pancuronium.

  18. Urgencias en patología neuromuscular Emergencies in neuromuscular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ayuso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La debilidad muscular aguda (DMA es el síntoma predominante de las urgencias neuromusculares, especialmente si afecta a la musculatura respiratoria u orofaríngea. La DMA es un síndrome plurietiológico y con distintos niveles lesionales en la unidad motora. Dentro del amplio grupo de enfermedades neuromusculares, las que con mayor frecuencia provocan DMA e insuficiencia respiratoria son el síndrome de Guillain-Barré (SGB y la miastenia gravis (MG. El SGB constituye la causa más frecuente de parálisis flácida aguda; puede ocasionar fallo respiratorio en un tercio de los casos precisando ventilación mecánica. El diagnóstico preciso de este síndrome permitirá iniciar tratamiento inmunomodulador, que ha demostrado que modifica el curso de la enfermedad. Además, la valoración clínica de los pacientes y el conocimiento de sencillos tests neurofisiológicos y de función respiratoria guiarán la decisión de ventilación mecánica evitando la intubación de urgencia. La urgencia más frecuente que ocasiona la MG es la crisis miasténica, definida por el deterioro en la función bulbar con insuficiencia respiratoria aguda y riesgo de parada respiratoria. Ocurre en un 15-20% de pacientes miasténicos y puede desencadenarse por múltiples factores. Además del diagnóstico preciso de la crisis es importante la supresión de los factores desencadenantes y medidas de soporte ventilatorio. Entre las medidas farmacológicas son la plasmaféresis y las inmunoglobulinas intravenosas los instrumentos más útiles en la actualidad; estos tratamientos no sustituyen la vigilancia intensiva y el reconocimiento de los signos inminentes de fallo respiratorio que implican soporte ventilatorio invasivo o no invasivo.Acute muscle weakness (AMW is the predominant symptom of neuromuscular emergencies, especially if it affects the respiratory or oropharyngeal musculature . AMW is a multi-etiological syndrome, with different lesion levels in the motor unit

  19. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  20. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  1. New techniques in the tissue diagnosis of gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles H Knowles; Joanne E Martin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders of children and adults in which symptoms are presumed or proven to arise as a result of neuromuscular (including interstitial cell of Cajal) dysfunction. Common to most of these diseases are symptoms of impaired motor activity which manifest as slowed or obstructed transit with or without evidence of transient or persistent radiological visceral dilatation. A variety of histopathological techniques and allied investigations are being increasingly applied to tissue biopsies from such patients. This review outlines some of the more recent advances in this field, particularly in the most contentious area of small bowel disease manifesting as intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  2. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment of degenerative knee disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is recommended as first-line treatment of degenerative knee disease. Our hypothesis is that neuromuscular exercise is feasible and at least as effective as tradionally used strength or aerobic training, but aims to more closely target the sensorimotor deficiencies and functional...... instability associated with the degenerative knee disease than traditionally used training methods.SUMMARY FOR TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGECurrent data suggests that the effect from neuromuscular exercise on pain and function is comparable to the effects seen from other forms of exercise....

  3. Prevention and management of limb contractures in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalsky, Andrew J; McDonald, Craig M

    2012-08-01

    Limb contractures are a common impairment in neuromuscular diseases. They contribute to increased disability from decreased motor performance, mobility limitations, reduced functional range of motion, loss of function for activities of daily living, and increased pain. The pathogenesis of contractures is multifactorial. Myopathic conditions are associated with more severe limb contractures compared with neuropathic disorders. Although the evidence supporting the efficacy of multiple interventions to improve range of motion in neuromuscular diseases in a sustained manner is lacking, there are generally accepted principles with regard to splinting, bracing, stretching, and surgery that help minimize the impact or disability from contractures.

  4. [Organization of therapeutic aid to patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, V A; Temin, P A; Arkhipov, B A; Zavadenko, N N

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes experience gained for many years by the All-Union Research Methodological Center for Study of Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases. The specialists of the Center render counselling and therapeutic assistance to patients afflicted with neuromuscular diseases. The counselling and diagnostic services are characterized by the fact that it is based on the activity of a large hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases. The problems which are being solved by the out- and inpatient services of the Center are considered in detail. The advantages of the setting up of the common in- and outpatient complex on the basis of the hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases are described.

  5. Efectos del vendaje neuromuscular sobre la flexibilidad del raquis lumbar

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Labrador-Cerrato; P. Ortega Sánchez-Diezma; G. Lanzas Melendo; Gutiérrez-Ortega, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: El vendaje neuromuscular es una técnica que produce una estimulación muy selectiva sobre la piel a través de la aplicación de unas vendas elásticas especiales con el fin de lograr cambios propioceptivos, aumento o inhibición del tono muscular y mitigación de algias, entre otros. Objetivos: Comprobar si la aplicación del vendaje neuromuscular permite aumentar la flexión del raquis lumbar comparándola con otras técnicas de vendaje placebo (esparadrapo rígido convencional; Omniplas...

  6. act up controls actin polymerization to alter cell shape and restrict Hedgehog signaling in the Drosophila eye disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlali, A; Draskovic, I; Hazelett, D J; Treisman, J E

    2000-04-28

    Cells in the morphogenetic furrow of the Drosophila eye disc undergo a striking shape change immediately prior to their neuronal differentiation. We have isolated mutations in a novel gene, act up (acu), that is required for this shape change. acu encodes a homolog of yeast cyclase-associated protein, which sequesters monomeric actin; we show that acu is required to prevent actin filament polymerization in the eye disc. In contrast, profilin promotes actin filament polymerization, acting epistatically to acu. However, both acu and profilin are required to prevent premature Hedgehog-induced photoreceptor differentiation ahead of the morphogenetic furrow. These findings suggest that dynamic changes in actin filaments alter cell shape to control the movement of signals that coordinate a wave of differentiation.

  7. Algorithms based on CWT and classifiers to control cardiac alterations and stress using an ECG and a SCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2013-05-10

    This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG) for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and J48) have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%), arrhythmia (93.48%) and extrasystoles (99.29%). The detection of stress level is complemented with Skin Conductance Response (SCR), whose success is 94.02%. The heart rate variability does not show added value to the stress detection in this case. With this pulsimeter, it is possible to prevent and detect anomalies for a non-intrusive way associated to a telemedicine system. It is also possible to use it during physical activity due to the fact the CWT minimizes the motion artifacts.

  8. Immediate Efficacy of Neuromuscular Exercise in Patients with Severe Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the effects of exercise in severe and endstage osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a neuromuscular exercise program in patients with clinically severe hip or knee OA. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled assessor-blinded trial...... and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb...

  9. Anormalidades neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available É feita revisão de literatura sobre as principais alterações do sistema neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia no ser humano e em modelos animais. A diminuição do diâmetro das fibras musculares após período de inatividade/imobilidade (desuso deve-se à perda de miofibrilas periféricas não ocorrendo formação de core-targetóides ou diminuição da atividade da miofosforilase, próprias da desnervação; mantêm-se a liberação espontânea de acetilcolina e fatores tróficos na junção mio-neural; em geral são afetadas preferencialmente fibras II, que podem assumir forma angular. Existe um processo contínuo intrínseco de envelhecimento de nervos e músculos, com desnervação e reinervação lenta e progressiva; o número de unidades motoras se reduz após 60 anos, sem ocorrência de atividade elétrica desnervatória; a quantidade de acetilcolina liberada nos neurônios terminais e a capacidade máxima de utilização de oxigênio estão diminuídas; a redução da capacidade oxidativa mitocondrial pode explicar o aumento de fibras I, mantendo-se o equilíbrio energético. Após poucas semanas de caquexia as fibras musculares podem ter o diâmetro reduzido em 30%, essa redução ocorre em ordem decrescente nos músculos dos membros inferiores, superiores e tronco; existe atrofia II preferencial com fibras angulares ocasionais, redução de RNA/síntese proteica, mantendo-se DNA normal.

  10. Presynaptic snake beta-neurotoxins produce tetanic fade and endplate potential run-down during neuromuscular blockade in mouse diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H I; Nicholson, G M

    1997-11-01

    The present study investigated the ability of a number of presynaptic snake neurotoxins (snake beta-neurotoxins) to produce nerve-evoked train-of-four fade, tetanic fade and endplate potential run-down during the development of neuromuscular blockade in the isolated mouse phrenic-hemidiaphragm nerve-muscle preparation. All the snake beta-neurotoxins tested, with the exception of notexin, produced train-of-four and tetanic fade of nerve-evoked isometric muscle contractions. Train-of-four fade was not present during the initial depressant or facilitatory phases of muscle tension produced by the snake beta-neurotoxins but developed progressively during the final depressant phase that precedes complete neuromuscular blockade. The 'non-neurotoxic' bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 and the 'low-toxicity' phospholipase A2 from Naja naja atra venom failed to elicit train-of-four fade, indicating that the phospholipase activity of the snake beta-neurotoxins is not responsible for the development of fade. Intracellular recording of endplate potentials (EPPs) elicited by nerve-evoked trains of stimuli showed a progressive run-down in EPP amplitude during the train following incubation with all snake beta-neurotoxins except notexin. Again this run-down in EPP amplitude was confined to the final depressant phase of snake beta-neurotoxin action. However when EPP amplitude fell to near uniquantal levels (fade was reduced. Unlike postjunctional snake alpha-neurotoxins, prejunctional snake beta-neurotoxins interfere with acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction during the development of neuromuscular blockade. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that fade in twitch and tetanic muscle tension is due to an underlying rundown in EPP amplitude resulting from a prejunctional alteration of transmitter release rather than a use-dependent block of postjunctional nicotinic receptors.

  11. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions.Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music. Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course.Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .02. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [(F(1, 56 = 3.0, p = .09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being [r = 0.31, p = .02] and decreased clinical symptoms [r = -0.29, p = .03].Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing.

  12. Influência do lítio no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo atracúrio e pelo cisatracúrio: estudo em preparações nervo frênico-diafragma de rato Influencia del litio en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el atracurio y por el cisatracurio: estudio en preparo nervio frénico-diafragma del ratón Influence of lithium on the neuromuscular blockade produced by atracurium and cisatracurium: study on rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Cristina Antoniassi Fernandes

    2007-06-01

    ção pré-sináptica.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: El litio, fármaco ampliamente utilizado en los disturbios bipolares, puede interactuar con los bloqueadores neuromusculares. Los mecanismos para explicar sus efectos en la transmisión neuromuscular y en la interacción con bloqueadores neuromusculares son controvertidos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar, en diafragma de ratón, los efectos del litio sobre la respuesta muscular al estímulo indirecto y la posible interacción con los bloqueadores neuromusculares. MÉTODO: Se utilizaron ratones con peso entre 250 y 300 g, sacrificados bajo anestesia con uretana. La preparación nervio frénico-diafragma se montó de acuerdo con la técnica de Bulbring. El diafragma se mantuvo bajo tensión, ligado a un transductor isométrico y sometido a la estimulación indirecta de 0,1 Hz de frecuencia. Las contracciones del diafragma fueron registradas en un fisiógrafo. Del análisis de la amplitud de las respuestas musculares se evaluaron los efectos de los fármacos: litio (1,5 mg.mL-1; atracurio (20 µg.mL-1 y cisatracurio (3 µg.mL-1 empleados aisladamente; de la asociación litio-bloqueadores neuromusculares; y del litio en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el atracurio (35 µg.mL-1 y cisatracurio (5 µg.mL-1. Los efectos se evaluaron antes y 45 minutos después de la adición de los fármacos. También se estudiaron los efectos del litio en los potenciales de membrana (PM y potenciales de placa terminal en miniatura (PPTM. RESULTADOS: El litio aisladamente no alteró la amplitud de las respuestas musculares, pero sí que redujo significativamente el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el atracurio y el cisatracurio. No alteró el PM y ocasionó un aumento inicial de la frecuencia de los PPTM. CONCLUSIONES: El litio empleado aisladamente no comprometió la transmisión neuromuscular y aumentó la resistencia al efecto del atracurio y del cisatracurio. No mostró acción sobre la fibra muscular, siendo que las

  13. Comparison of the effects of hamstring stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation with prior application of cryotherapy or ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Francisco Elezier Xavier; Junior, Arlindo Rodrigues de Mesquita; Meneses, Harnold's Tyson de Sousa; Moreira Dos Santos, Rayele Pricila; Rodrigues, Ezaine Costa; Gouveia, Samara Sousa Vasconcelos; Gouveia, Guilherme Pertinni de Morais; Orsini, Marco; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Machado, Dionis de Castro Dutra

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] Stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation involve physiological reflex mechanisms through submaximal contraction of agonists which activate Golgi organ, promoting the relaxation reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation alone and with prior application of cryotherapy and thermotherapy on hamstring stretching. [Subjects and Methods] The sample comprised of 32 young subjects with hamstring retraction of the right limb. The subjects were randomly allocated to four groups: the control, flexibility PNF, flexibility PNF associated with cryotherapy, flexibility PNF in association with ultrasound therapy. [Results] After 12 stretching sessions, experimental groups showed significant improvements compared to the control group. Moreover, we did not find any significant differences among the experimental groups indicating PNF stretching alone elicits similar results to PNF stretching with prior administration of cryotherapy or thermotherapy. [Conclusion] PNF without other therapy may be a more practical and less expensive choice for clinical care.

  14. Optimising abdominal space with deep neuromuscular blockade in gynaecologic laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Gätke, M R; Springborg, H H

    2015-01-01

    neuromuscular blockade (NMB) would enlarge surgical space, measured as the distance from the sacral promontory to the trocar in patients undergoing gynaecologic laparoscopy. METHODS: Fourteen patients were randomised in an assessor-blinded crossover design. The distance from the sacral promontory to the trocar...

  15. Is deep neuromuscular blockade beneficial in laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M V; Staehr-Rye, A K; Claudius, C;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deep neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic surgery may provide some clinical benefit. We present the 'Pro-' argument in this paired position paper. METHODS: We reviewed recent evidence from a basic database of references which we agreed on with the 'Con-' side, and present this i...

  16. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Motor Restoration in Hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jayme S; Fu, Michael J; Sheffler, Lynne R; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the most common therapeutic and neuroprosthetic applications of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for upper and lower extremity stroke rehabilitation. Fundamental NMES principles and purposes in stroke rehabilitation are explained. NMES modalities used for upper and lower limb rehabilitation are described, and efficacy studies are summarized. The evidence for peripheral and central mechanisms of action is also summarized.

  17. Drug Development and Challenges for Neuromuscular Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouelhi, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Drug development process faces many challenges, including those encountered in clinical trials for neuromuscular diseases. Drug development is a lengthy and highly costly process. Out of 10 compounds entering first study in man (phase 1), only one compound reaches the market after an average of 14 years with a cost of $2.7 billion. Nevertheless, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, prescription drugs constituted only 9 % of each health care dollar spent in USA in 2013. Examples of challenges encountered in neuromuscular clinical trials include lack of validated patient-reported outcome tools, blinding issues, and the use of placebo in addition to lack of health authority guidance for orphan diseases. Patient enrollment challenge is the leading cause of missed clinical trial deadlines observed in about 80 % of clinical trials, resulting in delayed availability of potentially life-saving therapies. Another specific challenge introduced by recent technology is the use of social media and risk of bias. Sharing personal experiences while in the study could easily introduce bias among patients that would interfere with accurate interpretation of collected data. To minimize this risk, recent neuromuscular studies incorporate as an inclusion criterion the patient's agreement not to share any of study experiences through social media with other patients during the study conduct. Consideration of these challenges will allow timely response to the high unmet medical needs for many neuromuscular diseases.

  18. Muscle ultrasound quantifies segmental neuromuscular outcome in pediatric myelomeningocele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Renate J; Hoving, Eelco; Maurits, Natalia M; Brouwer, Oebele F; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    In pediatric spina bifida aperta (SBA), non-invasive assessment of neuromuscular integrity by muscle ultrasound density (MUD) could provide important information about the clinical condition. We therefore aimed to determine the association between pediatric SBA MUD and segmental neurologic function.

  19. Antagonism of non-depolarising neuromuscular block: current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Eikermann, M

    2009-03-01

    There is now mounting evidence that even small degrees of postoperative residual neuromuscular block increases the incidence of adverse respiratory events in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit and may increase longer-term morbidity as well. In the absence of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring, residual block is easily missed. A very strong case can be made for the routine administration of a non-depolarising antagonist unless it can be objectively demonstrated that complete recovery has occurred spontaneously. However, the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is associated with the potential for cardiovascular and respiratory side-effects, so there are cogent reasons for using low doses when the level of neuromuscular block is not intense. As little as 0.015-0.025 mg.kg(-1) of neostigmine is required at a train-of-four count of four with minimal fade, whereas 0.04-0.05 mg.kg(-1) is needed at a train-of-four count of two or three. If only a single twitch or none at all can be evoked, neostigmine should not be expected to promptly reverse neuromuscular block, and antagonism is best delayed till a train-of-four-count of two is achieved.

  20. Volume of the effect compartment in simulations of neuromuscular block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Vladimir; Proost, Johannes H.; Amann, Anton; Bhatt, Shashi B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The study examines the role of the volume of the effect compartment in simulations of neuromuscular block (NMB) produced by nondepolarizing muscle relaxants. Methods: The molar amount of the postsynaptic receptors at the motor end plates in muscle was assumed constant; the apparent recep

  1. Neuromuscular and mitochondrial disorders: what is relevant to the anaesthesiologist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review provides an up-to-date information to the anaesthesiologist about the more frequent and important neuromuscular disorders for which new basic insights or clinical implications have been reported. RECENT FINDINGS: The findings include the mechanisms of the hyperkalemia a

  2. The predictability of frequency-altered auditory feedback changes the weighting of feedback and feedforward input for speech motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Nichole E; Jones, Jeffery A

    2014-12-01

    Speech production requires the combined effort of a feedback control system driven by sensory feedback, and a feedforward control system driven by internal models. However, the factors that dictate the relative weighting of these feedback and feedforward control systems are unclear. In this event-related potential (ERP) study, participants produced vocalisations while being exposed to blocks of frequency-altered feedback (FAF) perturbations that were either predictable in magnitude (consistently either 50 or 100 cents) or unpredictable in magnitude (50- and 100-cent perturbations varying randomly within each vocalisation). Vocal and P1-N1-P2 ERP responses revealed decreases in the magnitude and trial-to-trial variability of vocal responses, smaller N1 amplitudes, and shorter vocal, P1 and N1 response latencies following predictable FAF perturbation magnitudes. In addition, vocal response magnitudes correlated with N1 amplitudes, vocal response latencies, and P2 latencies. This pattern of results suggests that after repeated exposure to predictable FAF perturbations, the contribution of the feedforward control system increases. Examination of the presentation order of the FAF perturbations revealed smaller compensatory responses, smaller P1 and P2 amplitudes, and shorter N1 latencies when the block of predictable 100-cent perturbations occurred prior to the block of predictable 50-cent perturbations. These results suggest that exposure to large perturbations modulates responses to subsequent perturbations of equal or smaller size. Similarly, exposure to a 100-cent perturbation prior to a 50-cent perturbation within a vocalisation decreased the magnitude of vocal and N1 responses, but increased P1 and P2 latencies. Thus, exposure to a single perturbation can affect responses to subsequent perturbations.

  3. Chronic infusion of SOD1(G93A) astrocyte-secreted factors induces spinal motoneuron degeneration and neuromuscular dysfunction in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri N; Rojas, Fabiola; van Zundert, Brigitte; Tapia, Ricardo

    2017-01-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease and studies in vitro show that motoneuron degeneration is triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. However, whether soluble toxic factor(s) released by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) expressing astrocytes induces death of motoneurons and leads to motor dysfunction in vivo is not known. To directly test this, healthy adult rats were treated with conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocytes (ACM) that express human (h) SOD1(G93A) (ACM-hG93A) via chronic osmotic pump infusion in the lumbar spinal cord. Controls included ACM derived from transgenic mice expressing hSOD1(WT) (ACM-hWT) or non-transgenic mouse SOD1(WT) (ACM-WT) astrocytes. Rats chronically infused with ACM-hG93A started to develop motor dysfunction at 8 days, as measured by rotarod performance. Additionally, immunohistochemical analyses at day 16 revealed reactive astrogliosis and significant loss of motoneurons in the ventral horn of the infused region. Controls did not show significant motor behavior alterations or neuronal damage. Thus, we demonstrate that factors released in vitro from astrocytes derived from ALS mice cause spinal motoneuron death and consequent neuromuscular dysfunction in vivo.

  4. The role of altered proximal femoral geometry in impaired pelvis stability and hip control during CP gait: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Lode; Jansen, Karen; Wesseling, Mariska; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-02-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, more specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. This study analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in subjects with CP, on the ability of muscles to control hip and knee joint kinematics. Given the specific gait deficits observed during crouch gait, increased ability to abduct, externally rotate the hip and extend the knee and hip were denoted as beneficial effects. We ran dynamic simulations of CP and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models, one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The results show that the combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics beneficially increased the ability of gluteus medius and maximus to extend the hip and knee. In contrast, the potentials of the hamstrings to extend the hip decreased whereas the potentials to flex the knee increased. These changes closely followed the observed changes in the muscle moment arm lengths. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the concomitant effect of the presence of proximal femoral deformity and CP gait characteristics on the muscle control of hip and knee joint kinematics during single stance. Not accounting for subject-specific geometry will affect the calculated muscles' potential during gait. Therefore, the use of generic models to assess muscle function in the presence of femoral deformity and CP gait should be treated with caution.

  5. Contribución del soporte nutricional al tratamiento de las alteraciones neuro-musculares del paciente crítico Contribution of nutritional support to treatment neuromuscular impairments of critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Montejo González

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Las alteraciones neuromusculares que tienen lugar en el paciente crítico han sido atribuidas a factores como la situación séptica, la liberación de mediadores inflamatorioso el empleo de fármacos que afectan desfavorablemente a la función neuro-muscular. El papel de factores metabólicos y nutricionales en el desarrollo de esta patología ha recibido poca atención. En la actualidad, el empleo de protocolos de control intensivo de la glucemia podría tener gran interés en la prevención de las alteraciones neuro-musculares de los pacientes críticos. Los mecanismos exactos de la implicación de la hiperglucemia en esta patología son, todavía, desconocidos, aunque la evidencia de los datos procedentes de la investigación es importante. La miopatía caquectizante (atrofia muscular tiene lugar de manera habitual como consecuencia de los cambios obligados por la respuesta metabólica al estrés. El efecto del aporte de nutrientes sobre la ganancia de masa muscular es muy limitado, por lo que deben estudiarse otras acciones dirigidas a recuperar, de manera más rápida, la masa muscular perdida. Deben evitarse pautas agresivas de renutrición con objeto de prevenir el síndrome de realimentación y el consiguiente mayor deterioro de la función muscular. El aporte de substratos específicos, como la glutamina, podría tener un efecto beneficioso en la recuperación de las alteraciones neuro-musculares del paciente crítico. No obstante, no existen aún datos para justificar su empleo si el único objetivo es la recuperación de la función neuro-muscular.Neuromuscular impairments occurring in the critically ill patient have been attributed to factors such as sepsis, release of inflammatory mediators, or the use of drugs unfavorably affecting neuromuscular function. The role of metabolic and nutritional factors in the development of this condition has received little attention. Currently, the use of protocols of intensive glycemia monitoring

  6. Assessment of ventilatory neuromuscular drive in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

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    L.R.A. Bittencourt

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of abnormalities of the respiratory center in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients and their correlation with polysomnographic data are still a matter of controversy. Moderately obese, sleep-deprived OSA patients presenting daytime hypersomnolence, with normocapnia and no clinical or spirometric evidence of pulmonary disease, were selected. We assessed the ventilatory control and correlated it with polysomnographic data. Ventilatory neuromuscular drive was evaluated in these patients by measuring the ventilatory response (VE, the inspiratory occlusion pressure (P.1 and the ventilatory pattern (VT/TI, TI/TTOT at rest and during submaximal exercise, breathing room air. These analyses were also performed after inhalation of a hypercapnic mixture of CO2 (DP.1/DPETCO2, DVE/DPETCO2. Average rest and exercise ventilatory response (VE: 12.2 and 32.6 l/min, respectively, inspiratory occlusion pressure (P.1: 1.5 and 4.7 cmH2O, respectively, and ventilatory pattern (VT/TI: 0.42 and 1.09 l/s; TI/TTOT: 0.47 and 0.46 l/s, respectively were within the normal range. In response to hypercapnia, the values of ventilatory response (DVE/DPETCO2: 1.51 l min-1 mmHg-1 and inspiratory occlusion pressure (DP.1/DPETCO2: 0.22 cmH2O were normal or slightly reduced in the normocapnic OSA patients. No association or correlation between ventilatory neuromuscular drive and ventilatory pattern, hypersomnolence score and polysomnographic data was found; however a significant positive correlation was observed between P.1 and weight. Our results indicate the existence of a group of normocapnic OSA patients who have a normal awake neuromuscular ventilatory drive at rest or during exercise that is partially influenced by obesity

  7. Do Psychosocial Interventions Improve Quality of Life and Wellbeing in Adults with Neuromuscular Disorders? A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walklet, Elaine; Muse, Kate; Meyrick, Jane; Moss, Tim

    2016-08-30

    Quality of life and well-being are frequently restricted in adults with neuromuscular disorders. As such, identification of appropriate interventions is imperative. The objective of this paper was to systematically review and critically appraise quantitative studies (RCTs, controlled trials and cohort studies) of psychosocial interventions designed to improve quality of life and well-being in adults with neuromuscular disorders. A systematic review of the published and unpublished literature was conducted. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were appraised using a validated quality assessment tool and results presented in a narrative synthesis. Out of 3,136 studies identified, ten studies met criteria for inclusion within the review. Included studies comprised a range of interventions including: cognitive behavioural therapy, dignity therapy, hypnosis, expressive disclosure, gratitude lists, group psychoeducation and psychologically informed rehabilitation. Five of the interventions were for patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The remainder were for patients with post-polio syndrome, muscular dystrophies and mixed disorders, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myasthenia gravis and myotonic dystrophy. Across varied interventions and neuromuscular disorders, seven studies reported a short-term beneficial effect of intervention on quality of life and well-being. Whilst such findings are encouraging, widespread issues with the methodological quality of these studies significantly compromised the results. There is no strong evidence that psychosocial interventions improve quality of life and well-being in adults with neuromuscular disorders, due to a paucity of high quality research in this field. Multi-site, randomised controlled trials with active controls, standardised outcome measurement and longer term follow-ups are urgently required.

