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Sample records for altered growth differentiation

  1. Exercise training alters DNA methylation patterns in genes related to muscle growth and differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzleiter, Timo; Jähnert, Markus; Schulze, Gunnar; Selbig, Joachim; Hallahan, Nicole; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-15

    The adaptive response of skeletal muscle to exercise training is tightly controlled and therefore requires transcriptional regulation. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism known to modulate gene expression, but its contribution to exercise-induced adaptations in skeletal muscle is not well studied. Here, we describe a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in muscle of trained mice (n = 3). Compared with sedentary controls, 2,762 genes exhibited differentially methylated CpGs (P 5%, coverage >10) in their putative promoter regions. Alignment with gene expression data (n = 6) revealed 200 genes with a negative correlation between methylation and expression changes in response to exercise training. The majority of these genes were related to muscle growth and differentiation, and a minor fraction involved in metabolic regulation. Among the candidates were genes that regulate the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (Plexin A2) as well as genes that participate in muscle hypertrophy (Igfbp4) and motor neuron innervation (Dok7). Interestingly, a transcription factor binding site enrichment study discovered significantly enriched occurrence of CpG methylation in the binding sites of the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin. These findings suggest that DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of muscle adaptation to regular exercise training.

  2. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-6 Alters Skeletal Muscle Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Doaa Aboalola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6, the main regulator of insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2, is a component of the stem cell niche in developing muscle cells. However, its role in muscle development has not been clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the role of IGFBP-6 in muscle commitment and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from the placenta. We showed that placental mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs have the ability to differentiate into muscle cells when exposed to a specific culture medium by expressing muscle markers Pax3/7, MyoD, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain in a stage-dependent manner with the ultimate formation of multinucleated fibers and losing pluripotency-associated markers, OCT4 and SOX2. The addition of IGFBP-6 significantly increased pluripotency-associated markers as well as muscle differentiation markers at earlier time points, but the latter decreased with time. On the other hand, silencing IGFBP-6 decreased both pluripotent and differentiation markers at early time points. The levels of these markers increased as IGFBP-6 levels were restored. These findings indicate that IGFBP-6 influences MSC pluripotency and myogenic differentiation, with more prominent effects observed at the beginning of the differentiation process before muscle commitment.

  3. Truncated DNMT3B isoform DNMT3B7 suppresses growth, induces differentiation, and alters DNA methylation in human neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ostler, Kelly R.; Yang, Qiwei; Looney, Timothy J.; Li ZHANG; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Tian, Yufeng; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stacey L. Raimondi; DeMaio, Jessica G.; Salwen, Helen R.; Gu, Song; Chlenski, Alexandre; Naranjo, Arlene; Gill, Amy; Peddinti, Radhika

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes in pediatric neuroblastoma may contribute to the aggressive pathophysiology of this disease, but little is known about the basis for such changes. In this study, we examined a role for the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, in particular, the truncated isoform DNMT3B7 which is generated frequently in cancer. To investigate if aberrant DNMT3B transcripts alter DNA methylation, gene expression, and phenotypic character in neuroblastoma, we measured DNMT3B expression in primary tum...

  4. Altering the expression of two chitin synthase genes differentially affects the growth and morphology of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Christian; Hjort, C.M.; Hansen, K.

    2002-01-01

    , analysis of the cell-wall composition and growth in the presence of Calcofluor white (CFW). The chsB disrupted strain and the uninduced P-niiA,-ChsB strain exhibited hyperbranching, they had a lower level of conidiation than the wild-type and were sensitive to CFW at 50 mg l(-1). When chsB transcription...

  5. Proliferative response of fibroblasts expressing internalization-deficient epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors is altered via differential EGF depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C C; Wells, A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1994-01-01

    We describe experiments comparing the proliferation responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) by NR6 fibroblasts expressing genetically engineered epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). These cells present either wild-type (WT) EGFR or a cytoplasmic domain-truncated (c'973) EGFR that exhibits a decreased ligand-induced internalization rate constant. In two distinct in vitro proliferation assays, with or without medium replenishment, we measured the specific cell proliferation rate constants and EGF depletion kinetics for both WT and c'973 cells. When EGF depletion is minimized by replenishment, the EGF concentration dependencies of the two cell types are similar, whereas when EGF depletion is not prevented, maximal proliferation of WT cells requires an initial EGF concentration that is approximately 10x that required by c'973 cells. However, when EGF depletion is accounted for, the dependencies of growth rate for the two cell types on the current EGF concentration in both assays are essentially identical. Our results demonstrate that diminished depletion of EGF from the extracellular medium is a major reason for increased mitogenic sensitivity to EGF by cells possessing internalization-deficient receptors.

  6. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

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    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  7. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Espeso, D R; Einarsson, B

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Foppl-Von Karman equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to repr...

  8. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T

    1986-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis...

  9. Alterations in bone morphogenetic protein 15, growth differentiation factor 9, and gene expression in granulosa cells in preovulatory follicles of dairy cows given porcine LH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzi, Amir; Colazo, Marcos Germán; Ambrose, Divakar Justus

    2016-04-15

    In a previous work, using porcine LH (pLH) in lieu of GnRH for synchronizing ovulation in dairy cows improved pregnancy rates without increasing plasma progesterone concentrations after ovulation. The LH profile is known to remain elevated above basal concentrations (≥1 ng/mL) for up to 20 hours in pLH-treated cows compared to less than 6 hours in GnRH-treated cows. Because LH triggers a cascade of signaling networks in the preovulatory follicle to promote final maturation and support oocyte competence, we hypothesized that dissimilar LH profiles will differentially regulate the intrafollicular factors and expression of downstream genes associated with improved oocyte competence. Specific objectives were to determine differences in the abundance of oocyte-secreted factors in the preovulatory follicular fluid and target genes in granulosa cells associated with oocyte competence, in response to exogenous porcine LH or GnRH-induced endogenous bovine LH exposure, in dairy cows. Follicular contents were aspirated by a transvaginal ultrasound-guided procedure from the preovulatory follicle of cyclic, nonlactating Holstein cows 21 ± 1 hour after administration of either pLH (25-mg) or GnRH (100-μg). Mature forms of bone morphogenetic protein 15, growth differentiation factor 9, and transforming growth factorβ1 were approximately 2-fold more abundant in pLH-treated cows which were exposed to an extended, low LH profile, than in GnRH-treated cows that had a short, high LH profile. The relative abundance of messenger RNA for cyclooxygenase-2, LH receptor, and progesterone receptor in granulosa cells, was about two-, eight-, and two-fold higher, respectively, in cows subjected to pLH than GnRH treatment. We infer that the improved pregnancy rate after pLH-induced ovulation reported previously, occurred through greater activation of intrafollicular transforming growth factor-β1 superfamily members, as these proteins promote cumulus expansion and oocyte competence.

  10. Tribulus terrestris Alters the Expression of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in Rabbit Ovaries of Mothers and F1 Female Offspring.

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    Desislava Abadjieva

    Full Text Available Although previous research has demonstrated the key role of the oocyte-derived factors, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP 15 and growth differentiation factor (GDF 9, in follicular development and ovulation, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of external factors, which females are exposed to during folliculogenesis, on their expression. The present study investigated the effect of the aphrodisiac Tribulus terrestris on the GDF9 and BMP15 expression in the oocytes and cumulus cells at mRNA and protein levels during folliculogenesis in two generations of female rabbits. The experiment was conducted with 28 New Zealand rabbits. Only the diet of the experimental mothers group was supplemented with a dry extract of T. terrestris for the 45 days prior to insemination. The expression of BMP15 and GDF9 genes in the oocytes and cumulus cells of mothers and F1 female offspring was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The localization of the GDF9 and BMP15 proteins in the ovary tissues was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. The BMP15 and GDF9 transcripts were detected in the oocytes and cumulus cells of rabbits from all groups. T. terrestris caused a decrease in the BMP15 mRNA level in the oocytes and an increase in the cumulus cells. The GDF9 mRNA level increased significantly in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The downregulated expression of BMP15 in the treated mothers' oocytes was inherited in the F1 female offspring born to treated mothers. BMP15 and GDF9 show a clearly expressed sensitivity to the bioactive compounds of T. terrestris.

  11. Tribulus terrestris Alters the Expression of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in Rabbit Ovaries of Mothers and F1 Female Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadjieva, Desislava; Kistanova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated the key role of the oocyte-derived factors, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 15 and growth differentiation factor (GDF) 9, in follicular development and ovulation, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of external factors, which females are exposed to during folliculogenesis, on their expression. The present study investigated the effect of the aphrodisiac Tribulus terrestris on the GDF9 and BMP15 expression in the oocytes and cumulus cells at mRNA and protein levels during folliculogenesis in two generations of female rabbits. The experiment was conducted with 28 New Zealand rabbits. Only the diet of the experimental mothers group was supplemented with a dry extract of T. terrestris for the 45 days prior to insemination. The expression of BMP15 and GDF9 genes in the oocytes and cumulus cells of mothers and F1 female offspring was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The localization of the GDF9 and BMP15 proteins in the ovary tissues was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. The BMP15 and GDF9 transcripts were detected in the oocytes and cumulus cells of rabbits from all groups. T. terrestris caused a decrease in the BMP15 mRNA level in the oocytes and an increase in the cumulus cells. The GDF9 mRNA level increased significantly in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The downregulated expression of BMP15 in the treated mothers' oocytes was inherited in the F1 female offspring born to treated mothers. BMP15 and GDF9 show a clearly expressed sensitivity to the bioactive compounds of T. terrestris.

  12. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

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    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of fetal growth abnormalities in

  13. Exposure to Altered Gravity During Specific Developmental Periods Differentially Affects Growth, Development, the Cerebellum and Motor Functions in Male and Female Rats.

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    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  14. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  15. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

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    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  16. Trophoblast differentiation, fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia.

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    Huppertz, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    The number of hypotheses trying to decipher the etiologies of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction (FGR) is still increasing. However, for preeclampsia the actual knowledge we have is that the placenta is a prerequisite for the development of the syndrome. The recent years have seen a shift in understanding of the causes of preeclampsia from mostly focusing on the extravillous trophoblast towards the dysregulation of villous trophoblast development and maintenance. It seems as if a failure of the villous syncytiotrophoblast differentiation results in abnormal release of non-apoptotic fragments into maternal blood. In preeclampsia such necrotic or aponecrotic fragments can be found in maternal blood systemically and seem to be causative in the development of the inflammatory response of the mother. In cases with fetal growth restriction (FGR) extravillous trophoblast fails to adequately transform uterine spiral arteries. However, in FGR cases abnormal development of villous cytotrophoblast may have an impact on fetal nutrition without the induction of an inflammatory response of the mother. It is still unclear why the villous trophoblast fails to achieve an adequate turnover both in preeclampsia and in FGR. However, the detection of new biomarkers for preeclampsia such as placental protein 13 (PP13) has helped in clarifying the issue of when the syndrome starts to develop. PP13 levels in maternal serum are significantly altered already at six to seven weeks of gestation in women subsequently developing preeclampsia. Thus, there needs to be a very early alteration of villous development in such placentas. Herein the changes in villous trophoblast in preeclampsia and FGR are compared and differences between both scenarios are presented.

  17. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley L Gallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a glass wastebasket. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction.

  18. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kimberley L; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O; Santos, Guaciara M

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a "glass wastebasket." Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction.

  19. Genetic alterations in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC).It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer.

  20. Genetic Alterations in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC). It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer. PMID:22654560

  1. Surviving endoplasmic reticulum stress is coupled to altered chondrocyte differentiation and function.

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    Kwok Yeung Tsang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In protein folding and secretion disorders, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling (ERSS protects cells, alleviating stress that would otherwise trigger apoptosis. Whether the stress-surviving cells resume normal function is not known. We studied the in vivo impact of ER stress in terminally differentiating hypertrophic chondrocytes (HCs during endochondral bone formation. In transgenic mice expressing mutant collagen X as a consequence of a 13-base pair deletion in Col10a1 (13del, misfolded alpha1(X chains accumulate in HCs and elicit ERSS. Histological and gene expression analyses showed that these chondrocytes survived ER stress, but terminal differentiation is interrupted, and endochondral bone formation is delayed, producing a chondrodysplasia phenotype. This altered differentiation involves cell-cycle re-entry, the re-expression of genes characteristic of a prehypertrophic-like state, and is cell-autonomous. Concomitantly, expression of Col10a1 and 13del mRNAs are reduced, and ER stress is alleviated. ERSS, abnormal chondrocyte differentiation, and altered growth plate architecture also occur in mice expressing mutant collagen II and aggrecan. Alteration of the differentiation program in chondrocytes expressing unfolded or misfolded proteins may be part of an adaptive response that facilitates survival and recovery from the ensuing ER stress. However, the altered differentiation disrupts the highly coordinated events of endochondral ossification culminating in chondrodysplasia.

  2. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

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    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  3. Anticavitation and Differential Growth in Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, Derek E.

    2010-07-22

    Elastic anticavitation is the phenomenon of a void in an elastic solid collapsing on itself. Under the action of mechanical loading alone typical materials do not admit anticavitation. We study the possibility of anticavitation as a consequence of an imposed differential growth. Working in the geometry of a spherical shell, we seek radial growth functions which cause the shell to deform to a solid sphere. It is shown, surprisingly, that most material models do not admit full anticavitation, even when infinite growth or resorption is imposed at the inner surface of the shell. However, void collapse can occur in a limiting sense when radial and circumferential growth are properly balanced. Growth functions which diverge or vanish at a point arise naturally in a cumulative growth process. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2017-04-01

    Ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can accumulate in humans where they might influence differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is one of the underlying mechanisms by which POPs affect adipocyte differentiation, and to what extent DNA methylation can be related to gene transcription. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in two human cell models with continuous exposure to different POPs throughout differentiation. From the seven tested POPs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) decreased lipid accumulation, while tributyltin (TBT) increased lipid accumulation. In human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), TCDD and TBT induced opposite gene expression profiles, whereas after PFOS exposure gene expression remained relatively stable. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that all three POPs affected DNA methylation patterns in adipogenic and other genes, possibly related to the phenotypic outcome, but without concomitant gene expression changes. Differential methylation was predominantly detected in intergenic regions, where the biological relevance of alterations in DNA methylation is unclear. This study demonstrates that POPs, at environmentally relevant levels, are able to induce differential DNA methylation in human differentiating adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Wageningen University. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential growth triggers mechanical feedback that elevates Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanwang; Heemskerk, Idse; Ibar, Consuelo; Shraiman, Boris I; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2016-10-26

    Mechanical stress can influence cell proliferation in vitro, but whether it makes a significant contribution to growth control in vivo, and how it is modulated and experienced by cells within developing tissues, has remained unclear. Here we report that differential growth reduces cytoskeletal tension along cell junctions within faster-growing cells. We propose a theoretical model to explain the observed reduction of tension within faster-growing clones, supporting it by computer simulations based on a generalized vertex model. This reduced tension modulates a biomechanical Hippo pathway, decreasing recruitment of Ajuba LIM protein and the Hippo pathway kinase Warts, and decreasing the activity of the growth-promoting transcription factor Yorkie. These observations provide a specific mechanism for a mechanical feedback that contributes to evenly distributed growth, and we show that genetically suppressing mechanical feedback alters patterns of cell proliferation in the developing Drosophila wing. By providing experimental support for the induction of mechanical stress by differential growth, and a molecular mechanism linking this stress to the regulation of growth in developing organs, our results confirm and extend the mechanical feedback hypothesis.

  6. Dysplastic histogenesis of cartilage growth plate by alteration of sulphation pathway: a transgenic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Casasco, Andrea; Casasco, Marco; Riva, Federica; Necchi, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulphate transporter (dtdst) gene causes different forms of chondrodysplasia in the human. The generation of a knock-in mouse strain with a mutation in dtdst gene provides the basis to study developmental dynamics in the epiphyseal growth plate and long bone growth after impairment of the sulphate pathway. Our microscopical and histochemical data demonstrate that dtdst gene impairment deeply affects tissue organization, matrix structure, and cell differentiation in the epiphyseal growth plate. In mutant animals, the height of the growth plate was significantly reduced, according to a concomitant decrease in cell density and proliferation. Although the pathway of chondrocyte differentiation seemed complete, alteration in cell morphology compared to normal counterparts was detected. In the extracellular matrix, it we observed a dramatic decrease in sulphated proteoglycans, alterations in the organization of type II and type X collagen fibers, and premature onset of mineralization. These data confirm the crucial role of sulphate pathway in proteoglycan biochemistry and suggest that a disarrangement of the extracellular matrix may be responsible for the development of dtdts cartilage dysplasia. Moreover, we corroborated the concept that proteoglycans not only are structural components of the cartilage architecture, but also play a dynamic role in the regulation of chondrocyte growth and differentiation.

  7. Differential Geometric Analysis of Alterations in MH α-Helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, Birgit; Havlicek, Hans; Todoric, Jelena; Höllrigl-Binder, Sonja; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Knapp, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells present processed peptides via their major histocompatibility (MH) complex to the T cell receptors (TRs) of T cells. If a peptide is immunogenic, a signaling cascade can be triggered within the T cell. However, the binding of different peptides and/or different TRs to MH is also known to influence the spatial arrangement of the MH α-helices which could itself be an additional level of T cell regulation. In this study, we introduce a new methodology based on differential geometric parameters to describe MH deformations in a detailed and comparable way. For this purpose, we represent MH α-helices by curves. On the basis of these curves, we calculate in a first step the curvature and torsion to describe each α-helix independently. In a second step, we calculate the distribution parameter and the conical curvature of the ruled surface to describe the relative orientation of the two α-helices. On the basis of four different test sets, we show how these differential geometric parameters can be used to describe changes in the spatial arrangement of the MH α-helices for different biological challenges. In the first test set, we illustrate on the basis of all available crystal structures for (TR)/pMH complexes how the binding of TRs influences the MH helices. In the second test set, we show a cross evaluation of different MH alleles with the same peptide and the same MH allele with different peptides. In the third test set, we present the spatial effects of different TRs on the same peptide/MH complex. In the fourth test set, we illustrate how a severe conformational change in an α-helix can be described quantitatively. Taken together, we provide a novel structural methodology to numerically describe subtle and severe alterations in MH α-helices for a broad range of applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23703160

  8. Altered proliferation and differentiation properties of primary mammary epithelial cells from BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga, Laura N; Tung, Nadine M; Troyan, Susan L; Bostina, Mihnea; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Fountzilas, Helena; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf A; Lee, Bernard T; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2009-02-15

    Female BRCA1 mutation carriers have a nearly 80% probability of developing breast cancer during their life-time. We hypothesized that the breast epithelium at risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers harbors mammary epithelial cells (MEC) with altered proliferation and differentiation properties. Using a three-dimensional culture technique to grow MECs ex vivo, we found that the ability to form colonies, an indication of clonality, was restricted to the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1-positive fraction in MECs but not in HCC1937 BRCA1-mutant cancer cells. Primary MECs from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 9) had a 28% greater ability for clonal growth compared with normal controls (n = 6; P = 0.006), and their colonies were significantly larger. Colonies in controls and BRCA1 mutation carriers stained positive for BRCA1 by immunohistochemistry, and 79% of the examined single colonies from BRCA1 carriers retained heterozygosity for BRCA1 (ROH). Colonies from BRCA1 mutation carriers frequently showed high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (71% EGFR positive versus 44% in controls) and were negative for estrogen receptor (ERalpha; 32% ER negative, 44% mixed, 24% ER positive versus 90% ER positive in controls). Expression of CK14 and p63 were not significantly different. Microarray studies revealed that colonies from BRCA1-mutant PMECs anticipate expression profiles found in BRCA1-related tumors, and that the EGFR pathway is up-regulated. We conclude that BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to an increased ability for clonal growth and proliferation in the PMECs of BRCA1 mutation carriers, possibly as a result of EGFR pathway activation. These altered growth and differentiation properties may render BRCA1-mutant PMECs vulnerable to transformation and predispose to the development of ER-negative, EGFR-positive breast cancers.

  9. Cellular and molecular drivers of differential organ growth: insights from the limbs of Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Anna; Doroba, Carolyn; Maier, Jennifer A; Cohen, Lorna; VandeBerg, John; Sears, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is "how is growth differentially regulated during development to produce organs of particular sizes?" We used a new model system for the study of differential organ growth, the limbs of the opossum (Monodelphis domestica), to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of differential organ growth in mammals. Opossum forelimbs grow much faster than hindlimbs, making opossum limbs an exceptional system with which to study differential growth. We first used the great differences in opossum forelimb and hindlimb growth to identify cellular processes and molecular signals that underlie differential limb growth. We then used organ culture and pharmacological addition of FGF ligands and inhibitors to test the role of the Fgf/Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway in driving these cellular processes. We found that molecular signals from within the limb drive differences in cell proliferation that contribute to the differential growth of the forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums. We also found that alterations in the Fgf/MAPK pathway can generate differences in cell proliferation that mirror those observed between wild-type forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums and that manipulation of Fgf/MAPK signaling affects downstream focal adhesion-extracellular matrix (FA-ECM) and Wnt signaling in opossum limbs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionary changes in the Fgf/MAPK pathway could help drive the observed differences in cell behaviors and growth in opossum forelimb and hindlimbs.

  10. Gravitropism of cucumber hypocotyls: biophysical mechanism of altered growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The biophysical basis for the changes in cell elongation rate during gravitropism was examined in aetiolated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyls. Bulk osmotic pressures on the two sides of the stem and in the epidermal cells were not altered during the early time course of gravitropism. By the pressure-probe technique, a small increase in turgor (0.3 bar, 30 kPa) was detected on the upper (inhibited) side, whereas there was a negligible decrease in turgor on the lower (stimulated) side. These small changes in turgor and water potential appeared to be indirect, passive consequences of the altered growth and the small resistance for water movement from the xylem, and indicated that the change in growth was principally due to changes in wall properties. The results indicate that the hydraulic conductance of the water-transport pathway was large (.25 h-1 bar-1) and the water potential difference supporting cell expansion was no greater than 0.3 bar (30 kPa). From pressure-block experiments, it appeared that upon gravitropic stimulation (1) the yield threshold of the lower half of the stem did not decrease and (2) the wall on the upper side of the stem was not made more rigid by a cross-linking process. Mechanical measurements of the stress/strain properties of the walls showed that the initial development of gravitropism did not involve an alteration of the mechanical behaviour of the isolated walls. Thus, gravitropism in cucumber hypocotyls occurs principally by an alteration of the wall relaxation process, without a necessary change in wall mechanical properties.

  11. Periconceptional growth hormone treatment alters fetal growth and development in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J M; Wilmoth, T A; Wilson, M E

    2010-05-01

    Research in the area of fetal programming has focused on intrauterine growth restriction. Few studies have attempted to examine programming mechanisms that ultimately lead to lambs with a greater potential for postnatal growth. We previously demonstrated that treatment of ewes with GH at the time of breeding led to an increase in birth weight. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of a single injection of sustained-release GH given during the periconceptional period on fetal growth and development and to determine if the GH axis would be altered in these offspring. Estrus was synchronized using 2 injections of PGF(2alpha); at the time of the second injection, ewes assigned to treatment were also given an injection of sustained-release GH. A maternal jugular vein sample was taken weekly to analyze IGF-I as a proxy for GH to estimate the duration of the treatment effect. In ewes treated with GH, IGF-I increased (P growth and development. Lambs born to ewes treated with GH were larger at birth and had altered organ development, which may indicate that early maternal GH treatment may lead to permanent changes in the developing fetus. The ewe lambs maintained their growth performance to at least 100 d of postnatal life and appeared to have an altered GH axis, as demonstrated by the altered response to GHRH.

  12. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, van den Myrthe; Murk, Tinka; Steegenga, Wilma; Gils-Kok, van Dieuwertje

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling was performed in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiated into adipocytes (day 10) while being continuously exposed to either one of three different persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely TCDD, PFOS, and TBT. The Illumina Infinium 450K Human DNA

  13. Neuronal growth and differentiation on biodegradable membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sabrina; Piscioneri, Antonella; Messina, Antonietta; Salerno, Simona; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    Semipermeable polymeric membranes with appropriate morphological, physicochemical and transport properties are relevant to inducing neural regeneration. We developed novel biodegradable membranes to support neuronal differentiation. In particular, we developed chitosan, polycaprolactone and polyurethane flat membranes and a biosynthetic blend between polycaprolactone and polyurethane by phase-inversion techniques. The biodegradable membranes were characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physicochemical, mechanical and degradation properties. We investigated the efficacy of these different membranes to promote the adhesion and differentiation of neuronal cells. We employed as model cell system the human neuroblastoma cell line SHSY5Y, which is a well-established system for studying neuronal differentiation. The investigation of viability and specific neuronal marker expression allowed assessment that the correct neuronal differentiation and the formation of neuronal network had taken place in vitro in the cells seeded on different biodegradable membranes. Overall, this study provides evidence that neural cell responses depend on the nature of the biodegradable polymer used to form the membranes, as well as on the dissolution, hydrophilic and, above all, mechanical membrane properties. PCL-PU membranes exhibit mechanical properties that improve neurite outgrowth and the expression of specific neuronal markers.

  14. Identification of Pathways Mediating Growth Differentiation Factor5-Induced Tenogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sik-Loo Tan

    Full Text Available To date, the molecular signalling mechanisms which regulate growth factors-induced MSCs tenogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. Therefore, a study to determine the global gene expression profile of tenogenic differentiation in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs using growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5 was conducted. Microarray analyses were conducted on hMSCs cultures supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GDF5 and compared to undifferentiated hMSCs and adult tenocytes. Results of QuantiGene® Plex assay support the use and interpretation of the inferred gene expression profiles and pathways information. From the 27,216 genes assessed, 873 genes (3.21% of the overall human transcriptome were significantly altered during the tenogenic differentiation process (corrected p<0.05. The genes identified as potentially associated with tenogenic differentiation were ARHGAP29, CCL2, integrin alpha 8 and neurofilament medium polypeptides. These genes, were mainly associated with cytoskeleton reorganization (stress fibers formation signaling. Pathway analysis demonstrated the potential molecular pathways involved in tenogenic differentiation were: cytoskeleton reorganization related i.e. keratin filament signaling and activin A signaling; cell adhesion related i.e. chemokine and adhesion signaling; and extracellular matrix related i.e. arachidonic acid production signaling. Further investigation using atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated apparent cytoskeleton reorganization in GDF5-induced hMSCs suggesting that cytoskeleton reorganization signaling is an important event involved in tenogenic differentiation. Besides, a reduced nucleostemin expression observed suggested a lower cell proliferation rate in hMSCs undergoing tenogenic differentiation. Understanding and elucidating the tenogenic differentiation signalling pathways are important for future optimization of tenogenic hMSCs for functional tendon cell

  15. Choroidal thickness predicts ocular growth in normal chicks but not in eyes with experimentally altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickla, Debora L; Totonelly, Kristen

    2015-11-01

    In hatchling chicks, the thickness of the choroid is quite variable. It has been postulated that thickness per se or the changes occurring during early life might play a causal role in the regulation of ocular growth. We tested this notion by measuring ocular dimensions in several experimental conditions that alter ocular growth and in the fellow eyes. Chicks aged 12 to 14 days wore monocular lenses or diffusers (+10 D, n = 23; -10 D, n = 16; diffusers, n = 16) for four to five days. Fellow untreated eyes served as controls. A separate group of completely untreated birds aged eight days were also tested (n = 12). We tested two drugs known to alter ocular growth. The dopaminergic agonist quinpirole was injected daily for five days into eyes wearing negative lenses (n = 47). The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine was injected one time into normal eyes (n = 27). All eyes were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography at the start and end of the experiment. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used in all analyses. Choroidal thickness predicted ocular growth rates in normal eyes: eyes with thinner choroids grew faster than those with thicker choroids (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between initial thickness and the change in thickness (p = 0.0353). By contrast, eyes wearing lenses or diffusers did not show a correlation between initial thickness and growth rate. For lens-wearing eyes injected with quinpirole, which slowed growth, initial choroidal thickness predicted subsequent growth rate (p = 0.0126), similar to normal eyes. This was not so for oxotremorine, which stimulated growth. The loss of the association between choroidal thickness and subsequent growth rate in eyes with experimentally altered growth implies an uncoupling of the choroidal response from the visual regulation of ocular growth. The negative correlation between initial thickness and ocular growth in eyes injected with

  16. Endometrial metaplasias and reactive changes: a spectrum of altered differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, Alina; Preda, Ovidiu; Nogales, Francisco F

    2011-02-01

    Endometrial metaplasias and changes (EMCs) are conditions frequently overlooked and misdiagnosed. The aim of this review is to update current issues and provide a classification with a practical clinicopathological approach. Hormonal or irritative stimuli are the main inducing factors of EMCs, although some metaplasias have a mutational origin. EMCs vary from reactive, degenerative lesions to those able to associate with malignancy or those having a preneoplastic potential. The most common types of EMCs are ciliated tubal metaplasia (CTM) and mucinous metaplasia (MM), which occur in simple and complex glands, and possibly these architectural changes hold the same prognostic significance as they do in hyperplastic endometrioid lesions. Immunohistochemically, CTM is positive for LhS28, bcl-2, PAX2 and p16(INK4A). Complex CTM is likely to be a precursor of ciliated endometrioid-type carcinomas. MMs should be evaluated architecturally, taking into account that their atypicality is minimal. The differentiation between complex MM and mucinous carcinoma may be extremely difficult. Surface complex, papillary MM in endometrial polyps can be considered as benign. Intestinal-type endometrial MM is rare and its presence should prompt further investigation of associated lesions in the endocervix. Endometrial squamous metaplasia (ESS) is often linked to chronic irritative situations. It should be differentiated from secondary involvement by a human papilomavirus-related cervical lesion. Morular metaplasia is a mutational phenomenon with a distinct phenotype that helps to differentiate it from ESS. Morules are benign, hormonally inert structures that are often markers of complex endometrioid glandular architecture, and they are associated with an attenuated malignancy. Endometrial reactive changes are commonly associated with desquamation or hormonal imbalance. The frequent, p16(INK4A) positive, benign surface papillary syncytial change may be misdiagnosed, in some cases, as

  17. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Population Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of population growth, specifically logistic growth models and two-species competition models. We discuss student-evolved strategies and offer "Mathematica" code for a gradient search approach. We use historical (1930s) data from microbial studies of the Russian biologist,…

  18. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Verónica; Díaz-Martínez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7 μM. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms.

  19. Blood vessels restrain pancreas branching, differentiation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, Judith; Ilovich, Ohad; Lazarus, Alon; Klochendler, Agnes; Ziv, Oren; Werman, Roni; Hija, Ayat; Cleaver, Ondine; Mishani, Eyal; Keshet, Eli; Dor, Yuval

    2011-11-01

    How organ size and form are controlled during development is a major question in biology. Blood vessels have been shown to be essential for early development of the liver and pancreas, and are fundamental to normal and pathological tissue growth. Here, we report that, surprisingly, non-nutritional signals from blood vessels act to restrain pancreas growth. Elimination of endothelial cells increases the size of embryonic pancreatic buds. Conversely, VEGF-induced hypervascularization decreases pancreas size. The growth phenotype results from vascular restriction of pancreatic tip cell formation, lateral branching and differentiation of the pancreatic epithelium into endocrine and acinar cells. The effects are seen both in vivo and ex vivo, indicating a perfusion-independent mechanism. Thus, the vasculature controls pancreas morphogenesis and growth by reducing branching and differentiation of primitive epithelial cells.

  20. Prenatal exposure to urban air nanoparticles in mice causes altered neuronal differentiation and depression-like responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Davis

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that excessive exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during pregnancy may increase the vulnerability to neurodevelopmental alterations that underlie a broad array of neuropsychiatric disorders. We present a mouse model for prenatal exposure to urban freeway nanoparticulate matter (nPM. In prior studies, we developed a model for adult rodent exposure to re-aerosolized urban nPM which caused inflammatory brain responses with altered neuronal glutamatergic functions. nPMs are collected continuously for one month from a local freeway and stored as an aqueous suspension, prior to re-aerosolization for exposure of mice under controlled dose and duration. This paradigm was used for a pilot study of prenatal nPM impact on neonatal neurons and adult behaviors. Adult C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to re-aerosolized nPM (350 µg/m(3 or control filtered ambient air for 10 weeks (3×5 hour exposures per week, encompassing gestation and oocyte maturation prior to mating. Prenatal nPM did not alter litter size, pup weight, or postnatal growth. Neonatal cerebral cortex neurons at 24 hours in vitro showed impaired differentiation, with 50% reduction of stage 3 neurons with long neurites and correspondingly more undifferentiated neurons at Stages 0 and 1. Neuron number after 24 hours of culture was not altered by prenatal nPM exposure. Addition of exogenous nPM (2 µg/ml to the cultures impaired pyramidal neuron Stage 3 differentiation by 60%. Adult males showed increased depression-like responses in the tail-suspension test, but not anxiety-related behaviors. These pilot data suggest that prenatal exposure to nPM can alter neuronal differentiation with gender-specific behavioral sequelae that may be relevant to human prenatal exposure to urban vehicular aerosols.

  1. Differential model of macroeconomic growth with endogenic cyclicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail I. Geraskin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to elaborate a mathematical model of economic growth taking into account the cyclical nature of macroeconomic dynamics with the model parameters based on the Russian economy statistics. Methods economic and mathematical modeling system analysis regression factor analysis econometric time series analysis. Results the article states that under unstable economic growth in Russia forecasting of strategic prospects of the Russian economy is one of the topical directions of scientific studies. Furthermore construction of predictive models should be based on multiple factors taking into account such basic concepts as the neoKeynesian HarrodDomar model Ramsey ndash Cass ndash Koopmans model S. V. Dubovskiyrsquos concept as well as the neoclassical growth model by R. Solow. They served as the basis for developing a multifactor differential economic growth model which is a modification of the neoclassical growth model by R. Solow taking into account the laborsaving and capitalsaving forms of scientifictechnical progress and the Keynesian concept of investment. The model parameters are determined based on the dynamics of actual GDP employment fixed assets and investments in fixed assets for 19652016 in Russia on the basis of official statistics. The generalized model showed the presence of longwave fluctuations that are not detected during the individual periods modeling. The cyclical nature of macroeconomic dynamics with a period of 54 years was found which corresponds to the parameters of long waves by N. D. Kondratiev. Basing on the model the macroeconomic growth forecast was generated which shows that after 2020 the increase of scientifictechnical progress will be negative. Scientific novelty a model is proposed of the scientifictechnical progress indicator showing the growth rate of the capital productivity ratio to the saving rate a differential model of macroeconomic growth is obtained which endogenously takes cyclicity into account

  2. Second Order Backward Stochastic Differential Equations with Quadratic Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Dylan, Possamai

    2012-01-01

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of a solution for one-dimensionnal second order backward stochastic differential equations introduced by Soner, Touzi and Zhang (2010), with a bounded terminal condition and a generator which is continuous with quadratic growth in z. We also prove a Feyman-Kac formula and a probabilistic representation for fully nonlinear PDEs in this setting.

  3. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  4. Growth-related alterations during liver carcinogenesis: Effect of promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seglen, P.O.; Gerlyng, P. (Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    1990-08-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine labeling of DNA, binuclearity counting, and flow cytometric analysis of isolated hepatocytes and hepatocyte nuclei has been used to assess heptocellular growth patterns related to liver carcinogenesis. Three growth patterns can be distinguished. Mononucleating growth is observed during liver regeneration and after treatment with the tumor promoter 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and its analogue 4-AAF. In this growth mode binucleation does not occur, resulting in a decrease in the fraction of binucleated cells. Binucleating growth is observed during normal liver development and after treatment with compounds such as phenobarbital, characterized by progressive polyploidization and maintenance of a binucleated cell fraction. Diploid growth is the growth pattern of neoplastic liver hepatocytes. Most of the cells in neoplastic lesions (foci, nodules, and carcinomas) are diploid, in contrast to the normal liver. Diploid tumor cells have a much higher proliferative activity than tetraploid tumor cells, suggesting that the latter may posses a limited growth potential that makes abrogation of binucleation proliferatively advantageous.

  5. MicroRNA and DNA methylation alterations mediating retinoic acid induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Raymond L; Foley, Niamh H; Bray, Isabella M; Das, Sudipto; Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-10-01

    Many neuroblastoma cell lines can be induced to differentiate into a mature neuronal cell type with retinoic acid and other compounds, providing an important model system for elucidating signalling pathways involved in this highly complex process. Recently, it has become apparent that miRNAs, which act as regulators of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, are differentially expressed in differentiating cells and play important roles governing many aspects of this process. This includes the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases that cause the de-methylation and transcriptional activation of numerous protein coding gene sequences. The purpose of this article is to review involvement of miRNAs and DNA methylation alterations in the process of neuroblastoma cell differentiation. A thorough understanding of miRNA and genetic pathways regulating neuroblastoma cell differentiation potentially could lead to targeted therapies for this disease.

  6. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF® came recently into the physicians’ focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiation status of skin wounds in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the expression of early (keratin 1 and keratin 10 and late (transglutaminase-1 and involucrin differentiation markers. PRGF treatment of primary human keratinocytes decreased keratin 1 and keratin 10 gene expression but induced involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression in an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR- dependent manner. In concordance with these results, microscopic analyses revealed that PRGF-treated human keratinocytes displayed morphological features typical of keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In vivo treatment of artificial human wounds with Vivostat PRF revealed a significant induction of involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression. Together, our results indicate that PRGF and Vivostat PRF induce terminal differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. This potential mechanism may contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of hard-to-heal wounds with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates in vivo.

  7. Alterations of mineral elements in osteoblast during differentiation under hypo, moderate and high static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Static magnetic fields (SMFs) can enhance the ability of bone formation by osteoblast and is a potential physical therapy to bone disorders and the maintenance of bone health. But, the mechanism is not clear yet. Certain mineral elements including macro and trace elements are essential for normal bone metabolism. Deficiency of these elements can cause severe bone disorders including osteoporosis. However, there are few reports regarding the role of mineral elements in the regulation of bone formation under SMFs. In this study, hypomagnetic field (HyMF) of 500 nT, moderate SMF (MMF) of 0.2 T, and high SMF (HiMF) of 16 T were used to investigate the effects of SMFs on mineral element (calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc) alteration of MC3T3-E1 cells during osteoblast mineralization. The results showed that osteoblasts in differentiation accumulated more mineral elements than non-differentiated cell cultures. Furthermore, HyMF reduced osteoblast differentiation but did not affect mineral elements levels compared with control of geomagnetic field. MMF decreased osteoblast differentiation with elevated iron content. HiMF enhanced osteoblast differentiation and increased all the mineral contents except copper. It is suggested that the altered potential of osteoblast differentiation under SMFs may partially due to the involvement of different mineral elements.

  8. The integration of cell division, growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Hirofumi; Schnittger, Arp

    2010-02-01

    The development of a multicellular organism such as a flowering plant relies on the patterned control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Research in the recent years has revealed that the control of cell-cycle progression and growth in plants is distinct from the regulation found in yeast or metazoans. Understanding these plant-specific regulators and networks, in which they act, is key for the understanding of plant development and is of current global importance as a basis for breeding of energy crops as well as the breeding of plants adapted for changing environmental conditions. However, the production of cells and their specification and differentiation overlap in time and space and build an intricate interrelationship of dependencies and feedback loops. In this network, the developmental context and the generation of specific cell types and tissues are often decisive. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transforming growth factor-β and smooth muscle differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor(TGF)-β family members are multifunctional cytokines regulating diverse cel- lular functions such as growth,adhesion,migration, apoptosis,and differentiation.TGF-βs elicit their effects via specific typeⅠand typeⅡserine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. Knockout mouse models for the different components of the TGF-β signaling pathway have revealed their critical roles in smooth muscle cell(SMC)differentia- tion.Genetic studies in humans have linked mutations in these signaling components to specific cardiovascular disorders such as aorta aneurysm and congenital heart diseases due to SMC defects.In this review,the current understanding of TGF-β function in SMC differentiation is highlighted,and the role of TGF-βsignaling in SMC- related diseases is discussed.

  10. Epigenetic alteration of imprinted genes during neural differentiation of germline-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Choi, Na Young; Lee, Seung-Won; Ko, Kisung; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Dong Wook; Lim, Jisun; Schöler, Hans R; Ko, Kinarm

    2016-03-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are unipotent stem cells in the testes that give rise to sperm, can be converted into germline-derived pluripotent stem (gPS) by self-induction. The androgenetic imprinting pattern of SSCs is maintained even after their reprogramming into gPS cells. In this study, we used an in vitro neural differentiation model to investigate whether the imprinting patterns are maintained or altered during differentiation. The androgenetic patterns of H19, Snrpn, and Mest were maintained even after differentiation of gPS cells into NSCs (gPS-NSCs), whereas the fully unmethylated status of Ndn in SSCs was altered to somatic patterns in gPS cells and gPS-NSCs. Thus, our study demonstrates epigenetic alteration of genomic imprinting during the induction of pluripotency in SSCs and neural differentiation, suggesting that gPS-NSCs can be a useful model to study the roles of imprinted genes in brain development and human neurodevelopmental disorders.

  11. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  12. Surface Curvature Differentially Regulates Stem Cell Migration and Differentiation via Altered Attachment Morphology and Nuclear Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Maike; Blanquer, Sébastien B. G.; Haimi, Suvi P.; Korus, Gabriela; Dunlop, John W. C.; Duda, Georg N.; Grijpma, Dirk. W.

    2016-01-01

    Signals from the microenvironment around a cell are known to influence cell behavior. Material properties, such as biochemical composition and substrate stiffness, are today accepted as significant regulators of stem cell fate. The knowledge of how cell behavior is influenced by 3D geometric cues is, however, strongly limited despite its potential relevance for the understanding of tissue regenerative processes and the design of biomaterials. Here, the role of surface curvature on the migratory and differentiation behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has been investigated on 3D surfaces with well‐defined geometric features produced by stereolithography. Time lapse microscopy reveals a significant increase of cell migration speed on concave spherical compared to convex spherical structures and flat surfaces resulting from an upward‐lift of the cell body due to cytoskeletal forces. On convex surfaces, cytoskeletal forces lead to substantial nuclear deformation, increase lamin‐A levels and promote osteogenic differentiation. The findings of this study demonstrate a so far missing link between 3D surface curvature and hMSC behavior. This will not only help to better understand the role of extracellular matrix architecture in health and disease but also give new insights in how 3D geometries can be used as a cell‐instructive material parameter in the field of biomaterial‐guided tissue regeneration.

  13. Differential cloning of novel intestine-specific genes whose expression is altered under conditions of villus atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodin, R A; Meng, S; Shei, A

    1995-07-01

    Atrophy of the small intestinal villi occurs in a variety of disease states and is associated with diarrhea, malabsorption, and impaired barrier function. We have previously demonstrated that villus atrophy is associated with an increase in lactase and a decrease in intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene expression. Given these changes in enterocyte phenotype with villus atrophy, we speculated that there may be other intestine-specific genes whose expression is altered as a function of epithelial growth state. We have employed two molecular techniques in order to identify and clone complementary DNAs (cDNA) which are differentially expressed in atrophic compared to normal small intestinal mucosa. In differential cDNA library (+/-) screening, duplicate filters of a normal jejunal cDNA library are hybridized with radiolabeled cDNA probes from either atrophic or control tissues. Comparisons of the intensities of hybridized clones allows for the identification of differentially expressed gene products. In the mRNA differential display system, RT-PCR is used to randomly amplify mRNA species. Similar to cDNA library screening, comparisons of radiolabeled bands on a polyacrylamide sequencing gel allow for the identification of differentially expressed genes. Using these methods, we have identified a novel cDNA, called D9, which appears to be expressed exclusively in the intestinal mucosa. Northern analyses have confirmed that the expression of the D9 mRNA is dramatically decreased under conditions of villus atrophy, suggesting an underlying relationship with epithelial growth state. DNA sequence analysis (GenBank) reveals no identity to previously cloned genes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  15. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  16. Adiponectin in mice with altered growth hormone action: links to insulin sensitivity and longevity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Ellen R.; List, Edward O.; Jara, Adam; Sackman-Sala, Lucila; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Boparai, Ravneet; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is positively correlated with longevity and negatively correlated with many obesity-related diseases. While there are several circulating forms of adiponectin, the high molecular weight (HMW) version has been suggested to have the predominant bioactivity. Adiponectin gene expression and cognate serum protein levels are of particular interest in mice with altered growth hormone (GH) signaling as these mice exhibit extremes in obesity that are positively associated with insulin sensitivity and lifespan as opposed to the typical negative association of these factors. While a few studies have reported total adiponectin levels in young adult mice with altered GH signaling, much remains unresolved, including changes in adiponectin levels with advancing age, proportion of total adiponectin in the HMW form, adipose depot of origin, and differential effects of GH versus IGF1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to address these issues using assorted mouse lines with altered GH signaling. Our results show that adiponectin is generally negatively associated with GH activity, regardless of age. Further, the amount of HMW adiponectin is consistently linked with the level of total adiponectin and not necessarily with previously reported lifespan or insulin sensitivity of these mice. Interestingly, circulating adiponectin levels correlated strongly with inguinal fat mass, implying the effects of GH on adiponectin are depot-specific. Interestingly rbGH, but not IGF1, decreased circulating total and HMW adiponectin levels. Taken together, these results fill important gaps in the literature related to GH and adiponectin and question the frequently reported associations of total and HMW adiponectin with insulin sensitivity and longevity. PMID:23261955

  17. Alteration of placental haemostatic mechanisms in idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Eduardo Bernal Villegas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction is a complication of pregnancy with a high probability of perinatal morbidity and mortality. It appears tobe caused by abnormal development of placental vasculature. Haemostatic processes are important for the development of the placenta,and an imbalance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors has been associated with risk of intrauterine growth restriction.Objective. To evaluate coagulation abnormalities in placenta of pregnancies complicated with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction.Materials and methods. Five placentas from pregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction were compared to 19 controls.We performed gross and histological examination of the placenta. Analysis was made of both mRNA expression by real-time PCRand protein by ELISA of tissue factor and thrombomodulin in placental tissue. Results. Results based on histological evaluation wereconsistent with an increased prothrombotic state in placentas from pregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction, andthrombosis of chorionic vessels was the most important finding. The study showed an increased expression of tissue factor protein(p=0.0411 and an increase in the ratio of tissue factor/thrombomodulin mRNA (p=0.0411 and protein (p=0.0215 in placentas frompregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction. There were no statistically significant differences neither between cases andcontrols in the mRNA levels of tissue factor or thrombomodulin nor at the protein level of thrombomodulin. Conclusion. Evidence ofalteration of local haemostatic mechanisms at the level of the placenta, including abnormal expression of tissue factor and tissue factor/thrombomodulin ratio, in pregnancies that occur with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction is presented.

  18. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  19. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta. Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine

  20. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  1. Bending of the looping heart: differential growth revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfei; Yao, Jiang; Xu, Gang; Taber, Larry A

    2014-08-01

    In the early embryo, the primitive heart tube (HT) undergoes the morphogenetic process of c-looping as it bends and twists into a c-shaped tube. Despite intensive study for nearly a century, the physical forces that drive looping remain poorly understood. This is especially true for the bending component, which is the focus of this paper. For decades, experimental measurements of mitotic rates had seemingly eliminated differential growth as the cause of HT bending, as it has commonly been thought that the heart grows almost exclusively via hyperplasia before birth and hypertrophy after birth. Recently published data, however, suggests that hypertrophic growth may play a role in looping. To test this idea, we developed finite-element models that include regionally measured changes in myocardial volume over the HT. First, models based on idealized cylindrical geometry were used to simulate the bending process in isolated hearts, which bend without the complicating effects of external loads. With the number of free parameters in the model reduced to the extent possible, stress and strain distributions were compared to those measured in embryonic chick hearts that were isolated and cultured for 24 h. The results show that differential growth alone yields results that agree reasonably well with the trends in our data, but adding active changes in myocardial cell shape provides closer quantitative agreement with stress measurements. Next, the estimated parameters were extrapolated to a model based on realistic 3D geometry reconstructed from images of an actual chick heart. This model yields similar results and captures quite well the basic morphology of the looped heart. Overall, our study suggests that differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium (MY) is the primary cause of the bending component of c-looping, with other mechanisms possibly playing lesser roles.

  2. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  4. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the ... of granivorous species, such as the chicken ... dominant in carnivorous avian species.[1] The ... Studies in humans and animal models show ..... rabbits over expressing growth hormone develop acromegaly and.

  5. Alteration of rice growth and development via antisense expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    College of Life and Geography Sciences, Qinghai Normal University, Xining, 810008, China. ... OsGA20ox2 in regulating plant growth and development, we used reverse genomic approach to .... to-Midi Total RNA Purification System, Invitrogen, USA). Two ... and the optimal PCR cycle for exponential phase of amplification.

  6. Photoresist Derived Carbon for Growth and Differentiation of Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Zou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or necrosis of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS is thehallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Theinability to regenerate in CNS offers little hope for naturally repairing the damagedneurons. However, with the rapid development of new technologies, regenerative medicineoffers great promises to patients with these disorders. Among many events for furtheradvancement of regenerative medicine, extracellular matrix (ECM plays a critical role forcellular migration and differentiation. To develop a biocompatible and electricallyconductive substrate that can be potentially used to promote growth and regeneration ofneurons and to record intracellular and multisite signals from brain as a probe, a polymericprecursor – SPR 220.7 was fabricated by pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 700 oC.Human Neuroblastoma cells - SK-N-MC, SY5Y, mouse teratocarcinoma cells P-19 and ratPC12 cells were found to attach and proliferate on photoresist derived carbon film.Significantly, neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells induced by NGF was demonstrated byobserving cell shape and size, and measuring the length of neurites under SEM. Our resultsindicated that fabricated carbon could potentially be explored in regenerative medicine forpromoting neuronal growth and differentiation in CNS with neurodegeneration.

  7. Stochastic Differential Equation-Based Flexible Software Reliability Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Kapur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several software reliability growth models (SRGMs have been developed by software developers in tracking and measuring the growth of reliability. As the size of software system is large and the number of faults detected during the testing phase becomes large, so the change of the number of faults that are detected and removed through each debugging becomes sufficiently small compared with the initial fault content at the beginning of the testing phase. In such a situation, we can model the software fault detection process as a stochastic process with continuous state space. In this paper, we propose a new software reliability growth model based on Itô type of stochastic differential equation. We consider an SDE-based generalized Erlang model with logistic error detection function. The model is estimated and validated on real-life data sets cited in literature to show its flexibility. The proposed model integrated with the concept of stochastic differential equation performs comparatively better than the existing NHPP-based models.

  8. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  9. Postnatal growth after intrauterine growth restriction alters central leptin signal and energy homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Coupé

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is closely linked with metabolic diseases, appetite disorders and obesity at adulthood. Leptin, a major adipokine secreted by adipose tissue, circulates in direct proportion to body fat stores, enters the brain and regulates food intake and energy expenditure. Deficient leptin neuronal signalling favours weight gain by affecting central homeostatic circuitry. The aim of this study was to determine if leptin resistance was programmed by perinatal nutritional environment and to decipher potential cellular mechanisms underneath.We clearly demonstrated that 5 months old IUGR rats develop a decrease of leptin sentivity, characterized by no significant reduction of food intake following an intraperitoneal injection of leptin. Apart from the resistance to leptin injection, results obtained from IUGR rats submitted to rapid catch-up growth differed from those of IUGR rats with no catch-up since we observed, for the first group only, fat accumulation, increased appetite for food rich in fat and increased leptin synthesis. Centrally, the leptin resistant state of both groups was associated with a complex and not always similar changes in leptin receptor signalling steps. Leptin resistance in IUGR rats submitted to rapid catch-up was associated with alteration in AKT and mTOR pathways. Alternatively, in IUGR rats with no catch-up, leptin resistance was associated with low hypothalamic expression of LepRa and LepRb. This study reveals leptin resistance as an early marker of metabolic disorders that appears before any evidence of body weight increase in IUGR rats but whose mechanisms could depend of nutritional environment of the perinatal period.

  10. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  11. Selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially alter the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas, M C; Cabas, I; García-Alcázar, A; Meseguer, J; Mulero, V; García-Ayala, A

    2016-05-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic estrogen used in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen (Tmx), a selective estrogen-receptor modulator used in hormone replacement therapy, and G1, a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) selective agonist, differentially increased the hepatic vitellogenin (vtg) gene expression and altered the immune response in adult gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) males. However, no information exists on the effects of these compounds on the immune response of juveniles. This study aims, for the first time, to investigate the effects of the dietary intake of EE2, Tmx or G1 on the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles and the capacity of the immune system of the specimens to recover its functionality after ceasing exposures (recovery period). The specimens were immunized with hemocyanin in the presence of aluminium adjuvant 1 (group A) or 120 (group B) days after the treatments ceased (dpt). The results indicate that EE2 and Tmx, but not G1, differentially promoted a transient alteration in hepatic vtg gene expression. Although all three compounds did not affect the production of reactive oxygen intermediates, they inhibited the induction of interleukin-1β (il1b) gene expression after priming. Interestingly, although Tmx increased the percentage of IgM-positive cells in both head kidney and spleen during the recovery period, the antibody response of vaccinated fish varied depending on the compound used and when the immunization was administered. Taken together, our results suggest that these compounds differentially alter the capacity of fish to respond to infection during ontogeny and, more interestingly, that the adaptive immune response remained altered to an extent that depends on the compound.

  12. Maraviroc reduces cytokine expression and secretion in human adipose cells without altering adipogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Delfín, Julieta; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2013-03-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a drug approved for use as part of HAART in treatment-experienced HIV-1 patients with CCR5-tropic virus. Despite the current concerns on the alterations in adipose tissue that frequently appear in HIV-infected patients under HAART, there is no information available on the effects of MVC on adipose tissue. Here we studied the effects of MVC during and after the differentiation of human adipocytes in culture, and compared the results with the effects of efavirenz (EFV). We measured the acquisition of adipocyte morphology; the gene expression levels of markers for mitochondrial toxicity, adipogenesis and inflammation; and the release of adipokines and cytokines to the medium. Additionally, we determined the effects of MVC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in adipocytes. Unlike EFV-treated pre-adipocytes, MVC-treated pre-adipocytes showed no alterations in the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes and accumulated lipids normally. Consistent with this, there were no changes in the mRNA levels of PPARγ or SREBP-1c, two master regulators of adipogenesis. In addition, MVC caused a significant decrease in the gene expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas EFV had the opposite effect. Moreover, MVC lowered inflammation-related gene expression and inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes in differentiated adipocytes. We conclude that MVC does not alter adipocyte differentiation but rather shows anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our results suggest that MVC may minimize adverse effects on adipose tissue development, metabolism, and inflammation, and thus could be a potentially beneficial component of antiretroviral therapy.

