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Sample records for alter chloroplast gene

  1. Ultraviolet-B responses of nuclear genes encoding light-harvesting complex II proteins in pea (Pisum sativum) are altered by norflurazon- and photobleaching-induced chloroplast changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of functional and intact chloroplasts in mediating the ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 290–320 nm) regulation of two nuclear genes encoding light-harvesting complex II proteins in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Extra Early Alaska) was studied. Plants with chloroplasts lacking or containing carotenoids and functional photosystem II were obtained by growth under dim red light (0.2 µmol m−2 s−1) in the presence or absence of norflurazon (NF), an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis. The NF-treatment resulted in an increase in AB80 (lhcb1*2) mRNA but no substantial change in Cab-8 (lhcb1*4) mRNA, indicating that the mRNA accumulations for AB80 and Cab-8 were differently correlated with the presence and absence of carotenoids. The mRNA levels for both Cab-8 and AB80 in the NF-treated plants were reduced to the same extent by partially photobleaching the chloroplasts with 3 h of higher intensity white light (W, 110 µmol m−2 s−1), suggesting that chloroplast integrity was equally important for transcript accumulation of both genes. The mRNAs of both Cab-8 and AB80 in non-NF-treated control plants were decreased by UV-B irradiation, with the level of AB80 mRNA reduced to a greater extent. The UV-B-induced mRNA reduction of both genes was inhibited by NF. The difference between the UV-B responses of the two genes was unaffected by NF, but was abolished by photobleaching the NF-treated plants prior to the UV-B irradiation. Therefore, the presence of carotenoids enhanced rather than prevented the UV-B down-regulation, and the difference in UV-B responses of the two genes may be dependent on chloroplast integrity. (author)

  2. Expressing PHB synthetic genes through chloroplast genetic engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast integration and expression vector containing expression cassettes for phbB, phbA, phbC and aadA genes was constructed and bombarded into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Transplastomic plants were analyzed with PCR and Southern blot. Their homoplastomy was also judged. Northern dot and RT-PCR analysis were employed to investigate transgene expression at transcriptional level. The results indicate that the chloroplast transformation system is compatible for poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

  3. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  4. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns Among Mitochondrion, Chloroplast and Nuclear Genes in Triticum aestivum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Juan Zhang; Jie Zhou; Zuo-Feng Li; Li Wang; Xun Gu; Yang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    In many organisms, the difference in codon usage patterns among genes reflects variation in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to investigate the characteristics of codon bias and factors in shaping the codon usage patterns among mitochondrion,chloroplast and nuclear genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). GC contents in nuclear genes were higher than that in mitochondrion and chloroplast genes. The neutrality and correspondence analyses indicated that the codon usage in nuclear genes would be a result of relative strong mutational bias, while the codon usage patterns of rnitochondrion and chloroplast genes were more conserved in GC content and influenced by translation level.The Parity Rule 2 (PR2) plot analysis showed that pyrimidines were used more frequently than purines at the third codon position in the three genomes. In addition, using a new alterative strategy, 11, 12, and 24 triplets were defined as preferred codons in the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes, respectively. These findings suggested that the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes shared particularly different features of codon usage and evolutionary constraints.

  5. Chloroplast gene sequences and the study of plant evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Clegg, M T

    1993-01-01

    A large body of sequence data has accumulated for the chloroplast-encoded gene ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) as the result of a cooperative effort involving many laboratories. The data span all seed plants, including most major lineages from the angiosperms, and as such they provide an unprecedented opportunity to study plant evolutionary history. The full analysis of this large data set poses many problems and opportunities for plant evolutionary biologists and for bi...

  6. Chloroplast transformation of Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis with the bar gene as selectable marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Cui

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to establish a chloroplast transformation technique for Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis. Employing the gfp gene as a reporter and the bar gene as a selectable marker, transformation vectors of P. subcordiformis chloroplast were constructed with endogenous fragments rrn16S-trnI (left and trnA-rrn23S (right as a recombination site of the chloroplast genome. The plasmids were transferred into P. subcordiformis via particle bombardment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that the green fluorescence protein was localized in the chloroplast of P. subcordiformis, confirming the activity of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii promoter. Cells transformed with the bar gene were selected using the herbicide Basta. Resistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and Southern blotting, and the results indicated that the bar gene was successfully integrated into the chloroplast genome via homologous recombination. The technique will improve genetic engineering of this alga.

  7. Homologous Comparisons of Photosynthetic System 1 Genes among Cyanobacteria and Chloroplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yu; Pei-Jun Ma; Ding-Ji Shi; Shi-Ming Li; Chang-Lu Wang

    2008-01-01

    It has now believed that chloroplasts arose from cyanobacteria,however,during endosymbiosis,the photosynthetic genes in chloroplasts have been reduced.How these changes occurred during plant evolution was the focus of the present study.Beginning with photosystem Ⅰ (PSI) genes,a homologous comparison of amino acid sequences of 18 subunits of PSI from 10 species of cyanobacteria,chloroplasts in 12 species of eucaryotic algae,and 28 species of plants (including bryophytes,pteridophytes,gymnospermae,dicotyledon and monocotyledon) was undertaken.The data showed that 18 genes of PSIcan be divided into two groups: Part Ⅰ including seven genes (psaA,psaB,psaC,psaI,psaJ,yct3 and ycf4) shared both by cyanobacteria and plant chloroplasts;Part Ⅱ containing another 11 genes (psaD,psaE,psaF,psaK,psaL,psaM,btpA,ycf37,psaG,psaH and psaN) appeared to have diversified in different plant groups.Among Part I genes,psaC,psaA and psaB had higher homology in all species of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.Among Part II genes,only psaG,psaH and psaN emerged in seed plants.

  8. Recombination and Heterologous Expression of Allophycocyanin Gene in the Chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang SU; Kai-Xian QIAN; Cong-Ping TAN; Chun-Xiao MENG; Song QIN

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of multiple genes in the nucleus of transgenic plants requires the introduction of an individual gene and the subsequent backcross to reconstitute multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways. In order to accomplish the expression of multiple genes in a single transformation event, we inserted both large and small subunits of allophycocyanin gene (apcA and apcB) into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast expression vector, resulting in papc-S. The constructed vector was then introduced into the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii by micro-particle bombardment. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed that the two genes had integrated into the chloroplast genome. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the two genes from the prokaryotic cyanobacteria could be correctly expressed in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii. The expressed foreign protein in transformants accounted for about 2%-3% of total soluble proteins. These findings pave the way to the reconstitution of multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways in transgenic C. reinhardtii chloroplasts in a single transformation event.

  9. Molecular cloning of the maize gene crp1 reveals similarity between regulators of mitochondrial and chloroplast gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisk, D. G.; Walker, M. B.; Barkan, A

    1999-01-01

    The maize nuclear gene crp1 is required for the translation of the chloroplast petA and petD mRNAs and for the processing of the petD mRNA from a polycistronic precursor. In order to understand the biochemical role of the crp1 gene product and the interconnections between chloroplast translation and RNA metabolism, the crp1 gene and cDNA were cloned. The predicted crp1 gene product (CRP1) is related to nuclear genes in fungi that play an analogous role in mitochondrial gene expression, sugges...

  10. Different fates of the chloroplast tufA gene following its transfer to the nucleus in green algae.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldauf, S L; Manhart, J R; J.D. Palmer

    1990-01-01

    Previous work suggested that the tufA gene, encoding protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, was transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus within the green algal lineage giving rise to land plants. In this report we investigate the timing and mode of transfer by examining chloroplast and nuclear DNA from the three major classes of green algae, with emphasis on the class Charophyceae, the proposed sister group to land plants. Filter hybridizations reveal a chloroplast tufA gene in all Ul...

  11. Phytotoxic Mechanism of Nanoparticles: Destruction of Chloroplasts and Vascular Bundles and Alteration of Nutrient Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Le Van; Ma, Chuanxin; Rui, Yukui; Liu, Shutong; Li, Xuguang; Xing, Baoshan; Liu, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on determining the phytotoxic mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs): destroying chloroplasts and vascular bundles and altering absorption of nutrients on conventional and Bt-transgenic cottons. Experiments were designed with three concentrations of CeO2 NPs including: 0, 100 and 500 mg·L(-1), and each treatment was three replications. Results indicate that absorbed CeO2 nanoparticles significantly reduced the Zn, Mg, Fe, and P levels in xylem sap compared with the control group and decreased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations in the roots of conventional cotton. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that CeO2 NPs were absorbed into the roots and subsequently transported to the stems and leaves of both conventional and Bt-transgenic cotton plants via xylem sap. In addition, the majority of aggregated CeO2 NPs were attached to the external surface of chloroplasts, which were swollen and ruptured, especially in Bt-transgenic cotton. The vascular bundles were destroyed by CeO2 nanoparticles, and more damage was observed in transgenic cotton than conventional cotton. PMID:26108166

  12. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and their host nuclear genes in four plant species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingpo Liu; Qingzhong Xue

    2005-04-01

    A detailed comparison was made of codon usage of chloroplast genes with their host (nuclear) genes in the four angiosperm species Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum and Arabidopsis thaliana. The average GC content of the entire genes, and at the three codon positions individually, was higher in nuclear than in chloroplast genes, suggesting different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots suggested that nucleotide compositional constraint had a large contribution to codon usage bias of nuclear genes in O. sativa, Z. mays, and T. aestivum, whereas natural selection was likely to be playing a large role in codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes. Correspondence analysis and chi-test showed that regardless of the genomic environment (species) of the host, the codon usage pattern of chloroplast genes differed from nuclear genes of their host species by their AU-richness. All the chloroplast genomes have predominantly A- and/or U-ending codons, whereas nuclear genomes have G-, C- or U-ending codons as their optimal codons. These findings suggest that the chloroplast genome might display particular characteristics of codon usage that are different from its host nuclear genome. However, one feature common to both chloroplast and nuclear genomes in this study was that pyrimidines were found more frequently than purines at the synonymous codon position of optimal codons.

  13. Altered cytokinin metabolism affects cytokinin, auxin, and abscisic acid contents in leaves and chloroplasts, and chloroplast ultrastructure in transgenic tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polanská, Lenka; Vičánková, Anna; Nováková, Marie; Malbeck, Jiří; Dobrev, Petre; Brzobohatý, Břetislav; Vaňková, Radomíra; Macháčková, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2007), s. 637-649. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0369; GA ČR GA206/06/1306; GA AV ČR IAA600040612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : abscisic acid * auxin * chloroplast ultrastructure Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.917, year: 2007

  14. Endosymbiotic origin and codon bias of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, H; Martinez, P; Quigley, F; Martin, W; Cerff, R

    1987-01-01

    The nuclei of plant cells harbor genes for two types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDH) displaying a sequence divergence corresponding to the prokaryote/eukaryote separation. This strongly supports the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution and in particular the gene transfer hypothesis suggesting that the gene for the chloroplast enzyme, initially located in the genome of the endosymbiotic chloroplast progenitor, was transferred during the course of evolution into the nuclear genome of the endosymbiotic host. Codon usage in the gene for chloroplast GAPDH of maize is radically different from that employed by present-day chloroplasts and from that of the cytosolic (glycolytic) enzyme from the same cell. This reveals the presence of subcellular selective pressures which appear to be involved in the optimization of gene expression in the economically important graminaceous monocots. PMID:3131533

  15. Localized hypermutation and associated gene losses in legume chloroplast genomes

    OpenAIRE

    KAVANAGH, THOMAS; WOLFE, KENNETH; POWELL, ANTOINETTE

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Point mutations result from errors made during DNA replication or repair, so they are usually expected to be homogeneous across all regions of a genome. However, we have found a region of chloroplast DNA in plants related to sweetpea (Lathyrus) whose local point mutation rate is at least 20 times higher than elsewhere in the same molecule. There are very few precedents for such heterogeneity in any genome, and we suspect that the hypermutable region may be subject to an unusual p...

  16. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  17. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Paul G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-tolerant plant. Results The Tortula chloroplast genome is ~123,500 bp, and differs in a number of ways from that of Physcomitrella patens, the first published moss chloroplast genome. For example, Tortula lacks the ~71 kb inversion found in the large single copy region of the Physcomitrella genome and other members of the Funariales. Also, the Tortula chloroplast genome lacks petN, a gene found in all known land plant plastid genomes. In addition, an unusual case of nucleotide polymorphism was discovered. Conclusions Although the chloroplast genome of Tortula ruralis differs from that of the only other sequenced moss, Physcomitrella patens, we have yet to determine the biological significance of the differences. The polymorphisms we have uncovered in the sequencing of the genome offer a rare possibility (for mosses of the generation of DNA markers for fine-level phylogenetic studies, or to investigate individual variation within populations.

  18. Nuclear gene-regulated expression of chloroplast genes for coupling factor one in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction between the chloroplast and nuclear genomes in controlling the expression of plastid genes and the biosynthesis of chloroplast proteins, maize (Zea mays) nuclear gene mutant hcf*-38, in which α and β subunits of coupling factor one (CF1) are almost completely missing was studied. The mutant possesses all the other subunits of CF1 but several peptides of photosystem II are present in reduced amounts. A competitive hybridization experiment showed the presence of the same plastid mRNA species in mutant and wild-type plants except for slightly lower levels of some transcripts in the mutant. Northern hybridization and dot blot hybridization experiments showed the features of transcripts for α and β subunits of CF1 in the mutant to be similar to those in the wild-type maize although their levels are somewhat lower in the mutant. In vivo and in organello protein labeling experiments with L-[35S]Met have shown that α and β subunits of CF1 are synthesized, assembled into CF1, and probably associated with thylakoid membranes in mutant plants. It is concluded that they are subsequently degraded

  19. Expression patterns of cotton chloroplast genes during development: implications for development of plastid transformation vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to express genes of interest in plastids, transformation vectors must be developed that include appropriate promoters to drive expression at effective levels in both green and non-green tissues. Typically, chloroplasts are transformed with vectors that contain ribosomal RNA promoters for h...