  8. Alterations in the steroid hormone receptor co-chaperone FKBPL are associated with male infertility: a case-control study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sunnotel, Olaf

    2010-03-08

    Abstract Background Male infertility is a common cause of reproductive failure in humans. In mice, targeted deletions of the genes coding for FKBP6 or FKBP52, members of the FK506 binding protein family, can result in male infertility. In the case of FKBP52, this reflects an important role in potentiating Androgen Receptor (AR) signalling in the prostate and accessory glands, but not the testis. In infertile men, no mutations of FKBP52 or FKBP6 have been found so far, but the gene for FKBP-like (FKBPL) maps to chromosome 6p21.3, an area linked to azoospermia in a group of Japanese patients. Methods To determine whether mutations in FKBPL could contribute to the azoospermic phenotype, we examined expression in mouse and human tissues by RNA array blot, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry and sequenced the complete gene from two azoospermic patient cohorts and matching control groups. FKBPL-AR interaction was assayed using reporter constructs in vitro. Results FKBPL is strongly expressed in mouse testis, with expression upregulated at puberty. The protein is expressed in human testis in a pattern similar to FKBP52 and also enhanced AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays. We examined sixty patients from the Japanese patient group and found one inactivating mutation and one coding change, as well as a number of non-coding changes, all absent in fifty-six controls. A second, Irish patient cohort of thirty showed another two coding changes not present in thirty proven fertile controls. Conclusions Our results describe the first alterations in the gene for FKBPL in azoospermic patients and indicate a potential role in AR-mediated signalling in the testis.

  9. Alterations in the steroid hormone receptor co-chaperone FKBPL are associated with male infertility: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton David

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male infertility is a common cause of reproductive failure in humans. In mice, targeted deletions of the genes coding for FKBP6 or FKBP52, members of the FK506 binding protein family, can result in male infertility. In the case of FKBP52, this reflects an important role in potentiating Androgen Receptor (AR signalling in the prostate and accessory glands, but not the testis. In infertile men, no mutations of FKBP52 or FKBP6 have been found so far, but the gene for FKBP-like (FKBPL maps to chromosome 6p21.3, an area linked to azoospermia in a group of Japanese patients. Methods To determine whether mutations in FKBPL could contribute to the azoospermic phenotype, we examined expression in mouse and human tissues by RNA array blot, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry and sequenced the complete gene from two azoospermic patient cohorts and matching control groups. FKBPL-AR interaction was assayed using reporter constructs in vitro. Results FKBPL is strongly expressed in mouse testis, with expression upregulated at puberty. The protein is expressed in human testis in a pattern similar to FKBP52 and also enhanced AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays. We examined sixty patients from the Japanese patient group and found one inactivating mutation and one coding change, as well as a number of non-coding changes, all absent in fifty-six controls. A second, Irish patient cohort of thirty showed another two coding changes not present in thirty proven fertile controls. Conclusions Our results describe the first alterations in the gene for FKBPL in azoospermic patients and indicate a potential role in AR-mediated signalling in the testis.

  10. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Chemical controls on alteration and mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, R.W.; Berger, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Large bulk-tonnage high-sulfidation gold deposits, such as Yanacocha, Peru, are the surface expression of structurally-controlled lode gold deposits, such as El Indio, Chile. Both formed in active andesite-dacite volcanic terranes. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and geologic data show that lode deposits formed within 1500. m of the paleo-surface as a consequence of the expansion of low-salinity, low-density magmatic vapor with very limited, if any, groundwater mixing. They are characterized by an initial 'Sulfate' Stage of advanced argillic wallrock alteration ?? alunite commonly with intense silicification followed by a 'Sulfide' Stage - a succession of discrete sulfide-sulfosalt veins that may be ore grade in gold and silver. Fluid inclusions in quartz formed during wallrock alteration have homogenization temperatures between 100 and over 500 ??C and preserve a record of a vapor-rich environment. Recent data for El Indio and similar deposits show that at the commencement of the Sulfide Stage, 'condensation' of Cu-As-S sulfosalt melts with trace concentrations of Sb, Te, Bi, Ag and Au occurred at > 600 ??C following pyrite deposition. Euhedral quartz crystals were simultaneously deposited from the vapor phase during crystallization of the vapor-saturated melt occurs to Fe-tennantite with progressive non-equilibrium fractionation of heavy metals between melt-vapor and solid. Vugs containing a range of sulfides, sulfosalts and gold record the changing composition of the vapor. Published fluid inclusion and mineralogical data are reviewed in the context of geological relationships to establish boundary conditions through which to trace the expansion of magmatic vapor from source to surface and consequent alteration and mineralization. Initially heat loss from the vapor is high resulting in the formation of acid condensate permeating through the wallrock. This Sulfate Stage alteration effectively isolates the expansion of magmatic vapor in subsurface fracture arrays

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular diseases: present status and practical therapeutic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    1999-11-01

    This review summarizes the current status of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders and the possible mechanisms of action of the drug based on work in vivo, in vitro, and in animal models. Supply of idiotypic antibodies, suppression of antibody production, or acceleration of catabolism of immunoglobulin G (IgG) are relevant in explaining the efficacy of IVIg in myasthenia gravis (MG), Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and antibody-mediated neuropathies. Suppression of pathogenic cytokines has putative relevance in inflammatory myopathies and demyelinating neuropathies. Inhibition of complement binding and prevention of membranolytic attack complex (MAC) formation are relevant in dermatomyositis (DM), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), and MG. Modulation of Fc receptors or T-cell function is relevant in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), GBS, and inflammatory myopathies. The clinical efficacy of IVIg, based on controlled clinical trials conducted in patients with GBS, CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), DM, MG, LEMS, paraproteinemic IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) demyelinating polyneuropathies, and inclusion body myositis is summarized and practical issues related to each disorder are addressed. The present role of IVIg therapy in other disorders based on small controlled or uncontrolled trials is also summarized. Finally, safety issues, risk factors, adverse reactions, spurious results or serological tests, and practical guidelines associated with the administration of IVIg in the treatment of neuromuscular disorders are presented.

  12. Effects of Dynamic Neuromuscular Analysis Training on Static and Dynamic Balance in Indian Female Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of dynamic neuromuscular analysis on static and dynamic balance of Indian state level female athletes. It was hypothesized that the training protocol would improve both static and dynamic components of the balance, improving dynamic balance more than static. A total of 43 randomly selected state level female basketball players aged 16 -18 years participated in the study. The subjects were further divided into two groups, viz. Dynamic Neuromuscular Analysis (DNA group (n=23 and control group (n = 20. Pre and post static balance was tested to all the subjects by Stork Balance Test (SBT and Balance Error Scoring System (BESS, and dynamic balance was measured by Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT. DNA intervention of 90 minutes was given for 6 weeks while the control group followed traditional training. Results showed a significant improvement both in static and dynamic balance (p<0.001. It might be concluded that 6 week DNA training designed for the prevention of ACL injuries could also improve both static and dynamic balance in Indian female basketball players.

  13. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly

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    Winfried Mayr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period

  14. Detecção de fadiga neuromuscular em pessoas com lesão medular completa utilizando transformada wavelet

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger,Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: As pessoas com lesão medular (LM) podem ter seus músculos paralisados ativados por meio da estimulação elétrica funcional (FES) sobre vias neurais presentes próximas à pele. Estas estimulações elétricas são importantes para a recuperação do trofismo neuromuscular ou durante o controle de movimento por próteses neurais. No entanto, ao longo da aplicação da FES, a fadiga ocorre, diminuindo a eficiência da contração, principalmente devido à hipotrofia neuromuscular presente nessa pop...

  15. EFEITO DO TREINO NEUROMUSCULAR NA ROTAÇÃO DO JOELHO DURANTE A ATERRISSAGEM EM MULHERES

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    Narayana Vianna Spanó

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: O grande índice de lesões do ligamento cruzado anterior sem envolver contato em mulheres é motivo de curiosidade entre os cientistas, pois avaliações de aterrissagem podem sugerir a predisposição ao risco dessa lesão. Neste sentido, vários protocolos de treinamento foram utilizados como intervenção e obtiveram resultados diversificados na alteração desse fator de risco. Objetivo: O objetivo deste projeto foi avaliar as possíveis alterações de rotação do joelho na aterrissagem unipodal após a intervenção de um programa de treinamento neuromuscular. Métodos: Participaram do estudo 18 mulheres com idade entre 18 e 51 anos, que foram distribuídas em dois grupos: grupo de treinamento neuromuscular de oito semanas (GTN (n = 11 e grupo controle (GC (n = 7. Além disso, não apresentavam lesão musculoesquelética ou dores nos membros inferiores. Cada participante realizou cinco aterrissagens unipodais válidas de uma plataforma de 40 cm de altura. O processo de captura de movimento foi realizado com 12 câmeras infravermelho do sistema OptiTrack(tm para obter as coordenadas tridimensionais de marcadores fixados nos pontos anatômicos de interesse. Os sistemas de coordenadas locais da coxa e da perna foram definidos por meio dos respectivos marcadores fixados nos pontos anatômicos. Dessa forma, foram calculados os ângulos de rotação do joelho nos planos sagital, frontal e transverso através das sequências dos ângulos de Euler e as velocidades angulares através das formulações dos quatérnions. Resultados: Os resultados mostraram que houve um aumento na velocidade de rotação do joelho após o treinamento neuromuscular. Conclusão: Conclui-se que o treinamento neuromuscular resultou em maior velocidade de rotação no joelho nos 40 milissegundos que sucedem a aterrissagem unipodal.

  16. Influência da nifedipina no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo atracúrio e pelo cisatracúrio: estudo em preparações nervo frênico-diafragma de rato Influencia de la nifedipina en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por atracurio y cisatracurio: estudio en preparación nervio frénico diafragma de ratón Influence of nifedipine on the neuromuscular block produced by atracurium and cistracurium: study in rat phrenic-diaphragmatic nerve preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Rodrigues de Sousa

    2006-04-01

    neuromuscular del atracurio y del cisatracurio, no cambió el potencial de membrana y produjo el aumento inicial en la frecuencia de los PPTM, seguida de bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: La nifedipina, en la concentración empleada, potenció el bloqueo neuromuscular que el atracurio e cisatracurio produjeron. Estudios electrofisiológicos demostraron una acción presináptica y la ausencia de acción despolarizante sobre la fibra muscular.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Calcium channel blockers may interact with neuromuscular blockers, increasing its effects. Research studies about this interaction display controversial results. In some studies these drugs produced neuromuscular blockage, or contracture, or no effect at all was proved over skeletal neuromuscular response. This study assessed the nifedipine effects over muscular responses and its possible interaction with neuromuscular blockers in rat diaphragm. METHODS: A number of 25 rats were used, weighing between 250 and 300 g and sacrificed under anesthesia with intraperitoneal pentobarbital (40 mg.kg-1. Preparation was mounted according to the technique described by Bulbring. Diaphragm was kept under tension, connected to an isometric transducer and subjected to an indirect stimulation of 0.1 Hz frequency. Diaphragm contractions were registered on a physiograph. In order to evaluate the effect of these drugs on neuromuscular transmission, they were added separately or associated to the preparation, on the following concentrations: nifedipine (4 µg.mL-1; atracurium (20 µg.mL-1; cistracurium (3 µg.mL-1. On phrenic-nerve preparation, the assessed items were: 1 the extent of diaphragm muscle response to indirect stimulation, before and 45 minutes after adding nifedipine and neuromuscular blockers separately and after the association of both drugs; 2 nifedipine effects on membrane potentials (MP and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPP. RESULTS: Employed separately, nifedipine did not alter the extent of muscular responses, but it did

  17. Neuromuscular strain as a contributor to cognitive and other symptoms in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Hypothesis and conceptual model.

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    Peter C. Rowe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS have heightened sensitivity and increased symptoms following various physiologic challenges, such as orthostatic stress, physical exercise, and cognitive challenges. Similar heightened sensitivity to the same stressors in fibromyalgia (FM has led investigators to propose that these findings reflect a state of central sensitivity. A large body of evidence supports the concept of central sensitivity in FM. A more modest literature provides partial support for this model in CFS, particularly with regard to pain. Nonetheless, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction have not been explained by the central sensitivity data thus far. Peripheral factors have attracted attention recently as contributors to central sensitivity. Work by Brieg, Sunderland, and others has emphasized the ability of the nervous system to undergo accommodative changes in length in response to the range of limb and trunk movements carried out during daily activity. If that ability to elongate is impaired—due to movement restrictions in tissues adjacent to nerves, or due to swelling or adhesions within the nerve itself—the result is an increase in mechanical tension within the nerve. This adverse neural tension, also termed neurodynamic dysfunction, is thought to contribute to pain and other symptoms through a variety of mechanisms. These include mechanical sensitization and altered nociceptive signaling, altered proprioception, adverse patterns of muscle recruitment and force of muscle contraction, reduced intra-neural blood flow, and release of inflammatory neuropeptides. Because it is not possible to differentiate completely between adverse neural tension and strain in muscles, fascia, and other soft tissues, we use the more general term neuromuscular strain. In our clinical work, we have found that neuromuscular restrictions are common in CFS, and that many symptoms of CFS can be reproduced by selectively adding neuromuscular strain

  18. Altered corticomuscular coherence elicited by paced isotonic contractions in individuals with cerebral palsy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Cifre, Ignacio; Muñoz, Miguel A; Montoya, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze corticomuscular coherence during planning and execution of simple hand movements in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and healthy controls (HC). Fourteen individuals with CP and 15 HC performed voluntary paced movements (opening and closing the fist) in response to a warning signal. Simultaneous scalp EEG and surface EMG of extensor carpi radialis brevis were recorded during 15 isotonic contractions. Time-frequency corticomuscular coherence (EMG-C3/C4) before and during muscular contraction, as well as EMG intensity, onset latency and duration were analyzed. Although EMG intensity was similar in both groups, individuals with CP exhibited longer onset latency and increased duration of the muscular contraction than HC. CP also showed higher corticomuscular coherence in beta EEG band during both planning and execution of muscular contraction, as well as lower corticomuscular coherence in gamma EEG band at the beginning of the contraction as compared with HC. In conclusion, our results suggest that individuals with CP are characterized by an altered functional coupling between primary motor cortex and effector muscles during planning and execution of isotonic contractions. In addition, the usefulness of corticomuscular coherence as a research tool for exploring deficits in motor central processing in persons with early brain damage is discussed.

  19. Histochemical and immunohistological approach to comparative neuromuscular diseases.

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    Serenella Papparella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad category of neuromuscular diseases covers conditions that involve the weakness or wasting of the body muscles. These problems may occur in the spinal cord, the peripheral nerves or the muscle fibers. Some may be hereditary, while others are acquired. Commonly recognized conditions fall into the categories of myopathies, which are diseases of the muscle like muscular dystrophy, disorders of the junction where the nerve impulses are transmitted to the muscle like myasthenia gravis, and neuropathies, which are diseases of the peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of most neuromuscular diseases rest on careful clinical evaluation of the patient, electromyography, the muscle biopsy, and in some instances, molecular genetic studies. Muscle biopsy, associated to histochemical and immunohistological techniques, plays a key role in diagnosis of many neuromuscular disorders. A number of morphological abnormalities of muscle can be recognized on histological stains such as haematoxylin and eosin and Engel trichrome. Histochemical techniques are essential for the study of muscle biopsies for four main reasons. First, they demonstrate the non-uniform nature of the muscle highlighting the different biochemical properties of specific fibre type and their selective involvement in certain disease processes. Second, they may show an absences of a particular enzyme. Third, an excess of a particular substrate can be demonstrated. Fourth, they may show structural changes in the muscle which would not be apparent with routine histological stains, such as the enzyme-deficient cores in central core disease "mouth-eaten" fibers, and abnormalities in the distribution of mitochondria. In some neuromuscular disorders there could be only non-specific myopathological features. However, a number of proteins, including sarcolemmal, sarcomeric, and nuclear proteins as well as enzymes with defects responsible for neuromuscular disorders, have been identified during

  20. Efectos del vendaje neuromuscular sobre la flexibilidad del raquis lumbar

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    A.M. Labrador-Cerrato

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El vendaje neuromuscular es una técnica que produce una estimulación muy selectiva sobre la piel a través de la aplicación de unas vendas elásticas especiales con el fin de lograr cambios propioceptivos, aumento o inhibición del tono muscular y mitigación de algias, entre otros. Objetivos: Comprobar si la aplicación del vendaje neuromuscular permite aumentar la flexión del raquis lumbar comparándola con otras técnicas de vendaje placebo (esparadrapo rígido convencional; Omniplaste®-E; observar la concordancia entre la prueba sit-and-reach y el test de Schober en la valoración de la ganancia de flexión lumbar. Material y métodos: Estudio piloto experimental a triple ciego. Se distribuyeron aleatoriamente 45 sujetos sanos de 20-55 años en tres grupos: 1 esparadrapo convencional; 2 Omniplaste®-E; 3 vendaje neuromuscular. En todos los participantes se evaluó la flexión del raquis lumbar mediante la prueba sit-and-reach y el test de Schober antes y después de la intervención siguiendo el mismo protocolo. Resultados: Considerado un intervalo de confianza del 95% y grado de significación estadística p<0,05 en todos los casos, se obtuvo un incremento estadísticamente significativo de la flexión lumbar en todos los grupos según la prueba sit-and-reach, que fue mayor en el grupo del vendaje neuromuscular (1,5 cm de mediana; p=0,011. Según el test de Schober, solamente el vendaje neuromuscular se mostró eficiente (p<0,001, incrementándose el valor basal en un 6,25% (1 cm de mediana. Conclusiones: La aplicación del vendaje neuromuscular sobre la columna lumbar mejora la flexión lumbar respecto a técnicas placebo a partir de los resultados obtenidos mediante el test de Schober, así como una mayor flexión global del tronco que estas técnicas según la prueba sit-and-reach. El test de Schober parece ser más fiable y preciso que la prueba sit-and-reach para estudios de este tipo.

  1. Neuromuscular Control of Rapid Linear Accelerations in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    examine the relative balance between planned feedforward motor commands and reflexive feedback modulation. Our proposal was to train fish to...of the sensor, b is the bias of the gyro, which drifts 3 An gu la r v el oc ity (d eg s -1 ) -100 -50 0 50 100 Gyro To ta l a cc el . ( g) -1.5 -1...realistic lev- els of noise. We simulated a tail beat that includes yawing and rolling at the tail beat frequency, which leads to a pulse of forward accel

  2. The role of patient advocacy organisations in neuromuscular disease R&D - The case of the Dutch neuromuscular disease association VSN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, W.P.C.; Broekgaarden, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent patient advocacy organisations play a role in influencing R&D and policymaking for rare neuromuscular diseases. The Dutch neuromuscular disease organisation VSN is studied in depth. A brief history of the VSN is sketched along with the international embedding

  3. Identification of Changing Lower Limb Neuromuscular Activation in Parkinson’s Disease during Treadmill Gait with and without Levodopa Using a Nonlinear Analysis Index

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    Amir Pourmoghaddam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of electromyographic (EMG data is a cornerstone of research related to motor control in Parkinson’s disease. Nonlinear EMG analysis tools have shown to be valuable, but analysis is often complex and interpretation of the data may be difficult. A previously introduced algorithm (SYNERGOS that provides a single index value based on simultaneous multiple muscle activations (MMA has been shown to be effective in detecting changes in EMG activation due to modifications of walking speeds in healthy adults. In this study, we investigated if SYNERGOS detects MMA changes associated with both different walking speeds and levodopa intake. Nine male Parkinsonian patients walked on a treadmill with increasing speed while on or off medication. We collected EMG data and computed SYNERGOS indices and employed a restricted maximum likelihood linear mixed model to the values. SYNERGOS was sensitive to neuromuscular modifications due to both alterations of gait speed and intake of levodopa. We believe that the current experiment provides evidence for the potential value of SYNERGOS as a nonlinear tool in clinical settings, by providing a single value index of MMA. This could help clinicians to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and treatments in Parkinson’s disease in a simple manner.

  4. Effects of strength and power training on neuromuscular variables in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Lilian França; Tricoli, Valmor; Barroso, Renato; Rodacki A, L F; Russo, Luciano; Aihara, André Yui; da Rocha Correa Fernandes, Artur; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular adaptations produced by strength-training (ST) and power-training (PT) regimens in older individuals. Participants were balanced by quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and leg-press 1-repetition maximum and randomly assigned to an ST group (n = 14; 63.6 ± 4.0 yr, 79.7 ± 17.2 kg, and 163.9 ± 9.8 cm), a PT group (n = 16; 64.9 ± 3.9 yr, 63.9 ± 11.9 kg, and 157.4 ± 7.7 cm), or a control group (n = 13; 63.0 ± 4.0 yr, 67.2 ± 10.8 kg, and 159.8 ± 6.8 cm). ST and PT were equally effective in increasing (a) maximum dynamic and isometric strength (p < .05), (b) increasing quadriceps muscle CSA (p < .05), and (c) decreasing electrical mechanical delay of the vastus lateralis muscle (p < .05). There were no significant changes in neuromuscular activation after training. The novel finding of the current study is that PT seems to be an attractive alternative to regular ST to maintain and improve muscle mass.