  13. Alterations in the growth and adhesion pattern of Vero cells induced by nutritional stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genari, S C; Gomes, L; Wada, M L

    1998-01-01

    The pattern of growth, adhesion and protein synthesis in Vero cells submitted to nutritional stress conditions was investigated. The control cells presented a characteristic pattern, with monolayer growth, while the stressed cells presented multilayered growth, with aggregate or spheroid formation which detached on the flask surface and continued their growth in another region. In the soft agar assay, with reduced amount of nutrients, only the stressed cells presented growth, indicating physical and nutritional independence. A 44-kDa protein was observed in stressed cells and was absent in non-stressed cells. The adhesion index and fibronectin synthesis and distribution were altered in stressed cells. After confluence, control cells presented fibronectin accumulation in lateral cell-cell contact regions, while this fibronectin accumulation pattern was not observed in stressed cells. These alterations may be responsible for the multilayered growth and decreased adhesion index observed in stressed cells which were transformed by nutritional stress conditions.

  14. Simulated microgravity alters multipotential differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells in association with reduced telomerase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianwen; Gan, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Xie, Tian; Hu, Qinghua; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    Microgravity is one of the most important characteristics in space flight. Exposure to microgravity results in extensive physiological changes in humans. Bone loss is one of the changes with serious consequences; however, the mechanism retains unclear. As the origin of osteoprogenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in it. After cultured under simulated microgravity (in a rotary cell culture system, RCCS), MSCs were stained using oil red O to identify adipocytes. The mRNA level of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) γ2 was determined by RT-PCR. Otherwise, MSCs were induced to osteogenic differentiation after microgravity culture, and then the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was determined by PNPP and the content of osteocalcin (OC) by ELISA. Furthermore, the telomerase activity in MSCs was measured by TRAP. The results showed that simulated microgravity inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and induced adipogenic differentiation accompanied by the change of gene expression of BMP-2 and PPARγ2 in MSCs. Meanwhile, the telomerase activity decreased significantly in MSCs under simulated microgravity. The reduced bone formation in space flight may partly be due to the altered potential differentiation of MSCs associated with telomerase activity which plays a key role in regulating the lifespan of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, telomerase activation/replacement may act as a potential countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss.

  15. Histopathological alterations after a growth promoter boldenone injection in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousson, Ehab

    2016-02-01

    Boldenone (BOL) is a derivative of the testosterone that has dual effects on humans, both directly and indirectly; directly as injection to build muscles and indirectly as through consuming meat of animals that where treated with BOL. However, the action of these steroids on different body organs structures is still unclear; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the intramuscular injection of BOL undecylenate on the different organ structures. A total of 10 adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into two main groups, the first group was the control group, which includes animals that were injected intramuscularly with olive oil and the second group included animals that received two intramuscular injections of 5 mg/kg body weight BOL dissected after 6 weeks. Our results showed that intramuscular injection of rabbits with BOL showed hypertrophy in both skeletal and cardiac muscles, disturbances of the hepatocytes radially arranged cords with multifocal hepatocellular vacuolations in the liver, glomerulus mass reduction with multifocal glomerular injury in the kidney, disturbances of the cycle of spermatogenesis in the testes. In conclusion, using BOL, while preparing for a young bodybuilding contest, may cause an alteration in the histological structure of most of the body organs; these findings suggested that especially young people who misuse anablic androgenic steroids should be careful if they want to use such steroids to enhance their strength and endurance.

  16. FOXA1 deletion in luminal epithelium causes prostatic hyperplasia and alteration of differentiated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraff, David J; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Case, Tom C; Yu, Xiuping; Herrick, Mary K; Hayward, William J; Strand, Douglas W; Cates, Justin M; Hayward, Simon W; Gao, Nan; Walter, Michael A; Buttyan, Ralph; Yi, Yajun; Kaestner, Klaus H; Matusik, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) superfamily of transcription factors has essential roles in organogenesis and tissue differentiation. Foxa1 and Foxa2 are expressed during prostate budding and ductal morphogenesis, whereas Foxa1 expression is retained in adult prostate epithelium. Previous characterization of prostatic tissue rescued from embryonic Foxa1 knockout mice revealed Foxa1 to be essential for ductal morphogenesis and epithelial maturation. However, it is unknown whether Foxa1 is required to maintain the differentiated status in adult prostate epithelium. Here, we employed the PBCre4 transgenic system and determined the impact of prostate-specific Foxa1 deletion in adult murine epithelium. PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) mouse prostates showed progressive florid hyperplasia with extensive cribriform patterning, with the anterior prostate being most affected. Immunohistochemistry studies show mosaic Foxa1 KO consistent with PBCre4 activity, with Foxa1 KO epithelial cells specifically exhibiting altered cell morphology, increased proliferation, and elevated expression of basal cell markers. Castration studies showed that, while PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) prostates did not exhibit altered sensitivity in response to hormone ablation compared with control prostates, the number of Foxa1-positive cells in mosaic Foxa1 KO prostates was significantly reduced compared with Foxa1-negative cells following castration. Unexpectedly, gene expression profile analyses revealed that Foxa1 deletion caused abnormal expression of seminal vesicle-associated genes in KO prostates. In summary, these results indicate Foxa1 expression is required for the maintenance of prostatic cellular differentiation.

  17. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  18. Liver cell adenoma showing sequential alteration of radiological findings suggestive of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayuki Kogure; Yoshiyuki Ueno; Satoshi Sekiguchi; Kazuyuki Ishida; Takehiko Igarashi; Yuta Wakui; Takao Iwasaki; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2009-01-01

    A liver tumor 35 mm in diameter was found incidentally in a 40-year-old woman who had no history of liver diseases or the use of oral contraceptives. Radiological diagnostics showed the typical findings of liver cell adenoma (LCA). Dynamic computed tomography revealed that the tumor showed a homogenous enhancement in the arterial phase and almost the same enhancement as the surrounding liver parenchyma in the delayed phase. The tumor was found to contain fat on magnetic resonance imaging. A benign fat containing liver tumor was suggested. However, radiological findings altered, which caused us to suspect that a welldifferentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) containing fat was becoming dedifferentiated. Partial hepatectomy was performed and the pathological findings showed the typical findings of LCA. This case was an extremely rare LCA, which had no background of risk for LCA and developed the sequential alteration of the radiological findings to suspect well-differentiated HCC.

  19. Long Noncoding RNA Ceruloplasmin Promotes Cancer Growth by Altering Glycolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesha Rupaimoole

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs significantly influence the development and regulation of genome expression in cells. Here, we demonstrate the role of lncRNA ceruloplasmin (NRCP in cancer metabolism and elucidate functional effects leading to increased tumor progression. NRCP was highly upregulated in ovarian tumors, and knockdown of NRCP resulted in significantly increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased glycolysis compared with control cancer cells. In an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, siNRCP delivered via a liposomal carrier significantly reduced tumor growth compared with control treatment. We identified NRCP as an intermediate binding partner between STAT1 and RNA polymerase II, leading to increased expression of downstream target genes such as glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. Collectively, we report a previously unrecognized role of the lncRNA NRCP in modulating cancer metabolism. As demonstrated, DOPC nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA-mediated silencing of this lncRNA in vivo provides therapeutic avenue toward modulating lncRNAs in cancer.

  20. N-myc regulates growth and fiber cell differentiation in lens development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Gabriel R.; Matos-Rodrigues, Gabriel E.; Zhao, Yilin; Gomes, Anielle L.; Anand, Deepti; Predes, Danilo; de Lima, Silmara; Abreu, Jose G.; Zheng, Deyou; Lachke, Salil A.; Cvekl, Ales; Martins, Rodrigo A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Myc proto-oncogenes regulate diverse cellular processes during development, but their roles during morphogenesis of specific tissues are not fully understood. We found that c-myc regulates cell proliferation in mouse lens development and previous genome-wide studies suggested functional roles for N-myc in developing lens. Here, we examined the role of N-myc in mouse lens development. Genetic inactivation of N-myc in the surface ectoderm or lens vesicle impaired eye and lens growth, while "late" inactivation in lens fibers had no effect. Unexpectedly, defective growth of N-myc--deficient lenses was not associated with alterations in lens progenitor cell proliferation or survival. Notably, N-myc-deficient lens exhibited a delay in degradation of DNA in terminally differentiating lens fiber cells. RNA-sequencing analysis of N-myc--deficient lenses identified a cohort of down-regulated genes associated with fiber cell differentiation that included DNaseIIβ. Further, an integrated analysis of differentially expressed genes in N-myc-deficient lens using normal lens expression patterns of iSyTE, N-myc-binding motif analysis and molecular interaction data from the String database led to the derivation of an N-myc-based gene regulatory network in the lens. Finally, analysis of N-myc and c-myc double-deficient lens demonstrated that these Myc genes cooperate to drive lens growth prior to lens vesicle stage. Together, these findings provide evidence for exclusive and cooperative functions of Myc transcription factors in mouse lens development and identify novel mechanisms by which N-myc regulates cell differentiation during eye morphogenesis. PMID:28716713

  1. Differential gene regulation under altered gravity conditions in follicular thyroid cancer cells: relationship between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbrich, C.; Pietsch, J.; Grosse, J.; Wehland, M.; Schulz, H.; Saar, K.; Hübner, N.; Hauslage, J.; Hemmersbach, R.; Braun, M.; van Loon, J.; Vagt, N.; Egli, M.; Richter, P.; Einspanier, R.; Sharbati, S.; Baltz, T.; Infanger, M.; Ma, X.; Grimm, D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, and cytoskeletal proteins form a dynamic network interacting with signalling molecules as an adaptive response to altered gravity. An important issue is the exact differentiation between real microgravity responses of the cells or cellular reactions

  2. Type-1 Collagen differentially alters β-catenin accumulation in primary Dupuytren's Disease cord and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Bing

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dupuytren's Disease (DD is a debilitating contractile fibrosis of the palmar fascia characterised by excess collagen deposition, contractile myofibroblast development, increased Transforming Growth Factor-β levels and β-catenin accumulation. The aim of this study was to determine if a collagen-enriched environment, similar to in vivo conditions, altered β-catenin accumulation by primary DD cells in the presence or absence of Transforming Growth Factor-β. Methods Primary DD and patient matched, phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF cells were cultured in the presence or absence of type-1 collagen and Transforming Growth Factor-β1. β-catenin and α-smooth muscle actin levels were assessed by western immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results DD cells display a rapid depletion of cellular β-catenin not evident in patient-matched PF cells. This effect was not evident in either cell type when cultured in the absence of type-1 collagen. Exogenous addition of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 to DD cells in collagen culture negates the loss of β-catenin accumulation. Transforming Growth Factor-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, is attenuated by the inclusion of type-1 collagen in cultures of DD and PF cells. Conclusion Our findings implicate type-1 collagen as a previously unrecognized regulator of β-catenin accumulation and a modifier of TGF-β1 signaling specifically in primary DD cells. These data have implications for current treatment modalities as well as the design of in vitro models for research into the molecular mechanisms of DD.

  3. Does ozone exposure alter growth and carbon allocation of mycorrhizal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, L.C.; Gamon, J.A. (California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Andersen, C.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Ozone is known to adversely affect plant growth. However, it is less clear how ozone affects belowground processes. This study tests the hypothesis that ozone alters growth and carbon allocation of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) plants. Two ecotypes of Elymus glaucus (blue wild rye) were exposed to mycorrhizal inoculation and episodic ozone exposures simulating atmospheric conditions in the Los Angeles Basin. Preliminary results show that effects of ozone on growth were subtle. In both ecotypes, growth of aboveground biomass was not affected by ozone while root growth was decreased. In most treatments, mycorrhizal inoculation decreased growth of leaves and stems, but had no significant effect on root growth. Three-way ANOVA tests indicated interactive effects between ecotype, mycorrhiza and ozone. Further experimental work is needed to reveal the biological processes governing these responses.

  4. Positional and expressive alteration of prohibitin during the induced differentiation of human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Hui Xu; Jian Tang; Qi-Fu Li; Song-Lin Shi; Xiang-Feng Chen; Ying Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the existence and distribution of prohibitin (PHB) in nuclear matrix and its co-localization with products of some related genes during the differentiation of human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721cells.METHODS: The nuclear matrix of the SHHC-7721 cells cultured with or without 5 x 10-3 mmol/L hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) was selectively extracted.Western blot was used to analyze the expression of PHB in nuclear matrix; imrnunofluorescence microscope observation was used to analyze the distribution of PHB in cell. LCSM was used to observe the co-localization of PHB with products of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.RESULTS: Western blot analysis showed that PHB existed in the composition of nuclear matrix proteins and was down-regulated by HMBA treatment.Immunofluorescence observation revealed that PHB existed in the nuclear matrix, and its distribution regions and expression levels were altered after HMBA treatment. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed the co-localization between PHB and the products of oncogenes or tumor repression genes including c-fos, c-myc, p53 and Rb and its alteration of distributive area in the cells treated by HMBA.CONCLUSION: These data confirm that PHB is a nuclear matrix protein, which is located in the nuclear matrix, and the distribution and expression of PHB and its relation with associated genes may play significant roles during the differentiation of SMHC-7721 cells.

  5. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-Ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a "double contour-like structure" (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated.

  6. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsurou Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated.

  7. Re-growth, morphogenesis and differentiation during starfish arm regeneration

    KAUST Repository

    Khadra, Yousra Ben

    2015-06-25

    The red starfish Echinaster sepositus is an excellent model for studying arm regeneration processes following traumatic amputation. The initial repair phase was described in a previous paper in terms of the early cicatrisation phenomena, and tissue and cell involvement. In this work we attempt to provide a further comprehensive description of the later regenerative stages in this species. Here we present the results of a detailed microscopic and submicroscopic investigation of the long regenerative phase, which can be subdivided into two sub-phases: early and advanced regenerative phases. The early regenerative phase (1-6 weeks p.a.) is characterized by tissue rearrangement, morphogenetic processes and initial differentiation events (mainly neurogenesis and skeletogenesis). The advanced regenerative phase (after 6 weeks p.a.) is characterized by further differentiation processes (early myogenesis), and obvious morphogenesis and re-growth of the regenerate. As in other starfish, the regenerative process in E. sepositus is relatively slow in comparison with that of crinoids and many ophiuroids, which is usually interpreted as resulting mainly from size-related aspects and of the more conspicuous involvement of morphallactic processes. Light and electron microscopy analyses suggest that some of the amputated structures, such as muscles, are not able to replace their missing parts by directly regrowing them from the remaining tissues, whereas others tissues, such as the skeleton and the radial nerve cord, appear to undergo direct re-growth. The overall process is in agreement with the distalization-intercalation model proposed by Agata and co-workers (1). Further experiments are needed to confirm this hypothesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N;

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...... biosynthesis of pancreatic beta-cells in monolayer culture. In culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 2% normal human serum islets or dissociated islet cells from newborn rats maintained their insulin-producing capacity. When supplemented with 1-1000 ng/ml pituitary or recombinant human GH the islet cells....... It is concluded that GH is a potent growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell....

  9. Altered goblet cell differentiation and surface mucus properties in Hirschsprung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R Thiagarajah

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC leads to significant mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. Changes in the colonic epithelium related to goblet cells and the luminal mucus layer have been postulated to play a key role. Here we show that the colonic epithelium of both aganglionic and ganglionic segments are altered in patients and in mice with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR. Structurally, goblet cells were altered with increased goblet cell number and reduced intracellular mucins in the distal colon of biopsies from patients with HSCR. Endothelin receptor B (Ednrb mutant mice showed increased goblet cell number and size and increased cell proliferation compared to wild-type mice in aganglionic segments, and reduced goblet cell size and number in ganglionic segments. Functionally, compared to littermates, Ednrb-/- mice showed increased transepithelial resistance, reduced stool water content and similar chloride secretion in the distal colon. Transcript levels of goblet cell differentiation factors SPDEF and Math1 were increased in the distal colon of Ednrb-/- mice. Both distal colon from Ednrb mice and biopsies from HSCR patients showed reduced Muc4 expression as compared to controls, but similar expression of Muc2. Particle tracking studies showed that mucus from Ednrb-/- mice provided a more significant barrier to diffusion of 200 nm nanoparticles as compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that aganglionosis is associated with increased goblet cell proliferation and differentiation and subsequent altered surface mucus properties, prior to the development of inflammation in the distal colon epithelium. Restoration of normal goblet cell function and mucus layer properties in the colonic epithelium may represent a therapeutic strategy for prevention of HAEC.

  10. Leishmania donovani infection induces anemia in hamsters by differentially altering erythropoiesis in bone marrow and spleen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Lafuse

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani is a parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis by infecting and replicating in macrophages of the bone marrow, spleen, and liver. Severe anemia and leucopenia is associated with the disease. Although immune defense mechanisms against the parasite have been studied, we have a limited understanding of how L. donovani alters hematopoiesis. In this study, we used Syrian golden hamsters to investigate effects of L. donovani infection on erythropoiesis. Infection resulted in severe anemia and leucopenia by 8 weeks post-infection. Anemia was associated with increased levels of serum erythropoietin, which indicates the hamsters respond to the anemia by producing erythropoietin. We found that infection also increased numbers of BFU-E and CFU-E progenitor populations in the spleen and bone marrow and differentially altered erythroid gene expression in these organs. In the bone marrow, the mRNA expression of erythroid differentiation genes (α-globin, β-globin, ALAS2 were inhibited by 50%, but mRNA levels of erythroid receptor (c-kit, EpoR and transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, FOG1 were not affected by the infection. This suggests that infection has a negative effect on differentiation of erythroblasts. In the spleen, erythroid gene expression was enhanced by infection, indicating that the anemia activates a stress erythropoiesis response in the spleen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA levels in spleen and bone marrow found that IFN-γ mRNA is highly increased by L. donovani infection. Expression of the IFN-γ inducible cytokine, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, was also up-regulated. Since TRAIL induces erythroblasts apoptosis, apoptosis of bone marrow erythroblasts from infected hamsters was examined by flow cytometry. Percentage of erythroblasts that were apoptotic was significantly increased by L. donovani infection. Together, our results suggest that L. donovani infection inhibits erythropoiesis in the bone marrow by

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Signaling from Membrane Microdomains to the Nucleus: Differential Regulation by Caveolins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ambre; Yu, Lingli; Guili, Vincent; Reynaud, Florie; Ding, Yindi; Ma, Ji; Jullien, Jérôme; Koubi, David; Gauthier, Emmanuel; Cluet, David; Falk, Julien; Castellani, Valérie; Yuan, Chonggang; Rudkin, Brian B.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane microdomains or “lipid rafts” have emerged as essential functional modules of the cell, critical for the regulation of growth factor receptor-mediated responses. Herein we describe the dichotomy between caveolin-1 and caveolin-2, structural and regulatory components of microdomains, in modulating proliferation and differentiation. Caveolin-2 potentiates while caveolin-1 inhibits nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling and subsequent cell differentiation. Caveolin-2 does not appear to impair NGF receptor trafficking but elicits prolonged and stronger activation of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Rsk2 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2), and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). In contrast, caveolin-1 does not alter initiation of the NGF signaling pathway activation; rather, it acts, at least in part, by sequestering the cognate receptors, TrkA and p75NTR, at the plasma membrane, together with the phosphorylated form of the downstream effector Rsk2, which ultimately prevents CREB phosphorylation. The non-phosphorylatable caveolin-1 serine 80 mutant (S80V), no longer inhibits TrkA trafficking or subsequent CREB phosphorylation. MC192, a monoclonal antibody towards p75NTR that does not block NGF binding, prevents exit of both NGF receptors (TrkA and p75NTR) from lipid rafts. The results presented herein underline the role of caveolin and receptor signaling complex interplay in the context of neuronal development and tumorigenesis. PMID:28338624

  12. Improved Growth and Stress Tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 Mutant Triggered by Altered Adenine Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suchada Sukrong; Kil-Young Yun; Patrizia Stadler; Charan Kumar; Tony Facciuolo; Barbara A.Moffatt; Deane L.Falcone

    2012-01-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses.A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1,a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions.Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1),an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP),indicating a link between purine metabolism,whole-plant growth responses,and stress acclimation.The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity.Correspondingly,oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine.Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1.The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge.Finally,it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants.Collectively,these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth,leading to increases in plant biomass.The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  13. Gastrostomy placement favorably alters the natural history of growth failure and undernutrition in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growth failure and undernutrition complicate the clinical course of girls with Rett syndrome (RTT). These abnormalities are, in part, the consequence of oral motor dysfunction and inadequate dietary intake. Our objective was to determine if gastrostomy placement for nutritional therapy alters the na...

  14. GROWTH DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR-5 STIMULATES THE GROWTH AND ANABOLIC METABOLISM OF ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱcollagen by RT-PCR. Results After 7 days culture, MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Conclusion GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation in mono-layer culture.

  15. Growth differentiation factor-5 stimulates the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Guo Xiong; Yao Jianfeng; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱ collagen by RT-PCR,the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture,MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and X collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  16. Growth Differentiation Factor-5 Stimulates the Growth and Anabolic Metabolism of Articular Chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Guo Xiong; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTr assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type 11 collagen by RT-PCR, the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture, MTF assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of ehondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the colal mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was gready enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and Ⅹ collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chon-drocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic ex-pression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  17. Altered Transcriptional Control Networks with Trans-Differentiation of Isogenic Mutant KRas NSCLC Models

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    John A Haley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe capacity of cancer cells to undergo epithelial mesenchymal trans-differentiation has been implicated as a factor driving metastasis, through the acquisition of enhanced migratory/invasive cell programs and the engagement of anti-apoptotic mechanisms promoting drug and radiation resistance. Our aim was to define molecular signaling changes associated with mesenchymal trans-differentiation in two KRas mutant NSCLC models. We focused on central transcription and epigenetic regulators predicted to be important for mesenchymal cell survival.Experimental designWe have modeled trans-differentiation and cancer stemness in inducible isogenic mutant KRas H358 and A549 non-small cell lung cell backgrounds. We employed large-scale quantitative phospho-proteomic, proteomic, protein-protein interaction, RNA-Seq and network function prediction approaches to dissect the molecular events associated with the establishment and maintenance of the mesenchymal state.ResultsGene set enrichment and pathway prediction indicated BMI1, KDM5B, RUNX2, MYC/MAX, NFkB, LEF1, and HIF1 target networks were significantly enriched in the trans-differentiation of H358 and A549 NSCLC models. Physical overlaps between multiple networks implicate NR4A1 as an overlapping control between TCF and NFkB pathways. Enrichment correlations also indicated marked decrease in cell cycling, which occurred early in the EMT process. RNA abundance time course studies also indicated early expression of epigenetic and chromatin regulators, including CITED4, RUNX3, CMBX1 and SIRT4. ConclusionsMultiple transcription and epigenetic pathways where altered between epithelial and mesenchymal tumor cell states, notably the polycomb repressive complex-1, HP1g and BAF/Swi-Snf. Network analysis suggests redundancy in the activation and inhibition of pathway regulators, notably factors controlling epithelial cell state.

  18. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factors by Embryoid Bodies in Hydrodynamic and Static Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Krista M.; Nair, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    During development, cell fate specification and tissue development are orchestrated by the sequential presentation of soluble growth factors (GF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Similarly, differentiation of stem cells in vitro relies upon the temporal presence of extracellular cues within the microenvironment. Hydrodynamic culture systems are not limited by volume restrictions and therefore offer several practical advantages for scalability over static cultures; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose cells to physical parameters not present in static culture, such as fluid shear stress and mass transfer through convective forces. In this study, the differences between static and hydrodynamic culture conditions on the expression of ECM and GF molecules during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells were examined at both the gene and protein level. The expression of ECM and GF genes exhibited an early decrease in static cultures based on heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis and a relative delayed increase in hydrodynamic cultures. Although the temporal patterns of specific ECM and GF protein expression were comparable between static and hydrodynamic cultures, several notable differences in the magnitudes of expression were observed at similar time points. These results describe the establishment of an analytical framework that can be used to examine the expression patterns of ECM and GF molecules expressed by pluripotent stem cells undergoing differentiation as 3D multicellular aggregates under different culture conditions, and suggest that physical parameters of stem cell microenvironments can alter endogenous ECM and GF expression profiles that may, in turn, influence cell fate decisions. PMID:25423310

  19. Loss of NHE3 alters gut microbiota composition and influences Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engevik, Melinda A; Aihara, Eitaro; Montrose, Marshall H; Shull, Gary E; Hassett, Daniel J; Worrell, Roger T

    2013-11-15

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota have been linked to diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)-associated disease. Despite this, it remains unclear how the intestinal environment, set by ion transport, affects luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial composition. Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3), a target of C. difficile toxin B, plays an integral role in intestinal Na(+) absorption. Thus the NHE3-deficient mouse model was chosen to examine the effect of pH and ion composition on bacterial growth. We hypothesized that ion transport-induced change in the intestinal environment would lead to alteration of the microbiota. Region-specific changes in ion composition and pH correlated with region-specific alteration of luminal and mucosal-associated bacteria with general decreases in Firmicutes and increases in Bacteroidetes members. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron) increased in NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum and was examined in vitro to determine whether altered Na(+) was sufficient to affect growth. Increased in vitro growth of B. thetaiotaomicron occurred in 43 mM Na(+) correlating with the NHE3(-/-) mouse terminal ileum [Na(+)]. NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum displayed increased fut2 mRNA and fucosylation correlating with B. thetaiotaomicron growth. Inoculation of B. thetaiotaomicron in wild-type and NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum organoids displayed increased fut2 and fucosylation, indicating that B. thetaiotaomicron alone is sufficient for the increased fucosylation seen in vivo. These data demonstrate that loss of NHE3 alters the intestinal environment, leading to region-specific changes in bacteria, and shed light on the growth requirements of some gut microbiota members, which is vital for creating better treatments of complex diseases with an altered gut microbiota.

  20. Differential Functional Connectivity Alterations of Two Subdivisions within the Right dlPFC in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, Julian; Mathys, Christian; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Südmeyer, Martin; Cieslik, Edna C.; Rubbert, Christian; Hartmann, Christian J.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Reetz, Kathrin; Grefkes, Christian; Michely, Jochen; Turowski, Bernd; Schnitzler, Alfons; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) often show impairments in executive function (EF) like decision-making and action control. The right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has been strongly implicated in EF in healthy subjects and has repeatedly been reported to show alterations related to EF impairment in PD. Recently, two key regions for cognitive action control have been identified within the right dlPFC by co-activation based parcellation. While the posterior region is engaged in rather basal EF like stimulus integration and working memory, the anterior region has a more abstract, supervisory function. To investigate whether these functionally distinct subdivisions of right dlPFC are differentially affected in PD, we analyzed resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in 39 PD patients and 44 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients were examined both after at least 12 h withdrawal of dopaminergic drugs (OFF) and under their regular dopaminergic medication (ON). We found that only the posterior right dlPFC subdivision shows FC alterations in PD, while the anterior part remains unaffected. PD-related decreased FC with posterior right dlPFC was found in the bilateral medial posterior parietal cortex (mPPC) and left dorsal premotor region (PMd) in the OFF state. In the medical ON, FC with left PMd normalized, while decoupling with bilateral mPPC remained. Furthermore, we observed increased FC between posterior right dlPFC and the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in PD in the ON state. Our findings point to differential disturbances of right dlPFC connectivity in PD, which relate to its hierarchical organization of EF processing by stronger affecting the functionally basal posterior aspect than the hierarchically higher anterior part. PMID:28611616

  1. Alterations of Growth Factors in Autism and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

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    Alma Y. Galvez-Contreras

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth factors (GFs are cytokines that regulate the neural development. Recent evidence indicates that alterations in the expression level of GFs during embryogenesis are linked to the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In this concise review, we summarize the current evidence that supports the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor 2, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, neurotrophins 3 and 4, and epidermal growth factor in the pathogenesis of ADHD and ASD. We also highlight the potential use of these GFs as clinical markers for diagnosis and prognosis of these neurodevelopmental disorders.

  2. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  3. Altered expression of adipose differentiation-related protein gene in placental tissue of pre-eclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-li; YAO Yuan-qing; LI Dong-hong; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the altered expression of lipid metabolism-related gene adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) in pre-eclampsia. Methods: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to validate the altered expression of ADRP gene between pre-eclamptic placentas (preeclampsia group) and normotensive placentas (control group) respectively. In situ hybridization (ISH)was used to localize ADRP mRNA in pre-eclamptic placentas. Results: There was a significant difference in the levels of placental ADRP mRNA between pre-eclampsia group and control group (1.98± 0. 50 vs 1. 09±0. 20, P<0.01). Western blotting showed that placentas both in pre-eclampsia group and control group expressed the special ADRP band at 48. 1 kD. The relative levels of ADRP protein in pre-eclampsia group were significantly higher than those of control group (0. 40 ±0. 19 vs 0. 19 ±0. 09, P< 0. 01).ADRP mRNA was diffusely distributed in pre-eclamptic placentas. Their positive staining existed in cytoplasm of trophoblast. Conclusion: Abnormal expression of ADRP gene in pre-eclamptic placenta may be associated with the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

  4. Altered Pathway Analyzer: A gene expression dataset analysis tool for identification and prioritization of differentially regulated and network rewired pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Abhinav; Ali, Shakir; Gupta, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Gene connection rewiring is an essential feature of gene network dynamics. Apart from its normal functional role, it may also lead to dysregulated functional states by disturbing pathway homeostasis. Very few computational tools measure rewiring within gene co-expression and its corresponding regulatory networks in order to identify and prioritize altered pathways which may or may not be differentially regulated. We have developed Altered Pathway Analyzer (APA), a microarray dataset analysis tool for identification and prioritization of altered pathways, including those which are differentially regulated by TFs, by quantifying rewired sub-network topology. Moreover, APA also helps in re-prioritization of APA shortlisted altered pathways enriched with context-specific genes. We performed APA analysis of simulated datasets and p53 status NCI-60 cell line microarray data to demonstrate potential of APA for identification of several case-specific altered pathways. APA analysis reveals several altered pathways not detected by other tools evaluated by us. APA analysis of unrelated prostate cancer datasets identifies sample-specific as well as conserved altered biological processes, mainly associated with lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation and proliferation. APA is designed as a cross platform tool which may be transparently customized to perform pathway analysis in different gene expression datasets. APA is freely available at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/APA. PMID:28084397

  5. Coleusin factor, a novel anticancer diterpenoid, inhibits osteosarcoma growth by inducing bone morphogenetic protein-2-dependent differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shuo; Sun, Bo; Lu, Ran; Wang, Jingze

    2014-06-01

    Coleusin factor is a diterpenoid compound isolated from the root of a tropical plant, Coleus forskohlii. Although Coleusin factor has been reported to suppress proliferation of and induce apoptosis in several types of cancer cells, the effects of Coleusin factor on osteosarcoma and the underlying mechanism are still not fully understood. In this study, we show that Coleusin factor treatment potently inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cells associated with G(1) cell-cycle arrest. Interestingly, apoptosis and cell death are not induced. Instead, Coleusin factor causes osteosarcoma cells to exhibit typical properties of differentiated osteoblasts, including a morphologic alteration resembling osteoblasts, the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers, elevated alkaline phosphatase activity, and increased cellular mineralization. Coleusin factor treatment significantly increases the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a crucial osteogenic regulator, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), one of the key transcription factors of the BMP pathway. When BMP-2 signaling is blocked, Coleusin factor fails to inhibit cell proliferation and to induce osteoblast differentiation. Thus, upregulation of BMP-2 autocrine is critical for Coleusin factor to induce osteoblast differentiation and exert its anticancer effects on osteosarcoma. Importantly, administration of Coleusin factor inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma xenografted in nude mice without systemic or immunologic toxicity. Osteosarcoma is a highly aggressive cancer marked by the loss of normal differentiation. Coleusin factor represents a new type of BMP-2 inducer that restores differentiation in osteosarcoma cells. It may provide a promising therapeutic strategy against osteosarcoma with minimal side effects.

  6. The effect of epidermal growth factor on neonatal incisor differentiation in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, R T; Chiego, D J; Gattone, V H; Hinton, D A; Klein, R M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on cellular differentiation of the neonatal mouse mandibular incisor was examined autoradiographically using tritiated thymidine ([3H]TDR) and tritiated proline ([3H]PRO). On days 0 (day of birth), 1, and 2, EGF was administered (3 micrograms/g body wt) sc to neonates. Mice were killed on Days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 13 after birth and were injected with either [3H]TDR or [3H]PRO 1 hr before death. [3H]TDR was used to analyze cell proliferation in eight cell types in the developing mouse incisor including upper (lingual) and lower (buccal) pulpal fibroblasts, preodontoblasts, inner and outer enamel epithelial cells (IEE and OEE), stratum intermedium (SI), stellate reticulum (SR), and periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. [3H]PRO was used to analyze protein synthesis in ameloblasts, and their secretion products (enamel and dentin), as well as PDL fibroblasts. The selected EGF injection scheme elicited acceleration of incisor eruption with minimal growth retardation. At Day 1, the upper and lower pulp, preodontoblasts, SI, and SR showed a significant decrease in labeling index (LI) 24 hr after a single EGF injection. After multiple injections (Days 0, 1, 2), two LI patterns were observed. In lower pulp, preodontoblasts, IEE, SI, SR, and OEE, a posteruptive change in LI was observed. In contrast, the upper pulp and PDL regions demonstrated a direct temporal relationship with eruption. Autoradiographic analysis with [3H]PRO indicated that EGF treatment caused significant increases in grain counts per unit area in ameloblast, odontoblast, and PDL regions studied. Significant differences were found in all four regions studied (ameloblasts, enamel, odontoblasts, dentin) at the 45-microns-tall ameloblast level as well as ameloblasts and odontoblasts at the 30-microns level at 13 days of age. The PDL demonstrated significant differences at all locations studied (base, 30 microns, 45 microns,) in 4-, 7-, and 13-day-old mice

  7. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

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    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  8. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

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    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  10. Geographic after-tax real income differentials and population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G; Cebula, R J; Koch, J V

    1990-03-01

    "The purpose of this [one-page] note is to empirically investigate the impact of geographic after-tax real income differentials on geographic population growth rate differentials. The focus is on population growth rates in Florida's 67 counties over the period 1980-88." The authors conclude that "even after allowing for a variety of other location-influencing factors, including coastal access, after-tax real income differentials exercise a positive and significant impact on population growth rate differentials among Florida's counties."

  11. Alterations to mTORC1 signaling in the skeletal muscle differentially affect whole-body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guridi, Maitea; Kupr, Barbara; Romanino, Klaas; Lin, Shuo; Falcetta, Denis; Tintignac, Lionel; Rüegg, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central node in a network of signaling pathways controlling cell growth and survival. This multiprotein complex integrates external signals and affects different nutrient pathways in various organs. However, it is not clear how alterations of mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscle affect whole-body metabolism. We characterized the metabolic phenotype of young and old raptor muscle knock-out (RAmKO) and TSC1 muscle knock-out (TSCmKO) mice, where mTORC1 activity in skeletal muscle is inhibited or constitutively activated, respectively. Ten-week-old RAmKO mice are lean and insulin resistant with increased energy expenditure, and they are resistant to a high-fat diet (HFD). This correlates with an increased expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a downregulation of genes involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Ten-week-old TSCmKO mice are also lean, glucose intolerant with a decreased activation of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) targets that regulate glucose transporters in the muscle. The mice are resistant to a HFD and show reduced accumulation of glycogen and lipids in the liver. Both mouse models suffer from a myopathy with age, with reduced fat and lean mass, and both RAmKO and TSCmKO mice develop insulin resistance and increased intramyocellular lipid content. Our study shows that alterations of mTORC1 signaling in the skeletal muscle differentially affect whole-body metabolism. While both inhibition and constitutive activation of mTORC1 induce leanness and resistance to obesity, changes in the metabolism of muscle and peripheral organs are distinct. These results indicate that a balanced mTORC1 signaling in the muscle is required for proper metabolic homeostasis.

  12. Altered metabolism of growth hormone receptor mutant mice: a combined NMR metabonomics and microarray study.

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    Horst Joachim Schirra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth hormone is an important regulator of post-natal growth and metabolism. We have investigated the metabolic consequences of altered growth hormone signalling in mutant mice that have truncations at position 569 and 391 of the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor, and thus exhibit either low (around 30% maximum or no growth hormone-dependent STAT5 signalling respectively. These mutations result in altered liver metabolism, obesity and insulin resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis of metabolic changes was performed using microarray analysis of liver tissue and NMR metabonomics of urine and liver tissue. Data were analyzed using multivariate statistics and Gene Ontology tools. The metabolic profiles characteristic for each of the two mutant groups and wild-type mice were identified with NMR metabonomics. We found decreased urinary levels of taurine, citrate and 2-oxoglutarate, and increased levels of trimethylamine, creatine and creatinine when compared to wild-type mice. These results indicate significant changes in lipid and choline metabolism, and were coupled with increased fat deposition, leading to obesity. The microarray analysis identified changes in expression of metabolic enzymes correlating with alterations in metabolite concentration both in urine and liver. Similarity of mutant 569 to the wild-type was seen in young mice, but the pattern of metabolites shifted to that of the 391 mutant as the 569 mice became obese after six months age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The metabonomic observations were consistent with the parallel analysis of gene expression and pathway mapping using microarray data, identifying metabolites and gene transcripts involved in hepatic metabolism, especially for taurine, choline and creatinine metabolism. The systems biology approach applied in this study provides a coherent picture of metabolic changes resulting from impaired STAT5 signalling by the growth hormone

  13. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  14. An invasive plant alters phenotypic selection on the vegetative growth of a native congener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beans, Carolyn M; Roach, Deborah A

    2015-02-01

    The ecological consequences of plant competition have frequently been tested, but the evolutionary outcomes of these interactions have gone largely unexplored. The study of species invasions can make an important contribution to this field of research by allowing us to watch ecological and evolutionary processes unfold as a novel species is integrated into a plant community. We explored the ecological and evolutionary impact of an invasive jewelweed, Impatiens glandulifera, on a closely related native congener, I. capensis and asked: (1) Does the presence of the invasive jewelweed alter the fitness of native jewelweed populations? (2) Does the invasive jewelweed affect the vegetative growth of the native congener? and (3) Does the invasive jewelweed alter phenotypic selection on the vegetative traits of the native congener? We used a greenhouse competition experiment, an invasive species removal field experiment, and a survey of natural populations. We show that when the invasive jewelweed is present, phenotypic selection favors native jewelweed individuals investing less in rapid upward growth and more in branching and fruiting potential through the production of nodes. This research demonstrates that invasive plants have the potential to greatly alter natural selection on native competitors. Studies investigating altered selection in invaded communities can reveal the potential evolutionary impact of invasive competitors, while deepening our understanding of the more general role of competition in driving plant evolution and permitting species coexistence. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  15. Macroalgae decrease growth and alter microbial community structure of the reef-building coral, Porites astreoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca; Burkepile, Deron E; Correa, Adrienne M S; Thurber, Andrew R; Shantz, Andrew A; Welsh, Rory; Pritchard, Catharine; Rosales, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    With the continued and unprecedented decline of coral reefs worldwide, evaluating the factors that contribute to coral demise is of critical importance. As coral cover declines, macroalgae are becoming more common on tropical reefs. Interactions between these macroalgae and corals may alter the coral microbiome, which is thought to play an important role in colony health and survival. Together, such changes in benthic macroalgae and in the coral microbiome may result in a feedback mechanism that contributes to additional coral cover loss. To determine if macroalgae alter the coral microbiome, we conducted a field-based experiment in which the coral Porites astreoides was placed in competition with five species of macroalgae. Macroalgal contact increased variance in the coral-associated microbial community, and two algal species significantly altered microbial community composition. All macroalgae caused the disappearance of a γ-proteobacterium previously hypothesized to be an important mutualist of P. astreoides. Macroalgal contact also triggered: 1) increases or 2) decreases in microbial taxa already present in corals, 3) establishment of new taxa to the coral microbiome, and 4) vectoring and growth of microbial taxa from the macroalgae to the coral. Furthermore, macroalgal competition decreased coral growth rates by an average of 36.8%. Overall, this study found that competition between corals and certain species of macroalgae leads to an altered coral microbiome, providing a potential mechanism by which macroalgae-coral interactions reduce coral health and lead to coral loss on impacted reefs.

  16. Macroalgae decrease growth and alter microbial community structure of the reef-building coral, Porites astreoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Vega Thurber

    Full Text Available With the continued and unprecedented decline of coral reefs worldwide, evaluating the factors that contribute to coral demise is of critical importance. As coral cover declines, macroalgae are becoming more common on tropical reefs. Interactions between these macroalgae and corals may alter the coral microbiome, which is thought to play an important role in colony health and survival. Together, such changes in benthic macroalgae and in the coral microbiome may result in a feedback mechanism that contributes to additional coral cover loss. To determine if macroalgae alter the coral microbiome, we conducted a field-based experiment in which the coral Porites astreoides was placed in competition with five species of macroalgae. Macroalgal contact increased variance in the coral-associated microbial community, and two algal species significantly altered microbial community composition. All macroalgae caused the disappearance of a γ-proteobacterium previously hypothesized to be an important mutualist of P. astreoides. Macroalgal contact also triggered: 1 increases or 2 decreases in microbial taxa already present in corals, 3 establishment of new taxa to the coral microbiome, and 4 vectoring and growth of microbial taxa from the macroalgae to the coral. Furthermore, macroalgal competition decreased coral growth rates by an average of 36.8%. Overall, this study found that competition between corals and certain species of macroalgae leads to an altered coral microbiome, providing a potential mechanism by which macroalgae-coral interactions reduce coral health and lead to coral loss on impacted reefs.

  17. Altered differentiation and paracrine stimulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation by conditionally activated Smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Adriana P; LaMarca, Heather L; Villanueva, Hugo; Toneff, Michael J; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling network is critical for patterning and organogenesis in mammals, and has been implicated in a variety of cancers. Smoothened (Smo), the gene encoding the principal signal transducer, is overexpressed frequently in breast cancer, and constitutive activation in MMTV-SmoM2 transgenic mice caused alterations in mammary gland morphology, increased proliferation, and changes in stem/progenitor cell number. Both in transgenic mice and in clinical specimens, proliferative cells did not usually express detectable Smo, suggesting the hypothesis that Smo functioned in a non-cell autonomous manner to stimulate proliferation. Here, we employed a genetically tagged mouse model carrying a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditional allele of constitutively active Smo (SmoM2) to test this hypothesis. MMTV-Cre- or adenoviral-Cre-mediated SmoM2 expression in the luminal epithelium, but not in the myoepithelium, was required for the hyper-proliferative phenotypes. High levels of proliferation were observed in cells adjacent or in close-proximity to Smo expressing cells demonstrating that SmoM2 expressing cells were stimulating proliferation via a paracrine or juxtacrine mechanism. In contrast, Smo expression altered luminal cell differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. SmoM2 expressing cells, purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) via the genetic fluorescent tag, expressed high levels of Ptch2, Gli1, Gli2, Jag2 and Dll-1, and lower levels of Notch4 and Hes6, in comparison to wildtype cells. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of Smo activation in the mammary gland and its possible roles in breast tumorigenesis. In addition, these results also have potential implications for the interpretation of proliferative phenotypes commonly observed in other organs as a consequence of hedgehog signaling activation.

  18. Rat hepatic stellate cells alter the gene expression profile and promote the growth, migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Liu, Bin-Bin; Jia, Qin-An; Dong, Yin-Ying; Xia, Yun-Hong; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and their paracrine secretions, on hepatocellular cancer cell growth and gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Differentially expressed genes in McA-RH7777 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells following non-contact co-culture with activated stellate cells, were identified by a cDNA microarray. The effect of the co-injection of HCC cells and activated HSCs on tumor size in rats was also investigated. Non-contact co-culture altered the expression of 573 HCC genes by >2-fold of the control levels. Among the six selected genes, ELISA revealed increased protein levels of hepatic growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9). Incubation of HCC cells with medium conditioned by activated HSCs significantly increased the proliferation rate (Pprofile of HCC cells and affected their growth, migration and invasiveness. The results from the present study indicate that the interaction between the activated HSCs and HCC has an important role in the development of HCC.

  19. High-throughput sperm differential proteomics suggests that epigenetic alterations contribute to failed assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiazu, Rubén; Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Guimerà, Marta; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Balasch, Juan; Oliva, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Are there quantitative alterations in the proteome of normozoospermic sperm samples that are able to complete IVF but whose female partner does not achieve pregnancy? Normozoospermic sperm samples with different IVF outcomes (pregnancy versus no pregnancy) differed in the levels of at least 66 proteins. The analysis of the proteome of sperm samples with distinct fertilization capacity using low-throughput proteomic techniques resulted in the detection of a few differential proteins. Current high-throughput mass spectrometry approaches allow the identification and quantification of a substantially higher number of proteins. This was a case-control study including 31 men with normozoospermic sperm and their partners who underwent IVF with successful fertilization recruited between 2007 and 2008. Normozoospermic sperm samples from 15 men whose female partners did not achieve pregnancy after IVF (no pregnancy) and 16 men from couples that did achieve pregnancy after IVF (pregnancy) were included in this study. To perform the differential proteomic experiments, 10 no pregnancy samples and 10 pregnancy samples were separately pooled and subsequently used for tandem mass tags (TMT) protein labelling, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification and peak intensity relative protein quantification. Bioinformatic analyses were performed using UniProt Knowledgebase, DAVID and Reactome. Individual samples (n = 5 no pregnancy samples; n = 6 pregnancy samples) and aliquots from the above TMT pools were used for western blotting. By using TMT labelling and LC-MS/MS, we have detected 31 proteins present at lower abundance (ratio no pregnancy/pregnancy 1.5) in the no pregnancy group. Bioinformatic analyses showed that the proteins with differing abundance are involved in chromatin assembly and lipoprotein metabolism (P values Economia y Competividad; FEDER BFU 2009-07118 and PI13/00699) and

  20. Maternal and fetal metabonomic alterations in prenatal nicotine exposure-induced rat intrauterine growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiang-hua; Yan, You-e; Liang, Gai; Liu, Yan-song; Li, Xiao-jun; Zhang, Ben-jian; Chen, Liao-bin; Yu, Hong; He, Xiao-hua; Wang, Hui

    2014-08-25

    Prenatal nicotine exposure causes adverse birth outcome. However, the corresponding metabonomic alterations and underlying mechanisms of nicotine-induced developmental toxicity remain unclear. The aims of this study were to characterize the metabolic alterations in biofluids in nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rat model. In the present study, pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered with different doses of nicotine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg d) from gestational day (GD) 11-20. The metabolic profiles of the biofluids, including maternal plasma, fetal plasma and amniotic fluid, were analyzed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic techniques. Prenatal nicotine exposure caused noticeably lower body weights, higher IUGR rates of fetal rats, and elevated maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels compared to the controls. The correlation analysis among maternal, fetal serum CORT levels and fetal bodyweight suggested that the levels of maternal and fetal serum CORT presented a positive correlation (r=0.356, n=32, Pfetal (r=-0.639, n=32, Pfetal bodyweight. The fetal metabonome alterations included the stimulation of lipogenesis and the decreased levels of glucose and amino acids. The maternal metabonome alterations involved the enhanced blood glucose levels, fatty acid oxygenolysis, proteolysis and amino acid accumulation. These results suggested that prenatal nicotine exposure is associated with an altered maternal and fetal metabonome, which may be related to maternal increased glucocorticoid level induced by nicotine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential tinnitus-related neuroplastic alterations of cortical thickness and surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Liem, Franziskus; Kleinjung, Tobias; Weidt, Steffi; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Structural neuroimaging techniques have been used to identify cortical and subcortical regions constituting the neuroarchitecture of tinnitus. One recent investigation used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to analyze a sample of tinnitus patients (TI, n = 257) (Schecklmann et al., 2013). A negative relationship between individual distress and cortical volume (CV) in bilateral auditory regions was observed. However, CV has meanwhile been identified as a neuroanatomical measurement that confounds genetically distinct neuroanatomical traits, namely cortical thickness (CT) and cortical surface area (CSA). We performed a re-analysis of the identical sample using the automated FreeSurfer surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach (Fischl, 2012). First, we replicated the negative correlation between tinnitus distress and bilateral supratemporal gray matter volume. Second, we observed a negative correlation for CSA in the left periauditory cortex and anterior insula. Furthermore, we noted a positive correlation between tinnitus duration and CT in the left periauditory cortex as well as a negative correlation in the subcallosal anterior cingulate, a region collated to the serotonergic circuit and germane to inhibitory functions. In short, the results elucidate differential neuroanatomical alterations of CSA and CT for the two independent tinnitus-related psychological traits distress and duration. Beyond this, the study provides further evidence for the distinction and specific susceptibility of CSA and CT within the context of neuroplasticity of the human brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. White-throated sparrows alter songs differentially in response to chorusing anurans and other background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Ariel K; La, Van T

    2014-06-01

    Animals can use acoustic signals to attract mates and defend territories. As a consequence, background noise that interferes with signal transmission has the potential to reduce fitness, especially in birds that rely on song. While much research on bird song has investigated vocal flexibility in response to urban noise, weather and other birds, the possibility of inter-class acoustic competition from anurans has not been previously studied. Using sound recordings from central Ontario wetlands, we tested if white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicolis) make short-term changes to their singing behaviour in response to chorusing spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), as well as to car noise, wind and other bird vocalizations. White-throated sparrow songs that were sung during the spring peeper chorus were shorter with higher minimum frequencies and narrower bandwidths resulting in reduced frequency overlap. Additionally, sparrows were less likely to sing when car noise and the vocalizations of other birds were present. These patterns suggest that birds use multiple adjustment strategies. This is the first report to demonstrate that birds may alter their songs differentially in response to different sources of noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  3. Morpho-anatomical and growth alterations induced by arsenic in Cajanus cajan (L.) DC (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Barbosa, Alice; Gonçalves, Elton Carvalho; Azevedo, Aristéa Alves

    2015-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element to most organisms. Studies investigating anatomic alterations due to As exposure in plants are scarce but of utmost importance to the establishment of environmental biomonitoring techniques. So, this study aimed to investigate the effects of As on the development and initial root growth in Cajanus cajan (Fabaceae), characterize and quantify the possible damages, evaluate genotoxic effects, and identify structural markers to be used in environmental bioindication. Plants were exposed hydroponically to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mg As L(-1), as sodium arsenate. Growth parameters were measured, and in the end of the exposure, root samples were analyzed for qualitative and quantitative anatomical alterations. Arsenic genotoxicity was evaluated through analysis of the mitotic index in the root apex. Compared to the control, As-treated seedlings showed an altered architecture, with significantly decreased root length (due to the lower mitotic index in the apical meristem and reduced elongation of parenchyma cells) with darkened color, and abnormal development of the root cap. A significant increase in vascular cylinder/root diameter ratio was also detected, due to the reduction of the cellular spaces in the cortex. The secondary xylem vessel elements were reduced in diameter and had sinuous walls. The severest damage was visible in the ramification zone, where uncommon division planes of phellogen and cambium cells and disintegration of the parenchyma cells adjacent to lateral roots were observed. The high sensibility of C. cajan to As was confirmed, since it caused severe damages in root growth and anatomy. The main structural markers for As toxicity were the altered root architecture, with the reduction of the elongation zone and increase of ramification zone length, and the root primordia retained within the cortex. Our results show a new approach about As toxicity and indicate that C. cajan is a promising species to be used for

  4. Estrogen Receptor β Agonists Differentially Affect the Growth of Human Melanoma Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Marzagalli

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive malignancy; its incidence is increasing worldwide and its prognosis remains poor. Clinical observations indicate that estrogen receptor β (ERβ is expressed in melanoma tissues and its expression decreases with tumor progression, suggesting its tumor suppressive function. These experiments were performed to investigate the effects of ERβ activation on melanoma cell growth.Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Cell proliferation was assessed by counting the cells by hemocytometer. ERβ transcriptional activity was evaluated by gene reporter assay. Global DNA methylation was analyzed by restriction enzyme assay and ERβ isoforms were identified by qRT-PCR. We demonstrated that ERβ is expressed in a panel of human melanoma cell lines (BLM, WM115, A375, WM1552. In BLM (NRAS-mutant cells, ERβ agonists significantly and specifically inhibited cell proliferation. ERβ activation triggered its cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of ERβ agonists was associated with an altered expression of G1-S transition-related proteins. In these cells, global DNA was found to be hypomethylated when compared to normal melanocytes; this DNA hypomethylation status was reverted by ERβ activation. ERβ agonists also decreased the proliferation of WM115 (BRAF V600D-mutant cells, while they failed to reduce the growth of A375 and WM1552 (BRAF V600E-mutant cells. Finally, we could observe that ERβ isoforms are expressed at different levels in the various cell lines. Specific oncogenic mutations or differential expression of receptor isoforms might be responsible for the different responses of cell lines to ERβ agonists.Our results demonstrate that ERβ is expressed in melanoma cell lines and that ERβ agonists differentially regulate the proliferation of these cells. These data confirm the notion that melanoma is a

  5. Immune dysregulation in offspring of a bipolar parent. Altered serum levels of immune growth factors at adolescent age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, J.G.; Mesman, E.; de Wit, H.; Wijkhuijs, AJM; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Immune dysregulation plays a role in the vulnerability for mood disorders. Immune growth factors, such as Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-2 (IGF-BP2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), IL-7 and sCD25 have repeatedly been reported altered in patients with mood

  6. Differential growth stimulation response of potato towards inoculation with taxonomically diverse plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir eNaqqash

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere engineering with beneficial plant growth promoting bacteria offers great promise for sustainable crop yield. Potato is an important food commodity that needs large inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. To overcome high fertilizer demand (especially nitrogen, five bacteria, i.e. Azospirillum sp.TN10, Agrobacterium sp.TN14, Pseudomonas sp.TN36, Enterobactersp. TN38 and Rhizobium sp. TN42 were isolated from the potato rhizosphere on nitrogen-free malate medium and identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains, i.e. TN10, TN38 and TN42, showed nitrogen fixation (92.67-134.54 nmol h-1mg-1protein, while all showed the production of indole acetic acid in the presence and/or absence of L-tryptophan. Azospirillum sp. TN10 produced the highest amount of IAA, as measured by spectrophotometry (312.14 µg mL-1 and HPLC (18.3 µg mL-1. Inoculation with these bacteria under axenic conditions resulted in differential growth responses of potato. Azospirillum sp. TN10 incited the highest increase in potato fresh and dry weight over control plants, along with increased N contents of shoot and roots. All strains were able to colonize and maintain their population densities in the potato rhizosphere for upto 60 days, with Azospirillum sp. and Rhizobium sp. showing the highest survival. Plant root colonization potential was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of root sections inoculated with Azospirillum sp. TN10. Of the five test strains, Azospirillum sp. TN10 has the greatest potential to increase the growth and nitrogen uptake of potato. Hence, it is suggested as a good candidate for the production of potato biofertilizer for integrated nutrient management with potato.