  20. Polyuridylylation and processing of transcripts from multiple gene minicircles in chloroplasts of the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2012-05-05

    Although transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of plants have been extensively characterised, the RNA metabolism of other chloroplast lineages across the eukaryotes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use RT-PCR to study transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of Amphidinium carterae, a model peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These organisms have a highly unusual chloroplast genome, with genes located on multiple small \\'minicircle\\' elements, and a number of idiosyncratic features of RNA metabolism including transcription via a rolling circle mechanism, and 3′ terminal polyuridylylation of transcripts. We demonstrate that transcription occurs in A. carterae via a rolling circle mechanism, as previously shown in the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa, and present evidence for the production of both polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from A. carterae minicircles, including several regions containing ORFs previously not known to be expressed. We demonstrate the presence of both polyuridylylated and non-polyuridylylated transcripts in A. carterae, and show that polycistronic transcripts can be terminally polyuridylylated. We present a model for RNA metabolism in dinoflagellate chloroplasts where long polycistronic precursors are processed to form mature transcripts. Terminal polyuridylylation may mark transcripts with the correct 3′ end. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. Factors affecting UV-B-induced changes in Arabidopsis thaliana L. gene expression: The role of development, protective pigments and the chloroplast signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression is known to change in response to UV-B radiation. In this paper, we have investigated three factors in Arabidopsis leaves that are likely to influence these changes: development, protective pigments and the 'chloroplast signal'. During late leaf development the major change in pigment composition, after exposure to UV-B radiation, is an increase in UV-absorbing pigments. Chl and Chl a/b ratio do not change substantially. Similarly Chl fluorescence is not altered. In contrast, RNA transcripts of photosynthetic proteins are reduced more in older leaves than in young leaves. To determine the role of flavonoids in UV-B protection, plants of Arabidopsis mutant tt-5, which have reduced flavonoids and sinapic esters, were exposed to UV-B and RNA transcript levels determined. The tt-mutants were more sensitive to UV-B radiation than wild-type. To examine the role of the chloroplast signal in regulating UV-B induced changes in gene expression, Arabidopsis gun mutants (genome uncoupled) have been used. The results show that UV-B-induced down-regulation still takes place in gun mutants and strongly suggests that the chloroplast signal is not required. Overall, this study clearly demonstrates that UV-B-induced changes in gene expression are influenced by both developmental and cellular factors but not chloroplastic factors

  2. Translational coupling of the maize chloroplast atpB and atpE genes

    OpenAIRE

    Gatenby, Anthony A.; Rothstein, Steven. J.; Nomura, Masayasu

    1989-01-01

    The genes for the β and ε subunits of maize chloroplast ATP synthase are encoded by the organelle genome, are cotranscribed, and have overlapping translation initiation and termination codons. To determine whether the atpB and atpE genes are translationally coupled, they were transformed into Escherichia coli on a multicopy plasmid. Synthesis of full-length β and ε polypeptides demonstrated correct initiation of translation by the bacterial ribosomes. To assay for translational coupling, the ...

  3. RNA Editing Sites Exist in Protein-coding Genes in the Chloroplast Genome of Cycas taitungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Chen; Likun Deng; Yuan Jiang; Ping Lu; Jianing Yu

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that results in modifications of ribonucleotides at specific locations.In land plants editing can occur in both mitochondria and chloroplasts and most commonly involves C-to-U changes,especially in seed plants.Using prediction and experimental determination,we investigated RNA editing in 40 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of Cycas taitungensis.A total of 85 editing sites were identified in 25 transcripts.Comparison analysis of the published editotypes of these 25 transcripts in eight species showed that RNA editing events gradually disappear during plant evolution.The editing in the first and third codon position disappeared quicker than that in the second codon position,ndh genes have the highest editing frequency while serine and proline codons were more frequently edited than the codons of other amino acids.These results imply that retained RNA editing sites have imbalanced distribution in genes and most of them may function by changing protein structure or interaction.Mitochondrion protein-coding genes have three times the editing sites compared with chloroplast genes of Cycas,most likely due to slower evolution speed.

  4. Light quality regulates expression of chloroplast genes and assembly of photosynthetic membrane complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Glick, Richard E.; McCauley, Steven W.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Melis, Anastasios

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers and the level of chloroplast reaction center gene transcripts were determined in pea plants grown under different light-quality regimes. In plants grown in light primarily absorbed by PSI (“red” light), the PSII/PSI reaction center ratio was 2-fold greater than that in plants grown in PSII-sensitizing (“yellow”) light. In addition, the ratio of a PSII gene (psbB) transcript to a PSI gene (psaA) transcript was...

  5. DISRUPTION OF ARABIDOPSIS RETICULON GENE RTNLB16 RESULTS IN CHLOROPLAST DYSFUNCTION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasenko V.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reticulons (RTNs are endoplasmic reticulum (ER-localized proteins that have recently attracted much attention. RTNs are ubiquitous proteins present in all eukaryotic organisms examined so far. In animal and yeast, in which knowledge of this protein family is more advanced, RTNs are involved in numerous cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell division and intracellular trafficking. Up to now, a little attention has been paid to their plant counterparts, RTNLBs. Meanwhile, gene search across sequenced genomes revealed that the RTN gene family is more diverse and numerous in plants than in animals and yeasts, which possibly suggests existence of functions specific for plant RTNs. Recently, the localization in different ER regions was shown for two members of plant reticulon family. The location in close proximity to chloroplast membrane was revealed for one of RTNLBs, which is argument in favor of its role in interorganellar interactions. In spite of growing interest towards to plant RTNs, there are no investigations devoted to insertion mutagenesis of genes encoding these proteins. We have genotyped an Arabidopsis line containing T-DNA insertion in RTNLB16 gene encoding uncharacterized member of RTNLB family. The obtained homozygous plants have marked phenotype expressed in a decreased growth rate and a pale-green leaf color. The leaf total chlorophyll content as well as the chlorophyll a/b ratio was significantly lower in mutant plants. It is interesting to note that the extent of phenotypic expression depended on a light intensity. The growth rate of wild-type and mutant plants was the same in low light conditions. The growth rate was significantly decreased and chlorophyll content was 3-5-fold lower in mutant plants growing under moderate light conditions. The growing of plants under high light conditions led to halted growth and death of mutants on the seedling stage. The demonstrated phenotype probably points out to a chloroplast

  6. Evolutionary transfer of the chloroplast tufA gene to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, S L; Palmer, J D

    1990-03-15

    Evolutionary gene transfer is a basic corollary of the now widely accepted endosymbiotic theory, which proposes that mitochondria and chloroplasts originated from once free-living eubacteria. The small organellar chromosomes are remnants of larger bacterial genomes, with most endosymbiont genes having been either transferred to the nucleus soon after endosymbiosis or lost entirely, with some being functionally replaced by pre-existing nuclear genes. Several lines of evidence indicate that relocation of some organelle genes could have been more recent. These include the abundance of non-functional organelle sequences of recent origin in nuclear DNA, successful artificial transfer of functional organelle genes to the nucleus, and several examples of recently lost organelle genes, although none of these is known to have been replaced by a nuclear homologue that is clearly of organellar ancestry. We present gene sequence and molecular phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of the chloroplast tufA gene to the nucleus in the green algal ancestor of land plants. PMID:2314461

  7. Overexpression of yeast ArDH gene in chloroplasts confers salinity tolerance in plants (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water stress due to salinity and drought is the main limiting factor for plant growth, productivity and quality. A common response to water deficit is the accumulation of osmoprotectants such as sugars and amino acids. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase is found responsible for the production of arabitol from ribulose-5-phosphate. All plants synthesize ribulose-5-phosphate via pentose pathway in chloroplasts.. Therefore, osmotolerance of the plants could be enhanced through metabolic engineering of chloroplasts by introducing ArDH gene into the plastome, which is responsible for the conversion of ribulose-5- phosphate to arabitol. Here we report high-level expression of arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) in chloroplasts. Homoplasmic transgenic plants were recovered on spectinomycin-containing regeneration medium. Transformed tobacco plants survived whereas non-transformed were severely stressed or killed when two weeks old seedlings were exposed to NaCl (up to 400 mM), suggesting a role for arabitol in salt tolerance. Seedlings survived up to five weeks on medium containing high salt concentrations (350-400 mM). Nevertheless, seedlings remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl for several weeks. Hypothesis that membranes are protected under stress conditions due to the arabitol accumulation in chloroplasts, seedlings were grown in liquid medium containing polyethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%). Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ArDH enzyme protects membranes integrity under stress. Therefore, it is concluded that ArDH gene could be expressed in crop plants to withstand abiotic stresses. (author)

  8. Molecular analysis of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) in peanut

    OpenAIRE

    State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai'an 271018, China; Qian Wan; Fengzhen Liu; Kun Zhang; Aiqing Sun; Bing Luo; Li Sun; Yongshan Wan

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) plays a key role in response to drought stress, and differences in SOD activity changes among cultivars are important under drought conditions. We obtained the full-length DNA of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) from 11 allotetraploid cultivars and 5 diploid wild species in peanut. BLAST search against the peanut genome showed that the AhCSD2 genes gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2 are located at the tops of chromosome A03 (A genome) and B03 (B genome), respec...

  9. Expression of ROS-responsive genes and transcription factors after metabolic formation of H2O2 in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Balazadeh, Salma; Jaspert, Nils; Arif, Muhammad; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2012-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) catalyses the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate, thereby consuming O(2) and producing H(2)O(2). In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing GO in the chloroplasts (GO plants) were used to assess the expressional behavior of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive genes and transcription factors (TFs) after metabolic induction of H(2)O(2) formation in chloroplasts. In this organelle, GO uses the glycolate derived from the oxygenase activity of RubisCO. Here,...

  10. Virus-induced gene silencing of pea CHLI and CHLD affects tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chloroplast development and the primary metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Luo, Sha; Araújo, Wagner L; Schlicke, Hagen; Rothbart, Maxi; Yu, Jing; Fan, Tingting; Fernie, Alisdair R; Grimm, Bernhard; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-04-01

    The first committed and highly regulated step of chlorophyll biosynthesis is the insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX, which is catalyzed by Mg chelatase that consists of CHLH, CHLD and CHLI subunits. In this study, CHLI and CHLD genes were suppressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD) in pea (Pisum sativum), respectively. VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants both showed yellow leaf phenotypes with the reduced Mg chelatase activity and the inactivated synthesis of 5-aminolevulinic acid. The lower chlorophyll accumulation correlated with undeveloped thylakoid membranes, altered chloroplast nucleoid structure, malformed antenna complexes and compromised photosynthesis capacity in the yellow leaf tissues of the VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Non-enzymatic antioxidant contents and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were altered in response to enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the chlorophyll deficient leaves of VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Furthermore, the results of metabolite profiling indicate a tight correlation between primary metabolic pathways and Mg chelatase activity. We also found that CHLD induces a feedback-regulated change of the transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. CHLD and CHLI silencing resulted in a rapid reduction of photosynthetic proteins. Taken together, Mg chelatase is not only a key regulator of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis but its activity also correlates with ROS homeostasis, primary interorganellar metabolism and retrograde signaling in plant cells. PMID:23416492

  11. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of the Moss Tortula ruralis: Gene Content and Structural Arrangement Relative to Other Green Plant Chloroplast Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed moss species in the family Pottiaceae, is increasingly being used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Tortula ruralis, only the second publishe...

  12. Altered regulation of lipid biosynthesis in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in chloroplast glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaf membrane lipids of many plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., are synthesized by two complementary pathways that are associated with the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum. By screening directly for alterations in lipid acyl-group composition, the authors have identified several mutants of Arabidopsis that lack the plastid pathway because of a deficiency in activity of the first enzyme in the plastid pathway of glycerolipid synthesis, acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The lesion results in an increased synthesis of lipids by the cytoplasmic pathway that largely compensates for the loss of the plastid pathway and provides nearly normal amounts of all the lipids required for chloroplast biogenesis. However, the fatty acid composition of the leaf membrane lipids of the mutants is altered because the acyltransferases associated with the two pathways normally exhibit different substrate specificities. The remarkable flexibility of the system provides an insight into the nature of the regulatory mechanisms that allocate lipids for membrane biogenesis

  13. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  14. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b 6 f (Cytb 6 f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  15. Identification and Analysis of the Chloroplast rpoC1 Gene Differentially Expressed in Wild Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kwang-Ho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known herbal medicine in traditional Asian medicine, and wild ginseng is widely accepted to be more active than cultivated ginseng in chemoprevention. However, little has actually been reported on the difference between wild ginseng and cultivated ginseng. Thus, to identify and analyze those differences, we used suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH sequences with microarrays, realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcription PCRs (RT-PCRs. One of the clones isolated in this research was the chloroplast rpoC1 gene, a β subunit of RNA polymerase. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that the expression of the rpoC1 gene was significantly upregulated in wild ginseng as compared to cultivated ginseng, so, we conclude that the rpoC1 gene may be one of the important markers of wild ginseng.

  16. Sequence of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene and its surrounding regions of Chlamydomonas reinhardii.

    OpenAIRE

    Dron, M; Rahire, M; Rochaix, J D

    1982-01-01

    The sequence of a 2 kb DNA fragment containing the chloroplast 16S ribosomal RNA gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardii and its flanking regions has been determined. The algal 16S rRNA sequence (1475 nucleotides) and secondary structure are highly related to those found in bacteria and in the chloroplasts of higher plants. In contrast, the flanking regions are very different. In C. reinhardii the 16S rRNA gene is surrounded by AT rich segments of about 180 bases, which are followed by a long stre...