  5. Anormalidades neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia Neuromuscular abnormalities in disuse, cachexia and ageing

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    João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available É feita revisão de literatura sobre as principais alterações do sistema neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia no ser humano e em modelos animais. A diminuição do diâmetro das fibras musculares após período de inatividade/imobilidade (desuso deve-se à perda de miofibrilas periféricas não ocorrendo formação de core-targetóides ou diminuição da atividade da miofosforilase, próprias da desnervação; mantêm-se a liberação espontânea de acetilcolina e fatores tróficos na junção mio-neural; em geral são afetadas preferencialmente fibras II, que podem assumir forma angular. Existe um processo contínuo intrínseco de envelhecimento de nervos e músculos, com desnervação e reinervação lenta e progressiva; o número de unidades motoras se reduz após 60 anos, sem ocorrência de atividade elétrica desnervatória; a quantidade de acetilcolina liberada nos neurônios terminais e a capacidade máxima de utilização de oxigênio estão diminuídas; a redução da capacidade oxidativa mitocondrial pode explicar o aumento de fibras I, mantendo-se o equilíbrio energético. Após poucas semanas de caquexia as fibras musculares podem ter o diâmetro reduzido em 30%, essa redução ocorre em ordem decrescente nos músculos dos membros inferiores, superiores e tronco; existe atrofia II preferencial com fibras angulares ocasionais, redução de RNA/síntese proteica, mantendo-se DNA normal.Cachexia, ageing and disuse and their effects on the human and animals neuromuscular system are reviewed. Disuse induces reduction of muscle fibers (mainly II diameter with peripheral myofibrils lost; there is no core-targetoid or even reduction on myophosphorilase activity, both typical of denervation; the acetylcholine spontaneous release and trophic factors on myoneural junction are maintained; muscle fibers could change to angular shape. Ageing affects nerve and muscle by a continuous and progressive process of denervation and reinner

  6. An overview of neurological and neuromuscular signs in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussenot, A; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have a broad clinical spectrum and are genetically heterogeneous, involving two genomes. These disorders may be develop at any age, with isolated or multiple system involvement, and any pattern of inheritance. Neurological involvement is the most frequent, and concerns muscular, peripheral and central nervous system. Among these diverse signs, some are suggestive of mitochondrial disease, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, psychomotor regression, stroke-like episodes, refractory epilepsy and Epilepsia Partialis Continua. Others are less specific and mitochondrial hypothesis may be evocated because of either association of different neuromuscular signs or a multisystemic involvement. This review describes the wealth of this neurological and neuromuscular symptomatology through different syndromes reported in the literature, according to preponderant signs and to modes of inheritance, as key elements to guide genetics testing.

  7. Early appearance and possible roles of non-neuromuscular cholinesterases.

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    Carla eFalugi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological function of the cholinesterase (ChE enzymes is well known and has been studied since the beginning of the XXth century; in particular, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, E.C. 3.1.1.7 is an enzyme playing a key role in the modulation of neuromuscular impulse transmission. However, in the past decades, there has been increasing interest concerning its role in regulating non-neuromuscular cell-to-cell interactions mediated by intracellular ion concentration changes, like the ones occurring during gamete interaction and embryonic development. An understanding of the mechanisms of the cholinergic regulation of these events can help us foresee the possible impact on environmental and human health, including gamete efficiency and possible teratogenic effects on different models, and help elucidate the extent to which exposure to ChE inhibitors may affect human health.

  8. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.

    1985-06-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions.

  9. Report on Adaptive Force, a specific neuromuscular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hoff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In real life motions, as well as in sports, the adaptation of the neuromuscular systems to externally applied forces plays an important role. The term Adaptive Force (AF shall characterize the ability of the nerve-muscle-system to adapt to impacting external forces during isometric and eccentric muscle action. The focus in this paper is on the concept of this neuromuscular action, which is not yet described in this way. A measuring system was constructed and evaluated for this specific neuromuscular function, but only the main information of the evaluation of the measuring system and the preliminary reference values are mentioned here, while an article with detailed description will be published separately. This paper concentrates on the three following points: 1 What is the peculiarity of this neuromuscular function, introduced as AF? 2 Is the measuring system able to capture its specific characteristics and which phases of measurement occur? 3 It seems reasonable to discuss if AF can be distinguished and classified among the known force concepts. The article describes the measuring system and how it is able to capture special features of real life motions like submaximal intensities and the subjects’ option to react adequately on external varying forces. Furthermore, within one measurement the system records three different force qualities: the isometric submaximal Adaptive Force (AFiso, the maximal isometric Adaptive Force (AFisomax and the maximal eccentric Adaptive Force (AFeccmax. Each of these phases provide different and unique information on the nerve-muscle-system that are discussed in detail. Important, in terms of the Adaptive Force, seems to be the combination of conditional and coordinative abilities.

  10. Aggravated neuromuscular symptoms of mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Ayla; Yılmaz, Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Köş, Durdu Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Dental amalgam fillings are widely used all over the world. However, their mercury content can lead to various side effects and clinical problems. Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause several side effects on the central nerve system, renal and hepatic functions, immune system, fetal development and it can play a role on exacerbation of neuromuscular diseases. In this case, we will present a patient with vacuolar myopathy whose symptoms were started and aggravated with her dental amalgam fillings.

  11. The effect of a Lucia jig for 30 minutes on neuromuscular re-programming, in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Salles Pereira Nassar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lucia jig is a technique that promotes neuromuscular reprogramming of the masticatory system and allows the stabilization of the mandible without the interference of dental contacts, maintaining the mandible position in harmonic condition with the musculature in normal subjects or in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD. This study aimed to electromyographically analyze the activity (RMS of the masseter and temporal muscles in normal subjects (control group during the use of an anterior programming device, the Lucia jig, in place for 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes to demonstrate its effect on the stomatognathic system. Forty-two healthy dentate individuals (aged 21 to 40 years with normal occlusion and without parafunctional habits or temporomandibular dysfunction (RDC/TMD were evaluated on the basis of the electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporal muscles before placement of a neuromuscular re-programming device, the Lucia jig, on the upper central incisors. There were no statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles in the different time periods. The Lucia jig changed the electromyographic activity by promoting a neuromuscular reprogramming. In most of the time periods, it decreased the activation of the masticatory muscles, showing that this device has wide applicability in dentistry. The use of a Lucia jig over 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes did not promote any statistically significant increase in muscle activity despite differences in the data, thus showing that this intra-oral device can be used in dentistry.

  12. Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. Wannamaker

    2007-11-30

    State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

  13. Neuromuscular responses to simulated brazilian jiu-jitsu fights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Bruno Victor Corrêa; Ide, Bernardo Neme; de Moura Simim, Mário Antônio; Marocolo, Moacir; da Mota, Gustavo Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuromuscular performance responses following successive Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) fights. Twenty-three BJJ athletes (age: 26.3 ± 6.3 years; body mass: 79.4 ± 9.7 kg; body height: 1.80 ± 0.1 m) undertook 3 simulated BJJ fights (10 min duration each separated by 15 min of rest). Neuromuscular performance was measured by the bench press throw (BPT) and vertical counter movement jump (VCMJ) tests, assessed before the 1st fight (Pre) and after the last one (Post). Blood lactate (LA) was measured at Pre, 1 min Post, and 15 min Post fights. Paired t-tests were employed in order to compare the BPT and VCMJ results. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests were utilized to compare LA responses. The results revealed a significant (p BJJ fights demanded considerable anaerobic contribution of ATP supply, reinforcing the high-intensity intermittent nature of the sport. Nevertheless, no negative impact on acute neuromuscular performance (power) was observed.

  14. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

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    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  15. Fatty replacement of lower paraspinal muscles: normal and neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hader, H.; Gadoth, N.; Heifetz, H.

    1983-11-01

    The physiologic replacement of the lower paraspinal muscles by fat was evaluated in 157 patients undergoing computed tomography for reasons unrelated to abnormalities of the locomotor system. Five patients with neuromuscular disorders were similarly evaluated. The changes were graded according to severity at three spinal levels: lower thoracic-upper lumbar, midlumbar, and lumbosacral. The results were analyzed in relation to age and gender. It was found that fatty replacement of paraspinal muscles is a normal age-progressive phenomenon most prominent in females. It progresses down the spine, being most advanced in the lumbosacral region. The severest changes in the five patients with neuromuscular disorders (three with poliomyelitis and two with progressive muscular dystrophy) consisted of complete muscle group replacement by fat. In postpoliomyelitis atrophy, the distribution was typically asymmetric and sometimes lacked clinical correlation. In muscular dystrophy, fatty replacement was symmetric, showing relative sparing of the psoas and multifidus muscles. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, computed tomography of muscles may be helpful in planning a better rehabilitation regimen.

  16. Persons with lower-limb amputation have impaired trunk postural control while maintaining seated balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-07-01

    Abnormal mechanics of movement resulting from lower-limb amputation (LLA) may increase stability demands on the spinal column and/or alter existing postural control mechanisms and neuromuscular responses. A seated balance task was used to investigate the effects of LLA on trunk postural control and stability, among eight males with unilateral LLA (4 transtibial, 4 transfemoral), and eight healthy, non-amputation controls (matched by age, stature, and body mass). Traditional measures derived from center of pressure (COP) time series, and measures obtained from non-linear stabilogram diffusion analyses, were used to characterize trunk postural control. All traditional measures of postural control (95% ellipse area, RMS distance, and mean velocity) were significantly larger among participants with LLA. Non-linear stabilogram diffusion analyses also revealed significant differences in postural control among persons with LLA, but only in the antero-posterior direction. Normalized trunk muscle activity was also larger among participants with LLA. Larger COP-based sway measures among participants with LLA during seated balance suggest an association between LLA and reduced trunk postural control. Reductions in postural control and spinal stability may be a result of adaptations in functional tissue properties and/or neuromuscular responses, and may potentially be caused by repetitive exposure to abnormal gait and movement. Such alterations could then lead to an increased risk for spinal instability, intervertebral motions beyond physiological limits, and pain.

  17. Epigenetic Alterations in Muscular Disorders

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    Chiara Lanzuolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms, acting via chromatin organization, fix in time and space different transcriptional programs and contribute to the quality, stability, and heritability of cell-specific transcription programs. In the last years, great advances have been made in our understanding of mechanisms by which this occurs in normal subjects. However, only a small part of the complete picture has been revealed. Abnormal gene expression patterns are often implicated in the development of different diseases, and thus epigenetic studies from patients promise to fill an important lack of knowledge, deciphering aberrant molecular mechanisms at the basis of pathogenesis and diseases progression. The identification of epigenetic modifications that could be used as targets for therapeutic interventions could be particularly timely in the light of pharmacologically reversion of pathological perturbations, avoiding changes in DNA sequences. Here I discuss the available information on epigenetic mechanisms that, altered in neuromuscular disorders, could contribute to the progression of the disease.

  18. Fatigue in neuromuscular disorders: focus on Guillain–Barré syndrome and Pompe disease

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFatigue accounts for an important part of the burden experienced by patients with neuromuscular disorders. Substantial high prevalence rates of fatigue are reported in a wide range of neuromuscular disorders, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and Pompe disease. Fatigue can be subdivided into experienced fatigue and physiological fatigue. Physiological fatigue in turn can be of central or peripheral origin. Peripheral fatigue is an important contributor to fatigue in neuromuscular di...

  19. PICU EXTUBATION FAILURE: THE ROLE OF NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS

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    N. Billan MD,

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveNeuromuscular disorders (diseases of the motor unit, can cause respiratory problems such as impaired cough reflex, chest deformity, recurrent pneumonia and acute respiratory failure; these are the worst most common complications of these diseases and the leading cause of death in such patients (1, 2. Their management hence, very often, entails admission to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU (3,4 and during this phase, endotracheal intubation is almost always necessary, to maintain the patency of airways and to apply Positive Pressure Ventilation (PPV. However, endotracheal intubation is always temporary, and its success or failure depends on the timely decision of its termination to restore the normal respiration or to avoid the risk of recurring respiratory failure (5, 6. We designed this study to evaluate the role of neuromuscular disorders in causing extubation failure as compared to that of other risk factors.Materials & MethodsIn an analytical cross-sectional study, the risk factors of reintubation and duration of mechanical ventilation in two groups of 30 patients each, was compared, the first successful extubation and the second with extubation failure.ResultsNeuromuscular disorders (including Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Guillain- Barre' Syndrome, Congenital Myopathies and Muscular Dystrophies were the main underlying diseases in extubation-failure group (P= 0.0002. Hypercapnia (PaCO2>50mmHg was shown to be the most common cause of both the first intubation (P=0.001 and reintubation (P=0.004 in the group of patients who failed extubation. The mean duration of intubation and mechanical ventilation was longer in patients with neuromuscular disorders who had extubation failure (P= 0.01.ConclusionThis study showed that, as underlying problems, neuromuscular disorders are the most common causes of prolonged intubation which defeat weaning from the ventilator and result in reintubation by inducing hypercapnia. Therefore the weaning

  20. Mechanisms of short-term plasticity at neuromuscular active zones of Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallermann, Stefan; Heckmann, Manfred; Kittel, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    During short bursts of neuronal activity, changes in the efficacy of neurotransmitter release are governed primarily by two counteracting processes: (1) Ca2+-dependent elevations of vesicle release probability and (2) depletion of synaptic vesicles. The dynamic interplay of both processes contributes to the expression of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here, we exploited various facets of short-term plasticity at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction to dissect these two processes. This enabled us to rigorously analyze different models of synaptic vesicle pools in terms of their size and mobilization properties. Independent of the specific model, we estimate ∼300 readily releasable vesicles with an average release probability of ∼50% in 1 mM extracellular calcium (∼5% in 0.4 mM extracellular calcium) under resting conditions. The models also helped interpreting the altered short-term plasticity of the previously reported mutant of the active zone component Bruchpilot (BRP). Finally, our results were independently confirmed through fluctuation analysis. Our data reveal that the altered short-term plasticity observed in BRP mutants cannot be accounted for by delocalized Ca2+ channels alone and thus suggest an additional role of BRP in short-term plasticity. PMID:20811513

  1. Agrin and synaptic laminin are required to maintain adult neuromuscular junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A Samuel

    Full Text Available As synapses form and mature the synaptic partners produce organizing molecules that regulate each other's differentiation and ensure precise apposition of pre- and post-synaptic specializations. At the skeletal neuromuscular junction (NMJ, these molecules include agrin, a nerve-derived organizer of postsynaptic differentiation, and synaptic laminins, muscle-derived organizers of presynaptic differentiation. Both become concentrated in the synaptic cleft as the NMJ develops and are retained in adulthood. Here, we used mutant mice to ask whether these organizers are also required for synaptic maintenance. Deletion of agrin from a subset of adult motor neurons resulted in the loss of acetylcholine receptors and other components of the postsynaptic apparatus and synaptic cleft. Nerve terminals also atrophied and eventually withdrew from muscle fibers. On the other hand, mice lacking the presynaptic organizer laminin-α4 retained most of the synaptic cleft components but exhibited synaptic alterations reminiscent of those observed in aged animals. Although we detected no marked decrease in laminin or agrin levels at aged NMJs, we observed alterations in the distribution and organization of these synaptic cleft components suggesting that such changes could contribute to age-related synaptic disassembly. Together, these results demonstrate that pre- and post-synaptic organizers actively function to maintain the structure and function of adult NMJs.

  2. Effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, on neuromuscular transmission. II. Postsynaptic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekers, J F

    1983-06-01

    The postsynaptic effects of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, were studied on miniature end-plate currents (mepcs) and acetylcholine-induced end-plate current fluctuations in voltage-clamped costocutaneous muscles of the garter snake (species Thamnophis). Neomycin decreased the amplitude of mepcs and accelerated the time constants of mepc decay in a concentration-dependent manner without altering the single exponential nature of mepc decay. Neomycin also produced a voltage- and concentration-dependent nonlinearity in the current/voltage relationship. The relationship between the time constants of mepc decay and membrane potential was progressively reduced with increasing concentrations of neomycin. A concentration-dependent reduction in single channel conductance and channel lifetime was also obtained with neomycin. In contrast, streptomycin, in concentrations up to 5 X 10(-5) M, did not significantly alter either mepc amplitude, the time constant of mepc decay, the relationship between the mepc decay time constant and membrane potential or the lifetime and conductance of single end-plate channels. In very high concentrations (greater than 1 mM) streptomycin decreased mepc amplitude and prolonged mepc decay at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The results suggest that neomycin interacts with the ionic channels of the acetylcholine receptor in their open configuration, whereas streptomycin acts primarily by blocking the receptor. The significant differences in the molecular actions of these two antibiotics may provide an explanation for the observed differences in the character and reversal of the neuromuscular block produced by these antibiotics.

  3. FUNCTIONAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR CHANGES IN THE HAMSTRINGS AFTER DROP JUMPS AND LEG CURLS

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    Nejc Sarabon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production, kinaesthesia (active torque tracking and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles

  4. Neuromuscular dressing effects: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Calero Saa, Pedro Antonio; Cañón Martínez, Gustavo Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The kinesio taping is a technique that was created in 1979 by Doctor Kenzo Kase I’m looking through it that could generate a new therapeutic option to control pain, improve athletic performance and reduce the impact of musculoskeletal disorders. From the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, this technique as a therapeutic alternative PTO and is composed of health professionals in the field of sport and physical rehabilitation. Objetive: This article aims to identify theoretical approaches on the bandag...

  5. Neutralization of the neuromuscular activity of bothropstoxin-i, a myotoxin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom, by a hydroalcoholic extract of Casearia sylvestris Sw. (guaçatonga

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    Y. Oshima-Franco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous plants are used as snakebite antidotes in Brazilian folk medicine, including Casearia sylvestris Swartz, popularly known as guaçatonga. In this study, we examined the action of a hydroalcoholic extract from C. sylvestris on the neuromuscular blockade caused by bothropstoxin-I (BthTX-I, a myotoxin from Bothrops jararacussu venom, in mouse isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND preparations. Aqueous (8 and 12 mg/ml, n=4 and 5, respectively and hydroalcoholic (12 mg/ml, n=12 extracts of the leaves of C. sylvestris caused facilitation in PND preparations followed by partial neuromuscular blockade. BthTX-I (20 µg/ml, n=4 caused 50% paralysis after 65±15 min (mean ± S.E.M. Preincubation (30 min at 37° C of BthTX-I (20 µg/ml, n=4 with a concentration of the hydroalcoholic extract (4 mg/ml that had no neuromuscular activity, such as the control (n=5, prevented the neuromuscular blockade caused by the toxin. This protection may be mediated by compounds such as flavonoids and phenols identified by thin-layer chromatography and colorimetric assays.

  6. Assembly, plasticity and selective vulnerability to disease of mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alexandre Ferrão; Caroni, Pico

    2003-01-01

    Although physiological differences among neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) have long been known, NMJs have usually been considered as one type of synapse, restricting their potential value as model systems to investigate mechanisms controlling synapse assembly and plasticity. Here we discuss recent evidence that skeletal muscles in the mouse can be subdivided into two previously unrecognized subtypes, designated FaSyn and DeSyn muscles. These muscles differ in the pattern of neuromuscular synaptogenesis during embryonic development. Differences between classes are intrinsic to the muscles, and manifest in the absence of innervation or agrin. The distinct rates of synaptogenesis in the periphery may influence processes of circuit maturation through retrograde signals. While NMJs on FaSyn and DeSyn muscles exhibit a comparable anatomical organization in postnatal mice, treatments that challenge synaptic stability result in nerve sprouting, NMJ remodeling, and ectopic synaptogenesis selectively on DeSyn muscles. This anatomical plasticity of NMJs diminishes greatly between 2 and 6 months postnatally. NMJs lacking this plasticity are lost selectively and very early on in mouse models of motoneuron disease, suggesting that disease-associated motoneuron dysfunction may fail to initiate maintenance processes at "non-plastic" NMJs. Transgenic mice overexpressing growth-promoting proteins in motoneurons exhibit greatly enhanced stimulus-induced sprouting restricted to DeSyn muscles, supporting the notion that anatomical plasticity at the NMJ is primarily controlled by processes in the postsynaptic muscle. The discovery that entire muscles in the mouse differ substantially in the anatomical plasticity of their synapses establishes NMJs as a uniquely advantageous experimental system to investigate mechanisms controlling synaptic rearrangements at defined synapses in vivo.

  7. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation leads to physiological gains enhancing postural balance in the pre-frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Deschamps, Thibault; Le Goff, Camille G; Roumier, François-Xavier; Duclay, Julien; Martin, Alain; Sixt, Marc; Pousson, Michel; Cornu, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Physiological aging leads to a progressive weakening of muscles and tendons, thereby disturbing the ability to control postural balance and consequently increasing exposure to the risks of falls. Here, we introduce a simple and easy-to-use neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) training paradigm designed to alleviate the postural control deficit in the elderly, the first hallmarks of which present as functional impairment. Nine pre-frail older women living in a long-term care facility performed 4 weeks of NMES training on their plantarflexor muscles, and seven nontrained, non-frail older women living at home participated in this study as controls. Participants were asked to perform maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) during isometric plantarflexion in a lying position. Musculo-tendinous (MT) stiffness was assessed before and after the NMES training by measuring the displacement of the MT junction and related tendon force during MVC. In a standing position, the limit of stability (LoS) performance was determined through the maximal forward displacement of the center of foot pressure, and related postural sway parameters were computed around the LoS time gap, a high force requiring task. The NMES training induced an increase in MVC, MT stiffness, and LoS. It significantly changed the dynamics of postural balance as a function of the tendon property changes. The study outcomes, together with a multivariate analysis of investigated variables, highlighted the benefits of NMES as a potential tool in combating neuromuscular weakening in the elderly. The presented training-based strategy is valuable in alleviating some of the adverse functional consequences of aging by directly acting on intrinsic biomechanical and muscular properties whose improvements are immediately transferable into a functional context.

  8. Neuromuscular adaptations following prepubescent strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmun, J C; Mikesky, A E; Surburg, P R

    1994-04-01

    Underlying mechanisms of prepubescent strength gains following resistance training are speculative. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of 8 wk of resistance training on muscular strength, integrated EMG amplitude (IEMG), and arm anthropometrics of prepubescent youth. Sixteen subjects (8 males, 8 females) were randomly assigned to trained or control groups. All subjects (mean age = 10.3 yr) were of prepubertal status according to the criteria of Tanner. The trained group performed three sets (7-11 repetitions) of bicep curls with dumbbells three times per week for 8 wk. Pre- and posttraining measurements included isotonic and isokinetic strength of the elbow flexors, arm anthropometrics, and IEMG of the biceps brachii. Planned comparisons for a 2 x 2 (group by test) ANOVA model were used for data analysis. Significant isotonic (22.6%) and isokinetic (27.8%) strength gains were observed in the trained group without corresponding changes in arm circumference or skinfolds. The IEMG amplitude increased 16.8% (P < 0.05). The control group did not demonstrate any significant changes in the parameters measured. Early gains in muscular strength resulting from resistance training prepubescent children may be attributed to increased muscle activation.

  9. Efeito do priming na redução da latência do pipecurônio, novo bloqueador neuromuscular não-despolarizante Efecto del priming en la reducción de la latencia del pipecuronio, nuevo bloqueador neuromuscular no despolarizante Effect of priming in shortening onset of pipecuronium, a new nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Canga

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Uma das mais importantes propriedades dos bloqueadores neuromusculares é o rápido início de ação, possibilitando intubação traqueal precoce. A administração de pequena dose de bloqueador não-despolarizante antes da dose plena é sabidamente redutora da latência da maioria dos bloqueadores neuromusculares utilizados. O brometo de pipecurônio é um agente aminoesteróide de longa duração com grande estabilidade cardiovascular, porém, com início de ação tardio. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar o efeito do priming do pipecurônio em pacientes adultos submetidos a cirurgias eletivas sob anestesia geral. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 33 pacientes adultos de ambos os sexos, com idade entre 20 e 65 anos, estado físico ASA I ou II, submetidos a cirurgias eletivas sob anestesia geral. Foram excluídos do estudo pacientes com insuficiência renal ou hepática, neuromiopatia, uso concomitante de drogas que influenciem a sua farmacocinética ou pacientes com histórico familiar de hipertermia maligna. Foram divididos em dois grupos: Grupo 1 onde foi utilizado o priming com 0,01 mg.kg-1 e três minutos depois completada a dose de 0,08 mg.kg-1 e o Grupo 2, sem dose priming (Grupo Controle. O relaxamento neuromuscular foi controlado pela aceleromiografia (Aparelho TOF-Guard e no momento em que T1 JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Una de las más importantes propiedades de los bloqueadores neuromusculares es el rápido inicio de acción, posibilitando intubación orotraqueal precoz. La administración de pequeña dosis del bloqueador no despolarizante antes de la dosis completa es consabidamente reductora de la latencia de la mayoría de los bloqueadores neuromusculares utilizados. El bromuro de pipecuronio es un agente aminoesteroide de larga duración con grande estabilidad cardiovascular, sin embargo, con inicio de acción tardía. El objetivo de ese estudio es evaluar el efecto del priming del pipecuronio en pacientes

  10. Altered heart rate control in transgenic mice carrying the KCNJ6 gene of the human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignon, Jacques M; Bichler, Zoë; Hivert, Bruno; Gannier, François E; Cosnay, Pierre; del Rio, José A; Migliore-Samour, Danièle; Malécot, Claire O

    2008-04-22

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are common in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Recently, cardiac sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalance has also been documented in DS adults free of any CHD. The KCNJ6 gene located on human chromosome 21 encodes for the Kir3.2/GIRK2 protein subunits of G protein-regulated K(+) (K(G)) channels and could contribute to this altered cardiac regulation. To elucidate the role of its overexpression, we used homozygous transgenic (Tg(+/+)) mice carrying copies of human KCNJ6. These mice showed human Kir3.2 mRNA expression in the heart and a 2.5-fold increased translation in the atria. Phenotypic alterations were assessed by recording electrocardiogram of urethane anesthetized mice. Chronotropic responses to direct (carbachol) and indirect (methoxamine) muscarinic stimulation were enhanced in Tg(+/+) mice with respect to wild-type (WT) mice. Alternating periods of slow and fast rhythm induced by CCPA (2-chloro-N-cyclopentyl-adenosine) were amplified in Tg(+/+) mice, resulting in a reduced negative chronotropic effect. These drugs reduced the atrial P wave amplitude and area. P wave variations induced by methoxamine and CCPA were respectively increased and reduced in the Tg(+/+) mice, while PR interval and ventricular wave showed no difference between Tg(+/+) and WT. These results indicate that Tg(+/+) mice incorporating the human KCNJ6 exhibit altered Kir3.2 expression and responses to drugs that would activate K(G) channels. Moreover, these altered expression and responses are limited to sino-atrial node and atria that normally express large amounts of K(G) channels. These data suggest that KCNJ6 could play an important role in altered cardiac regulation in DS patients.