  7. Mechanism of divergent growth factor effects in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy; Haack-Sorensen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Closely related signals often lead to very different cellular outcomes. We found that the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into bone-forming cells is stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics...... it as a possible control point. Indeed, chemical inhibition of PI3K in PDGF-stimulated cells removed the differential effect of the two growth factors, bestowing full differentiation effect onto PDGF. Thus, quantitative proteomics can directly compare entire signaling networks and discover critical differences...... capable of changing cell fate....

  8. Keratinocyte growth factor improves alterations of lung permeability and bronchial epithelium in allergic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Gosset, P; Le Berre, R; Janin, A; Prangère, T; Tonnel, A B; Guery, B P H

    2007-07-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is associated with marked inflammatory reaction, microvascular leakage and epithelium injury. As previously shown in a rat model of chronic asthma, these alterations increase lung permeability and distal airway fluid clearance. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) has been shown to induce epithelial cell proliferation and to protect from acute lung injuries. Therefore, the current authors evaluated the potential role of KGF treatment on lung permeability and airway inflammation in rats with chronic asthma. KGF (1 mg x kg(-1)) was administered intravenously before the last ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in sensitised rats. Permeability was assessed by the leak of radiolabelled albumin from the alveolar and systemic compartments. Histopathological analysis was also performed. Treatment with KGF decreased the leak of both markers and decreased the level of extravascular lung water in sensitised rats challenged with OVA. KGF treatment also reduced the inflammatory cell number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid but not in bronchial mucosa. KGF markedly limited the allergen-induced alterations in epithelium integrity and the expression of the intercellular junction proteins beta-catenin and zonula occludens protein-1. In conclusion, keratinocyte growth factor administration markedly limits lung permeability and airway inflammation, an effect associated with a decrease in epithelium alterations during chronic allergic asthma. These data open new prospects in the therapeutic strategy of asthma.

  9. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  10. Growth of Helicobacter pylori in a long spiral form does not alter expression of immunodominant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proujansky Roy

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that altered culture conditions (a broth media with shaking could induce a strain of Helicobacter pylori to assume a long spiral morphology resembling that described for Helicobacter heilmannii. The present study was initiated to determine if other strains of H. pylori could be induced to assume that morphology and if doing so would alter the expression of immunodominant proteins. Results The six strains used in this study were American Type Culture Collection 43504, 43579, 49503, 51652, and 51653, and Sydney Strain I. Each strain was grown on solid media and in broth culture using conditions previously shown to induce the long spiral morphology in strain 43504. DNA from each was subjected to urease gene fingerprint analysis. Results of the molecular analysis showed identical fingerprint patterns for each strain independent of culture source, indicating that only a single strain was present in each culture. Expression of immunodominant proteins was assessed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting with hyperimmune rabbit anti H. pylori sera or serum from an H. pylori infected patient. Analysis of protein profiles revealed some variation between strains but no significant differences associated with morphologic alterations. Conclusions These results indicate that growth of H. pylori in a long spiral form does not affect expression of immunodominant proteins, thus in vivo growth in the long spiral form (not documented to date would not be distinguishable by serology.

  11. Transforming growth factor-β2 induces morphological alteration of human corneal endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; Wang; Ting-Jun; Fan; Xiu-Xia; Yang; Shi-Min; Chang

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the morphological altering effect of transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2) on untransfected human corneal endothelial cells(HCECs)in vitro.METHODS:After untransfected HCECs were treated with TGF-β2 at different concentrations, the morphology,cytoskeleton distribution, and type IV collagen expression of the cells were examined with inverted contrast light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy,immunofluorescence or Western Blot.RESULTS:TGF-β2 at the concentration of 3-15 μg/L had obviously alterative effects on HCECs morphology in dose and time-dependent manner, and 9 μg/L was the peak concentration. TGF-β2(9 μg/L) altered HCE cell morphology after treatment for 36 h, increased the mean optical density(P <0.01) and the length of F-actin,reduced the mean optical density(P <0.01) of the collagen type IV in extracellular matrix(ECM) and induced the rearrangement of F-actin, microtubule in cytoplasm and collagen type IV in ECM after treatment for 72 h.·CONCLUTION: TGF-β2 has obviously alterative effect on the morphology of HCECs from polygonal phenotype to enlarged spindle-shaped phenotype, in dose and time-dependence manner by inducing more, elongation and alignment of F-actin, rearrangement of microtubule and larger spread area of collagen type IV.

  12. Alterations in plant growth and in root hormone levels of lodgepole pines inoculated with rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, E; Tuzun, S; Chanway, C P; Enebak, S

    2001-09-01

    The presence of other soil microorganisms might influence the ability of rhizobacterial inoculants to promote plant growth either by reducing contact between the inoculant and the plant root or by interfering with the mechanism(s) involved in rhizobacterially mediated growth promotion. We conducted the following experiments to determine whether reductions in the extent of growth promotion of lodgepole pine mediated by Paenibacillus polymyxa occur in the presence of a forest soil isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens M20) and whether changes in plant growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa (i) are related to changes in P. polymyxa density in the rhizosphere or (ii) result from alterations in root hormone levels. The extent of plant growth, P. polymyxa rhizosphere density, and root hormone concentrations were determined for lodgepole pine treated with (i) a single growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain (P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2) or (ii) a combination of bacteria: strain L6 + strain M20 or strain Pw-2 + strain M20. There was no difference in the growth of pines inoculated with strain L6 and those inoculated with strain L6 + strain M20. However, seedlings inoculated with strain Pw-2 had more lateral roots and greater root mass at 12 weeks after inoculation than plants inoculated with strain Pw-2 + strain M20. The extent of growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa L6 and Pw-2 in each treatment was not correlated to the average population density of each strain in the rhizosphere. Bacterial species-specific effects were observed in root hormone levels: indole-3-acetic acid concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2, while dihydrozeatin riboside concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. fluorescens M20.

  13. Renal pyramid echogenicity in ureteropelvic junction obstruction: correlation between altered echogenicity and differential renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind; Daneman, Alan; Lim, Ruth; Traubici, Jeffrey [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Langlois, Valerie [University of Toronto, Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Improvement in resolution and use of high-frequency transducers in US has enabled visualization of previously unreported changes in medullary pyramid echogenicity in children with obstructive hydronephrosis. To determine whether these unreported changes in echogenicity and morphology of the renal pyramids in ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction correlate with differential renal function (DRF) of the kidney as determined by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG3) scan. Renal sonograms in 60 children with UPJ obstruction were retrospectively reviewed. Children were divided into three groups based on the echogenicity of the pyramids: (1) normal echogenicity of the pyramids, (2) increased echogenicity of the pyramids with maintained corticomedullary differentiation (CMD), and (3) loss of CMD. DRF, as determined by {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 scan, of the obstructed kidney of {>=}45% was considered normal and of {<=}44% was considered abnormal based on a published study correlating histological changes with DRF. Fisher's exact test was performed for assessing the association between DRF and altered echogenicity of the pyramids. In group 1, which consisted of 13 patients with normal pyramids on US, DRF was normal in 11 and abnormal in two. In group 2, which consisted of 33 patients with echogenic pyramids and preserved CMD, DRF was normal in 15 and abnormal in 18. In group 3, which consisted of 14 patients with complete loss of CMD, DRF was normal in 2 and abnormal in 12. There was a strong correlation between abnormal pyramids and DRF (P=0.0009). The risk ratio (RR) of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with abnormal echogenicity of the pyramids with preserved CMD (group 2) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 1.56 (95% CI 1.088-2.236). The RR of DRF becoming abnormal for those kidneys with loss of CMD (group 3) compared to normal pyramid echogenicity (group 1) was 5.571 (95% CI 1.530-20.294). We observed that in obstructed kidneys

  14. The IGF system during growth and differentiation of the mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Kleffens (Marjolein)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) were first discovered in 1957 by Salmon and Daughaday (1957). They found that in vivo administration of growth hormone (GH) induced a serum factor capable of stimulating sulfate uptake in cartilage. In 1972 this 'sulfation factor' was renamed somato

  15. Altering Work to Rest Ratios Differentially Influences Fatigue Indices During Repeated Sprint Ability Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Riffe, Josh J; Baker, Kayla M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the influence of recovery time on fatigue indices, performance (total work [TW], peak power [PP], and mean power [MP]), and oxygen consumption during repeated sprint ability (RSA) on a cycle ergometer. Eight recreationally-trained men performed 3 RSA protocols consisting of 10 × 6 s sprints with 12 s, 18 s, and 24 s rest intervals between each sprint. Fatigue indices were determined as percent decrement (%Dec) and rate of decline using either a log transform method or standard slope approach for TW, PP, and MP during respective RSA protocols. The maximal VO2 value in response to given sprint intervals and the minimal VO2 value in response to given rest periods (VO2 work and VO2 rest, respectively) were recorded. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze all variables. Average VO2 work was not different among rest interval trials. Average VO2 rest with 12 s rest was greater than 18 s and 24 s (2.16 ± 0.17 L · min(-1), 1.91 ± 0.18 L · min(-1), 1.72 ± 0.15 L · min(-1), respectively), while 18 s was greater than 24 s. Average TW and MP were greater with 24 s rest than 12 s (4,604.44 ± 915.98 J vs. 4,305.46 ± 727.17 J, respectively), with no differences between RSA protocols for PP. No differences in %Dec were observed. Both methods of calculating rates of decline per sprint for PP and TW were greater during 12 s than 18 s or 24 s. Since changes were only noted between the 12 s and 24 s protocols, a 6 s differential in rest intervals may not be enough to elicit alterations in TW, PP, MP, or %Dec in RSA performance. Rate of decline may be a more sensitive measure of fatigue than %Dec.

  16. Diet, age, and prior injury status differentially alter behavioral outcomes following concussion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; van Waes, Linda; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion affects a large portion of the population and although many of these individuals recover completely, a small subset of people experience lingering symptomology and poor outcomes. Little is known about the factors that affect individual susceptibility or resilience to poor outcomes after mTBI and there are currently no biomarkers to delineate mTBI diagnosis or prognosis. Based upon the growing literature associated with caloric intake and altered neurological aging and the ambiguous link between repetitive mTBI and progressive neurodegeneration, the current study was designed to examine the effect of a high fat diet (HFD), developmental age, and repetitive mTBI on behavioral outcomes following a mTBI. In addition, telomere length was examined before and after experimental mTBI. Sprague Dawley rats were maintained on a HFD or standard rat chow throughout life (including the prenatal period) and then experienced an mTBI/concussion at P30, P30 and P60, or only at P60. Behavioral outcomes were examined using a test battery that was administered between P61-P80 and included; beam-walking, open field, elevated plus maze, novel context mismatch, Morris water task, and forced swim task. Animals with a P30 mTBI often demonstrated lingering symptomology that was still present during testing at P80. Injuries at P30 and P60 rarely produced cumulative effects, and in some tests (i.e., beam walking), the first injury may have protected the brain from the second injury. Exposure to the high fat diet exacerbated many of the behavioral deficits associated with concussion. Finally, telomere length was shortened following mTBI and was influenced by the animal's dietary intake. Diet, age at the time of injury, and the number of prior concussion incidents differentially contribute to behavioral deficits and may help explain individual variations in susceptibility and resilience to poor outcomes following an mTBI.

  17. Growth, survival and bone alterations in Piaractus mesopotamicus larvae under different rearing protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roque Hernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus is a neotropical freshwater fish. It is one of the most important species farmed in areas of the Parana and Paraguay Rivers basins. The effects of different rearing protocols on growth, survival and incidence of skeletal malformations in pacu larvae were analyzed. A total of six experimental treatments were considered, consisting of: a semi-intensive larviculture (LS in ponds; intensive larviculture (LIn in laboratory (both LS and LIn until 60 days of life; and mixed larviculture, with 20 days of semi-intensive larviculture into cages in ponds after 14 (L1, 21 (L2, 33 (L3 or 40 (L4 days of laboratory larviculture. At the end of the experimental period, LSlarvae showed higher growth rate, with average weight values (2.28g and total length (TL-48.20mm statistically higher than the rest (P1 to L4 treatments showed intermediate growth values, without differences between them (P>0.05, while LIn presented the lowest growth (PS, that presented a significantly lower value (17.5%, PIn and L1 presented the lowest incidence. In no case, visible morphological alterations were found. This study shows that prolonging pacu rearing under laboratory conditions at high densities improves temporal availability and survival of juvenile without affecting growth or subsequent osteological development of fish.

  18. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  19. Effects of arecoline on cell growth, migration, and differentiation in cementoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Juai Chen

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that arecoline could inhibit cell growth, migration, and differentiation in cementoblasts. Areca quid chewers might be more susceptible to the destruction of periodontium and less responsive to regenerative procedure during periodontal therapy.

  20. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Growth and Differentiation of ’Physarum polycephalum’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    AD-AO10 187 EFFECTS OF EXTREMELY LOW FREQUENCY ELECTRO- MAGNETIC FIELDS ON GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION OF ’ PHYSARUM POLYCEPHALUM ’ E. M. Guodman, et al...LExtremely Low Prequency Electromagnetic Fields on Growth and Differentiation of Physarum polycephalum Technical Report Phase I (Continuous Wave) by...that weak, alternating electromagnetic fields (60 or 75 Hz, 2.0 G, 0.7 V/n) affect the cell cycle of Physarum polycephalum by increasing the interval

  1. Cataloging altered gene expression in young and senescent cells using enhanced differential display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Feng, Junli; Andrews, William H.; Enlow, Brett E.; Saati, Shahin M.; Tonkin, Leath A.; Funk, Walter D.; Villeponteau, Bryant

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a novel PCR-based technique, differential display (DD), has facilitated the study of differentially expressed genes at the mRNA level. We report here an improved version of DD, which we call Enhanced Differential Display (EDD). We have modified the technique to enhance reproducibility and

  2. Modulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor expression and signalling during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of Tera-2 teratocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertovaara, L; Tienari, J; Vainikka, S; Partanen, J; Saksela, O; Lehtonen, E; Alitalo, K

    1993-02-26

    We have analyzed the regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) during retinoic acid (RA) induced differentiation of Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells. Undifferentiated Tera-2 cells expressed mRNAs for all four known FGFRs. Their differentiation led to loss of FGFR-4 mRNA expression and mRNA levels for FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 were considerably downregulated, whereas the mRNA levels for FGFR-1 remained unaltered. A substantial decrease in binding of K-FGF was found to occur upon RA-induced differentiation of the cells. In undifferentiated Tera-2 cells FGF stimulation caused an increase of c-fos mRNA, and c-jun mRNAs, but no increase of junB mRNA, whereas in the differentiated cells, FGFs strongly stimulated the expression of all three genes. Thus differentiation of the Tera-2 cells leads to marked changes in FGFR gene expression as well as to complex alterations in their responses to exogenous FGFs.

  3. GROWTH OF SOLUTIONS OF THREE ORDER DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZongxuan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper,the precise estimation of the order and hyper-order of solutions of a class of three order homogeneous and non-homogeneous linear differential equations are obtained. The results of M. Ozawa (1980), G. Gundersen (1988) and J. K. Langley ( 1986 ) are improved.

  4. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  5. Perfluorooctane sulfonate induces neuronal and oligodendrocytic differentiation in neural stem cells and alters the expression of PPARγ in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah, E-mail: hamidah@science.upm.edu.my [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Tofighi, Roshan, E-mail: Roshan.Tofighi@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Onishchenko, Natalia, E-mail: Natalia.Onishchenko@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Rebellato, Paola, E-mail: Paola.Rebellato@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Bose, Raj, E-mail: Raj.Bose@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Uhlén, Per, E-mail: Per.Uhlen@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Ceccatelli, Sandra, E-mail: Sandra.Ceccatelli@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    Perfluorinated compounds are ubiquitous chemicals of major concern for their potential adverse effects on the human population. We have used primary rat embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) to study the effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on the process of NSC spontaneous differentiation. Upon removal of basic fibroblast growth factor, NSCs were exposed to nanomolar concentrations of PFOS for 48 h, and then allowed to differentiate for additional 5 days. Exposure to 25 or 50 nM concentration resulted in a lower number of proliferating cells and a higher number of neurite-bearing TuJ1-positive cells, indicating an increase in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to 50 nM also significantly increased the number of CNPase-positive cells, pointing to facilitation of oligodendrocytic differentiation. PPAR genes have been shown to be involved in PFOS toxicity. By q-PCR we detected an upregulation of PPARγ with no changes in PPARα or PPARδ genes. One of the downstream targets of PPARs, the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was also upregulated. The number of TuJ1- and CNPase-positive cells increased after exposure to PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ, 3 μM) and decreased after pre-incubation with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (5 μM). RGZ also upregulated the expression of PPARγ and UCP2 genes. Meanwhile GW9662 abolished the UCP2 upregulation and decreased Ca{sup 2+} activity induced by PFOS. Interestingly, a significantly higher expression of PPARγ and UCP3 genes was also detected in mouse neonatal brain after prenatal exposure to PFOS. These data suggest that PPARγ plays a role in the alteration of spontaneous differentiation of NSCs induced by nanomolar concentrations of PFOS. - Highlights: • PFOS decreases proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs). • PFOS induces neuronal and oligodendrocytic differentiation in NSCs. • PFOS alters expression of PPARγ and UCP2 in vitro. • PFOS alters expression of PPARγ and UCP3 in vivo. • Block of PPAR

  6. Ocean acidification with (de)eutrophication will alter future phytoplankton growth and succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kevin J; Clark, Darren R; Mitra, Aditee; Fabian, Heiner; Hansen, Per J; Glibert, Patricia M; Wheeler, Glen L; Stoecker, Diane K; Blackford, Jerry C; Brownlee, Colin

    2015-04-07

    Human activity causes ocean acidification (OA) though the dissolution of anthropogenically generated CO2 into seawater, and eutrophication through the addition of inorganic nutrients. Eutrophication increases the phytoplankton biomass that can be supported during a bloom, and the resultant uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon during photosynthesis increases water-column pH (bloom-induced basification). This increased pH can adversely affect plankton growth. With OA, basification commences at a lower pH. Using experimental analyses of the growth of three contrasting phytoplankton under different pH scenarios, coupled with mathematical models describing growth and death as functions of pH and nutrient status, we show how different conditions of pH modify the scope for competitive interactions between phytoplankton species. We then use the models previously configured against experimental data to explore how the commencement of bloom-induced basification at lower pH with OA, and operating against a background of changing patterns in nutrient loads, may modify phytoplankton growth and competition. We conclude that OA and changed nutrient supply into shelf seas with eutrophication or de-eutrophication (the latter owing to pollution control) has clear scope to alter phytoplankton succession, thus affecting future trophic dynamics and impacting both biogeochemical cycling and fisheries.

  7. Food restriction alters energy allocation strategy during growth in tobacco hornworms (Manduca sexta larvae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Lihong; Amunugama, Kaushalya; Hayes, Matthew B; Jennings, Michael; Domingo, Azriel; Hou, Chen

    2015-08-01

    Growing animals must alter their energy budget in the face of environmental changes and prioritize the energy allocation to metabolism for life-sustaining requirements and energy deposition in new biomass growth. We hypothesize that when food availability is low, larvae of holometabolic insects with a short development stage (relative to the low food availability period) prioritize biomass growth at the expense of metabolism. Driven by this hypothesis, we develop a simple theoretical model, based on conservation of energy and allometric scaling laws, for understanding the dynamic energy budget of growing larvae under food restriction. We test the hypothesis by manipulative experiments on fifth instar hornworms at three temperatures. At each temperature, food restriction increases the scaling power of growth rate but decreases that of metabolic rate, as predicted by the hypothesis. During the fifth instar, the energy budgets of larvae change dynamically. The free-feeding larvae slightly decrease the energy allocated to growth as body mass increases and increase the energy allocated to life sustaining. The opposite trends were observed in food restricted larvae, indicating the predicted prioritization in the energy budget under food restriction. We compare the energy budgets of a few endothermic and ectothermic species and discuss how different life histories lead to the differences in the energy budgets under food restriction.

  8. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  9. Bulbous epiphysis and popcorn calcification as related to growth plate differentiation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizola, Evelise; McCarthy, Edward; Shapiro, Jay Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is an heritable systemic disorder of connective tissue due to different sequence variants in genes affecting both the synthesis of type I collagen and osteoblast function. Dominant and recessive inheritance is recognized. Approximately 90% of the OI cases are due to mutations in COL1A1/A2 genes. We clinically and radiologically describes an adult male with type III osteogenesis imperfecta who presents a rare bone dysplasia termed bulbous epiphyseal deformity in association with popcorn calcifications. Popcorn calcifications may occur with bulbous epiphyseal deformity or independently. Methods Molecular analysis was performed for COL1A1, COL1A2, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Results An uncommon COL1A1 mutation was identified. Clinical and radiological exams confirmed a distinctive bulbous epiphyseal deformity with popcorn calcifications in distal femurs. We have identified four additional OI patients reported in current literature, whose X-rays show bulbous epiphyseal deformity related to mutations in CR-TAP, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Conclusion The mutation identified here had been previously described twice in OI patients and no previous correlation with bulbous epiphyseal deformity was described. The occurrence of this bone dysplasia focuses attention on alterations in normal growth plate differentiation and the subsequent effect on endochondral bone formation in OI. PMID:26604951

  10. A Casparian strip domain-like gene, CASPL, negatively alters growth and cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinghua; Ding, Changqing; Xu, Baochen; Chen, Cuiting; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, Jim; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2015-09-24

    A cold-induced transcript encoding a Casparian strip membrane domain (CASP)-like protein (ClCASPL) was identified in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that ClCASPL-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The orthologous gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCASPL4C1) was also found to play an important role in cold tolerance. Expression analysis using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that AtCASPL4C1 is widely expressed in a variety of organs and is cold inducible. Analysis of AtCASPL4C1 T-DNA knock-out plants showed altered growth dynamics, faster growth, increased biomass (dry weight) and earlier flowering compared to wild type (Col-0) and ClCASPL overexpressing plants. AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants showed elevated tolerance to cold stress, while overexpressing CICASPL resulted in increased sensitivity to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants did not display significant alterations in the Casparian strip formation in roots. Thus, the combination of these results suggests a role for CICASPL and AtCASPL4C1 beyond Casparian strip formation in roots, possibly indicating a more fundamental role in vascular tissue.

  11. Changes in insulin-like growth factor signaling alter phenotypes in Fragile X Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, T L

    2017-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an inherited form of intellectual disability that is usually caused by expansion of a polymorphic CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the X-linked FMR1 gene, which leads to hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. Two non-neurological phenotypes of FXS are enlarged testes and connective tissue dysplasia, which could be caused by alterations in a growth factor signaling pathway. FXS patients also frequently have autistic-like symptoms, suggesting that the signaling pathways affected in FXS may overlap with those affected in autism. Identifying these pathways is important for both understanding the effects of FMR1 inactivation and developing treatments for both FXS and autism. Here we show that decreasing the levels of the insulin-like growth factor (Igf) receptor 1 corrects a number of phenotypes in the mouse model of FXS, including macro-orchidism, and that increasing the levels of IGF2 exacerbates the seizure susceptibility phenotype. These results suggest that the pathways altered by the loss of the FMR1-encoded protein (FMRP) may overlap with the pathways affected by changes in Igf signaling or that one or more of the proteins that play a role in Igf signaling could interact with FMRP. They also indicate a new set of potential targets for drug treatment of FXS and autism spectrum disorders.

  12. Hepatocellular alterations and dysregulation of oncogenic pathways in the liver of transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G; Freund, Thomas; Martinez, Carolina S; González, Lorena; Díaz, María E; Micucci, Giannina P; Zotta, Elsa; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) overexpression throughout life in transgenic mice is associated with the development of liver tumors at old ages. The preneoplastic pathology observed in the liver of young adult GH-overexpressing mice is similar to that present in humans at high risk of hepatic cancer. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying the pro-oncogenic liver pathology induced by prolonged exposure to elevated GH levels, the activation and expression of several components of signal transduction pathways that have been implicated in hepatocellular carcinogenesis were evaluated in the liver of young adult GH-transgenic mice. In addition, males and females were analyzed in parallel in order to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Transgenic mice from both sexes exhibited hepatocyte hypertrophy with enlarged nuclear size and exacerbated hepatocellular proliferation, which were higher in males. Dysregulation of several oncogenic pathways was observed in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Many signaling mediators and effectors were upregulated in transgenic mice compared with normal controls, including Akt2, NFκB, GSK3β, β-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-myc, c-jun and c-fos. The molecular alterations described did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in transgenic mice except for higher gene expression and nuclear localization of cyclin D1 in males. We conclude that prolonged exposure to GH induces in the liver alterations in signaling pathways involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival that resemble those found in many human tumors.

  13. Choline and methionine differentially alter methyl carbon metabolism in bovine neonatal hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Tawny L.

    2017-01-01

    Intersections in hepatic methyl group metabolism pathways highlights potential competition or compensation of methyl donors. The objective of this experiment was to examine the expression of genes related to methyl group transfer and lipid metabolism in response to increasing concentrations of choline chloride (CC) and DL-methionine (DLM) in primary neonatal hepatocytes that were or were not exposed to fatty acids (FA). Primary hepatocytes isolated from 4 neonatal Holstein calves were maintained as monolayer cultures for 24 h before treatment with CC (61, 128, 2028, and 4528 μmol/L) and DLM (16, 30, 100, 300 μmol/L), with or without a 1 mmol/L FA cocktail in a factorial arrangement. After 24 h of treatment, media was collected for quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and cell lysates were collected for quantification of gene expression. No interactions were detected between CC, DLM, or FA. Both CC and DLM decreased the expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A). Increasing CC did not alter betaine-homocysteine S-methyltranferase (BHMT) but did increase 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) expression. Increasing DLM decreased expression of BHMT and MTR, but did not affect MTHFR. Expression of both phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were decreased by increasing CC and DLM, while carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) was unaffected by either. Treatment with FA decreased the expression of MAT1A, MTR, MTHFR and tended to decrease PEMT but did not affect BHMT and MTTP. Treatment with FA increased CPT1A expression. Increasing CC increased secretion of VLDL and decreased the accumulation of ROS in media. Within neonatal bovine hepatocytes, choline and methionine differentially regulate methyl carbon pathways and suggest that choline may play a critical role in

  14. Possible role of differential growth in airway wall remodeling in asthma

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D. E.

    2011-01-20

    Possible role of differential growth in airway wall remodeling in asthma. J Appl Physiol 110: 1003-1012, 2011. First published January 20, 2011; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00991.2010.- Airway remodeling in patients with chronic asthma is characterized by a thickening of the airway walls. It has been demonstrated in previous theoretical models that this change in thickness can have an important mechanical effect on the properties of the wall, in particular on the phenomenon of mucosal folding induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this paper, we present a model for mucosal folding of the airway in the context of growth. The airway is modeled as a bilayered cylindrical tube, with both geometric and material nonlinearities accounted for via the theory of finite elasticity. Growth is incorporated into the model through the theory of morphoelasticity. We explore a range of growth possibilities, allowing for anisotropic growth as well as different growth rates in each layer. Such nonuniform growth, referred to as differential growth, can change the properties of the material beyond geometrical changes through the generation of residual stresses. We demonstrate that differential growth can have a dramatic impact on mucosal folding, in particular on the critical pressure needed to induce folding, the buckling pattern, as well as airway narrowing. We conclude that growth may be an important component in airway remodeling. Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Alteration of nuclear matrix-intermediate filament system and differential expression of nuclear matrix proteins during human hepatocarcinoma cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Tang; Jing-Wen Niu; Dong-Hui Xu; Zhi-Xing Li; Qi-Fu Li; Jin-An Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between the configurational and compositional changes of nuclear matrix and the differentiation of carcinoma cells.METHODS: Cells cultured with or without 5 × 10-3mmol/L of hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) on Nickel grids were treated by selective extraction and prepared for whole mount observation under electron microscopy. The samples were examined under transmission electron microscope. Nuclear matrix proteins were selectively extracted and subjected to subcellular proteomics study. The protein expression patterns were analyzed by PDQuest software. Spots of differentially expressed nuclear matrix proteins were excised and subjected to in situ digestion with trypsin.The peptides were analyzed by matrix-assisted laserdesorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Data were submitted for database searching using Mascot tool (www. Matrixscience.com).RESULTS: The nuclear matrix (NM) and intermediate filament (IF) in SMMC-7721 hepatocarcinoma cells were found relatively sparse and arranged irregularly.The nuclear lamina was non-uniform, and two kinds of filaments were not tightly connected. After induction for differentiation by HMBA, the NM-IF filaments were concentrated and distributed uniformly. The heterogeneous population of filaments, including highly branched utrathin filaments could also be seen in the regular meshwork. The connection between the two kinds of filaments and the relatively thin, condensed and sharply demarcated lamina composed of intermediatesized filaments was relatively fastened. Meanwhile, 21NM proteins changed remarkably during SMMC-7721cell differentiation. Four proteins, I.e. Mutant Pyst1,hypothetical protein, nucleophosmin1, and LBP were downregulated, whereas four other proteins, eIF6, p44subunit, β-tubulin, and SIN3B were upregulated with the last one, SR2/ASF found only in the differentiated SMMC-7721 cells.CONCLUSION: The induced differentiation of SMMC-7721cells by HMBA is

  16. Hypoxia is a key regulator of limbal epithelial stem cell growth and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Chris; Yang, Sufang; Muttuvelu, Danson

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth and differentiation of limbal epithelial stem cell cultures could be controlled through manipulation of the oxygen tension. Limbal epithelial cells were isolated from corneoscleral disks, and cultured using either feeder cells in a growth ...

  17. ANALYSIS OF REGIONAL ECONOMY GROWTH WITH THE THEORY OF DIFFERENTIAL SYSTEM DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiuping; LIU Jicheng

    2003-01-01

    In order to describe the interrelation forces among different regions during the economic growth, this paper introduces and analyzes the dynamical system model with the theory of differential systems dynamics. A practical example based on a simplified model is given to analyze the dynamical process of Sichuan economy growth.

  18. Order of growth of solutions to algebraic differential equations in the unit disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Benbourenane

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available S. B. Bank has shown that there is no uniform growth estimate for meromorphic solutions of algebraic differential equations with meromorphic coefficients in the unit disk. We give conditions under which such solutions must have a finite order of growth.

  19. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M; Grant, Michael P; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D R; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCsin vitroandin vivoIn vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCsin vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesisin vivo Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age.

  20. Analysis of Cry Features in Newborns with Differential Fetal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeskind, Philip Sanford; Ramey, Craig T.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the relationship between neonatal crying and anthropometric indices of fetal growth. No differences were found between cry features of underweight and overweight infants; both groups required more stimulation than average weight infants to elicit crying. It is suggested that certain cry features may reflect the risk status of neonates…

  1. Noggin versus basic fibroblast growth factor on the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Junmei Zhou; Zhenfu Fang; Manxi Jiang; Xuejin Chen

    2013-01-01

    The difference between Noggin and basic fibroblast growth factor for the neural precursor differen-tiation from human embryonic stem cel s has not been studied. In this study, 100 µg/L Noggin or 20 µg/L basic fibroblast growth factor in serum-free neural induction medium was used to differen-tiate human embryonic stem cel s H14 into neural precursors using monolayer differentiation. Two weeks after induction, significantly higher numbers of neural rosettes formed in the Noggin-induced group than the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced group, as detected by phase contrast micro-scope. Immunofluorescence staining revealed expression levels of Nestin,β-III Tubulin and Sox-1 were higher in the induced cel s and reverse-transcription PCR showed induced cel s expressed Nestin, Sox-1 and Neurofilament mRNA. Protein and mRNA expression in the Noggin-induced group was increased compared with the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced group. Noggin has a greater effect than basic fibroblast growth factor on the induction of human embryonic stem cel differentiation into neural precursors by monolayer differentiation, as Noggin accelerates and in-creases the differentiation of neural precursors.

  2. Thymosin beta 4 induces hair growth via stem cell migration and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Deborah; St-Surin, Sharleen; Cha, Hee-Jae; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Elkin, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Thymosin beta 4 is a small 43-amino-acid molecule that has multiple biological activities, including promotion of cell migration angiogenesis, cell survival, protease production, and wound healing. We have found that thymosin beta 4 promotes hair growth in various rat and mice models including a transgenic thymosin beta 4 overexpressing mouse. We have also determined the mechanism by which thymosin beta 4 acts to promote hair growth by examining its effects on follicle stem cell growth, migration, differentiation, and protease production.

  3. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  4. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T; Jin, Ying; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sahoo, Pabitra K; Fischer, Itzhak; Twiss, Jeffery L

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons.

  5. Control of Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Altering the Geometry of Nanofibers

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    Satoshi Fujita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is required for clinical applications. To control MSC differentiation, induction media containing different types of soluble factors have been used to date; however, it remains challenging to obtain a uniformly differentiated population of an appropriate quality for clinical application by this approach. We attempted to develop nanofiber scaffolds for effective MSC differentiation by mimicking anisotropy of the extracellular matrix structure, to assess whether differentiation of these cells can be controlled by using geometrically different scaffolds. We evaluated MSC differentiation on aligned and random nanofibers, fabricated by electrospinning. We found that induction of MSCs into adipocytes was markedly more inhibited on random nanofibers than on aligned nanofibers. In addition, adipoinduction on aligned nanofibers was also inhibited in the presence of mixed adipoinduction and osteoinduction medium, although osteoinduction was not affected by a change in scaffold geometry. Thus, we have achieved localized control over the direction of differentiation through changes in the alignment of the scaffold even in the presence of a mixed medium. These findings indicate that precise control of MSC differentiation can be attained by using scaffolds with different geometry, rather than by the conventional use of soluble factors in the medium.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine......, ductal, and acinar cells but become bipotent by embryonic day 13.5, giving rise to endocrine cells and ductal cells. However, the dynamics of individual progenitors balancing self-renewal and lineage-specific differentiation has never been described. Using three-dimensional live imaging and in vivo...... differentiation process is consistent with a simple model of cell cycle-dependent stochastic priming of progenitors to endocrine fate. The findings provide insights to define control parameters to optimize the generation of β-cells in vitro....

  7. Timing applications of growth regulators to alter spring cereal development at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAJALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth regulators (PGRs are commonly used in commercial farming to control lodging in cereals. PGRs have been shown to alter yield formation and plant stand structure, other than the straw length. To study their potential in Northern growing conditions PGRs and their application time impacts on plant stand structure and yield formation in tall and short statured cultivars of barley, oat, and wheat were studied in the field. Crop stands were sprayed with the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitors CCC [chlormequat chloride CCC], Moddus [Trinexapac-ethyl TE], or with ethylene-releasing Cerone [ethephon ETH] at the recommended times or at an earlier growth stage. CCC applied at Zadoks growth scale (ZGS 13-14 increased and ETH applied at ZGS 39-40 reduced grain yield of oat by 370 kg ha-1 and 270 kg ha-1, respectively. In wheat, CCC applied at ZGS 31-32 reduced grain yield by 480 kg ha-1. This yield reduction was associated with lower grain yield production by the main head and particularly lower single grain weight. In barley cv. Kymppi, ETH and TE treatments promoted yield formation, whereas in cv. Saana they tended to reduce yield. Early applied PGRs reduced stem height at 14 days after treatment irrespective of species or stem stature, but at maturity no constant PGR effect was noted. Excluding the stem length, PGRs did not modify plant stand structure or yield formation markedly.

  8. Alteration of microRNA expression of human dental pulp cells during odontogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qimei; Wang, Runfu; Jiang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Ling, Junqi

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play momentous roles in various biological processes including cell differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic differentiation. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of miRNAs in the primary culture of hDPCs when incubated in odontogenic medium. The potential characteristics of hDPCs were investigated by miRNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics (ie, target prediction, Gene Ontology analysis, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping tools) were applied for predicting the complementary target genes of miRNAs and their biological functions. A total of 22 miRNAs were differentially expressed in which 12 miRNAs up-regulated and 10 miRNAs down-regulated in differentiated hDPCs compared with the control. The target genes of differential miRNAs were predicted to associate with several biological functions and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential expression miRNAs may be involved in governing hDPC odontogenic differentiation, thus contributing to the future investigations of regulatory mechanisms in reparative dentin formation and dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Reniqua P; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-12-22

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Identifying placental epigenetic alterations in an intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) rat model induced by gestational protein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Buschmann, Jochen; Lewin, Geertje

    2014-06-01

    Poor maternal nutrition during gestation can lead to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), a main cause of low birth weight associated with high neonatal morbidity and mortality. Such early uterine environmental exposures can impact the neonatal epigenome to render later-in-life disease susceptibility. We established in Wistar Han rats a mild IUGR model induced by gestational protein deficiency (i.e. 9% crude protein in low protein diet vs. 21% in control, from GD 0 to 21) to identify alterations in gene expression and methylation patterns in certain genes implicated in human IUGR or in placental development. We found differential gene expression of Wnt2 and Dlk1 between IUGR and control. Notably, Wnt2 exhibited significant decrease while Dlk1 increase in IUGR placentas, correlating to decrease in fetal and placental weight. Methylation patterns encompassing 30 CpGs in the Wnt2 promoter region revealed variability in both IUGR and control placentas, but a site-specific hypomethylation was evident in IUGR placentas. Our present findings further support a key role of maternal gestational nutrition in defining the neonatal epigenome. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  12. Metabolomics reveals metabolic alterations by intrauterine growth restriction in the fetal rabbit brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin van Vliet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino

  13. GROWTH OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS IN BIOFILMS ALTERS PEPTIDE SIGNALING AT THE SUB-POPULATION LEVEL

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    Robert Colquhoun Shields

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (pppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations.

  14. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  15. Growth of common brackish marsh macrophytes under altered hydrology and salinity regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Biagas, Janelda M.; Allain, Larry K.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marsh plants are increasingly subject to physicochemical stressors under rising sea levels, and the maintenance of marsh ecological functions can depend on the ability of individual species and communities to tolerate or adapt to altered conditions. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to identify hydrology and salinity effects on growth of three common brackish marsh macrophytes of coastal Florida, USA: Distichlis spicata, Juncus roemerianus, and Spartina bakeri. The species were potted as monocultures and exposed to three salinities (0, 15, or 28 psu) and two hydrologic conditions (saturated, tidal) over 22 months. Final stem density of J. roemerianus and S. bakeri did not differ among treatments. In D. spicata, however, stem density was lowest at 28 psu and lower in tidal compared to saturated conditions. Mean stem height of all species was lowest at 28 psu. Aboveground biomass of J. roemerianus was not affected by the treatments, but in D. spicata andS. bakeri it was lowest at 28 psu. Results indicated that J. roemerianus was the most adaptable species and may, therefore, be more resilient to climate-change driven stressors. However, plant-plant interactions such as interspecific competition and facilitation can alter the response of individual species to environmental factors.

  16. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  17. Sox7-sustained expression alters the balance between proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors at the onset of blood specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandillet, Arnaud; Serrano, Alicia G; Pearson, Stella; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie

    2009-11-26

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation of precursors at the onset of hematopoiesis specification are poorly understood. By using a global gene expression profiling approach during the course of embryonic stem cell differentiation, we identified Sox7 as a potential candidate gene involved in the regulation of blood lineage formation from the mesoderm germ layer. In the present study, we show that Sox7 is transiently expressed in mesodermal precursors as they undergo specification to the hematopoietic program. Sox7 knockdown in vitro significantly decreases the formation of both primitive erythroid and definitive hematopoietic progenitors as well as endothelial progenitors. In contrast, Sox7-sustained expression in the earliest committed hematopoietic precursors promotes the maintenance of their multipotent and self-renewing status. Removal of this differentiation block driven by Sox7-enforced expression leads to the efficient differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors to all erythroid and myeloid lineages. This study identifies Sox7 as a novel and important player in the molecular regulation of the first committed blood precursors. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the mere sustained expression of Sox7 is sufficient to completely alter the balance between proliferation and differentiation at the onset of hematopoiesis.

  18. Altered membrane dynamics of quantum dot-conjugated integrins during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongfeng; Titushkin, Igor; Stroscio, Michael; Cho, Michael

    2007-02-15

    Functionalized quantum dots offer several advantages for tracking the motion of individual molecules on the cell surface, including selective binding, precise optical identification of cell surface molecules, and detailed examination of the molecular motion without photobleaching. We have used quantum dots conjugated with integrin antibodies and performed studies to quantitatively demonstrate changes in the integrin dynamics during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived progenitor cells (BMPCs). Consistent with the unusually strong BMPC adhesion previously observed, integrins on the surface of undifferentiated BMPC were found in clusters and the lateral diffusion was slow (e.g., approximately 10(-11) cm2/s). At times as early as those after a 3-day incubation in the osteogenic differentiation media, the integrin diffusion coefficients increased by an order of magnitude, and the integrin dynamics became indistinguishable from that measured on the surface of terminally differentiated human osteoblasts. Furthermore, microfilaments in BMPCs consisted of atypically thick bundles of stress fibers that were responsible for restricting the integrin lateral mobility. Studies using laser optical tweezers showed that, unlike fully differentiated osteoblasts, the BMPC cytoskeleton is weakly associated with its cell membrane. Based on these findings, it appears likely that the altered integrin dynamics is correlated with BMPC differentiation and that the integrin lateral mobility is restricted by direct links to microfilaments.

  19. Differential effects of young maternal age on child growth

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    Soo Hyun Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association of early maternal birthing age with smaller children has been widely observed. However, it is unclear if this is due to confounding by factors such as socioeconomic status, or the age at which child growth restriction first occurs. Objective: To examine the effect of early maternal birthing age on the first-born child's height-for-age in a sample of developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Design: Cross-sectional data from Demographic Health Surveys from 18 countries were used, to select the first-born child of mothers aged 15–24 years and a range of potential confounding factors, including maternal height. Child length/height-for-age z-scores (HAZs was estimated in age bands of 0–11, 12–23, 24–35, 36–47, and 48–59 months; HAZ was first compared between maternal age groups of 15–17, 18–19, and 20–24 years. Results: 1 There were significant bivariate associations between low child HAZ and young maternal age (71 of 180 possible cases; at p<0.10, but the majority of these did not persist when controlling for confounders (41 cases, 23% of the 180. 2 For children <12 months, when controlling for confounders, three out of seven Asian countries showed a significant association between lower infant HAZ and low maternal age, as did six out of nine African countries (15–17 or 15–19 years vs. the older group. 3 The association (adjusted continued after 24 months in 12 of the 18 countries, in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. 4 The stunting differences for children between maternal age groups were around 9 percentage points (ppts in Asia, 14 ppts in Africa, and 10 ppts in Latin America. These data do not show whether this is due to, for example, socioeconomic factors that were not included, an emerging effect of intrauterine growth restriction, or the child feeding or caring behaviors of young mothers. The latter is considered to be the most likely. Conclusions: The effect of low maternal age

  20. Growth at elevated ozone or elevated carbon dioxide concentration alters antioxidant capacity and response to acute oxidative stress in soybean (Glycine max)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, K.M.; Rogers, A.; Ainsworth, E. A.

    2011-01-31

    Soybeans (Glycine max Merr.) were grown at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) or chronic elevated ozone concentration ([O{sub 3}]; 90 ppb), and then exposed to an acute O{sub 3} stress (200 ppb for 4 h) in order to test the hypothesis that the atmospheric environment alters the total antioxidant capacity of plants, and their capacity to respond to an acute oxidative stress. Total antioxidant metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, and antioxidant transcript abundance were characterized before, immediately after, and during recovery from the acute O{sub 3} treatment. Growth at chronic elevated [O{sub 3}] increased the total antioxidant capacity of plants, while growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}] decreased the total antioxidant capacity. Changes in total antioxidant capacity were matched by changes in ascorbate content, but not phenolic content. The growth environment significantly altered the pattern of antioxidant transcript and enzyme response to the acute O{sub 3} stress. Following the acute oxidative stress, there was an immediate transcriptional reprogramming that allowed for maintained or increased antioxidant enzyme activities in plants grown at elevated [O{sub 3}]. Growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}] appeared to increase the response of antioxidant enzymes to acute oxidative stress, but dampened and delayed the transcriptional response. These results provide evidence that the growth environment alters the antioxidant system, the immediate response to an acute oxidative stress, and the timing over which plants return to initial antioxidant levels. The results also indicate that future elevated [CO{sub 2}] and [O{sub 3}] will differentially affect the antioxidant system.

  1. Morphomechanics of bacterial biofilms undergoing anisotropic differential growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Bo; Huang, Xiao; Ni, Yong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-10-01

    Growing bacterial biofilms exhibit a number of surface morphologies, e.g., concentric wrinkles, radial ridges, and labyrinthine networks, depending on their physiological status and nutrient access. We explore the mechanisms underlying the emergence of these greatly different morphologies. Ginzburg-Landau kinetic method and Fourier spectral method are integrated to simulate the morphological evolution of bacterial biofilms. It is shown that the morphological instability of biofilms is triggered by the stresses induced by anisotropic and heterogeneous bacterial expansion, and involves the competition between membrane energy and bending energy. Local interfacial delamination further enriches the morphologies of biofilms. Phase diagrams are established to reveal how the anisotropy and spatial heterogeneity of growth modulate the surface patterns. The mechanics of three-dimensional microbial morphogenesis may also underpin self-organization in other development systems and provide a potential strategy for engineering microscopic structures from bacterial aggregates.

  2. Growth and differentiation on a trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia I. Hamanaka

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, pH, osmolarity and aeration on the growth and differentiation of a trypanosome ofthe subgenus Schizotrypanum isolatedfrom the bat Phyllostomus hastatus were studied. In general, the growth characteristics ofthe flagellate were similar to those of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. However, the parasite did not growth at 33 or 37C. Increase in the osmolarity and aeration promoted growth at 33C. Significant metacyclogenesis was detected only in the growth condition where maximal growth occured (28C, pH 7.3, 380m0s/kg, in tissue cullure flasks, at the end ofthe exponential growth phase. The begining of the metacyclogenesis process was coincident with most glucose utilization and lowest pH. During metacyclogenesis both culture medium pH and osmolarity increased steadly.

  3. Age-related changes in rat myocardium involve altered capacities of glycosaminoglycans to potentiate growth factor functions and heparan sulfate-altered sulfation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh Bao; Morin, Christophe; Carpentier, Gilles; Garcia-Filipe, Stephanie; Talhas-Perret, Sofia; Barbier-Chassefière, Véronique; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Martelly, Isabelle; Albanese, Patricia; Papy-Garcia, Dulce

    2012-03-30

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are essential components of the extracellular matrix, the natural environment from which cell behavior is regulated by a number or tissue homeostasis guarantors including growth factors. Because most heparin-binding growth factor activities are regulated by GAGs, structural and functional alterations of these polysaccharides may consequently affect the integrity of tissues during critical physiological and pathological processes. Here, we investigated whether the aging process can induce changes in the myocardial GAG composition in rats and whether these changes can affect the activities of particular heparin-binding growth factors known to sustain cardiac tissue integrity. Our results showed an age-dependent increase of GAG levels in the left ventricle. Biochemical and immunohistological studies pointed out heparan sulfates (HS) as the GAG species that increased with age. ELISA-based competition assays showed altered capacities of the aged myocardial GAGs to bind FGF-1, FGF-2, and VEGF but not HB EGF. Mitogenic assays in cultured cells showed an age-dependent decrease of the elderly GAG capacities to potentiate FGF-2 whereas the potentiating effect on VEGF(165) was increased, as confirmed by augmented angiogenic cell proliferation in Matrigel plugs. Moreover, HS disaccharide analysis showed considerably altered 6-O-sulfation with modest changes in N- and 2-O-sulfations. Together, these findings suggest a physiological significance of HS structural and functional alterations during aging. This can be associated with an age-dependent decline of the extracellular matrix capacity to efficiently modulate not only the activity of resident or therapeutic growth factors but also the homing of resident or therapeutic cells.

  4. Insulin like growth factor-1/insulin bypasses Pref-1/FA1-mediated inhibition of adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Nøhr, Jane; Jensen, Charlotte Harken;

    2003-01-01

    of Pref-1/FA1 in 3T3-L1 or 3T3-F442A cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation when insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was omitted from the differentiation mixture. We demonstrate that the level of the mature form of the IGF-1 receptor is reduced and that IGF-1-dependent activation of p42/p44......, and adipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jun-6......Pref-1 is a highly glycosylated Delta-like transmembrane protein containing six epidermal growth factor-like repeats in the extracellular domain. Pref-1 is abundantly expressed in preadipocytes, but expression is down-regulated during adipocyte differentiation. Forced expression of Pref-1 in 3T3-L1...

  5. Inhibition of the Processes of Growth and Differentiation in the Embryonic Development of the Axolotl (Ambystma mexicanum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Anth.

    1954-01-01

    The problem of the retardation of the processes of growth and differentiation is certainly as important as the processes of growth and differentiation themselves. It is striking, therefore, that whereas the analysis of growth has been carried out for a considerable period of time already, the analys

  6. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  7. Altered Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 Stability Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression

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    Jianghua Wang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR-4 is expressed at significant levels in almost all human prostate cancers, and expression of its ligands is ubiquitous. A common polymorphism of FGFR-4 in which arginine (Arg388 replaces glycine (Gly388 at amino acid 388 is associated with progression in human prostate cancer. We show that the FGFR-4 Arg388 polymorphism, which is present in most prostate cancer patients, results in increased receptor stability and sustained receptor activation. In patients bearing the FGFR-4 Gly388 variant, expression of Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1, which occurs in more than half of human prostate cancers, also results in FGFR-4 stabilization. This is associated with enhanced proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Our findings indicate that increased receptor stability and sustained FGFR-4 signaling occur in most human prostate cancers due to either the presence of a common genetic polymorphism or the expression of a protein that stabilizes FGFR-4. Both of these alterations are associated with clinical progression in patients with prostate cancer. Thus, FGFR-4 signaling and receptor turnover are important potential therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Bechtle, Chad A.; Garcia, Claudia M.; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M.; Beebe, David C.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens dev...

  9. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Mansfield, Shawn D; Groover, Andrew T

    2009-12-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX homeobox gene, ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2), which we show influences terminal cell differentiation and cell wall properties during secondary growth. In the early stages of secondary growth, ARK2 is expressed broadly in the cambial zone and in terminally differentiating cell types, before becoming progressively restricted to the cambium. ARK2 overexpression and synthetic miRNA-suppression transgenics reveal positive correlations between ARK2 expression level and the timing of cambium formation, the width of the cambial zone and inhibition of cambial daughter cell differentiation. These phenotypes in turn correlate with changes in the expression of genes affecting transcription, cell division, auxin and cell wall synthesis. Notably, wood properties associated with secondary cell wall synthesis are negatively associated with ARK2 expression, including lignin and cellulose content. Together, our results suggest that ARK2 functions primarily to regulate a complex suite of genes that together influence cell differentiation during secondary growth. We propose that ARK2 may represent a co-evolved transcriptional module that influences complex, adaptive wood properties.

  10. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  11. Increasing Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Dose Alters Oligodendroglial and Neuronal Differentiation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 (low to 500,000 (very high cells differentiated predominantly into the oligodendroglial lineage. However, while the number of engrafted cells increased linearly in relationship to increasing dose, the proportion of oligodendrocytic cells declined. Increasing dose resulted in a plateau of engraftment, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and increased distal migration caudal to the transplantation sites. Dose had no effect on terminal sensory recovery or open-field locomotor scores. However, total human cell number and decreased oligodendroglial proportion were correlated with hindlimb girdle coupling errors. Conversely, greater oligodendroglial proportion was correlated with increased Ab step pattern, decreased swing speed, and increased paw intensity, consistent with improved recovery. These data suggest that transplant dose, and/or target niche parameters can regulate donor cell engraftment, differentiation/maturation, and lineage-specific migration profiles.

  12. Decreased mitochondrial activities of malate dehydrogenase and fumarase in tomato lead to altered root growth and architecture via diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Osorio, Sonia; Moritz, Thomas; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2009-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in which either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase was antisense inhibited have previously been characterized to exhibit altered photosynthetic metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that these manipulations also resulted in differences in root growth, with both transgenics being characterized by a dramatic reduction of root dry matter deposition and respiratory activity but opposite changes with respect to root area. A range of physiological, molecular, and biochemical experiments were carried out in order to determine whether changes in root morphology were due to altered metabolism within the root itself, alterations in the nature of the transformants' root exudation, consequences of alteration in the efficiency of photoassimilate delivery to the root, or a combination of these factors. Grafting experiments in which the transformants were reciprocally grafted to wild-type controls suggested that root length and area were determined by the aerial part of the plant but that biomass was not. Despite the transgenic roots displaying alteration in the expression of phytohormone-associated genes, evaluation of the levels of the hormones themselves revealed that, with the exception of gibberellins, they were largely unaltered. When taken together, these combined experiments suggest that root biomass and growth are retarded by root-specific alterations in metabolism and gibberellin contents. These data are discussed in the context of current models of root growth and biomass partitioning.