  17. Improvement of hydrogen production with expression of lba gene in chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shuangxiu; Yan, Guangyu; Xu, Lili; Wang, Quanxi; Liu, Xiaolei [Department of Biology, college of life and environmental science, Shanghai Normal University, Guilin road 100, 200234, Shanghai City (China)

    2010-12-15

    An ORF cDNA fragment of one of leghemoglobin genes, lba was cloned from Glycine max and transferred into chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. More rapidly O{sub 2} consumption, lower O{sub 2} content and higher H{sub 2} output were monitored in the transgenic algal cultures than those in WT cultures either in S-free or S-containing medium. Maximum expression of lba in the transgenic algae consisted with the time when minimal O{sub 2} contents and maximal H{sub 2} evolution occurred. The highest H{sub 2} production achieved in sulfur-free medium for both algal cultures. When restoring sulfate in the medium, H{sub 2} production in the transgenic algal cultures kept steadily around 130-145 {mu}l per bottle while that in WT cultures decreased gradually from 98 {mu}l per bottle at 12.5 {mu}M sulfate to 40 {mu}l per bottle at 100 {mu}M sulfate. The results indicated that heteroexpression of lehemoglaobin genes in chloroplasts of green algae improved H{sub 2} yield by decreasing O{sub 2} content in the medium. This protein had potential to be used in improvement of H{sub 2} production in green algae. (author)

  18. Abiotic stresses affect differently the intron splicing and expression of chloroplast genes in coffee plants (Coffea arabica) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Dinh, Sy; Sai, Than Zaw Tun; Nawaz, Ghazala; Lee, Kwanuk; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-08-20

    Despite the increasing understanding of the regulation of chloroplast gene expression in plants, the importance of intron splicing and processing of chloroplast RNA transcripts under stress conditions is largely unknown. Here, to understand how abiotic stresses affect the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in dicots and monocots, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in the coffee plant (Coffea arabica) as a dicot and rice (Oryza sativa) as a monocot under abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, or combined drought and heat stresses. The photosynthetic activity of both coffee plants and rice seedlings was significantly reduced under all stress conditions tested. Analysis of the transcript levels of chloroplast genes revealed that the splicing of tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings were significantly affected by abiotic stresses. Notably, abiotic stresses affected differently the splicing of chloroplast tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings. The transcript levels of most chloroplast genes were markedly downregulated in both coffee plants and rice seedlings upon stress treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that coffee and rice plants respond to abiotic stresses via regulating the intron splicing and expression of different sets of chloroplast genes. PMID:27448724

  19. Chloroplast-targeted expression of recombinant crystal-protein gene in cotton: an unconventional combat with resistant pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Sarfraz; Mohamed, Bahaeldeen Babiker; Shehzad, Kamran; Jamal, Adil; Shahid, Muhammad Naveed; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2013-07-10

    Plants transformed with single Bt gene are liable to develop insect resistance and this has already been reported in a number of studies carried out around the world where Bt cotton was cultivated on commercial scale. Later, it was envisaged to transform plants with more than one Bt genes in order to combat with resistant larvae. This approach seems valid as various Bt genes possess different binding domains which could delay the likely hazards of insect resistance against a particular Bt toxin. But it is difficult under field conditions to develop homozygous plants expressing all Bt genes equally after many generations without undergoing recombination effects. A number of researches claiming to transform plants from three to seven transgenes in a single plant were reported during the last decade but none has yet applied for patent of homozygous transgenic lines. A better strategy might be to use hybrid-Bt gene(s) modified for improved lectin-binding domains to boost Bt receptor sites in insect midgut. These recombinant-Bt gene(s) would express different lectin domains in a single polypeptide and it is relatively easy to develop homozygous transgenic lines under field conditions. Enhanced chloroplast-localized expression of hybrid-Bt gene would leave no room for insects to develop resistance. We devised and successfully applied this strategy in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and data up to T3 generation showed that our transgenic cotton plants were displaying enhanced chloroplast-targeted Cry1Ac-RB expression. Laboratory and field bioassays gave promising results against American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), pink bollworm (Pictinophora scutigera) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) that otherwise, were reported to have evolved resistance against Cry1Ac toxin. Elevated levels of hybrid-Bt toxin were confirmed by ELISA of chloroplast-enriched protein samples extracted from leaves of transgenic cotton lines. While, localization of recombinant Cry1Ac-RB protein in

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ampelopsis: gene organization, comparative analysis and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy eRaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is an economically important plant that belongs to the Vitaceae family of angiosperms. The phylogenetic placement of Vitaceae is still unresolved. Recent phylogenetic studies suggested that it should be placed in various alternative families including Caryophyllaceae, asteraceae, Saxifragaceae, Dilleniaceae, or with the rest of the rosid families. However, these analyses provided weak supportive results because they were based on only one of several genes. Accordingly, complete chloroplast genome sequences are required to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on the complete chloroplast genome sequence suggested strong support for the position of Vitaceae as the earliest diverging lineage of rosids and placed it as a sister to the remaining rosids. These studies also revealed relationships among several major lineages of angiosperms; however, they highlighted the significance of taxon sampling for obtaining accurate phylogenies. In the present study, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of A. brevipedunculata and used these data to assess the relationships among 32 angiosperms, including 18 taxa of rosids. The Ampelopsis chloroplast genome is 161,090 bp in length, and includes a pair of inverted repeats of 26,394 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,036 bp and 89,266 bp, respectively. The gene content and order of Ampelopsis is identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Vitis and tobacco. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 70 protein-coding genes of 33 angiosperms showed that both Saxifragales and Vitaceae diverged from the rosid clade and formed two clades with 100% bootstrap value. The position of the Vitaceae is sister to Saxifragales, and both are the basal and earliest diverging lineages. Moreover, Saxifragales forms a sister clade to Vitaceae of rosids. Overall, the results of

  1. Molecular analysis of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) in peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiurong Zhang; Qian Wan; Fengzhen Liu⁎; Kun Zhang; Aiqing Sun; Bing Luo; Li Sun; Yongshan Wan⁎⁎

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) plays a key role in response to drought stress, and differences in SOD activity changes among cultivars are important under drought conditions. We obtained the full-length DNA of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) from 11 allotetraploid cultivars and 5 diploid wild species in peanut. BLAST search against the peanut genome showed that the AhCSD2 genes gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2 are located at the tops of chromosome A03 (A genome) and B03 (B genome), respectively, and both contain 8 exons and 7 introns. Nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that gCSD2-2 sequences were identical among all the tested cultivars, while gCSD2-1 sequences showed allelic variations. The amino acid sequences deduced from gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2 both contain a chloroplast transit peptide and are distinguished by 6 amino acid (aa) residue differences. The other 2 aa residue variations in the mature peptide regions give rise to three-dimensional structure changes of the protein deduced from the genes gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2. Sequences analyses of cultivars and wild species showed that gCSD2-2 of Arachis hypogaea and gAipCSD2 (Arachis ipaensis) are identical, and despite the abundant polymorphic loci between gCSD2-1 of A. hypogaea and sequences from A genome wild species, the deduced amino acid sequence of AhCSD2-1 (A. hypogaea) is identical to that of AduCSD2 (Arachis duranensis), whereas AcoCSD2 (Arachis correntina) and AcaCSD2 (Arachis cardenasii) both have 2 aa differences in the transit peptide region compared with AhCSD2-1 (A. hypogaea). Based on the Peanut Genome Project, promoter prediction revealed many stress-related cis-acting elements within the potential promoter regions (pp-A and pp-B). pp-A contains more binding sites for drought-associated transcriptional factors than pp-B. We hypothesize that the marked changes in SOD activity in different cultivars under drought stress are tightly regulated by transcription factors through transcription and

  2. OrgConv: detection of gene conversion using consensus sequences and its application in plant mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Weilong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestry of mitochondria and chloroplasts traces back to separate endosymbioses of once free-living bacteria. The highly reduced genomes of these two organelles therefore contain very distant homologs that only recently have been shown to recombine inside the mitochondrial genome. Detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs was previously impossible due to the lack of suitable computer programs. Recently, I developed a novel method and have, for the first time, discovered recurrent gene conversion between chloroplast mitochondrial genes. The method will further our understanding of plant organellar genome evolution and help identify and remove gene regions with incongruent phylogenetic signals for several genes widely used in plant systematics. Here, I implement such a method that is available in a user friendly web interface. Results OrgConv (Organellar Conversion is a computer package developed for detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologous genes. OrgConv is available in two forms; source code can be installed and run on a Linux platform and a web interface is available on multiple operating systems. The input files of the feature program are two multiple sequence alignments from different organellar compartments in FASTA format. The program compares every examined sequence against the consensus sequence of each sequence alignment rather than exhaustively examining every possible combination. Making use of consensus sequences significantly reduces the number of comparisons and therefore reduces overall computational time, which allows for analysis of very large datasets. Most importantly, with the significantly reduced number of comparisons, the statistical power remains high in the face of correction for multiple tests. Conclusions Both the source code and the web interface of OrgConv are available for free from the OrgConv website http

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of the chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene from Pyropia haitanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Haidong; CHEN Changsheng; XU Yan; JI Dehua; XIE Chaotian

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) is one of the key enzymes in Calvin circle and starch biosynthesis. In this study, the full-length of cpFBPase gene from Pyropia haitanensis was cloned by using rapid amplifica-tion of cDNA ends (RACE) technology. The nucleotide sequence of PhcpFBPase consists of 1 400 bp, includ-ing a 5′untranslated region (UTR) of 92 bp, a 3′ UTR of 69 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 236 bp, which can be translated into a 412-amino-acid putative peptides with a molecular weight of 44.3 kDa and a theoretical pI of 5.23. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that the protein belonged to the chloroplast FBPase enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the protein assembled with the cpFBPase of a thermal tolerant unicellular red micro-algae Galdieria sulphuraria. Expression patterns analyzed by qRT-PCR re-vealed that the expression of PhcpFBPase gene in the thallus phage was 7-fold higher than in the conchocelis phage, which suggested the different mechanisms of inorganic carbon utilization among the different life phages of P. haitanensis. And the different response modes of PhcpFBPase mRNA levels to high temperature and desiccation stress indicated that PhcpFBPase played an important role in responsing to abiotic stress.

  4. Origin and evolution of the colonial volvocales (Chlorophyceae) as inferred from multiple, chloroplast gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, H; Misawa, K; Kajita, T; Kato, M; Nohara, S; Watanabe, M M

    2000-11-01

    A combined data set of DNA sequences (6021 bp) from five protein-coding genes of the chloroplast genome (rbcL, atpB, psaA, psaB, and psbC genes) were analyzed for 42 strains representing 30 species of the colonial Volvocales (Volvox and its relatives) and 5 related species of green algae to deduce robust phylogenetic relationships within the colonial green flagellates. The 4-celled family Tetrabaenaceae was robustly resolved as the most basal group within the colonial Volvocales. The sequence data also suggested that all five volvocacean genera with 32 or more cells in a vegetative colony (all four of the anisogamous/oogamous genera, Eudorina, Platydorina, Pleodorina, and Volvox, plus the isogamous genus Yamagishiella) constituted a large monophyletic group, in which 2 Pleodorina species were positioned distally to 3 species of Volvox. Therefore, most of the evolution of the colonial Volvocales appears to constitute a gradual progression in colonial complexity and in types of sexual reproduction, as in the traditional volvocine lineage hypothesis, although reverse evolution must be considered for the origin of certain species of Pleodorina. Data presented here also provide robust support for a monophyletic family Goniaceae consisting of two genera: Gonium and Astrephomene. PMID:11083939

  5. Expression of chloroplast protein genes during the cell cycle of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: evidence for transcriptional and translocational control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells, growing synchronously under a repeating 12 h light:12 h dark cycle, were used to investigate the synthesis and regulation of chloroplast proteins. The cells accumulate chlorophyll, the major thylakoid membrane proteins, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) during the light (G1) period of the cell cycle. Pulse-labeling in vivo with [3H]arginine, and analysis of the protein synthetic capacity of thylakoid-bound polysomes in vitro, shows that these proteins are synthesized de novo during the light. Specific antibody and cloned DNA probes were obtained and used to estimate translatable and/or steady-state mRNA levels for light-harvesting (LHCII) and reaction center (D-1 and D-2) polypeptides of photosystem II, a light-harvesting polypeptide of photosystem I (LHCI), and the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of RuBPCase. Levels of mRNA for the nuclear-encoded LHCI, LHCII and SS correlated with the synthesis of these polypeptides in vivo; they were higher in the light period and several-folded lower or absent during the dark period. The results suggest that synthesis of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are regulated primarily by the level of mRNA. In contrast, regulation of chloroplast-encoded genes is achieved by controlling the translation of mRNA that is constitutively present, and by transcriptional mechanisms during light induction

  6. Origins and domestication of cultivated banana inferred from chloroplast and nuclear genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Feng Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cultivated bananas are large, vegetatively-propagated members of the genus Musa. More than 1,000 cultivars are grown worldwide and they are major economic and food resources in numerous developing countries. It has been suggested that cultivated bananas originated from the islands of Southeast Asia (ISEA and have been developed through complex geodomestication pathways. However, the maternal and parental donors of most cultivars are unknown, and the pattern of nucleotide diversity in domesticated banana has not been fully resolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the genetics of 16 cultivated and 18 wild Musa accessions using two single-copy nuclear (granule-bound starch synthase I, GBSS I, also known as Waxy, and alcohol dehydrogenase 1, Adh1 and two chloroplast (maturase K, matK, and the trnL-F gene cluster genes. The results of phylogenetic analyses showed that all A-genome haplotypes of cultivated bananas were grouped together with those of ISEA subspecies of M. acuminata (A-genome. Similarly, the B- and S-genome haplotypes of cultivated bananas clustered with the wild species M. balbisiana (B-genome and M. schizocarpa (S-genome, respectively. Notably, it has been shown that distinct haplotypes of each cultivar (A-genome group were nested together to different ISEA subspecies M. acuminata. Analyses of nucleotide polymorphism in the Waxy and Adh1 genes revealed that, in comparison to the wild relatives, cultivated banana exhibited slightly lower nucleotide diversity both across all sites and specifically at silent sites. However, dramatically reduced nucleotide diversity was found at nonsynonymous sites for cultivated bananas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study not only confirmed the origin of cultivated banana as arising from multiple intra- and inter-specific hybridization events, but also showed that cultivated banana may have not suffered a severe genetic bottleneck during the domestication process. Importantly