  11. Neuromuscular adaptations to electrostimulation resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Zory, Raphael; Miotti, Danilo; Pellegrino, Maria A; Jubeau, Marc; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses was performed to investigate muscular and neural adaptations of the weaker (nondominant) quadriceps femoris muscle of one healthy individual to short-term electrostimulation resistance training. The increase in maximal voluntary strength (+12%) was accompanied by neural (cross-education effect and increased muscle activation) and muscle adaptations (impairment of whole-muscle contractile properties). Significant changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms relative content (+22% for MHC-2A and -28% for MHC-2X), single-fiber cross-sectional area (+27% for type 1 and +6% for type 2A muscle fibers), and specific tension of type 1 (+67%) but not type 2A fibers were also observed after training. Plastic changes in neural control confirm the possible involvement of both spinal and supraspinal structures to electrically evoked contractions. Changes at the single muscle fiber level induced by electrostimulation resistance training were significant and preferentially affected slow, type 1 fibers.

  12. The role of AO external fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies in the pediatric neuromuscular population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, John E; Weinberg, Jacob; Razi, Afshin; Mulley, Debra A

    2004-09-01

    Internal fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies using traditional devices may be sub-optimal in children with neuromuscular disorders who have small or osteopenic bone. In this population, between 1988 and 2000, we performed 36 proximal femoral varus osteotomies in 28 patients. These were controlled by the AO external fixator. The average age at surgery was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). A mean varus correction of 34 degrees (range, 15-90 degrees) was obtained. Complications consisted of one superficial pin tract infection, one skin breakdown, and one non-union. Other than the non-union, all osteotomies were stable at the time of the fixator removal. The AO external fixator is an effective alternative in maintaining corrective proximal femoral osteotomies in children with fragile bones.

  13. Turning off the central contribution to contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J C; Yates, L M; Collins, D F

    2008-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation can generate contractions through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The peripheral mechanism involves the direct activation of motor axons, while the central mechanism involves the activation of sensory axons that recruit spinal neurons through a reflex pathway. For use in functional electrical stimulation. One must have control over turning the central mechanism on and off. We investigated whether inhibition developed through antagonist muscle (tibialis anterior, TA) contractions elicited by electrical stimulation or by volition can turn off the central mechanism in triceps surae. Both electrical stimulation and voluntary contractions of TA reduced or eliminated plantar flexion torque produced by the central mechanism, indicating that inhibition induced via these contractions can effectively turn off the central contribution to force. These findings suggest that patterns of electrical stimulation may be able to generate periodic muscle contractions by turning the central contribution to muscular contractions on and off.

  14. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Lund, Hans; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    patient sample with SIS, and to assess the clinimetric properties of clinical assessment methods of scapular kinematics as important aspects for optimising effect measures of treatment in order to improve clinical guidelines in this area. METHODS: Scapular muscle activity was examined, 1) during......Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute...... a voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods...

  15. Quality of life after surgery for neuromuscular scoliosis

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    Peter Obid

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications. It is still controversially discussed whether the patients truly benefit from deformity correction. The purpose of this study is to investigate if the quality of life has been improved and if the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the results of surgery. This is a retrospective clinical outcome study of 46 patients with neuromuscular scoliosis which were treated with primary stable posterior pedicle screw instrumentation and correction. To achieve fusion only autologous bone was used. Follow up was minimum 2 years and maximum 5 years with an average of 36 months. The patients and/or their caregivers received a questionnaire based on the PEDI (pediatric disability inventory and the GMFS (gross motor function score. The patients (and their caregivers were also asked if the quality of life has improved after surgery. Only 32 of 46 patients answered the questionnaire. The answers showed a high approval-rate regarding the patients satisfaction with the surgery and the improvement of quality of life. The questionnaire could be answered from 1 (I do not agree to 4 (I completely agree. The average agreement to the following statements was: i the quality of life has improved: 3.35; ii I am satisfied with surgery: 3.95; iii the operation has fulfilled my expectations: 3.76. The average age at surgery was 12.7 years. The mean pre-operative cobb-angle of the main curve was 83.1° with a correction post-operatively to a mean of 36.9° and 42.6° at final follow-up. That is an average correction of 56.9%. Although spinal fusion in neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications our results show that the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the operation and the quality of life has improved after surgery.

  16. Neuromuscular Responses to Simulated Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Fights

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    Corrêa da Silva Bruno Victor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the neuromuscular performance responses following successive Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ fights. Twenty-three BJJ athletes (age: 26.3 ± 6.3 years; body mass: 79.4 ± 9.7 kg; body height: 1.80 ± 0.1 m undertook 3 simulated BJJ fights (10 min duration each separated by 15 min of rest. Neuromuscular performance was measured by the bench press throw (BPT and vertical counter movement jump (VCMJ tests, assessed before the 1st fight (Pre and after the last one (Post. Blood lactate (LA was measured at Pre, 1 min Post, and 15 min Post fights. Paired t-tests were employed in order to compare the BPT and VCMJ results. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests were utilized to compare LA responses. The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05 increase in VCMJ performance (40.8 ± 5.5 cm Pre vs. 42.0 ± 5.8 cm Post, but no significant changes in the BPT (814 ± 167 W Pre vs. 835 ± 213 W Post were observed. LA concentration increased significantly (p < 0.05 at Post, both in the 1st min and the 15th min of recovery. We concluded that successive simulated BJJ fights demanded considerable anaerobic contribution of ATP supply, reinforcing the high-intensity intermittent nature of the sport. Nevertheless, no negative impact on acute neuromuscular performance (power was observed.

  17. Early reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in a randomized multicenter study - Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, Harald J.; Vermeyen, Karel M.; Beaufort, Anton M.; Rietbergen, Henk; Proost, Johannes H.; Saldien, Vera; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sugammadex reverses the neuromuscular blocking effects of rocuronium by chemical encapsulation. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex for reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade were evaluated. Methods: Ninety-eight male adult patients were rando

  18. Can neuromuscular fatigue explain running strategies and performance in ultra-marathons?: the flush model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Guillaume Y

    2011-06-01

    While the industrialized world adopts a largely sedentary lifestyle, ultra-marathon running races have become increasingly popular in the last few years in many countries. The ability to run long distances is also considered to have played a role in human evolution. This makes the issue of ultra-long distance physiology important. In the ability to run multiples of 10 km (up to 1000 km in one stage), fatigue resistance is critical. Fatigue is generally defined as strength loss (i.e. a decrease in maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), which is known to be dependent on the type of exercise. Critical task variables include the intensity and duration of the activity, both of which are very specific to ultra-endurance sports. They also include the muscle groups involved and the type of muscle contraction, two variables that depend on the sport under consideration. The first part of this article focuses on the central and peripheral causes of the alterations to neuromuscular function that occur in ultra-marathon running. Neuromuscular function evaluation requires measurements of MVCs and maximal electrical/magnetic stimulations; these provide an insight into the factors in the CNS and the muscles implicated in fatigue. However, such measurements do not necessarily predict how muscle function may influence ultra-endurance running and whether this has an effect on speed regulation during a real competition (i.e. when pacing strategies are involved). In other words, the nature of the relationship between fatigue as measured using maximal contractions/stimulation and submaximal performance limitation/regulation is questionable. To investigate this issue, we are suggesting a holistic model in the second part of this article. This model can be applied to all endurance activities, but is specifically adapted to ultra-endurance running: the flush model. This model has the following four components: (i) the ball-cock (or buoy), which can be compared with the rate of perceived

  19. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  20. Tissue engineering for neuromuscular disorders of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth L Koch; Khalil N Bitar; John E Fortunato

    2012-01-01

    The digestive tract is designed for the optimal processing of food that nourishes all organ systems.The esophagus,stomach,small bowel,and colon are sophisticated neuromuscular tubes with specialized sphincters that transport ingested food-stuffs from one region to another.Peristaltic contractions move ingested solids and liquids from the esophagus into the stomach; the stomach mixes the ingested nutrients into chyme and empties chyme from the stomach into the duodenum.The to-and-fro movement of the small bowel maximizes absorption of fat,protein,and carbohydrates.Peristaltic contractions are necessary for colon function and defecation.

  1. El vendaje neuromuscular en podología

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Amela, F. Xavier (Francesc Xavier); Verdaguer Sanmartí, Josefina; Lluch Fruns, Joan; Genís Barniol, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Desde hace unos cinco años la introducción en España de los vendajes neuromusculares ha ido cobrando mayor relevancia, llegando el momento más álgido las imágenes de las olimpiadas de Beijing, donde se pudo observar el uso de este tipo de vendajes en muchas de las disciplinas deportivas. En este artículo pretendemos hacer una introducción general a este tipo de vendajes y la aplicación en patologías podales de gran incidencia en nuestras consultas.

  2. MRI in neuromuscular disorders; MRT bei neuromuskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischmann, Arne [Klinik St. Anna, Luzern (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Fischer, Dirk [Kantonsspital Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Neuromuscular disorders are caused by damage of the skeletal muscles or supplying nerves, in many cases due to a genetic defect, resulting in progressive disability, loss of ambulation and often a reduced life expectancy. Previously only supportive care and steroids were available as treatments, but several novel therapies are under development or in clinical trial phase. Muscle imaging can detect specific patterns of involvement and facilitate diagnosis and guide genetic testing. Quantitative MRT can be used to monitor disease progression either to monitor treatment or as a surrogate parameter for clinical trails. Novel imaging sequences can provide insights into disease pathology and muscle metabolism. (orig.)

  3. Cardiac involvement in children with neuro-muscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Arkhipova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many inherited neuromuscular disorders include cardiac involvement as a typical clinical feature. Among the most common of them is the group of muscular dystrophies. Dilated cardiomyopathy, ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillations, atrioventricular and intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and sudden cardiac death are well known pathological findings in Duchenne muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy type I and 2, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophies and different types of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies and other disorders. Detection of cardiac pathology in patients with different muscular dystrophies is possible with ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, which are recommended for screening and early cardioprotective treatment.

  4. Neuromuscular manifestations of endocrine disorders%内分泌疾病的神经肌肉表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹雯; 夏萍; 范尧夫; 徐书杭; 刘超

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine diseases have complicated clinical manifestations.Some non-specific manifestations such as neuromuscular changes are easy to be misdiagnosed and mistreated.A variety of endocrine diseases,including glucocorticoids abnormalities,thyroid diseases,pituitary dysfunction,abnormal calcium and vitamin D metabolism,can cause neuromuscular alterations manifested by muscle weakness,muscle atrophy,muscle fatigue,etc.Through the diagnosis and treatment of underlying diseases,as well as symptomatic treatment,muscle lesions may be cured or alleviated.%内分泌疾病的临床表现错综复杂,一些非特异性的病变如神经肌肉改变易于漏诊、误诊或误治.糖皮质激素分泌异常、甲状腺疾病、垂体功能紊乱、钙和维生素D代谢异常等多种内分泌代谢性疾病,均可以导致神经肌肉病变而呈现相应的临床特征,如肌肉软弱、肌肉萎缩、乏力等.通过对症处理以及对原发疾病的及时诊断和治疗,神经肌肉病变可以恢复或者缓解.

  5. Screening for sleep-disordered breathing in neuromuscular disease using a questionnaire for symptoms associated with diaphragm paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, J; Jolley, C J; Seymour, J; Teschler, H; Luo, Y M; Polkey, M I; Moxham, J

    2011-02-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) are at risk of developing sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) following respiratory muscle involvement. We hypothesised that a questionnaire based on clinical symptoms and signs of diaphragm weakness can be used to screen for SDB in such patients. We developed a self-administered multiple choice questionnaire containing five questions (Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Neuromuscular Disease Questionnaire (SiNQ)-5), scoring 0-10 points. 125 patients were enrolled: 32 with respiratory muscle weakness, 35 subjects with normal respiratory muscle strength and 58 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). All subjects underwent full polysomnography. NMD patients with involvement of the respiratory muscles scored mean ± sd 6.8 ± 2.3 out of 10 points, significantly higher than both OSA patients 2.5 ± 2.3 and normal subjects 1.0 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001). A score of five or more points in the SiNQ-5 had a sensitivity of 86.2%, specificity of 88.5%, positive predictive value of 69.4% and a negative predictive value of 95.5% to identify NMD with combined SDB. A short self-administered questionnaire, the SiNQ-5, based on clinical symptoms can reliably screen for SDB in patients with diaphragm weakness. However, comorbidities, such as heart failure, that have symptoms influenced by posture could alter diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Neuromuscular blockade for optimising surgical conditions during abdominal and gynaecological surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M V; Staehr-Rye, A K; Gätke, M R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) that provides optimal surgical conditions during abdominal surgery has not been well established. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence on the use of neuromuscular blocking agents in order to optimise surgical cond...

  7. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy; a neuromuscular disorder encountered in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M-A.C.J. de Letter

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPatients with neuromuscular disorders encountered on the ICU can be divided into two main categories. One category has been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to an underlying neuromuscular disorder, mainly the Guillam Barre Syndrome ( GBS) and myasthenia gravis. The other cat

  8. The prejunctional inhibitory effect of suramin on neuromuscular transmission in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henning, RH; Rowan, EG; Braga, MFM; Nelemans, A; Harvey, AL

    1996-01-01

    The P-2 purinoceptor antagonist suramin reverses skeletal muscle paralysis evoked by non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents in vitro and in vivo. To further study the action of suramin on neuromuscular transmission, (miniature) endplate potentials ((m.)e.p.ps), motor nerve terminal currents

  9. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents : Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viby-Mogensen, J; Ostergaard, D; Donati, F; Fisher, D; Hunter, J; Kampmann, JP; Kopman, A; Proost, JH; Rasmussen, SN; Skovgaard, LT; Varin, F; Wright, PMC

    2000-01-01

    In September 1997, an international consensus conference on standardization of studies of neuromuscular blocking agents was held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Based on the conference, a set of guidelines fur good clinical research practice (GCRT) in pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents

  10. Plantar flexor neuromuscular adjustments following match-play football in hot and cool conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, O; Nybo, Lars; Mohr, Magni;

    2015-01-01

    We assessed neuromuscular fatigue and recovery of the plantar flexors after playing football with or without severe heat stress. Neuromuscular characteristics of the plantar flexors were assessed in 17 male players at baseline and ∼30 min, 24, and 48 h after two 90-min football matches in tempera...

  11. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu; Ullrich, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots.

  12. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210 (Mexico); Ullrich, Bruno, E-mail: bruno@fis.unam.mx, E-mail: bruno.ullrich@yahoo.com [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210 (Mexico); Ullrich Photonics LLC, Wayne, Ohio 43466 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots.

  13. Influência da procainamida sobre o bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo rocurônio e investigação sobre o mecanismo de ação da procainamida na junção neuromuscular Influencia de la procainamida sobre el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el rocuronio e investigación sobre el mecanismo de acción de la procainamida en la junción neuromuscular Influence of procainamide on the neuromuscular blockade caused by rocuronium and investigation on the mechanism of action of procainamide on the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Duque Martins

    2007-02-01

    el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por la d-tubocurarina ya está comprobada, pero sin embargo el mecanismo es controvertido. El objetivo del estudio fue el de evaluar la influencia de la procainamida en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el rocuronio e investigar los mecanismos de esa interacción. MÉTODO: Se utilizaron 15 ratones (250 a 300 g en preparación descrita por Bülbring. Se formaron los siguientes grupos (n = 5 cada: procainamida - 20 µg.mL-1 (Grupo I; rocuronio - 4 µg.mL-1 (Grupo II y rocuronio - 4µg.mL-1 y procainamida - 20µg.mL-1 (Grupo III. Se evaluó: 1 la amplitud de las contracciones musculares bajo la estimulación indirecta en cada grupo, antes y después de la adición de los fármacos; 2 los potenciales de placa terminal en miniatura (PPTM; 3 la eficacia de la 4-aminopiridina en la reversión del bloqueo neuromuscular. El mecanismo de la interacción se estudió en Biventer cervicis (n = 5 y diafragma de ratón desnervado (n = 5, observándose la influencia de la procainamida en la respuesta a la acetilcolina antes y después de la adición de la procainamida. RESULTADOS: De forma aislada, la procainamida no alteró las respuestas neuromusculares. El bloqueo producido con el Grupo III fue de 68,6% ± 7,1%, con una diferencia significativa (p = 0,0067 con relación al Grupo II (10,4% ± 4,5%, revertido por la 4-aminopiridina. La procainamida ocasionó un aumento en la frecuencia de los PPTM, seguido de bloqueo revertido por la 4-aminopiridina. En Biventer cervicis, la procainamida aumentó la respuesta a la acción de contracción de la acetilcolina, resultado no observado con el diafragma desnervado. CONCLUSIONES: La procainamida potenció el bloqueo producido por el rocuronio. Las alteraciones observadas con PPTM y Biventer cervicis identificaron una acción presináptica. El antagonismo de la 4-aminopiridina sobre el bloqueo de los PPTMs sugirió la desensibilización de los receptores por la procainamida.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

  14. Effects of organophosphate,carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides and their mixtures on neuromuscular junction transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeFS; XiaoC

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effects of organophosphorus (OP),carbamate (Carb),pyrehroid (Pyr) insecticides and their mixtures on neuromuscular junction transmission (NMJT),dimethoate(D) and phoxim(P),methomyl(M),and fenvalerate(F) were selected.Rats were intraperitoneally intoxicated by D,P,M,F,D+M,D+F,P+M,or P+F with the dosage of each LD50 respectively.The function of the NMJT was assessed with the mean consecutive differences (MCD) of the latencies of single fiber action potentials detected by stimulation single fiber electromyography(SSFEMG) at the stimulus frequency of 20 Hz.The SSFEMG was also applied to detect the function of NMJT in 40 patients with OPs and their mixtures poisoning in this study.The results showed that (1)the myasthenia occurred only in rats with OPs and their mixtures poisoning,but not in F,M intoxicated rats.The increase of MCD shown by SSFEMG and induced by OP and their mixtures indicating a post-synaptic block was well correlated with the occurrence of myasthenia both in rats and patients(P<0.001);(2)the increase of MCD in rats of OP poisoning was significant in comparison with the control and F,M intoxicated rats;but was not significantly different from those in rats intoxicated by OP mixtures;(3)the MCDs were significantly increased in IMS patients of both acute OP poisoning and OP mixtures poisoning,but showing no significant difference between the two groups of patients.It is concluded that OP is the only responsible agent for the dysfunction of neuromuscular transmission induced by single OP and OP mixture insecticides which could be sensitively detected by SSFEMG.

  15. Time-Course of Neuromuscular Changes during and after Maximal Eccentric Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doguet, Valentin; Jubeau, Marc; Dorel, Sylvain; Couturier, Antoine; Lacourpaille, Lilian; Guével, Arnaud; Guilhem, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the relationship between the magnitude of muscle damage and both central and peripheral modulations during and after eccentric contractions of plantar flexors. Eleven participants performed 10 sets of 30 maximal eccentric contractions of the plantar flexors at 45°·s(-1). Maximal voluntary torque, evoked torque (peripheral component) and voluntary activation (central component) were assessed before, during, immediately after (POST) and 48 h after (48 h) the eccentric exercise. Voluntary eccentric torque progressively decreased (up to -36%) concomitantly to a significant alteration of evoked torque (up to -34%) and voluntary activation (up to -13%) during the exercise. Voluntary isometric torque (-48 ± 7%), evoked torque (-41 ± 14%) and voluntary activation (-13 ± 11%) decreased at POST, but only voluntary isometric torque (-19 ± 6%) and evoked torque (-10 ± 18%) remained depressed at 48 h. Neither changes in voluntary activation nor evoked torque during the exercise were related to the magnitude of muscle damage markers, but the evoked torque decrement at 48 h was significantly correlated with the changes in voluntary activation (r = -0.71) and evoked torque (r = 0.77) at POST. Our findings show that neuromuscular responses observed during eccentric contractions were not associated with muscle damage. Conversely, central and peripheral impairments observed immediately after the exercise reflect the long-lasting reduction in force-generating capacity.

  16. Factors affecting magnitude and time course of neuromuscular block produced by suxamethonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlinthout, L E; van Egmond, J; de Boo, T; Lerou, J G; Wevers, R A; Booij, L H

    1992-07-01

    This study was designed to identify factors that significantly alter the magnitude and duration of suxamethonium-induced neuromuscular block in patients with an apparently normal genotype for pseudocholinesterase. One hundred and fifty-six adults (ages 18-65 yr) were allocated to 13 subgroups. Patients in each subgroup received suxamethonium 50-2000 micrograms kg-1. The mechanographic response of the adductor pollicis brevis muscle to ulnar nerve stimulation was recorded. The ED50 was found to be 167 micrograms kg-1, ED90 was 316 micrograms kg-1 and ED95 was 392 micrograms kg-1. The duration of action (delta t) was in agreement with earlier published results. The magnitude of block was dose-related and decreased with increasing onset time (ton) and pseudocholinesterase activity (PChA). Neither age nor gender affected the degree of suxamethonium-induced block. Delta t was dose-related, decreased with increasing PChA, and was shorter for women. Age and ton had no effect on delta t.

  17. The adult abdominal neuromuscular junction of Drosophila: a model for synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Sarita; Hall, Rachel E; Demski, Sarah A; Subramanian, Aswati; Fernandes, Joyce J

    2006-09-01

    During its life cycle, Drosophila makes two sets of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), embryonic/larval and adult, which serve distinct stage-specific functions. During metamorphosis, the larval NMJs are restructured to give rise to their adult counterparts, a process that is integrated into the overall remodeling of the nervous system. The NMJs of the prothoracic muscles and the mesothoracic dorsal longitudinal (flight) muscles have been previously described. Given the diversity and complexity of adult muscle groups, we set out to examine the less complex abdominal muscles. The large bouton sizes of these NMJs are particularly advantageous for easy visualization. Specifically, we have characterized morphological attributes of the ventral abdominal NMJ and show that an embryonic motor neuron identity gene, dHb9, is expressed at these adult junctions. We quantified bouton numbers and size and examined the localization of synaptic markers. We have also examined the formation of boutons during metamorphosis and examined the localization of presynaptic markers at these stages. To test the usefulness of the ventral abdominal NMJs as a model system, we characterized the effects of altering electrical activity and the levels of the cell adhesion molecule, FasciclinII (FasII). We show that both manipulations affect NMJ formation and that the effects are specific as they can be rescued genetically. Our results indicate that both activity and FasII affect development at the adult abdominal NMJ in ways that are distinct from their larval and adult thoracic counterparts

  18. Skeletal muscle contractile function and neuromuscular performance in Zmpste24 -/- mice, a murine model of human progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greising, Sarah M; Call, Jarrod A; Lund, Troy C; Blazar, Bruce R; Tolar, Jakub; Lowe, Dawn A

    2012-08-01

    Human progeroid syndromes and premature aging mouse models present as segmental, accelerated aging because some tissues and not others are affected. Skeletal muscle is detrimentally changed by normal aging but whether it is an affected tissue in progeria has not been resolved. We hypothesized that mice which mimic Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome would exhibit age-related alterations of skeletal muscle. Zmpste24 (-/-) and Zmpste24 (+/+) littermates were assessed for skeletal muscle functions, histo-morphological characteristics, and ankle joint mechanics. Twenty-four-hour active time, ambulation, grip strength, and whole body tension were evaluated as markers of neuromuscular performance, each of which was at least 33% lower in Zmpste24 (-/-) mice compared with littermates (p progeria.