  13. Major Changes in Growth Rate and Growth Variability of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Related to Soil Alteration and Climate Change in Belgium

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    Nicolas Latte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change—particularly climate change, forest management, and atmospheric deposition—has significantly altered forest growing conditions in Europe. The influences of these changes on beech growth (Fagus sylvatica L. were investigated for the past 80 years in Belgium, using non-linear mixed effects models on ring-width chronologies of 149 mature and dominant beech trees (87–186 years old. The effects of the developmental stage (i.e., increasing tree size were filtered out in order to focus on time-dependent growth changes. Beech radial growth was divided into a low-frequency signal (=growth rate, mainly influenced by forest management and atmospheric deposition, and into a high-frequency variability (≈mean sensitivity, mainly influenced by climate change. Between 1930 and 2008, major long-term and time-dependent changes were highlighted. The beech growth rate has decreased by about 38% since the 1950–1960s, and growth variability has increased by about 45% since the 1970–1980s. Our results indicate that (1 before the 1980s, beech growth rate was not predominantly impacted by climate change but rather by soil alteration (i.e., soil compaction and/or nitrogen deposition; and (2 since the 1980s, climate change induced more frequent and intense yearly growth reductions that amplified the growth rate decrease. The highlighted changes were similar in the two ecoregions of Belgium, although more pronounced in the lowlands than in the uplands.

  14. Differential Proteomic Analysis Using iTRAQ Reveals Alterations in Hull Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L..

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    Shuzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Rice hull, the outer cover of the rice grain, determines grain shape and size. Changes in the rice hull proteome in different growth stages may reflect the underlying mechanisms involved in grain development. To better understand these changes, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitative (iTRAQ MS/MS was used to detect statistically significant changes in the rice hull proteome in the booting, flowering, and milk-ripe growth stages. Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed to predict their potential functions during development. Gene ontology (GO terms and pathways were used to evaluate the biological mechanisms involved in rice hull at the three growth stages. In total, 5,268 proteins were detected and characterized, of which 563 were differentially expressed across the development stages. The results showed that the flowering and milk-ripe stage proteomes were more similar to each other (r=0.61 than either was to the booting stage proteome. A GO enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed proteins was used to predict their roles during rice hull development. The potential functions of 25 significantly differentially expressed proteins were used to evaluate their possible roles at various growth stages. Among these proteins, an unannotated protein (Q7X8A1 was found to be overexpressed especially in the flowering stage, while a putative uncharacterized protein (B8BF94 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase (Q9FPK6 were overexpressed only in the milk-ripe stage. Pathways regulated by differentially expressed proteins were also analyzed. Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative] cyclase (Q9SDJ2, and two magnesium-chelatase subunits, ChlD (Q6ATS0, and ChlI (Q53RM0, were associated with chlorophyll biosynthesis at different developmental stages. The expression of Q9SDJ2 in the flowering and milk-ripe stages was validated by qRT-PCR. The 25 candidate proteins may be pivotal markers for controlling rice hull development

  15. Differential motor alterations in children with three types of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

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    Adrián Poblano

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine frequency of motor alterations in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Method We evaluated 19 children aged 7-12 years with ADHD classified in three sub-types: Combined (ADHD-C, with Inattention (ADHD-I, and with Hyperactivity (ADHD-H. Controls were age- and gender matched healthy children. We utilized Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP for measuring motor skills. Results We observed differences between children with ADHD and controls in BOTMP general score and in static coordination, dynamic general- and hand- coordination, and in synkinetic movements. We also found differences in dynamic hand coordination between controls and children with ADHD-C; in dynamic general coordination between controls and children with ADHD-H; and in frequency of synkinetic movements between controls and children with ADHD-H. Conclusion Children with ADHD with a major degree of hyperactivity showed greater frequency of motor alterations.

  16. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves' Ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chieh-Chih; Wu, Shi-Bei; Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 μM H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO.

  17. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P; Larsen, J O; Martinussen, T; List, E O; Kopchick, J J; Kjaer, M; Heinemeier, K M

    2014-02-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant transgenic mice that expressed bovine GH (bGH) and had high circulating levels of GH and IGF-I, 2) dwarf mice with a disrupted GH receptor gene (GHR-/-) leading to GH resistance and low circulating IGF-I, and 3) a wild-type control group (CTRL). We measured the ultra-structure, collagen content and mRNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon and muscle compared to CTRL. Mean collagen fibril diameter was significantly decreased with both high and low GH/IGF-I signaling, but the GHR-/- mouse tendons were most severely affected with a total loss of the normal bimodal diameter distribution. In conclusion, chronic manipulation of the GH/IGF-I axis influenced both morphology and mRNA levels of selected genes in the muscle-tendon unit of mice. Whereas only moderate structural changes were observed with up-regulation of GH/IGF-I axis, disruption of the GH receptor had pronounced effects upon tendon ultra-structure.

  18. Metabolic fingerprints of altered brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a Rett syndrome model.

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    Angèle Viola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is the leading cause of profound mental retardation of genetic origin in girls. Since RS is mostly caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, transgenic animal models such as the Mecp2-deleted ("Mecp2-null" mouse have been employed to study neurological symptoms and brain function. However, an interdisciplinary approach drawing from chemistry, biology and neuroscience is needed to elucidate the mechanistic links between the genotype and phenotype of this genetic disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed, for the first time, a metabolomic study of brain extracts from Mecp2-null mice by using high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of individual water-soluble metabolites and phospholipids were quantified without prior selection for specific metabolic pathways. Results were interpreted in terms of Mecp2 gene deletion, brain cell function and brain morphology. This approach provided a "metabolic window" to brain characteristics in Mecp2-null mice (n = 4, revealing (i the first metabolic evidence of astrocyte involvement in RS (decreased levels of the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, vs. wild-type mice; p = 0.034; (ii reduced choline phospholipid turnover in Mecp2-null vs. wild-type mice, implying a diminished potential of cells to grow, paralleled by globally reduced brain size and perturbed osmoregulation; (iii alterations of the platelet activating factor (PAF cycle in Mecp2-null mouse brains, where PAF is a bioactive lipid acting on neuronal growth, glutamate exocytosis and other processes; and (iv changes in glutamine/glutamate ratios (p = 0.034 in Mecp2-null mouse brains potentially indicating altered neurotransmitter recycling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes, for the first time, detailed metabolic fingerprints of perturbed brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Combined with morphological and neurological findings

  19. Pectin from Prunus domestica L. induces proliferation of IEC-6 cells through the alteration of cell-surface heparan sulfate on differentiated Caco-2 cells in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Mitsutaka; Murata, Kazuma; Oshima, Kazuya; Itoh, Chihiro; Kitaguchi, Kohji; Kanamaru, Yoshihiro; Yabe, Tomio

    2015-05-01

    Dietary fiber intake provides various physiological and metabolic effects for human health. Pectin, a water-soluble dietary fiber, induces morphological changes of the small intestine in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pectin-derived morphological alterations have not been elucidated. Previously, we found that pectin purified from Prunus domestica L. altered the sulfated structure of cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) on differentiated Caco-2 cells via fibronectin and α5β1 integrin. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of the effect of pectin on HS in differentiated Caco-2 cells. An in vitro intestinal epithelium model was constructed by co-culture of differentiated Caco-2 cells and rat IEC-6 cells, which were used as models of intestinal epithelium and intestinal crypt cells, respectively. We found that pectin-treated differentiated Caco-2 cells promoted growth of IEC-6 cells. Real-time RT-PCR analysis and western blotting showed that relative mRNA and protein expression levels of Wnt3a were upregulated by pectin treatment in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Analysis by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that pectin-induced structural alteration of HS markedly decreased the interaction with Wnt3a. However, depression in the secretion of Wnt3a from Caco-2 cells by anti-Wnt3a antibody did not affect the proliferation of IEC-6 cells in co-culture system. These observations indicated that pectin altered the sulfated structure of cell-surface HS to promote secretion of Wnt3a from differentiated Caco-2 cells and Wnt3a indirectly stimulated the proliferation of IEC-6 cells.

  20. Algal Toxin Azaspiracid-1 Induces Early Neuronal Differentiation and Alters Peripherin Isoform Stoichiometry

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    Linda V. Hjørnevik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Azaspiracid-1 is an algal toxin that accumulates in edible mussels, and ingestion may result in human illness as manifested by vomiting and diarrhoea. When injected into mice, it causes neurotoxicological symptoms and death. Although it is well known that azaspiracid-1 is toxic to most cells and cell lines, little is known about its biological target(s. A rat PC12 cell line, commonly used as a model for the peripheral nervous system, was used to study the neurotoxicological effects of azaspiracid-1. Azaspiracid-1 induced differentiation-related morphological changes followed by a latter cell death. The differentiated phenotype showed peripherin-labelled neurite-like processes simultaneously as a specific isoform of peripherin was down-regulated. The precise mechanism behind this down-regulation remains uncertain. However, this study provides new insights into the neurological effects of azaspiracid-1 and into the biological significance of specific isoforms of peripherin.

  1. Multiple Antenatal Dexamethasone Treatment Alters Brain Vessel Differentiation in Newborn Mouse Pups.

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    Winfried Neuhaus

    Full Text Available Antenatal steroid treatment decreases morbidity and mortality in premature infants through the maturation of lung tissue, which enables sufficient breathing performance. However, clinical and animal studies have shown that repeated doses of glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone and betamethasone lead to long-term adverse effects on brain development. Therefore, we established a mouse model for antenatal dexamethasone treatment to investigate the effects of dexamethasone on brain vessel differentiation towards the blood-brain barrier (BBB phenotype, focusing on molecular marker analysis. The major findings were that in total brains on postnatal day (PN 4 triple antenatal dexamethasone treatment significantly downregulated the tight junction protein claudin-5, the endothelial marker Pecam-1/CD31, the glucocorticoid receptor, the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and Abc transporters (Abcb1a, Abcg2 Abcc4. Less pronounced effects were found after single antenatal dexamethasone treatment and in PN10 samples. Comparisons of total brain samples with isolated brain endothelial cells together with the stainings for Pecam-1/CD31 and claudin-5 led to the assumption that the morphology of brain vessels is affected by antenatal dexamethasone treatment at PN4. On the mRNA level markers for angiogenesis, the sonic hedgehog and the Wnt pathway were downregulated in PN4 samples, suggesting fundamental changes in brain vascularization and/or differentiation. In conclusion, we provided a first comprehensive molecular basis for the adverse effects of multiple antenatal dexamethasone treatment on brain vessel differentiation.

  2. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Du; Shawn D. Mansfield; Andrew T. Groover

    2009-01-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX...

  3. Development of a restricted state space stochastic differential equation model for bacterial growth in rich media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo;

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, bacterial growth in a rich media is analysed in a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) framework. It is demonstrated that the SDE formulation and smoothened state estimates provide a systematic framework for data driven model improvements, using random walk hidden states...

  4. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  5. ON THE GROWTH OF SOLUTIONS OF A CLASS OF HIGHER ORDER DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宗煊; 孙光镐

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, authors investigate the order of growth and the hyper order of solutions of a class of the higher order linear differential equation, and improve results of M. Ozawa[6], G. Gundersen[7] and J.K. Langley[8], Li Chun-hong[11].

  6. Growth of Logarithmic Derivatives and Their Applications in Complex Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinelâabidine Latreuch

    2014-01-01

    of their logarithmic derivatives. We also give an estimate of the growth of the quotient of two differential polynomials generated by solutions of the equation f″+A(zf′+B(zf=0, where A(z and B(z are entire functions.

  7. Studies on orthocephalization. IV. Differential growth of the sphenooccipital synchondosis in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, H; Kirkeby, S; Moss, M L

    1980-01-01

    The growth of the bone ends articulating through the sphenooccipital synchondrosis in the rat occurs differentially. Considerably more bone is during growth formed in the pharyngeal part of the anterior end of the basioccipital bone than in the cerebral part. The same conditions hold good...... to be a measure of growth rate. Sections of the sphenooccipital synchondrosis from 10 rats 10 days ago, incubated for reactions to alkaline phosphatase have formed the basis of the study. Quantitative expressions of the extension of enzymatic reaction have been collected. Statistical treatment of these data have...

  8. Butterfat fatty acids differentially regulate growth and differentiation in Jurkat T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Paolo; Luongo, Diomira; Maurano, Francesco; Rossi, Mauro

    2005-10-01

    Synthetic Conjugated Linoleic Acid mixture (CLA; c9,t11; t10,c12-18:2) has been previously shown to inhibit growth, and enhance apoptosis and IL-2 mRNA synthesis in human lymphoblastic Jurkat T-cells. In this study, two different butterfat types were evaluated and compared for their effects on Jurkat cell viability, oxidative stress, pro-apoptotic activity, and cytokine synthesis: the conventionally produced butterfat (CBF), and organic butterfat (OBF) containing significantly higher amounts of c9,t11 (Rumenic Acid, RA), trans-vaccenic acid (VA; t11-18:1), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), and lower levels of linoleic acid (LA). Results from cell treatment with both butterfat mixtures showed comparable oxidative stress (superoxide production, intracellular GSH depletion,and lipid peroxides yield), NADPH oxidase activation, cytotoxicity (LDH release), and IL-2 transcript level, whereas the effects of enhanced growth-inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activities were associated with OBF treatment. To then investigate each butterfat-induced effect caused by RA, VA, LA, and ALA, cells were exposed to synthetic FA concentrations similar to those from the different butterfats. Higher oxidative stress (superoxide production, intracellular GSH depletion) was induced by alpha-linolenic (ALA) and linoleic (LA) incubation (P<0.01) and superoxide production was suppressed by specific PKCalpha inhibitor (Gö 6976) and linked to increased toxicity and IL-2 synthesis inhibition. By contrast, cell treatment with RA increased apoptosis and IL-2 synthesis. These results suggest that a supply of ALA and LA is responsible for BF-induced oxidative stress via PKCalpha-NADPH oxidase pathway, and that enhanced antiproliferative effects in OBF treated cells is essentially determined by RA-induced pro-apoptotic activity. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Storage Temperature Alters the Expression of Differentiation-Related Genes in Cultured Oral Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Islam, Rakibul; Fostad, Ida G; Eidet, Jon R; Sehic, Amer; Olstad, Ole K; Dartt, Darlene A; Messelt, Edward B; Griffith, May; Pasovic, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Storage of cultured human oral keratinocytes (HOK) allows for transportation of cultured transplants to eye clinics worldwide. In a previous study, one-week storage of cultured HOK was found to be superior with regard to viability and morphology at 12°C compared to 4°C and 37°C. To understand more of how storage temperature affects cell phenotype, gene expression of HOK before and after storage at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C was assessed. Cultured HOK were stored in HEPES- and sodium bicarbonate-buffered Minimum Essential Medium at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C for one week. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression profile was determined using DNA microarrays and analyzed with Partek Genomics Suite software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Differentially expressed genes (fold change > 1.5 and P expression of cultures stored at 4°C and 12°C clustered close to the unstored control cultures. Cultures stored at 37°C displayed substantial change in gene expression compared to the other groups. In comparison with 12°C, 2,981 genes were differentially expressed at 37°C. In contrast, only 67 genes were differentially expressed between the unstored control and the cells stored at 12°C. The 12°C and 37°C culture groups differed most significantly with regard to the expression of differentiation markers. The Hedgehog signaling pathway was significantly downregulated at 37°C compared to 12°C. HOK cultures stored at 37°C showed considerably larger changes in gene expression compared to unstored cells than cultured HOK stored at 4°C and 12°C. The changes observed at 37°C consisted of differentiation of the cells towards a squamous epithelium-specific phenotype. Storing cultured ocular surface transplants at 37°C is therefore not recommended. This is particularly interesting as 37°C is the standard incubation temperature used for cell culture.

  10. Transforming growth factor-β superfamily, implications in development and differentiation of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Juan F; Kocic, Jelena

    2012-10-01

    Abstract Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, including TGF-βs and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), play important roles in directing the fate of stem cells. In embryonic stem cells, the TGF-β superfamily participates in almost all stages of cell development, such as cell maintenance, lineage selection, and progression of differentiation. In adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), TGF-βs can provide competence for early stages of chondroblastic and osteoblastic differentiation, but they inhibit myogenesis, adipogenesis, and late-stage osteoblast differentiation. BMPs also inhibit adipogenesis and myogenesis, but they strongly promote osteoblast differentiation. The TGF-β superfamily members signal via specific serine/threonine kinase receptors and their nuclear effectors termed Smad proteins as well as through non-Smad pathways, which explain their pleiotropic effects in self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pleiotropic effects of the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors on the fate of stem cells and also discusses the mechanisms by which the TGF-β superfamily members control embryonic and MSCs differentiation.

  11. Sp3 controls fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 gene activity during myogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Eric; DiMario, Joseph X

    2017-03-27

    Fibroblast growth factor/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling is a critical component in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. The transient FGFR4 gene expression during the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiated myotubes indicates that FGFR4 regulates this critical phase of myogenesis. The Specificity Protein (SP) family of transcription factors controls FGFR family member gene activity. We sought to determine if members of the Sp family regulate mouse FGFR4 gene activity during myogenic differentiation. RT-PCR and western blot analysis of FGFR4 mRNA and protein revealed transient expression over 72h, with peak expression between 24 and 36h after addition of differentiation medium to C2C12 myogenic cultures. Sp3 also displayed a transient expression pattern with peak expression occurring after 6h of differentiation. We cloned a 1527bp fragment of the mouse FGFR4 promoter into a luciferase reporter. This FGFR4 promoter contains eight putative Sp binding sites and directed luciferase gene activity comparable to native FGFR4 expression. Overexpression of Sp1 and Sp3 showed that Sp1 repressed FGFR4 gene activity, and Sp3 activated FGFR4 gene activity during myogenic differentiation. Mutational analyses of multiple Sp binding sites within the FGFR4 promoter revealed that three of these sites were transcriptionally active. Electromobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation of the area containing the activator sites showed that Sp3 bound to this promoter location.

  12. A role for fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 in the altered osteoblast phenotype induced by Twist haploinsufficiency in the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenou, Hind; Kaabeche, Karim; Mée, Sandrine Le; Marie, Pierre J

    2005-06-01

    Genetic mutations of Twist, a bHLH transcription factor, induce premature fusion of cranial sutures (craniosynostosis) in the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS). The mechanisms by which Twist haploinsufficiency may alter osteoblast differentiation are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (Fgfr2) in the abnormal osteoblast differentiation in SCS. Cranial osteoblasts from an SCS patient with a Y103X mutation inducing deletion of the Twist bHLH domain showed decreased Fgfr2 mRNA levels associated with decreased expression of Runx2, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC), markers of differentiated osteoblasts, compared with wild-type osteoblasts. Transfection with Twist or Runx2 expression vectors, but not with Runx2 mutant which impairs DNA binding, restored Fgfr2, Runx2, BSP and OC expression in Twist mutant osteoblasts. EMSA analysis of mutant osteoblast nuclear extracts showed reduced Runx2 binding to a target OSE2 site in the Fgfr2 promoter. ChIP analyses showed that both Twist and Runx2 in mutant osteoblast nuclear extracts bind to a specific region in the Fgfr2 promoter. Significantly, forced expression of Fgfr2 restored Runx2 and osteoblast marker genes, whereas a dominant-negative Fgfr2 further decreased Runx2 and downstream genes in Twist mutant osteoblasts, indicating that alteration of Fgfr2 results in downregulation of osteoblast genes in Twist mutant osteoblasts. We conclude that Twist haploinsufficiency downregulates Fgfr2 mRNA expression, which in turn reduces Runx2 and downstream osteoblast-specific genes in human calvarial osteoblasts. This provides genetic and biochemical evidence for a role of Fgfr2 in the altered osteoblast phenotype induced by Twist haploinsufficiency in the SCS.

  13. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, David L; Peterson, Christy J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression.

  15. Alterations of expression and regulation of transforming growth factor beta in human cancer prostate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchère, M; Saunier, E; Mestayer, C; Broshuis, M; Mowszowicz, I

    2002-11-01

    TGF beta can promote and/or suppress prostate tumor growth through multiple and opposing actions. Alterations of its expression, secretion, regulation or of the sensitivity of target cells can lead to a favorable environment for tumor development. To gain a better insight in TGF beta function during cancer progression, we have used different cultured human prostate cells: preneoplastic PNT2 cells, the androgen-dependent LNCaP and the androgen-independent PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. We have studied by specific ELISA assays in conditioned media (CM), the secretion of TGF beta 1 and TGF beta 2 in basal conditions and after hormonal treatment (DHT or E2) and the expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA by Northern blot. We have also compared the effect of fibroblast CM on TGF beta secretion by the different cell types. Compared to PNT2 cells, cancer cell lines secrete lower levels of active TGF beta which are not increased in the presence of fibroblast CM. LNCaP cells respond to androgen or estrogen treatment by a 10-fold increase of active TGF beta secretion while PC3 and DU145 are unresponsive. In conclusion, prostate cancer cell lines have lost part of their ability to secrete and activate TGF beta, and to regulate this secretion through stromal-epithelial interactions. Androgen-sensitive cancer cells may compensate this loss by hormonal regulation.

  16. Effect of growth hormone and estrogen administration on hepatocyte alterations in old ovariectomized female wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen; Salazar, Veronica; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2005-02-01

    Aging could be due to the accumulation of oxidative damage. On the other hand, growth hormone (GH) and estrogen deficiency induce deleterious effects on different tissues, and hormonal replacement could counteract these effects. We have investigated whether GH and estrogen administration modify some parameters related to oxidative stress and inflammation in hepatocytes isolated from old ovariectomized female rats. Twenty-two month-old ovariectomized animals were divided into control rats, rats treated with GH, rats treated with estradiol, and rats treated with GH+estradiol. Two-month-old intact female rats were used as young reference group. Hepatocytes were isolated, cultured, and CO and NO release, ATP, cyclic-guanosyl monophosphate (cGMP), and lipid peroxide (LPO) content of cells, as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC)synthesis, were measured. Hepatocytes isolated from old ovariectomized rats showed a decrease in ATP content and PC synthesis compared to young rats. Age also induced an increase in LPO, NO, CO, and cGMP. Treating old rats with GH significantly increased ATP and reduced CO and cGMP levels. Estradiol administration improved all the parameters that were altered. Co-administration of GH and estrogens induced a more marked effect than estrogens alone only in cGMP content. In conclusion, administration of estrogens to old ovariectomized females seemed to prevent oxidative changes in hepatocytes, whereas the effect of GH is not so evident.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Gallardo-Escarate, C. [Laboratory of Biotechnology and Aquatic Genomics, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Molina, A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  18. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  19. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  20. Altered chromatin occupancy of master regulators underlies evolutionary divergence in the transcriptional landscape of erythroid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob C Ulirsch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoiesis is one of the best understood examples of cellular differentiation. Morphologically, erythroid differentiation proceeds in a nearly identical fashion between humans and mice, but recent evidence has shown that networks of gene expression governing this process are divergent between species. We undertook a systematic comparative analysis of six histone modifications and four transcriptional master regulators in primary proerythroblasts and erythroid cell lines to better understand the underlying basis of these transcriptional differences. Our analyses suggest that while chromatin structure across orthologous promoters is strongly conserved, subtle differences are associated with transcriptional divergence between species. Many transcription factor (TF occupancy sites were poorly conserved across species (∼25% for GATA1, TAL1, and NFE2 but were more conserved between proerythroblasts and cell lines derived from the same species. We found that certain cis-regulatory modules co-occupied by GATA1, TAL1, and KLF1 are under strict evolutionary constraint and localize to genes necessary for erythroid cell identity. More generally, we show that conserved TF occupancy sites are indicative of active regulatory regions and strong gene expression that is sustained during maturation. Our results suggest that evolutionary turnover of TF binding sites associates with changes in the underlying chromatin structure, driving transcriptional divergence. We provide examples of how this framework can be applied to understand epigenomic variation in specific regulatory regions, such as the β-globin gene locus. Our findings have important implications for understanding epigenomic changes that mediate variation in cellular differentiation across species, while also providing a valuable resource for studies of hematopoiesis.

  1. 10e12z CLA alters adipocyte differentiation and adipocyte cytokine expression and induces macrophage proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Benjamin J; Thompson, Jerry T; Eser, Pinar O; Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2012-05-01

    The trans-10, cis-12 (10e12z) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer of CLA is responsible for loss of lipid storage or adipose tissue in vitro or in vivo. This isomer also induces inflammatory signaling in both mouse and human adipocytes in vitro. However, when these events occur and whether they are significant enough to affect other cell types are unclear. In these experiments, the 3T3-L1 cell line has been used to examine the interaction between inflammatory signaling and decreased differentiation or lipid storage induced by 10e12z CLA. In assays measuring both lipid accumulation and gene expression, differentiating 3T3-L1 cells exhibit concurrent induction of inflammatory signaling, as measured by cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and a decrease in adipocyte marker gene expression. Furthermore, in fully differentiated adipocytes, as identified in microarray assays and confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction, 10e12z CLA also significantly affected expression of both matrix metalloprotein-3 (MMP-3), collagen VI α 3 ColVI alpha 3 (VIα3) and the cytokine epiregulin, demonstrating that the effects of 10e12z broadly impact adipocyte function. In agreement with other experimental systems, 10e12z CLA inhibited RAW 264.7 cell proliferation; however, in response to adipocyte-conditioned media, 10e12z-CLA-treated adipocytes induced proliferation of this cell line, suggesting that the effect of 10e12z CLA is context dependent. These results are largely consistent with the known activation of the inflammatory mediator nuclear factor-κB in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo by 10e12z CLA treatment and demonstrate that adipose is an important target tissue of this isomer that impacts other cell types.

  2. Cholinergic Abnormalities, Endosomal Alterations and Up-Regulation of Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabeza Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins and their receptors regulate several aspects of the developing and mature nervous system, including neuronal morphology and survival. Neurotrophin receptors are active in signaling endosomes, which are organelles that propagate neurotrophin signaling along neuronal processes. Defects in the Npc1 gene are associated with the accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes, leading to neurodegeneration and Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease. The aim of this work was to assess whether the endosomal and lysosomal alterations observed in NPC disease disrupt neurotrophin signaling. As models, we used i NPC1-deficient mice to evaluate the central cholinergic septo-hippocampal pathway and its response to nerve growth factor (NGF after axotomy and ii PC12 cells treated with U18666A, a pharmacological cellular model of NPC, stimulated with NGF. Results NPC1-deficient cholinergic cells respond to NGF after axotomy and exhibit increased levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, whose gene is under the control of NGF signaling, compared to wild type cholinergic neurons. This finding was correlated with increased ChAT and phosphorylated Akt in basal forebrain homogenates. In addition, we found that cholinergic neurons from NPC1-deficient mice had disrupted neuronal morphology, suggesting early signs of neurodegeneration. Consistently, PC12 cells treated with U18666A presented a clear NPC cellular phenotype with a prominent endocytic dysfunction that includes an increased size of TrkA-containing endosomes and reduced recycling of the receptor. This result correlates with increased sensitivity to NGF, and, in particular, with up-regulation of the Akt and PLC-γ signaling pathways, increased neurite extension, increased phosphorylation of tau protein and cell death when PC12 cells are differentiated and treated with U18666A. Conclusions Our results suggest that the NPC cellular phenotype causes neuronal

  3. Alterations in Epidermal Eicosanoid Metabolism Contribute to Inflammation and Impaired Late Differentiation in FLG-Mutated Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunder, Stefan; Rühl, Ralph; Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena; Krimmel, Christine; Geisler, Anita; Zhu, Huiting; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M; Gruber, Robert; Schmuth, Matthias; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the FLG gene cause ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and represent the major predisposing genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Although both conditions are characterized by epidermal barrier impairment, AD also exhibits signs of inflammation. This work was aimed at delineating the role of FLG loss-of-function mutations on eicosanoid metabolism in IV and AD. Using human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) generated with keratinocytes isolated from nonlesional skin of patients with FLG wild-type AD (WT/WT), FLG-mutated AD (FLG/WT), IV (FLG/FLG), or FLG WT control skin, we assessed the potential autocrine role of epidermal-derived eicosanoids in FLG-associated versus FLG-WT AD pathogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated abnormal stratum corneum lipid architecture in AD and IV HEEs, independent of FLG genotype. Both AD (FLG/WT) and IV (FLG/FLG) HEEs showed impaired late epidermal differentiation. Only AD (FLG/WT) HEEs exhibited significantly increased levels of inflammatory cytokines. Analyses of lipid mediators revealed increased arachidonic acid and 12-lipoxygenase metabolites. Whereas treatment of control HEEs with arachidonic acid increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid attenuated expression of late differentiation markers. Thus, FLG mutations lead to alterations in epidermal eicosanoid metabolism that could serve as an autocrine trigger of inflammation and impaired late epidermal differentiation in AD.

  4. Effect of 5-azacytidine and galectin-1 on growth and differentiation of the human b lymphoma cell line bl36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert-Caron Raymonde

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 5-AzaCytidine (AzaC is a DNA demethylating drugs that has been shown to inhibit cell growth and to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Induced expression of the galectin1 (Gal1 protein, a galactoside-binding protein distributed widely in immune cells, has been described in cultured hepatoma-derived cells treated with AzaC and this event may have a role in the effect of the drug. According to this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of AzaC and Gal1 on human lymphoid B cells phenotype. Methods The effect of AzaC and Gal1 on cell growth and phenotype was determined on the Burkitt lymphoma cell line BL36. An immunocytochemical analysis for detection of Gal1 protein expression was performed in AzaC-treated cells. To investigate the direct effects of Gal1, recombinant Gal1 was added to cells. Results Treatment of lymphoid B cells with AzaC results in: i a decrease in cell growth with an arrest of the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, ii phenotypic changes consistent with a differentiated phenotype, and iii the expression of p16, a tumor-suppressor gene whose expression was dependent of its promoter demethylation, and of Gal1. A targeting of Gal 1 to the plasma membrane follows its cytosolic expression. To determine which of the effects of AzaC might be secondary to the induction of Gal1, recombinant Gal1 was added to BL36 cells. Treated cells displayed growth inhibition and phenotypic changes consistent with a commitment toward differentiation. Conclusions Altered cell growth and expression of the cell surface plasma cell antigen, CD138 are detectable in BL36 cells treated by AzaC as well as by Gal1. It seems that AzaC-induced Gal1 expression and consequent binding of Gal1 on its cell membrane receptor may be, in part, involved in AzaC-induced plasmacytic differentiation.

  5. Effects of bovine colostral ultrafiltrates on growth and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Ho; Hossner, Kim L

    2002-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of whole and size-fractionated bovine colostrum with bovine calf serum (BCS) on the growth and differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. High (HMW) and low (LMW)-molecular-mass ultrafiltrate fractions of colostrum were prepared from defatted colostrum (COL) by diafiltration through membranes with a molecular-mass cut-off of 30 kDa. Incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into the cells was used as a reflection of DNA synthesis/cell proliferation. The growth-promoting activity of LMW was 2.3- and 2.5-fold higher than COL and HMW, respectively (P insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and platelet-derived growth factor AB stimulated 3T3-L1 cells, antibodies to these factors did not inhibit the LMW effects. The LMW fraction was about twice as effective as COL and HMW in stimulating differentiation of the cells into adipocytes, but maximal differentiation was only 60% of that seen with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Treatment with COL, HMW, IGF-I and insulin induced peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma RNA, but levels were about half of that with 10% FBS treatment and LMW induction was 80% of FBS. Low amounts of leptin mRNA were detected in adipocytes and abundance did not differ between treatments with BCS, hormones or COL fractions. This study showed that bovine colostral LMW stimulated the growth and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and may be a useful serum substitute to support the growth of these cells.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter above- and below-ground chemical defense expression differentially among Asclepias species

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    Rachel L Vannette

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Belowground symbionts of plants can have substantial influence on plant growth and nutrition. Recent work demonstrates that mycorrhizal fungi can affect plant resistance to herbivory and the performance of above and belowground herbivores. Although these examples emerge from diverse systems, it is unclear if plant species that express similar defensive traits respond similarly to fungal colonization, but comparative work may inform this question. To examine the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the expression of chemical resistance, we inoculated 8 species of Asclepias (milkweed--which all produce toxic cardenolides--with a community of AMF. We quantified plant biomass, foliar and root cardenolide concentration and composition, and assessed evidence for a growth-defense tradeoff in the presence and absence of AMF. As expected, total foliar and root cardenolide concentration varied among milkweed species. Importantly, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi on total foliar cardenolide concentration also varied among milkweed species, with foliar cardenolides increasing or decreasing, depending on the plant species. We detected a phylogenetic signal to this variation; AMF fungi reduced foliar cardenolide concentrations to a greater extent in the clade including A. curassavica than in the clade including A. syriaca. Moreover, AMF inoculation shifted the composition of cardenolides in above- and below-ground plant tissues in a species-specific fashion. Mycorrhizal inoculation changed the relative distribution of cardenolides between root and shoot tissue in a species-specific fashion, but did not affect cardenolide diversity or polarity. Finally, a tradeoff between plant growth and defense in non-mycorrhizal plants was mitigated completely by AMF inoculation. Overall, we conclude that the effects of AMF inoculation on the expression of chemical resistance can vary among congeneric plant species, and ameliorate tradeoffs between growth and

  7. The role of specific retinoid receptors in sebocyte growth and differentiation in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Ciletti, N; Michel, S; Reichert, U; Rosenfield, R L

    2000-02-01

    Retinoic acid derivatives (retinoids) exert their pleiotropic effects on cell development through specific nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Despite recent progress in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of retinoid activity, it is unknown which of the retinoid receptor pathways are involved in the specific processes of sebocyte growth and development. In this study, we investigated the roles of specific retinoid receptors in sebocyte growth and differentiation, by testing the effects of selective retinoic acid receptor and retinoid X receptor ligands at concentrations between 10-10 M and 10-6 M in a primary rat preputial cell monolayer culture system. Cell growth was determined by number of cells and colonies, and cell differentiation by analysis of lipid-forming colonies. All-trans retinoic acid and selective retinoic acid receptor agonists (CD271 = adapalene, an RAR-beta,gamma agonist; CD2043 = retinoic acid receptor pan-agonist; and CD336 = Am580, an RAR-alpha agonist) caused significant decreases in numbers of cells, colonies, and lipid-forming colonies, but with an exception at high doses of all-trans retinoic acid (10-6 M), with which only a small number of colonies grew but they became twice as differentiated as controls (42.2 +/- 4.0% vs 22.6 +/- 2.7%, mean +/- SEM, lipid-forming colonies, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the RAR-beta,gamma antagonist CD2665 antagonized the suppressive effects of all-trans retinoic acid, adapalene, and CD2043 on both cell growth and differentiation. In contrast, the retinoid X receptor agonist CD2809 increased cell growth slightly and lipid-forming colonies dramatically in a clear dose-related manner to a maximum of 73.7% +/- 6.7% at 10-6 M (p < 0. 001). Our data suggest that retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors differ in their roles in sebocyte growth and differentiation: (i) retinoic acid receptors, especially the beta and/or gamma subtypes, mediate both the

  8. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II induces accelerated myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C E; James, P L; Fant, M E; Rotwein, P

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can stimulate the terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts in culture and have established a correlation between the rate and the extent of IGF-II secretion by muscle cell lines and the rate of biochemical and morphological differentiation. To investigate the hypothesis that autocrine secretion of IGF-II plays a critical role in stimulating spontaneous myogenic differentiation in vitro, we have established C2 muscle cell lines that stably express a mouse IGF-II cDNA under control of the strong, constitutively active Moloney sarcoma virus promoter, enabling us to study directly the effects of IGF-II overproduction. Similar to observations with other muscle cell lines, IGF-II overexpressing myoblasts proliferated normally in growth medium containing 20% fetal serum, but they underwent enhanced differentiation compared with controls when incubated in low-serum differentiation medium. Accelerated differentiation of IGF-II overexpressing C2 cells was preceded by the rapid induction of myogenin mRNA and protein expression (within 1 h, compared with 24-48 h in controls) and was accompanied by an enhanced proportion of the retinoblastoma protein in an underphosphrylated and potentially active form, by a marked increase in activity of the muscle-specific enzyme, creatine phosphokinase, by extensive myotube formation by 48 h, and by elevated secretion of IGF binding protein-5 when compared with controls. These results confirm a role for IGF-II as an autocrine/paracrine differentiation factor for skeletal myoblasts, and they define a model cell system that will be useful in determining the biochemical mechanisms of IGF action in cellular differentiation.

  9. Differential segmental growth of the vertebral column of the rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Philip J; Melin, Amanda D; Russell, Anthony P

    2006-01-01

    Despite the pervasive occurrence of segmental morphologies in the animal kingdom, the study of segmental growth is almost entirely lacking, but may have significant implications for understanding the development of these organisms. We investigate the segmental and regional growth of the entire vertebral column of the rat (Rattus norvegicus) by fitting a Gompertz curve to length and age data for each vertebra and each vertebral region. Regional lengths are calculated by summing constituent vertebral lengths and intervertebral space lengths for cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and caudal regions. Gompertz curves allow for the estimation of parameters representing neonatal and adult vertebral and regional lengths, as well as initial growth rate and the rate of exponential growth decay. Findings demonstrate differences between neonatal and adult rats in terms of relative vertebral lengths, and differential growth rates between sequential vertebrae and vertebral regions. Specifically, relative differences in the length of vertebrae indicate increasing differences caudad. Vertebral length in neonates increases from the atlas to the middle of the thoracic series and decreases in length caudad, while adult vertebral lengths tend to increase caudad. There is also a general trend of increasing vertebral and regional initial growth and rate of growth decay caudad. Anteroposterior patterns of growth are sexually dimorphic, with males having longer vertebrae than females at any given age. Differences are more pronounced (a) increasingly caudad along the body axis, and (b) in adulthood than in neonates. Elucidated patterns of growth are influenced by a combination of developmental, functional, and genetic factors.

  10. Auxin Transport and Ribosome Biogenesis Mutant/Reporter Lines to Study Plant Cell Growth and Proliferation under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Miguel A.; Manzano, Ana I.; van Loon, Jack JWA.; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Carnero-Diaz, Eugenie; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. J.

    2013-02-01

    We tested different Arabidopsis thaliana strains to check their availability for space use in the International Space Station (ISS). We used mutants and reporter gene strains affecting factors of cell proliferation and cell growth, to check variations induced by an altered gravity vector. Seedlings were grown either in a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), under simulated microgravity (μg), or in a Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC), under hypergravity (2g). A combination of the two devices (μgRPM+LDC) was also used. Under all gravity alterations, seedling roots were longer than in control 1g conditions, while the levels of the nucleolar protein nucleolin were depleted. Alterations in the pattern of expression of PIN2, an auxin transporter, and of cyclin B1, a cell cycle regulator, were shown. All these alterations are compatible with previous space data, so the use of these strains will be useful in the next experiments in ISS, under real microgravity.

  11. In vitro growth, differentiation and biological characteristics of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meijiang Yun; Lianzhong Wang; Yongcai Wang; Xiaolian Jiang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the biological characteristics of neural stem cells, and the separation, purification, differentiation and source of neural stem cells.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify English articles about the growth of neural stem cells in vitro published from January 2000 to October 2006 by using the keywords of "neural stem ceils, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), umbilical cord blood stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), separation methods, neural growth factor". And relevant articles published in IEEE/IEE Electronic Library (IEL) database, Springer Link database and Kluwer Online Journals were also searched.Chinese relevant articles published between January 2000 to October 2006 were searched with the same keywords in Chinese in Chinese journal full-text database.STUDY SELECTTON: The articles were primarily screened, and then the full-texts were searched. Inclusive criteria: ① Articles relevant to the biological characteristics and classification of neural stem cells; ② Articles about the source, separation and differentiation of the ESCs, BMSCs and umbilical cord blood stem cells. The repetitive studies and reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Thirty articles were selected from 203 relevant articles according to the inclusive criteria.Articles were excluded because of repetition and reviews.DATA SYNTHESTS: Neural stem cells have the ability of self-renewing and high differentiation, and they are obtained from ESCs, nerve tissue, nerve system, BMSCs and umbilical cord blood stem cells. ESCs can be separated by means of mechanical dissociation is better than that of the trypsin digestion, BMSCs by density gradient centrifuge separation, hemolysis, whole-blood culture, etc., and umbilical cord blood stem cells by Ficoil density gradient centrifugation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) centrifugation sedimentation, etc. Neural growth factor (NGF) and other factors play an important role in the growth

  12. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) alters sexual differentiation in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandegian, Caitlin M.; Deem, Sharon L.; Bhandari, Ramji K.; Holliday, Casey M.; Nicks, Diane; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S.; Selcer, Kyle; Tillitt, Donald E.; vom Saal, Fredrick S.; Velez, Vanessa; Yang, Ying; Holliday, Dawn K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental chemicals can disrupt endocrine signaling and adversely impact sexual differentiation in wildlife. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical commonly found in a variety of habitats. In this study, we used painted turtles (Chrysemys picta), which have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), as an animal model for ontogenetic endocrine disruption by BPA. We hypothesized that BPA would override TSD and disrupt sexual development. We incubated farm-raised turtle eggs at the male-producing temperature (26 °C), randomly assigned individuals to treatment groups: control, vehicle control, 17β-estradiol (E2, 20 ng/g-egg) or 0.01, 1.0, 100 μg BPA/g-egg and harvested tissues at hatch. Typical female gonads were present in 89% of the E2-treated “males”, but in none of the control males (n = 35). Gonads of BPA-exposed turtles had varying amounts of ovarian-like cortical (OLC) tissue and disorganized testicular tubules in the medulla. Although the percentage of males with OLCs increased with BPA dose (BPA-low = 30%, BPA-medium = 33%, BPA-high = 39%), this difference was not significant (p = 0.85). In all three BPA treatments, SOX9 patterns revealed disorganized medullary testicular tubules and β-catenin expression in a thickened cortex. Liver vitellogenin, a female-specific liver protein commonly used as an exposure biomarker, was not induced by any of the treatments. Notably, these results suggest that developmental exposure to BPA disrupts sexual differentiation in painted turtles. Further examination is necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of sex reversal in reptiles and how these translate to EDC exposure in wild populations.

  13. Growth and differentiation of C2 myogenic cells are dependent on serum response factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulez, M; Rouviere, C G; Chafey, P; Hentzen, D; Vandromme, M; Lautredou, N; Lamb, N; Kahn, A; Tuil, D

    1996-01-01

    In order to study to what extent and at which stage serum response factor (SRF) is indispensable for myogenesis, we stably transfected C2 myogenic cells with, successively, a glucocorticoid receptor expression vector and a construct allowing for the expression of an SRF antisense RNA under the direction of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. In the clones obtained, SRF synthesis is reversibly down-regulated by induction of SRF antisense RNA expression by dexamethasone, whose effect is antagonized by the anti-hormone RU486. Two kinds of proliferation and differentiation patterns have been obtained in the resulting clones. Some clones with a high level of constitutive SRF antisense RNA expression are unable to differentiate into myotubes; their growth can be blocked by further induction of SRF antisense RNA expression by dexamethasone. Other clones are able to differentiate and are able to synthesize SRF, MyoD, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain at confluency. When SRF antisense RNA expression is induced in proliferating myoblasts by dexamethasone treatment, cell growth is blocked and cyclin A concentration drops. When SRF antisense RNA synthesis is induced in arrested confluent myoblasts cultured in a differentiation medium, cell fusion is blocked and synthesis of not only SRF but also MyoD, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain is inhibited. Our results show, therefore, that SRF synthesis is indispensable for both myoblast proliferation and myogenic differentiation. PMID:8887636

  14. Oncogene Regulation during the Growth and Differentiation of a Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Constance Marie

    To determine the significance of the regulation of the cellular oncogenes c-myc and c-myb during myeloid and monocytic differentiation, we analyzed oncogene expression concurrent with functional and morphological differences in HL-60 cells and in a partial differentiation resistant HL-60 clone (HL-60-1E3). Although HL-60-1E3 cells are unable to develop mature terminally differentiated features with PDBu or DMSO stimulation, they do exhibit partial differentiation features with these conditions. Treatments of HL-60-1E3 cells with PDBu preceded by treatment with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), results in complete maturation to macrophage-like cells. Using parallel PDBu-induction studies, we analyzed the kinetics of expression of c-myc, c-myb, c-fms, c-fos, c-raf, and histone H4, together with cell cycle frequency distribution, cytotoxic effector activity and clonogenic potential in HL-60 and HL-60-1E3 cells. The results of these studies revealed altered c-myc and c-myb regulation in resistant cells corresponding to a lack of terminal commitment as assessed by an increase in clonogenic potential and the inability to acquire cytotoxic function. These data suggest that maintenance of the suppressed state of c-myc and c-myb gene expression may be an important component of the regulatory mechanisms which allow HL-60 cells to complete macrophage-like terminal differentiation. A similar series of experiments examining the DMSO-induced granulocyte pathway revealed that differentiation resistance of HL-60-1E3 cells corresponded to altered regulation of both c-myc and c-myb, strengthening the hypothesis that regulation of both of these genes is integral to HL-60 differentiation. Biphasic c-myb expression was observed in both cell populations in the presence of DMSO where maximal expression took place at approximately 72 hours post-induction and was not linked to proliferation. Introduction of SV40:c-myc recombinant plasmids into HL-60 cells resulted in altered nuclear morphology

  15. Effect of growth and differentiation factor 6 on the tenogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Wei; NI Ming; RUI Yun-feng; ZHANG Kai-yi; ZHANG Qiang; XU Liang-liang; CHAN Kai-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies showed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) had risk of ectopic bone formation.In this study,we aimed to investigate the effect of growth and differentiation factor 6 (GDF-6) on the tenogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro,and then combined with small intestine submucous (SIS) to promote tendon regeneration in vivo.Methods The BMSCs were isolated from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) rats,and were characterized by multi-differentiation assays following our previous study protocol.BMSCs cultured with different concentrations of GDF-6,without growth factors served as control.After 2 weeks,mRNA expression and protein expression of tendon specific markers were examined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting to define an optimal concentration of GDF-6.Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the difference in relative mRNA expression among all groups; P ≤0.05 was regarded as statistically significant.The GDF-6 treated BMSCs combined with SIS were implanted in nude mice and SD rat acute patellar tendon injury model,the BMSCs combined with SIS served as control.After 12 and 4 weeks in nude mice and tendon injury model,the samples were collected for histology.Results After the BMSCs were treated with different concentration of GDF-6 for 2 weeks,the fold changes of the specific markers (Tenomodulin and Scleraxis) mRNA expression were significantly higher in GDF-6 (20 ng/ml) group (P ≤0.05),which was also confirmed by Western blotting result.The BMSCs became parallel in orientation after GDF-6 (20 ng/ml) treatment,but the BMSCs in control group were randomly oriented.The GDF-6 (20 ng/ml) treated BMSCs were combined with SIS,and were implanted in nude mice for 12 weeks,the histology showed neo-tendon formation.In the SD rat patellar tendon window injury model,the histology also indicated the GDF-6 (20 ng/ml) treated BMSCs combined with SIS could promote tendon regeneration.Conclusions GDF-6 has tenogenic effect on the tenogenic

  16. Growth Inhibition and Morphological Alteration of Fusarium sporotrichioides by Mentha piperita Essential Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitha, P; Krupashree, K; Jayashree, G V; Gopalan, Natarajan; Khanum, Farhath

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the phytochemical composition, antifungal activity of Mentha piperita essential oil (MPE) against Fusarium sporotrichioides. The phytochemical composition was conducted by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC MS) analysis and mycelia growth inhibition was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC), the morphological characterization was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the membrane permeability was determined by the release of extracellular constituents, pH, and total lipid content. In GC MS analysis, 22 metabolites were identified such as menthol, l menthone, pulegone, piperitone, caryophyllene, menthol acetate, etc. The antifungal activity against targeted pathogen, with MIC and MFC 500 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL, respectively. The MPE altered the morphology of F. sporotrichoides hyphae with the loss of cytoplasm content and contorted the mycelia. The increasing concentration of MPE showed increase in membrane permeability of F. sporotrichoides as evidenced by the release of extracellular constituents and pH with the disruption of cell membrane indicating decrease in lipid content of F. sporotrichoides. The observed results showed that MPE exhibited promising new antifungal agent against Fusarium sporotrichioides. F. sporotrichioides, filamentous fungi contaminate to corn and corn--based productsF. sporotrichioides mainly responsible for the production of T-2 toxinPhytochemical composition was conducted by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry analysisMentha piperita essential oil (MPE) is commonly known as peppermintThe F. sporotrichioides growth was inhibited by MPE (minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration)Morphological observation by scanning electron microscope. Abbreviations Used: Cfu: Colony forming unit; DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide, °C: Degree celsius; F. Sporotrichoides: Fusarium sporotrichioides; EOs: Essential oils; M

  17. Growth Inhibition and Morphological Alteration of Fusarium sporotrichioides by Mentha piperita Essential Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitha, P.; Krupashree, K.; Jayashree, G. V.; Gopalan, Natarajan; Khanum, Farhath

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the phytochemical composition, antifungal activity of Mentha piperita essential oil (MPE) against Fusarium sporotrichioides. Methods: The phytochemical composition was conducted by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC MS) analysis and mycelia growth inhibition was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC), the morphological characterization was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the membrane permeability was determined by the release of extracellular constituents, pH, and total lipid content. Result: In GC MS analysis, 22 metabolites were identified such as menthol, l menthone, pulegone, piperitone, caryophyllene, menthol acetate, etc. The antifungal activity against targeted pathogen, with MIC and MFC 500 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL, respectively. The MPE altered the morphology of F. sporotrichoides hyphae with the loss of cytoplasm content and contorted the mycelia. The increasing concentration of MPE showed increase in membrane permeability of F. sporotrichoides as evidenced by the release of extracellular constituents and pH with the disruption of cell membrane indicating decrease in lipid content of F. sporotrichoides. Conclusion: The observed results showed that MPE exhibited promising new antifungal agent against Fusarium sporotrichioides. SUMMARY F. sporotrichioides, filamentous fungi contaminate to corn and corn--based productsF. sporotrichioides mainly responsible for the production of T-2 toxinPhytochemical composition was conducted by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry analysisMentha piperita essential oil (MPE) is commonly known as peppermintThe F. sporotrichioides growth was inhibited by MPE (minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration)Morphological observation by scanning electron microscope. Abbreviations Used: Cfu: Colony forming unit; DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide, °C: Degree celsius; F. Sporotrichoides

  18. Nerve growth factor alters the sensitivity of rat masseter muscle mechanoreceptors to NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hayes; Dong, Xu-Dong; Cairns, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into rat masseter muscle induces a local mechanical sensitization that is greater in female than in male rats. The duration of NGF-induced sensitization in male and female rats was associated with an increase in peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression by masseter muscle afferent fibers that began 3 days postinjection. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of increased NMDA expression on the response properties of masseter muscle mechanoreceptors. In vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiological recordings of trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the masseter muscle were performed in anesthetized rats 3 days after NGF injection (25 μg/ml, 10 μl) into the masseter muscle. Mechanical activation threshold was assessed before and after intramuscular injection of NMDA. NMDA injection induced mechanical sensitization in both sexes that was increased significantly following NGF injection in the male rats but not in the female rats. However, in female but not male rats, further examination found that preadministration of NGF induced a greater sensitization in slow Aδ-fibers (2-7 m/s) than fast Aδ-fibers (7-12 m/s). This suggests that preadministration of NGF had a different effect on slowly conducting mechanoreceptors in the female rats compared with the male rats. Although previous studies have found an association between estrogenic tone and NMDA activity, no correlation was observed between NMDA-evoked mechanical sensitization and plasma estrogen level. This study suggests NGF alters NMDA-induced mechanical sensitization in the peripheral endings of masseter mechanoreceptors in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  19. Rising CO2 interacts with growth light and growth rate to alter photosystem II photoinactivation of the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available We studied the interactive effects of pCO(2 and growth light on the coastal marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 growing under ambient and expected end-of-the-century pCO(2 (750 ppmv, and a range of growth light from 30 to 380 µmol photons·m(-2·s(-1. Elevated pCO(2 significantly stimulated the growth of T. pseudonana under sub-saturating growth light, but not under saturating to super-saturating growth light. Under ambient pCO(2 susceptibility to photoinactivation of photosystem II (σ(i increased with increasing growth rate, but cells growing under elevated pCO(2 showed no dependence between growth rate and σ(i, so under high growth light cells under elevated pCO(2 were less susceptible to photoinactivation of photosystem II, and thus incurred a lower running cost to maintain photosystem II function. Growth light altered the contents of RbcL (RUBISCO and PsaC (PSI protein subunits, and the ratios among the subunits, but there were only limited effects on these and other protein pools between cells grown under ambient and elevated pCO(2.

  20. Differential spectral power alteration following acupuncture at different designated places revealed by magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Youbo; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; Xue, Ting; Zhong, Chongguang; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Hu; Feng, Yuanyuan; Wei, Wenjuan; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    As an ancient therapeutic technique in Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture has been used increasingly in modern society to treat a range of clinical conditions as an alternative and complementary therapy. However, acupoint specificity, lying at the core of acupuncture, still faces many controversies. Considering previous neuroimaging studies on acupuncture have mainly employed functional magnetic resonance imaging, which only measures the secondary effect of neural activity on cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, in the current study, we adopted an electrophysiological measurement technique named magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure the direct neural activity. 28 healthy college students were recruited in this study. We filtered MEG data into 5 consecutive frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma band) and grouped 140 sensors into 10 main brain regions (left/right frontal, central, temporal, parietal and occipital regions). Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) based spectral analysis approach was further performed to explore the differential band-limited power change patterns of acupuncture at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36) using a nearby nonacupoint (NAP) as control condition. Significantly increased delta power and decreased alpha as well as beta power in bilateral frontal ROIs were observed following stimulation at ST36. Compared with ST36, decreased alpha power in left and right central, right parietal as well as right temporal ROIs were detected in NAP group. Our research results may provide additional evidence for acupoint specificity.