  7. Chloroplast His-to-Asp signal transduction: a potential mechanism for plastid gene regulation in Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Michael A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of homeostasis requires that an organism perceive selected physical and chemical signals within an informationally dense environment. Functionally, an organism uses a variety of signal transduction arrays to amplify and convert these perceived signals into appropriate gene transcriptional responses. These changes in gene expression serve to modify selective metabolic processes and thus optimize reproductive success. Here we analyze a chloroplast-encoded His-to-Asp signal transduction circuit in the stramenopile Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada Hada ex Y. Hara et Chihara [syn. H. carterae (Hulburt F.J.R. Taylor]. The presence, structure and putative function of this protein pair are discussed in the context of their evolutionary homologues. Results Bioinformatic analysis of the Heterosigma akashiwo chloroplast genome sequence revealed the presence of a single two-component His-to-Asp (designated Tsg1/Trg1 pair in this stramenopile (golden-brown alga. These data represent the first documentation of a His-to-Asp array in stramenopiles and counter previous reports suggesting that such regulatory proteins are lacking in this taxonomic cluster. Comparison of the 43 kDa H. akashiwo Tsg1 with bacterial sensor kinases showed that the algal protein exhibits a moderately maintained PAS motif in the sensor kinase domain as well as highly conserved H, N, G1 and F motifs within the histidine kinase ATP binding site. Molecular modelling of the 27 kDa H. akashiwo Trg1 regulator protein was consistent with a winged helix-turn-helix identity – a class of proteins that is known to impact gene expression at the level of transcription. The occurrence of Trg1 protein in actively growing H. akashiwo cells was verified by Western analysis. The presence of a PhoB-like RNA polymerase loop in Trg1 and its homologues in the red-algal lineage support the hypothesis that Trg1 and its homologues interact with a sigma 70 (σ70 subunit (encoded by

  8. Chloroplast biogenesis-associated nuclear genes: Control by plastid signals evolved prior to their regulation as part of photomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C HIlls

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of photosynthetically-competent chloroplasts occurs in angiosperm seedlings when first exposed to light, and is due to the control by light of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs, also dependent upon plastid-to-nucleus biogenic communication signals. The relationship between light- and plastid signal-regulation of PhANGs is close but poorly understood. In contrast, many conifers green in the dark and the promoter of a pine PhANG, Lhcb, is active in the dark in tobacco. Here we show that the activity of this promoter in tobacco is sensitive to plastid photobleaching, or to the inhibition of plastid translation in the light or the dark, and the same interventions reduce expression of the native gene in pine seedlings, demonstrating classic plastid biogenic signalling in gymnosperms. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutations causing defective plastid biogenesis suppress the effect in darkness of mutations in COP1 and DET1, repressors of photomorphogenesis, for the expression of several PhANGs but not a photosynthesis-unrelated, light-regulated gene. GLK transcriptional regulators mediate the response of LHCB but not of other tested PhANGs. We propose gain of the ability by repressors of photomorphogenesis to suppress the response of PhANG promoters to positive plastid biogenic signals in the dark to have contributed to the evolution of light control of chloroplast biogenesis.

  9. Chloroplast genes are expressed during intracellular symbiotic association of Vaucheria litorea plastids with the sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K; Rumpho, M E

    1996-10-29

    The marine slug Elysia chlorotica (Gould) forms an intracellular symbiosis with photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea (C. Agardh). This symbiotic association was characterized over a period of 8 months during which E. chlorotica was deprived of V. litorea but provided with light and CO2. The fine structure of the symbiotic chloroplasts remained intact in E. chlorotica even after 8 months of starvation as revealed by electron microscopy. Southern blot analysis of total DNA from E. chlorotica indicated that algal genes, i.e., rbcL, rbcS, psaB, psbA, and 16S rRNA are present in the animal. These genes are typically localized to the plastid genome in higher plants and algae except rbcS, which is nuclear-encoded in higher plants and green (chlorophyll a/b) algae. Our analysis suggests, however, that similar to the few other chromophytes (chlorophyll a/c) examined, rbcS is chloroplast encoded in V. litorea. Levels of psbA transcripts remained constant in E. chlorotica starved for 2 and 3 months and then gradually declined over the next 5 months corresponding with senescence of the animal in culture and in nature. The RNA synthesis inhibitor 6-methylpurine reduced the accumulation of psbA transcripts confirming active transcription. In contrast to psbA, levels of 16S rRNA transcripts remained constant throughout the starvation period. The levels of the photosystem II proteins, D1 and CP43, were high at 2 and 4 months of starvation and remained constant at a lower steady-state level after 6 months. In contrast, D2 protein levels, although high at 2 and 4 months, were very low at all other periods of starvation. At 8 months, de novo synthesis of several thylakoid membrane-enriched proteins, including D1, still occurred. To our knowledge, these results represent the first molecular evidence for active transcription and translation of algal chloroplast genes in an animal host and are discussed in relation to the endosymbiotic

  10. Expression and function analysis of the metallo-thionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN SiHai; HU ZhangLi; LEI AnPing

    2008-01-01

    The cDNA of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra cv. Merlin was optimized with bias codon of Chlamydomonous reinhardtii chloroplast genome. The optimized MT-like gene was delivered into C. reinhardtii chloroplast and the transgenic strains expressing MT-like gene was obtained. PCR-Southern blot and RT-PCR-Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the MT-like gene was integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii and expressed at the transcriptional level. The cadmium binding capacity of the transgenic C. reinhardtii was determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) and the binding properties were analyzed. Results showed that the transgenic C. reinhardtii expressing the MT-like gene exhibited remarkably higher Cd2+ binding capacity and grew to higher densities at toxic Cd2+ concentrations (40-100 μmol/L) than the wild type strain, and that the IC50 of Cd2+ (3-d treating) to algal cell growth of transgenic strain was 55.43% higher than that of the wild type strain, indicating that the Cd2+ binding capacity and Cd2+ tolerance of C. reinhardtii was enhanced through the expression of the foreign MT-like gene in chloroplast.

  11. Expression and function analysis of the metallo-thionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The cDNA of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra cv. Merlin was optimized with bias codon of Chlamydomonous reinhardtii chloroplast genome. The optimized MT-like gene was de-livered into C. reinhardtii chloroplast and the transgenic strains expressing MT-like gene was obtained. PCR-Southern blot and RT-PCR-Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the MT-like gene was inte-grated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii and expressed at the transcriptional level. The cad-mium binding capacity of the transgenic C. reinhardtii was determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) and the binding properties were analyzed. Results showed that the transgenic C. reinhardtii expressing the MT-like gene exhibited remarkably higher Cd2+ binding capacity and grew to higher densities at toxic Cd2+ concentrations (40-100 μmol/L) than the wild type strain, and that the IC50 of Cd2+ (3-d treating ) to algal cell growth of transgenic strain was 55.43% higher than that of the wild type strain, indicating that the Cd2+ binding capacity and Cd2+ tolerance of C. reinhardtii was enhanced through the expression of the foreign MT-like gene in chloroplast.

  12. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants that overexpress chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A. S.; Heinen, J L; Holaday, A S; Burke, J. J.; Allen, R D

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) from pea have been developed. To investigate whether increased expression of chloroplast-targeted SOD could alter the resistance of photosynthesis to environmental stress, these plants were subjected to chilling temperatures and moderate (500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) or high (1500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) light intensity. During exposure to moderate stress, tran...

  13. Light-stimulated transcription of genes for two chloroplast polypeptides in isolated pea leaf nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Thomas F; Ellis, R. John

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from both light-grown and dark-grown leaves of Pisum sativum by Percoll density gradient centrifugation incorporate labelled UTP into RNA when supplemented with the other three nucleoside triphosphates. The RNA is heterodisperse, with transcripts up to at least 25S in size. Among these transcripts are sequences hybridizing to cloned DNA probes for wheat rRNA and two abundant chloroplast polypeptides of Pisum, viz. the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and a po...

  14. Overexpression of a MADS-box gene from birch (Betula platyphylla promotes flowering and enhances chloroplast development in transgenic tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Zheng Qu

    Full Text Available In this study, a MADS-box gene (BpMADS, which is an ortholog of AP1 from Arabidopsis, was isolated from birch (Betula platyphylla. Transgenic Arabidopsis containing a BpMADS promoter::GUS construct was produced, which exhibited strong GUS staining in sepal tissues. Ectopic expression of BpMADS significantly enhanced the flowering of tobacco (35S::BpMADS. In addition, the chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco exhibited much higher growth and division rates, as well rates of photosynthesis, than wild-type. A grafting experiment demonstrated that the flowering time of the scion was not affected by stock that overexpressed BpMADS. In addition, the overexpression of BpMADS resulted in the upregulation of some flowering-related genes in tobacco.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  16. Congruent Deep Relationships in the Grape Family (Vitaceae Based on Sequences of Chloroplast Genomes and Mitochondrial Genes via Genome Skimming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    Full Text Available Vitaceae is well-known for having one of the most economically important fruits, i.e., the grape (Vitis vinifera. The deep phylogeny of the grape family was not resolved until a recent phylogenomic analysis of 417 nuclear genes from transcriptome data. However, it has been reported extensively that topologies based on nuclear and organellar genes may be incongruent due to differences in their evolutionary histories. Therefore, it is important to reconstruct a backbone phylogeny of the grape family using plastomes and mitochondrial genes. In this study, next-generation sequencing data sets of 27 species were obtained using genome skimming with total DNAs from silica-gel preserved tissue samples on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 instrument. Plastomes were assembled using the combination of de novo and reference genome (of V. vinifera methods. Sixteen mitochondrial genes were also obtained via genome skimming using the reference genome of V. vinifera. Extensive phylogenetic analyses were performed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The topology based on either plastome data or mitochondrial genes is congruent with the one using hundreds of nuclear genes, indicating that the grape family did not exhibit significant reticulation at the deep level. The results showcase the power of genome skimming in capturing extensive phylogenetic data: especially from chloroplast and mitochondrial DNAs.

  17. Overexpression of a Chloroplast-located Peroxiredoxin Q Gene, SsPrxQ, Increases the Salt and Low-temperature Tolerance of Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wen Jing; Shi-Hua Chen; Xiao-Li Guo; Hui Zhang; Yan-Xiu Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Abiotic stress, such as salt, drought and extreme temperature,can result in enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants have developed both enzymatic ROS-scavenging and non-enzymatic ROS-scavenging systems. The major ROS-scavenging enzymes of plants include superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and peroxiredoxins (Prxs). In the present work, we identified a gene encoding chloroplast-located peroxiredoxin Q, SsPrxQ, from Suaeda salsa L. Located at chloroplast. Overexpression of SsPrxQ in Arabidopsis leads to an increase in salt and low-temperature tolerance.

  18. Structural feature of sorghum chloroplast psbA gene and regulation effects of its 5’-noncoding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴乃虎; 方晓华; 施晓梅; 张晓武; 周立; 黄美娟

    1999-01-01

    Comparative analysis reveals remarkable homology between the sequences of both psbA gene nucleotides and the inferred amino acids of sorghum, a C4 plant, and those of rice, a C3 plant. The 5’-noncoding region of sorghum psbA gene contains the conservative promoter elements, "-35" element and "-10" element, like the prokaryote and the promoter element, TATA box, like the eukaryote. As compared with that of the rice, an extra sequence of 7 bp is found in the leader sequence of the mRNA in the former. Using an in vitro system, it has been demonstrated that protein factor exists in sorghum chloroplast protein extract which specifically binds to the 5’-noncoding region of psbA gene. Measurement of the expression of luciferase shows a 2—5 time greater reaction of the expression plasmids pALqs which contain leader region of sorghum psbA gene than that of the expression plasmids pALqr which contain leader region of rice psbA gene in E. coli.