  19. Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Clement, Gilles R.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Taylor, Laura C..

    2015-01-01

    Control of vehicles and other complex systems is a high-level integrative function of the central nervous system (CNS). It requires well-functioning subsystem performance, including good visual acuity, eye-hand coordination, spatial and geographic orientation perception, and cognitive function. Evidence from space flight research demonstrates that the function of each of these subsystems is altered by removing gravity, a fundamental orientation reference, which is sensed by vestibular, proprioceptive, and haptic receptors and used by the CNS for spatial orientation, posture, navigation, and coordination of movements. The available evidence also shows that the degree of alteration of each subsystem depends on a number of crew- and mission-related factors. There is only limited operational evidence that these alterations cause functional impacts on mission-critical vehicle (or complex system) control capabilities. Furthermore, while much of the operational performance data collected during space flight has not been available for independent analysis, those that have been reviewed are somewhat equivocal owing to uncontrolled (and/or unmeasured) environmental and/or engineering factors. Whether this can be improved by further analysis of previously inaccessible operational data or by development of new operational research protocols remains to be seen. The true operational risks will be estimable only after we have filled the knowledge gaps and when we can accurately assess integrated performance in off-nominal operational settings (Paloski et al. 2008). Thus, our current understanding of the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space flight is limited primarily to extrapolation of scientific research findings, and, since there are limited ground-based analogs of the sensorimotor and vestibular changes associated with space flight, observation of their functional

  20. INCIDENCE OF RESIDUAL NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKADE AT TRACHEAL EXTUBATION: COMPARISON OF ATRACURIUM WITH VECURONIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetha S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occurrence of undetected residual neuromuscular blockade is a common event in the post anaesthesia care unit. AIM: To compare the incidence and degree of residual neuromuscular blockade with the use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents Atracurium and Vecuronium. METHODS: 360 patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study and randomly allocated into one of the two study groups of 180 each to receive either Atracurium or Vecuronium intraoperatively. The anaesthesiologist blinded from the study extubated the patient based on the standard clinical criteria and the corresponding Train of Four(TOF ratios were noted by a blinded research assistant using a TOF watch (TOF- Watch® SX Organon, Ireland Ltd., Dublin, Ireland. Residual neuromuscular blockade was defined as a TOF ratio of 0.9 thirty minutes after tracheal extubation. CONCLUSION: We conclude from our study that significant post-operative residual curarization (TOF < 0.9 exists in majority of patients at the time of tracheal extubation (54.4% incidence despite the use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking drugs. The incidence and degree of post-operative residual curarization is significantly greater with Vecuronium compared to Atracurium. Thus we suggest that quantitative neuromuscular monitoring is required to assure complete neuromuscular recovery.

  1. Medical image integrity control and forensics based on watermarking--approximating local modifications and identifying global image alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Coatrieux, G; Shu, H Z; Luo, L M; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a medical image integrity verification system that not only allows detecting and approximating malevolent local image alterations (e.g. removal or addition of findings) but is also capable to identify the nature of global image processing applied to the image (e.g. lossy compression, filtering …). For that purpose, we propose an image signature derived from the geometric moments of pixel blocks. Such a signature is computed over regions of interest of the image and then watermarked in regions of non interest. Image integrity analysis is conducted by comparing embedded and recomputed signatures. If any, local modifications are approximated through the determination of the parameters of the nearest generalized 2D Gaussian. Image moments are taken as image features and serve as inputs to one classifier we learned to discriminate the type of global image processing. Experimental results with both local and global modifications illustrate the overall performances of our approach.

  2. Altered plasma lysophosphatidylcholines and amides in non-obese and non-diabetic subjects with borderline-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Young Lee

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD. We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites associated with borderline-to-moderate HTG (triglycerides (TG 150-500 mg/dL. Using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis, the metabolomics profiles of 111 non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG were compared with those of 111 age- and sex-matched controls with normotriglyceridemia (NTG, TG <150 mg/dL. When compared to the NTG control group, the HTG group exhibited higher plasma levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs, including C14:0 (q = 0.001 and C16:0 (q = 1.8E-05, and several amides, including N-ethyldodecanamide (q = 2.9E-05, N-propyldodecanamide (q = 3.5E-05, palmitoleamide (q = 2.9E-06, and palmitic amide (q = 0.019. The metabolomic profiles of the HTG group also exhibited lower plasma levels of cis-4-octenedioic acid (q<1.0E-9 and docosanamide (q = 0.002 compared with those of the NTG controls. LysoPC 16:0 and palmitoleamide emerged as the primary metabolites able to discriminate the HTG group from the NTG group in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis and were positively associated with the fasting triglyceride levels. We identified alterations in lysoPCs, amides, and cis-4-octenedioic acid among non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG. These results provide novel insights into the metabolic alterations that occur in the early metabolic stages of HTG. This information may facilitate the design of early interventions to prevent disease progression.

  3. Effects of extreme-duration heavy load carriage on neuromuscular function and locomotion: a military-based study.

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    Jordane G Grenier

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Trekking and military missions generally consist of carrying heavy loads for extreme durations. These factors have been separately shown to be sources of neuromuscular (NM fatigue and locomotor alterations. However, the question of their combined effects remains unresolved, and addressing this issue required a representative context. PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the effects of extreme-duration heavy load carriage on NM function and walking characteristics. METHODS: Ten experienced infantrymen performed a 21-h simulated military mission (SMM in a middle-mountain environment with equipment weighing ∼27 kg during battles and ∼43 kg during marches. NM function was evaluated for knee extensors (KE and plantar flexors (PF pre- and immediately post-SMM using isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC measurement, neural electrical stimulation and surface EMG. The twitch-interpolation method was used to assess central fatigue. Peripheral changes were examined by stimulating the muscle in the relaxed state. The energy cost, mechanical work and spatio-temporal pattern of walking were also evaluated pre-/post-SMM on an instrumented treadmill in three equipment conditions: Sportswear, Battle and March. RESULTS: After the SMM, MVC declined by -10.2±3.6% for KE (P<0.01 and -10.7±16.1% for PF (P = 0.06. The origin of fatigue was essentially peripheral for both muscle groups. A trend toward low-frequency fatigue was detected for KE (5.5%, P = 0.08. These moderate NM alterations were concomitant with a large increase in perceived fatigue from pre- (rating of 8.3±2.2 to post-SMM (15.9±2.1, P<0.01. The SMM-related fatigue did not alter walking energetics or mechanics, and the different equipment carried on the treadmill did not interact with this fatigue either. CONCLUSION: this study reports the first data on physiological and biomechanical consequences of extreme-duration heavy load carriage. Unexpectedly, NM function

  4. Slowed muscle force production and sensory organization deficits contribute to altered postural control strategies in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Yiu, Beverley P H L

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to (1) compare the postural control strategies, sensory organization of balance control, and lower limb muscle performance of children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and (2) determine the association between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters and knee muscle performance indices among children with DCD. Fifty-eight DCD-affected children and 46 typically developing children participated in the study. Postural control strategies and sensory organization were evaluated with the sensory organization test (SOT). Knee muscle strength and time to produce maximum muscle torque (at 180°/s) were assessed using an isokinetic machine. Analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between groups, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters, and isokinetic indices in children with DCD. The DCD group had significantly lower strategy scores (SOT conditions 5 and 6), lower visual and vestibular ratios, and took a longer time to reach peak torque in the knee flexor muscles than the control group (p>0.05). After accounting for age, sex, and body mass index, the vestibular ratio explained 35.8% of the variance in the strategy score of SOT condition 5 (ppostural control strategy, sensory organization and prolonged duration of muscle force development. Slowed knee muscle force production combined with poor visual and vestibular functioning may result in greater use of hip strategy by children with DCD in sensory challenging environments.

  5. Resúmenes de los trabajos sobre las Enfermedades Neuromusculares

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    Congreso Nacional de Neurología

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades neuromusculares constituyen un conjunto de afectaciones que afectan las neuronas motoras periférica, las vías motoras eferentes o los efectores (músculos esqueléticos. Sus manifestaciones clínicas son muy variadas y dependen de la causa y de los niveles de afectación. En este acápite se pueden encontrar los resúmenes de trabajos relacionados con el síndrome de Guillain Barre, polineuropatía diabética, Atrofia Muscular Espinal, Distrofia miotónica y otros todos presentados en el salón que abordó estas enfermedades.

  6. Regional neuromuscular regulation within human rectus femoris muscle during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Kouzaki, Motoki; Moritani, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of neuromuscular activation within the human rectus femoris (RF) muscle was investigated during gait by multi-channel surface electromyography (surface EMG). Eleven healthy men walked on a treadmill with three gait speeds (4, 5, and 6 km/h) and gradients (0°, 12.5°, and 25°). The spatial distribution of surface EMG was tested by central locus activation (CLA), which is calculated from 2-D multi-channel surface EMG with 46 surface electrodes. For all conditions, CLA was around the middle regions during the swing-to-stance transition and moved in a proximal direction during the stance phase and stance-to-swing transition (pphase significantly moved to proximal site with increasing gait speed (pphases, with increasing grade, CLA significantly moved distally (pgait cycle and is non-uniformly regulated longitudinally.

  7. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  8. Abdominal compartment syndrome successfully treated with neuromuscular blockade

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    Kris T Chiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old male admitted to the intensive care unit after a cardiac arrest complicated by a stroke intra-operatively during automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. He post-operatively developed a rigid abdomen, elevated peak and plateau pressures, hypoxia and renal insufficiency. He was diagnosed with abdominal compartment syndrome with an intra-abdominal compartment pressure of 40mmHg. The patient was administered 10 mg of intravenous cisatracuriumbesylate in preparation for bedside surgical abdominal decompression. Cisatracurium eliminated the patients need for surgical intervention by reducing his abdominal compartment pressures to normal and improving his hypoxia and renal function. This case illustrates that neuromuscular blockade should be attempted in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome prior to surgical intervention.

  9. The use of neuromuscular blocking agents in the ICU: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steven B; Vender, Jeffery

    2013-05-01

    Intensivists use neuromuscular blocking agents for a variety of clinical conditions, including for emergency intubation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, status asthmaticus, elevated intracranial pressure, elevated intra-abdominal pressure, and therapeutic hypothermia after ventricular fibrillation-associated cardiac arrest. The continued creation and use of evidence-based guidelines and protocols could ensure that neuromuscular blocking agents are used and monitored appropriately. A collaborative multidisciplinary approach coupled with constant review of the pharmacology, dosing, drug interactions, and monitoring techniques may reduce the adverse events associated with the use of neuromuscular blocking agents.

  10. Neuromuscular medicine competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method of development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Innerfield, Caitlin E; Strax, Thomas E; Petagna, Anne

    2013-03-01

    This project endeavored to create an educational module including methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation residents in the evaluation and appropriate treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. It further sought to verify acquired competencies in neuromuscular rehabilitation through objective evaluation methodology. An American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine board-certified physician with 10 yrs of clinical experience in neuromuscular and general rehabilitation trained 19 residents using a standardized competency-based module. The residents were trained through clinical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill proficiency were measured in (1) completion of neuromuscular history and physical examination satisfactorily, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient care management plan via chart stimulated recall examinations, (3) physician-patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician-staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient care report and to document a patient care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. The objective measures compared resident self-assessment examination scores in neuromuscular rehabilitation before and after the institution of the comprehensive neuromuscular competency module in the residency program. Nineteen (100%) of 19 residents successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the

  11. Electrical stimulation for testing neuromuscular function: from sport to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Martin, Vincent; Martin, Alain; Vergès, Samuel

    2011-10-01

    The use of electrical stimulation (ES) can contribute to our knowledge of how our neuromuscular system can adapt to physical stress or unloading. Although it has been recently challenged, the standard technique used to explore central modifications is the twitch interpolated method which consists in superimposing single twitches or high-frequency doublets on a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and to compare the superimposed response to the potentiated response obtained from the relaxed muscle. Alternative methods consist in (1) superimposing a train of stimuli (central activation ratio), (2) comparing the MVC response to the force evoked by a high-frequency tetanus or (3) examining the change in maximal EMG response during voluntary contractions, if this variable is normalized to the maximal M wave, i.e. EMG response to a single stimulus. ES is less used to examine supraspinal factors but it is useful for investigating changes at the spinal level, either by using H reflexes, F waves or cervicomedullary motor-evoked potentials. Peripheral changes can be examined with ES, usually by stimulating the muscle in the relaxed state. Neuromuscular propagation of action potentials on the sarcolemma (M wave, high-frequency fatigue), excitation-contraction coupling (e.g. low-frequency fatigue) and intrinsic force (high-frequency stimulation at supramaximal intensity) can all be used to non-invasively explore muscular function with ES. As for all indirect methods, there are limitations and these are discussed in this review. Finally, (1) ES as a method to measure respiratory muscle function and (2) the comparison between electrical and magnetic stimulation will also be considered.

  12. Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation Therapy: A New Strategy for Improving Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Hemiparesis following Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Fujiwara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation (HANDS therapy is one of the neurorehabilitation therapeutic approaches that facilitates the use of the paretic upper extremity (UE in daily life by combining closed-loop electromyography- (EMG- controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES with a wrist-hand splint. This closed-loop EMG-controlled NMES can change its stimulation intensity in direct proportion to the changes in voluntary generated EMG amplitudes recorded with surface electrodes placed on the target muscle. The stimulation was applied to the paretic finger extensors. Patients wore a wrist-hand splint and carried a portable stimulator in an arm holder for 8 hours during the daytime. The system was active for 8 hours, and patients were instructed to use their paretic hand as much as possible. HANDS therapy was conducted for 3 weeks. The patients were also instructed to practice bimanual activities in their daily lives. Paretic upper extremity motor function improved after 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. Functional improvement of upper extremity motor function and spasticity with HANDS therapy is based on the disinhibition of the affected hemisphere and modulation of reciprocal inhibition. HANDS therapy may offer a promising option for the management of the paretic UE in patients with stroke.

  13. Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation Therapy: A New Strategy for Improving Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Hemiparesis following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honaga, Kaoru; Tochikura, Michi; Abe, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation (HANDS) therapy is one of the neurorehabilitation therapeutic approaches that facilitates the use of the paretic upper extremity (UE) in daily life by combining closed-loop electromyography- (EMG-) controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with a wrist-hand splint. This closed-loop EMG-controlled NMES can change its stimulation intensity in direct proportion to the changes in voluntary generated EMG amplitudes recorded with surface electrodes placed on the target muscle. The stimulation was applied to the paretic finger extensors. Patients wore a wrist-hand splint and carried a portable stimulator in an arm holder for 8 hours during the daytime. The system was active for 8 hours, and patients were instructed to use their paretic hand as much as possible. HANDS therapy was conducted for 3 weeks. The patients were also instructed to practice bimanual activities in their daily lives. Paretic upper extremity motor function improved after 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. Functional improvement of upper extremity motor function and spasticity with HANDS therapy is based on the disinhibition of the affected hemisphere and modulation of reciprocal inhibition. HANDS therapy may offer a promising option for the management of the paretic UE in patients with stroke. PMID:28191352

  14. A chronic high fat diet alters the homologous and heterologous control of appetite regulating peptide receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentish, Stephen J; Wittert, Gary A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J

    2013-08-01

    Leptin, ghrelin and neuropeptide W (NPW) modulate vagal afferent activity, which may underlie their appetite regulatory actions. High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity induces changes in the plasma levels of these peptides and alters the expression of receptors on vagal afferents. We investigated homologous and heterologous receptor regulation by leptin, ghrelin and NPW. Mice were fed (12 weeks) a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD. Nodose ganglia were cultured overnight in the presence or absence of each peptide. Leptin (LepR), ghrelin (GHS-R), NPW (GPR7) and cholecystokinin type-1 (CCK1R) receptor mRNA, and the plasma leptin, ghrelin and NPW levels were measured. SLD: leptin reduced LepR, GPR7, increased GHS-R and CCK1R mRNA; ghrelin increased LepR, GPR7, CCK1R, and decreased GHS-R. HFD: leptin decreased GHS-R and GPR7, ghrelin increased GHS-R and GPR7. NPW decreased all receptors except GPR7 which increased with HFD. Plasma leptin was higher and NPW lower in HFD. Thus, HFD-induced obesity disrupts inter-regulation of appetite regulatory receptors in vagal afferents.

  15. P2-11: Attentional Control Setting Did Not Alter the Interference from Global Collinear Distractor in Visual Search

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    Wan-Chen Chang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A salient item usually captures our attention in visual search. When a distractor is salient, it should help observers to find a target that was overlapping it. However, in Jingling and Tseng (in press Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance doi: 10.1037/a0027325, a target overlapping with a salient distractor took longer to discriminate than that which was non-overlapped, if the salient distractor was grouped by collinearity. One of the reasons for prolonged responses in overlapping targets is that the collinear distractor was not contingent on the attentional control setting of task requirements. More specifically, the target was a broken bar, which might induce an attentional control setting on searching for discontinuity. Meanwhile, the distractor was grouped continuously, which was against the attentional control setting and generated interference to the overlapping target. In this study, we modified the definition of the target and tested whether the interference was preserved when the attentional control setting was not on discontinuity. The target was either a diamond or a square, and was either overlapping or not with the collinear salient distractor. Participants discriminated the shape of the target. The results replicated our previous study in that overlapping targets were harder to find. Our result argued against the possibility that the interference was induced by conflicts between the collinear distractor and the attentional control setting, implying that the interference might have been generated from earlier perceptual processing.

  16. Effects of neuromuscular fatigue on perceptual-cognitive skills between genders in the contribution to the knee joint loading during side-stepping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Abdul Jabbar; Harris, Sujae Ian; Michael, Loke; Joseph, Hamill; Qu, Xingda

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether neuromuscular fatigue affects the neuromuscular control of an athlete within a sports context setting and whether these effects were more pronounced in the females. Lower limb joint kinetics of 6 male and 6 female inter-varsity soccer players performing side-stepping tasks in non-fatigue versus fatigue and anticipated versus unanticipated conditions were quantified using 10 Motion Analysis Corporation cameras and a Kistler(™) force platform. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery Level 1 fatigue protocol was employed. Stance foot initial contact and peak forces, and peak joint knee moments of the lower limb were submitted to a 3-way mixed-model repeated measure ANOVA. The results suggested that males tend to elicit significantly higher knee joint loadings when fatigued. In addition, males elicited significantly higher peak proximal tibia anterior/posterior shear force, vertical ground reaction force at initial contact and peak internal rotational moments than females. These findings suggested that males were at greater overall injury risk than females, especially in the sagittal plane. Neuromuscular control-based training programmes/interventions that are designed to reduce the risk of the non-contact ACL injury need to be customised for the different genders.

  17. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Zijun Zhou; Changwen Du; Ting Li; Yazhen Shen; Jianmin Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the ...

  18. Neuromuscular stimulation therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury promotes recovery of interlimb coordination during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, R.; Belanger, A.; Kanchiku, T.; Fairchild, M.; Abbas, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) induced repetitive limb movement therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) are unknown. This study establishes the capability of using therapeutic NMES in rodents with iSCI and evaluates its ability to promote recovery of interlimb control during locomotion. Ten adult female Long Evans rats received thoracic spinal contusion injuries (T9; 156 ± 9.52 Kdyne). 7 days post-recovery, 6/10 animals received NMES therapy for 15 min/day for 5 days, via electrodes implanted bilaterally into hip flexors and extensors. Six intact animals served as controls. Motor function was evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale for the first 6 days and on 14th day post-injury. 3D kinematic analysis of treadmill walking was performed on day 14 post-injury. Rodents receiving NMES therapy exhibited improved interlimb coordination in control of the hip joint, which was the specific NMES target. Symmetry indices improved significantly in the therapy group. Additionally, injured rodents receiving therapy more consistently displayed a high percentage of 1:1 coordinated steps, and more consistently achieved proper hindlimb touchdown timing. These results suggest that NMES techniques could provide an effective therapeutic tool for neuromotor treatment following iSCI.

  19. AT1 receptor induced alterations in histone H2A reveal novel insights into GPCR control of chromatin remodeling.

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    Rajaganapathi Jagannathan

    Full Text Available Chronic activation of angiotensin II (AngII type 1 receptor (AT(1R, a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR induces gene regulatory stress which is responsible for phenotypic modulation of target cells. The AT(1R-selective drugs reverse the gene regulatory stress in various cardiovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. We speculate that activation states of AT(1R modify the composition of histone isoforms and post-translational modifications (PTM, thereby alter the structure-function dynamics of chromatin. We combined total histone isolation, FPLC separation, and mass spectrometry techniques to analyze histone H2A in HEK293 cells with and without AT(1R activation. We have identified eight isoforms: H2AA, H2AG, H2AM, H2AO, H2AQ, Q96QV6, H2AC and H2AL. The isoforms, H2AA, H2AC and H2AQ were methylated and H2AC was phosphorylated. The relative abundance of specific H2A isoforms and PTMs were further analyzed in relationship to the activation states of AT(1R by immunochemical studies. Within 2 hr, the isoforms, H2AA/O exchanged with H2AM. The monomethylated H2AC increased rapidly and the phosphorylated H2AC decreased, thus suggesting that enhanced H2AC methylation is coupled to Ser1p dephosphorylation. We show that H2A125Kme1 promotes interaction with the heterochromatin associated protein, HP1α. These specific changes in H2A are reversed by treatment with the AT(1R specific inhibitor losartan. Our analysis provides a first step towards an awareness of histone code regulation by GPCRs.

  20. Music does not alter anxiety in patients with suspected lung cancer undergoing bronchoscopy: a randomised controlled trial

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    Elisabeth Jeppesen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of music to relieve anxiety has been examined in various studies, but the results are inconclusive. Methods: From April to October 2015, 160 patients undergoing examination of pulmonary nodules were randomly assigned to MusiCure or no music. MusiCure was administered through earplugs to ensure blinding of the staff and was played from admission to the operating theatre to the end of the bronchoscopy. Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was administered on admission, immediately before bronchoscopy, and on discharge. Secondary outcomes were p-cortisol, physiological variables, dosage of sedatives, movements measured by Actigraph, bronchoscopy duration, number of re-examinations, and overall perception of the sounds in the operating theatre measured by Visual analogue scale. Results: The STAI scores were similar on admission, but after a 10-min wait in the operating theatre, scores varied significantly between patients with and without music, with lower scores in the music group [median (interquartile range, IQR 35 (18 vs. 43 (25; p=0.03]. Post hoc multiple regression revealed treatment group as insignificant when adjusting for sex and baseline anxiety. However, there was a significantly more positive perception of the sounds in the operating theatre in the music group (median (IQR 8.2 (1.8 vs. 5.4 (6.8; p<0.0001 and fewer re-examinations in the music group (19.2% vs. 7.7%, p<0.032. Conclusions: Ten minutes with MusiCure does not alter anxiety when adjusting for baseline anxiety and sex. The current study indicates that this field of research has many confounders.

  1. Invasive home mechanical ventilation, mainly focused on neuromuscular disorders

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    Börger, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and background: Invasive home mechanical ventilation is used for patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency. This elaborate and technology-dependent ventilation is carried out via an artificial airway (tracheal cannula to the trachea. Exact numbers about the incidence of home mechanical ventilation are not available. Patients with neuromuscular diseases represent a large portion of it. Research questions: Specific research questions are formulated and answered concerning the dimensions of medicine/nursing, economics, social, ethical and legal aspects. Beyond the technical aspect of the invasive home, mechanical ventilation, medical questions also deal with the patient’s symptoms and clinical signs as well as the frequency of complications. Economic questions pertain to the composition of costs and the differences to other ways of homecare concerning costs and quality of care. Questions regarding social aspects consider the health-related quality of life of patients and caregivers. Additionally, the ethical aspects connected to the decision of home mechanical ventilation are viewed. Finally, legal aspects of financing invasive home mechanical ventilation are discussed. Methods: Based on a systematic literature search in 2008 in a total of 31 relevant databases current literature is viewed and selected by means of fixed criteria. Randomized controlled studies, systematic reviews and HTA reports (health technology assessment, clinical studies with patient numbers above ten, health-economic evaluations, primary studies with particular cost analyses and quality-of-life studies related to the research questions are included in the analysis. Results and discussion: Invasive mechanical ventilation may improve symptoms of hypoventilation, as the analysis of the literature shows. An increase in life expectancy is likely, but for ethical reasons it is not confirmed by premium-quality studies. Complications (e. g. pneumonia are rare

  2. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Roig, Marc; Karatzanos, Eleftherios;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy may be useful in early musculoskeletal rehabilitation during acute critical illness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically...