  1. Comparative data on the differentiation and growth of bone ornamentation in gnathostomes (Chordata: Vertebrata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Buffrénil, Vivian; Clarac, François; Canoville, Aurore; Laurin, Michel

    2016-05-01

    Bone ornamentation, in the form of rounded pits framed by a network of ridges, is a frequent feature among a great diversity of gnathostome taxa. However, the basic osteogenic processes controlling the differentiation and development of these reliefs remain controversial. The present study is a broad comparative survey of this question with the classical methods used in hard tissue histology and paleohistology. Distinct processes, unevenly distributed among taxa, are involved in the creation and growth of pits and ridges. The simplest one is mere differential growth between pit bottom (slow growth) and ridge top (faster growth). The involvement of several complex remodeling processes, with the local succession of resorption and reconstruction cycles, is frequent and occurs in all major gnathostome clades. Some broad, inclusive clades (e.g., Temnospondyli) display consistency in the mechanisms controlling ornamentation, whereas other clades (e.g., Actinopterygii) are characterized by the diversity of the mechanisms involved. If osteogenic mechanisms are taken into account, bone ornamentation should be considered as a character extremely prone to homoplasy. Maximum likelihood (ML) optimizations reveal that the plesiomorphic mechanism creating ornamentation is differential apposition rate over pits (slow growth) and ridges (faster growth). In some taxas e.g., temnospondyls vs lissamphibians or pseudosuchians, bone ornamentation is likely to be a homoplastic feature due to a convergence process driven by similar selective pressures. ML models of character evolution suggest that the presence of resorption in the development of ornamentation may be selectively advantageous, although support for this conclusion is only moderate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Growth and differentiation of human lens epithelial cells in vitro on matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.; Aragon, G.; Lin, S. P.; Lui, G.; Polansky, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the growth and maturation of nonimmortalized human lens epithelial (HLE) cells grown in vitro. METHODS: HLE cells, established from 18-week prenatal lenses, were maintained on bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) extracellular matrix (ECM) in medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The identity, growth, and differentiation of the cultures were characterized by karyotyping, cell morphology, and growth kinetics studies, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: HLE cells had a male, human diploid (2N = 46) karyotype. The population-doubling time of exponentially growing cells was 24 hours. After 15 days in culture, cell morphology changed, and lentoid formation was evident. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated expression of alphaA- and betaB2-crystallin, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and major intrinsic protein (MIP26) in exponential growth. Western analyses of protein extracts show positive expression of three immunologically distinct classes of crystallin proteins (alphaA-, alphaB-, and betaB2-crystallin) with time in culture. By Western blot analysis, expression of p57(KIP2), a known marker of terminally differentiated fiber cells, was detectable in exponential cultures, and levels increased after confluence. MIP26 and gamma-crystallin protein expression was detected in confluent cultures, by using immunofluorescence, but not in exponentially growing cells. CONCLUSIONS: HLE cells can be maintained for up to 4 months on ECM derived from BCE cells in medium containing FGF-2. With time in culture, the cells demonstrate morphologic characteristics of, and express protein markers for, lens fiber cell differentiation. This in vitro model will be useful for investigations of radiation-induced cataractogenesis and other studies of lens toxicity.

  3. Polyamine levels as related to growth, differentiation and senescence in protoplast-derived cultures of Vigna aconitifolia and Avena sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur Sawhney, R.; Shekhawat, N. S.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported that aseptically cultured mesophyll protoplasts of Vigna divide rapidly and regenerate into complete plants, while mesophyll protoplasts of Avena divide only sporadically and senesce rapidly after isolation. We measured polyamine titers in such cultures of Vigna and Avena, to study possible correlations between polyamines and cellular behavior. We also deliberately altered polyamine titer by the use of selective inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, noting the effects on internal polyamine titer, cell division activity and regenerative events. In Vigna cultures, levels of free and bound putrescine and spermidine increased dramatically as cell division and differentiation progressed. The increase in bound polyamines was largest in embryoid-forming callus tissue while free polyamine titer was highest in root-forming callus. In Avena cultures, the levels of total polyamines decreased as the protoplast senesced. The presence of the inhibitors alpha-difluoromethyl-arginine (specific inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase), alpha-difluoromethylornithine (specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase) and dicyclohexylamine (inhibitor of spermidine synthase) reduced cell division and organogenesis in Vigna cultures. Addition of low concentration of polyamines to such cultures containing inhibitors or removal of inhibitors from the culture medium restored the progress of growth and differentiation with concomitant increase in polyamine levels.

  4. Genome Array on Differentially Expressed Genes of Skin Tissue in Cashmere Goat at Early Anagen of Cashmere Growth Cycle Using DNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Jiang; Marzeya Yasen; XU Xin-ming; Lazate Ainiwaer; ZHANG Yan-hua; TIAN Ke-chuan; YU Li-juan; WU Wei-wei; Hanikezi Tulafu; FU Xue-feng

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism involved in cashmere regeneration, this study investigated the gene expression proifle of skin tissue at various stages of the cashmere growth cycle and screen differentially expressed genes at proangen in 10 cashmere goats at 2 years of age using agilent sheep oligo microarray. Signiifcance analysis of microarray (SAM) methods was used to identify the differentially expressed genes, Hierarchical clustering was performed to clarify these genes in association with different cashmere growth stages, and GO (Gene ontology) and the pathway analyses were con-ducted by a free web-based Molecular Annotation System3.0 (MAS 3.0). Approximately 10 200 probe sets were detected in skin tissue of 2-yr-old cashmere goat. After SAM analysis of the microarray data, totally 417 genes were shown to be differentially expressed at different cashmere growth stages, and 24 genes are signiifcantly up-regulated (21) or down-regulated (3) at proangen concurrently compared to angen and telogen. Hierarchical clustering analysis clearly distinguished the differentially expressed genes of each stage. GO analysis indicated that these altered genes at proangen were predominantly involved in collagen ifbril organization, integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cell-matrix adhesion, cell adhesion, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptor signaling pathway, regulation of cell growth. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) analysis showed that the signiifcant pathways involved mainly included focal adhesion and extracellular matrixc (ECM)-receptor interaction. Some important genes involved in these biological processes, such as COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, SPARC, CYR61 and CTGF, were related to tissue remolding and repairing and detected by more than one probe with similar expression trends at different stages of cashmere growth cycle. The different expression of these genes may contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of cashmere

  5. Binding of insulin-like growth factors to Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J F; Sledge, G W; Benenati, S V; Frolik, C A; Roth, B J; Hirsch, K S

    1991-08-15

    Differentiation of Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells by exposure to 2.1 mM alpha-difluoromethylornithine resulted in changes in morphology, a decrease in growth rate, and changes in the expression of SSEA-1 differentiation antigen. While the binding of 125I-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) remained relatively constant during differentiation, binding of 125I-IGF-II increased 2-3-fold. Further, the binding of IGF-II was 87 times greater than IGF-I in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Undifferentiated Tera-2 cells exhibited a single class of binding sites for both IGF-I (KD = 1.2 nM, 7.0 x 10(3) sites/cell) and IGF-II (KD = 8.3 nM, 3.4 x 10(5) sites/cell). Following differentiation, IGF-I continued to bind to a single class of binding sites (KD 1.0 nM, 6.7 x 10(3) sites/cell) whereas IGF-II bound to both high-affinity sites (KDH 0.3 nM, 2.2 x 10(5) sites/cell) and low-affinity sites (KDL 15.1 nM, 1.6 x 10(7) sites/cell). The binding of iodinated IGF-II was blocked by unlabeled IGF-II but not IGF-I. In contrast, 125I-IGF-I binding was prevented by either IGF-I or IGF-II. Affinity cross-linking experiments demonstrated the presence of both type I and type II IGF receptors along with a number of IGF binding proteins. IGF-I failed to stimulate the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Although IGF-II caused a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in both undifferentiated and differentiated Tera-2 cells, the magnitude of the response and the sensitivity of the cells to IGF-II stimulation was diminished following differentiation. The observed changes in IGF-II binding, which occur in conjunction with cellular differentiation, may be an important feature of the expression of the differentiated phenotype by human germ cell tumors.

  6. Early- versus Late-Onset Fetal Growth Restriction Differentially Affects the Development of the Fetal Sheep Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Alencar Rocha, Anna Karynna; Allison, Beth J; Yawno, Tamara; Polglase, Graeme R; Sutherland, Amy E; Malhotra, Atul; Jenkin, Graham; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Miller, Suzanne L

    2017-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common complication of pregnancy, principally caused by suboptimal placental function, and is associated with high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Clinical studies suggest that the time of onset of placental insufficiency is an important contributor towards the neurodevelopmental impairments that are evident in children who had FGR. It is however currently unknown how early-onset and late-onset FGR differentially affect brain development. The aim of this study was to examine neuropathology in early-onset and late-onset FGR fetal sheep and to determine whether they differentially alter brain development. We induced placental insufficiency and FGR via single umbilical artery ligation at either 88 days (early-onset) or 105 days (late-onset) of fetal sheep gestation (term is approx. 147 days), reflecting a period of rapid white matter brain development. Fetal blood samples were collected for the first 10 days after surgery, and all fetuses were sacrificed at 125 days' gestation for brain collection and subsequent histopathology. Our results show that early-onset FGR fetuses became progressively hypoxic over the first 10 days after onset of placental insufficiency, whereas late-onset FGR fetuses were significantly hypoxic compared to controls from day 1 after onset of placental insufficiency (SaO2 46.7 ± 7.4 vs. 65.7 ± 3.9%, respectively, p = 0.03). Compared to control brains, early-onset FGR brains showed widespread white matter injury, with a reduction in both CNPase-positive and MBP-positive density of staining in the periventricular white matter (PVWM), subcortical white matter, intragyral white matter (IGWM), subventricular zone (SVZ), and external capsule (p development that principally mediates altered brain development associated with FGR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Age at developmental cortical injury differentially Alters corpus callosum volume in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Glenn D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freezing lesions to developing rat cortex induced between postnatal day (P one and three (P1 – 3 lead to malformations similar to human microgyria, and further correspond to reductions in brain weight and cortical volume. In contrast, comparable lesions on P5 do not produce microgyric malformations, nor the changes in brain weight seen with microgyria. However, injury occurring at all three ages does lead to rapid auditory processing deficits as measured in the juvenile period. Interestingly, these deficits persist into adulthood only in the P1 lesion case 1. Given prior evidence that early focal cortical lesions induce abnormalities in cortical morphology and connectivity 1234, we hypothesized that the differential behavioral effects of focal cortical lesions on P1, P3 or P5 may be associated with underlying neuroanatomical changes that are sensitive to timing of injury. Clinical studies indicate that humans with perinatal brain injury often show regional reductions in corpus callosum size and abnormal symmetry, which frequently correspond to learning impairments 567. Therefore, in the current study the brains of P1, 3 or 5 lesion rats, previously evaluated for brain weight, and cortical volume changes and auditory processing impairments (P21-90, were further analyzed for changes in corpus callosum volume. Results Results showed a significant main effect of Treatment on corpus callosum volume [F (1,57 = 10.2, P Conclusion Decrements in corpus callosum volume in the P1 and 3 lesion groups are consistent with the reductions in brain weight and cortical volume previously reported for microgyric rats 18. Current results suggest that disruption to the cortical plate during early postnatal development may lead to more widely dispersed neurovolumetric anomalies and subsequent behavioral impairments 1, compared with injury that occurs later in development. Further, these results suggest that in a human clinical setting decreased

  8. Pyrethroids differentially alter voltage-gated sodium channels from the honeybee central olfactory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklesso Kadala

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central 'antennal lobe neurons' (ALNs in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1 an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2 a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and

  9. ELEVATED CARBON DIOXIDE DIFFERENTIALLY ALTERS THE PHOTOPHYSIOLOGY OF THALASSIOSIRA PSEUDONANA (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) AND EMILIANIA HUXLEYI (HAPTOPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avery; Rogers, Susan P; Duffy, Stephen J; Campbell, Douglas A

    2012-06-01

    Increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide is causing changes to ocean chemistry, which will continue in a predictable manner. Dissolution of additional atmospheric carbon dioxide leads to increased concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and bicarbonate and decreased pH in ocean water. The concomitant effects on phytoplankton ecophysiology, leading potentially to changes in community structure, are now a focus of concern. Therefore, we grew the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) W. W. Hay et H. Mohler and the diatom strains Thalassiosira pseudonana (Hust.) Hasle et Heimdal CCMP 1014 and T. pseudonana CCMP 1335 under low light in turbidostat photobioreactors bubbled with air containing 390 ppmv or 750 ppmv CO2 . Increased pCO2 led to increased growth rates in all three strains. In addition, protein levels of RUBISCO increased in the coastal strains of both species, showing a larger capacity for CO2 assimilation at 750 ppmv CO2 . With increased pCO2 , both T. pseudonana strains displayed an increased susceptibility to PSII photoinactivation and, to compensate, an augmented capacity for PSII repair. Consequently, the cost of maintaining PSII function for the diatoms increased at increased pCO2 . In E. huxleyi, PSII photoinactivation and the counter-acting repair, while both intrinsically larger than in T. pseudonana, did not change between the current and high-pCO2 treatments. The content of the photosynthetic electron transport intermediary cytochrome b6/f complex increased significantly in the diatoms under elevated pCO2 , suggesting changes in electron transport function.

  10. Cafeteria diet differentially alters the expression of feeding-related genes through DNA methylation mechanisms in individual hypothalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarino, Gisela Paola; Andreoli, María Florencia; Rossetti, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Tschopp, María Virgina; Luque, Enrique Hugo; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2017-07-15

    We evaluated the effect of cafeteria diet (CAF) on the mRNA levels and DNA methylation state of feeding-related neuropeptides, and neurosteroidogenic enzymes in discrete hypothalamic nuclei. Besides, the expression of steroid hormone receptors was analyzed. Female rats fed with CAF from weaning increased their energy intake, body weight, and fat depots, but did not develop metabolic syndrome. The increase in energy intake was related to an orexigenic signal of paraventricular (PVN) and ventromedial (VMN) nuclei, given principally by upregulation of AgRP and NPY. This was mildly counteracted by the arcuate nucleus, with decreased AgRP expression and increased POMC and kisspeptin expression. CAF altered the transcription of neurosteroidogenic enzymes in PVN and VMN, and epigenetic mechanisms associated with differential promoter methylation were involved. The changes observed in the hypothalamic nuclei studied could add information about their differential role in food intake control and how their action is disrupted in obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on cardiac fibroblasts grown under altered gravity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Leder, Annekatrin; Pietsch, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Myocardium is very sensitive to gravitational changes. During a spaceflight cardiovascular atrophy paired with rhythm problems and orthostatic intolerance can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor...

  12. Leptin alters the response of the growth hormone releasing factor- growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor-I axis to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, M; Emanuele, N

    1998-10-01

    Proper nutritional status is critical for maintaining growth and metabolic function, playing an intimate role in neuroendocrine regulation. Leptin, the recently identified product of the obese gene, may very well be an integral signal which regulates neuroendocrine responses in times of food deprivation. The present study examines leptin's ability to regulate hormonal synthesis and secretion within the GRF-GH-IGF axis in the adult male rat during almost 3 days of fasting. Serum levels of GH and IGF-I were drastically suppressed by fasting. Daily leptin administration was able to fully prevent the fasting-induced fall in serum GH. Leptin failed to restore IGF-I to control levels, however, suggesting possible GH resistance. Fasting caused an insignificant increase in GH mRNA, while leptin injections significantly increased steady-state levels of this message. The GRF receptor (GRFr) message was not altered with fasting or leptin treatment. Leptin also exhibited effects at the hypothalamic level. Fasting induced a sharp fall in GRF mRNA expression and leptin injections partially prevented this fall. However, there were no observed changes in the hypothalamic GRF content. These results provide evidence that leptin may function as a neuromodulator of the GRF-GH-IGF axis communicating to this hormonal system the nutritional status of the animal.

  13. Transforming Growth Factors β Coordinate Cartilage and Tendon Differentiation in the Developing Limb Mesenchyme*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling has an increasing interest in regenerative medicine as a potential tool to repair cartilages, however the chondrogenic effect of this pathway in developing systems is controversial. Here we have analyzed the function of TGFβ signaling in the differentiation of the developing limb mesoderm in vivo and in high density micromass cultures. In these systems highest signaling activity corresponded with cells at stages preceding overt chondrocyte differe...

  14. Development of a restricted state space stochastic differential equation model for bacterial growth in rich media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Bergmann, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Madsen, Henrik

    2012-07-21

    In the present study, bacterial growth in a rich media is analysed in a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) framework. It is demonstrated that the SDE formulation and smoothened state estimates provide a systematic framework for data driven model improvements, using random walk hidden states. Bacterial growth is limited by the available substrate and the inclusion of diffusion must obey this natural restriction. By inclusion of a modified logistic diffusion term it is possible to introduce a diffusion term flexible enough to capture both the growth phase and the stationary phase, while concentration is restricted to the natural state space (substrate and bacteria non-negative). The case considered is the growth of Salmonella and Enterococcus in a rich media. It is found that a hidden state is necessary to capture the lag phase of growth, and that a flexible logistic diffusion term is needed to capture the random behaviour of the growth model. Further, it is concluded that the Monod effect is not needed to capture the dynamics of bacterial growth in the data presented.

  15. Coordinated vascular endothelial growth factor expression and signaling during skeletal myogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Brad A; Walshe, Tony E; Mitchell, Dianne C; Havumaki, Josh S; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Maharaj, Arindel S; Maldonado, Angel E; D'Amore, Patricia A

    2008-03-01

    Angiogenesis is largely controlled by hypoxia-driven transcriptional up-regulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its binding to the endothelial cell tyrosine receptor kinases, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. Recent expression analysis suggests that VEGF is expressed in a cell-specific manner in normoxic adult tissue; however, the transcriptional regulation and role of VEGF in these tissues remains fundamentally unknown. In this report we demonstrate that VEGF is coordinately up-regulated during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. We reveal that this regulation is mediated in part by MyoD homo- and hetero-dimeric transcriptional mechanisms. Serial deletions of the VEGF promoter elucidated a region containing three tandem CANNTG consensus MyoD sites serving as essential sites of direct interaction for MyoD-mediated up-regulation of VEGF transcription. VEGF-null embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibited reduced myogenic differentiation compared with wild-type ES cells, suggesting that VEGF may serve a role in skeletal muscle differentiation. We demonstrate that VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 are expressed at low levels in myogenic precursor cells and are robustly activated upon VEGF stimulation and that their expression is coordinately regulated during skeletal muscle differentiation. VEGF stimulation of differentiating C2C12 cells promoted myotube hypertrophy and increased myogenic differentiation, whereas addition of sFlt1, a VEGF inhibitor, resulted in myotube hypotrophy and inhibited myogenic differentiation. We further provide evidence indicating VEGF-mediated myogenic marker expression, mitogenic activity, migration, and prosurvival functions may contribute to increased myogenesis. These data suggest a novel mechanism whereby VEGF is coordinately regulated as part of the myogenic differentiation program and serves an autocrine function regulating skeletal myogenesis.

  16. Retinoic Acid Induces Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation by Altering Both Encoding RNA and microRNA Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA is a vitamin A metabolite that is essential for early embryonic development and promotes stem cell neural lineage specification; however, little is known regarding the impact of RA on mRNA transcription and microRNA levels on embryonic stem cell differentiation. Here, we present mRNA microarray and microRNA high-output sequencing to clarify how RA regulates gene expression. Using mRNA microarray analysis, we showed that RA repressed pluripotency-associated genes while activating ectoderm markers in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs. Moreover, RA modulated the DNA methylation of mESCs by altering the expression of epigenetic-associated genes such as Dnmt3b and Dnmt3l. Furthermore, H3K4me2, a pluripotent histone modification, was repressed by RA stimulation. From microRNA sequence data, we identified two downregulated microRNAs, namely, miR-200b and miR-200c, which regulated the pluripotency of stem cells. We found that miR-200b or miR-200c deficiency suppressed the expression of pluripotent genes, including Oct4 and Nanog, and activated the expression of the ectodermal marker gene Nestin. These results demonstrate that retinoid induces mESCs to differentiate by regulating miR-200b/200c. Our findings provide the landscapes of mRNA and microRNA gene networks and indicate the crucial role of miR-200b/200c in the RA-induced differentiation of mESCs.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Growth Rate in Differentiating Etiologies of Short Stature in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Alaei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Short stature is a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions that some of which may be amenable to timely treatment and a suboptimal growth rate may be an early marker pointing to the cause of growth retardation. This study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic utility of growth rate in differential diagnosis of children with short stature. Materials and Methods All children between the ages of 2 and 18 years who visited in pediatric endocrinology clinic in a five years period were recruited in a prospective cohort study. Children with standing height Results One hundred forty three patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean follow up period was 14.4±10.9 months. Etiologies of short stature were: constitutional growth delay (CGD 46.9%, familial short stature (FSS 28.7%, hypothyroidism 4.2%, growth hormone deficiency (GHD 4.2% and miscellaneous causes in 16% of patients.  Mean Z- score for children with constitutional growth delay was -2.3±0.69, in familial short stature was -2.3±0.65 and for other condition was -2.7±1.49. There was a meaningful statistical correlation between growth rate and etiology of short stature (P0.05. Conclusion There was significant difference in growth rate between children with constitutional growth delay and familial short stature in comparing to short stature due to endocrine problem and other etiologies. Assessment of growth rate has some utility in diagnosing the etiology of short stature.

  18. Differential gene expression profiling of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing mammary tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Haining Peng; Yingli Zhong; Daiqiang Li; Mi Tang; Xiaofeng Ding; Jian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is highly expressed in approximately 30% of breast cancer patients,and substantial evidence supports the relationship between HER2 overexpression and poor overall survival. However,the biological function of HER2 signaltransduction pathways is not entirely clear. To investigate gene activation within the pathways, we screened differentially expressed genes in HER2-positive mouse mammary tumor using two-directional suppression subtractive hybridization combined with reverse dot-blotting analysis. Forty genes and expressed sequence tags related to transduction, cell proliferation/growth/apoptosis and secreted/extracellular matrix proteins were differentially expressed in HER2-positive mammary tumor tissue. Among these, 19 were already reported to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor, 11 were first identified to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor in this study but were already reported in other tumors, and 10 correlated with other cancers. These genes can facilitate the understanding of the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer.

  19. Mint essential oil can induce or inhibit potato sprouting by differential alteration of apical meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Dudai, Nativ; Fischer, Ravit; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Shoseyov, Oded; Eshel, Dani

    2010-06-01

    Sprouting of potatoes during storage, due to tuber dormancy release, is associated with weight loss and softening. Sprout-preventing chemicals, such as chlorpropham (CIPC), can negatively impact the environment and human health. Monthly thermal fogging with mint (Mentha spicata L.) essential oil (MEO) inhibited sprouting in eight potato cultivars during large-volume 6-month storage: the tubers remained firm with 38% lower weight loss after 140 days of storage. The sprout-inhibitory action may be nullified: treated tubers washed with water resumed sprouting within days, with reduced apical dominance. MEO application caused local necrosis of the bud meristem, and a few weeks later, axillary bud (AX) growth was induced in the same sprouting eye. MEO components analysis showed that 73% of its content is the monoterpene R-carvone. Tubers treated with synthetic R-carvone in equivalent dose, 4.5 microl l(-1), showed an inhibitory effect similar to that of MEO. Surprisingly, 0.5 microl l(-1) of MEO or synthetic R-carvone catalyzed AX sprouting in the tuber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an essential oil vapor inducing early sprouting of potato tubers. R-carvone caused visible damage to the meristem membrane at sprout-inhibiting, but not sprout-inducing doses, suggesting different underlying mechanisms. After 5 days' exposure to R-carvone, its derivatives transcarveol and neo-dihydrocarveol were found in buds of tubers treated with the inhibitory dose, suggesting biodegradation. These experiments demonstrate the potential of MEO vapor as an environmentally friendly alternative to CIPC in stored potatoes and as a research tool for the control of sprouting in plants.

  20. Ontogeny strongly and differentially alters leaf economic and other key traits in three diverse Helianthus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Chase M; McGaughey, Sarah E; Donovan, Lisa A

    2013-10-01

    The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes large cross-species variation in suites of leaf functional traits ranging from resource-acquisitive to resource-conservative strategies. Such strategies have been integral in explaining plant adaptation to diverse environments, and have been linked to numerous ecosystem processes. The LES has previously been found to be significantly modulated by climate, soil fertility, biogeography, growth form, and life history. One largely unexplored aspect of LES variation, whole-plant ontogeny, is investigated here using multiple populations of three very different species of sunflower: Helianthus annuus, Helianthus mollis, and Helianthus radula. Plants were grown under environmentally controlled conditions and assessed for LES and related traits at four key developmental stages, using recently matured leaves to standardize for leaf age. Nearly every trait exhibited a significant ontogenetic shift in one or more species, with trait patterns differing among populations and species. Photosynthetic rate, leaf nitrogen concentration, and leaf mass per area exhibited surprisingly large changes, spanning over two-thirds of the original cross-species LES variation and shifting from resource-acquisitive to resource-conservative strategies as the plants matured. Other traits being investigated in relation to the LES, such as leaf water content, pH, and vein density, also showed large changes. The finding that ontogenetic variation in LES strategy can be substantial leads to a recommendation of standardization by developmental stage when assessing 'species values' of labile traits for comparative approaches. Additionally, the substantial ontogenetic trait shifts seen within single individuals provide an opportunity to uncover the contribution of gene regulatory changes to variation in LES traits.

  1. Differential Expression of Cell Cycle Regulators During Hyperplastic and Hypertrophic Growth of Broiler Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Suh, Y; Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Davis, M E; Lee, K

    2015-10-01

    Hyperplastic growth and hypertrophic growth within adipose tissue is tightly associated with cell cycle activity. In this study, CCNG2 and CDKN2C were found to be correlated with cell cycle inhibition during fat cell differentiation, whereas CCND3, CCNA1, and ANAPC5 were positively associated with cell cycle activity during fat cell proliferation after selection based on GEO datasets available on the NCBI website. The findings were validated through comparison of expressions of these genes among different tissues/fractions in broiler chickens and time points during primary cell culture using quantitative real-time PCR. Development of broiler subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated on embryonic days 15 and 17 and on post-hatch days 0, 5, 11, and 33 using H&E staining and PCNA immunostaining with DAPI counter stain. In addition, mRNA expressions of five cell cycle regulators as well as precursor cell and adipocyte markers were measured at those time points. The results suggest that cellular proliferation activity decreased as the fat pad grows, but a population of precursor cells seemed to be maintained until post-hatch day 5 despite increasing differentiation activity. Hypertrophic growth gradually intensified despite a slight cessation on post-hatch day 0 due to increased energy expenditure during hatching and delayed food access. From post-hatch day 5 to day 11, most of the precursor cells may become differentiated. After post-hatch day 11, hyperplastic growth seemed to slow, while hypertrophic growth may become dominant. This study provides further understanding about broiler fat tissue development which is imperative for effective control of fat deposition.

  2. Application of bacteria from non-cultivated plants to promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, I; White, J F

    2017-04-01

    Cotton seeds are frequently treated with acid to remove fibres and reduce seed-transmitted diseases. This process also eliminates beneficial bacteria on the seed surface. The goal of this research was to seek and apply beneficial bacteria to acid delinted cotton seeds to evaluate their growth-promoting and salt stress alleviating effects in seedlings. Bacteria were isolated from non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae. Seeds were collected from Portia tree (Thespesia populnea) and wild cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) from coastal and arid areas of Puerto Rico. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Curtobacterium oceanosedimentum and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans were inoculated onto acid delinted cotton seeds. Bacteria increased cotton seed germination and length of emerging seedling radicles. Cotton seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens to evaluate growth and root architecture of non-stressed and salt stressed seedlings. Inoculating cotton seeds with B. amyloliquefaciens led to a greater percentage of seedlings with expanded cotyledons after 8 days, enhanced primary and lateral root growth, and altered root architecture. Similar results were obtained when okra seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens. The data supported the hypothesis that non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae growing in stressful environments possess bacteria that promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton and okra seedlings. This study demonstrated the effects of applying beneficial bacteria on acid delinted cotton seeds. Inoculating seeds with salt stress alleviating bacteria could improve the growth of crop seedlings that are vulnerable to soil salinization. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Growth hormone and melatonin prevent age-related alteration in apoptosis processes in the dentate gyrus of male rats

    OpenAIRE

    R A Kireev; Vara, E. (E.); Tresguerres, J. A. F.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the age-related decrease in the number of neurons in the hippocampus that leads to alterations in brain function, may be associated with an increase in apoptosis due to the reduced secretion of growth hormone (GH) and/or melatonin in old animals. In order to investigate this possibility, male Wistar rats of 22 months of age were divided into three groups. One group remained untreated and acted as the control group. The second was treated with growth hormone (hGH) fo...

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals growth inhibition of soybean roots by manganese toxicity is associated with alteration of cell wall structure and lignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijian; Yan, Wei; Sun, Lili; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2016-06-30

    Plant roots, the hidden half of plants, play a vital role in manganese (Mn) toxicity tolerance. However, molecular mechanisms underlying root adaptation to Mn toxicity remain largely unknown. In this study, soybean (Glycine max) was used to investigate alterations of root morphology and protein profiles in response to Mn toxicity. Results showed that soybean root growth was significantly inhibited by Mn toxicity. Subsequent proteomic analysis revealed that 31 proteins were successfully identified via MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis including 21 unique up-regulated and 6 unique down-regulated proteins, which are mainly related to cell wall metabolism, protein metabolism and signal transduction. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that corresponding gene transcription patterns were correlated with accumulation of 14 of 21 up-regulated proteins, but only 1 of 6 down-regulated proteins, suggesting that most excess Mn up-regulated proteins are controlled at the transcriptional levels, while down-regulated proteins are controlled at the post-transcriptional levels. Furthermore, changes in abundances of GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran-3, expansin-like B1-like protein, dirigent protein and peroxidase 5-like protein strongly suggested that alteration of root cell wall structure and lignification might be associated with inhibited root growth. Taken together, this study was helpful to further understandings of adaptive strategies of legume roots to Mn toxicity. This study highlighted the effects of Mn toxicity on soybean root growth and its proteome profiles. Excess Mn treatments inhibited root growth. Comparative proteomic analysis was performed to analyze the changes in protein profiles of soybean roots in response to Mn toxicity. A total of 31 root proteins with differential abundances were identified and predominantly associated with signal transduction and cell wall metabolism. Among them, the abundances of the GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran-3 and Ran-binding protein 1 were

  5. Alteration of plant meristem function by manipulation of the Retinoblastoma-like plant RRB gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Tim; Feiler, Heidi; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Jenkins, Susan; Roe, Judith; Zambryski, Patricia

    2007-01-16

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  6. Alteration of plant meristem function by manipulation of the Retinoblastoma-like plant RRB gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Tim (Madison, WI); Feiler, Heidi (Albany, CA); Gruissem, Wilhelm (Forch, CH); Jenkins, Susan (Martinez, CA); Roe, Judith (Manhattan, KS); Zambryski, Patricia (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-01-16

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  7. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-feng Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These findings confirm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus results in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  8. Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator functions in balancing growth and differentiation in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiying; Pasolli, H Amalia; Fuchs, Elaine

    2011-02-01

    In mammals, skin begins as a single-layered epithelium, which, through a series of signals, either stratifies and differentiates to become epidermis or invaginates downward to make hair follicles (HFs). To achieve and maintain proper tissue architecture, keratinocytes must intricately balance growth and differentiation. Here, we uncover a critical and hitherto unappreciated role for Yes-associated protein (YAP), an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional coactivator with potent oncogenic potential. We show that YAP is highly expressed and nuclear in single-layered basal epidermal progenitors. Notably, nuclear YAP progressively declines with age and correlates with proliferative potential of epidermal progenitors. Shortly after initiation of HF morphogenesis, YAP translocates to the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. Through genetic analysis, we demonstrate a role for YAP in maintaining basal epidermal progenitors and regulating HF morphogenesis. YAP overexpression causes hair placodes to evaginate into epidermis rather than invaginate into dermis. YAP also expands basal epidermal progenitors, promotes proliferation, and inhibits terminal differentiation. In vitro gain-and-loss of function studies show that primary mouse keratinocytes (MKs) accelerate proliferation, suppress differentiation, and inhibit apoptosis when YAP is activated and reverse these features when YAP is inhibited. Finally, we identify Cyr61 as a target of YAP in MKs and demonstrate a requirement for TEA domain (TEAD) transcriptional factors to comediate YAP functions in MKs.

  9. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-feng Jiang; Kai Yang; Xiao-qing Yang; Ying-fu Liu; Yuan-chi Cheng; Xu-yi Chen; Yue Tu

    2015-01-01

    It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron speciifc enolase, glial ifbrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunolfuorescence. Moreover, lfow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These ifndings con-ifrm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus re-sults in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  10. Individualism in plant populations: using stochastic differential equations to model individual neighbourhood-dependent plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiming; Schneider, Manuel K; Pitchford, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    We study individual plant growth and size hierarchy formation in an experimental population of Arabidopsis thaliana, within an integrated analysis that explicitly accounts for size-dependent growth, size- and space-dependent competition, and environmental stochasticity. It is shown that a Gompertz-type stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, involving asymmetric competition kernels and a stochastic term which decreases with the logarithm of plant weight, efficiently describes individual plant growth, competition, and variability in the studied population. The model is evaluated within a Bayesian framework and compared to its deterministic counterpart, and to several simplified stochastic models, using distributional validation. We show that stochasticity is an important determinant of size hierarchy and that SDE models outperform the deterministic model if and only if structural components of competition (asymmetry; size- and space-dependence) are accounted for. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of plant ecology and in more general modelling situations.

  11. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid KHOSROSHAHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Khosroshahi N, Alizadeh P, Khosravi M, Salamati P, Kamrani K. Spinal Fluid Lactate Dehydrogenase Level Differentiates between Structural and Metabolic Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:31-36.AbstractObjectiveAltered mental status is a common cause of intensive care unit admission inchildren. Differentiating structural causes of altered mental status from metabolic etiologies is of utmost importance in diagnostic approach and management of the patients. Among many biomarkers proposed to help stratifying patients with altered mental status, spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase appears to be the most promising biomarker to predict cellular necrosis.Materials & MethodsIn this cross sectional study we measured spinal fluid level of lactatedehydrogenase in children 2 months to 12 years of age admitted to a single center intensive care unit over one year. Spinal fluid level of lactate dehydrogenase in 40 pediatric cases of febrile seizure was also determined as the control group.ResultsThe study group included 35 boys (58.3% and 25 girls (41.7%. Their meanage was 2.7+/-3 years and their mean spinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase levelwas 613.8+/-190.4 units/liter. The control group included 24 boys (55.8% and19 girls (44.2%. Their mean age was 1.3+/-1.2 years and their mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level was 18.9+/-7.5 units/liter. The mean spinalfluid lactate dehydrogenase level in children with abnormal head CT scan was246.3+/-351.5 units/liter compared to 164.5+/-705.7 in those with normal CTscan of the head (p=0.001.ConclusionSpinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase level is useful in differentiating structural andmetabolic causes of altered mental status in children. ReferencesFesk SK. Coma and confusional states: emergency diagnosis and management. Neurol Clin 1998; 16: 237- 56.Cucchiara BL, Kanser SE, Wolk DA, et al. Early impairment in consciousness Predicts

  12. The effect of polyamine biosynthesis inhibition on growth and differentiation of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

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    Pieckenstain, F L; Gárriz, A; Chornomaz, E M; Sánchez, D H; Ruiz, O A

    2001-12-01

    We studied the effects of several polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on growth, differentiation, free polyamine levels and in vivo and in vitro activity of polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) were potent inhibitors of mycelial growth. The effect of DFMO was due to inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). No evidence for the existence of an arginine decarboxylase (ADC) pathway was found. The effect of DFMA was partly due to inhibition of ODC, presumably after its conversion into DFMO by mycelial arginase, as suggested by the high activity of this enzyme detected both in intact mycelium and mycelial extracts. In addition, toxic effects of DFMA on cellular processes other than polyamine metabolism might have occurred. Cyclohexylamine (CHA) slightly inhibited mycelial growth and caused an important decrease of free spermidine associated with a drastic increase of free putrescine concentration. Methylglyoxal bis-[guanyl hydrazone] (MGBG) had no effect on mycelial growth. Excepting MGBG, all the inhibitors strongly decreased sclerotial formation. Results demonstrate that sclerotial development is much more sensitive to polyamine biosynthesis inhibition than mycelial growth. Our results suggest that mycelial growth can be supported either by spermidine or putrescine, while spermidine (or the putrescine/spermidine ratio) is important for sclerotial formation to occur. Ascospore germination was completely insensitive to the inhibitors.

  13. The effect of differential growth rates across plants on spectral predictions of physiological parameters.

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    Tal Rapaport

    Full Text Available Leaves of various ages and positions in a plant's canopy can present distinct physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics, leading to complexities in selecting a single leaf for spectral representation of an entire plant. A fortiori, as growth rates between canopies differ, spectral-based comparisons across multiple plants--often based on leaves' position but not age--becomes an even more challenging mission. This study explores the effect of differential growth rates on the reflectance variability between leaves of different canopies, and its implication on physiological predictions made by widely-used spectral indices. Two distinct irrigation treatments were applied for one month, in order to trigger the formation of different growth rates between two groups of grapevines. Throughout the experiment, the plants were physiologically and morphologically monitored, while leaves from every part of their canopies were spectrally and histologically sampled. As the control vines were constantly developing new leaves, the water deficit plants were experiencing growth inhibition, resulting in leaves of different age at similar nodal position across the treatments. This modification of the age-position correlation was characterized by a near infrared reflectance difference between younger and older leaves, which was found to be exponentially correlated (R(2 = 0.98 to the age-dependent area of intercellular air spaces within the spongy parenchyma. Overall, the foliage of the control plant became more spectrally variable, creating complications for intra- and inter-treatment leaf-based comparisons. Of the derived indices, the Structure-Insensitive Pigment Index (SIPI was found indifferent to the age-position effect, allowing the treatments to be compared at any nodal position, while a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI-based stomatal conductance prediction was substantially affected by differential growth rates. As various

  14. Early prenatal androgen exposure reduces testes size and sperm concentration in sheep without altering neuroendocrine differentiation and masculine sexual behavior.

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    Scully, C M; Estill, C T; Amodei, R; McKune, A; Gribbin, K P; Meaker, M; Stormshak, F; Roselli, C E

    2017-07-29

    Prenatal androgens are largely responsible for growth and differentiation of the genital tract and testis and for organization of the control mechanisms regulating male reproductive physiology and behavior. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of inappropriate exposure to excess testosterone (T) during the first trimester of fetal development on the reproductive function, sexual behavior, and fertility potential of rams. We found that biweekly maternal T propionate (100 mg) treatment administered from Day 30-58 of gestation significantly decreased (P sexually attracted to estrous females. In summary, these results suggest that exposure to exogenous T during the first trimester of gestation can negatively impact spermatogenesis and compromise the reproductive fitness of rams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Low and high doses of UV-B differentially modulate chlorpyrifos-induced alterations in nitrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-09-01

    The present study assessed the comparative responses on the specific growth rate, nitrogen metabolism and enzymes associated with nitrogen metabolism in two nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria-Nostoc muscorum and Phormidium foveolarum exposed to two UV-B doses (low; UV-BL: 0.5472kJm(-2) and high; UV-BH: 5.472kJm(-2)) and two doses of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate; low i.e. CPL, 1µgml(-1) and high i.e. CPH, 2µgml(-1)) singly and in combination. The specific growth rate, NO3(-) and NO2(-) uptake, nitrate assimilating enzymes - nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase and ammonium assimilating enzymes - glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were severely affected when treated either with CPH or/and UV-BH while glutamate dehydrogenase exhibited a stimulatory response. CPL also reduced all the measured parameters (except GDH activity) after 24h, however, a stimulatory effect was observed after 72h due to an increase in nitrogen metabolism (and other antioxidant) enzymes during this period. UV-BL did not cause significant alteration in the studied parameters while in combination with CP doses, it either alleviated the inhibitory effects or further enhanced the CPL induced activities of these enzymes (except GDH). Overall results indicate the resistant nature of P. foveolarum against the inhibitory doses of UV-B and chlorpyrifos in comparison to N. muscorum.

  16. Stage-specific effects of fibroblast growth factor 2 on the differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagomonyants, Karen; Mina, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Dentinogenesis is a complex and multistep process, which is regulated by various growth factors, including members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. Both positive and negative effects of FGFs on dentinogenesis have been reported, but the underlying mechanisms of these conflicting results are still unclear. To gain a better insight into the role of FGF2 in dentinogenesis, we used dental pulp cells from various transgenic mice, in which fluorescent protein expression identifies cells at different stages of odontoblast differentiation. Our results showed that the continuous exposure of pulp cells to FGF2 inhibited mineralization and revealed both the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of FGF2 on the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and various transgenes. During the proliferation phase of in vitro growth, FGF2 increased the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and the percentages of dentin matrix protein 1/green fluorescent protein (DMP1-GFP)-positive functional odontoblasts and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)-Cerulean-positive odontoblasts. Additional exposure to FGF2 during the differentiation/mineralization phase of in vitro growth decreased the extent of mineralization and the expression of markers of dentinogenesis and of the DMP1-GFP and DSPP-Cerulean transgenes. Recovery experiments showed that the inhibitory effects of FGF2 on dentinogenesis were related to the blocking of the differentiation of cells into mature odontoblasts. These observations together showed the stage-specific effects of FGF2 on dentinogenesis by dental pulp cells, and they provide critical information for the development of improved treatments for vital pulp therapy and dentin regeneration.

  17. NUMB does not impair growth and differentiation status of experimental gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euskirchen, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.euskirchen@charite.de [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne (Germany); Skaftnesmo, Kai-Ove; Huszthy, Peter C.; Brekka, Narve [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Bjerkvig, Rolf [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Centre de Public de la Sante, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Jacobs, Andreas H. [Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne (Germany); European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Muenster (Germany); Miletic, Hrvoje [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2011-12-10

    The cell fate determinant NUMB orchestrates asymmetric cell division in flies and mammals and has lately been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function in breast and lung cancer. Here, we studied NUMB in the context of malignant gliomas. We used ectopic expression of NUMB in order to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in glioma cells by alteration of Notch, Hedgehog and p53 signaling. We found that NUMB is consistently expressed in glioma biopsies with predominance of NUMB2/4 isoforms as determined by isoform-specific real-time PCR and Western blotting. Upon lentiviral overexpression, in vitro proliferation rate and the grade of differentiation as assessed by morphology and expression of neural and glial markers remained unchanged. Orthotopic xenografts of NUMB-transduced human U87 glioma cells could be established in nude rats without impairing engraftment or causing significant changes in morphology based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The previously reported alteration of Hedgehog and p53 signaling by NUMB could not be recapitulated in glioma cells. We thus show that in experimental gliomas, NUMB overexpression most likely does not exert a tumor suppressor function such as seen in epithelial cancers.

  18. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, a common genomic alteration in prostate cancer activates C-MYC and abrogates prostate epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C; Dobi, A; Mohamed, A; Li, H; Thangapazham, R L; Furusato, B; Shaheduzzaman, S; Tan, S-H; Vaidyanathan, G; Whitman, E; Hawksworth, D J; Chen, Y; Nau, M; Patel, V; Vahey, M; Gutkind, J S; Sreenath, T; Petrovics, G; Sesterhenn, I A; McLeod, D G; Srivastava, S

    2008-09-11

    The high prevalence of TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements ( approximately 60%) in prostate cancer (CaP) leads to androgenic induction of the ETS-related gene (ERG) expression. However, the biological functions of ERG overexpression in CaP remain to be understood. ERG knockdown in TMPRSS2-ERG expressing CaP cells induced striking morphological changes and inhibited cell growth both in cell culture and SCID mice. Evaluation of the transcriptome and specific gene promoters in ERG siRNA-treated cells and investigation of gene expression signatures of human prostate tumors revealed ERG-mediated activation of C-MYC oncogene and the repression of prostate epithelial differentiation genes (PSA and SLC45A3/Prostein). Taken together, these data combining cell culture and animal models and human prostate tumors reveal that ERG overexpression in prostate tumor cells may contribute to the neoplastic process by activating C-MYC and by abrogating prostate epithelial differentiation as indicated by prostate epithelial specific markers.

  19. Alterations of growth, blood biochemical components and hormone profiles by intensified nutrition in growth retarded Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisaku; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kazamatsuri, Hiroyuki; Ando, Takaaki; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Oikawa, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2010-09-01

    In order to determine the clinical conditions of Japanese Black (JB) cattle with growth retardation, we determined the changes of body growth, blood profiles of metabolism and hormones caused by intensified nutrition (sufficient total digestible nutrients and digestible crude protein for a target daily gain set at 1.2-1.3 kg/day) in three cattle. The daily gain (DG) was increased during the intensified period (Intense) compared with the preparation period (Pre), but the DG in the Intense period was 36-66% of the target DG. Serum albumin, total cholesterol, insulin and IGF-1 increased during the Intense period compared with the Pre period. Serum GH showed high levels in the Pre period, whereas it showed lower levels in the Intense period. These results suggested that the present growth retarded cattle had abnormalities in their metabolic systems and lacked nutrient absorption.

  20. Growth and differentiation of neural stem cells in a three-dimensional collagen gel scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Huang; Qiang Shen; Jitong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Collagen protein is an ideal scaffold material for the transplantation of neural stem cells. In this study, rat neural stem cells were seeded into a three-dimensional collagen gel scaffold, with suspension cultured neural stem cells being used as a control group. Neural stem cells, which were cultured in medium containing epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, actively expanded and formed neurospheres in both culture groups. In serum-free medium conditions, the processes extended from neurospheres in the collagen gel group were much longer than those in the suspension culture group. Immunofluorescence staining showed that neurospheres cultured in collagen gels were stained positive for nestin and differentiated cells were stained positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin, the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and the oligodendrocytic marker 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. Compared with neurospheres cultured in suspension, the differentiation potential of neural stem cells cultured in collagen gels increased, with the formation of neurons at an early stage. Our results show that the three-dimensional collagen gel culture system is superior to suspension culture in the proliferation, differentiation and process outgrowth of neural stem cells.

  1. Analysis of the growth kinetics of murine erythroleukaemia cells following commitment to terminal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibach, E

    1987-11-01

    Differentiation of murine erythroleukaemia cells by various inducers involves a step of irreversible commitment, after which the presence of the inducer is not required for completion of the process. Some cells become partially committed and give rise to differentiated as well as undifferentiated progeny. Commitment occurs asynchronously; under suboptimal inducing conditions, such as low concentration of inducer or short duration of exposure, both committed and uncommitted cells co-exist. In the present study the growth of these subpopulations was compared. Murine erythroleukaemia cells were exposed to the inducer hexamethylene-bisacetamide for 24 hr, then the inducer was removed by washing and the rate of proliferation of committed and uncommitted cells was measured. Commitment was scored by cloning the cells in inducer-free semi-solid medium and determining the cellular composition of the colonies with respect to haemoglobin content. The results indicated that following removal of the inducer the rate of proliferation was retarded similarly for both committed and uncommitted cells. Partially committed cells disappeared rapidly due to assymetrical cell division into fully committed and uncommitted cells. Both committed and uncommitted cells resumed logarithmic growth at 53 hr, but while uncommitted cells continued this pace until saturation was achieved, committed cells stopped multiplying earlier as a result of terminal differentiation.

  2. Effects of inorganic lead on the differentiation and growth of cortical neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, M; Audesirk, T; Audesirk, G

    1993-01-01

    Lead exposure has devastating effects on the developing nervous system, producing morphological, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. To elucidate some of the mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity, we have examined its effects on the differentiation of several types of cultured neurons. Previously, we reported the effects of inorganic lead on several parameters of growth and differentiation of E18 rat hippocampal neurons and two types of neuroblastoma cells cultured in medium with 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) (Audesirk et al., 1991). In the present study, we report the effects of concentrations of lead ranging from 1nM to 1 mM on the differentiation of hippocampal neurons cultured in medium containing 10% FCS. In addition, we investigated lead effects on neurons isolated from the motor cortex region of the E18 rat embryo. Cortical neurons were exposed to lead in concentrations ranging from 0.1 nM to 1 mM in medium with either 10% FCS or 2% FCS for 48 hr. The effects of lead tended to be multimodal. Neurite initiation, which is highly sensitive to neurotoxic compounds, was inhibited by lead at both high and low concentrations, with no effects at intermediate levels. Medium with 10% FCS enhanced certain growth parameters and tended to reduce the effects of lead. There was an overall consistency in the effects of lead on motor cortex and hippocampal neurons.

  3. Differential regulation of growth-promoting signalling pathways by E-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos T Georgopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the well-documented association between loss of E-cadherin and carcinogenesis, as well as the link between restoration of its expression and suppression of proliferation in carcinoma cells, the ability of E-cadherin to modulate growth-promoting cell signalling in normal epithelial cells is less well understood and frequently contradictory. The potential for E-cadherin to co-ordinate different proliferation-associated signalling pathways has yet to be fully explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a normal human urothelial (NHU cell culture system and following a calcium-switch approach, we demonstrate that the stability of NHU cell-cell contacts differentially regulates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3-K/AKT pathways. We show that stable cell contacts down-modulate the EGFR/ERK pathway, whilst inducing PI3-K/AKT activity, which transiently enhances cell growth at low density. Functional inactivation of E-cadherin interferes with the capacity of NHU cells to form stable calcium-mediated contacts, attenuates E-cadherin-mediated PI3-K/AKT induction and enhances NHU cell proliferation by allowing de-repression of the EGFR/ERK pathway and constitutive activation of β-catenin-TCF signalling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide evidence that E-cadherin can differentially and concurrently regulate specific growth-related signalling pathways in a context-specific fashion, with direct, functional consequences for cell proliferation and population growth. Our observations not only reveal a novel, complex role for E-cadherin in normal epithelial cell homeostasis and tissue regeneration, but also provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the consequences of E-cadherin loss on malignant transformation.

  4. A new hypothesis for foregut and heart tube formation based on differential growth and actomyosin contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Garcia, Kara E; Taber, Larry A

    2017-07-01

    For decades, it was commonly thought that the bilateral heart fields in the early embryo fold directly towards the midline, where they meet and fuse to create the primitive heart tube. Recent studies have challenged this view, however, suggesting that the heart fields fold diagonally. As early foregut and heart tube morphogenesis are intimately related, this finding also raises questions concerning the traditional view of foregut formation. Here, we combine experiments on chick embryos with computational modeling to explore a new hypothesis for the physical mechanisms of heart tube and foregut formation. According to our hypothesis, differential anisotropic growth between mesoderm and endoderm drives diagonal folding. Then, active contraction along the anterior intestinal portal generates tension to elongate the foregut and heart tube. We test this hypothesis using biochemical perturbations of cell proliferation and contractility, as well as computational modeling based on nonlinear elasticity theory including growth and contraction. The present results generally support the view that differential growth and actomyosin contraction drive formation of the foregut and heart tube in the early chick embryo. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Modification of collagen by 3-deoxyglucosone alters wound healing through differential regulation of p38 MAP kinase.

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    Danielle T Loughlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wound healing is a highly dynamic process that requires signaling from the extracellular matrix to the fibroblasts for migration and proliferation, and closure of the wound. This rate of wound closure is impaired in diabetes, which may be due to the increased levels of the precursor for advanced glycation end products, 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG. Previous studies suggest a differential role for p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK during wound healing; whereby, p38 MAPK acts as a growth kinase during normal wound healing, but acts as a stress kinase during diabetic wound repair. Therefore, we investigated the signaling cross-talk by which p38 MAPK mediates wound healing in fibroblasts cultured on native collagen and 3DG-collagen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using human dermal fibroblasts cultured on 3DG-collagen as a model of diabetic wounds, we demonstrated that p38 MAPK can promote either cell growth or cell death, and this was dependent on the activation of AKT and ERK1/2. Wound closure on native collagen was dependent on p38 MAPK phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. Furthermore, proliferation and collagen production in fibroblasts cultured on native collagen was dependent on p38 MAPK regulation of AKT and ERK1/2. In contrast, 3DG-collagen decreased fibroblast migration, proliferation, and collagen expression through ERK1/2 and AKT downregulation via p38 MAPK. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, the present study shows that p38 MAPK is a key signaling molecule that plays a significantly opposite role during times of cellular growth and cellular stress, which may account for the differing rates of wound closure seen in diabetic populations.

  6. Competition alters tree growth responses to climate at individual and stand scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin R. Ford; Ian K. Breckheimer; Jerry F. Franklin; James A. Freund; Steve J. Kroiss; Andrew J. Larson; Elinore J. Theobald; Janneke HilleRisLambers

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how climate affects tree growth is essential for assessing climate change impacts on forests but can be confounded by effects of competition, which strongly influences tree responses to climate. We characterized the joint influences of tree size, competition, and climate on diameter growth using hierarchical Bayesian methods applied to permanent sample...

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Hee [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Gupta, Mukesh Kumar, E-mail: goops@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Shin Hye [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  8. Human Keratinocyte Growth and Differentiation on Acellular Porcine Dermal Matrix in relation to Wound Healing Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zajicek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of implantable biomaterials derived from animal tissues are now used in modern surgery. Xe-Derma is a dry, sterile, acellular porcine dermis. It has a remarkable healing effect on burns and other wounds. Our hypothesis was that the natural biological structure of Xe-Derma plays an important role in keratinocyte proliferation and formation of epidermal architecture in vitro as well as in vivo. The bioactivity of Xe-Derma was studied by a cell culture assay. We analyzed growth and differentiation of human keratinocytes cultured in vitro on Xe-Derma, and we compared the results with formation of neoepidermis in the deep dermal wounds treated with Xe-Derma. Keratinocytes cultured on Xe-Derma submerged in the culture medium achieved confluence in 7–10 days. After lifting the cultures to the air-liquid interface, the keratinocytes were stratified and differentiated within one week, forming an epidermis with basal, spinous, granular, and stratum corneum layers. Immunohistochemical detection of high-molecular weight cytokeratins (HMW CKs, CD29, p63, and involucrin confirmed the similarity of organization and differentiation of the cultured epidermal cells to the normal epidermis. The results suggest that the firm natural structure of Xe-Derma stimulates proliferation and differentiation of human primary keratinocytes and by this way improves wound healing.