  19. Whole-gene positive selection, elevated synonymous substitution rates, duplication, and indel evolution of the chloroplast clpP1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erixon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synonymous DNA substitution rates in the plant chloroplast genome are generally relatively slow and lineage dependent. Non-synonymous rates are usually even slower due to purifying selection acting on the genes. Positive selection is expected to speed up non-synonymous substitution rates, whereas synonymous rates are expected to be unaffected. Until recently, positive selection has seldom been observed in chloroplast genes, and large-scale structural rearrangements leading to gene duplications are hitherto supposed to be rare. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We found high substitution rates in the exons of the plastid clpP1 gene in Oenothera (the Evening Primrose family and three separate lineages in the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae, the Carnation family. Introns have been lost in some of the lineages, but where present, the intron sequences have substitution rates similar to those found in other introns of their genomes. The elevated substitution rates of clpP1 are associated with statistically significant whole-gene positive selection in three branches of the phylogeny. In two of the lineages we found multiple copies of the gene. Neighboring genes present in the duplicated fragments do not show signs of elevated substitution rates or positive selection. Although non-synonymous substitutions account for most of the increase in substitution rates, synonymous rates are also markedly elevated in some lineages. Whereas plant clpP1 genes experiencing negative (purifying selection are characterized by having very conserved lengths, genes under positive selection often have large insertions of more or less repetitive amino acid sequence motifs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found positive selection of the clpP1 gene in various plant lineages to correlated with repeated duplication of the clpP1 gene and surrounding regions, repetitive amino acid sequences, and increase in synonymous substitution rates. The present study sheds light on the

  20. Organization of a large gene cluster encoding ribosomal proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 6301: comparison of gene clusters among cyanobacteria, eubacteria and chloroplast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, M; Sugishita, H; Fujishiro, T; Tsuboi, M; Sugita, C; Endo, T; Sugiura, M

    1997-08-11

    The structure of a large gene cluster containing 22 ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 is presented. Based on DNA and protein sequence analyses, genes encoding r-proteins L3, L4, L23, L2, S19, L22, S3, L16, L29, S17, L14, L24, L5, S8, L6, L18, S5, L15, L36, S13, S11, L17, SecY, adenylate kinase (AK) and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase were identified. The gene order is similar to that of the E. coli S10, spc and alpha operons. Unlike the corresponding E. coli operons, the genes for r-proteins S4, S10, S14 and L30 are not present in this cluster. The organization of Synechococcus r-protein genes also resembles that of chloroplast (cp) r-protein genes of red and brown algal species. This strongly supports the endosymbiotic theory that the cp genome evolved from an ancient photosynthetic bacterium. PMID:9300823

  1. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae: Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales, Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales, and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade. Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales. Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns, and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs, three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members

  2. Genetic relatedness of genus Oryza from Eastern Himalayan region as revealed by chloroplast matK gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Zodinpuii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationship was studied in wild and cultivated rice using the chloroplast matK gene. The aligned sequence fragments were 826bp in length with 7.02% variable and 4.47% phylogenetically informative sites and the estimated Transition/Transversion bias (R was 1.97. Seven hundred and two characters were constant, 74 variable characters were parsimony-uninformative and 50 were parsimony–informative. Haplotypes of Mizoram rice and wild relatives (A genome were more similar than those of distantly related species (B, C/CD, E and G genomes. It further revealed that the EE genome species is most closely related to the CC genome and CCDD genomes. The BBCC genome species had different origins, and their maternal parents had either the BB or CC genome. An additional genome type, HHKK was recognized in O. coarctata and O. schlechteri. Within the AA genome the African, O. glaberrima and O. longistaminatea and American, O. glumipatula and O. barthii were closer to the Indian Oryza species, O. nivara and O. rufipogon. The unknown genome O. malampuzhaensis from India is closer to BB and BBCC genome containing respectively O. punctata from Cameroon and O. minuta from Philippines. CpG rich matK sequences were rich in GG and FF genotypes, whereas CpA rich sequences belonged to BB and BBCC related genomes variety.

  3. A chloroplast DNA deletion located in RNA polymerase gene rpoC2 in CMS lines of sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Muthukrishnan, S; Liang, G H; Schertz, K F; Hart, G E

    1993-01-01

    Fertile lines of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were shown to differ from cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines by the presence of a 3.8 kb HindIII chloroplast DNA fragment in the former and a smaller (3.7 kb) fragment in the latter. DNA/DNA hybridization studies showed that these two fragments are homologous. Fertile plants from S. versicolor, S. almum, S. halepense, and Sorghastrum nutans (Yellow Indiangrass) also have the 3.8 kb fragment, and CMS lines studied containing A1, A2 and A3 cytoplasms have the 3.7 kb fragment. The size difference between the two fragments was localized to a 1.0 kb SacI-HindIII fragment by restriction mapping. A 165 bp deletion, which is flanked by a 51 bp tandem repeat, was identified in the CMS lines by sequencing the clones. Comparison of the two sequences with those from maize, rice, tobacco, spinach, pea, and liverwort revealed that the deleted sequence is located in the middle of the RNA polymerase beta" subunit encoded by the gene rpoC2. The amino acid sequence deleted in the CMS lines is in a monocot-specific region which contains two protein motifs that are characteristic of several transcriptional activation factors, namely, a leucine zipper motif and an acidic domain capable of forming an amphipathic alpha-helix. Further studies designed to determine whether or not the deletion is involved in CMS of sorghum are underway. PMID:8437572

  4. Chloroplast genes are expressed during intracellular symbiotic association of Vaucheria litorea plastids with the sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

    OpenAIRE

    Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K; Rumpho, M E

    1996-01-01

    The marine slug Elysia chlorotica (Gould) forms an intracellular symbiosis with photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea (C. Agardh). This symbiotic association was characterized over a period of 8 months during which E. chlorotica was deprived of V. litorea but provided with light and CO2. The fine structure of the symbiotic chloroplasts remained intact in E. chlorotica even after 8 months of starvation as revealed by electron microscopy. Southern b...

  5. Insights from the complete chloroplast genome into the evolution of Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Zhang

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603. The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC regions and inverted repeats (IR in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1-585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17 were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants.

  6. Downregulation of chloroplast RPS1 negatively modulates nuclear heat-responsive expression of HsfA2 and its target genes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Dong Yu

    Full Text Available Heat stress commonly leads to inhibition of photosynthesis in higher plants. The transcriptional induction of heat stress-responsive genes represents the first line of inducible defense against imbalances in cellular homeostasis. Although heat stress transcription factor HsfA2 and its downstream target genes are well studied, the regulatory mechanisms by which HsfA2 is activated in response to heat stress remain elusive. Here, we show that chloroplast ribosomal protein S1 (RPS1 is a heat-responsive protein and functions in protein biosynthesis in chloroplast. Knockdown of RPS1 expression in the rps1 mutant nearly eliminates the heat stress-activated expression of HsfA2 and its target genes, leading to a considerable loss of heat tolerance. We further confirm the relationship existed between the downregulation of RPS1 expression and the loss of heat tolerance by generating RNA interference-transgenic lines of RPS1. Consistent with the notion that the inhibited activation of HsfA2 in response to heat stress in the rps1 mutant causes heat-susceptibility, we further demonstrate that overexpression of HsfA2 with a viral promoter leads to constitutive expressions of its target genes in the rps1 mutant, which is sufficient to reestablish lost heat tolerance and recovers heat-susceptible thylakoid stability to wild-type levels. Our findings reveal a heat-responsive retrograde pathway in which chloroplast translation capacity is a critical factor in heat-responsive activation of HsfA2 and its target genes required for cellular homeostasis under heat stress. Thus, RPS1 is an essential yet previously unknown determinant involved in retrograde activation of heat stress responses in higher plants.

  7. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances. PMID:27111147

  8. Transfer of a eubacteria-type cell division site-determining factor CrMinD gene to the nucleus from the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiZhong; HU Yong; ZHANG RunJie; ZHOU WeiWei; ZHU JiaYing; LIU XiangLin; HE YiKun

    2007-01-01

    MinD is a ubiquitous ATPase that plays a crucial role in selection of the division site in eubacteria, chloroplasts, and probably Archaea. In four green algae, Mesostigma viride, Nephroselmis olivacea, Chlorella vulgaris and Prototheca wickerhamii, MinD homologues are encoded in the plastid genome. However, in Arabidopsis, MinD is a nucleus-encoded, chloroplast-targeted protein involved in chloroplast division, which suggests that MinD has been transferred to the nucleus in higher land plants. Yet the lateral gene transfer (LGT) of MinD from plastid to nucleus during plastid evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a nucleus-encoded MinD homologue from unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a basal species in the green plant lineage. Overexpression of CrMinD in wild type E. coli inhibited cell division and resulted in the filamentous cell formation, clearly demonstrated the conservation of the MinD protein during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The transient expression of CrMinD-egfp confirmed the role of CrMinD protein in the regulation of plastid division. Searching all the published plastid genomic sequences of land plants, no MinD homologues were found, which suggests that the transfer of MinD from plastid to nucleus might have occurred before the evolution of land plants.

  9. Differential Contribution of Endoplasmic Reticulum and Chloroplast ω-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes to the Linolenic Acid Content of Olive (Olea europaea) Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M Luisa; Sicardo, M Dolores; Martínez-Rivas, José M

    2016-01-01

    Linolenic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in plant lipids, which plays key roles in plant metabolism as a structural component of storage and membrane lipids, and as a precursor of signaling molecules. The synthesis of linolenic acid is catalyzed by two different ω-3 fatty acid desaturases, which correspond to microsomal- (FAD3) and chloroplast- (FAD7 and FAD8) localized enzymes. We have investigated the specific contribution of each enzyme to the linolenic acid content in olive fruit. With that aim, we isolated two different cDNA clones encoding two ω-3 fatty acid desaturases from olive (Olea europaea cv. Picual). Sequence analysis indicates that they code for microsomal (OepFAD3B) and chloroplast (OepFAD7-2) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase enzymes, different from the previously characterized OekFAD3A and OekFAD7-1 genes. Functional expression in yeast of the corresponding OepFAD3A and OepFAD3B cDNAs confirmed that they encode microsomal ω-3 fatty acid desaturases. The linolenic acid content and transcript levels of olive FAD3 and FAD7 genes were measured in different tissues of Picual and Arbequina cultivars, including mesocarp and seed during development and ripening of olive fruit. Gene expression and lipid analysis indicate that FAD3A is the gene mainly responsible for the linolenic acid present in the seed, while FAD7-1 and FAD7-2 contribute mostly to the linolenic acid present in the mesocarp and, therefore, in the olive oil. These results also indicate the relevance of lipid trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast in determining the linolenic acid content of membrane and storage lipids in oil-accumulating photosynthetic tissues. PMID:26514651

  10. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  11. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Munkholm K, Vinberg M, Berk M, Kessing LV. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder: a systematic review. Bipolar Disord 2012: 14: 684-696. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:  Alterations in gene expression in bipolar disorder...... vulnerability pathways. This review therefore evaluated the evidence for whether gene expression in bipolar disorder is state or trait related. Methods:  A systematic review, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline for reporting systematic reviews, based...... on comprehensive database searches for studies on gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder in specific mood states, was conducted. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Library, supplemented by manually searching reference lists from retrieved publications. Results:  A...

  12. Learning the Languages of the Chloroplast: Retrograde Signaling and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Crisp, Peter; McQuinn, Ryan; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-04-29

    The chloroplast can act as an environmental sensor, communicating with the cell during biogenesis and operation to change the expression of thousands of proteins. This process, termed retrograde signaling, regulates expression in response to developmental cues and stresses that affect photosynthesis and yield. Recent advances have identified many signals and pathways-including carotenoid derivatives, isoprenes, phosphoadenosines, tetrapyrroles, and heme, together with reactive oxygen species and proteins-that build a communication network to regulate gene expression, RNA turnover, and splicing. However, retrograde signaling pathways have been viewed largely as a means of bilateral communication between organelles and nuclei, ignoring their potential to interact with hormone signaling and the cell as a whole to regulate plant form and function. Here, we discuss new findings on the processes by which organelle communication is initiated, transmitted, and perceived, not only to regulate chloroplastic processes but also to intersect with cellular signaling and alter physiological responses. PMID:26735063

  13. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-12-31

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  14. H2O2-Activated Up-Regulation of Glutathione in Arabidopsis Involves Induction of Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Cysteine Synthesis in the Chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guillaume Queval; Dorothée Thominet; Hélène Vanacker; Myroslawa Miginiac-Maslow; Bertrand Gakière; Graham Noctor

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione is a key player in cellular redox homeostasis and, therefore, in the response to H2O2, but the factors regulating oxidation-activated glutathione synthesis are still unclear. We investigated H2O2-induced glutathione synthesis in a conditional Arabidopsis catalase-deficient mutant (cat2). Plants were grown from seed at elevated CO2 for 5 weeks, then transferred to air in either short-day or long-day conditions. Compared to cat2 at elevated CO2 or wild-type plants in any condition, transfer of cat2 to air in both photoperiods caused measurable oxidation of the leaf glutathione pool within hours. Oxidation continued on subsequent days and was accompanied by accumulation of glutathione. This effect was stronger in cat2 transferred to air in short days, and was not linked to appreciable increases in the extractable activities of or transcripts encoding enzymes involved in the committed pathway of glutathione synthesis. In contrast, it was accompanied by increases in serine, O-acetylserine, and cysteine. These changes in metabolites were accompanied by induction of genes encoding adenosine phosphosulfate reductase (APR), particularly APR3, as well as a specific serine acetyltransferase gene (SAT2.1) encoding a chloroplastic SAT. Marked induction of these genes was only observed in cat2 transferred to air in short-day conditions, where cysteine and glutathione accumulation was most dramatic. Unlike other SAT genes, which showed negligible induction in cat2, the relative abundance of APR and SAT2.1 transcripts was closely correlated with marker transcripts for H2O2 signaling. Together, the data underline the importance of cysteine synthesis in oxidant-induced up-regulation of glutathione synthesis and suggest that the chloroplast makes an important contribution to cysteine production under these circumstances.

  15. Update on chloroplast research

    OpenAIRE

    Armbruster, Ute; Pesaresi, Paolo; Pribil, Mathias; Hertle, Alexander; Leister, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplasts, the green differentiation form of plastids, are the sites of photosynthesis and other important plant functions. Genetic and genomic technologies have greatly boosted the rate of discovery and functional characterization of chloroplast proteins during the past decade. Indeed, data obtained using high-throughput methodologies, in particular proteomics and transcriptomics, are now routinely used to assign functions to chloroplast proteins. Our knowledge of many chloroplast process...

  16. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; CHEN, YI-CHENG; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from...