  3. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A. Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-01-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play.

  4. Pac-Man for biotechnology: co-opting degrons for targeted protein degradation to control and alter cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Geng; Rosenberg, Julian N; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Oyler, George A

    2015-12-01

    Protein degradation in normal living cells is precisely regulated to match the cells' physiological requirements. The selectivity of protein degradation is determined by an elaborate degron-tagging system. Degron refers to an amino acid sequence that encodes a protein degradation signal, which is oftentimes a poly-ubiquitin chain that can be transferred to other proteins. Current understanding of ubiquitination dependent and independent protein degradation processes has expanded the application of degrons for targeted protein degradation and novel cell engineering strategies. Recent findings suggest that small molecules inducing protein association can be exploited to create degrons that target proteins for degradation. Here, recent applications of degron-based targeted protein degradation in eukaryotic organisms are reviewed. The degron mediated protein degradation represents a rapidly tunable methodology to control protein abundance, which has broad application in therapeutics and cellular function control and monitoring.

  5. Can hyperbaric oxygen be used to prevent deep infections in neuro-muscular scoliosis surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Inanmaz, Mustafa Erkan; Kose, Kamil Cagri; Isik, Cengiz; Atmaca, Halil; Basar, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of postoperative wound infection in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis surgery is significantly higher than that in patients with other spinal surgery. Hyperbaric oxygen has been used as a supplement to treat postsurgical infections. Our aim was to determine beneficiary effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in terms of prevention of postoperative deep infection in this specific group of patients in a retrospective study. Methods Forty two neuromuscular scoliosis ...

  6. Daily Controlled Consumption of an Electrokinetically Modified Water Alters the Fatigue Response as a Result of Strenuous Resistance Exercise

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    Paul A. Borsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to assess the effects of consuming electrokinetically modified water (EMW on fatigue attenuation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE following resistance exercise. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-arm trial was used in this investigation. Forty participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a placebo-control group. Participants consumed the EMW or placebo water daily for eighteen days prior to completing a fatigue protocol for the elbow flexors. The fatigue protocol consisted of a single bout of resistance exercise for the biceps brachii. Participants were tested for isometric strength before exercise and immediately following exercise. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction was used as the criterion measure for strength. To calculate the fatigue index, the postexercise maximal voluntary isometric contraction value was divided by the preexercise maximal voluntary isometric contraction value multiplied by 100. Also, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE were assessed using the Borg scale. Fatigue indices and RPE were significantly lower for the experimental group compared to the control group (P<0.05. Consuming EMW for eighteen days prior to high intensity resistance exercise can significantly enhance muscle contractile function by reducing muscle fatigue and RPE.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and altered risk of lung cancer in a population-based case-control study.

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    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has been consistently associated with increased risk of lung cancer. However, previous studies have had limited ability to determine whether the association is due to smoking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE population-based case-control study recruited 2100 cases and 2120 controls, of whom 1934 cases and 2108 controls reported about diagnosis of chronic bronchitis, emphysema, COPD (chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema, or asthma more than 1 year before enrollment. We estimated odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI using logistic regression. After adjustment for smoking, other previous lung diseases, and study design variables, lung cancer risk was elevated among individuals with a history of chronic bronchitis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.5, emphysema (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.4-2.8, or COPD (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 2.0-3.1. Among current smokers, association between chronic bronchitis and lung cancer was strongest among lighter smokers. Asthma was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in males (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.30-0.78. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the associations of personal history of chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and COPD with increased risk of lung cancer are not entirely due to smoking. Inflammatory processes may both contribute to COPD and be important for lung carcinogenesis.

  8. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijun; Du, Changwen; Li, Ting; Shen, Yazhen; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-09-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the polyacrylate membrane, and hence to analyze the mechanism of nutrient release, Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed. The nutrient-release model of CRF post-treated at 30 °C was the inverse “L” curve, but an increased duration of the post-treatment had no effect. The nutrient-release model was “S” curve and nutrient-release period was enhanced at higher post-treatment temperatures, and increased post-treatment duration lengthened slowed nutrient release due to a more compact membrane and a smoother membrane surface as well as a promoted crosslinking action. CRF equipped with specified nutrient-release behaviors can be achieved by optimizing the thermal post-treatment parameters, which can contribute to the development and application of waterborne polymer-coated CRF and controlled-release technologies.

  9. Modulation of ankle EMG in spinally contused rats through application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation timed to robotic treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sina; Kamgar, Parisa; Chao, TeKang; Diaz, Eric; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2012-01-01

    While neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has enabled patients of neuromotor dysfunction to effectively regain some functions, analysis of neuromuscular changes underlying these functional improvements is lacking. We have developed an NMES system for a rodent model of SCI with the long term goal of creating a therapy which restores control over stepping back to the spinal circuitry. NMES was applied to the tibialis anterior (TA) and timed to the afferent feedback generated during robotic treadmill training (RTT). The effect of NMES+RTT on modifications in EMG was compared with that of RTT alone. A longitudinal study with a crossover design was conducted in which group 1 (n=7) received 2 weeks of RTT only followed by 2 weeks of NMES+RTT; group 2 (n=7) received 2 weeks of NMES+RTT followed by RTT only. On average, both types of training helped to modulate TA EMG activity over a gait cycle, resulting in EMG profiles across steps with peaks occurring just before or at the beginning of the swing phase, when ankle flexion is most needed. However, NMES+RTT resulted in concentration of EMG activation during the initial swing phase more than RTT only. In conjunction with these improvements in EMG activation presented here, a more complete analyses comparing changes after NMES+RTT vs. RTT is expected to further support the notion that NMES timed appropriately to hindlimb stepping could help to reinforce the motor learning that is induced by afferent activity generated by treadmill training.

  10. Vitamin d deficiency in a multiethnic healthy control cohort and altered immune response in vitamin D deficient European-American healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Ritterhouse

    Full Text Available In recent years, vitamin D has been shown to possess a wide range of immunomodulatory effects. Although there is extensive amount of research on vitamin D, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or the mechanism by which vitamin D regulates the human immune system. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency and the relationship between vitamin D and the immune system in healthy individuals.Healthy individuals (n = 774 comprised of European-Americans (EA, n = 470, African-Americans (AA, n = 125, and Native Americans (NA, n = 179 were screened for 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels by ELISA. To identify the most noticeable effects of vitamin D on the immune system, 20 EA individuals with severely deficient (24.8 ng/mL vitamin D levels were matched and selected for further analysis. Serum cytokine level measurement, immune cell phenotyping, and phosphoflow cytometry were performed.Vitamin D sufficiency was observed in 37.5% of the study cohort. By multivariate analysis, AA, NA, and females with a high body mass index (BMI, >30 demonstrate higher rates of vitamin D deficiency (p<0.05. Individuals with vitamin D deficiency had significantly higher levels of serum GM-CSF (p = 0.04, decreased circulating activated CD4+ (p = 0.04 and CD8+ T (p = 0.04 cell frequencies than individuals with sufficient vitamin D levels.A large portion of healthy individuals have vitamin D deficiency. These individuals have altered T and B cell responses, indicating that the absence of sufficient vitamin D levels could result in undesirable cellular and molecular alterations ultimately contributing to immune dysregulation.

  11. Analgesia, sedação e relaxamento neuromuscular no doente ventilado em cuidados intensivos cardíacos: parte III: relaxantes neuromusculares

    OpenAIRE

    Vilela, H; D. Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Neste artigo são revistos aspectos clínicos relevantes relacionados com a sedação, analgesia e relaxamento neuromuscular em cuidados intensivos cardíacos, incluindo métodos de monitorização e opções terapêuticas disponíveis. São ainda abordadas as implicações fisiopatológicas da dor, agitação, ansiedade e delírio no doente ventilado. Apesar de terem sido publicadas recentemente normas de orientação para sedação, analgesia e relaxamento neuromuscular em Cuidados I...

  12. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Ogura, Yuji; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Thirteen male university students (age, 20 ± 1 years; height, 172.2 ± 4.6 cm; weight, 68.4 ± 6.7 kg; mean ± SD) completed 3 different conditions on 3 nonconsecutive days in randomized order: static stretching (SS), PNF stretching (PNF), and no stretching (control, CON). Each condition consisted of a 5-minute rest accompanied by one of the following activities: (a) control, (b) SS, or (c) PNF stretching. The hip flexion range of motion (ROM) was evaluated immediately before and after the activity. The MVC of knee flexion was then measured. Surface electromyography was recorded from the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles during MVC tests and stretching. Although increases in ROM were significantly greater after PNF than after SS (p stretching increases ROM more than SS, PNF stretching and SS is detrimental to isometric maximal strength.

  13. Alterations in nigral NMDA and GABAA receptor control of the striatal dopamine level after repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2008-07-01

    Nitrogen pressure exposure in rats results in decreased dopamine (DA) release at the striatal terminals of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopaminergic neurons, demonstrating the narcotic potency of nitrogen. This effect is attributed to decreased excitatory and increased inhibitory inputs to dopaminergic neurons, involving a change in NMDA and GABA(A) receptor function. We investigated whether repetitive exposures to nitrogen modify the excitatory and inhibitory control of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal pathway. We used voltammetry to measure dopamine levels in freely-moving rats, implanted with dopamine-sensitive electrodes in the striatum. NMDA/GABA(A) receptor agonists (NMDA/muscimol) and antagonists (AP7/gabazine) were administered through a guide-cannula into the SNc, and their effects on striatal dopamine levels were measured under normobaric conditions, before and after five repetitive exposures to 1 MPa nitrogen. NMDA-mediated dopamine release was greater following repetitive exposures, AP7-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic input was blocked, suggesting that NMDA receptor sensitivity was increased and glutamate release reduced. Muscimol did not modify dopamine levels following repetitive exposures, whereas the effect of gabazine was greater after exposures than before. This suggested that interneuronal GABA(A) receptors were desensitized, leading to an increased GABAergic input at dopaminergic cells. Thus, repetitive nitrogen exposure induced persistent changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic control of dopaminergic neurons, resulting in decreased activity of the nigrostriatal pathway.

  14. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and biofeedback therapy may improve endometrial growth for patients with thin endometrium during frozen-thawed embryo transfer: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shaoqing

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of pelvic floor Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES Therapy in improving endometrial thickness in women with thin endometrium. Methods 41 patients undergoing assisted reproduction with a thin endometrium (less than or equal to7 mm were recruited and advised to go for a pelvic floor NMES in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycle. PHENIX Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Therapy System was used according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol for 20 to 30 minutes of intermittent vaginal electrical stimulation on the treatment days. Results A total of 20 and 21 were included in the NMES and non-NMES groups respectively. 12 out of 20 (60% patients developed endometrial thickness equal to or more than 8 mm after the NMES therapy, which was the primary outcome. The mean thickness of endometrium before and after was respectively 5.60 mm (0.82 mm and 7.93 mm (1.42 mm in the therapy group versus 5.50 mm (1.00 and 6.78 mm (0.47 in the control group; the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.002. There was higher pregnancy rate in the NMES group (42% versus 35% but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Neuromuscular Electrical stimulation therapy may be effective for the patients with a thin endometrium. Further studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness.

  15. Repetitive Daily Point of Choice Prompts and Occupational Sit-Stand Transfers, Concentration and Neuromuscular Performance in Office Workers: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Donath

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prolonged office sitting time adversely affects neuromuscular and cardiovascular health parameters. As a consequence, the present study investigated the effects of prompting the use of height-adjustable working desk (HAWD on occupational sitting and standing time, neuromuscular outcomes and concentration in office workers. Methods: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT with parallel group design was conducted. Thirty-eight office workers were supplied with HAWDs and randomly assigned (Strata: physical activity (PA, BMI, gender, workload to a prompt (INT or non-prompt (CON group. INT received three daily screen-based prompts within 12 weeks. CON was only instructed once concerning the benefits of using HAWDs prior to the start of the study. Sitting and standing times were objectively assessed as primary outcomes for one entire working week using the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT at baseline (pre, after 6 (mid and 12 weeks (post. Concentration (d2-test, postural sway during upright stance (under single, dual and triple task and lower limb strength endurance (heel-rise were collected as secondary outcomes. Results: With large but not statistically significant within group effects from pre to post, INT increased weekly standing time at work by 9% (p = 0.22, d = 0.8 representing an increase from 7.2 h (4.8 to 9.7 (6.6 h (p = 0.07. Concentration and neuromuscular performance did not change from pre to post testing (0.23 < p < 0.95; 0.001 < ηp² < 0.05. Conclusion: Low-frequent and low cost screen-based point of choice prompts (3 per day within 12 weeks already result in notable increases of occupational standing time of approx. daily 30 min. These stimuli, however, did not relevantly affect neuromuscular outcomes.

  16. Caloric restriction alters the metabolic response to a mixed-meal: results from a randomized, controlled trial.

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    Kim M Huffman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine if caloric restriction (CR would cause changes in plasma metabolic intermediates in response to a mixed meal, suggestive of changes in the capacity to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability or metabolic flexibility, and to determine how any such changes relate to insulin sensitivity (S(I. METHODS: Forty-six volunteers were randomized to a weight maintenance diet (Control, 25% CR, or 12.5% CR plus 12.5% energy deficit from structured aerobic exercise (CR+EX, or a liquid calorie diet (890 kcal/d until 15% reduction in body weightfor six months. Fasting and postprandial plasma samples were obtained at baseline, three, and six months. A targeted mass spectrometry-based platform was used to measure concentrations of individual free fatty acids (FFA, amino acids (AA, and acylcarnitines (AC. S(I was measured with an intravenous glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Over three and six months, there were significantly larger differences in fasting-to-postprandial (FPP concentrations of medium and long chain AC (byproducts of FA oxidation in the CR relative to Control and a tendency for the same in CR+EX (CR-3 month P = 0.02; CR-6 month P = 0.002; CR+EX-3 month P = 0.09; CR+EX-6 month P = 0.08. After three months of CR, there was a trend towards a larger difference in FPP FFA concentrations (P = 0.07; CR-3 month P = 0.08. Time-varying differences in FPP concentrations of AC and AA were independently related to time-varying S(I (P<0.05 for both. CONCLUSIONS: Based on changes in intermediates of FA oxidation following a food challenge, CR imparted improvements in metabolic flexibility that correlated with improvements in S(I. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00099151.

  17. Temporal variation of nitrate and phosphate transport in headwater catchments: the hydrological controls and land use alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Oceania rivers are hotspots of DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen and DIP (dissolved inorganic phosphorus transport due to humid/warm climate, typhoon-induced episodic rainfall and high tectonic activity that create an environment favorable for high/rapid runoff and soil erosion. In spite of its uniqueness, effects of hydrologic controls and land use on the transport behaviors of DIN and DIP are rarely documented. A 2 yr monitoring study for DIN and DIP from three headwater catchments with different cultivation gradient (0 To 8.9% was implemented during a ~ 3 day interval with an additional monitoring campaign at a 3 h interval during typhoon periods. Results showed the DIN yields in the pristine, moderately cultivated (2.7%, and intensively cultivated (8.9% watersheds were 8.3, 26, and 37 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. For the DIP yields, they were 0.36, 0.35, and 0.56 kg P ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Higher year-round DIN concentrations and five times larger in DIN yields in intensively cultivated watersheds indicate DIN is more sensitive to land use changes. The high background DIN yield from the relatively pristine watershed was likely due to high atmospheric nitrogen deposition and large subterranean N pool. The correlations between runoff and concentration reveals that typhoon floods purge out more DIN from the subterranean reservoir, i.e., soil, by contrast, runoff washes off surface soil resulting in higher suspended sediment with higher DIP. Collectively, typhoon runoff contributes 20–70% and 47–80%, respectively, to the annual DIN and DIP exports. The DIN yield to DIP yield ratio varied from 97 to 410, which is higher than the global mean of ~ 18. Such a high ratio indicates a P-limiting condition in stream and the downstream aquatic environment. Based on our field observation, we constructed a conceptual model illustrating different remobilization mechanisms for DIN and DIP from headwaters in a mountainous river, which is

  18. Estimulação elétrica neuromuscular em cães com atrofia muscular induzida Neuromuscular electric stimulation in dogs with induced muscle atrophy

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    C. Pelizzari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Empregou-se a estimulação elétrica neuromuscular (EENM de baixa freqüência no músculo quadríceps femoral de cães com atrofia induzida e avaliou-se a ocorrência de ganho de massa nessa musculatura. Foram utilizados oito cães com pesos entre 15 e 30kg, distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos denominados de I ou controle e II ou tratado. A articulação femorotibiopatelar esquerda foi imobilizada por 30 dias pelo método de transfixação percutânea tipo II, com retirada de aparelho de imobilização após esse período. Decorridas 48 horas da remoção, foi realizada a EENM nos cães do grupo II, cinco vezes por semana, com intervalo de 24 horas cada sessão, pelo período de 60 dias. Foram avaliadas a circunferência da coxa, a goniometria do joelho, a análise clínica da marcha, as enzimas creatina-quinase (CK e aspartato-amino-transferase (AST e a morfometria das fibras musculares em cortes transversais do músculo vasto lateral colhido mediante biópsia muscular. A EENM foi empregada no músculo quadríceps femoral na freqüência de 50Hz, duração de pulso de 300 milisegundos e relação de tempo on/off de 1:2. Quanto à morfometria das fibras do músculo vasto lateral, no grupo tratado houve aumento significativo (PLow frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES was used on the femoral quadriceps of dogs with induced muscular atrophy and the occurrence of gain in mass in these muscles was evaluated. Eight dogs from 15 to 30kg were randomly distributed in two groups named I, or control; and II, or treated. For the induction of muscular atrophy, the left femoral-tibial-patellar joint was immobilized for 30 days by percutaneous transfixation type II. After 30 days, the immobilization device was removed. The NMES treatment began 48 hours after the removal of the immobilization device of the dogs of group II, and it was carried out five times per week with an interval of 24 hours between each session, for 60 days. The

  19. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  20. Anestesia peribulbar com ropivacaína como alternativa ao bloqueio neuromuscular para facectomia em cães Peribulbar anesthesia with ropivacaine as an alternative to neuromuscular blocking agents for cataract surgery in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N.L.S. Oliva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se uma técnica de bloqueio peribulbar comparando-a à técnica de anestesia oftálmica com bloqueio neuromuscular parcial em cães submetidos à facectomia extracapsular. Doze cães, de diferentes raças, foram alocados em dois grupos (G1 e G2 e anestesiados com acepromazina (0,05mg/kg, IV e propofol (5mg/kg, IV e mantidos com isofluorano sob ventilação espontânea. Os cães do G1 receberam o bloqueio peribulbar com ropivacaína 0,75%, e os do G2 o bloqueio neuromuscular parcial com brometo de pancurônio (0,01mg/kg, IV. Utilizaram-se, como parâmetros comparativos, escores de posicionamento do globo ocular, controle do reflexo oculocardíaco e pressão intraocular (mmHg. Foi possível propor uma técnica eficaz para cães baseando-se na técnica de bloqueio peribulbar posterior realizada no homem. Em ambos os grupos, o globo ocular permaneceu centralizado. Não ocorreram alterações eletrocardiográficas atribuídas ao reflexo oculocardíaco. Houve redução significativa da pressão intraocular em G1 após o bloqueio (10,7±0,6 e 14,7±0,6. Conclui-se que o bloqueio peribulbar proporcionou condições cirúrgicas apropriadas para a realização da facectomia, com a vantagem de promover bloqueio sensitivo do olho.A peribulbar block technique was developed and its clinical efficacy was compared with neuromuscular blockade in dogs undergoing cataract surgery. Twelve dogs of different breeds were randomly and equally allocated in two groups. After given acepromazine (0.05mg/kg, IV, anesthesia was induced with propofol (5mg/kg, IV and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen during spontaneous breathing. A peribulbar block with 0.75% ropivacaine was performed in G1 dogs while partial neuromuscular blockade with pancuronium (0.01mg/kg IV was provided in G2 dogs. Globe position scores, oculocardiac reflex, and intra-ocular pressure (mmHg were evaluated at pre-defined intervals during surgery. Peribulbar blocks were successful performed

  1. "THE EFFECTS OF ANODAL IONTOPHORESIS OF EPINEPHRINE ON NEUROMUSCULAR RESPONSES IN HEALTHY MEN AND PATIENTS WITH MYASTHENIA GRAVIS "

    OpenAIRE

    Talebian, S.; Abolfazli, R.; G. R. Olyaei S. Hajizadeh

    2005-01-01

    Iontophoresis of epinephrine for assessment of neuromuscular junction response is a new technique that can improve diagnose of neuromuscular dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of iontophoresis of epinephrine on neuromuscular junction response. Iontophoresis of epinephrine solution (1mg/ml), sodium chloride, calcium gluconate, epinephrine with sodium chloride and distilled water was applied in five groups of healthy men and 7 patients with myasthenia gravis (...

  2. Neuromuscular adjustments of the quadriceps muscle after repeated cycling sprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Girard

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the supraspinal processes of fatigue of the quadriceps muscle in response to repeated cycling sprints. METHODS: Twelve active individuals performed 10 × 6-s "all-out" sprints on a cycle ergometer (recovery = 30 s, followed 6 min later by 5 × 6-s sprints (recovery = 30 s. Transcranial magnetic and electrical femoral nerve stimulations during brief (5-s and sustained (30-s isometric contractions of the knee extensors were performed before and 3 min post-exercise. RESULTS: Maximal strength of the knee extensors decreased during brief and sustained contractions (~11% and 9%, respectively; P0.05. While cortical voluntary activation declined (P 40% reduced (P<0.001 following exercise. CONCLUSION: The capacity of the motor cortex to optimally drive the knee extensors following a repeated-sprint test was shown in sustained, but not brief, maximal isometric contractions. Additionally, peripheral factors were largely involved in the exercise-induced impairment in neuromuscular function, while corticospinal excitability was well-preserved.

  3. Applications of Shape Memory Alloys for Neurology and Neuromuscular Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pittaccio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are a very promising class of metallic materials that display interesting nonlinear properties, such as pseudoelasticity (PE, shape memory effect (SME and damping capacity, due to high mechanical hysteresis and internal friction. Our group has applied SMA in the field of neuromuscular rehabilitation, designing some new devices based on the mentioned SMA properties: in particular, a new type of orthosis for spastic limb repositioning, which allows residual voluntary movement of the impaired limb and has no predetermined final target position, but follows and supports muscular elongation in a dynamic and compliant way. Considering patients in the sub-acute phase after a neurological lesion, and possibly bedridden, the paper presents a mobiliser for the ankle joint, which is designed exploiting the SME to provide passive exercise to the paretic lower limb. Two different SMA-based applications in the field of neuroscience are then presented, a guide and a limb mobiliser specially designed to be compatible with diagnostic instrumentations that impose rigid constraints in terms of electromagnetic compatibility and noise distortion. Finally, the paper discusses possible uses of these materials in the treatment of movement disorders, such as dystonia or hyperkinesia, where their dynamic characteristics can be advantageous.

  4. Drosophila RSK negatively regulates bouton number at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias; Raabe, Thomas; Heisenberg, Martin; Sendtner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs) are growth factor-regulated serine-threonine kinases participating in the RAS-ERK signaling pathway. RSKs have been implicated in memory formation in mammals and flies. To characterize the function of RSK at the synapse level, we investigated the effect of mutations in the rsk gene on the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila larvae. Immunostaining revealed transgenic expressed RSK in presynaptic regions. In mutants with a full deletion or an N-terminal partial deletion of rsk, an increased bouton number was found. Restoring the wild-type rsk function in the null mutant with a genomic rescue construct reverted the synaptic phenotype, and overexpression of the rsk-cDNA in motoneurons reduced bouton numbers. Based on previous observations that RSK interacts with the Drosophila ERK homologue Rolled, genetic epistasis experiments were performed with loss- and gain-of-function mutations in Rolled. These experiments provided evidence that RSK mediates its negative effect on bouton formation at the Drosophila NMJ by inhibition of ERK signaling.