  9. Transforming Growth Factors β Coordinate Cartilage and Tendon Differentiation in the Developing Limb Mesenchyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Montero, Juan A.; Martinez-Cue, Carmen; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A.; Hurle, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling has an increasing interest in regenerative medicine as a potential tool to repair cartilages, however the chondrogenic effect of this pathway in developing systems is controversial. Here we have analyzed the function of TGFβ signaling in the differentiation of the developing limb mesoderm in vivo and in high density micromass cultures. In these systems highest signaling activity corresponded with cells at stages preceding overt chondrocyte differentiation. Interestingly treatments with TGFβs shifted the differentiation outcome of the cultures from chondrogenesis to fibrogenesis. This phenotypic reprogramming involved down-regulation of Sox9 and Aggrecan and up-regulation of Scleraxis, and Tenomodulin through the Smad pathway. We further show that TGFβ signaling up-regulates Sox9 in the in vivo experimental model system in which TGFβ treatments induce ectopic chondrogenesis. Looking for clues explaining the dual role of TGFβ signaling, we found that TGFβs appear to be direct inducers of the chondrogenic gene Sox9, but the existence of transcriptional repressors of TGFβ signaling modulates this role. We identified TGF-interacting factor Tgif1 and SKI-like oncogene SnoN as potential candidates for this inhibitory function. Tgif1 gene regulation by TGFβ signaling correlated with the differential chondrogenic and fibrogenic effects of this pathway, and its expression pattern in the limb marks the developing tendons. In functional experiments we found that Tgif1 reproduces the profibrogenic effect of TGFβ treatments. PMID:19717568

  10. Amphetamine and environmentally induced hyperthermia differentially alter the expression of genes regulating vascular tone and angiogenesis in the meninges and associated vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Monzy; George, Nysia I; Patterson, Tucker A; Bowyer, John F

    2009-10-01

    An amphetamine (AMPH) regimen that does not produce a prominent blood-brain barrier breakdown was shown to significantly alter the expression of genes regulating vascular tone, immune function, and angiogenesis in vasculature associated with arachnoid and pia membranes of the forebrain. Adult-male Sprague-Dawley rats were given either saline injections during environmentally-induced hyperthermia (EIH) or four doses of AMPH with 2 h between each dose (5, 7.5, 10, and 10 mg/kg d-AMPH, s.c.) that produced hyperthermia. Rats were sacrificed either 3 h or 1 day after dosing, and total RNA and protein was isolated from the meninges, arachnoid and pia membranes, and associated vasculature (MAV) that surround the forebrain. Vip, eNos, Drd1a, and Edn1 (genes regulating vascular tone) were increased by either EIH or AMPH to varying degrees in MAV, indicating that EIH and AMPH produce differential responses to enhance vasodilatation. AMPH, and EIH to a lesser extent, elicited a significant inflammatory response at 3 h as indicated by an increased MAV expression of cytokines Il1b, Il6, Ccl-2, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2. Also, genes related to heat shock/stress and disruption of vascular homeostasis such as Icam1 and Hsp72 were also observed. The increased expression of Ctgf and Timp1 and the decreased expression of Akt1, Anpep, and Mmp2 and Tek (genes involved in stimulating angiogenesis) from AMPH exposure suggest that angiogenesis was arrested or disrupted in MAV to a greater extent by AMPH compared to EIH. Alterations in vascular-related gene expression in the parietal cortex and striatum after AMPH were less in magnitude than in MAV, indicating less of a disruption of vascular homeostasis in these two regions. Changes in the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins Igfbp1, 2, and 5 in MAV, compared to those in striatum and parietal cortex, imply an interaction between these regions to regulate the levels of insulin-like growth factor after AMPH damage. Thus, the

  11. Milk-derived ribonuclease 5 preparations induce myogenic differentiation in vitro and muscle growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Matthew I; Tester, Angus M; McDonagh, Matthew B; Brown, Andrew; Cottrell, Jeremy; Wang, Jianghui; Hobman, Peter; Cocks, Benjamin G

    2014-12-01

    Ribonuclease 5, also known as angiogenin, is a stable and abundant ribonuclease in milk whey protein, which is able to regulate several cellular functions, including capillary formation, neuron survival, and epithelial cell growth. Ribonuclease 5 is important for protein synthesis directly stimulating rRNA synthesis in the nucleolus. Here, we show that biologically active RNase5 can be purified from bovine milk. Furthermore, we show that milk-derived RNase5 directly stimulates muscle cell differentiation in vitro, inducing C2C12 cell differentiation and myogenesis. When supplemented into the diet of healthy adult mice, milk-derived RNase5 preparations promoted muscle weight gain and grip strength. Collectively, these data indicate that milk-derived RNase5 preparations exhibit a novel role in skeletal muscle cell function.

  12. Altered lung morphogenesis, epithelial cell differentiation and mechanics in mice deficient in the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Love

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays crucial roles in various aspects of lung morphogenesis and regeneration/repair. Here, we examined the lung phenotype and function in mice lacking the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby (Cby. In support of its inhibitory role in canonical Wnt signaling, expression of β-catenin target genes is elevated in the Cby(-/- lung. Notably, Cby protein is prominently associated with the centrosome/basal body microtubule structures in embryonic lung epithelial progenitor cells, and later enriches as discrete foci at the base of motile cilia in airway ciliated cells. At birth, Cby(-/- lungs are grossly normal but spontaneously develop alveolar airspace enlargement with reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation of lung epithelial cells, resulting in altered pulmonary function. Consistent with the Cby expression pattern, airway ciliated cells exhibit a marked paucity of motile cilia with apparent failure of basal body docking. Moreover, we demonstrate that Cby is a direct downstream target for the master ciliogenesis transcription factor Foxj1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that Cby facilitates proper postnatal lung development and function.

  13. Altered lung morphogenesis, epithelial cell differentiation and mechanics in mice deficient in the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Damon; Li, Feng-Qian; Burke, Michael C; Cyge, Benjamin; Ohmitsu, Masao; Cabello, Jeffrey; Larson, Janet E; Brody, Steven L; Cohen, J Craig; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2010-10-25

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays crucial roles in various aspects of lung morphogenesis and regeneration/repair. Here, we examined the lung phenotype and function in mice lacking the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby (Cby). In support of its inhibitory role in canonical Wnt signaling, expression of β-catenin target genes is elevated in the Cby(-/-) lung. Notably, Cby protein is prominently associated with the centrosome/basal body microtubule structures in embryonic lung epithelial progenitor cells, and later enriches as discrete foci at the base of motile cilia in airway ciliated cells. At birth, Cby(-/-) lungs are grossly normal but spontaneously develop alveolar airspace enlargement with reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation of lung epithelial cells, resulting in altered pulmonary function. Consistent with the Cby expression pattern, airway ciliated cells exhibit a marked paucity of motile cilia with apparent failure of basal body docking. Moreover, we demonstrate that Cby is a direct downstream target for the master ciliogenesis transcription factor Foxj1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that Cby facilitates proper postnatal lung development and function.

  14. Exposure of PC12 cells to NGF/ethanol results in accelerated differentiation and altered gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, K.R.; Wooten, M.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The role of alcohols in affecting neuromorphogenesis was investigated in the pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. The effect of ethanol at physiological concentrations in this system leads to accelerated neurite extension in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of NGF. Accelerated morphological differentiation was dependent upon the side chain length of the alcohol and not inhibited by pyrazole. Ethanol/NGF induced neurite extension can be blocked with 50nM of K252a, but not sphingozine, H7, H89, genistein or okadaic acid. Changes in the expression of 17 NGF-induced and/or neuronal transcripts were examined in relationship to time of NGF/ethanol exposure; dose of NGF/ethanol; and side-chain length of NFG/alcohol. The authors studies indicate that ethanol potentiates the effects of NFG and subsequent neurogenesis through both protein kinase C and cAMP-independent pathways. In addition, these data show that ethanol is capable of altering gene expression in a specific manner.

  15. Growth and differentiation on a trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia I. Hamanaka

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, pH, osmolarity and aeration on the growth and differentiation of a trypanosome ofthe subgenus Schizotrypanum isolatedfrom the bat Phyllostomus hastatus were studied. In general, the growth characteristics ofthe flagellate were similar to those of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. However, the parasite did not growth at 33 or 37C. Increase in the osmolarity and aeration promoted growth at 33C. Significant metacyclogenesis was detected only in the growth condition where maximal growth occured (28C, pH 7.3, 380m0s/kg, in tissue cullure flasks, at the end ofthe exponential growth phase. The begining of the metacyclogenesis process was coincident with most glucose utilization and lowest pH. During metacyclogenesis both culture medium pH and osmolarity increased steadly.Foram estudados os efeitos da temperatura, do pH, da osmolaridade e da areaçâo sobre o crescimento e a diferenciação de um tripanosoma do subgenêro Schizotrypanum, isolado do morcego Phyllostomus hastatus. Em geral, as características do crescimento do flagelado foram semelhantes àquelas do Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. Entretanto, o parasita não de desenvolveu a 33 ou 37°C. O aumento na osmolaridade e areaçâo estimulou o crescimento a 33°C. Metaciclogênese sifhificativa foi detectada somente na condição de crescimento, onde ocorreu desenvolvimento máximo (28°C, pH 7.3, 320m0/kg H20, em frascos de cultura de tecido, no final da fase do crescimento exponencial. O início do processo de metaciclogênese coincidiu com maior utilização de glucose e menor pH. Durante a metaciclogênese, o pHdo meio de cultura e a osmolaridade aumentaram constantemente.

  16. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eREY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs, reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast.

  17. Non-Faradaic electrical impedimetric investigation of the interfacial effects of neuronal cell growth and differentiation on silicon nanowire transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Vinzons, Lester U; Kang, Yu-Shan; Lai, Tung-Yen

    2015-05-13

    Silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) devices have been interfaced with cells; however, their application for noninvasive, real-time monitoring of interfacial effects during cell growth and differentiation on SiNW has not been fully explored. Here, we cultured rat adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, a type of neural progenitor cell, directly on SiNW FET devices to monitor cell adhesion during growth and morphological changes during neuronal differentiation for a period of 5-7 d. Monitoring was performed by measuring the non-Faradaic electrical impedance of the cell-SiNW FET system using a precision LCR meter. Our SiNW FET devices exhibited changes in impedance parameters during cell growth and differentiation because of the negatively charged cell membrane, seal resistance, and membrane capacitance at the cell/SiNW interface. It was observed that during both PC12 cell growth and neuronal differentiation, the impedance magnitude increased and the phase shifted to more negative values. However, impedance changes during cell growth already plateaued 3 d after seeding, while impedance changes continued until the last observation day during differentiation. Our results also indicate that the frequency shift to above 40 kHz after growth factor induction resulted from a larger coverage of cell membrane on the SiNWs due to distinctive morphological changes according to vinculin staining. Encapsulation of PC12 cells in a hydrogel scaffold resulted in a lack of trend in impedance parameters and confirmed that impedance changes were due to the cells. Moreover, cytolysis of the differentiated PC12 cells led to significant changes in impedance parameters. Equivalent electrical circuits were used to analyze the changes in impedance values during cell growth and differentiation. The technique employed in this study can provide a platform for performing investigations of growth-factor-induced progenitor cell differentiation.

  18. Temperature effect on proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells from turkeys with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D L; Coy, C S; Strasburg, G M; Reed, K M; Velleman, S G

    2016-04-01

    Poultry selected for growth have an inefficient thermoregulatory system and are more sensitive to temperature extremes. Satellite cells are precursors to skeletal muscle and mediate all posthatch muscle growth. Their physiological functions are affected by temperature. The objective of the current study was to determine how temperature affects satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle (breast muscle) of turkeys selected for increased 16 wk body weight (F line) in comparison to a randombred control line (RBC2) from which the F line originated. Pectoralis major muscle satellite cells were thermally challenged by culturing between 33°C and 43°C to analyze the effects of cold and heat on proliferation and differentiation as compared to control temperature of 38°C. Expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors: myogenic differentiation factor 1 (MYOD1) and myogenin (MYOG) were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At all sampling times, proliferation increased at a linear rate across temperature in both the RBC2 and F lines. Differentiation also increased at a linear rate across temperature from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. Satellite cells isolated from F line turkeys were more sensitive to both hot and cold temperatures as proliferation and differentiation increased to a greater extent across temperature (33 to 43°C) when compared with the RBC2 line. Expression of MYOD1 and MYOG increased as temperatures increased from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. These results demonstrate that satellite cell function is sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures and p. major muscle satellite cells from F line turkeys are more sensitive to temperature extremes than RBC2 satellite cells.

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients.

  20. Deletion of amino acid residues 33-46 in growth hormone alters the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... hormone alters the hydrophobicity of the molecule. Amtul Jamil Sami. Institute of ... The mutant protein remained insoluble and did not refold. To investigate the effect of ..... pH 9.5 after treatment for refolding. It showed that the.

  1. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Avet-Rochex

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk, which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem

  2. Amino acid starvation induced by protease inhibition produces differential alterations in redox status and the thiol proteome in organogenesis-stage rat embryos and visceral yolk sacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Craig; Jilek, Joseph L; Sant, Karilyn E; Pohl, Jan; Reed, Matthew; Hansen, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    The process of embryonic nutrition in rodent conceptuses during organogenesis has been shown to involve a dominant histiotrophic mechanism where essential developmental substrates and micronutrients are supplied as whole maternal proteins or cargoes associated with proteins. The histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNP) responsible for uptake and initial processing of proteins across maternal-conceptal interfaces involve uptake via receptor mediated endocytosis and protein degradation via lysosomal proteolysis. Chemical inhibition of either process can lead to growth deficits and malformation in the embryo (EMB), but selective inhibition of either HNP component will elicit a different subset of developmental perturbations. In vitro, whole embryo culture exposure of GD10 or GD11 rat conceptuses to the natural protease inhibitor, leupeptin, leads to significant reductions in all measured embryonic growth parameters as well as a myriad of other effects. Leupeptin doses of 10 μM or 20 μM over a 26-h period (GD10-GD11) and 50 μM over a 3 h pulse period produced significant decreases in the clearance of FITC-albumin from culture media. The near complete loss of acid soluble fluorescence and increased total visceral yolk sac (VYS) protein content confirmed the selective inhibition of proteolysis. Inhibition of lysosomal proteolysis thus deprives the developing EMB of essential nutrient amino acids producing conditions akin to amino acid starvation, but may also cause direct effects on pathways critical for normal growth and differentiation. Following leupeptin exposure for 26 or 6 h, total glutathione (GSH) concentrations dropped significantly in the VYS, but only slightly in yolk sac (YSF) and amniotic (AF) fluids. Cys concentrations increased in VYS and EMB, but dropped in YSF and AF fluids. Redox potentials (Eh) for the glutathione disulfide (GSSG)/glutathione (GSH) redox couple trended significantly toward the positive, confirming the net oxidation of conceptual

  3. Local Lyapunov exponents sublimiting growth rates of linear random differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Siegert, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Establishing a new concept of local Lyapunov exponents the author brings together two separate theories, namely Lyapunov exponents and the theory of large deviations. Specifically, a linear differential system is considered which is controlled by a stochastic process that during a suitable noise-intensity-dependent time is trapped near one of its so-called metastable states. The local Lyapunov exponent is then introduced as the exponential growth rate of the linear system on this time scale. Unlike classical Lyapunov exponents, which involve a limit as time increases to infinity in a fixed system, here the system itself changes as the noise intensity converges, too.

  4. Fetal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating towards Chondrocytes Acquire a Gene Expression Profile Resembling Human Growth Plate Cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, S.A.; Emons, J.A.M.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Decker, E.; Sticht, C.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; Goeman, J.J.; Kleijburg, C.; Scherjon, S.; Gretz, N.; Wit, J.M.; Rappold, G.; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs) differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP). Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether

  5. SIRT1 is a critical regulator of K562 cell growth, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mark T; DeLuca, Teresa A; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Yi, Minchang; Mrksich, Milan; Miller, William M

    2016-05-15

    Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACi) has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of many types of cancer, including leukemias. Among the HDACs, Class III HDACs, also known as sirtuins (SIRTs), are unique in that their function is directly related to the cell's metabolic state through their dependency on the co-factor NAD(+). In this study, we examined the relation between SIRTs and the growth, survival, and differentiation of K562 erythroleukemia cells. Using a mass spectrometry approach we previously developed, we show that SIRT expression and deacetylase activity in these cells changes greatly with differentiation state (undifferentiated vs. megakaryocytic differentiation vs. erythroid differentiation). Moreover, SIRT1 is crucially involved in regulating the differentiation state. Overexpression of wildtype (but not deacetylase mutant) SIRT1 resulted in upregulation of glycophorin A, ~2-fold increase in the mRNA levels of α, γ, ε, and ζ-globins, and spontaneous hemoglobinization. Hemin-induced differentiation was also enhanced by (and depended on) higher SIRT1 levels. Since K562 cells are bipotent, we also investigated whether SIRT1 modulation affected their ability to undergo megakaryocytic (MK) differentiation. SIRT1 was required for commitment to the MK lineage and subsequent maturation, but was not directly involved in polyploidization of either K562 cells or an already-MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11. The observed blockage in commitment to the MK lineage was associated with a dramatic decrease in the formation of autophagic vacuoles, which was previously shown to be required for K562 cell MK commitment. Autophagy-associated conversion of the protein LC3-I to LC3-II was greatly enhanced by overexpression of wildtype SIRT1, further suggesting a functional connection between SIRT1, autophagy, and MK differentiation. Based on its clear effects on autophagy, we also examined the effect of SIRT1 modulation on stress responses. Consistent

  6. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  7. Hydrothermal alteration of plagioclase and growth of secondary feldspar in the Hengill Volcanic Centre, SW Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D.; Grönvold, K.; Oskarsson, N.; Gunnlaugsson, E.

    2002-05-01

    Dissolution of igneous feldspar and the formation and occurrence of secondary feldspar in tholeiitic basalts from the Hengill volcanic centre, in SW Iceland was studied by microprobe analysis of cuttings from two ca. 2000 m deep geothermal wells. Well NG-7 in Nesjavellir represents a geothermal system in a rift zone where the intensity of young, insignificantly altered intrusions increases with depth. Well KhG-1 in Kolviðarhóll represents the margin of a rift zone where the intensity of intrusives is lower and the intensity of alteration higher. This marginal well represents altered basaltic crust in an early retrograde state. The secondary plagioclase in both wells is mainly oligoclase, occurring in association with K-feldspar and chlorite±actinolite. The texture of this assemblage depends on the lithology and intensity of alteration. In Nesjavellir (NG-7) the composition of secondary albite-oligoclase is correlated with the host-rock composition. This connection is not apparent in more intensely altered samples from Kolviðarhóll (KhG-1). The influence of temperature on composition of secondary Na-feldspar is unclear in both wells although Ca is expected to increase with temperature. Any temperature dependence may be suppressed by the influence of rock composition in Nesjavellir and by retrograde conditions at Kolviðarhóll. The absence of clear compositional gradients between igneous plagioclase and secondary feldspar and between Na-feldspar and K-feldspar suggests that secondary feldspars formed by dissolution precipitation reactions.

  8. On the Biomass Specific Growth Rates Estimation for Anaerobic Digestion using Differential Algebraic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Diop

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with identifiability and observability of anaerobic digestion (AD processes. In such kind of processes, generally carried out in continuously stirred tank bioreactors, the organic matter is depolluted by microorganisms into biogas and compost in the absence of oxygen. The biogas is an additional energy source, which can replace fossil fuel sources. The differential algebraic approach of general observation problems has been applied to investigate the identification and observation of a simple AD model. The major discovery is that the biomass specific growth rate can be stably estimated from easily measured quantities: the dilution rate and the biogas flow rate. Next if the yield coefficients are assumed known then, of course, the biomass concentration is observable. Unfortunately, even under the latter strongest assumption the substrate concentration is not observable. This concentration becomes observable if an additional model, say the Monod model, is assumed for the specific growth rate. Illustrative simulations are presented.

  9. Growth and differentiation of a long bone in limb development, repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Shiro; Miura, Shinichirou; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Endo, Tetsuya; Tamura, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Repair from traumatic bone fracture is a complex process that includes mechanisms of bone development and bone homeostasis. Thus, elucidation of the cellular/molecular basis of bone formation in skeletal development would provide valuable information on fracture repair and would lead to successful skeletal regeneration after limb amputation, which never occurs in mammals. Elucidation of the basis of epimorphic limb regeneration in amphibians would also provide insights into skeletal regeneration in mammals, since the epimorphic regeneration enables an amputated limb to re-develop the three-dimensional structure of bones. In the processes of bone development, repair and regeneration, growth of the bone is achieved through several events including not only cell proliferation but also aggregation of mesenchymal cells, enlargement of cells, deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix, and bone remodeling. © 2014 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2014 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. The murine growth differentiation factor 15 is not essential for systemic iron homeostasis in phlebotomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, Guillem; Vujić Spasic, Maja; Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano; Strelau, Jens; Unsicker, Klaus; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2013-03-01

    In conditions of increased erythropoiesis, expression of hepcidin, the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis, is decreased to allow for the release of iron into the blood stream from duodenal enterocytes and macrophages. It has been suggested that hepcidin suppression is controlled by growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of cytokines that is secreted from developing erythroblasts. In this study, we analyzed iron-related parameters in mice deficient for GDF15 under steady-state conditions and in response to increased erythropoietic activity induced by blood loss. We demonstrate that GDF15 suppresses the hepatic mRNA expression of some BMP/TGFβ target genes but not of hepcidin, and show that GDF15 is not required to balance iron homeostasis in response to blood loss.

  11. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarra, Francisco J.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Nielsen, Jens;

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent environm......Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent......-limited, anaerobic, steady-state chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the growth temperature strongly impacted the biomass yield of both strains. Moreover, we found that the wine yeast was better adapted to mobilizing resources for biomass production and that the laboratory yeast...... global insight into how growth temperature affects differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of S. cerevisiae....

  12. Existence Results for Differential Inclusions with Nonlinear Growth Conditions in Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaoud Bounkhel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Banach space setting, the existence of viable solutions for differential inclusions with nonlinear growth; that is, ẋ(t∈F(t,x(t a.e. on I, x(t∈S, ∀t∈I, x(0=x0∈S, (*, where S is a closed subset in a Banach space , I=[0,T], (T>0, F:I×S→, is an upper semicontinuous set-valued mapping with convex values satisfying F(t,x⊂c(tx+xp, ∀(t,x∈I×S, where p∈ℝ, with p≠1, and c∈C([0,T],ℝ+. The existence of solutions for nonconvex sweeping processes with perturbations with nonlinear growth is also proved in separable Hilbert spaces.

  13. Differential effect of culture temperature and specific growth rate on CHO cell behavior in chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Mauricio; Becerra, Silvana; Berrios, Julio; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Mild hypothermia condition in mammalian cell culture technology has been one of the main focuses of research for the development of breeding strategies to maximize productivity of these production systems. Despite the large number of studies that show positive effects of mild hypothermia on specific productivity of r-proteins, no experimental approach has addressed the indirect effect of lower temperatures on specific cell growth rate, nor how this condition possibly affects less specific productivity of r-proteins. To separately analyze the effects of mild hypothermia and specific growth rate on CHO cell metabolism and recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator productivity as a model system, high dilution rate (0.017 h(-1)) and low dilution rate (0.012 h(-1)) at two cultivation temperatures (37 and 33 °C) were evaluated using chemostat culture. The results showed a positive effect on the specific productivity of r-protein with decreasing specific growth rate at 33 °C. Differential effect was achieved by mild hypothermia on the specific productivity of r-protein, contrary to the evidence reported in batch culture. Interestingly, reduction of metabolism could not be associated with a decrease in culture temperature, but rather with a decrease in specific growth rate.

  14. An attenuated strain of Bacillus anthracis (CDC 684 has a large chromosomal inversion and altered growth kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivins Bruce E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An isolate originally labeled Bacillus megaterium CDC 684 was found to contain both pXO1 and pXO2, was non-hemolytic, sensitive to gamma-phage, and produced both the protective antigen and the poly-D-glutamic acid capsule. These phenotypes prompted Ezzell et al., (J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:223 to reclassify this isolate to Bacillus anthracis in 1990. Results We demonstrate that despite these B. anthracis features, the isolate is severely attenuated in a guinea pig model. This prompted whole genome sequencing and closure. The comparative analysis of CDC 684 to other sequenced B. anthracis isolates and further analysis reveals: a CDC 684 is a close relative of a virulent strain, Vollum A0488; b CDC 684 defines a new B. anthracis lineage (at least 51 SNPs that includes 15 other isolates; c the genome of CDC 684 contains a large chromosomal inversion that spans 3.3 Mbp; d this inversion has caused a displacement of the usual spatial orientation of the origin of replication (ori to the termination of replication (ter from 180° in wild-type B. anthracis to 120° in CDC 684 and e this isolate also has altered growth kinetics in liquid media. Conclusions We propose two alternative hypotheses explaining the attenuated phenotype of this isolate. Hypothesis 1 suggests that the skewed ori/ter relationship in CDC 684 has altered its DNA replication and/or transcriptome processes resulting in altered growth kinetics and virulence capacity. Hypothesis 2 suggests that one or more of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in CDC 684 has altered the expression of a regulatory element or other genes necessary for virulence.

  15. Fractional differential equations based modeling of microbial survival and growth curves: model development and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, A; Takhar, P S; Smith, D M; Mann, J E; Brashears, M M

    2008-10-01

    A fractional differential equations (FDEs)-based theory involving 1- and 2-term equations was developed to predict the nonlinear survival and growth curves of foodborne pathogens. It is interesting to note that the solution of 1-term FDE leads to the Weibull model. Nonlinear regression (Gauss-Newton method) was performed to calculate the parameters of the 1-term and 2-term FDEs. The experimental inactivation data of Salmonella cocktail in ground turkey breast, ground turkey thigh, and pork shoulder; and cocktail of Salmonella, E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef exposed at isothermal cooking conditions of 50 to 66 degrees C were used for validation. To evaluate the performance of 2-term FDE in predicting the growth curves-growth of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, and background flora in ground pork and boneless pork chops; and E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef in the temperature range of 22.2 to 4.4 degrees C were chosen. A program was written in Matlab to predict the model parameters and survival and growth curves. Two-term FDE was more successful in describing the complex shapes of microbial survival and growth curves as compared to the linear and Weibull models. Predicted curves of 2-term FDE had higher magnitudes of R(2) (0.89 to 0.99) and lower magnitudes of root mean square error (0.0182 to 0.5461) for all experimental cases in comparison to the linear and Weibull models. This model was capable of predicting the tails in survival curves, which was not possible using Weibull and linear models. The developed model can be used for other foodborne pathogens in a variety of food products to study the destruction and growth behavior.

  16. Growth and differentiation of eosinophils from human peripheral blood CD 34+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalit, M

    1997-01-01

    Small numbers of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors are found in normal human peripheral blood. These cells differentiate to myeloid or lymphoid lineage under the influence of growth factors. We investigated the effects of IL5 and other growth factors on the production of eosinophils from peripheral blood CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in agarose with different combinations of cytokines. At 14 days of growth a triple stain technique was used to identify eosinophil, monocyte and neutrophil colonies. IL5 alone did not support colony growth. In contrast GM-CSF and IL3 alone or together supported the generation of more than 50% eosinophil colonies. Addition of IL5 increased the fraction of eosinophil colonies to over 70%. Under the best conditions (IL3 + GM-CSF + IL5), the addition of interferon-a or LPS inhibited colony growth by 51% and 58%, respectively. Since IL5 alone did not support colony growth from CD34+ cells, we determined when IL5 responsive cells appeared in culture. Cells were grown initially with IL3 + GM-CSF, washed, and plated with IL5 alone. Only when progenitors were grown at least 3 days, could IL5 serve as the single growth factor supporting pure eosinophil colony growth (47 colonies/104 cells plated at day 3 and 134 colonies/104 cells at day 7). Growth of CD34+ in liquid culture for 28 days in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and IL5 resulted in almost 250 fold increase in cell number, yielding a population of 83% maturing eosinophils. We used our culture system and the sensitive technique of RT-PCR to analyze the kinetics of production of mRNA transcripts encoding several eosinophil proteins. Freshly isolated CD34+ cells contained no eosinophil granule protein transcripts and barely detectable amounts of some oxidase protein transcripts. At day 3 of culture no cells recognizable by histochemical staining as eosinophils could be detected, but transcripts for all five eosinophil granule proteins were present. These transcripts increased

  17. The Effects of Funding Changes upon the Rate of Knowledge Growth in Algebraic and Differential Topology, 1955-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Steven F.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses effects of funding variations upon the rate of knowledge growth in algebraic and differential topology. Results based on a marginal productivity model indicated that funding variations had little or no effect upon the rate of knowledge growth. Lists 150 of the field's most highly rated papers. (ML)

  18. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  19. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  20. CBX7 gene expression plays a negative role in adipocyte cell growth and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Forzati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently generated knockout mice for the Cbx7 gene, coding for a polycomb group protein that is downregulated in human malignant neoplasias. These mice develop liver and lung adenomas and carcinomas, which confirms a tumour suppressor role for CBX7. The CBX7 ability to downregulate CCNE1 expression likely accounts for the phenotype of the Cbx7-null mice. Unexpectedly, Cbx7-knockout mice had a higher fat tissue mass than wild-type, suggesting a role of CBX7 in adipogenesis. Consistently, we demonstrate that Cbx7-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts go towards adipocyte differentiation more efficiently than their wild-type counterparts, and this effect is Cbx7 dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained when Cbx7-null embryonic stem cells were induced to differentiate into adipocytes. Conversely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human adipose-derived stem cells overexpressing CBX7 show an opposite behaviour. These findings support a negative role of CBX7 in the control of adipocyte cell growth and differentiation.

  1. Wnt5a regulates growth, patterning, and odontoblast differentiation of developing mouse tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Minkui; Li, Lu; Liu, Chao; Liu, Hongbing; He, Fenglei; Yan, Fuhua; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for tooth development beyond the bud stage, but little is known about the role of non-canonical Wnt signaling in odontogenesis. Here we compared the expression of Wnt5a, a representative of noncanonical Wnts, with that of Ror2, the Wnt5a receptor for non-canonical signaling, in the developing tooth, and analyzed tooth phenotype in Wnt5a mutants. Wnt5a deficient mice exhibit retarded tooth development beginning from E16.5, leading to the formation of smaller and abnormally patterned teeth with a delayed odontoblast differentiation at birth. These defects are associated with upregulated Axin2 and Shh expression in the dental epithelium and reduced levels of cell proliferation in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme. Retarded tooth development and defective odontoblast differentiation were also observed in Ror2 mutant mice. Our results suggest that Wnt5a regulates growth, patterning, and odontoblast differentiation during odontogenesis, at least partially by modulating Wnt/β-catenin canonical signaling. PMID:21246660

  2. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P; Thiels, Cornelius A; Bechtle, Chad A; Garcia, Claudia M; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M; Beebe, David C; Robinson, Michael L

    2008-06-15

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens development, while mice possessing only a single Fgfr1 allele developed cataracts and microphthalmia. Profound defects were observed in lenses lacking all three Fgfrs. These included lack of fiber cell elongation, abnormal proliferation in prospective lens fiber cells, reduced expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p27(kip1) and p57(kip2), increased apoptosis and aberrant or reduced expression of Prox1, Pax6, c-Maf, E-cadherin and alpha-, beta- and gamma-crystallins. Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly.

  3. The lipid composition and its alteration during the growth stage in pathogenic fungus, epidermophyton floccosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T.; Watanabe, R.; Nozawa, Y.; Ito, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes of lipid components during the growth stages were studied in E. floccosum. The acyl group components of total lipids of Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum cookei were also examined. The lipids of E. floccosum amounted to approximately 4% of the dry cell weight. Neutral lipids mainly consisted of triglycerides and sterols, and major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and an unknown lipid X. The fatty acids in tryglycerides and phospholipids were palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. The unknown polar lipid X which appeared between phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin on thin layer chromatography plates contained no phosphorus. There was no significant change in the fatty acid components of E. floccosum and T. rubrum during the cell growth, whereas profound changes occurred in M. cookei. The sterol components of E. floccosum showed striking changes depending on the growth stage.

  4. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Meachum, Sharon; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Peretz, Jackye; Yao, Humphrey H; Flaws, Jodi A

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  5. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väänänen H Kalervo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. Methods We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. Results VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p p p p Conclusion The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites.

  6. Effect of receptor-selective retinoids on growth and differentiation pathways in mouse melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S H; Boskovic, G; Eastham, L; Dawson, M; Niles, R M

    2000-05-15

    Treatment of B16 mouse melanoma cells with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) results in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of differentiation. Accompanying these events is an induction of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta) expression, an increase in protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) expression, and enhanced activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. These cells express nuclear RARalpha and RARgamma and nuclear retinoid X receptors (RXR) alpha and beta constitutively. We tested the ability of receptor-selective retinoids to induce the biochemical changes found in ATRA-treated melanoma cells and also tested their effectiveness in decreasing anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. The RXR-selective ligand (2E,4E)-6-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3,5,5,8, 8-pentamethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid (SR11246) was most effective at inhibiting anchorage-dependent growth, whereas the RARgamma-selective ligand 6-[(5,6,7, 8-tetrahydro-5,5,8, 8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)(hydroxyimino)methyl]-2-naphthalen ecarbo xylic acid (SR11254) was most potent at inhibiting anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, 4-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5, 8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenecarboxamido)-benzoic acid (Am580), an RARalpha-selective ligand, was the most effective receptor-selective agonist for inducing RARbeta mRNA and increasing the amount of PKCalpha protein. All of the retinoids induced a concentration-dependent increase in AP-1 transcriptional activity, with little difference in effectiveness among the receptor-selective retinoids. A synergistic increase in the amount of PKCalpha was found when an RAR-selective agonist was combined with an RXR-selective agonist. One possible explanation for this result is that an RXR-RAR heterodimer in which both receptors are liganded is required for maximum expression of this critical component of the ATRA-induced differentiation pathway. Our data suggest that synthetic retinoids can activate different growth and

  7. EPCR promotes breast cancer progression by altering SPOCK1/testican 1-mediated 3D growth

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    Naiara Perurena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C/endothelial protein C receptor (APC/EPCR axis is physiologically involved in anticoagulant and cytoprotective activities in endothelial cells. Emerging evidence indicates that EPCR also plays a role in breast stemness and human tumorigenesis. Yet, its contribution to breast cancer progression and metastasis has not been elucidated. Methods Transcriptomic status of EPCR was examined in a cohort of 286 breast cancer patients. Cell growth kinetics was evaluated in control and EPCR and SPARC/osteonectin, Cwcv, and kazal-like domains proteoglycan (SPOCK1/testican 1 silenced breast cancer cells in 2D, 3D, and in co-culture conditions. Orthotopic tumor growth and lung and osseous metastases were evaluated in several human and murine xenograft breast cancer models. Tumor-stroma interactions were further studied in vivo by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. An EPCR-induced gene signature was identified by microarray analysis. Results Analysis of a cohort of breast cancer patients revealed an association of high EPCR levels with adverse clinical outcome. Interestingly, EPCR knockdown did not affect cell growth kinetics in 2D but significantly reduced cell growth in 3D cultures. Using several human and murine xenograft breast cancer models, we showed that EPCR silencing reduced primary tumor growth and secondary outgrowths at metastatic sites, including the skeleton and the lungs. Interestingly, these effects were independent of APC ligand stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptomic analysis of EPCR-silenced tumors unveiled an effect mediated by matricellular secreted proteoglycan SPOCK1/testican 1. Interestingly, SPOCK1 silencing suppressed in vitro 3D growth. Moreover, SPOCK1 ablation severely decreased orthotopic tumor growth and reduced bone metastatic osteolytic tumors. High SPOCK1 levels were also associated with poor clinical outcome in a subset breast cancer patients. Our results suggest that EPCR

  8. Episodic intrusion, internal differentiation, and hydrothermal alteration of the miocene tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bray, E.A.; Bacon, C.R.; John, D.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Miocene Tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier is composed of three broadly granodioritic plutons that are manifestations of ancestral Cascades arc magmatism. Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons have individually diagnostic characteristics, including texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry, and apparently lack internal contacts. New ion-microprobe U-Pb zircon ages indicate crystallization of the Stevens pluton ca. 19.2 Ma, Reflection-Pyramid pluton ca. 18.5 Ma, and Nisqually pluton ca. 17.5 Ma. The Stevens pluton includes rare, statistically distinct ca. 20.1 Ma zircon antecrysts. Wide-ranging zircon rare earth element (REE), Hf, U, and Th concentrations suggest late crystallization from variably evolved residual liquids. Zircon Eu/Eu*-Hf covariation is distinct for each of the Reflection-Pyramid, Nisqually, and Stevens plutons. Although most Tatoosh intrusive suite rocks have been affected by weak hydrothermal alteration, and sparse mineralized veins cut some of these rocks, significant base or precious metal mineralization is absent. At the time of shallow emplacement, each of these magma bodies was largely homogeneous in bulk composition and petrographic features, but, prior to final solidification, each of the Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons developed internal compositional variation. Geochemical and petrographic trends within each pluton are most consistent with differential loss of residual melt, possibly represented by late aplite dikes or erupted as rhyolite, from crystal-rich magma. Crystal-rich magma that formed each pluton evidently accumulated in reservoirs below the present level of exposure and then intruded to a shallow depth. Assembled by episodic intrusion, the Tatoosh intrusive suite may be representative of midsized composite plutonic complexes beneath arc volcanoes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  9. Adolescent methylphenidate treatment differentially alters adult impulsivity and hyperactivity in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat model of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuwar, S S; Kantak, K M; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2016-02-01

    Impulsivity and hyperactivity are two facets of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Impulsivity is expressed as reduced response inhibition capacity, an executive control mechanism that prevents premature execution of an intermittently reinforced behavior. During methylphenidate treatment, impulsivity and hyperactivity are decreased in adolescents with ADHD, but there is little information concerning levels of impulsivity and hyperactivity in adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment is discontinued. The current study evaluated impulsivity, hyperactivity as well as cocaine sensitization during adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment was discontinued in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR) model of ADHD. Treatments consisted of oral methylphenidate (1.5mg/kg) or water vehicle provided Monday-Friday from postnatal days 28-55. During adulthood, impulsivity was measured in SHR and control strains (Wistar Kyoto and Wistar rats) using differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedules. Locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization were measured using the open-field assay. Adult SHR exhibited decreased efficiency of reinforcement under the DRL30 schedule and greater levels of locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization compared to control strains. Compared to vehicle, methylphenidate treatment during adolescence reduced hyperactivity in adult SHR, maintained the lower efficiency of reinforcement, and increased burst responding under DRL30. Cocaine sensitization was not altered following adolescent methylphenidate in adult SHR. In conclusion, adolescent treatment with methylphenidate followed by discontinuation in adulthood had a positive benefit by reducing hyperactivity in adult SHR rats; however, increased burst responding under DRL compared to SHR given vehicle, i.e., elevated impulsivity, constituted an adverse consequence associated with increased risk for cocaine abuse liability.

  10. Modulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 expression levels alters mouse mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D Young

    Full Text Available Tumor cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion which is supported by an increase in glucose transport and consumption. We hypothesized that reducing or eliminating the expression of the most prominently expressed glucose transporter(s would decrease the amount of glucose available to breast cancer cells thereby decreasing their metabolic capacity and proliferative potential.Of the 12 GLUT family glucose transporters expressed in mice, GLUT1 was the most abundantly expressed at the RNA level in the mouse mammary tumors from MMTV-c-ErbB2 mice and cell lines examined. Reducing GLUT1 expression in mouse mammary tumor cell lines using shRNA or Cre/Lox technology reduced glucose transport, glucose consumption, lactate secretion and lipid synthesis in vitro without altering the concentration of ATP, as well as reduced growth on plastic and in soft agar. The growth of tumor cells with reduced GLUT1 expression was impaired when transplanted into the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice in vivo. Overexpression of GLUT1 in a cell line with low levels of endogenous GLUT1 increased glucose transport in vitro and enhanced growth in nude mice in vivo as compared to the control cells with very low levels of GLUT1.These studies demonstrate that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in mouse mammary carcinoma models overexpressing ErbB2 or PyVMT and that modulation of the level of GLUT1 has an effect upon the growth of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in vivo.

  11. Differential growth and development of the upper and lower human thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastir, Markus; García Martínez, Daniel; Recheis, Wolfgang; Barash, Alon; Coquerelle, Michael; Rios, Luis; Peña-Melián, Angel; García Río, Francisco; O'Higgins, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The difficulties in quantifying the 3D form and spatial relationships of the skeletal components of the ribcage present a barrier to studies of the growth of the thoracic skeleton. Thus, most studies to date have relied on traditional measurements such as distances and indices from single or few ribs. It is currently known that adult-like thoracic shape is achieved early, by the end of the second postnatal year, with the circular cross-section of the newborn thorax transforming into the ovoid shape of adults; and that the ribs become inclined such that their anterior borders come to lie inferior to their posterior. Here we present a study that revisits growth changes using geometric morphometrics applied to extensive landmark data taken from the ribcage. We digitized 402 (semi) landmarks on 3D reconstructions to assess growth changes in 27 computed tomography-scanned modern humans representing newborns to adults of both sexes. Our analyses show a curved ontogenetic trajectory, resulting from different ontogenetic growth allometries of upper and lower thoracic units. Adult thoracic morphology is achieved later than predicted, by diverse modifications in different anatomical regions during different ontogenetic stages. Besides a marked increase in antero-posterior dimensions, there is an increase in medio-lateral dimensions of the upper thorax, relative to the lower thorax. This transforms the pyramidal infant thorax into the barrel-shaped one of adults. Rib descent is produced by complex changes in 3D curvature. Developmental differences between upper and lower thoracic regions relate to differential timings and rates of maturation of the respiratory and digestive systems, the spine and the locomotor system. Our findings are relevant to understanding how changes in the relative rates of growth of these systems and structures impacted on the development and evolution of modern human body shape.

  12. Differential Growth and Development of the Upper and Lower Human Thorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastir, Markus; García Martínez, Daniel; Recheis, Wolfgang; Barash, Alon; Coquerelle, Michael; Rios, Luis; Peña-Melián, Ángel; García Río, Francisco; O’Higgins, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The difficulties in quantifying the 3D form and spatial relationships of the skeletal components of the ribcage present a barrier to studies of the growth of the thoracic skeleton. Thus, most studies to date have relied on traditional measurements such as distances and indices from single or few ribs. It is currently known that adult-like thoracic shape is achieved early, by the end of the second postnatal year, with the circular cross-section of the newborn thorax transforming into the ovoid shape of adults; and that the ribs become inclined such that their anterior borders come to lie inferior to their posterior. Here we present a study that revisits growth changes using geometric morphometrics applied to extensive landmark data taken from the ribcage. We digitized 402 (semi) landmarks on 3D reconstructions to assess growth changes in 27 computed tomography-scanned modern humans representing newborns to adults of both sexes. Our analyses show a curved ontogenetic trajectory, resulting from different ontogenetic growth allometries of upper and lower thoracic units. Adult thoracic morphology is achieved later than predicted, by diverse modifications in different anatomical regions during different ontogenetic stages. Besides a marked increase in antero-posterior dimensions, there is an increase in medio-lateral dimensions of the upper thorax, relative to the lower thorax. This transforms the pyramidal infant thorax into the barrel-shaped one of adults. Rib descent is produced by complex changes in 3D curvature. Developmental differences between upper and lower thoracic regions relate to differential timings and rates of maturation of the respiratory and digestive systems, the spine and the locomotor system. Our findings are relevant to understanding how changes in the relative rates of growth of these systems and structures impacted on the development and evolution of modern human body shape. PMID:24073239

  13. Numerical simulation of asymmetrically altered growth as initiation mechanism of scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Plaats, A.; Veldhuizen, A. G.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    The causes of idiopathic scoliosis are still uncertain; buckling is mentioned often, but never proven. The authors hypothesize another option: unilateral postponement of growth of MM Rotatores or of ligamentum flavum and intertransverse ligament. In this paper, both buckling and the two new theories

  14. Numerical simulation of asymmetrically altered growth as initiation mechanism of scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Plaats, A.; Veldhuizen, A. G.; Verkerke, G. J.

    The causes of idiopathic scoliosis are still uncertain; buckling is mentioned often, but never proven. The authors hypothesize another option: unilateral postponement of growth of MM Rotatores or of ligamentum flavum and intertransverse ligament. In this paper, both buckling and the two new theories

  15. Structural alterations of transforming growth factor-beta receptor genes in human cervical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, TP; De Vries, EGE; Hollema, H; Yegen, HA; Vellucci, VF; Strickler, HD; Hildesheim, A; Reiss, M

    1999-01-01

    The development and progression of invasive uterine cervical carcinomas appear to be associated with the progressive loss of sensitivity to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta)-mediated cell cycle arrest. In order to identify possible molecular mechanisms responsible for TGF beta resistance, w

  16. Rhizosphere competent Pantoea agglomerans enhances maize (Zea mays) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) growth, without altering the rhizosphere functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Aradhana; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Tripathi, Manisha; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2011-10-01

    Plant growth promoting Pantoea agglomerans NBRISRM (NBRISRM) was able to produce 60.4 μg/ml indole acetic acid and solubilize 77.5 μg/ml tri-calcium phosphate under in vitro conditions. Addition of 2% NaCl (w/v) in the media induced the IAA production and phosphate solubilization by 11% and 7%, respectively. For evaluating the plant growth promotory effect of NBRISRM inoculation a micro plot trial was conducted using maize and chickpea as host plants. The results revealed significant increase in all growth parameters tested in NBRISRM inoculated maize and chickpea plants, which were further confirmed by higher macronutrients (N, P and K) accumulation as compared to un-inoculated controls. Throughout the growing season of maize and chickpea, rhizosphere population of NBRISRM were in the range 10(7)-10(8) CFU/g soil and competing with 10(7)-10(9) CFU/g soil with heterogeneous bacterial population. Functional richness, diversity, and evenness were found significantly higher in maize rhizosphere as compared to chickpea, whereas NBRISRM inoculation were not able to change it, in both crops as compared to their un-inoculated control. To the best of our knowledge this is first report where we demonstrated the effect of P. agglomerans strain for improving maize and chickpea growth without altering the functional diversity.

  17. Synthesis of Hydroxylated Sterols in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Alters Growth and Steroid Metabolism1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Lisa; Nahar, Nurun; Dalman, Kerstin; Fujioka, Shozo; Jonsson, Lisbeth; Dutta, Paresh C.; Sitbon, Folke

    2011-01-01

    To explore mechanisms in plant sterol homeostasis, we have here increased the turnover of sterols in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants by overexpressing four mouse cDNA encoding cholesterol hydroxylases (CHs), hydroxylating cholesterol at the C-7, C-24, C-25, or C-27 positions. Compared to the wild type, the four types of Arabidopsis transformant showed varying degrees of phenotypic alteration, the strongest one being in CH25 lines, which were dark-green dwarfs resembling brassinosteroid-related mutants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants revealed trace levels of α and β forms of 7-hydroxycholesterol, 7-hydroxycampesterol, and 7-hydroxysitosterol. The expected hydroxycholesterol metabolites in CH7-, CH24-, and CH25 transformants were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additional hydroxysterol forms were also observed, particularly in CH25 plants. In CH24 and CH25 lines, but not in CH7 ones, the presence of hydroxysterols was correlated with a considerable alteration of the sterol profile and an increased sterol methyltransferase activity in microsomes. Moreover, CH25 lines contained clearly reduced levels of brassinosteroids, and displayed an enhanced drought tolerance. Equivalent transformations of potato plants with the CH25 construct increased hydroxysterol levels, but without the concomitant alteration of growth and sterol profiles observed in Arabidopsis. The results suggest that an increased hydroxylation of cholesterol and/or other sterols in Arabidopsis triggers compensatory processes, acting to maintain sterols at adequate levels. PMID:21746809

  18. Spirodela polyrhiza stimulates the growth of its endophytes but differentially increases their fenpropathrin-degradation capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing-Jian; Sun, Ji-Quan; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-04-01

    In situ remediation of organic contaminants via physical, chemical, and biological approaches is a practical technique for cleansing contaminated water and soil. In the present study, we showed that the three bacterial strains Pseudomonas sp. E1, Klebsiella terrigena E42, and Pseudomonas sp. E46, which can infect and colonize the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrhiza, utilize fenpropathrin as the sole carbon source for growth. S. polyrhiza helped enhance fenpropathrin degradation by E46 by 17.5%, only slightly improved fenpropathrin degradation by E42, and had no effect on strain E1. The application of plant exudates and extracts from fenpropathrin-unexposed/induced plants stimulated bacterial growth of the three strains, but resulted in differential fenpropathrin degradation, suggesting that not all plants and their endophytic bacteria are suitable for coupling phytoremediation and microbial-remediation. Moreover, addition of soil sediments to a microcosm not only stimulated the growth of strain E46 but also increased the rate of fenpropathrin degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex-specific effects of altered competition on nestling growth and survival: an experimental manipulation of brood size and sex ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, Marion; Michler, Stephanie P M; Ubels, Richard; van der Velde, Marco; Komdeur, Jan; Both, Christiaan; Tinbergen, Joost M

    2009-03-01

    1. An increase of competition among adults or nestlings usually negatively affects breeding output. Yet little is known about the differential effects that competition has on the offspring sexes. This could be important because it may influence parental reproductive decisions. 2. In sexual size dimorphic species, two main contradictory mechanisms are proposed regarding sex-specific effects of competition on nestling performance assuming that parents do not feed their chicks differentially: (i) the larger sex requires more resources to grow and is more sensitive to a deterioration of the rearing conditions ('costly sex hypothesis'); (ii) the larger sex has a competitive advantage in intra-brood competition and performs better under adverse conditions ('competitive advantage hypothesis'). 3. In the present study, we manipulated the level of sex-specific sibling competition in a great tit population (Parus major) by altering simultaneously the brood size and the brood sex ratio on two levels: the nest (competition for food among nestlings) and the woodlot where the parents breed (competition for food among adults). We investigated whether altered competition during the nestling phase affected nestling growth traits and survival in the nest and whether the effects differed between males, the larger sex, and females. 4. We found a strong negative and sex-specific effect of experimental brood size on all the nestling traits. In enlarged broods, sexual size dimorphism was smaller which may have resulted from biased mortality towards the less competitive individuals i.e. females of low condition. No effect of brood sex ratio on nestling growth traits was found. 5. Negative brood size effects on nestling traits were stronger in natural high-density areas but we could not confirm this experimentally. 6. Our results did not support the 'costly sex hypothesis' because males did not suffer from higher mortality under harsh conditions. The 'competitive advantage hypothesis' was

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration alters the effect of phosphate supply on growth of Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawara, Satoshi; Norisada, Mariko; Tange, Takeshi; Yagi, Hisayoshi; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that the inorganic phosphate (P(i)) requirement for growth of Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc.) seedlings is increased by elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) and that responses of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch to P(i) supply are also altered. To investigate the growth response of non-mycorrhizal seedlings to P(i) supply in elevated [CO(2)], non-mycorrhizal seedlings were grown for 73 days in ambient or elevated [CO(2)] (350 or 700 micromol mol(-1)) with nutrient solutions containing one of seven phosphate concentrations (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10 and 0.20 mM). In ambient [CO(2)], the growth response to P(i) was saturated at about 0.1 mM P(i), whereas in elevated [CO(2)], the growth response to P(i) supply did not saturate, even at the highest P(i) supply (0.2 mM), indicating that the P(i) requirement is higher in elevated [CO(2)] than in ambient [CO(2)]. The increased requirement was due mainly to an altered shoot growth response to P(i) supply. The enhanced P(i) requirement in elevated [CO(2)] was not associated with a change in photosynthetic response to P(i) or a change in leaf phosphorus (P) status. We investigated the effect of P(i) supply (0.04, 0.08 and 0.20 mM) on the ectomycorrhizal fungus P. tinctorius in mycorrhizal seedlings grown in ambient or elevated [CO(2)]. Root ergosterol concentration (an indicator of fungal biomass) decreased with increasing P(i) supply in ambient [CO(2)], but the decrease was far less in elevated [CO(2)]. In ambient [CO(2)] the ratio of extramatrical mycelium to root biomass decreased with increasing P(i) supply but did not change in elevated [CO(2)]. We conclude that, because elevated [CO(2)] increased the P(i) requirement for shoot growth, the significance of the ectomycorrhizal association was also increased in elevated [CO(2)].

  1. Ocean acidification with (de)eutrophication will alter future phytoplankton growth and succession

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Kevin J.; Clark, Darren R.; Mitra, Aditee; Fabian, Heiner; Hansen, Per J.; Glibert, Patricia M.; Wheeler, Glen L.; Stoecker, Diane K.; Blackford, Jerry C.; Brownlee, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Human activity causes ocean acidification (OA) though the dissolution of anthropogenically generated CO2 into seawater, and eutrophication through the addition of inorganic nutrients. Eutrophication increases the phytoplankton biomass that can be supported during a bloom, and the resultant uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon during photosynthesis increases water-column pH (bloom-induced basification). This increased pH can adversely affect plankton growth. With OA, basification commences at ...

  2. Altered growth response to exogenous auxin and gibberellic acid by gravistimulation in pulvini of Avena sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, T. G.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvini of excised segments from oats (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) were treated unilaterally with indoleacetic acid (IAA) or gibberellic acid (GA3) with or without gravistimulation to assess the effect of gravistimulation on hormone action. Optimum pulvinus elongation growth (millimeters) and segment curvature (degrees) over 24 hours were produced by 100 micromolar IAA in vertical segments. The curvature response to IAA at levels greater than 100 micromolar, applied to the lower sides of gravistimulated (90 degrees) pulvini, was significantly less than the response to identical levels in vertical segments. Furthermore, the bending response of pulvini to 100 micromolar IAA did not vary significantly over a range of presentation angles between 0 and 90 degrees. In contrast, the response to IAA at levels less than 10 micromolar, with gravistimulation, was approximately the sum of the responses to gravistimulation alone and to IAA without gravistimulation. This was observed over a range of presentation angles. Also, GA3 (0.3-30 micromolar) applied to the lower sides of horizontal segments significantly enhanced pulvinus growth and segment curvature, although exogenous GA3 over a range of concentrations had no effect on pulvinus elongation growth or segment curvature in vertical segments. The response to GA3 (10 micromolar) plus IAA (1.0 or 100 micromolar) was additive for either vertical or horizontal segments. These results indicate that gravistimulation produces changes in pulvinus responsiveness to both IAA and GA3 and that the changes are unique for each growth regulator. It is suggested that the changes in responsiveness may result from processes at the cellular level other than changes in hormonal sensitivity.