  18. Chloroplast lipid transfer processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii involving a TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL 2 (TGD2) orthologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warakanont, Jaruswan; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Michel, Elena J S; Murphy, George R; Hsueh, Peter Y; Roston, Rebecca L; Sears, Barbara B; Benning, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    In plants, lipids of the photosynthetic membrane are synthesized by parallel pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the chloroplast envelope membranes. Lipids derived from the two pathways are distinguished by their acyl-constituents. Following this plant paradigm, the prevalent acyl composition of chloroplast lipids suggests that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas) does not use the ER pathway; however, the Chlamydomonas genome encodes presumed plant orthologues of a chloroplast lipid transporter consisting of TGD (TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL) proteins that are required for ER-to-chloroplast lipid trafficking in plants. To resolve this conundrum, we identified a mutant of Chlamydomonas deleted in the TGD2 gene and characterized the respective protein, CrTGD2. Notably, the viability of the mutant was reduced, showing the importance of CrTGD2. Galactoglycerolipid metabolism was altered in the tgd2 mutant with monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) synthase activity being strongly stimulated. We hypothesize this to be a result of phosphatidic acid accumulation in the chloroplast outer envelope membrane, the location of MGDG synthase in Chlamydomonas. Concomitantly, increased conversion of MGDG into triacylglycerol (TAG) was observed. This TAG accumulated in lipid droplets in the tgd2 mutant under normal growth conditions. Labeling kinetics indicate that Chlamydomonas can import lipid precursors from the ER, a process that is impaired in the tgd2 mutant. PMID:26496373

  19. Chloroplast quality control - balancing energy production and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, Jesse D

    2016-10-01

    Contents 36 I. 36 II. 37 III. 37 IV. 38 V. 39 VI. 40 VII. 40 40 References 40 SUMMARY: All organisms require the ability to sense their surroundings and adapt. Such capabilities allow them to thrive in a wide range of habitats. This is especially true for plants, which are sessile and have to be genetically equipped to withstand every change in their environment. Plants and other eukaryotes use their energy-producing organelles (i.e. mitochondria and chloroplasts) as such sensors. In response to a changing cellular or external environment, these organelles can emit 'retrograde' signals that alter gene expression and/or cell physiology. This signaling is important in plants, fungi, and animals and impacts diverse cellular functions including photosynthesis, energy production/storage, stress responses, growth, cell death, ageing, and tumor progression. Originally, chloroplast retrograde signals in plants were known to lead to the reprogramming of nuclear transcription. New research, however, has pointed to additional posttranslational mechanisms that lead to chloroplast regulation and turnover in response to stress. Such mechanisms involve singlet oxygen, ubiquitination, the 26S proteasome, and cellular degradation machinery. PMID:27533783

  20. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal. PMID:26153739

  1. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz-Linneweber Christian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions.

  2. An Approach to Population and Evolutionary Genetic Theory for Genes in Mitochondria and Chloroplasts, and Some Results

    OpenAIRE

    Birky, C. William; Maruyama, Takeo; Fuerst, Paul

    1983-01-01

    We developed population genetic theory for organelle genes, using an infinite alleles model appropriate for molecular genetic data, and considering the effects of mutation and random drift on the frequencies of selectively neutral alleles. The effects of maternal inheritance and vegetative segregation of organelle genes are dealt with by defining new effective gene numbers, and substituting these for 2Ne in classical theory of nuclear genes for diploid organisms. We define three different eff...

  3. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072194

  4. Evolution of the chloroplast division machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo GAO; Fuli GAO

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic organelles derived from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria during evolution.Dramatic changes occurred during the process of the formation and evolution of chloroplasts,including the large-scale gene transfer from chloroplast to nucleus.However,there are still many essential characters remaining.For the chloroplast division machinery,FtsZ proteins,Ftn2,SulA and part of the division site positioning system- MinD and MinE are still conserved.New or at least partially new proteins,such as FtsZ family proteins FtsZl and ARC3,ARC6H,ARC5,PDV1,PDV2 and MCD1,were introduced for the division of chloroplasts during evolution.Some bacterial cell division proteins,such as FtsA,MreB,Ftn6,FtsW and Ftsl,probably lost their function or were gradually lost.Thus,the chloroplast division machinery is a dynamically evolving structure with both conservation and innovation.

  5. Ionizing radiation and bacterial challenge alter splenic cytokine gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Exogenous proinflammatory cytokines can alter the response of mice to γradiation, but the role of endogenous inflammatory cytokines after bacterial infection in irradiated animals is not known. Gene expression of hematopoietic (GM-CSF) and proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) cytokines were examined in spleens of B6D2F1/J female mice after irradiation alone (1.0- and 7.0-Gy), and after irradiation followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae s.c. challenge 4 days postirradiation by using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. At 4, 8, and 24 h after bacterial challenge in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, GM-CSF mRNA increased (p<0.05). TNF-α mRNA in irradiated mice were slightly decreased, whereas after bacterial challenge, TNF-α mRNA elevated at 30 h in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice; at 4, and 8 h in 1.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and at 1 h in sham-irradiated mice (p<0.05). IL-6 mRNA displayed a biphasic response in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice, and, after bacterial challenge, in both irradiated mice (1.0- and 7.0-Gy) and sham-irradiated mice. IL-1β mRNA remained at or below normal for 8 h and increased at 24 h after bacterial challenge on day 4 in 7.0-Gy-irradiated mice. These results indicate that sublethal gamma radiation alters the patterns of the hematopoietic and proinflammatory cytokine responses to bacterial challenge in vivo. Consequently, treatment protocols may need to take into account changes in cytokine gene responses to resolve infection after irradiation. (author)

  6. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and ...

  7. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; Maleux, Katrien; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Storme, Véronique; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Leaves are the plant's powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  8. Ion Channels in Plant Bioenergetic Organelles, Chloroplasts and Mitochondria: From Molecular Identification to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Checchetto, Vanessa; Finazzi, Giovanni; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-03-01

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological measurements, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed the research of ion transport a step forward in the case of the plant bioenergetic organelles, chloroplasts and mitochondria, leading to the molecular identification and functional characterization of several ion transport systems in recent years. Here we focus on channels that mediate relatively high-rate ion and water flux and summarize the current knowledge in this field, focusing on targeting mechanisms, proteomics, electrophysiology, and physiological function. In addition, since chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial ancestor, we give an overview of the information available about cyanobacterial ion channels and discuss the evolutionary origin of chloroplast channels. The recent molecular identification of some of these ion channels allowed their physiological functions to be studied using genetically modified Arabidopsis plants and cyanobacteria. The view is emerging that alteration of chloroplast and mitochondrial ion homeostasis leads to organelle dysfunction, which in turn significantly affects the energy metabolism of the whole organism. Clear-cut identification of genes encoding for channels in these organelles, however, remains a major challenge in this rapidly developing field. Multiple strategies including bioinformatics, cell biology, electrophysiology, use of organelle-targeted ion-sensitive probes, genetics, and identification of signals eliciting specific ion fluxes across organelle membranes should provide a better understanding of the physiological role of organellar channels and their contribution to signaling pathways in plants in the future. PMID:26751960

  9. Congruent Deep Relationships in the Grape Family (Vitaceae) Based on Sequences of Chloroplast Genomes and Mitochondrial Genes via Genome Skimming

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ning; Wen, Jun; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Vitaceae is well-known for having one of the most economically important fruits, i.e., the grape (Vitis vinifera). The deep phylogeny of the grape family was not resolved until a recent phylogenomic analysis of 417 nuclear genes from transcriptome data. However, it has been reported extensively that topologies based on nuclear and organellar genes may be incongruent due to differences in their evolutionary histories. Therefore, it is important to reconstruct a backbone phylogeny of the grape ...

  10. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manifestation of nitrogen deficiency in vascular plants and algae is chlorosis, indicating that chloroplast biogenesis can be strongly restricted by direct or indirect effects of nitrogen assimilation products. To define the molecular basis of nitrogen responses we are using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Depending on the levels of ammonium, steady-state deficiency conditions are established such that the cellular levels of chlorophylls and xanthophylls are depressed. Chloroplasts in nitrogen-deficient cells contain appreciable levels of carbon assimilation enzyme and thylakoids with high electron transport activities. However, the light harvesting complexes are nearly absent and Photosystem I exhibits unusual characteristics. Studies of rates of protein synthesis by in vivo pulse-chase labeling and levels of RNAs encoded by the chloroplast and nuclear genomes have been initiated: the accumulation of transcripts for the nuclear light-harvesting apoproteins is dramatically altered qualitatively and quantitatively; there is no major effect on chloroplast RNAs but, in general, these are inefficiently utilized for protein synthesis until nitrogen is provided to the cultures. Supplying nitrogen results in an almost immediate release of chloroplast mRNAs from a translational arrest but the stimulation of the accumulation of nuclear transcripts for light-harvesting apoproteins does not occur until after a 1-2 hour lag

  11. Refactoring the six-gene photosystem II core in the chloroplast of the green algae chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Scranton, Melissa A;

    2016-01-01

    production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct...

  12. A gene-alteration profile of human lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    R. Blanco; Iwakawa, R.; Tang, M; Kohno, T.; Angulo, B; Pio, R. (Rubén); Montuenga, L M; Minna, J D; Yokota, J; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Aberrant proteins encoded from genes altered in tumors drive cancer development and may also be therapeutic targets. Here we derived a comprehensive gene-alteration profile of lung cancer cell lines. We tested 17 genes in a panel of 88 lung cancer cell lines and found the rates of alteration to be higher than previously thought. Nearly all cells feature inactivation at TP53 and CDKN2A or RB1, whereas BRAF, MET, ERBB2, and NRAS alterations were infrequent. A p...

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  14. Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus has chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius.

    OpenAIRE

    Rieseberg, L H; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S.; Doan, K

    1990-01-01

    Heiser [Heiser, C. B. (1951) Evolution 5, 42-51] hypothesized that Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus was derived by the introduction of H. annuus into Texas and subsequent introgression of genes from Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius into H. annuus. Although often considered to be one of the best cases of introgression in plants, alternative hypotheses to introgression, such as convergence or the joint retention of the ancestral condition, could not be ruled out in the original study. To te...

  15. Intercontinental long-distance dispersal of Canellaceae from the New to the Old World revealed by a nuclear single copy gene and chloroplast loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian; Salomo, Karsten; Salazar, Jackeline; Naumann, Julia; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Neinhuis, Christoph; Feild, Taylor S; Wanke, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Canellales, a clade consisting of Winteraceae and Canellaceae, represent the smallest order of magnoliid angiosperms. The clade shows a broad distribution throughout the Southern Hemisphere, across a diverse range of dry to wet tropical forests. In contrast to their sister-group, Winteraceae, the phylogenetic relations and biogeography within Canellaceae remain poorly studied. Here we present the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized genera of Canellales with a special focus on the Old World Canellaceae using a combined dataset consisting of the chloroplast trnK-matK-trnK-psbA and the nuclear single copy gene mag1 (Maigo 1). Within Canellaceae we found high statistical support for the monophyly of Warburgia and Cinnamosma. However, we also found relationships that differ from previous studies. Cinnamodendron splitted into two clades, a South American clade and a second clade confined to the Antilles and adjacent areas. Cinnamodendron from the Antilles, as well as Capsicodendron, South American Cinnamodendron and Pleodendron were not monophyletic. Consequently, Capsicodendron should be included in the South American Cinnamodendron clade and the genus Pleodendron merged with the Cinnamodendron clade from the Antilles. We also found that Warburgia (restricted to mainland eastern Africa) together with the South American Cinnamodendron and Capsicodendron are sister to the Malagasy genus Cinnamosma. In addition to the unexpected geographical relationships, both biogeographic and molecular clock analyses suggest vicariance, extinction, and at least one intercontinental long-distance-dispersal event. Our dating result contrasts previous work on Winteraceae. Diversification of Winteraceae took place in the Paleocene, predating the Canellaceae diversification by 13 MA in the Eocene. The phylogenetic relationships for Canellaceae supported here offer a solid framework for a future taxonomic revision of the Canellaceae. PMID:25579657

  16. The genetic alteration of MTS1/CDKN2 gene in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MTS1/CDKN2 gene plays a key role in cell cycle regulation, and there have been many studies about the significance of this gene in tumorigenesis. To investigate the frequency of MTS1/CDKN2 gene alteration in Korean esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with paired PCR analysis to detect homozygous deletion and PCR-SSCP methods to find minute mutations, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. And in cases without RB gene a alterations, direct sequence analysis was also done. There was no homozygous deletions. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in four cases at exon 2, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 97 of mutation in codon 100 which changed TAT (Tyr) from GAT (Asp). But there were not MTS1/CDKN2 gene alterations in cases without Rb gene alterations. Analysis of clinical data did not show any differences depending upon MTS1/CDKN2 gene alterations. Therefore the MTS1/CDKN2 gene mutations were infrequent events and do not play a major role in the group of patients examined. More study for contribution of methylation in MTS1/CDKN2 gene for inactivation of p16 should be done before evaluation and application of MTS1/CDKN2 gene in tumorigenesis and as an candidate of gene therapy. (author). 15 refs

  17. Origin of a chloroplast protein importer

    OpenAIRE

    Bölter, Bettina; Soll, Jürgen; Schulz, Alexander; Hinnah, Silke; Wagner, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During evolution, chloroplasts have relinquished the majority of their genes to the nucleus. The products of transferred genes are imported into the organelle with the help of an import machinery that is distributed across the inner and outer plastid membranes. The evolutionary origin of this machinery is puzzling because, in the putative predecessors, the cyanobacteria, the outer two membranes, the plasma membrane, and the lipopolysaccharide layer lack a functionally similar protein import s...

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Han, Limin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos is 154 995 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 944 bp separated by a large single-copy (LSC) region and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 87 366 bp and 15 741 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes, 18 of which are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions. In these genes, 16 genes contained single intron and two genes comprising double introns. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using complete chloroplast genome revealed that A. macrorrhizos does not belong to Araceae family, which infers that the A. macrorrhizos is distant from the species in Araceae family. PMID:26258514

  19. Gene conversion as a mechanism for divergence of a chloroplast tRNA gene inserted in the mitochondrial genome of Brassica oleracea.