  5. The neuromuscular features of acromegaly: a clinical and pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleeli, A A; Levy, R D; Edwards, R H; McPhail, G; Mills, K R; Round, J M; Betteridge, D J

    1984-09-01

    A study of the neuromuscular features of acromegaly was performed in six patients. Clinical assessment was supplemented by quadriceps force measurements, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activities, electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies. Muscle mass was measured by urinary creatinine/height indices (CHI) and cross sectional area (CSA) of thighs and calves on computed tomography. Quadriceps force/unit cross sectional area was derived. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis were studied by histochemical and ultrastructural methods. Mean fibre area (MFA) and fibre type proportions were measured. Most of the subjects studied had muscle pain and proximal muscle weakness confirmed by quadriceps force measurements. This occurred in the absence of muscle wasting, as shown by cross sectional area measurements and normal or raised creatinine/height indices. "Myopathic" features were demonstrated by needle biopsy in half the patients and occasionally by electromyography and raised plasma creatine kinase activity. Abnormalities on needle biopsy included variation in fibre size, type 2 fibre atrophy and large type 1 MFA relative to type 2 MFA. Electronmicroscopy showed the non-specific findings of increased glycogen accumulation, excess lipofuscin pigment and myofilament loss.

  6. Tetanic fade following administration of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, F M; Mirakhur, R K

    1989-06-01

    Fade in response to tetanic stimulation was studied following administration of atracurium 120 or 225 micrograms/kg, vecuronium 23 or 40 micrograms/kg, pancuronium 30 or 60 micrograms/kg, or d-tubocurarine 185 or 450 micrograms/kg. Ten patients received each dose and tetanic fade was measured at maximum block in the patients, who received the lower doses of the relaxants or at 10% recovery in those who received the higher doses. Fade during tetanic stimulation was generally similar in all the groups with the exception of the higher dose of pancuronium which showed a significantly greater fade in comparison with the higher doses of atracurium and d-tubocurarine. If fade in response to tetanic stimulation represents a prejunctional effect, the results from the present study suggest that neuromuscular blocking drugs cannot be differentiated with respect to their relative prejunctional effects by measurement of tetanic fade during established block after administration of clinically useful doses as used in the present study.

  7. Pseudoephedrine and circadian rhythm interaction on neuromuscular performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarés, J G; López-Samanes, Á; Fernández-Elías, V E; Aguado-Jiménez, R; Ortega, J F; Gómez, C; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Mora-Rodríguez, R

    2015-12-01

    This study analyzed the effects of pseudoephedrine (PSE) provided at different time of day on neuromuscular performance, side effects, and violation of the current doping cut-off threshold [World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)]. Nine resistance-trained males carried out bench press and full squat exercises against four incremental loads (25%, 50%, 75%, and 90% one repetition maximum [1RM]), in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Participants ingested either 180 mg of PSE (supra-therapeutic dose) or placebo in the morning (7:00 h; AM(PLAC) and AM(PSE)) and in the afternoon (17:00 h; PM(PLAC) and PM(PSE)). PSE enhanced muscle contraction velocity against 25% and 50% 1RM loads, only when it was ingested in the mornings, and only in the full squat exercise (4.4-8.7%; P < 0.05). PSE ingestion raised urine and plasma PSE concentrations (P < 0.05) regardless of time of day; however, cathine only increased in the urine samples. PSE ingestion resulted in positive tests occurring in 11% of samples, and it rose some adverse side effects such us tachycardia and heart palpitations. Ingestion of a single dose of 180 mg of PSE results in enhanced lower body muscle contraction velocity against low and moderate loads only in the mornings. These mild performance improvements are accompanied by undesirable side effects and an 11% risk of surpassing the doping threshold.

  8. Neuromuscular factors related to success in Olympic wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Martínez-Moreno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study was undertaken to determine the relationship between maximum dynamic and isometric strength and success in male and female Olympic wrestling. Thirty-five female and thirty-seven male wrestlers were assigned into 4 groups according to their gender and competitive level: men elite (♂ ET, n = 18 and amateur (AT ♂, n = 19 and female elite (♀ ET n = 13 and amateur (AT ♀, n = 22. All subjects underwent assessments of body composition, countermovement jump, maximum dynamic strength test in full squat and bench press exercises and maximum isometric strength test of grip and hip extension. All the neuromuscular markers studied showed significantly higher values in the two elite groups compared to their respective amateur groups results, except the jump height between ♀ET y ♀AT, where no significant differences were detected. The present results suggest that the higher maximum isometric and dynamic strength values, explained in part by the differences in lean mass, will give elite wrestlers a clear advantage during the most frequently used techniques in Olympic wrestling. Key  Words: bench press; squat; maximum dynamic strength; maximum isometric strength; combat.

  9. Neuromuscular Fatigue after Submaximal Intermittent Contractions in Motorcycle Riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, P; Cabib, C; Morales, M; Valls-Sole, J; Marina, M

    2015-11-01

    Highly repetitive submaximal intermittent contractions of the forearm muscles during periods of 30-50 min partially explain why motorcycle races are so demanding for the neuromuscular system. This study investigated the contribution of central and peripheral mechanisms of fatigue on the exerted and contralateral extensor digitorum communis following an intermittent fatigue protocol (IFP) designed for motorcycle riders. 12 riders performed an IFP, which simulates the braking and throttle handle gesture. We examined the time course of recovery of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), M-wave, motor evoked potential (MEP) to transcranial magnetic stimuli in relaxed and facilitated condition, and the cortical silent period (CSP) at time windows of 1, 3, 5, 10 and 20 min after the IFP. Whereas MVC, M-wave and MEP decreased, CSP lengthened significantly in the fatigued limb after completion of the IFP. Nevertheless, no differences were observed in the contralateral limb. All neurophysiological parameters reverted to baseline values in less than 20 min, while MVC remained lower in the exercised limb. No cross-over effects were observed in the contralateral non-exercised limb. Our results suggest that local factors are those mainly responsible for the incomplete MVC recovery after an intermittent muscle contraction protocol.

  10. Neuromuscular characteristics and fatigue during 10 km running.

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    Paavolainen, L; Nummela, A; Rusko, H; Häkkinen, K

    1999-11-01

    This study investigated neuromuscular characteristics and fatigue during 10 km running (10 K) performance in well-trained endurance athletes with different distance running capability. Nine high (HC) and ten low (LC) caliber endurance athletes performed the 10 K on a 200 m indoor track, constant velocity lap (CVL, 4.5 m x s(-1)) 5 times during the course of the 10 K and maximal 20 m speed test before (20 m(b)) and after (20 m(a)) the 10 K. Running velocity (V), ground contact times (CT), ground reaction forces (F) and electromyographic activity (EMG) of the leg muscles (vastus lateralis; VL, biceps femoris; BF, gastrocnemius; GA) were measured during 20 m(b), 20 m(a), and CVLs. The 10 K times differed (pactivity of GA in relation to the IEMG of the total contact phase during the CVLs was higher (prun did not differentiate endurance athletes with different V10K. However, a capability to produce force rapidly throughout the 10 K accompanied with optimal preactivation and contact phase activation seem to be important for 10 km running performance in well trained endurance athletes.

  11. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

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    Mayana Zatz

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country.

  12. Verifax: Biometric instruments measuring neuromuscular disorders/performance impairments

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    Morgenthaler, George W.; Shrairman, Ruth; Landau, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    VeriFax, founded in 1990 by Dr. Ruth Shrairman and Mr. Alex Landau, began operations with the aim of developing a biometric tool for the verification of signatures from a distance. In the course of developing this VeriFax Autograph technology, two other related applications for the technologies under development at VeriFax became apparent. The first application was in the use of biometric measurements as clinical monitoring tools for physicians investigating neuromuscular diseases (embodied in VeriFax's Neuroskill technology). The second application was to evaluate persons with critical skills (e.g., airline pilots, bus drivers) for physical and mental performance impairments caused by stress, physiological disorders, alcohol, drug abuse, etc. (represented by VeriFax's Impairoscope prototype instrument). This last application raised the possibility of using a space-qualified Impairoscope variant to evaluate astronaut performance with respect to the impacts of stress, fatigue, excessive workload, build-up of toxic chemicals within the space habitat, etc. The three applications of VeriFax's patented technology are accomplished by application-specific modifications of the customized VeriFax software. Strong commercial market potentials exist for all three VeriFax technology applications, and market progress will be presented in more detail below.

  13. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick biventer cervicis muscle

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    B. Esfandiar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available biventer cervicis muscleD. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick EsfandiarAbstractBackground and Purpose: NO is a short-lived gas molecule generated by degradation of L-arg to citrulline and by the activation of enzyme NOS Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent. There are multiple NOS isoforms that strongly are expressed in skeletal muscle, suggesting the crucial role of NO in regulating muscular metabolism and function. In this study, the effect of L-arginine was examined at the neuromuscular junction of the chick biventer cervicis muscle.Materials and Methods: Biventer cervicis muscle preparations from chick’s age of 3 weeks were set up in the organ bath. The organ bath had a vessel with volume of about 70 ml; it contained Tyrode solution aerated with oxygen and was kept at 37º C. NO levels was also measured in the chick biventer cervicis muscle homogenates, using spectrophotometer method for the direct detection of NO, nitrite and nitrate. Total nitrite (nitrite+nitrate was measured by a spectrophotometer at 540 nm after the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by copperized cadmium granules.Results: L-Arginine at 500 µg/ml, decreased twitch response to electrical stimulation, and produced rightward shift of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol. L-arginine at 1000 µg/ml produced a strong shift to the right of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol with a reduction in efficacy. The inhibitory effect of L-arginine on the twitch response was blocked by caffeine (200 µg/ml. NO levels were found to be significantly increased in concentrations 500 and 1000 µg/ml of L-arginine in comparison with the control group (p < 0.001.Conclusion: These findings indicate a possible role of increased NO levels in the suppressive action of L-arginie on the twitch response. In addition, the results indicate that the post-junctional antagonistic action of L-arginine is probably the result of impaired sarcoplasmic

  14. Cruciferous vegetable supplementation in a controlled diet study alters the serum peptidome in a GSTM1-genotype dependent manner

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    Chen Chu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely associated with the risk of several cancers. Isothiocyanates (ITC are hypothesized to be the major bioactive constituents contributing to these cancer-preventive effects. The polymorphic glutathione-S-transferase (GST gene family encodes several enzymes which catalyze ITC degradation in vivo. Methods We utilized high throughput proteomics methods to examine how human serum peptides (the "peptidome" change in response to cruciferous vegetable feeding in individuals of different GSTM1 genotypes. In two randomized, crossover, controlled feeding studies (EAT and 2EAT participants consumed a fruit- and vegetable-free basal diet and the basal diet supplemented with cruciferous vegetables. Serum samples collected at the end of the feeding period were fractionated and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry spectra were obtained. Peak identification/alignment computer algorithms and mixed effects models were used to analyze the data. Results After analysis of spectra from EAT participants, 24 distinct peaks showed statistically significant differences associated with cruciferous vegetable intake. Twenty of these peaks were driven by their GSTM1 genotype (i.e., GSTM1+ or GSTM1- null. When data from EAT and 2EAT participants were compared by joint processing of spectra to align a common set, 6 peaks showed consistent changes in both studies in a genotype-dependent manner. The peaks at 6700 m/z and 9565 m/z were identified as an isoform of transthyretin (TTR and a fragment of zinc α2-glycoprotein (ZAG, respectively. Conclusions Cruciferous vegetable intake in GSTM1+ individuals led to changes in circulating levels of several peptides/proteins, including TTR and a fragment of ZAG. TTR is a known marker of nutritional status and ZAG is an adipokine that plays a role in lipid mobilization. The results of this study present evidence that the GSTM1

  15. Efeitos neuromusculares in vitro e in vivo do atracúrio e do rocurônio em ratos submetidos a tratamento de sete dias com carbamazepina Efectos neuromusculares in vitro e in vivo del atracurio y del rocuronio en ratones sometidos a tratamiento de siete días con carbamazepina In vitro and in vivo neuromuscular effects of atracurium and rocuronium in rats treated with carbamazepine for seven days

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    Caroline Coutinho de Barcelos

    2008-04-01

    neuromuscular producido por el rocuronio y atracurio en ratones tratados con carbamazepina y determinó las concentraciones de citocromo P450 y b5 reductasis en microsomas hepáticos. MÉTODO: Ratones fueron tratados por siete días con carbamazepina (CBZ - 40 mg.kg-1 a través de una sonda y sacrificados al octavo día bajo anestesia con uretana. Las preparaciones in vitro e in vivo fueron montadas de acuerdo con las técnicas de Bulbring y de Leeuwin y Wolters, respectivamente. Las concentraciones y dosis utilizadas de los bloqueadores en las preparaciones in vitro e in vivo fueron, respectivamente, 20 µg.mL-1 y 0,5 mg.kg-1 para atracurio (ATC; 4 µg.mL-1 y 0,6 mg.kg-1 para rocuronio (ROC. Cada protocolo tuvo un n = 5 y las respuestas fueron observadas por 60 minutos. Los efectos del ATC y ROC fueron evaluados en las preparaciones de ratones tratados (Cbz t y comparados a los observados en los de ratones no tratados (CBZst. Las concentraciones de citocromo P450 y b5 reductasis fueron determinadas en microsomas aislados de hígados de ratones tratados (CBZt y comparadas con las obtenidas en ratones no tratados (CBZst RESULTADOS: La carbamazepina no alteró la amplitud de las respuestas musculares; in vitro y in vivo, no hubo diferencia entre el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el atracurio en las preparaciones CBZt versus CBZst; el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el Rocuronio en las preparaciones CBZt fue potenciado in vitro. La carbamazepina no alteró las concentraciones de citocromo P450 y b5. CONCLUSIONES: El tratamiento por siete días con carbamazepina, no influenció en el bloqueo producido por el atracurio, y alteró in vitro los efectos del rocuronio. El tiempo de tratamiento no fue suficiente para causar la inducción enzimática y disminuir la sensibilidad al rocuronio.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This experimental study investigated the in vitro and in vivo neuromuscular blockade of rocuronium and atracurium in rats treated with carbamazepine and determined

  16. Does vitamin D supplementation alter plasma adipokines concentrations? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Madalina; Serban, Maria-Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Blüher, Matthias; Gurban, Camelia; Penson, Peter; Michos, Erin D; Hernandez, Adrian V; Jones, Steven R; Banach, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin D supplementation on adipokines through a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PUBMED, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar through July 1st, 2015. Finally we identified 9 RCTs and 484 participants. Meta-analysis of data from 7 studies did not find a significant change in plasma adiponectin concentrations following vitamin D supplementation (mean difference [MD]: 4.45%, 95%CI: -3.04, 11.93, p=0.244; Q=2.18, I(2)=0%). In meta-regression, changes in plasma adiponectin concentrations following vitamin D supplementation were found to be independent of treatment duration (slope: 0.25; 95%CI: -0.69, 1.19; p=0.603) and changes in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels (slope: -0.02; 95%CI: -0.15, 0.12; p=0.780). Meta-analysis of data from 6 studies did not find a significant change in plasma leptin concentrations following vitamin D supplementation (MD: -4.51%, 95%CI: -25.13, 16.11, p=0.668; Q=6.41, I(2)=21.97%). Sensitivity analysis showed that this effect size is sensitive to one of the studies; removing it resulted in a significant reduction in plasma leptin levels (MD: -12.81%, 95%CI: -24.33, -1.30, p=0.029). In meta-regression, changes in plasma leptin concentrations following vitamin D supplementation were found to be independent of treatment duration (slope: -1.93; 95%CI: -4.08, 0.23; p=0.080). However, changes in serum 25(OH)D were found to be significantly associated with changes in plasma leptin levels following vitamin D supplementation (slope: 1.05; 95%CI: 0.08, 2.02; p=0.033). In conclusion, current data did not indicate a significant effect of vitamin D supplementation on adiponectin and leptin levels.

  17. Growth and anabolic hormones, leptin, and neuromuscular performance in moderately trained prepubescent athletes and untrained boys.

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    Tsolakis, Charilaos; Vagenas, George; Dessypris, Athanasios

    2003-02-01

    We investigated hormonal regulators of growth and development, leptin levels, body composition, neuromuscular performance, and the associations among them in trained prepubertal athletes (experimental group [EG]) and an untrained control group (CG). Informed consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Their maturation stage was evaluated according to Tanner's criteria. There were no differences between EG and CG in physical characteristics, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass, testosterone (T), sex hormone-binding globulin, free androgen index, growth hormone (GH), hand grip strength, and jumping performance. Leptin levels and percent fat of the EG were significantly lower than those of the CG (p growth and anabolic factors. Sex hormone-binding globulin and GH may explain the variation of leptin in athletes with low T (R(2) = 0.43) and in CG (R(2) = 0.35), respectively. Leptin seems to be a permissive factor for the onset of puberty, and the training background needs an optimal biological maturation to produce significant differences in muscle and power performance.

  18. Neuromuscular performance of Bandal Chagui: Comparison of subelite and elite taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Pedro Vieira Sarmet; Goethel, Márcio Fagundes; Gonçalves, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    With the aim of comparing kinematic and neuromuscular parameters of Bandal Chagui kicks between 7 elite and 7 subelite taekwondo athletes, nine Bandal Chaguis were performed at maximal effort in a selective reaction time design, simulating the frequency of kicks observed in taekwondo competitions. Linear and angular leg velocities were recorded through 3D motion capture system. Ground reaction forces (GRF) were evaluated by a force platform, and surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were evaluated in the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, rectus femoris, tensor fasciae lata, adductor magnus, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gastrocnemius lateralis muscles of the kicking leg. sEMG data were processed to obtain the cocontraction indices (CI) of antagonist vs. overall (agonist and antagonist) muscle activity. CI was measured for the hip and knee, in flexion and extension, and for hip abduction. Premotor, reaction (kinetic and kinematic), and kicking times were evaluated. Timing parameters, except kinetic reaction time, were faster in elite athletes. Furthermore, CI and angular velocity during knee extension, foot and knee linear velocity, and horizontal GRF were significantly higher in elite than in subelite athletes. In conclusion, selected biomechanical parameters of Bandal Chagui appear to be useful in controlling the training status of the kick and in orienting the training goal of black belt competitors.

  19. The effect of static, ballistic, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul S; Olsen, Peter D; Portas, Matthew D

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of different modes of stretching on vertical jump performance. Eighteen male university students (age, 24.3 +/- 3.2 years; height, 181.5 +/- 11.4 cm; body mass, 78.1 +/- 6.4 kg; mean +/- SD) completed 4 different conditions in a randomized order, on different days, interspersed by a minimum of 72 hours of rest. Each session consisted of a standard 5-minute cycle warm-up, accompanied by one of the subsequent conditions: (a) control, (b) 10-minute static stretching, (c) 10-minute ballistic stretching, or (d) 10-minute proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. The subjects performed 3 trials of static and countermovement jumps prior to stretching and poststretching at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. Vertical jump height decreased after static and PNF stretching (4.0% and 5.1%, p ballistic stretching (2.7%, p > 0.05). However, jumping performance had fully recovered 15 minutes after all stretching conditions. In conclusion, vertical jump performance is diminished for 15 minutes if performed after static or PNF stretching, whereas ballistic stretching has little effect on jumping performance. Consequently, PNF or static stretching should not be performed immediately prior to an explosive athletic movement.

  20. Bothrops jararacussu venom-induced neuromuscular blockade inhibited by Casearia gossypiosperma Briquet hydroalcoholic extract

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    TM Camargo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydroalcoholic extract of Casearia gossypiosperma Briquet (Flacourtiaceae was standardized for the first time through quality control procedures including pharmacognostic methods, fingerprint chromatograms, defined amounts of marker substances and physicochemical characteristics. The pharmacological activity of C. gossypiosperma (Cg hydroalcoholic extract was assayed by a traditional in vitro test, which involved irreversible neuromuscular blockade induced by Bothrops jararacussu (Bjssu venom (60 µg/mL in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. Bjssu venom blocked muscle activity for 26 (± 2.0 minutes (n = 6. Cg extract (0.1 mg/mL induced changes on the baseline muscle activity without impairing the muscle function and inhibited 87.6% (± 1.8 (n = 6 of the Bjssu venom-induced blockade. Both flavonoids (0.624 g% and polyphenols (4.63 g% from the extract were spectrophotometrically quantified. Therefore, the present study confirms the antibothropic activity of Cg extract, supporting the ethnomedical use of Casearia sp. in the treatment of snakebite victims.

  1. Unilateral balance training enhances neuromuscular reactions to perturbations in the trained and contralateral limb.

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    Oliveira, Anderson Souza Castelo; Brito Silva, Priscila; Farina, Dario; Kersting, Uwe Gustav

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of unilateral balance training on the reactive recovery of balance for both trained and untrained limbs. Twenty-three subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group (CG) or a training group (TG). The latter performed six weeks of balance training for the right leg. The pre- and post-training measurements were based on single leg standing posture on a moveable force platform which moved 6 cm anteriorly. TG subjects were tested on the trained (TR) and untrained leg (UTR), whereas CG subjects were tested on the right leg (CTR). The center of pressure trajectory length (CPLEN) and average speed (CPSPD) as well as onsets of muscular activation and time to peak (EMGTP) from lower limb muscles were calculated and compared by a 2-way ANOVA (three legs×two training status). Muscular onsets were reduced after training for TR (∼19 ms, ptraining for CPLEN and medial-lateral CPSPD were found. Furthermore, the EMGTP of UTR was predominantly greater before training (∼17 ms, ptraining the EMGTP was similar among limbs. These results suggest that concomitant with improved balance recovery and neuromuscular reactions in TR, there is also a cross-education effect in UTR, which might be predominantly related to supraspinal adaptations shared between interconnected structures in the brain.

  2. Development of network-based multichannel neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for stroke rehabilitation.

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    Qu, Hongen; Xie, Yongji; Liu, Xiaoxuan; He, Xin; Hao, Manzhao; Bao, Yong; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a promising assistive technology for stroke rehabilitation. Here we present the design and development of a multimuscle stimulation system as an emerging therapy for people with paretic stroke. A network-based multichannel NMES system was integrated based on dual bus architecture of communication and an H-bridge current regulator with a power booster. The structure of the system was a body area network embedded with multiple stimulators and a communication protocol of controlled area network to transmit muscle stimulation parameter information to individual stimulators. A graphical user interface was designed to allow clinicians to specify temporal patterns and muscle stimulation parameters. We completed and tested a prototype of the hardware and communication software modules of the multichannel NMES system. The prototype system was first verified in nondisabled subjects for safety, and then tested in subjects with stroke for feasibility with assisting multijoint movements. Results showed that synergistic stimulation of multiple muscles in subjects with stroke improved performance of multijoint movements with more natural velocity profiles at elbow and shoulder and reduced acromion excursion due to compensatory trunk rotation. The network-based NMES system may provide an innovative solution that allows more physiological activation of multiple muscles in multijoint task training for patients with stroke.

  3. Neuromuscular independence of abdominal wall muscles as demonstrated by middle-eastern style dancers.

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    Moreside, Janice M; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; McGill, Stuart M

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies analyzing neuromuscular independence of the abdominal wall have involved a participant population with no specific training in separating individual muscle segments. We chose to study nine women trained in the art of middle-eastern dance, anticipating they may have unique skills in motor control. Specifically, we were searching for evidence of separation of upper rectus abdominis (URA) from lower rectus abdominis (LRA), as well as understanding what role the oblique muscles play in abdominal wall synergies. EMG analysis was done on eight trunk muscles bilaterally as the dancers participated in 30 dance, planar, and curl-up activities. The filtered data were then cross-correlated to determine the time lag between pairs of signals. Only three dance movements demonstrated consistent evidence of an ability to separate URA/LRA activation timing. The external and internal oblique muscles tend to align themselves temporally with the LRA. However, these findings were only evident in these three specific "belly-roll" conditions, all with low levels of muscle activation, and no external torque. Evidence of significantly different activation levels (% MVC) between URA/LRA was demonstrated in eight conditions, all of which required various pelvis movements with minimal thorax motion.