  3. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Colquhoun

    Full Text Available Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s. Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in

  4. beta-Sitosterol inhibits HT-29 human colon cancer cell growth and alters membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A B; Chen, Y C; Fink, C S; Hennessey, T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-sitosterol, the main dietary phytosterol on the growth of HT-29 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. In addition, the incorporation of this phytosterol into cellular membranes and how this might influence the lipid composition of the membranes were investigated. Tumor cells were grown in DMEM containing 10% FBS and supplemented with sterols (cholesterol or beta-sitosterol) at final concentrations up to 16 microM. The sterols were supplied to the media in the form of sterol cyclodextrin complexes. The cyclodextrin used was 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The sterol to cyclodextrin molar ratio was maintained at 1:300. The study indicated that 8 and 16 microM beta-sitosterol were effective at cel growth inhibition as compared to cholesterol or to the control (no sterol supplementation). After supplementation with 16 microM beta-sitosterol for 9 days, cell growth was only one-third that of cells supplemented with equimolar concentration of cholesterol. No effect was observed on total membrane phospholipid concentration. At 16 microM beta-sitosterol supplementation, membrane cholesterol was reduced by 26%. Cholesterol supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio compared to either beta-sitosterol supplemented cells or controls. There was a 50% reduction in membrane sphingomyelin (SM) of cells grown in 16 microM beta-sitosterol. Additional changes were observed in the fatty acid composition of minor phospholipids of beta-sitosterol supplemented cells, such as SM, phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Only in the case of PI, was there an effect of these fatty acid changes on the unsaturation index, beta-sitosterol incorporation resulted in an increase in the U.I. It is possible that the observed growth inhibition by beta-sitosterol may be mediated through the influence of signal transduction pathways that involve membrane phospholipids.

  5. Ocean acidification with (de)eutrophication will alter future phytoplankton growth and succession.

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, KJ; Clark, DR; Mitra, A.; Fabian, H; Hansen, PJ; Glibert, PM; Wheeler, GL; Stoecker, DK; Blackford, JC; Brownlee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Human activity causes ocean acidification (OA) though the dissolution of anthropogenically generated CO2 into seawater, and eutrophication through the addition of inorganic nutrients. Eutrophication increases the phytoplankton biomass that can be supported during a bloom, and the resultant uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon during photosynthesis increases water-column pH (bloom-induced basification). This increased pH can adversely affect plankton growth. With OA, basification commences at ...

  6. Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferase mutants oppositely alter tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana and Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, Cora A; Ortiz-Ramírez, Carlos; Becker, Jörg D; Feijó, José A; Lippman, Zachary B

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferases (HPATs) are members of a small, deeply conserved family of plant-specific glycosyltransferases that add arabinose sugars to diverse proteins including cell wall-associated extensins and small signaling peptides. Recent genetic studies in flowering plants suggest that different HPAT homologs have been co-opted to function in diverse species-specific developmental contexts. However, nothing is known about the roles of HPATs in basal plants. We show that complete loss of HPAT function in Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens results in a shared defect in gametophytic tip cell growth. Arabidopsis hpat1/2/3 triple knockout mutants suffer from a strong male sterility defect as a consequence of pollen tubes that fail to fully elongate following pollination. Knocking out the two HPAT genes of Physcomitrella results in larger multicellular filamentous networks due to increased elongation of protonemal tip cells. Physcomitrella hpat mutants lack cell-wall associated hydroxyproline arabinosides and can be rescued with exogenous cellulose, while global expression profiling shows that cell wall-associated genes are severely misexpressed, implicating a defect in cell wall formation during tip growth. Our findings point to a major role for HPATs in influencing cell elongation during tip growth in plants.

  7. Control of heterogeneous nucleation and growth kinetics of dopamine-melanin by altering substrate chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Luke; Riley, John K; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2015-03-24

    Dopamine-melanin (DM or "polydopamine") can be deposited on virtually any substrate from solution through autoxidation of dopamine. The versatility of this process has allowed surface-mediated assembly of DM for a wide variety of functional coatings. Here we report the impact of well-defined surface chemistries on the nucleation and growth of such films. DM was deposited on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and SiO2 substrates modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing octadecyl (C18), phenethyl, and aminopropyl functional groups. Atomic force microscopy revealed three-dimensional islands whose areal density and surface coverage are lowest on bare SiO2 substrates and highest on the neutral aromatic and aliphatic substrates. Increasing the pH of the solution from 8.2 to 10 dissociates catechol moieties in DM and inhibits adsorption on negatively charged SiO2 substrates. The growth rate of DM films on SAM-modified SiO2 is maximized at pH 9.5 and almost completely abolished at pH 10 because of increased DM solubility. The initial rates of DM adsorption were measured using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements. The initial adsorption rate is proportional to the nucleation density, which increases as the hydrophobicity of the substrate increases. Taken together, these data provide insight into the rates of heterogeneous nucleation and growth of DM on substrates with well-defined chemistries.

  8. Annual Glyphosate Treatments Alter Growth of Unaffected Bentgrass (Agrostis) Weeds and Plant Community Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Collin W.; Auer, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is becoming more common in weed ecotypes and crop species including turfgrasses, but current gaps in knowledge limit predictive ecological risk assessments and risk management plans. This project examined the effect of annual glyphosate applications on the vegetative growth and reproductive potential of two weedy bentgrasses, creeping bentgrass (CB) and redtop (RT), where the glyphosate resistance (GR) trait was mimicked by covering the bentgrass plants during glyphosate application. Five field plots were studied in habitats commonly inhabited by weedy bentgrasses including an agricultural hayfield, natural meadow, and wasteland. Results showed that annual glyphosate treatment improved bentgrass survivorship, vegetative growth, and reproductive potential compared with bentgrass in unsprayed subplots. In the second year of growth, RT plants had an 86-fold increase in flower number in glyphosate-treated subplots versus controls, while CB plants had a 20-fold increase. At the end of the three year study, plant community composition had changed in glyphosate-treated subplots in hayfield and meadow plots compared to controls. Soils in subplots receiving glyphosate had higher nitrate concentrations than controls. This is the first study to mimic the GR trait in bentgrass plants with the goal of quantifying bentgrass response to glyphosate selection pressure and understanding the impacts on surrounding plant communities. PMID:23226530

  9. Annual glyphosate treatments alter growth of unaffected bentgrass (Agrostis) weeds and plant community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Collin W; Auer, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is becoming more common in weed ecotypes and crop species including turfgrasses, but current gaps in knowledge limit predictive ecological risk assessments and risk management plans. This project examined the effect of annual glyphosate applications on the vegetative growth and reproductive potential of two weedy bentgrasses, creeping bentgrass (CB) and redtop (RT), where the glyphosate resistance (GR) trait was mimicked by covering the bentgrass plants during glyphosate application. Five field plots were studied in habitats commonly inhabited by weedy bentgrasses including an agricultural hayfield, natural meadow, and wasteland. Results showed that annual glyphosate treatment improved bentgrass survivorship, vegetative growth, and reproductive potential compared with bentgrass in unsprayed subplots. In the second year of growth, RT plants had an 86-fold increase in flower number in glyphosate-treated subplots versus controls, while CB plants had a 20-fold increase. At the end of the three year study, plant community composition had changed in glyphosate-treated subplots in hayfield and meadow plots compared to controls. Soils in subplots receiving glyphosate had higher nitrate concentrations than controls. This is the first study to mimic the GR trait in bentgrass plants with the goal of quantifying bentgrass response to glyphosate selection pressure and understanding the impacts on surrounding plant communities.

  10. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  11. Annual glyphosate treatments alter growth of unaffected bentgrass (Agrostis weeds and plant community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin W Ahrens

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is becoming more common in weed ecotypes and crop species including turfgrasses, but current gaps in knowledge limit predictive ecological risk assessments and risk management plans. This project examined the effect of annual glyphosate applications on the vegetative growth and reproductive potential of two weedy bentgrasses, creeping bentgrass (CB and redtop (RT, where the glyphosate resistance (GR trait was mimicked by covering the bentgrass plants during glyphosate application. Five field plots were studied in habitats commonly inhabited by weedy bentgrasses including an agricultural hayfield, natural meadow, and wasteland. Results showed that annual glyphosate treatment improved bentgrass survivorship, vegetative growth, and reproductive potential compared with bentgrass in unsprayed subplots. In the second year of growth, RT plants had an 86-fold increase in flower number in glyphosate-treated subplots versus controls, while CB plants had a 20-fold increase. At the end of the three year study, plant community composition had changed in glyphosate-treated subplots in hayfield and meadow plots compared to controls. Soils in subplots receiving glyphosate had higher nitrate concentrations than controls. This is the first study to mimic the GR trait in bentgrass plants with the goal of quantifying bentgrass response to glyphosate selection pressure and understanding the impacts on surrounding plant communities.

  12. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B differentially affects thyroid cancer cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweppe Rebecca E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a key role in promoting cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. Our understanding of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer, however, is limited. In this study, we have investigated the role of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis using selective genetic inhibition of NF-κB in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Results Three pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB differentially inhibited growth in a panel of advanced thyroid cancer cell lines, suggesting that these NF-κB inhibitors may have off-target effects. We therefore used a selective genetic approach to inhibit NF-κB signaling by overexpression of a dominant-negative IκBα (mIκBα. These studies revealed decreased cell growth in only one of five thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, which occurred through a block in the S-G2/M transition. Resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis was observed in all cell lines, likely through an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of NF-κB by mIκBα sensitized a subset of cell lines to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cell lines displayed sustained activation of the stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK pathway, defining a potential mechanism of response. Finally, NF-κB inhibition by mIκBα expression differentially reduced thyroid cancer cell invasion in these thyroid cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines demonstrated approximately a two-fold decrease in invasion, which was associated with differential expression of MMP-13. MMP-9 was reduced by mIκBα expression in all cell lines tested. Conclusions These data indicate that selective inhibition of NF-κB represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced thyroid. However, it is apparent that global regulation of thyroid cancer cell growth and invasion is not achieved by NF-κB signaling alone. Instead, our

  13. Growth hormone can improve insulin resistance and differentiation in pancreas of senescence accelerated prone male mice (SAMP8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; Forman, Katherine; García, Cruz; Acuña, Darío; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of aging on several parameters related to glucose metabolism, proliferation and differentiation in the pancreas and how GH administration to old SAMP8 mice could affect these parameters. Pancreas samples were obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAMR1) mice SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice and the influence of exogenous administration of GH (2mgs.c./kg/day) on SAMP8 mice. RNA was isolated from pancreas samples of male mice using the kit RNeasy total RNA kit Ref. 50974104 (Qiagen). Insulin was measured in plasma by RIA kit and glucose was measured in plasma by an assay kit. Aging decreases the expression of differentiation in the pancreas of Pdx-1, FoxO 1 and FoxO 3A but not of Sirt 1 or of the expression of the proliferative genes PCNA and Sei1. The expression of glucagon and GLUT2 were increased with aging and no differences were observed in somatostatin and insulin expressions. Insulin levels in plasma were increased with aging in SAMP8 mice. IGF-1 expression was reduced with aging. The treatment with GH was able to increase the expression of Sirt 1, Pdx-1, FoxO 3A and IGF-1. On the other hand, the treatment decreased the expression of glucagon, GLUT2, somatostatin and insulin, furthermore GH was able to decrease the plasma levels of insulin in old male SAMP8 mice (p<0.0004). The present study has shown that aging is associated with significant alterations in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in insulin secretion as well as in the differentiation and in the intra islet glucose metabolism. According to our results, GH administration to old SAMP8 mice was able to improve the pancreatic function of the old SAMP8 mice and to decrease insulin and glucagon expressions in the pancreas improving instead insulin levels and glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Growth Hormone Research Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Magnesium Alleviates Adverse Effects of Lead on Growth, Photosynthesis, and Ultrastructural Alterations of Torreya grandis Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Song, Lili; Müller, Karin; Hu, Yuanyuan; Song, Yang; Yu, Weiwu; Wang, Hailong; Wu, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) has been shown to reduce the physiological and biochemical stress in plants caused by heavy metals. To date our understanding of how Mg2+ ameliorates the adverse effects of heavy metals in plants is scarce. The potential effect of Mg2+ on lead (Pb2+) toxicity in plants has not yet been studied. This study was designed to clarify the mechanism of Mg2+-induced alleviation of lead (Pb2+) toxicity. Torreya grandis (T. grandis) seedlings were grown in substrate contaminated with 0, 700 and 1400 mg Pb2+ per kg-1 and with or without the addition of 1040 mg kg-1 Mg2+. Growth parameters, concentrations of Pb2+ and Mg2+ in the plants’ shoots and roots, photosynthetic pigment, gas exchange parameters, the maximum quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm), root oxidative activity, ultrastructure of chloroplasts and root growth were determined to analyze the effect of different Pb2+ concentrations on the seedlings as well as the potential ameliorating effect of Mg2+ on the Pb2+ induced toxicity. All measurements were tested by a one-way ANOVA for the effects of treatments. The growth of T. grandis seedlings cultivated in soils treated with 1400 mg kg-1 Pb2+ was significantly reduced compared with that of plants cultivated in soils treated with 0 or 700 mg kg-1 Pb2+. The addition of 1040 mg kg-1 Mg2+ improved the growth of the Pb2+-stressed seedlings, which was accompanied by increased chlorophyll content, the net photosynthetic rate and Fv/Fm, and enhanced chloroplasts development. In addition, the application of Mg2+ induced plants to accumulate five times higher concentrations of Pb2+ in the roots and to absorb and translocate four times higher concentrations of Mg2+ to the shoots than those without Mg2+ application. Furthermore, Mg2+ addition increased root growth and oxidative activity, and protected the root ultrastructure. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first report on the mechanism of Mg2+-induced alleviation of Pb2+ toxicity. The generated results

  15. Magnesium alleviates adverse effects of lead on growth, photosynthesis and ultrastructural alterations of Torreya grandis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg2+ has been shown to reduce the physiological and biochemical stress in plants caused by heavy metals. To date our understanding of how Mg2+ ameliorates the adverse effects of heavy metals in plants is scarce. The potential effect of Mg2+ on lead (Pb2+ toxicity in plants has not yet been studied. This study was designed to clarify the mechanism of Mg2+-induced alleviation of lead (Pb2+ toxicity. Torreya grandis (T. grandis seedlings were grown in substrate contaminated with 0, 700 and 1400 mg Pb2+ per kg-1 and with or without the addition of 1040 mg kg-1 Mg2+. Growth parameters, concentrations of Pb2+ and Mg2+ in the plants’ shoots and roots, photosynthetic pigment, gas exchange parameters, the maximum quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm, root oxidative activity, ultrastructure of chloroplasts and root growth were determined to analyze the effect of different Pb2+ concentrations in the seedlings as well as the potential ameliorating effect of Mg2+ on the Pb2+ induced toxicity. The growth of T. grandis seedlings cultivated in soils treated with 1400 mg kg-1 Pb2+ was significantly reduced compared with that of plants cultivated in soils treated with 0 or 700 mg kg-1 Pb2+. The addition of 1040 mg kg-1 Mg2+ improved the growth of the Pb2+-stressed seedlings, which was accompanied by increased chlorophyll content, the net photosynthetic rate and Fv/Fm, and enhanced chloroplasts development. In addition, the application of Mg2+ induced plants to accumulate five times higher concentrations of Pb2+ in the roots and to absorb and translocate four times higher concentrations of Mg2+ to the shoots than those without Mg2+ application. Furthermore, Mg2+ addition increased root growth and oxidative activity, and protected the root ultrastructure. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first report on the mechanism of Mg2+-induced alleviation of Pb2+ toxicity. The gener¬ated results may have important implications for understanding the

  16. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  17. Insulin-like growth factor 1 regulation of proliferation and differentiation of Xenopus laevis myogenic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Sairi; Yada, Tomotaka; Ishikawa, Natsuko; Taheruzzaman, Kazi; Hara, Ryohei; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akio

    2017-03-01

    To understand the mechanism of muscle remodeling during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis, we examined the in vitro effect of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on growth and differentiation of three different-fate myogenic cell populations: tadpole tail, tadpole dorsal, and young adult leg muscle. IGF-1 promoted growth and differentiation of both tail and leg myogenic cells only under conditions where these cells could proliferate. Inhibition of cell proliferation by DNA synthesis inhibitor cytosine arabinoside completely canceled the IGF-1's cell differentiation promotion, suggesting the possibility that IGF-1's differentiation-promotion effect is an indirect effect via IGF-1's cell proliferation promotion. IGF-1 promoted differentiation dose dependently with maximum effect at 100-500 ng/ml. RT-PCR analysis revealed the upregulation (11-fold) of ifg1 mRNA expression in developing limbs, suggesting that IGF-1 plays a role in promoting muscle differentiation during limb development. The combined effect of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) and IGF-1 was also examined. In adult leg cells, IGF-1 promoted growth and differentiation irrespective of the presence of T3. In larval tail cells, cell count was 76% lower in the presence of T3, and IGF-1 did not promote proliferation and differentiation in T3-containing medium. In larval dorsal cells, cell count was also lower in the presence of T3, but IGF-1 enhanced proliferation and differentiation in T3-containing medium. This result is likely due to the presence among dorsal cells of both adult and larval types (1:1). Thus, IGF-1 affects only adult-type myogenic cells in the presence of T3 and helps accelerate dorsal muscle remodeling during metamorphosis.

  18. INHIBITING GERANYLGERANYLATION INCREASES NEURITE BRANCHING AND DIFFERENTIALLY ACTIVATES COFILIN IN CELL BODIES AND GROWTH CONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Filsy; Reddy, Jairus; Kaimal, Radhika; Segovia, Vianey; Mo, Huanbiao; Hynds, DiAnna L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, including the highly prescribed statins, reduce the production of cholesterol and isoprenoids such as geranylgeranyl pyrophosphates. The Rho family of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) requires isoprenylation, specifically geranylgeranylation, for activation. Because Rho GTPases are primary regulators of actin filament rearrangements required for process extension, neurite arborization and synaptic plasticity, statins may affect cognition or recovery from nervous system injury. Here, we assessed how manipulating geranylgeranylation affects neurite initiation, elongation and branching in neuroblastoma growth cones. Treatment with the statin, lovastatin (20 μM) decreased measures of neurite initiation by 17.0% to 19.0% when a source of cholesterol was present and increased neurite branching by 4.03 to 9.54 fold (regardless of exogenous cholesterol). Neurite elongation was increased by treatment with lovastatin only in cholesterol-free culture conditions. Treatment with lovastatin decreased growth cone actin filament content by up to 24.3%. In all cases, co-treatment with the prenylation precursor, geranylgeraniol (10 μM), reversed the effect of lovastatin. In prior work, statin effects on outgrowth were linked to modulating the actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin. In our assays, treatment with lovastatin or geranylgeraniol decreased cofilin phosphorylation in whole cell lysates. However, lovastatin increased cofilin phosphorylation in cell bodies and decreased it in growth cones, indicating differential regulation in specific cell regions. Together, we interpret these data to suggest that protein geranylgeranylation likely regulates growth cone actin filament content and subsequent neurite outgrowth through mechanisms that also affect actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:24515839

  19. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled “Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II”. In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2, poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  20. Neuronal development and axon growth are altered by glyphosate through a WNT non-canonical signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coullery, Romina P; Ferrari, María E; Rosso, Silvana B

    2016-01-01

    The growth and morphological differentiation of neurons are critical events in the establishment of proper neuronal connectivity and functioning. The developing nervous system is highly susceptible to damage caused by exposure to environmental contaminants. Glyphosate-containing herbicides are the most used agrochemicals in the world, particularly on genetically modified plants. Previous studies have demonstrated that glyphosate induces neurotoxicity in mammals. Therefore, its action mechanism on the nervous system needs to be determined. In this study, we report about impaired neuronal development caused by glyphosate exposure. Particularly, we observed that the initial axonal differentiation and growth of cultured neurons is affected by glyphosate since most treated cells remained undifferentiated after 1 day in culture. Although they polarized at 2 days in vitro, they elicited shorter and unbranched axons and they also developed less complex dendritic arbors compared to controls. To go further, we attempted to identify the cellular mechanism by which glyphosate affected neuronal morphology. Biochemical approaches revealed that glyphosate led to a decrease in Wnt5a level, a key factor for the initial neurite development and maturation, as well as inducing a down-regulation of CaMKII activity. This data suggests that the morphological defects would likely be a consequence of the decrease in both Wnt5a expression and CaMKII activity induced by glyphosate. Additionally, these changes might be reflected in a subsequent neuronal dysfunction. Therefore, our findings highlight the importance of establishing rigorous control on the use of glyphosate-based herbicides in order to protect mammals' health.

  1. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of alpha

  2. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, but Not Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichen Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF, chemical fertilizer (CF, organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF and organic fertilizer (OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with organic fertilizer application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR versus sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the Alpha- and Beta- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil

  3. Neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells inhibit the growth of low-differentiated glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Savchenko, E A; Bykovskaya, S N; Yusubalieva, G M; Viktorov, I V; Bryukhovetskii, A S; Bryukhovetskii, I S; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-02-01

    The effects of neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells on C6 glioma cells were studied in in vivo and in vitro experiments. Considerable inhibition of proliferation during co-culturing of glioma cells with neural progenitor cells was revealed by quantitative MTT test and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation test. Labeled neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells implanted into the focus of experimental cerebral glioma C6 survive in the brain of experimental animals for at least 7 days, migrate with glioma cells, and accumulate in the peritumoral space. Under these conditions, neural progenitor cells differentiate with the formation of long processes. Morphometric analysis of glioma cells showed that implantation of neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells is accompanied by considerable inhibition of the growth of experimental glioma C6 in comparison with the control. The mechanisms of tumor-suppressive effects of neural and hemopoietic stem cells require further investigation.

  4. Differentiation of bacterial colonies and temporal growth patterns using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrübeoglu, Mehrube; Buck, Gregory W.; Livingston, Daniel W.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and identification of bacteria are important for health and safety. Hyperspectral imaging offers the potential to capture unique spectral patterns and spatial information from bacteria which can then be used to detect and differentiate bacterial species. Here, hyperspectral imaging has been used to characterize different bacterial colonies and investigate their growth over time. Six bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes) were grown on tryptic soy agar plates. Hyperspectral data were acquired immediately after, 24 hours after, and 96 hours after incubation. Spectral signatures from bacterial colonies demonstrated repeatable measurements for five out of six species. Spatial variations as well as changes in spectral signatures were observed across temporal measurements within and among species at multiple wavelengths due to strengthening or weakening reflectance signals from growing bacterial colonies based on their pigmentation. Between-class differences and within-class similarities were the most prominent in hyperspectral data collected 96 hours after incubation.

  5. Growth and Zeros of Meromorphic Solutions to Second-Order Linear Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamar Andasmas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to investigate the growth of meromorphic solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous second order linear differential equations f00+Af0+Bf = F, where A(z, B (z and F (z are meromorphic functions with finite order having only finitely many poles. We show that, if there exist a positive constants σ > 0, α > 0 such that |A(z| ≥ eα|z|σ as |z| → +∞, z ∈ H, where dens{|z| : z ∈ H} > 0 and ρ = max{ρ(B, ρ(F} < σ, then every transcendental meromorphic solution f has an infinite order. Further, we give some estimates of their hyper-order, exponent and hyper-exponent of convergence of distinct zeros.

  6. The role of the insulin‑like growth factor (IGF) axis in osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kharobi, H; El-Gendy, R; Devine, D A; Beattie, J

    2014-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is a multicomponent molecular network which has important biological functions in the development and maintenance of differentiated tissue function(s). One of the most important functions of the IGF axis is the control of skeletal tissue metabolism by the finely tuned regulation of the process of osteogenesis. To achieve this, the IGF axis controls the activity of several cell types—osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts to achieve the co-ordinated development of appropriate hard tissue structure and associated matrix deposition. In addition, there is an increasing awareness that the IGF axis also plays a role in the process of odontogenesis (tooth formation). In this review, we highlight some of the key findings in both of these areas. A further understanding of the role of the IGF axis in hard tissue biology may contribute to tissue regeneration strategies in cases of skeletal tissue trauma.

  7. ALTERATIONS TO PLBS AND PLANTLETS OF HYBRID CYMBIDIUM (ORCHIDACEAE IN RESPONSE TO PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. TEIXEIRA DA SILVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A previous study examined, in detail, the morphological response of hybrid Cymbidium Twilight Moon ‘Day Light’ protocorm-like bodies (PLBs to 26 plant growth regulators (PGRs. In this study, flow cytometric analyses of the PLBs derived from several of these PGR treatments revealed changes in the ploidy of PLBs while the ploidy of plant leaves remained constant. The SPAD value of leaves of plants derived from PGR treatments changed significantly. The choice of PGR must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of the possible resulting changes to morphology and physiological parameters.

  8. Medullary Endocannabinoids Contribute to the Differential Resting Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Altered Brain Renin-Angiotensin System Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaich, Chris L; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2016-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), providing anatomical evidence for their role in arterial baroreflex modulation. To better understand the relationship between the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and endocannabinoid expression within the NTS, we measured dorsal medullary endocannabinoid tissue content and the effects of CB1 receptor blockade at this brain site on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in ASrAOGEN rats with low glial angiotensinogen, normal Sprague-Dawley rats and (mRen2)27 rats with upregulated brain RAS expression. Mass spectrometry revealed higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in (mRen2)27 compared to ASrAOGEN rats (2.70 ± 0.28 vs. 1.17 ± 0.09 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.01), while Sprague-Dawley rats had intermediate content (1.85 ± 0.27 ng/mg tissue). Microinjection of the CB1receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmol) into the NTS did not change cardiac BRS in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (1.04 ± 0.05 ms/mmHg baseline vs. 1.17 ± 0.11 ms/mmHg after 10 min). However, SR141716A in (mRen2)27 rats dose-dependently improved BRS in this strain: 0.36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.43 ± 0.03 to 0.71 ± 0.04 ms/mmHg (P < 0.001), and 36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.47 ± 0.02 to 0.94 ± 0.10 ms/mmHg (P < 0.01). In contrast, 0.36 pmol (1.50 ± 0.12 vs. 0.86 ± 0.08 ms/mmHg; P < 0.05) and 36 pmol (1.38 ± 0.16 vs. 0.46 ± 0.003 ms/mmHg; P < 0.01) of SR141716A significantly reduced BRS in ASrAOGEN rats. These observations reveal differential dose-related effects of the brain endocannabinoid system that influence cardiovagal BRS in animals with genetic alterations in the brain RAS.

  9. SUB-ACUTE TREATMENT WITH METHYLMERCURY DURING DIFFERENTIATION OF PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS DOES NOT ALTER BINDING OF ION CHANNEL LIGANDS OR CELL MORPHOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrated recently that 6 days of exposure to nanomolar concentrations (3-10 nM) of methylmercury (MeHg) during nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell differentiation reduced the amplitude and density of voltage-gated sodium and calcium currents. In the present study,...

  10. Embryonic-only arsenic exposure in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) reduces growth and alters muscle IGF levels one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowicz, Dana B; Sims, Kaleigh C; Castro, Noemi M; Bridges, William C; Bain, Lisa J

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant of drinking water and crops in many parts of the world. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure is linked to decreased birth weight, weight gain, and proper skeletal muscle function. The goal of this study was to use killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) as a model to determine the long-term effects of embryonic-only arsenic exposure on muscle growth and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway. Killifish embryos were exposed to 0, 50, 200 or 800ppb As(III) from fertilization until hatching. Juvenile fish were reared in clean water and muscle samples were collected at 16, 28, 40 and 52 weeks of age. There were significant reductions in condition factors, ranging from 12 to 17%, in the fish exposed to arsenic at 16, 28 and 40 weeks of age. However, by 52 weeks, no significant changes in condition factors were seen. Alterations in IGF-1R and IGF-1 levels were assessed as a potential mechanism by which growth was reduced. While there no changes in hepatic IGF-1 transcripts, skeletal muscle cells can also produce their own IGF-1 and/or alter IGF-1 receptor levels to help enhance growth. After a 200 and 800ppb embryonic exposure, fish grown in clean water for 16 weeks had IGF-1R transcripts that were 2.8-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than unexposed fish. Through 40 weeks of age, IGF1-R remained elevated in the 200ppb and 800ppb embryonic exposure groups by 1.8-3.9-fold, while at 52 weeks of age, IGF-1R levels were still significantly increased in the 800ppb exposure group. Skeletal muscle IGF-1 transcripts were also significantly increased by 1.9-5.1 fold through the 52 weeks of grow-out in clean by water in the 800ppb embryonic exposure group. Based on these results, embryonic arsenic exposure has long-term effects in that it reduces growth and increases both IGF-1 and IGF-1R levels in skeletal muscle even 1year after the exposure has ended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Opposing actions of endocannabinoids on cholangiocarcinoma growth is via the differential activation of Notch signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampton, Gabriel; Coufal, Monique [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Li, Huang [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Ramirez, Jonathan [Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX (United States); DeMorrow, Sharon, E-mail: demorrow@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) have opposing effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Implicated in cancer, Notch signaling requires the {gamma}-secretase complex for activation. The aims of this study were to determine if the opposing effects of endocannabinoids depend on the differential activation of the Notch receptors and to demonstrate that the differential activation of these receptors are due to presenilin 1 containing- and presenilin 2 containing-{gamma}-secretase complexes. Mz-ChA-1 cells were treated with AEA or 2-AG. Notch receptor expression, activation, and nuclear translocation were determined. Specific roles for Notch 1 and 2 on cannabinoid-induced effects were determined by transient transfection of Notch 1 or 2 shRNA vectors before stimulation with AEA or 2-AG. Expression of presenilin 1 and 2 was determined after AEA or 2-AG treatment, and the involvement of presenilin 1 and 2 in the cannabinoid-induced effects was demonstrated in cell lines with low presenilin 1 or 2 expression. Antiproliferative effects of AEA required increased Notch 1 mRNA, activation, and nuclear translocation, whereas the growth-promoting effects induced by 2-AG required increased Notch 2 mRNA expression, activation, and nuclear translocation. AEA increased presenilin 1 expression and recruitment into the {gamma}-secretase complex, whereas 2-AG increased expression and recruitment of presenilin 2. The development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the endocannabinoid system or mimicking the mode of action of AEA on Notch signaling pathways would prove beneficial for cholangiocarcinoma management.

  12. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  13. Hybridization between Yellowstone cutthroat trout and rainbow trout alters the expression of muscle growth-related genes and their relationships with growth patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Carl O.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Hauser, Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization creates novel gene combinations that may generate important evolutionary novelty, but may also reduce existing adaptation by interrupting inherent biological processes, such as genotype-environment interactions. Hybridization often causes substantial change in patterns of gene expression, which, in turn, may cause phenotypic change. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and cutthroat trout (O. clarkii) produce viable hybrids in the wild, and introgressive hybridization with introduced rainbow trout is a major conservation concern for native cutthroat trout. The two species differ in body shape, which is likely an evolutionary adaptation to their native environments, and their hybrids tend to show intermediate morphology. The characterization of gene expression patterns may provide insights on the genetic basis of hybrid and parental morphologies, as well as on the ecological performance of hybrids in the wild. Here, we evaluated the expression of eight growth-related genes (MSTN-1a, MSTN-1b, MyoD1a, MyoD1b, MRF-4, IGF-1, IGF-2, and CAST-L) and the relationship of these genes with growth traits (length, weight, and condition factor) in six line crosses: both parental species, both reciprocal F1 hybrids, and both first-generation backcrosses (F1 x rainbow trout and F1 x cutthroat trout). Four of these genes were differentially expressed among rainbow, cutthroat, and their hybrids. Transcript abundance was significantly correlated with growth traits across the parent species, but not across hybrids. Our findings suggest that rainbow and cutthroat trout exhibit differences in muscle growth regulation, that transcriptional networks may be modified by hybridization, and that hybridization disrupts intrinsic relationships between gene expression and growth patterns that may be functionally important for phenotypic adaptations.

  14. Hybridization between Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Rainbow Trout Alters the Expression of Muscle Growth-Related Genes and Their Relationships with Growth Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl O Ostberg

    Full Text Available Hybridization creates novel gene combinations that may generate important evolutionary novelty, but may also reduce existing adaptation by interrupting inherent biological processes, such as genotype-environment interactions. Hybridization often causes substantial change in patterns of gene expression, which, in turn, may cause phenotypic change. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and cutthroat trout (O. clarkii produce viable hybrids in the wild, and introgressive hybridization with introduced rainbow trout is a major conservation concern for native cutthroat trout. The two species differ in body shape, which is likely an evolutionary adaptation to their native environments, and their hybrids tend to show intermediate morphology. The characterization of gene expression patterns may provide insights on the genetic basis of hybrid and parental morphologies, as well as on the ecological performance of hybrids in the wild. Here, we evaluated the expression of eight growth-related genes (MSTN-1a, MSTN-1b, MyoD1a, MyoD1b, MRF-4, IGF-1, IGF-2, and CAST-L and the relationship of these genes with growth traits (length, weight, and condition factor in six line crosses: both parental species, both reciprocal F1 hybrids, and both first-generation backcrosses (F1 x rainbow trout and F1 x cutthroat trout. Four of these genes were differentially expressed among rainbow, cutthroat, and their hybrids. Transcript abundance was significantly correlated with growth traits across the parent species, but not across hybrids. Our findings suggest that rainbow and cutthroat trout exhibit differences in muscle growth regulation, that transcriptional networks may be modified by hybridization, and that hybridization disrupts intrinsic relationships between gene expression and growth patterns that may be functionally important for phenotypic adaptations.

  15. Hybridization between Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Rainbow Trout Alters the Expression of Muscle Growth-Related Genes and Their Relationships with Growth Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Carl O; Chase, Dorothy M; Hauser, Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization creates novel gene combinations that may generate important evolutionary novelty, but may also reduce existing adaptation by interrupting inherent biological processes, such as genotype-environment interactions. Hybridization often causes substantial change in patterns of gene expression, which, in turn, may cause phenotypic change. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and cutthroat trout (O. clarkii) produce viable hybrids in the wild, and introgressive hybridization with introduced rainbow trout is a major conservation concern for native cutthroat trout. The two species differ in body shape, which is likely an evolutionary adaptation to their native environments, and their hybrids tend to show intermediate morphology. The characterization of gene expression patterns may provide insights on the genetic basis of hybrid and parental morphologies, as well as on the ecological performance of hybrids in the wild. Here, we evaluated the expression of eight growth-related genes (MSTN-1a, MSTN-1b, MyoD1a, MyoD1b, MRF-4, IGF-1, IGF-2, and CAST-L) and the relationship of these genes with growth traits (length, weight, and condition factor) in six line crosses: both parental species, both reciprocal F1 hybrids, and both first-generation backcrosses (F1 x rainbow trout and F1 x cutthroat trout). Four of these genes were differentially expressed among rainbow, cutthroat, and their hybrids. Transcript abundance was significantly correlated with growth traits across the parent species, but not across hybrids. Our findings suggest that rainbow and cutthroat trout exhibit differences in muscle growth regulation, that transcriptional networks may be modified by hybridization, and that hybridization disrupts intrinsic relationships between gene expression and growth patterns that may be functionally important for phenotypic adaptations.

  16. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Yu, Xiyan, E-mail: yuxiyan@sdau.edu.cn [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Wang, Xiufeng, E-mail: xfwang@sdau.edu.cn [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China)

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  17. Elevated CO[sub 2] alters deployment of roots in small growth containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntson, G.M.; McConnaughay, K.D.M.; Bazzaz, F.A. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology)

    1993-07-01

    Previously the authors examined how limited rooting space and nutrient supply influenced plant growth under elevated atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations. To gain insight into how elevated CO[sub 2] atmospheres affect how plants utilize available belowground space, when rooting space and nutrient supply are limited, they measured the deployment of roots within pots through time. Contrary to aboveground responses, patterns of belowground deployment were most strongly influenced by elevated CO[sub 2] in pots of different volume and shape. Further, elevated CO[sub 2] conditions interacted differently with limited belowground space for the two species studied, Abutilon theophrasti, a C[sub 3] dicot with a deep taproot, and Setaria faberii, a C4 monocot with a shallow fibrous root system. For Setaria, elevated CO[sub 2] increased the size of the largest region of low root density at the pot surface in larger rooting volumes independent of nutrient content, thereby decreasing their efficiency of deployment. For Abutilon, plants responded to elevated CO[sub 2] concentrations by equalizing the pattern of deployment in all the pots. Nutrient concentration, and not pot size or shape, greatly influenced the density of root growth. Root densities for Abutilon and Setaria were similar to those observed in field conditions, for annual dicots and monocots respectively, suggesting that studies using pots may successfully mimic natural conditions.

  18. Exogenous estradiol alters gonadal growth and timing of temperature sex determination in gonads of sea turtle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2015-12-01

    Temperature sex determining species offer a model for investigating how environmental cues become integrated to the regulation of patterning genes and growth, among bipotential gonads. Manipulation of steroid hormones has revealed the important role of aromatase in the regulation of the estrogen levels involved in temperature-dependent sex determination. Estradiol treatment counteracts the effect of male-promoting temperature, but the resulting ovarian developmental pattern differs from that manifested with the female-promoting temperature. Hypoplastic gonads have been reported among estradiol-treated turtles; however the estradiol effect on gonadal size has not been examined. Here we focused on the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea, which develops hypoplastic gonads with estradiol treatment. We studied the effect of estradiol on cell proliferation and on candidate genes involved in ovarian pattern. We found this effect is organ specific, causing a dramatic reduction in gonadal cell proliferation during the temperature-sensitive period. Although the incipient gonads resembled tiny ovaries, remodeling of the medullary cords and down-regulation of testicular factor Sox9 were considerably delayed. Contrastingly, with ovarian promoting temperature as a cue, exogenous estradiol induced the up-regulation of the ovary factor FoxL2, prior to the expression of aromatase. The strong expression of estrogen receptor alpha at the time of treatment suggests that it mediates estradiol effects. Overall results indicate that estradiol levels required for gonadal growth and to establish the female genetic network are delicately regulated by temperature.

  19. Alterations in the upper facial growth of Macaca mulatta resulting from high-pull headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, R J

    1975-04-01

    Four prepubertal Macaca mulatta monkeys, ranging in age from 13 to 24 months, were used in an investigation of the effects of high-pull headgear (to a face-bow) therapy on the growth of the upper facial skeleton. Amalgam bone implants were placed across the frontomaxillary, frontozygomatic, zygomaticomaxillary, and zygomaticotemporal sutures in each animal. Three of the monkeys wore appliances consisting of a maxillary dental spling, a face-bow, two coil springs, and an acrylic helmet. The fourth monkey (control) wore only a dental splint and a face-bow. A continuous high-pull headgear force of 300 grams per side was applied to the three monkeys for 81, 87 and 89 days, respectively, before death. Procion brilliant red 8-HBS vital stain was administered to all four animals at the start of and 3 days before the end of the treatment period. The facial growth patterns were determined from lateral cephalograms taken before and after treatment, from direct measurement of implant separation at the sutures, and from histologic sections of the four mentioned facial sutures.

  20. Tailoring the nanostructured surfaces of hydroxyapatite bioceramics to promote protein adsorption, osteoblast growth, and osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Xia, Lunguo; Gan, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hong; Jiang, Xinquan; Chang, Jiang

    2013-08-28

    To promote and understand the biological responses of the implant via nanostructured surface design is essential for the development of bioactive bone implants. However, the control of the surface topography of the bioceramics in nanoscale is a big challenge because of their brittle property. Herein, the hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramics with distinct nanostructured topographies were fabricated via hydrothermal treatment using α-tricalcium phosphate ceramic as hard-template under different reaction conditions. HAp bioceramics with nanosheet, nanorod and micro-nanohybrid structured surface in macroscopical size were obtained by controlling the composition of the reaction media. Comparing with the traditional sample with flat and dense surface, the fabricated HAp bioceramics with hierarchical 3D micro-nanotextured surfaces possessed higher specific surface area, which selectively enhanced adsorption of specific proteins including Fn and Vn in plasma, and stimulated osteoblast adhesion, growth, and osoteogenic differentiation. In particular, the biomimetic features of the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid surface resulted in the best ability for simultaneous enhancement of protein adsorption, osteoblast proliferation, and differentiation. The results suggest that the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid topography might be one of the critical factors to be considered in the design of functional bone grafts.

  1. Control of patterning, growth, and differentiation by floral organ identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, Robert

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the different morphologies of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels, all these floral organs are believed to be modified versions of a ground-state organ similar to the leaf. Modifications of the ground-state developmental programme are orchestrated by different combinations of MADS-domain transcription factors encoded by floral organ identity genes. In recent years, much has been revealed about the gene regulatory networks controlled by the floral organ identity genes and about the genetic pathways that control leaf development. This review examines how floral organ identity is connected with the control of morphogenesis and differentiation of shoot organs, focusing on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Direct links have emerged between floral organ identity genes and genes involved in abaxial-adaxial patterning, organ boundary formation, tissue growth, and cell differentiation. In parallel, predictive models have been developed to explain how the activity of regulatory genes can be coordinated by intercellular signalling and constrained by tissue mechanics. When combined, these advances provide a unique opportunity for revealing exactly how leaf-like organs have been 'metamorphosed' into floral organs during evolution and showing crucial regulatory points in the generation of plant form. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Differential growth at the apical hook: all roads lead to auxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad eAbbas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The apical hook is a developmentally regulated structure that appears in dicotyledonous seedlings when seeds germinate buried in the soil. It protects the shoot apical meristem and cotyledons from damage while the seedling is pushing upwards seeking for light, and it is formed by differential cell expansion between both sides of the upper part of the hypocotyl. Its apparent simplicity and the fact that it is dispensable when seedlings are grown in vitro have converted the apical hook in one of the favorite experimental models to study the regulation of differential growth. The involvement of hormones –especially auxin– in this process was manifest already in the early studies. Remarkably, a gradient of this hormone across the hook curvature is instrumental to complete its development, similar to what has been proposed for other processes involving the bending of an organ, such as tropic responses. In agreement with this, other hormones –mainly gibberellins and ethylene–, and the light, regulate in a timely and interconnected manner the auxin gradient to promote hook development and its opening, respectively. Here, we review the latest findings in the field, paying special attention to the molecular mechanisms for the cross-regulation between the different hormone signaling pathways that underlie this developmental process.

  3. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Britnie R; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S; Norian, Lyse A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. Because dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intrarenal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in normal weight mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a comorbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies.

  4. Phosphorus Availability Alters the Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Periphyton Growth and Stoichiometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth C Norman

    Full Text Available Exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs may alter the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, there remains a paucity of studies investigating the effects of AgNP exposure on freshwater communities in the natural environment where interactions with the ambient environment may modify AgNP toxicity. We used nutrient diffusing substrates to determine the interactive effects of AgNP exposure and phosphorus (P enrichment on natural assemblages of periphyton in three Canadian Shield lakes. The lakes were all phosphorus poor and spanned a gradient of dissolved organic carbon availability. Ag slowly accumulated in the exposed periphyton, which decreased periphyton carbon and chlorophyll a content and increased periphyton C:P and N:P in the carbon rich lakes. We found significant interactions between AgNP and P treatments on periphyton carbon, autotroph standing crop and periphyton stoichiometry in the carbon poor lake such that P enhanced the negative effects of AgNPs on chlorophyll a and lessened the impact of AgNP exposure on periphyton stoichiometry. Our results contrast with those of other studies demonstrating that P addition decreases metal toxicity for phytoplankton, suggesting that benthic and pelagic primary producers may react differently to AgNP exposure and highlighting the importance of in situ assays when assessing potential effects of AgNPs in fresh waters.

  5. The role of auxin and ethylene for gravitropic differential growth of coleoptiles and roots of rye- and maize seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, H. G.; Sabovljevic, A.; Njio, G.; Roth, U.

    The relevance of auxin and ethylene for differential gravitropic growth has been analyzed both in shoots and roots of etiolated rye- and maize seedlings. As previously demonstrated for indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA), incubation of coleoptiles in dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) resulted in a two- to threefold length increase compared to water controls. In spite of this immense effect on elongation growth, gravi-curvature was similar to water controls. In contrast, inhibition of ethylene synthesis prevented differential growth of abraded coleoptiles as well as of roots without a significant inhibiting effect on elongation. Inhibition of ethylene perception in horizontally stimulated maize roots growing on surfaces eliminated the capacity of the roots to adapt growth to the surface and a vertical orientation of the root tip. This effect is accompanied by up- and down-regulation of a number of proteins as detected with the 2D-MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight) method. Exogenous ethylene inhibited growth but enhanced gravitropic curvature in roots that were "freely" gravistimulated in a horizontal position, exhibiting a pronounced "waving" behavior. Together the data challenge the regulatory relevance of IAA-redistribution for gravitropic differential growth. They corroborate the crucial regulatory relevance of ethylene for gravitropic growth, in both roots and coleoptiles.

  6. Altering the growth conditions of Gluconacetobacter xylinus to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Dianne R; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2012-06-20

    An extensive matrix of different growth conditions including media, incubation time, inoculum volume, surface area and media volume were investigated in order to maximize the yield of bacterial cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which will be used as reinforcement material to produce fully biodegradable composites. Crystallinity was shown to be controllable depending on the media and conditions employed. Samples with significant difference in crystallinity in a range from 50% to 95% were produced. Through experimental design, the yield of cellulose was maximized; primarily this involved reactor surface area design, optimized media and the use of mannitol being the highest cellulose-producing carbon source. Increasing the volume of the media did achieve a higher cellulose yield, however this increase was not found to be cost or time effective.

  7. RNA interference silencing of CHS greatly alters the growth pattern of apple (Malus x domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Andrew P; Hellens, Roger P

    2013-08-01

    Plants produce a vast array of phenolic compounds which are essential for their survival on land. One major class of polyphenols are the flavonoids and their formation is dependent on the enzyme chalcone synthase (CHS). In a recent study we silenced the CHS genes of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) and observed a loss of pigmentation in the fruit skin, flowers and stems. More surprisingly, highly silenced lines were significantly reduced in size, with small leaves and shortened internode lengths. Chemical analysis also revealed that the transgenic shoots contained greatly reduced concentrations of flavonoids which are known to modulate auxin flow. An auxin transport study verified this, with an increased auxin transport in the CHS-silenced lines. Overall, these findings suggest that auxin transport in apple has adapted to take place in the presence of high endogenous concentrations of flavonoids. Removal of these compounds therefore results in abnormal auxin movement and a highly disrupted growth pattern.

  8. Differentiation and growth of bone ornamentation in vertebrates: a comparative histological study among the Crocodylomorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Buffrénil, V; Clarac, F; Fau, M; Martin, S; Martin, B; Pellé, E; Laurin, M

    2015-04-01

    Bone ornamentation, that is, hollow (pits and grooves) or protruding (ridges) repetitive reliefs on the surface of dermal bones, is a frequent, though poorly studied and understood, feature in vertebrates. One of the most typical examples of this characteristic is given by the Crurotarsi, a taxon formed by the crocodilians and their closest allies, which generally display deep ornamentation on skull roof and osteoderms. However, the ontogenetic process responsible for the differentiation and development of this character remains controversial. This study was conducted to settle the question on histological and microanatomical evidence in several crurotarsan taxa. Observational and experimental data in extant and extinct crocodyliforms show that bone ornamentation is initially created, and later maintained during somatic growth (that is indefinite in crocodilians), by a complex process of bone remodeling comprising local resorption of superficial bone cortices, followed by partial reconstruction. The superficial reliefs of crocodilian dermal bones are thus permanently modified through pit enlargement, drift, stretching, shrinking, or complete filling. Ridges are also remodeled in corresponding ways. These processes allow accommodation of unitary ornamental motifs to the overall dimensions of the bones during growth. A parsimony optimization based on the results of this study, but integrating also published data on bone histology in non-crocodyliform crurotarsans and some non-crurotarsan taxa, suggests that the peculiar mechanism described above for creating and maintaining bone ornamentation is a general feature of the Crurotarsi and is quite distinct from that attributed by previous authors to other vertebrates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Stress-induced growth-differentiation factor 15 plays an intriguing role in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-tao; WANG Hai-chang; TAO Ling; LI Cheng-xiang; LI Fei; ZHANG Yu-yang; LIU Bo-wu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the current knowledge of growth-differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) in heart disease.Data sources To identify relevant publications,we searched PubMED database combining the textual terms of heart,cardiac,cardiovascular disease with GDF-15.Study selection Well-controlled,relatively large-scale,retrospective studies as well as meaningful individual cases were all selected as materials.Results GDF-15 is a distant member of the transforming growth factor-β cytokine superfamily.In myocardium,GDF-15 is weakly expressed under physiological conditions.However,its expression level is increased in response to pathological stress.Growing evidence indicate that elevated levels of GDF-15 is a promising prognostic biomarker in cardiovascular diseases.Moreover,GDF-15 exhibits the properties of endogenous anti-hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and protecting the heart suffering from ischemia and reperfusion insult.Conclusion Ve GDF-15 may be a promising biomarker for evaluation and management of patient with cardiovascular diseases,and have potential protective properties on myocardium.

  10. Carbon dioxide enrichment alters plant community structure and accelerates shrub growth in the shortgrass steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jack A; Milchunas, Daniel G; LeCain, Daniel R; West, Mark; Mosier, Arvin R

    2007-09-11

    A hypothesis has been advanced that the incursion of woody plants into world grasslands over the past two centuries has been driven in part by increasing carbon dioxide concentration, [CO(2)], in Earth's atmosphere. Unlike the warm season forage grasses they are displacing, woody plants have a photosynthetic metabolism and carbon allocation patterns that are responsive to CO(2), and many have tap roots that are more effective than grasses for reaching deep soil water stores that can be enhanced under elevated CO(2). However, this commonly cited hypothesis has little direct support from manipulative experimentation and competes with more traditional theories of shrub encroachment involving climate change, management, and fire. Here, we show that, although doubling [CO(2)] over the Colorado shortgrass steppe had little impact on plant species diversity, it resulted in an increasingly dissimilar plant community over the 5-year experiment compared with plots maintained at present-day [CO(2)]. Growth at the doubled [CO(2)] resulted in an approximately 40-fold increase in aboveground biomass and a 20-fold increase in plant cover of Artemisia frigida Willd, a common subshrub of some North American and Asian grasslands. This CO(2)-induced enhancement of plant growth, among the highest yet reported, provides evidence from a native grassland suggesting that rising atmospheric [CO(2)] may be contributing to the shrubland expansions of the past 200 years. Encroachment of shrubs into grasslands is an important problem facing rangeland managers and ranchers; this process replaces grasses, the preferred forage of domestic livestock, with species that are unsuitable for domestic livestock grazing.

  11. Altered seawater salinity levels affected growth and photosynthesis ofUlva fasciata (Ulvales, Chlorophyta) germlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Binbin; ZOU Dinghui

    2015-01-01

    Seawater salinity is greatly influenced by tide, evaporation and rain falls. In this study, we investigated the growth and photosynthetic responses of zygote-derivedUlva fasciata Delile germlings to short-term (minutes) and prolonged (days) exposure to different salinity gradients, to evaluate the effect of salinity variation on the early stage of life history in this seaweed. The results showed that, the maximum net photosynthetic rates (NPRm) ofU. fasciata germlings was observably decreased in desalted (25 and 15) and high (45) salinity seawater in short-term exposure tests (in minutes). However, after 30 min, the photosynthesis activity in medium salinity (25) was maintained at a relative high level (above 70%). After 8 d prolonged culture, the photosynthesis and mean relative growth rate (RGR) of germlings were all markedly lowered, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents increased as the salinity desalted from 34 to 15. The salinity decrease from 34 to 25 had no significant effect on the RGR, but obviously influenced the morphology of the germlings. High salinity level (45) significantly depressed theRGR and photosynthesis ofU. fasciata germlings, while it notably increased the MDA contents. The results showed that the salinity elevation had more detrimental effects onUlva fasciata germlings than salinity decrease did. The germlings grown at the salinity seawater levels from 25 to 34, performed preferable photosynthetic acclimation both in temporary and prolonged culture. Broad salinity tolerance from 25 to 34 inU. fasciata germlings may have partly evolved as a response to regular diurnal tides.