    OpenAIRE

    Dron, M; Hartmann, C; Rode, A.; Sevignac, M

    1985-01-01

    We have characterized a 1.7 kb sequence, containing a tRNA Leu2 gene shared by the ct and mt genomes of Brassica oleracea. The two sequences are completely homologous except in two short regions where two distinct gene conversion events have occurred between two sets of direct repeats leading to the insertion of 5 bp in the T loop of the mt copy of the ct gene. This is the first evidence that gene conversion represents the initial evolutionary step in inactivation of transferred ct genes in t...

  20. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships. PMID:26214707

  1. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized the albino mutant emb1303-1 in Arabidopsis. The mutant displayed a severe dwarf phenotype with small albino rosette leaves and short roots on a synthetic medium containing sucrose. It is pigment-deficient and seedling lethal when grown in soil. Embryo development was delayed in the mutant, although seed germination was not significantly im-paired. The plastids of emb1303-1 were arrested in early developmental stages without the classical stack of thylakoid membrane. Genetic and molecular analyses uncovered that the EMB1303 gene encodes a novel chloroplast-localized protein. Mieroarray and RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of nuclear-and plastid-encoded genes involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis were substantially downregulated in the mutant. Moreover, the accu-mulation of several major chloroplast proteins was severely compromised in emb1303-1. These results suggest that EMBI303 is essential for chloroplast development.

  2. A synthetic gene increases TGFβ3 accumulation by 75-fold in tobacco chloroplasts enabling rapid purification and folding into a biologically active molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisby, Martin F; Mellors, Philip; Madesis, Panagiotis; Ellin, Marianne; Laverty, Hugh; O'Kane, Sharon; Ferguson, Mark W J; Day, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Human transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3) is a new therapeutic protein used to reduce scarring during wound healing. The active molecule is a nonglycosylated, homodimer comprised of 13-kDa polypeptide chains linked by disulphide bonds. Expression of recombinant human TGFβ3 in chloroplasts and its subsequent purification would provide a sustainable source of TGFβ3 free of animal pathogens. A synthetic sequence (33% GC) containing frequent chloroplast codons raised accumulation of the 13-kDa TGFβ3 polypeptide by 75-fold compared to the native coding region (56% GC) when expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. The 13-kDa TGFβ3 monomer band was more intense than the RuBisCO 15-kDa small subunit on Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels. TGFβ3 accumulated in insoluble aggregates and was stable in leaves of different ages but was not detected in seeds. TGFβ3 represented 12% of leaf protein and appeared as monomer, dimer and trimer bands on Western blots of SDS-PAGE gels. High yield and insolubility facilitated initial purification and refolding of the 13-kDa polypeptide into the TGFβ3 homodimer recognized by a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody. The TGFβ3 homodimer and trace amounts of monomer were the only bands visible on silver-stained gels following purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. N-terminal sequencing and electronspray ionization mass spectrometry showed the removal of the initiator methionine and physical equivalence of the chloroplast-produced homodimer to standard TGFβ3. Functional equivalence was demonstrated by near-identical dose-response curves showing the inhibition of mink lung epithelial cell proliferation. We conclude that chloroplasts are an attractive production platform for synthesizing recombinant human TGFβ3. PMID:21535357

  3. Complete chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum: extensiverearrangements are associated with repeats and tRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberle, Rosemarie C.; Fourcade, Matthew L.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-09

    Chloroplast genome structure, gene order and content arehighly conserved in land plants. We sequenced the complete chloroplastgenome sequence of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) a member of anangiosperm family known for highly rearranged chloroplast genomes. Thetotal genome size is 162,321 bp with an IR of 27,273 bp, LSC of 100,113bp and SSC of 7,661 bp. The genome encodes 115 unique genes, with 19duplicated in the IR, a tRNA (trnI-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC and aprotein coding gene (psbJ) duplicated twice, for a total of 137 genes.Four genes (ycf15, rpl23, infA and accD) are truncated and likelynonfunctional; three others (clpP, ycf1 and ycf2) are so highly divergedthat they may now be pseudogenes. The most conspicuous feature of theTrachelium genome is the presence of eighteen internally unrearrangedblocks of genes that have been inverted or relocated within the genome,relative to the typical gene order of most angiosperm chloroplastgenomes. Recombination between repeats or tRNAs has been suggested as twomeans of chloroplast genome rearrangements. We compared the relativenumber of repeats in Trachelium to eight other angiosperm chloroplastgenomes, and evaluated the location of repeats and tRNAs in relation torearrangements. Trachelium has the highest number and largest repeats,which are concentrated near inversion endpoints or other rearrangements.tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints. There is likely nosingle mechanism responsible for the remarkable number of alterations inthis genome, but both repeats and tRNAs are clearly associated with theserearrangements. Land plant chloroplast genomes are highly conserved instructure, gene order and content. The chloroplast genomes of ferns, thegymnosperm Ginkgo, and most angiosperms are nearly collinear, reflectingthe gene order in lineages that diverged from lycopsids and the ancestralchloroplast gene order over 350 million years ago (Raubeson and Jansen,1992). Although earlier mapping studies

  4. Chromatin looping as a target for altering erythroid gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivega, Ivan; Dean, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The β-hemoglobinopathies are the most common monogenic disorders in humans, with symptoms arising after birth when the fetal γ-globin genes are silenced and the adult β-globin gene is activated. There is a growing appreciation that genome organization and the folding of chromosomes are key determinants of gene transcription. Underlying this function is the activity of transcriptional enhancers that increase the transcription of target genes over long linear distances. To accomplish this, enhancers engage in close physical contact with target promoters through chromosome folding or looping that is orchestrated by protein complexes that bind to both sites and stabilize their interaction. We find that enhancer activity can be redirected with concomitant changes in gene transcription. Both targeting the β-globin locus control region (LCR) to the γ-globin gene in adult erythroid cells by tethering and epigenetic unmasking of a silenced γ-globin gene lead to increased frequency of LCR/γ-globin contacts and reduced LCR/β-globin contacts. The outcome of these manipulations is robust, pancellular γ-globin transcription activation with a concomitant reduction in β-globin transcription. These examples show that chromosome looping may be considered a therapeutic target for gene activation in β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26918894

  5. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips Aaron T; Chakraborty Nabarun; Hammamieh Rasha; Carroll Erica E; Miller Stacy-Ann M; Jett Marti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta) closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV). A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected ani...

  6. Alteration of plant meristem function by manipulation of the Retinoblastoma-like plant RRB gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Tim (Madison, WI); Feiler, Heidi (Albany, CA); Gruissem, Wilhelm (Forch, CH); Jenkins, Susan (Martinez, CA); Roe, Judith (Manhattan, KS); Zambryski, Patricia (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-01-16

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  7. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 unique genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Of these, seven genes are duplicated in the inverted repeats and 12 genes contain one or two introns. Comparative analysis with the reference chloroplast genome revealed 125 simple sequence repeat motifs and 34 variants, mostly located in the noncoding regions. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome sequence of C. frutescens reported here is a valuable genetic resource for Capsicum species. PMID:27213127

  8. Gene expression alterations in brains of mice infected with three strains of scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Race Richard E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders which occur in humans and various animal species. Examples include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep, and experimental mice. To gain insights into TSE pathogenesis, we made and used cDNA microarrays to identify disease-associated alterations in gene expression. Brain gene expression in scrapie-infected mice was compared to mock-infected mice at pre-symptomatic and symptomatic time points. Three strains of mouse scrapie that show striking differences in neuropathology were studied: ME7, 22L, and Chandler/RML. Results In symptomatic mice, over 400 significant gene expression alterations were identified. In contrast, only 22 genes showed significant alteration in the pre-symptomatic animals. We also identified genes that showed significant differences in alterations in gene expression between strains. Genes identified in this study encode proteins that are involved in many cellular processes including protein folding, endosome/lysosome function, immunity, synapse function, metal ion binding, calcium regulation and cytoskeletal function. Conclusion These studies shed light on the complex molecular events that occur during prion disease, and identify genes whose further study may yield new insights into strain specific neuropathogenesis and ante-mortem tests for TSEs.

  9. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  10. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report, August 1995--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1997-06-17

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focused on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The research focused on the isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  11. Microarray Expression Profiling Identifies Genes with Altered Expression in HDL-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Callow, Matthew J.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Gong, Elaine L.; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism may affect the expression of other genes, we screened an array of >5000 mouse expressed sequence tags for altered gene expression in the livers of two lines of mice with dramatic decreases in HDL plasma concentrations. Labeled cDNA from livers of apolipoprotein AI (apoAI)-knockout mice, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) transgenic mice, and control mice were...

  12. Identification of cancer-driver genes in focal genomic alterations from whole genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho; Hur, Youngmi; Lee, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) are the main genomic events that occur during the initiation and development of cancer. Distinguishing driver aberrant regions from passenger regions, which might contain candidate target genes for cancer therapies, is an important issue. Several methods for identifying cancer-driver genes from multiple cancer patients have been developed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. However, for NGS data, methods for the SNP array cannot be directly applied because of different characteristics of NGS such as higher resolutions of data without predefined probes and incorrectly mapped reads to reference genomes. In this study, we developed a wavelet-based method for identification of focal genomic alterations for sequencing data (WIFA-Seq). We applied WIFA-Seq to whole genome sequencing data from glioblastoma multiforme, ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma, and identified focal genomic alterations, which contain candidate cancer-related genes as well as previously known cancer-driver genes. PMID:27156852

  13. Identification of cancer-driver genes in focal genomic alterations from whole genome sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho; Hur, Youngmi; Lee, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) are the main genomic events that occur during the initiation and development of cancer. Distinguishing driver aberrant regions from passenger regions, which might contain candidate target genes for cancer therapies, is an important issue. Several methods for identifying cancer-driver genes from multiple cancer patients have been developed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. However, for NGS data, methods for the SNP array cannot be directly applied because of different characteristics of NGS such as higher resolutions of data without predefined probes and incorrectly mapped reads to reference genomes. In this study, we developed a wavelet-based method for identification of focal genomic alterations for sequencing data (WIFA-Seq). We applied WIFA-Seq to whole genome sequencing data from glioblastoma multiforme, ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma, and identified focal genomic alterations, which contain candidate cancer-related genes as well as previously known cancer-driver genes. PMID:27156852

  14. Dynamics of chloroplast genomes in green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Qiuxiang; Hu, Wangxiong; Wang, Tingzhang; Xue, Qingzhong; Messing, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles, in which genes have widely been used in the phylogenetic analysis of green plants. Here, we took advantage of the breadth of plastid genomes (cpDNAs) sequenced species to investigate their dynamic changes. Our study showed that gene rearrangements occurred more frequently in the cpDNAs of green algae than in land plants. Phylogenetic trees were generated using 55 conserved protein-coding genes including 33 genes for photosynthesis, 16 ribosomal protein genes and 6 other genes, which supported the monophyletic evolution of vascular plants, land plants, seed plants, and angiosperms. Moreover, we could show that seed plants were more closely related to bryophytes rather than pteridophytes. Furthermore, the substitution rate for cpDNA genes was calculated to be 3.3×10(-10), which was almost 10 times lower than genes of nuclear genomes, probably because of the plastid homologous recombination machinery. PMID:26206079

  15. Genetic Alterations within the DENND1A Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, Mette B.; Michael F B Nielsen; Klaus Brusgaard; Qihua Tan; Marianne S Andersen; Dorte Glintborg; Michael Gaster

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene in white patients with PCOS to identify possible alterations that may be implicated in the PCOS pathogenesis. Patients were referred with PCOS and/or hirsutism between 1998 and 2011 (n = 261). PCOS ...

  16. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiangjun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and the regulatory control of chloroplast biogenesis and development remain to be elucidated. Results Green cauliflower mutant causes ectopic development of chloroplasts in the curd tissue of the plant, turning the otherwise white curd green. To investigate the transcriptional control of chloroplast development, we compared gene expression between green and white curds using the RNA-seq approach. Deep sequencing produced over 15 million reads with lengths of 86 base pairs from each cDNA library. A total of 7,155 genes were found to exhibit at least 3-fold changes in expression between green and white curds. These included light-regulated genes, genes encoding chloroplast constituents, and genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Moreover, we discovered that the cauliflower ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (BoHY5 was expressed higher in green curds than white curds and that 2616 HY5-targeted genes, including 1600 up-regulated genes and 1016 down-regulated genes, were differently expressed in green in comparison to white curd tissue. All these 1600 up-regulated genes were HY5-targeted genes in the light. Conclusions The genome-wide profiling of gene expression by RNA-seq in green curds led to the identification of large numbers of genes associated with chloroplast development, and suggested the role of regulatory genes in the high hierarchy of light signaling pathways in mediating the ectopic chloroplast development in the green curd cauliflower mutant.