  4. Efeito da administração do atracúrio sobre a recuperação do bloqueio neuromuscular induzido pelo pancurônio Efecto de la administración del atracúrio sobre la recuperación del bloqueo neuromuscular inducido por el pancuronio Effect of atracurium on pancuronium-induced neuromuscular block recovery

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    Luís Fernando Rodrigues Maria

    2004-06-01

    complementación con atracúrio no promovió alteración en la recuperación espontanea inicial del bloqueo neuromuscular inducido por el pancuronio y promovió diminución de 20% en el tiempo de recuperación total.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Additional neuromuscular blocker doses are in general needed during wall closing after abdominal surgeries. This study aimed at determining during partial pancuronium-induced neuromuscular block recovery, the effect of additional atracurium dose on spontaneous neuromuscular block recovery. METHODS: Participated in this study 30 patients divided in two groups: pancuronium group (n = 14 and atracurium group (n = 16. Neuromuscular function was continuously monitored by accelerometry of abductor pollicis muscle using TOF to supramaximally stimulate ulnar nerve. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl and 0.08 mg.kg-1 pancuronium, and was maintained with 60% N2O in oxygen and 0.5% isoflurane expired concentration. When T1 returned to 25% of control, 0.025 mg.kg-1 pancuronium or 0.20 mg.kg-1 atracurium were administered to pancuronium or atracurium group, respectively. Time for spontaneous T1 recovery = 10%, 25%, 75% of recovery index (RI 25-75% and time to T4/T1 equal 0.8 after complementary dose, were recorded. RESULTS: There were no differences between groups on T1 spontaneous recovery to 10% (45.00 ± 15.50 vs. 49.69 ± 9.41, 25% (61.64 ± 18.58 vs. 64.25 ± 12.51 and 75% (94.00 ± 28.52 vs. 84.69 ± 16.50. Recovery index (RI 25-75% and time to T4/T1= 0.8 were shorter in the atracurium group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, atracurium complementation has made no difference in initial spontaneous recovery of pancuronium-induced neuromuscular block, but has decreased total recovery time in 20%.

  5. Avaliação da ativação neuromuscular em indivíduos com escoliose através da eletromiografia de superfície Assessment of neuromuscular activation in individuals with scoliosis using surface electromyography

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    E Bassani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar o potencial da eletromiografia (EMG de superfície para a avaliação da eficiência neuromuscular e da fadiga muscular localizada dos extensores lombares em indivíduos com escoliose. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 20 indivíduos divididos igualmente em dois grupos, (1 Grupo com Escoliose e (2 Grupo Controle, que foram submetidos a um teste de indução dos músculos extensores lombares a fadiga, o qual constituiu da realização de uma contração voluntária máxima isométrica (CVM, e realização de um teste com esforço a 80% da CVM. Foram coletados simultaneamente sinais de força e eletromiográficos (sinal EMG. O sinal EMG foi processado no domínio da freqüência, utilizando-se a transformada rápida de Fourier (FFT, por meio da mediana da freqüência (MF, e no domínio do tempo, pelo cálculo do valor root mean square (RMS. Os dados foram submetidos a uma análise de variância one-way para verificar as diferenças entre os dois grupos. Para verificar a simetria entre os lados direito e esquerdo, foi realizado o teste t pareado. O nível de significância adotado foi 0,05. RESULTADOS: os resultados demonstraram que indivíduos com escoliose apresentaram: (1 simetria de ativação neuromuscular entre os lados; (2 menor eficiência neuromuscular; (3 maior capacidade de resistir a fadiga; e (4 valores de força 42,6% menores que os indivíduos do GC. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados sugerem que a EMG de superfície corresponde a um efetivo instrumento de avaliação funcional da escoliose, embora o protocolo estabelecido tenha limitado a participação dos indivíduos com escoliose, do ponto de vista da eficiência neuromuscular.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of surface electromyography (EMG for assessing neuromuscular efficiency and localized muscle fatigue in the lumbar extensors, in individuals with scoliosis. METHODS: Twenty individuals participated

  6. The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases

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    Nemat BILAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Bilan N, Poorshiri B.The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:21-24. ObjectiveThere are controversial findings in the literature on the effects of chest physiotherapy on postextubation lung collapse in pediatric age group. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients. Materials & Methods In a case-control study from March 2007 to March 2011, two groups of patients (35 patients in each group susceptible to lung collapse were enrolled in the study. The studied patients had neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, and cerebral palsy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (case and control; The case group underwent daily chest physiotherapy through vibrator and chest percussion and the control group was under supervision. In the latter group, the underlying disease was treated and the lung collapse was managed, if occurred. Results The frequency of atelectasis was lower in the case group who received prophylactic chest physiotherapy compared to the control group (16.6% vs. 40%. Conclusion Chest physiotherapy as well as appropriate and regular change of position can considerably reduce the rate of pulmonary collapse in pediatric patients.References Jorgensen J, Wei JL, Sykes KJ, Klem SA, Weatherly RA, Bruegger DE, Latz AD, Nicklaus PJ. Incidence of and risk factors for airway complications following endotracheal intubation for bronchiolitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007;137(3:394-9.Flenady VJ, Gray PH. Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(2:CD000283.Odita JC, Kayyali M, Ammari A. Post-extubation atelectasis in ventilated

  7. Cruciferous vegetable feeding alters UGT1A1 activity: diet- and genotype-dependent changes in serum bilirubin in a controlled feeding trial.

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    Navarro, Sandi L; Peterson, Sabrina; Chen, Chu; Makar, Karen W; Schwarz, Yvonne; King, Irena B; Li, Shuying S; Li, Lin; Kestin, Mark; Lampe, Johanna W

    2009-04-01

    Chemoprevention by isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetables occurs partly through up-regulation of phase II conjugating enzymes, such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). UGT1A1 glucuronidates bilirubin, estrogens, and several dietary carcinogens. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism reduces transcription compared with the wild-type, resulting in decreased enzyme activity. Isothiocyanates are metabolized by glutathione S-transferases (GST); variants may alter isothiocyanate clearance such that response to crucifers may vary by genotype. We evaluated, in a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding trial in humans (n = 70), three test diets (single- and double-"dose" cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous) compared with a fruit and vegetable-free basal diet. We measured serum bilirubin concentrations on days 0, 7, 11, and 14 of each 2-week feeding period to monitor UGT1A1 activity and determined effects of UGT1A1*28 and GSTM1/GSTT1-null variants on response. Aggregate bilirubin response to all vegetable-containing diets was statistically significantly lower compared with the basal diet (P cruciferous diets compared with basal (P cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared with basal, and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared with single-dose cruciferous (P vegetable-containing diets compared with basal (P < 0.02 for all). Evaluation of the effects of diet stratified by GST genotype revealed some statistically significant genotypic differences; however, the magnitude was similar and not statistically significant between genotypes. These results may have implications for altering carcinogen metabolism through dietary intervention, particularly among UGT1A1*28/*28 individuals.

  8. Neuromuscular scoliosis and pelvic fixation in 2015: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anari, Jason B; Spiegel, David A; Baldwin, Keith D

    2015-09-18

    Neuromuscular scoliosis is a challenging problem to treat in a heterogeneous patient population. When the decision is made for surgery the surgeon must select a technique employed to correct the curve and achieve the goals of surgery, namely a straight spine over a level pelvis. Pre-operatively the surgeon must ask if pelvic fixation is worth the extra complications and infection risk it introduces to an already compromised host. Since the advent of posterior spinal fusion the technology used for instrumentation has changed drastically. However, many of the common problems seen with the unit rod decades ago we are still dealing with today with pedicle screw technology. Screw cut out, pseudoarthrosis, non-union, prominent hardware, wound complications, and infection are all possible complications when extending a spinal fusion construct to the pelvis in a neuromuscular scoliosis patient. Additionally, placing pelvic fixation in a neuromuscular patient results in extra blood loss, greater surgical time, more extensive dissection with creation of a deep dead space, and an incision that extends close to the rectum in patients who are commonly incontinent. Balancing the risk of placing pelvic fixation when the benefit, some may argue, is limited in non-ambulating patients is difficult when the literature is so mottled. Despite frequent advancements in technology issues with neuromuscular scoliosis remain the same and in the next 10 years we must do what we can to make safe neuromuscular spine surgery a reality.

  9. A Dutch guideline for the treatment of scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titarsolej PJ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with neuromuscular disorders with a progressive muscle weakness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy frequently develop a progressive scoliosis. A severe scoliosis compromises respiratory function and makes sitting more difficult. Spinal surgery is considered the primary treatment option for correcting severe scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders. Surgery in this population requires a multidisciplinary approach, careful planning, dedicated surgical procedures, and specialized after care. Methods The guideline is based on scientific evidence and expert opinions. A multidisciplinary working group representing experts from all relevant specialties performed the research. A literature search was conducted to collect scientific evidence in answer to specific questions posed by the working group. Literature was classified according to the level of evidence. Results For most aspects of the treatment scientific evidence is scarce and only low level cohort studies were found. Nevertheless, a high degree of consensus was reached about the management of patients with scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders. This was translated into a set of recommendations, which are now officially accepted as a general guideline in the Netherlands. Conclusion In order to optimize the treatment for scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders a Dutch guideline has been composed. This evidence-based, multidisciplinary guideline addresses conservative treatment, the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative care of scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders.

  10. RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL TO COMPARE THE INCIDENCE OF RESIDUAL NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCK FOLLOWING PANCURONIUM AND ATRACURIUM USING TRAIN OF FOUR RATIO

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    Nagesha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical studies have reported that significant number of patients receiving non depolarizing muscle relaxants during general anesthesia show postoperative residual neuromuscular block when assessed by neuromuscular monitor in the recovery room. The degree of residual neuromuscular block produced by non-depolarizing muscle relaxants can be evaluated by clinical tests as well as by neuromuscular monitoring y neuromuscular monitor in the recovery room. A randomized double blind clinical trial to determine and compare the incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular block in patients receiving pancuronium and atracurium applying Train of Four ratio using Train of Four- Guard neuromuscular monitor. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To compare the incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular block following pancuronium and atracurium using Train of Four Ratio in the recovery room. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Comparative randomized study done using 100 patients of age between 15-60 years belonging to either sex, ASA grade 1 and 2 with GROUP ‘P’ – Pancuronium was employed as the muscle relaxant, GROUP ‘A’ – Atracurium was employed as the muscle relaxant. Statistical analysis done using student “t” test. RESULTS: The mean duration required to attain Train of Four Ratio of 0.80 in patients with initial Train of four ratio <0.80 in group ‘P’ was 9.65±5.4413 min and in group ‘A’ was 2.8± 1.4832 min. CONCLUSION: 1. Our study concludes that the incidence of residual neuromuscular block in patients receiving pancuronium and atracurium were 40% and 10% respectively. Thus residual neuromuscular block can be a significant problem in recovery room, during the postoperative period. 2. The use of intermediate acting non depolarizing muscle relaxant like atracurium lowers the incidence of residual neuromuscular block but does not eliminate it.

  11. A murine model of muscle training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Ferrari, Ricardo; Distefano, Giovanna; Carvell, George

    2012-05-09

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a common clinical modality that is widely used to restore (1), maintain (2) or enhance (3-5) muscle functional capacity. Transcutaneous surface stimulation of skeletal muscle involves a current flow between a cathode and an anode, thereby inducing excitement of the motor unit and the surrounding muscle fibers. NMES is an attractive modality to evaluate skeletal muscle adaptive responses for several reasons. First, it provides a reproducible experimental model in which physiological adaptations, such as myofiber hypertophy and muscle strengthening (6), angiogenesis (7-9), growth factor secretion (9-11), and muscle precursor cell activation (12) are well documented. Such physiological responses may be carefully titrated using different parameters of stimulation (for Cochrane review, see (13)). In addition, NMES recruits motor units non-selectively, and in a spatially fixed and temporally synchronous manner (14), offering the advantage of exerting a treatment effect on all fibers, regardless of fiber type. Although there are specified contraindications to NMES in clinical populations, including peripheral venous disorders or malignancy, for example, NMES is safe and feasible, even for those who are ill and/or bedridden and for populations in which rigorous exercise may be challenging. Here, we demonstrate the protocol for adapting commercially available electrodes and performing a NMES protocol using a murine model. This animal model has the advantage of utilizing a clinically available device and providing instant feedback regarding positioning of the electrode to elicit the desired muscle contractile effect. For the purpose of this manuscript, we will describe the protocol for muscle stimulation of the anterior compartment muscles of a mouse hindlimb.

  12. The effects of stair gait training using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on stroke patients' dynamic balance ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, KyoChul; Park, Seung Hwan; Park, KwangYong

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine stroke patients' changes in dynamic balance ability through stair gait training where in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) was applied. [Subjects and Methods] In total 30 stroke patients participated in this experiment and were randomly and equally allocated to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received exercise treatment for 30 min and stair gait training where in PNF was applied for 30 min and the control group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ground gait training where in PNF was applied for 30 min. For the four weeks of the experiment, each group received training three times per week, for 30 min each time. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) values were measured and a time up and go (TUG) test and a functional reach test (FRT) were performed for a comparison before and after the experiment. [Results] According to the result of the stroke patients' balance performance through stair gait training, the BBS and FRT results significantly increased and the TUG test result significantly decreased in the experimental group. On the contrary, BBS and FRT results did not significantly increase and the TUG test result did not significantly decrease in the control group. According to the result of comparing differences between before and after training in each group, there was a significant change in the BBS result of the experimental group only. [Conclusions] In conclusion, the gait training group to which PNF was applied saw improvements in their balance ability, and a good result is expected when neurological disease patients receive stair gait training applying PNF.

  13. Interaction against different environmental dynamics during a leg extension task is controlled by temporal rather than amplitude scaling of muscular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuebbenhorst, Kati; Zschorlich, Volker

    2013-10-01

    Force exertion against different mechanical environments can affect motor control strategies in order to account for the altered environmental dynamics and to maintain the ability to produce force. Here, we investigated the change of muscular activity of selected muscles of the lower extremities while the participants interacted with an external mechanical device of variable stability. Twenty-five healthy participants exerted force against the device by performing a unilateral ballistic leg extension task under 1 or 3 degrees of freedom (DoF). Directional force data and electromyographic responses from four leg muscles (TA, VM, GM, PL) were recorded. Muscle responses to the altered experimental conditions were analyzed by calculating time to peak electrical activity (TTP), peak electrical activity (PEA), slope of EMG-signal and muscle activity. It was found that neuromuscular system adjustments to the task are expressed mainly by temporal (TTP) rather than amplitude (PEA) scaling of muscular activity. This change was specific for the investigated muscles. Moreover, a selective increase of muscle activity occurred while increasing external DoF. This scheme was accompanied by a significant reduction of applicable force against the device in the unstable 3 DoF condition. The findings suggest that orchestration of movement control is linked to environmental dynamics also affecting the ability to produce force under dynamic conditions. The adjustments of the neuromuscular system are rather temporal in nature being consistent with the impulse timing hypothesis of motor control.

  14. Reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block by the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex: a dose-finding and safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorgenfrei, Iben F; Norrild, Kathrine; Larsen, Per Bo;

    2006-01-01

    Sugammadex (Org 25969) forms a complex with steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents, thereby reversing neuromuscular block. This study investigated the dose-response relation, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex to reverse rocuronium-induced block....

  15. Swimming kinematics and respiratory behaviour of Xenopus laevis larvae raised in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejtek, M.; Souza, K.; Neff, A.; Wassersug, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the respiratory behaviours and swimming kinematics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles hatched in microgravity (Space Shuttle), simulated microgravity (clinostat) and hypergravity (3 g centrifuge). All observations were made in the normal 1 g environment. Previous research has shown that X. laevis raised in microgravity exhibit abnormalities in their lungs and vestibular system upon return to 1 g. The tadpoles raised in true microgravity exhibited a significantly lower tailbeat frequency than onboard 1 g centrifuge controls on the day of landing (day0), but this behaviour normalized within 9 days. The two groups did not differ significantly in buccal pumping rates. Altered buoyancy in the space-flight microgravity tadpoles was indicated by an increased swimming angle on the day after landing (day1). Tadpoles raised in simulated microgravity differed to a greater extent in swimming behaviours from their 1 g controls. The tadpoles raised in hypergravity showed no substantive effects on the development of swimming or respiratory behaviours, except swimming angle. Together, these results show that microgravity has a transient effect on the development of locomotion in X. laevis tadpoles, most notably on swimming angle, indicative of stunted lung development. On the basis of the behaviours we studied, there is no indication of neuromuscular retardation in amphibians associated with embryogenesis in microgravity.

  16. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  17. Neuromuscular factors related to success in Olympic wrestling FACTORES NEUROMUSCULARES RELACIONADOS CON EL RENDIMIENTO EN LUCHA OLÍMPICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Borrego

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study was undertaken to determine the relationship between maximum dynamic and isometric strength and success in male and female Olympic wrestling. Thirty-five female and thirty-seven male wrestlers were assigned into 4 groups according to their gender and competitive level: men elite (♂ ET, n = 18 and amateur (AT ♂, n = 19 and female elite (♀ ET n = 13 and amateur (AT ♀, n = 22. All subjects underwent assessments of body composition, countermovement jump, maximum dynamic strength test in full squat and bench press exercises and maximum isometric strength test of grip and hip extension. All the neuromuscular markers studied showed significantly higher values in the two elite groups compared to their respective amateur groups results, except the jump height between ♀ET y ♀AT, where no significant differences were detected. The present results suggest that the higher maximum isometric and dynamic strength values, explained in part by the differences in lean mass, will give elite wrestlers a clear advantage during the most frequently used techniques in Olympic wrestling. Key  Words: bench press; squat; maximum dynamic strength; maximum isometric strength; combat.ResumenEste estudio se llevó a cabo para determinar la relación entre la fuerza dinámica e isométrica máxima con el éxito en Lucha Olímpica masculina y femenina. Treinta cinco mujeres y treinta y siete varones luchadores fueron divididos en 4 grupos de acuerdo a su género y nivel competitivo: hombres élite (♂ET, n = 18 y amateur (♂AT, n = 19 y mujeres élite (♀ET, n = 13 y amateur (♀AT, n = 22. Todos los sujetos fueron sometidos a valoraciones de la composición corporal, salto con contramovimiento, test de fuerza dinámica máxima en los ejercicios de sentadilla completa y press banca así como test de fuerza isométrica máxima de agarre y de extensión de cadera. Todas las variables neuromusculares estudiadas presentaron valores

  18. Neuromuscular scoliosis as a sequelae of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Max R; Panteliadis, Pavlos; Lucas, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    The neuromuscular sequaelae of Guillain-Barré syndrome are well documented in the literature. Persistent distal muscular weakness and loss of peripheral limb reflexes are common in those affected. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed the Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome at the age of 8 years. Six years after the acute episode, he had persistent lower limb areflexia and mild weakness. He had also developed a neuromuscular scoliosis. The scoliosis was successfully treated with posterior instrumentation and fusion surgery. Neuromuscular scoliosis is rare following Guillain-Barré syndrome, with no previous reports associated with the Miller-Fisher variant that we are aware of. When evaluating patients post Guillain-Barré syndrome, structural spinal examination is essential to identify rare deformity that may need surgical correction.

  19. Local identifiability and sensitivity analysis of neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M M; Lemos, J M; Coito, A; Costa, B A; Wigren, T; Mendonça, T

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the local identifiability and sensitivity properties of two classes of Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis, when drug dose profiles like the ones commonly administered in the clinical practice are used as model inputs. The local parameter identifiability was assessed based on the singular value decomposition of the normalized sensitivity matrix. For the given input signal excitation, the results show an over-parameterization of the standard pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models. The same identifiability assessment was performed on recently proposed minimally parameterized parsimonious models for both the neuromuscular blockade and the depth of hypnosis. The results show that the majority of the model parameters are identifiable from the available input-output data. This indicates that any identification strategy based on the minimally parameterized parsimonious Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and for the depth of hypnosis is likely to be more successful than if standard models are used.

  20. Naturally occurring plant polyphenols as potential therapies for inherited neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Heidi R; Humphrey, Emma L; Morris, Glenn E

    2013-11-01

    There are several lines of laboratory-based evidence emerging to suggest that purified polyphenol compounds such as resveratrol, found naturally in red grapes, epigallocatechin galate from green tea and curcumin from turmeric, might be useful for the treatment of various inherited neuromuscular diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Here, we critically examine the scientific evidence related to the known molecular effects that these polyphenols have on different models of inherited neuromuscular disease, with particular attention to problems with the validity of in vitro evidence. We also present proteomic evidence that polyphenols have in vitro effects on cells related to metal ion chelation in cell-culture media. Although their precise mechanisms of action remain somewhat elusive, polyphenols could be an attractive approach to therapy for inherited neuromuscular disease, especially since they may be safer to use on young children, compared with some of the other drug candidates.

  1. Assessment of bone density in patients with scoliosis neuromuscular secondary to cerebral palsy

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    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mineral density in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective descriptive study in which, in addition to bone densitometry, the anthropometric data of the patients were assessed. As inclusion criterion we adopted patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, wheelchair users, aged between 10 and 20 years and with neuromuscular scoliosis. RESULTS: We evaluated 31 patients, 20 female, whose average age was 14.2 years. The mean bone density was -3.2 standard deviation (Z-score, with mean biceps circumference of 19.4 cm, calf circumference 18.6 cm and BMI of 13.6 kg/m². CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of osteoporosis in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

  2. Update on the approach of respiratory therapy in patients with neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Barreto Paula

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the role of physiotherapy in approaching neuromuscular disease (NMD, with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic aspects of respiratory therapy. Methods: A nonsystematic literature review covering the past twenty years, using the databases MEDLINE and LILACS through the following descriptors: neuromuscular diseases, physical therapy, vital capacity and respiratory failure. Results: The studies reviewed show the need to establish a routine periodic evaluation of respiratory function in order to introduce physical therapy measures relevant to each stage of the disease. The monitoring should include pulmonary function tests and specific techniques of chest physiotherapy, in order to avoid complications such as respiratory failure. Conclusion: The introduction of regular monitoring and preventive physiotherapy measures have helped to increase survival and improve quality of life of patients with neuromuscular diseases.

  3. Interpretation of electroneuromyographic studies in diseases of neuromuscular junction and myopathies

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    Mansukhani Khushnuma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroneuromyography (ENMG also called electrodiagnosis or at times simply (and erroneously electromyography (EMG, has been used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular and muscle diseases. It consists of tests done serially and assessed collectively, to arrive at a diagnosis of neuromuscular weakness. The test should be treated as an extension of the clinical examination and not a replacement. When done adequately ENMG is the only test which gives information about the function of the peripheral nervous system and hence co-relates well with the clinical signs. This article reviews the role of ENMG in the evaluation of neuromuscular and muscle disease. We hope this will meet the requirements of both practicing neurologists and dedicated electromyographers.

  4. Differential Alterations in Excitatory and Inhibitory Networks Involving Dentate Granule Cells Following Chronic Treatment with Distinct Classes of NMDAR Antagonists in Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    22. 155 Kwak YG, Navarro- Polanco RA, Grobaski T, Gallagher DJ, Tamkun MM (1999a) Phosphorylation is required for alteration of kv1.5 K(+) channel...Presynaptic failure of neuromuscular propagation in rats. J Physiol 149:1-22. Kwak YG, Navarro- Polanco RA, Grobaski T, Gallagher DJ, Tamkun MM (1999a

  5. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  6. Efeitos da facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva na estabilidade postural e risco de quedas em pacientes com sequela de acidente vascular encefálico: estudo piloto Efectos de la facilitación neuromuscular propioceptiva en la estabilidad postural y riesgo de caídas en pacientes con secuela de accidente vascular encefálico: estudio piloto Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in postural stability and risk of falls in patients with sequelae of stroke: pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Natália Noman de Lacerda; Érika Baptista Gomes; Hudson Azevedo Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    O controle do tronco é uma habilidade motora básica necessária para executar diversas tarefas funcionais, e é deficiente em pacientes que sofreram acidente vascular encefálico (AVE). Objetivo: Avaliar o efeito do método facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (PNF) na estabilidade postural e risco de quedas em pacientes com sequela de AVE. Metodologia: Foi realizado estudo de intervenção que consistiu em treinamento da estabilidade postural por meio de um protocolo fixo constituído por 5 exe...

  7. Hormonal and neuromuscular responses to mechanical vibration applied to upper extremity muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Di Giminiani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. METHODS: Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG, a low vibration group (LVG, or a control group (CG. A randomized double-blind, controlled-p