  12. Differential regulation of GS-GOGAT gene expression by plant growth regulators in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT pathway in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains five cytosolic GS1 genes (GLN1;1 - GLN1;5, one nuclear gene for chloroplastic GS2 isoform (GLN2, two Fd-GOGAT genes (GLU1 and GLU2 and a GLT1 gene coding for NADH-GOGAT. Even though the regulation of GS and GOGAT isoforms has been extensively studied in response to various environmental and metabolic cues in many plant species, little is known about the effects of phytohormones on their regulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of representative plant growth regulators, kinetin (KIN, abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellic acid (GA3 and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, on the expression of A. thaliana GS and GOGAT genes. The obtained results indicate that GS and GOGAT genes are differentially regulated by growth regulators in shoots and roots. KIN and 2,4-D repressed GS and GOGAT expression in roots, with little effect on transcript levels in shoots. KIN affected all tested genes; 2,4-D was apparently more selective and less potent. ABA induced the expression of GLN1;1 and GLU2 in whole seedlings, while GA3 enhanced the expression of all tested genes in shoots, except GLU2. The observed expression patterns are discussed in relation to physiological roles of investigated plant growth regulators and N-assimilating enzymes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173024

  13. Differential Response of Potato Toward Inoculation with Taxonomically Diverse Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqqash, Tahir; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Hanif, Muhammad Kashif; Majeed, Afshan; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Rhizosphere engineering with beneficial plant growth promoting bacteria offers great promise for sustainable crop yield. Potato is an important food commodity that needs large inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. To overcome high fertilizer demand (especially nitrogen), five bacteria, i.e., Azospirillum sp. TN10, Agrobacterium sp. TN14, Pseudomonas sp. TN36, Enterobacter sp. TN38 and Rhizobium sp. TN42 were isolated from the potato rhizosphere on nitrogen-free malate medium and identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains, i.e., TN10, TN38, and TN42 showed nitrogen fixation (92.67–134.54 nmol h-1mg-1 protein), while all showed the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which was significantly increased by the addition of L-tryptophan. Azospirillum sp. TN10 produced the highest amount of IAA, as measured by spectrophotometry (312.14 μg mL-1) and HPLC (18.3 μg mL-1). Inoculation with these bacteria under axenic conditions resulted in differential growth responses of potato. Azospirillum sp. TN10 incited the highest increase in potato fresh and dry weight over control plants, along with increased N contents of shoot and roots. All strains were able to colonize and maintain their population densities in the potato rhizosphere for up to 60 days, with Azospirillum sp. and Rhizobium sp. showing the highest survival. Plant root colonization potential was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of root sections inoculated with Azospirillum sp. TN10. Of the five test strains, Azospirillum sp. TN10 has the greatest potential to increase the growth and nitrogen uptake of potato. Hence, it is suggested as a good candidate for the production of potato biofertilizer for integrated nutrient management. PMID:26925072

  14. Evolution of Bacillus subtilis to enhanced hypobaric growth: global alterations in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Rivas-Castillo, Andrea; Schuerger, Andrew

    Much astrobiology research is concerned with defining the environmental limits for life in the universe. Because Mars currently is the primary target for life detection missions, it is important to understand how terrestrial microbes might survive, proliferate, and evolve in martian envi-ronments. This issue is relevant in three distinct but related contexts: (i) testing panspermia hypotheses [1], (ii) mitigating the forward contamination of Mars [2], and (iii) understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to microbial growth in extreme extraterrestrial environments [3]. Prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transfer include bacteria of the genus Bacillus, spores of which are significant contaminants of Mars-bound spacecraft and which are considered good candidates for lithopanspermia [1-4]. It is thus relevant to assess the potential for such microbes to survive and proliferate in the martian environment. The martian atmosphere poses a significant barrier to growth of terrestrial microbes, due to its low pressure (1-10 mbar; average 7 mbar) and anoxic (˜95% CO2) composition. In an earlier study [5] we showed that low pressures approaching those found on the surface of Mars exhibited an inhibitory effect on the germination and vegetative growth of several Bacillus spp. isolated from spacecraft or their assembly facilities. Even in an Earth-like 80%N2/20%O2 atmosphere, growth of B. subtilis cells was nearly completely inhibited at pressures below 35 mbar, well above the highest pressure on the martian surface [5]. The purpose of the present investigation was to use low pressure as a selective agent to test the hypothesis that a terrestrial microorganism, Bacillus subtilis, could evolve the ability for enhanced growth under hypobaric conditions approaching those of Mars. B. subtilis wild-type strains WN624 (SpcR) and WN628 (CmR) have been described previously [6] and were used as ancestral strains. Strains were propagated in LB liquid medium containing the appropriate

  15. Altered profiles of nuclear matrix proteins during the differentiation of human gastric mucous adenocarcinoma MGc80-3 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Zhao; Qi-Fu Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find and identify specific nuclear matrix proteins associated with proliferation and differentiation of carcinoma cells, which will be potential markers for cancer diagnosis and targets in cancer therapy.METHODS: Nuclear matrix proteins were selectively extracted from MGc80-3 cells treated with or without hexamethylamine bisacetamide (HMBA), and subjected to 2-D gel electrophoresis. The resulted protein patterns were analyzed by Melanie software. Spots of nuclear matrix proteins differentially expressed were excised and subjected to in situ digestion with trypsin. Peptide masses were obtained by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis and submitted for database searching using Mascot tool.RESULTS: The MGc80-3 cells were induced into differentiation by HMBA. There were 22 protein spots which changed remarkably in the nuclear matrix, from differentiation of MGc80-3 cells compared to control.Eleven of which were identified. Seven proteins -actin, prohibitin, porin 31HL, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, vimentin, ATP synthase, and heatshock protein 60 were downregulated, whereas three proteins - heat shock protein gp96, heat shock protein 90-beta, and valosin-containing protein were upregulated,and the oxygen-regulated protein was only found in the differentiated MGc80-3 cells.CONCLUSION: The induced differentiation of carcinoma cells is accompanied by the changes of nuclear matrix proteins. Further characterization of those proteins will show the mechanism of cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as cancer differentiation.

  16. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-02-28

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  17. Light stimuli control neuronal migration by altering of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Komuro, Yutaro; Fahrion, Jennifer K; Hu, Taofang; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Fenner, Kathleen B; Wooton, Jessica; Raoult, Emilie; Galas, Ludovic; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2012-02-14

    The role of genetic inheritance in brain development has been well characterized, but little is known about the contributions of natural environmental stimuli, such as the effect of light-dark cycles, to brain development. In this study, we determined the role of light stimuli in neuronal cell migration to elucidate how environmental factors regulate brain development. We show that in early postnatal mouse cerebella, granule cell migration accelerates during light cycles and decelerates during dark cycles. Furthermore, cerebellar levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are high during light cycles and low during dark cycles. There are causal relationships between light-dark cycles, speed of granule cell migration, and cerebellar IGF-1 levels. First, changes in light-dark cycles result in corresponding changes in the fluctuations of both speed of granule cell migration and cerebellar IGF-1 levels. Second, in vitro studies indicate that exogenous IGF-1 accelerates the migration of isolated granule cells through the activation of IGF-1 receptors. Third, in vivo studies reveal that inhibiting the IGF-1 receptors decelerates granule cell migration during light cycles (high IGF-1 levels) but does not alter migration during dark cycles (low IGF-1 levels). In contrast, stimulating the IGF-1 receptors accelerates granule cell migration during dark cycles (low IGF-1 levels) but does not alter migration during light cycles (high IGF-1 levels). These results suggest that during early postnatal development light stimuli control granule cell migration by altering the activity of IGF-1 receptors through modification of cerebellar IGF-1 levels.

  18. Long-term alterations of cytokines and growth factors expression in irradiated tissues and relation with histological severity scoring.

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    Patrice Gallet

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Beside its efficacy in cancer treatment, radiotherapy induces degeneration of healthy tissues within the irradiated area. The aim of this study was to analyze the variations of proinflammatory (IL-1α, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, profibrotic (TGF-β1, proangiogneic (VEGF and stem cell mobilizing (GM-CSF cytokines and growth factors in an animal model of radiation-induced tissue degeneration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 24 rats were irradiated unilaterally on the hindlimb at a monodose of 30 Gy. Six weeks (n=8, 6 months (n=8 and 1 year (n=8 after irradiation the mediators expression in skin and muscle were analyzed using Western blot and the Bio-Plex® protein array (BPA technology. Additional histological severity for fibrosis, inflammation, vascularity and cellularity alterations scoring was defined from histology and immnunohistochemistry analyses. RESULTS: A significant increase of histological severity scoring was found in irradiated tissue. Skin tissues were more radio-sensitive than muscle. A high level of TGF-β1 expression was found throughout the study and a significant relation was evidenced between TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scoring. Irradiated tissue showed a chronic inflammation (IL-2 and TNF-α significantly increased. Moreover a persistent expression of GM-CSF and VEGF was found in all irradiated tissues. The vascular score was related to TGF-β1 expression and the cellular alterations score was significantly related with the level of IL-2, VEGF and GM-CSF. CONCLUSION: The results achieved in the present study underline the complexity and multiplicity of radio-induced alterations of cytokine network. It offers many perspectives of development, for the comprehension of the mechanisms of late injuries or for the histological and molecular evaluation of the mode of action and the efficacy of rehabilitation techniques.

  19. Differential role of entorhinal and hippocampal nerve growth factor in short- and long-term memory modulation

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    Walz R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF into the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g, N = 11-13 per group on inhibitory avoidance retention. In order to evaluate the modulation of entorhinal and hippocampal NGF in short- and long-term memory, animals were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (foot shock, 0.4 mA. Retention tests were carried out 1.5 h or 24 h after training to measure short- and long-term memory, respectively. Immediately after training, rats received 5 µl NGF (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng or saline per side into the CA1 area and entorhinal cortex. The correct position of the cannulae was confirmed by histological analysis. The highest dose of NGF (5.0 ng into the hippocampus blocked short-term memory (P < 0.05, whereas the doses of 0.5 (P < 0.05 and 5.0 ng (P < 0.01 NGF enhanced long-term memory. NGF administration into the entorhinal cortex improved long-term memory at the dose of 5.0 ng (P < 0.05 and did not alter short-term memory. Taken as a whole, our results suggest a differential modulation by entorhinal and hippocampal NGF of short- and long-term memory.

  20. Gefitinib induces epidermal growth factor receptor dimers which alters the interaction characteristics with ¹²⁵I-EGF.

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    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib inhibits growth in some tumor types by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Previous studies show that the affinity of the EGF-EGFR interaction varies between hosting cell line, and that gefitinib increases the affinity for some cell lines. In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms behind these observations. Real-time interaction analysis in LigandTracer® Grey revealed that the HER2 dimerization preventing antibody pertuzumab clearly modified the binding of ¹²⁵I-EGF to EGFR on HER2 overexpressing SKOV3 cells in the presence of gefitinib. Pertuzumab did not affect the binding on A431 cells, which express low levels of HER2. Cross-linking measurements showed that gefitinib increased the amount of EGFR dimers 3.0-3.8 times in A431 cells in the absence of EGF. In EGF stimulated SKOV3 cells the amount of EGFR dimers increased 1.8-2.2 times by gefitinib, but this effect was cancelled by pertuzumab. Gefitinib treatment did not alter the number of EGFR or HER2 expressed in tumor cell lines A431, U343, SKOV3 and SKBR3. Real-time binding traces were further analyzed in a novel tool, Interaction Map, which deciphered the different components of the measured interaction and supports EGF binding to multiple binding sites. EGFR and HER2 expression affect the levels of EGFR monomers, homodimers and heterodimers and EGF binds to the various monomeric/dimeric forms of EGFR with unique binding properties. Taken together, we conclude that dimerization explains the varying affinity of EGF-EGFR in different cells, and we propose that gefitinib induces EGFR dimmers, which alters the interaction characteristics with ¹²⁵I-EGF.

  1. Evidence for altered Ca2+ handling in Growth Associated Protein 43-knockout skeletal muscle

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    Giusy A. Caprara

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43 has crucial roles in the nervous system, and during development, regeneration after injury, and learning and memory. GAP43 is expressed in mouse skeletal muscle fibers and satellite cells, with suggested its involvement in intracellular Ca2+ handling. However, the physiological role of GAP43 in muscle remains unknown. Using a GAP43-knockout (GAP43-/- mouse, we have defined the role of GAP43 in skeletal muscle. GAP43-/- mice showed low survival beyond weaning, reduced adult body weight, decreased muscle strength, and changed myofiber ultrastructure, with no significant differences in the expression of markers of satellite cell and myotube progression through the myogenic program. Thus GAP43 expression is involved in timing of muscle maturation in-vivo. Intracellular Ca2+ measurements in-vitro in myotubes revealed GAP43 involvement in Ca2+ handling. In the absence of GAP43 expression, the spontaneous Ca2+ variations had greater amplitudes and higher frequency. In GAP43-/- myotubes, also the intracellular Ca2+ variations induced by the activation of dihydropyridine and ryanodine Ca2+ channels, resulted modified. These evidences suggested dysregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis. The emerging hypothesis indicates that GAP43 interacts with calmodulin to indirectly modulate the activities of dihydropyridine and ryanodine Ca2+ channels. This thus influences intracellular Ca2+ dynamics and its related intracellular patterns, from functional excitation-contraction coupling, to cell metabolism, and gene expression.

  2. Genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 recapitulates phenotypic alterations underlying cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia

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    Alshammari, T K; Alshammari, M A; Nenov, M N; Hoxha, E; Cambiaghi, M; Marcinno, A; James, T F; Singh, P; Labate, D; Li, J; Meltzer, H Y; Sacchetti, B; Tempia, F; Laezza, F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive processing is highly dependent on the functional integrity of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) interneurons in the brain. These cells regulate excitability and synaptic plasticity of principal neurons balancing the excitatory/inhibitory tone of cortical networks. Reduced function of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and disruption of GABAergic synapses in the cortical circuitry result in desynchronized network activity associated with cognitive impairment across many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these complex phenotypes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in animal models, genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 (Fgf14), a regulator of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, leads to loss of PV interneurons in the CA1 hippocampal region, a critical area for cognitive function. Strikingly, this cellular phenotype associates with decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and also coincides with disrupted CA1 inhibitory circuitry, reduced in vivo gamma frequency oscillations and impaired working memory. Bioinformatics analysis of schizophrenia transcriptomics revealed functional co-clustering of FGF14 and genes enriched within the GABAergic pathway along with correlatively decreased expression of FGF14, PVALB, GAD67 and VGAT in the disease context. These results indicate that Fgf14−/− mice recapitulate salient molecular, cellular, functional and behavioral features associated with human cognitive impairment, and FGF14 loss of function might be associated with the biology of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27163207

  3. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

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    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  4. Scabies mites alter the skin microbiome and promote growth of opportunistic pathogens in a porcine model.

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    Pearl M Swe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. CONCLUSIONS

  5. New animal model to study epigenetic mechanisms mediating altered gravity effects upon cell growth and morphogenesis

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    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Radugina, Elena A.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Almeida, Eduardo

    The gravitational field and its variations act as a major environmental factor that can impact morphogenesis developing through epigenetic molecular mechanisms. The mechanisms can be thoroughly investigated by using adequate animal models that reveal changes in the morpho-genesis of a growing organ as a function of gravitational effects. Two cooperative US/Russian experiments on Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) were the first to demonstrate differences in the shape of regenerating tails of space-flown and ground control newts. The space-flown and aquarium (simulated microgravity) animals developed lancet-shaped tails whereas 1 g con-trols (kept in space-type habitats) showed hook-like regenerates. These visual observations were supported by computer-aided processing of the images and statistical analysis of the results. Morphological examinations and cell proliferation measurements using BrdU demon-strated dorsal-ventral asymmetry as well as enhanced epithelial growth on the dorsal area of regenerating tails in 1 g newts. These findings were reproduced in laboratory tests on newts kept at 1 g and in large water tanks at cut g. The 1 g animals showed statistically significant deviations of the lancet-like tail shape typically seen in aquarium animals. Such modifications were found as early as regeneration stages III-IV and proved irreversible. The authors believe that the above phenomenon detected in newts used in many space experiments can serve as an adequate model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying gravitational effects upon animal morphogenesis.

  6. Obesity-Associated Alterations in Inflammation, Epigenetics, and Mammary Tumor Growth Persist in Formerly Obese Mice.

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    Rossi, Emily L; de Angel, Rebecca E; Bowers, Laura W; Khatib, Subreen A; Smith, Laura A; Van Buren, Eric; Bhardwaj, Priya; Giri, Dilip; Estecio, Marcos R; Troester, Melissa A; Hair, Brionna Y; Kirk, Erin L; Gong, Ting; Shen, Jianjun; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hursting, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Using a murine model of basal-like breast cancer, we tested the hypothesis that chronic obesity, an established breast cancer risk and progression factor in women, induces mammary gland epigenetic reprogramming and increases mammary tumor growth. Moreover, we assessed whether the obesity-induced epigenetic and protumor effects are reversed by weight normalization. Ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet or diet-induced obesity (DIO) regimen for 17 weeks, resulting in a normal weight or obese phenotype, respectively. Mice on the DIO regimen were then randomized to continue the DIO diet or were switched to the control diet, resulting in formerly obese (FOb) mice with weights comparable with control mice. At week 24, all mice were orthotopically injected with MMTV-Wnt-1 mouse mammary tumor cells. Mean tumor volume, serum IL6 levels, expression of proinflammatory genes in the mammary fat pad, and mammary DNA methylation profiles were similar in DIO and FOb mice and higher than in controls. Many of the genes found to have obesity-associated hypermethylation in mice were also found to be hypermethylated in the normal breast tissue of obese versus nonobese human subjects, and nearly all of these concordant genes remained hypermethylated after significant weight loss in the FOb mice. Our findings suggest that weight normalization may not be sufficient to reverse the effects of chronic obesity on epigenetic reprogramming and inflammatory signals in the microenvironment that are associated with breast cancer progression. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 339-48. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Altered transmission of maternal angiotensin II receptor haplotypes in fetal growth restriction.

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    Tower, Clare; Chappell, Sally; Acharya, Meera; Crane, Richard; Szolin, Stephanie; Symonds, Lyneth; Chevins, Helen; Kalsheker, Noor; Baker, Philip; Morgan, Linda

    2006-02-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) predisposes to significant short- and long-term health problems. Epidemiological studies have suggested a role for inherited factors in its pathogenesis. The angiotensin II receptor genes, AGTR1 and AGTR2, are candidate genes because they mediate processes that are important for placentation. This study investigated AGTR1 and AGTR2 haplotypes and genotypes in FGR. A total of 107 families (father, mother, and baby) with FGR, and 101 families with normal pregnancies were genotyped at five sites in AGTR1 and six sites across AGTR2. All of the participants were white western Europeans. FGR was identified antenatally by ultrasound scans and confirmed postnatally by correcting the birth weight centile for gestation, infant sex, maternal height, weight, and parity. Fetal genes were investigated using transmission disequilibrium testing (TDT), and a case-control comparison of maternal haplotypes was conducted. FGR was associated with maternal (but not paternal) transmission of the AGTR1 haplotype (GenBank AF245699.1) g.4955T, g.5052T, g.5245C, g.5612A, and haplotype g.4955T, g.5052T, g.5245T, g.5612A. Haplotype g.4955A, g.5052G, g.5245T, g.5612G was undertransmitted (P = 0.002). TDT of the AGTR1 genotype showed undertransmission of maternal AGTR1 genotypes g.4955T>A (odds ratio (OR), 0.34 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.14-0.86); P = 0.02), g.5052T>G (OR, 0.18 (0.06-0.48); PG (OR, 0.21 (0.08-0.55); P AGTR1 or AGTR2 (P > 0.10). This is the first study to show distortion of transmission of maternal AGTR1 haplotypes in FGR, which suggests that this gene plays a role in FGR. In particular, maternal-fetal gene sharing may be an important factor. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice have major alterations in hepatic expression of metabolic genes.

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    Olsson, Bob; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Brusehed, Ola; Isaksson, Olle G P; Ahrén, Bo; Olofsson, Sven-Olof; Oscarsson, Jan; Törnell, Jan

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) have been extensively used to study the chronic effects of elevated serum levels of GH. GH is known to have many acute effects in the liver, but little is known about the chronic effects of GH overexpression on hepatic gene expression. Therefore, we used DNA microarray to compare gene expression in livers from bovine GH (bGH)-transgenic mice and littermates. Hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and genes involved in fatty acid activation, peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and production of ketone bodies was decreased. In line with this expression profile, bGH-transgenic mice had a reduced ability to form ketone bodies in both the fed and fasted states. Although the bGH mice were hyperinsulinemic, the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 and most lipogenic enzymes regulated by SREBP-1 was reduced, indicating that these mice are different from other insulin-resistant models with respect to expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream genes. This study also provides several candidate genes for the well-known association between elevated GH levels and cardiovascular disease, e.g., decreased expression of scavenger receptor class B type I, hepatic lipase, and serum paraoxonase and increased expression of serum amyloid A-3 protein. We conclude that bGH-transgenic mice display marked changes in hepatic genes coding for metabolic enzymes and suggest that GH directly or indirectly regulates many of these hepatic genes via decreased expression of PPARalpha and SREBP-1.

  9. Alterations in transcript abundance of bovine oocytes recovered at growth and dominance phases of the first follicular wave

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    Kanitz Wilhelm

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oocyte developmental competence is highly affected by the phase of ovarian follicular wave. Previous studies have shown that oocytes from subordinate follicles recovered at growth phase (day 3 after estrus are developmentally more competent than those recovered at dominance phase (day 7 after estrus. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with these differences are not well elucidated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate transcript abundance of bovine oocytes retrieved from small follicles at growth and dominance phases of the first follicular wave and to identify candidate genes related to oocyte developmental competence using cDNA microarray. Results Comparative gene expression analysis of oocytes from growth and dominance phases and subsequent data analysis using Significant Analysis of Microarray (SAM revealed a total of 51 differentially regulated genes, including 36 with known function, 6 with unknown function and 9 novel transcripts. Real-time PCR has validated 10 transcripts revealed by microarray analysis and quantified 5 genes in cumulus cells derived from oocytes of both phases. The expression profile of 8 (80% transcripts (ANAXA2, FL396, S100A10, RPL24, PP, PTTG1, MSX1 and BMP15 was in agreement with microarray data. Transcript abundance of five candidate genes in relation to oocyte developmental competence was validated using Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB staining as an independent model. Furthermore, localization of mRNA and protein product of the candidate gene MSX1 in sections of ovarian follicles at days 0, 1, 3 and 7 of estrous cycle showed a clear fluorescent signal in both oocytes and cumulus cells with higher intensity in the former. Moreover, the protein product was detected in bovine oocytes and early cleavage embryos after fertilization with higher intensity around the nucleus. Conclusion This study has identified distinct sets of differentially regulated transcripts between

  10. Covalent growth factor tethering to direct neural stem cell differentiation and self-organization.

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    Ham, Trevor R; Farrag, Mahmoud; Leipzig, Nic D

    2017-04-15

    Tethered growth factors offer exciting new possibilities for guiding stem cell behavior. However, many of the current methods present substantial drawbacks which can limit their application and confound results. In this work, we developed a new method for the site-specific covalent immobilization of azide-tagged growth factors and investigated its utility in a model system for guiding neural stem cell (NSC) behavior. An engineered interferon-γ (IFN-γ) fusion protein was tagged with an N-terminal azide group, and immobilized to two different dibenzocyclooctyne-functionalized biomimetic polysaccharides (chitosan and hyaluronan). We successfully immobilized azide-tagged IFN-γ under a wide variety of reaction conditions, both in solution and to bulk hydrogels. To understand the interplay between surface chemistry and protein immobilization, we cultured primary rat NSCs on both materials and showed pronounced biological effects. Expectedly, immobilized IFN-γ increased neuronal differentiation on both materials. Expression of other lineage markers varied depending on the material, suggesting that the interplay of surface chemistry and protein immobilization plays a large role in nuanced cell behavior. We also investigated the bioactivity of immobilized IFN-γ in a 3D environment in vivo and found that it sparked the robust formation of neural tube-like structures from encapsulated NSCs. These findings support a wide range of potential uses for this approach and provide further evidence that adult NSCs are capable of self-organization when exposed to the proper microenvironment. For stem cells to be used effectively in regenerative medicine applications, they must be provided with the appropriate cues and microenvironment so that they integrate with existing tissue. This study explores a new method for guiding stem cell behavior: covalent growth factor tethering. We found that adding an N-terminal azide-tag to interferon-γ enabled stable and robust Cu-free 'click

  11. 1,25(OH)2D3 alters growth plate maturation and bone architecture in young rats with normal renal function.

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    Idelevich, Anna; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Shahar, Ron; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2011-01-01

    Whereas detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency are known over century, the effects of vitamin D receptor activation by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the principal hormonal form of vitamin D, on the growing bone and its growth plate are less clear. Currently, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is used in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and is strongly associated with growth retardation. Here, we investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment on bone development in normal young rats, unrelated to renal insufficiency. Young rats received daily i.p. injections of 1 µg/kg 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) for one week, or intermittent 3 µg/kg 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) for one month. Histological analysis revealed narrower tibial growth plates, predominantly in the hypertrophic zone of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treated animals in both experimental protocols. This phenotype was supported by narrower distribution of aggrecan, collagens II and X mRNA, shown by in situ hybridization. Concomitant with altered chondrocyte maturation, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis in terminal hypertrophic cells. In vitro treatment of the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5 with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) lowered differentiation and increased proliferation dose and time-dependently. Micro-CT analysis of femurs from 1-week 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treated group revealed reduced cortical thickness, elevated cortical porosity, and higher trabecular number and thickness. 1-month administration resulted in a similar cortical phenotype but without effect on trabecular bone. Evaluation of fluorochrome binding with confocal microscopy revealed inhibiting effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on intracortical bone formation. This study shows negative effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on growth plate and bone which may contribute to the exacerbation of MBD in the CKD pediatric patients.

  12. 1,25(OH2D3 alters growth plate maturation and bone architecture in young rats with normal renal function.

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    Anna Idelevich

    Full Text Available Whereas detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency are known over century, the effects of vitamin D receptor activation by 1,25(OH(2D(3, the principal hormonal form of vitamin D, on the growing bone and its growth plate are less clear. Currently, 1,25(OH(2D(3 is used in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD and is strongly associated with growth retardation. Here, we investigate the effect of 1,25(OH(2D(3 treatment on bone development in normal young rats, unrelated to renal insufficiency. Young rats received daily i.p. injections of 1 µg/kg 1,25(OH(2D(3 for one week, or intermittent 3 µg/kg 1,25(OH(2D(3 for one month. Histological analysis revealed narrower tibial growth plates, predominantly in the hypertrophic zone of 1,25(OH(2D(3-treated animals in both experimental protocols. This phenotype was supported by narrower distribution of aggrecan, collagens II and X mRNA, shown by in situ hybridization. Concomitant with altered chondrocyte maturation, 1,25(OH(2D(3 increased chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis in terminal hypertrophic cells. In vitro treatment of the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5 with 1,25(OH(2D(3 lowered differentiation and increased proliferation dose and time-dependently. Micro-CT analysis of femurs from 1-week 1,25(OH(2D(3-treated group revealed reduced cortical thickness, elevated cortical porosity, and higher trabecular number and thickness. 1-month administration resulted in a similar cortical phenotype but without effect on trabecular bone. Evaluation of fluorochrome binding with confocal microscopy revealed inhibiting effects of 1,25(OH(2D(3 on intracortical bone formation. This study shows negative effects of 1,25(OH(2D(3 on growth plate and bone which may contribute to the exacerbation of MBD in the CKD pediatric patients.

  13. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636 Alters Phytophthora infestans Growth and Late Blight Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher K; Arseneault, Tanya; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, one of the most devastating diseases affecting potato production. Alternative approaches for controlling late blight are being increasingly sought due to increasing environmental concerns over the use of chemical pesticides and the increasing resistance of P. infestans to fungicides. Our research group has isolated a new strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (LBUM636) of biocontrol interest producing the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). Wild-type LBUM636 was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of Phytophthora infestans in in vitro confrontational assays whereas its isogenic mutant (phzC-; not producing PCA) only slightly altered the pathogen's growth. Wild-type LBUM636 but not the phzC- mutant also completely repressed disease symptom development on tubers. A pot experiment revealed that wild-type LBUM636 can significantly reduce P. infestans populations in the rhizosphere and in the roots of potato plants, as well as reduce in planta disease symptoms due to PCA production. The expression of eight common plant defense-related genes (ChtA, PR-1b, PR-2, PR-5, LOX, PIN2, PAL-2, and ERF3) was quantified in tubers, roots, and leaves by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and revealed that the biocontrol observed was not associated with the induction of a plant defense response by LBUM636. Instead, a direct interaction between P. infestans and LBUM636 is required and PCA production appears to be a key factor for LBUM636's biocontrol ability.

  14. Overexpression of patatin-related phospholipase AIIIδ altered plant growth and increased seed oil content in camelina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoyin; Wei, Fang; Tawfall, Amanda; Tang, Michelle; Saettele, Allison; Wang, Xuemin

    2015-08-01

    Camelina sativa is a Brassicaceae oilseed species being explored as a biofuel and industrial oil crop. A growing number of studies have indicated that the turnover of phosphatidylcholine plays an important role in the synthesis and modification of triacylglycerols. This study manipulated the expression of a patatin-related phospholipase AIIIδ (pPLAIIIδ) in camelina to determine its effect on seed oil content and plant growth. Constitutive overexpression of pPLAIIIδ under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic 35S promoter resulted in a significant increase in seed oil content and a decrease in cellulose content. In addition, the content of major membrane phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, in 35S::pPLAIIIδ plants was increased. However, these changes in 35S::pPLAIIIδ camelina were associated with shorter cell length, leaves, stems, and seed pods and a decrease in overall seed production. When pPLAIIIδ was expressed under the control of the seed specific, β-conglycinin promoter, the seed oil content was increased without compromising plant growth. The results suggest that pPLAIIIδ alters the carbon partitioning by decreasing cellulose content and increasing oil content in camelina. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Watershed-Scale Modeling of Land-Use and Altered Environment Impacts on Aquatic Weed Growth in the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David; Potter, Christopher; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    model component. Plant response to the range of water quality factors, response times, and altered temperature and light regimes of the Delta have required gap-filling studies to provide model parameters. Delta-SWAT provides a tool for evaluating temporal and spatial effects of land-use and altered environments in the Delta and contributing watersheds on aquatic weed growth. Using Delta-SWAT for simulation modeling allows evaluation of historic and current conditions as well as consideration potential climate change and management practice outcomes. Delta-SWAT adds to the scientific understanding of dynamics in the Delta and enhances development of science-informed, management strategies and practices.

  16. Maternal Administration of Sildenafil Citrate Alters Fetal and Placental Growth and Fetal-Placental Vascular Resistance in the Growth-Restricted Ovine Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyston, Charlotte; Stanley, Joanna L; Oliver, Mark H; Bloomfield, Frank H; Baker, Philip N

    2016-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) causes short- and long-term morbidity. Reduced placental perfusion is an important pathogenic component of IUGR; substances that enhance vasodilation in the uterine circulation, such as sildenafil citrate (sildenafil), may improve placental blood flow and fetal growth. This study aimed to examine the effects of sildenafil in the growth-restricted ovine fetus. Ewes carrying singleton pregnancies underwent insertion of vascular catheters, and then, they were randomized to receive uterine artery embolization (IUGR) or to a control group. Ewes in the IUGR group received a daily infusion of sildenafil (IUGR+SC; n=10) or vehicle (IUGR+V; n=8) for 21 days. The control group received no treatment (n=9). Umbilical artery blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasound and the resistive index (RI) calculated. Fetal weight, biometry, and placental weight were obtained at postmortem after treatment completion. Umbilical artery RI in IUGR+V fell less than in controls; the RI of IUGR+SC was intermediate to that of the other 2 groups (mean±SEM for control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: ∆RI, 0.09±0.03 versus -0.01±0.02 versus 0.03±0.02; F(2, 22)=4.21; P=0.03). Compared with controls, lamb and placental weights were reduced in IUGR+V but not in IUGR+SC (control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: fetal weight, 4381±247 versus 3447±235 versus 3687±129 g; F(2, 24)=5.49; P=0.01 and placental weight: 559.7±35.0 versus 376.2±32.5 versus 475.2±42.5 g; F(2, 24)=4.64; P=0.01). Sildenafil may be a useful adjunct in the management of IUGR. An increase in placental weight and fall in fetal-placental resistance suggests that changes to growth are at least partly mediated by changes to placental growth rather than alterations in placental efficiency.

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces intestinal myofibroblast differentiation and modulates their migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Brenmoehl; Sandra Nicole Miller; Claudia Hofmann; Daniela Vogl; Werner Falk; Jürgen Scholmerich; Gerhard Rogler

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on the differentiation of colonic lamina propria fibroblasts (CLPF) into myofibroblasts in vitro. METHODS:Primary CLPF cultures were incubated with TGF-β1 and analyzed for production of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), fibronectin (FN) and FN isoforms. Migration assays were performed in a modified 48-well Boyden chamber. Levels of total and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in CLPF were analyzed after induction of migration. RESULTS:Incubation of CLPF with TGF-β1 for 2 d did not change α-SMA levels, while TGF-β1 treatment for 6 d significantly increased α-SMA production. Short term incubation (6 h) with TGF-β1 enhanced CLPF migration, while long term treatment (6 d) of CLPF with TGF-β1 reduced migration to 15%-37% compared to untreated cells. FN and FN isoform mRNA expression were increased after short term incubation with TGF-β1 (2 d) in contrast to long term incubation with TGF-β1 for 6 d. After induction of migration, TGF-β1-preincubated CLPF showed higher amounts of FN and its isoforms and lower levels of total and phosphorylated FAK than untreated cells. CONCLUSION:Long term incubation of CLPF with TGF-β1 induced differentiation into myofibroblasts with enhanced α-SMA, reduced migratory potential and FAK phosphorylation, and increased FN production. In contrast, short term contact (6 h) of fibroblasts with TGF-β1 induced a dose-dependent increase of cell migration and FAK phosphorylation without induction of α-SMA production.

  18. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

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    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  19. DNA Supercoiling Regulates the Motility of Campylobacter jejuni and Is Altered by Growth in the Presence of Chicken Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Claire; Scanlan, Eoin; Hilliard, Amber; Cotroneo, Chiara E; Bourke, Billy; Ó Cróinín, Tadhg

    2016-09-13

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but relatively little is known about the global regulation of virulence factors during infection of chickens or humans. This study identified DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in regulating motility and flagellar protein production and found that this supercoiling-controlled regulon is induced by growth in chicken mucus. A direct correlation was observed between motility and resting DNA supercoiling levels in different strains of C. jejuni, and relaxation of DNA supercoiling resulted in decreased motility. Transcriptional analysis and Western immunoblotting revealed that a reduction in motility and DNA supercoiling affected the two-component regulatory system FlgRS and was associated with reduced FlgR expression, increased FlgS expression, and aberrant expression of flagellin subunits. Electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar structure remained intact. Growth in the presence of porcine mucin resulted in increased negative supercoiling, increased motility, increased FlgR expression, and reduced FlgS expression. Finally, this supercoiling-dependent regulon was shown to be induced by growth in chicken mucus, and the level of activation was dependent on the source of the mucus from within the chicken intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study reports for the first time the key role played by DNA supercoiling in regulating motility in C. jejuni and indicates that the induction of this supercoiling-induced regulon in response to mucus from different sources could play a critical role in regulating motility in vivo Although Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, very little is understood about how this pathogen controls the expression of genes involved in causing disease. This study for the first time identifies DNA supercoiling as a key regulator of motility in C. jejuni, which is essential for both pathogenesis and colonization. Altering the

  20. Over-expression of hNGF in adult human olfactory bulb neural stem cells promotes cell growth and oligodendrocytic differentiation.

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    Hany E S Marei

    Full Text Available The adult human olfactory bulb neural stem/progenitor cells (OBNC/PC are promising candidate for cell-based therapy for traumatic and neurodegenerative insults. Exogenous application of NGF was suggested as a promising therapeutic strategy for traumatic and neurodegenerative diseases, however effective delivery of NGF into the CNS parenchyma is still challenging due mainly to its limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, and intolerable side effects if administered into the brain ventricular system. An effective method to ensure delivery of NGF into the parenchyma of CNS is the genetic modification of NSC to overexpress NGF gene. Overexpression of NGF in adult human OBNSC is expected to alter their proliferation and differentiation nature, and thus might enhance their therapeutic potential. In this study, we genetically modified adult human OBNS/PC to overexpress human NGF (hNGF and green fluorescent protein (GFP genes to provide insight about the effects of hNGF and GFP genes overexpression in adult human OBNS/PC on their in vitro multipotentiality using DNA microarray, immunophenotyping, and Western blot (WB protocols. Our analysis revealed that OBNS/PC-GFP and OBNS/PC-GFP-hNGF differentiation is a multifaceted process involving changes in major biological processes as reflected in alteration of the gene expression levels of crucial markers such as cell cycle and survival markers, stemness markers, and differentiation markers. The differentiation of both cell classes was also associated with modulations of key signaling pathways such MAPK signaling pathway, ErbB signaling pathway, and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway for OBNS/PC-GFP, and axon guidance, calcium channel, voltage-dependent, gamma subunit 7 for OBNS/PC-GFP-hNGF as revealed by GO and KEGG. Differentiated OBNS/PC-GFP-hNGF displayed extensively branched cytoplasmic processes, a significant faster growth rate and up modulated the expression of oligodendroglia

  1. Costs of defense and a test of the carbon-nutrient balance and growth-differentiation balance hypotheses for two co-occurring classes of plant defense.

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    Tara Joy Massad

    Full Text Available One of the goals of chemical ecology is to assess costs of plant defenses. Intraspecific trade-offs between growth and defense are traditionally viewed in the context of the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH and the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH. Broadly, these hypotheses suggest that growth is limited by deficiencies in carbon or nitrogen while rates of photosynthesis remain unchanged, and the subsequent reduced growth results in the more abundant resource being invested in increased defense (mass-balance based allocation. The GDBH further predicts trade-offs in growth and defense should only be observed when resources are abundant. Most support for these hypotheses comes from work with phenolics. We examined trade-offs related to production of two classes of defenses, saponins (triterpenoids and flavans (phenolics, in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae, an abundant tree in Costa Rican wet forests. We quantified physiological costs of plant defenses by measuring photosynthetic parameters (which are often assumed to be stable in addition to biomass. Pentaclethra macroloba were grown in full sunlight or shade under three levels of nitrogen alone or with conspecific neighbors that could potentially alter nutrient availability via competition or facilitation. Biomass and photosynthesis were not affected by nitrogen or competition for seedlings in full sunlight, but they responded positively to nitrogen in shade-grown plants. The trade-off predicted by the GDBH between growth and metabolite production was only present between flavans and biomass in sun-grown plants (abundant resource conditions. Support was also only partial for the CNBH as flavans declined with nitrogen but saponins increased. This suggests saponin production should be considered in terms of detailed biosynthetic pathway models while phenolic production fits mass-balance based allocation models (such as the CNBH. Contrary to expectations based on the two

  2. Differential alterations in striatal acetylcholine function in rats during 12 months' continuous administration of haloperidol, sulpiride, or clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupniak, N M; Briggs, R S; Petersen, M M; Mann, S; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    Rats were treated continuously for 12 months with therapeutically equivalent doses of either haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day), sulpiride (102-109 mg/kg/day), or clozapine (24-27 mg/kg/day). After treatment for 3 and 12 months with haloperidol or clozapine but not sulpiride, striatal acetylcholine levels were increased. Striatal choline acetyltransferase activity was not altered by any drug treatment. Vmax for striatal acetylcholinesterase activity during the course of 12 months' treatment with haloperidol or clozapine, but not with sulpiride, tended to increase; Km was not altered by any drug treatment. Bmax for specific striatal [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was not altered by haloperidol or sulpiride treatment but was transiently elevated after 6 months of clozapine treatment, thereafter returning to control levels. Kd was not altered by any drug treatment. These findings indicate that alterations in striatal acetylcholine content caused by chronic treatment with some but not all neuroleptics are due to changes in cholinergic neuronal activity rather than neurotransmitter synthesis or destruction. The effects of haloperidol but not those of clozapine may be related to the emergence of functional striatal dopamine receptor supersensitivity. Since haloperidol (which is associated with a high prevalence of tardive dyskinesias) but not clozapine (which is not) had similar effects on striatal cholinergic function, the latter may not be related to the emergence of tardive dyskinesias during chronic therapy.

  3. A study on the alterations in skin viscoelasticity before and after an intradermal administration of growth factor

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    Ichiro Ono

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While photo-aging is believed to be preventable by the complete blockage of ultraviolet rays, there is no epoch-making method except sing fillers or autologous fat injection, for rejuvenating the skin once it has aged. Objective: Our group developed a new method for rejuvenating aged skin by the direct intradermal injection of basic fibroblast growth factor, the first method of its kind in the world. In this paper we report the results of long-term follow-up observations and alterations in skin viscoelasticity before and after this treatment. Materials and Methods: A single dose of growth factor was injected directly into aged skin of the dorsal surface of the hand intradermally. The skin viscoelasticity of 50 treated cases was measured by a cutometer just before the treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment, respectively. Results: We observed the following rejuvenating effects: improved skin softness, gradual improvement of turgor, improved thickness of atrophied skin, and greatly improved viscoelasticity which reveals the improvement of biomechanical properties of the treated aged skin. According to the comparisons of viscoelasticity between pre- and post-treatment, the rejuvenated changes of R2 and R7 values were comparable to an age difference of more than 20 years. Conclusion: This method was confirmed to have excellent effects in rejuvenating aged skin safely and reliably including biomechanical properties. With this advance, we expect conventional non-physiological skin rejuvenating treatments to be replaced by a much more fundamental method using one-time injections of the growth factor.

  4. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone in the mouse alters cardiac growth patterns and increases pulse pressure in aged male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Lee; Cuffe, James S M; Paravicini, Tamara M; Campbell, Sally; Dickinson, Hayley; Singh, Reetu R; Gezmish, Oksan; Black, M Jane; Moritz, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids during development can result in later cardiovascular and renal disease in sheep and rats. Although prenatal glucocorticoid exposure is associated with impaired renal development, less is known about effects on the developing heart. This study aimed to examine the effects of a short-term exposure to dexamethasone (60 hours from embryonic day 12.5) on the developing mouse heart, and cardiovascular function in adult male offspring. Dexamethasone (DEX) exposed fetuses were growth restricted compared to saline treated controls (SAL) at E14.5, but there was no difference between groups at E17.5. Heart weights of the DEX fetuses also tended to be smaller at E14.5, but not different at E17.5. Cardiac AT1aR, Bax, and IGF-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by DEX compared to SAL at E17.5. In 12-month-old offspring DEX exposure caused an increase in basal blood pressure of ~3 mmHg. In addition, DEX exposed mice had a widened pulse pressure compared to SAL. DEX exposed males at 12 months had an approximate 25% reduction in nephron number compared to SAL, but no difference in cardiomyocyte number. Exposure to DEX in utero appears to adversely impact on nephrogenesis and heart growth but is not associated with a cardiomyocyte deficit in male mice in adulthood, possibly due to compensatory growth of the myocardium following the initial insult. However, the widened pulse pressure may be indicative of altered vascular compliance.

  5. Differential Regulation of a Fibroblast Growth Factor-Binding Protein during Skin Carcinogenesis and Wound Healing

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    Andreas Kurtz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of premalignant lesions is associated with subtle cellular and gene expression changes. Here we describe a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model with human adult skin and compare chemical carcinogenesis and wound healing. We focus on a secreted binding protein for fibroblast growth factors (FGF-BP that enhances the activity of locally stored FGFs and is expressed at high levels in human epithelial cancers. Carcinogen treatment of murine skin induced papilloma within 6 weeks, whereas the human skin grafts displayed no obvious macroscopic alterations. Microscopic studies of the human skin, however, showed p53-positive keratinocytes in the epidermis, increased angiogenesis in the dermis of the treated skin, enhanced proliferation of keratinocytes in the basal layer, and an increase of FGF-BP protein and mRNA expression. In contrast, after surgical wounding of human skin grafts or of mouse skin, FGF-BP expression was upregulated within a few hours and returned to control levels after 2 days with wound closure. Enhanced motility of cultured keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts by FGF-BP supports a role in wound healing. We conclude that adult human skin xenografts can be used to identify early molecular events during malignant transformation as well as transient changes during wound healing.

  6. Differential School Effects among Low, Middle, and High Social Class Composition Schools: A Multiple Group, Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses large-scale survey data and a multiple group, multilevel latent growth curve model to examine differential school effects between low, middle, and high social class composition public schools. The results show that the effects of school inputs and school practices on learning differ across the 3 subpopulations. Moreover, student…

  7. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Du; Eriko Miura; Marcel Robischon; Ciera Martinez; Andrew Groover

    2011-01-01

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, ...

  8. Genetic deletion of growth differentiation factor 15 augments renal damage in both type 1 and type 2 models of diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazagova, Magdalena; Buikema, Hendrik; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Duin, Marry; Goris, Maaike; Sandovici, Maria; Henning, Robert H.; Deelman, Leo E.

    2013-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is emerging as valuable biomarker in cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease. Also, GDF15 represents an early response gene induced after tissue injury and studies performed in GDF15 knockout (KO) mice suggest that GDF15 plays a protective role aft

  9. Differential School Effects among Low, Middle, and High Social Class Composition Schools: A Multiple Group, Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses large-scale survey data and a multiple group, multilevel latent growth curve model to examine differential school effects between low, middle, and high social class composition public schools. The results show that the effects of school inputs and school practices on learning differ across the 3 subpopulations. Moreover, student…

  10. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) in patients admitted for acute heart failure : results from the RELAX-AHF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, Gad; Voors, Adriaan A.; Prescott, Margaret F.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Pang, Peter S.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Milo, Olga; Hua, Tsushung A.; Qian, Min; Severin, Thomas M.; Teerlink, John R.; Metra, Marco; Davison, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) was found to be upregulated in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and associated with disease severity, however, data on patients with acute heart failure (AHF) is lacking. Methods and results Levels of GDF-15 were measured at pre-specified

  11. Genetic deletion of growth differentiation factor 15 augments renal damage in both type 1 and type 2 models of diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazagova, Magdalena; Buikema, Hendrik; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Duin, Marry; Goris, Maaike; Sandovici, Maria; Henning, Robert H.; Deelman, Leo E.

    2013-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is emerging as valuable biomarker in cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease. Also, GDF15 represents an early response gene induced after tissue injury and studies performed in GDF15 knockout (KO) mice suggest that GDF15 plays a protective role

  12. A multiphase model for chemically- and mechanically- induced cell differentiation in a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor: minimising growth factor consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Natalie C; Oliver, James M; Shipley, Rebecca J; Waters, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    We present a simplified two-dimensional model of fluid flow, solute transport, and cell distribution in a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor. We consider two cell populations, one undifferentiated and one differentiated, with differentiation stimulated either by growth factor alone, or by both growth factor and fluid shear stress. Two experimental configurations are considered, a 3-layer model in which the cells are seeded in a scaffold throughout the extracapillary space (ECS), and a 4-layer model in which the cell-scaffold construct occupies a layer surrounding the outside of the hollow fibre, only partially filling the ECS. Above this is a region of free-flowing fluid, referred to as the upper fluid layer. Following previous models by the authors (Pearson et al. in Math Med Biol, 2013, Biomech Model Mechanbiol 1-16, 2014a, we employ porous mixture theory to model the dynamics of, and interactions between, the cells, scaffold, and fluid in the cell-scaffold construct. We use this model to determine operating conditions (experiment end time, growth factor inlet concentration, and inlet fluid fluxes) which result in a required percentage of differentiated cells, as well as maximising the differentiated cell yield and minimising the consumption of expensive growth factor.

  13. Alginate encapsulation supports the growth and differentiation of human primordial follicles within ovarian cortical tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronda, Monica M; Duncan, Francesca E; Hornick, Jessica E; Xu, Min; Pahnke, Jennifer E; Whelan, Kelly A; Shea, Lonnie D; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2014-08-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) is an investigational fertility preservation technique in which immature follicles are grown in culture to produce mature eggs that can ultimately be fertilized. Although progress has been made in growing primate primary and secondary follicles in vitro, it has been a relatively greater challenge to isolate and culture primordial follicles. The purpose of this study was to develop methods to grow human primordial follicles in vitro using alginate hydrogels. We obtained human ovarian tissue for research purposes through the National Physicians Cooperative from nationwide sites and used it to test two methods for culturing primordial follicles. First, primordial follicles were isolated from the ovarian cortex and encapsulated in alginate hydrogels. Second, 1 mm × 1 mm pieces of 500 μm-thick human ovarian cortex containing primordial follicles were encapsulated in alginate hydrogels, and survival and follicle development within the tissue was assessed for up to 6 weeks. We found that human ovarian tissue could be kept at 4 °C for up to 24 h while still maintaining follicle viability. Primordial follicles isolated from ovarian tissue did not survive culture. However, encapsulation and culture of ovarian cortical pieces supported the survival, differentiation, and growth of primordial and primary follicles. Within several weeks of culture, many of the ovarian tissue pieces had formed a defined surface epithelium and contained growing preantral and antral follicles. The early stages of in vitro human follicle development require the support of the native ovarian cortex.

  14. Platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates support growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose of this study was to produce human platelet lysates from expired, blood bank-approved platelet concentrates and evaluate their use as growth supplement in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with one of three culture supplements; fetal bovine serum, lysates from freshly prepared human platelet concentrates, or lysates from expired human platelet concentrates. The effects of these platelet-derived culture supplements on basic mesenchymal stem cell characteristics were evaluated. All cultures maintained the typical mesenchymal stem cell surface marker expression, trilineage differentiation potential, and the ability to suppress in vitro immune responses. However, mesenchymal stem cells supplemented with platelet lysates proliferated faster than traditionally cultured cells and increased the expression of the osteogenic marker gene RUNX-2; yet no difference between the use of fresh and expired platelet concentrates was observed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that human platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum for mesenchymal stem cell culture to the same extent as lysates from fresh platelets.

  15. Differential Regulation of Human Thymosin Beta 15 Isoforms by Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Barrows, Courtney; Zetter, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified an additional isoform of human thymosin beta 15 (also known as NB-thymosin beta, gene name TMSB15A) transcribed from an independent gene, and designated TMSB15B. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these isoforms were differentially expressed and functional. Our data show that the TMSB15A and TMSB15B isoforms have distinct expression patterns in different tumor cell lines and tissues. TMSB15A was expressed at higher levels in HCT116, DU145, LNCaP and LNCaP-LN3 cancer cells. In MCF-7, SKOV-3, HT1080 and PC-3MLN4 cells, TMSB15A and TMSB15B showed approximately equivalent levels of expression, while TMSB15B was the predominant isoform expressed in PC-3, MDA-MB-231, NCI-H322 and Caco-2 cancer cells. In normal human prostate and prostate cancer tissues, TMSB15A was the predominant isoform expressed. In contrast, normal colon and colon cancer tissue expressed predominantly TMSB15B. The two gene isoforms are also subject to different transcriptional regulation. Treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with transforming growth factor beta 1 repressed TMSB15A expression but had no effect on TMSB15B. siRNA specific to the TMSB15B isoform suppressed cell migration of prostate cancer cells to epidermal growth factor, suggesting a functional role for this second isoform. In summary, our data reveal different expression patterns and regulation of a new thymosin beta 15 gene paralog. This may have important consequences in both tumor and neuronal cell motility. PMID:19296525

  16. Gdt2 regulates the transition of Dictyostelium cells from growth to differentiation

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    Anjard Christophe

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dictyostelium life cycle consists of two distinct phases – growth and development. The control of growth-differentiation transition in Dictyostelium is not completely understood, and only few genes involved in this process are known. Results We have isolated a REMI (restriction enzyme-mediated integration mutant, which prematurely initiates multicellular development. When grown on a bacterial lawn, these cells aggregate before the bacteria are completely cleared. In bacterial suspension, mutant cells express the developmental marker discoidin Iγ even at low cell densities and high concentrations of bacteria. In the absence of nutrients, mutant cells aggregate more rapidly than wild type, but the rest of development is unaffected and normal fruiting bodies are formed. The disrupted gene shows substantial homology to the recently described gdt1 gene, and therefore was named gdt2. While GDT1 and GDT2 are similar in many ways, there are intriguing differences. GDT2 contains a well conserved protein kinase domain, unlike GDT1, whose kinase domain is probably non-functional. The gdt2 and gdt1 mRNAs are regulated differently, with gdt2 but not gdt1 expressed throughout development. The phenotypes of gdt2- and gdt1- mutants are related but not identical. While both initiate development early, gdt2- cells grow at a normal rate, unlike gdt1- mutants. Protein kinase A levels and activity are essentially normal in growing gdt2- mutants, implying that GDT2 regulates a pathway that acts separately from PKA. Gdt1 and gdt2 are the first identified members of a family containing at least eight closely related genes. Conclusions We have isolated and characterised a new gene, gdt2, which acts to restrain development until conditions are appropriate. We also described a family of related genes in the Dictyostelium genome. We hypothesise that different family members might control similar cellular processes, but respond to different

  17. Genetic alterations of hepatocellular carcinoma by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and cloning sequencing of tumor differential DNA fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xian; Wen-Ming Cong; Shu-Hui Zhang; Meng-Chao Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the genetic alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to find the tumor related DNA fragments.METHODS: DNA isolated from tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 HCC patients was amplified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)with 10 random 10-mer arbitrary primers. The RAPD bands showing obvious differences in tumor tissue DNA corresponding to that of normal tissue were separated,purified, cloned and sequenced. DNA sequences were analyzed and compared with GenBank data.RESULTS: A total of 56 cases of HCC were demonstrated to have genetic alterations, which were detected by at least one primer. The detestability of genetic alterations ranged from 20% to 70% in each case, and 17.9% to 50% in each primer. Serum HBV infection, tumor size,histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with genetic alterations on certain primers. A band with a higher intensity of 480 bp or so amplified fragments in tumor DNA relative to normal DNA could be seen in 27 of 56 tumor samples using primer 4. Sequence analysis of these fragments showed 91% homology with Homo sapiens double homeobox protein DUX10 gene.CONCLUSION: Genetic alterations are a frequent event in HCC, and tumor related DNA fragments have been found in this study, which may be associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. RAPD is an effective method for the identification and analysis of genetic alterations in HCC, and may provide new information for further evaluating the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Aluminum Enhances Growth and Sugar Concentration, Alters Macronutrient Status and Regulates the Expression of NAC Transcription Factors in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Alvarado, Marcos; García-Morales, Soledad; Trejo-Téllez, Libia Iris; Hidalgo-Contreras, Juan Valente; Gómez-Merino, Fernando Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a beneficial element for some plant species, especially when used at low concentrations. Though some transcription factors are induced by exposure to this element, no data indicate that Al regulates the expression of NAC genes in rice. In this study we tested the effect of applying 200 μM Al on growth, chlorophyll, amino acids, sugars, macronutrient concentration and regulation of NAC transcription factors gene expression in 24-day-old plants of four rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica) cultivars: Cotaxtla, Tres Ríos, Huimanguillo and Temporalero, grown hydroponically under greenhouse conditions. Twenty days after treatment, we observed that Al enhanced growth in the four cultivars studied. On average, plants grown in the presence of Al produced 140% more root dry biomass and were 30% taller than control plants. Cotaxtla and Temporalero showed double the root length, while Huimanguillo and Cotaxtla had three times more root fresh biomass and 2.5 times more root dry biomass. Huimanguillo plants showed 1.5 times more shoot height, while Cotaxtla had almost double the root dry biomass. With the exception of Tres Ríos, the rest of the cultivars had almost double the chlorophyll concentration when treated with Al, whereas amino acid and proline concentrations were not affected by Al. Sugar concentration was also increased in plants treated with Al, almost 11-fold in comparison to the control. Furthermore, we observed a synergic response of Al application on P and K concentration in roots, and on Mg concentration in shoots. Twenty-four hours after Al treatment, NAC transcription factors gene expression was measured in roots by quantitative RT-PCR. Of the 57 NAC transcription factors genes primer-pairs tested, we could distinguish that 44% (25 genes) showed different expression patterns among rice cultivars, with most of the genes induced in Cotaxtla and Temporalero plants. Of the 25 transcription factors up-regulated, those showing differential expression

  19. Differential Role of Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase in D. discoideum growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begum Rasheedunnisa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase is evolutionarily conserved as a responder to various forms of stress. Though PARP's role in cell death is well addressed, its role in development and multicellularity is still an enigma. We have previously reported the role of PARP in oxidative stress induced delayed development of D. discoideum. Results In the current study we highlight the involvement of PARP during D. discoideum development. Oxidative stress affects expression of aca and cAR1 thus affecting aggregation. Although parp expression is not affected during oxidative stress but it is involved during normal development as confirmed by our PARP down-regulation studies. Constitutive PARP down-regulation resulted in blocked development while no effect was observed on D. discoideum growth. Interestingly, stage specific PARP down-regulation arrested development at the slug stage. Conclusion These results emphasize that PARP is essential for complex differentiation and its functi