  17. Radiation-induced alteration of gene expression in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of rats to high dose of γ-radiation (200 Gy) significantly enhanced the ability of mitochondria to accumulate and retain exogenously added Ca2+ one hour after irradiation. 48 hours after irradiation no differences in Ca2+ transporting parameters between mitochondria from control and irradiated animals were found. The stability of mitochondrial membrane potential - the driving force for Ca2+ accumulation and retention, depends on the expression of bcl-2 gene, whose product not only participates in the regulation of Ca2+ fluxes in, but also demonstrates antioxidant properties. The overexpression of this gene was shown to protect cell mitochondria against oxidative stress. However, the investigation of bcl-2 expression in rat liver did not show any significant changes neither 1 nor 48 hours after irradiation. Taking into account that the damage of mitochondria induced action of oxygen radicals and Ca2+ can be prevented by antioxidants, the expression of genes encoded superoxiddismutase and catalase was studied. Expression was gradually stimulated. However, under conditions employed in experiments, direct changes. Presumably this can be explained by a post-translational regulation of the activity of these enzymes. (authors)

  18. The complete chloroplast genome of Schrenkiella parvula (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qi; Hao, Guoqian; Wang, Xiaojuan; Bi, Hao; Li, Yuanshuo; Guo, Xinyi; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Schrenkiella parvula is an Arabidopsis-related model species used here for studying plant stress tolerance. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome sequence of S. parvula has been reported for the first time. The total length of the chloroplast genome was 153 979 bp, which had a typical quadripartite structure. The annotated plastid genome includes 87 protein-coding genes, 39 tRNA genes and 8 ribosomal RNA genes. The evolutionary relationships revealed by our phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. parvula is closer to the Brassiceae species when compared with Eutrema salsugineum. PMID:26260181

  19. Using a cDNA microarray to study cellular gene expression altered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永忠; 谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 陈建平; 淳于利娟; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the global effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection on macrophages. Methods The gene expression profiling of macrophage U937, in response to infection with M.tuberculosis H37Ra, was monitored using a high-density cDNA microarray. Results M.tuberculosis infection caused 463 differentially expressed genes, of which 366 genes are known genes registered in the Gene Bank. These genes function in various cellular processes including intracellular signalling, cytoskeletal rearrangement, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, cell surface receptors, cell-mediated immunity as well as a variety of cellular metabolic pathways, and may play key roles in M.tuberculosis infection and intracellular survival. Conclusions M.tuberculosis infection alters the expression of host-cell genes, and these genes will provide a foundation for understanding the infection process of M.tuberculosis. The cDNA microarray is a powerful tool for studying pathogen-host cell interaction.

  20. Definition of a core module for the nuclear retrograde response to altered organellar gene expression identifies GLK overexpressors as gun mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leister, Dario; Kleine, Tatjana

    2016-07-01

    Retrograde signaling can be triggered by changes in organellar gene expression (OGE) induced by inhibitors such as lincomycin (LIN) or mutations that perturb OGE. Thus, an insufficiency of the organelle-targeted prolyl-tRNA synthetase PRORS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana activates retrograde signaling and reduces the expression of nuclear genes for photosynthetic proteins. Recently, we showed that mTERF6, a member of the so-called mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, is involved in the formation of chloroplast (cp) isoleucine-tRNA. To obtain further insights into its functions, co-expression analysis of MTERF6, PRORS1 and two other genes for organellar aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was conducted. The results suggest a prominent role of mTERF6 in aminoacylation activity, light signaling and seed storage. Analysis of changes in whole-genome transcriptomes in the mterf6-1 mutant showed that levels of nuclear transcripts for cp OGE proteins were particularly affected. Comparison of the mterf6-1 transcriptome with that of prors1-2 showed that reduced aminoacylation of proline (prors1-2) and isoleucine (mterf6-1) tRNAs alters retrograde signaling in similar ways. Database analyses indicate that comparable gene expression changes are provoked by treatment with LIN, norflurazon or high light. A core OGE response module was defined by identifying genes that were differentially expressed under at least four of six conditions relevant to OGE signaling. Based on this module, overexpressors of the Golden2-like transcription factors GLK1 and GLK2 were identified as genomes uncoupled mutants. PMID:26876646

  1. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Aaron T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV. A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected animals despite the lack of clinical signs. Splenic tissue from four adult male Indian-origin Rhesus monkeys serologically positive for non-pathogenic SHIV 89.6 was processed by cDNA microarray analysis. Results were compared with the corresponding outcome using splenic tissues from four unexposed adult male Rhesus monkeys. Subsequent gene analysis confirmed statistically significant variations between control and infected samples. Interestingly, SHIV-infected monkeys exhibited altered expression in genes related to apoptosis, signal transduction, T and B lymphocyte activation and importantly, to immune regulation. Although infected animals appeared asymptomatic, our study demonstrated that SHIV-infected monkeys cannot reliably be used in studies of other infectious agents as their baseline gene expression differs from that of normal Rhesus monkeys. The gene expression differences in SHIV-infected animals relative to uninfected animals offer additional clues to the pathogenesis of altered immune function in response to secondary infection.

  2. Maize mutants lacking chloroplast FtsY exhibit pleiotropic defects in the biogenesis of thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Hirohashi, Toshiya; Kikuchi, Shingo; Belcher, Susan; Osborne, Erin; Yano, Satoshi; Terashima, Ichiro; Barkan, Alice; Nakai, Masato

    2004-01-01

    A chloroplast signal recognition particle (SRP) that is related to the SRP involved in secretion in bacteria and eukaryotic cells is used for the insertion of light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins (LHCPs) into the thylakoid membranes. A conserved component of the SRP mechanism is a membrane-bound SRP receptor, denoted FtsY in bacteria. Plant genomes encode FtsY homologs that are targeted to the chloroplast (cpFtsY). To investigate the in vivo roles of cpFtsY, we characterized maize cpFtsY and maize mutants having a Mu transposon insertion in the corresponding gene (chloroplast SRP receptor1, or csr1). Maize cpFtsY accumulates to much higher levels in leaf tissue than in roots and stems. Interestingly, it is present at similar levels in etiolated and green leaf tissue and was found to bind the prolamellar bodies of etioplasts. A null cpFtsY mutant, csr1-1, showed a substantial loss of leaf chlorophyll, whereas a "leaky" allele, csr1-3, conditioned a more moderate chlorophyll deficiency. Both alleles caused the loss of various LHCPs and the thylakoid-bound photosynthetic enzyme complexes and were seedling lethal. By contrast, levels of the membrane-bound components of the thylakoid protein transport machineries were not altered. The thylakoid membranes in csr1-1 chloroplasts were unstacked and reduced in abundance, but the prolamellar bodies in mutant etioplasts appeared normal. These results demonstrate the essentiality of cpFtsY for the biogenesis not only of the LHCPs but also for the assembly of the other membrane-bound components of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:14688289

  3. Prion disease induced alterations in gene expression in spleen and brain prior to clinical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon O Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon O Kim1, Greg P Snyder1, Tyler M Blazey1, Richard E Race2, Bruce Chesebro2, Pamela J Skinner11Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, USA; 2NIH Laboratory of Persistent Viral Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, Montana, USAAbstract: Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect animals and humans. There is a need to gain understanding of prion disease pathogenesis and to develop diagnostic assays to detect prion diseases prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. The goal of this study was to identify genes that show altered expression early in the disease process in the spleen and brain of prion disease-infected mice. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we identified 67 genes that showed increased expression in the brains of prion disease-infected mice prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. These genes function in many cellular processes including immunity, the endosome/lysosome system, hormone activity, and the cytoskeleton. We confirmed a subset of these gene expression alterations using other methods and determined the time course in which these changes occur. We also identified 14 genes showing altered expression prior to the onset of clinical symptoms in spleens of prion disease infected mice. Interestingly, four genes, Atp1b1, Gh, Anp32a, and Grn, were altered at the very early time of 46 days post-infection. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of prion disease.Keywords: prion disease, microarrays, gene expression

  4. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.)

  5. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  6. Expression of human soluble TRAIL in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zongqi; LI yinü; CHEN Feng; LI Dong; ZHANG Zhifang; LIU Yanxin; ZHENG Dexian; WANG Yong; SHEN Guifang

    2006-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces selectively apoptosis in various tumor cells and virus-infected cells, but rarely in normal cells. A chloroplast expression vector, p64TRAIL, containing the cDNA coding for the soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), was constructed with clpP-trnL-petB-chlL-rpl23-rpl2 as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii plastid homologous recombinant fragments and spectinomycin-resistant aadA gene as a select marker. The plasmid p64TRAIL was transferred into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by the biolistic method. Three independently transformed lines were obtained by 100 mg/L spectinomycin selection. PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis of the sTRAIL coding region DNA and cultivation cells in the dark all showed that the exogenous DNA had been integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii. Western blot analysis showed that human soluble TRAIL was expressed in C. reinhardtii chloroplast. The densitometric analysis of Western blot indicated that the expressed human sTRAIL protein in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii accounted for about 0.43%-0.67% of the total soluble proteins.These experimental results demonstrated the possibility of using transgenic chloroplasts of green alga as bioreactors for production of biopharmaceuticals.

  7. Exploring photosynthesis evolution by comparative analysis of metabolic networks between chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jing

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts descended from cyanobacteria and have a drastically reduced genome following an endosymbiotic event. Many genes of the ancestral cyanobacterial genome have been transferred to the plant nuclear genome by horizontal gene transfer. However, a selective set of metabolism pathways is maintained in chloroplasts using both chloroplast genome encoded and nuclear genome encoded enzymes. As an organelle specialized for carrying out photosynthesis, does the chloroplast metabolic network have properties adapted for higher efficiency of photosynthesis? We compared metabolic network properties of chloroplasts and prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms, mostly cyanobacteria, based on metabolic maps derived from genome data to identify features of chloroplast network properties that are different from cyanobacteria and to analyze possible functional significance of those features. Results The properties of the entire metabolic network and the sub-network that consists of reactions directly connected to the Calvin Cycle have been analyzed using hypergraph representation. Results showed that the whole metabolic networks in chloroplast and cyanobacteria both possess small-world network properties. Although the number of compounds and reactions in chloroplasts is less than that in cyanobacteria, the chloroplast's metabolic network has longer average path length, a larger diameter, and is Calvin Cycle -centered, indicating an overall less-dense network structure with specific and local high density areas in chloroplasts. Moreover, chloroplast metabolic network exhibits a better modular organization than cyanobacterial ones. Enzymes involved in the same metabolic processes tend to cluster into the same module in chloroplasts. Conclusion In summary, the differences in metabolic network properties may reflect the evolutionary changes during endosymbiosis that led to the improvement of the photosynthesis efficiency in higher plants. Our

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection induced alteration of gene expression in human gastric cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chiou, C.; Chan, C.; Sheu, D; Chen, K; Li, Y; Chan, E

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen responsible for many digestive disorders, induces complex changes in patterns of gene expression in infected tissues. cDNA expression arrays provide a useful tool for studying these complex phenomena.
AIM—To identify genes that showed altered expression after H pylori infection of human gastric cells compared with uninfected controls.
METHODS—The gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS was cocultivated with H pylori. Growth of infected cells was d...

  9. Mutation of MeCP2 alters transcriptional regulation of select immediate-early genes

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dan; Cha, Young May; West, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 are associated with neurological dysfunction and impaired neural plasticity. However, the transcriptional changes that underlie these deficits remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mice bearing a C-terminal truncating mutation in Mecp2 (Mecp2308) are hypersensitive to the locomotor stimulating effects of cocaine. Furthermore, these mice have gene-specific alterations in striatal immediate-early gene (IEG) induction foll...

  10. Neuroglobin-overexpression Alters Hypoxic Response Gene Expression in Primary Neuron Culture Following Oxygen Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Jianxiang; Guo, Shuzhen; Xing, Changhong; Fan, Xiang; Ning, MingMing; Yuan, Juliet C.; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a tissue globin specifically expressed in neurons. Our laboratory and others have shown that Ngb overexpression protects neurons against hypoxia/ischemia, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia/ischemia induces a multitude of spatially and temporally regulated responses in gene expression, and initial evidence suggested that Ngb might function in altering biological processes of gene expression. In this study, we as...

  11. Somatic VHL gene alterations in MEN2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma

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    Pacak Karel

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in RET are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2, an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer syndrome that is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC, pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma. Recent studies suggest a "second hit" mechanism resulting in amplification of mutant RET. Somatic VHL gene alterations are implicated in the pathogenesis of MEN2 pheochromocytomas. We hypothesized that somatic VHL gene alterations are also important in the pathogenesis of MEN2-associated MTC. Methods We analyzed 6 MTCs and 1 C-cell hyperplasia (CCH specimen from 7 patients with MEN2A and RET germline mutations in codons 609, 618, 620, or 634, using microdissection, microsatellite analysis, phosphorimage densitometry, and VHL mutation analysis. Results First, we searched for allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET by using the polymorphic markers D10S677, D10S1239, and RET on thyroid tissue from these patients. Evidence for RET amplification by this technique could be demonstrated in 3 of 6 MTCs. We then performed LOH analysis using D3S1038 and D3S1110 which map to the VHL gene locus at 3p25/26. VHL gene deletion was present in 3 MTCs. These 3 MTCs also had an allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET. Mutation analysis of the VHL gene showed a somatic frameshift mutation in 1 MTC that also demonstrated LOH at 3p25/26. In the 2 other MTCs with allelic imbalance of RET and somatic VHL gene deletion, no somatic VHL mutation could be detected. The CCH specimen did neither reveal RET imbalance nor somatic VHL gene alterations. Conclusion These data suggest that a RET germline mutation is necessary for development of CCH, that allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET may set off tumorigenesis, and that somatic VHL gene alterations may not play a major role in tumorigenesis of MEN2A-associated MTC.

  12. Somatic VHL gene alterations in MEN2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germline mutations in RET are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer syndrome that is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma. Recent studies suggest a 'second hit' mechanism resulting in amplification of mutant RET. Somatic VHL gene alterations are implicated in the pathogenesis of MEN2 pheochromocytomas. We hypothesized that somatic VHL gene alterations are also important in the pathogenesis of MEN2-associated MTC. We analyzed 6 MTCs and 1 C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) specimen from 7 patients with MEN2A and RET germline mutations in codons 609, 618, 620, or 634, using microdissection, microsatellite analysis, phosphorimage densitometry, and VHL mutation analysis. First, we searched for allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET by using the polymorphic markers D10S677, D10S1239, and RET on thyroid tissue from these patients. Evidence for RET amplification by this technique could be demonstrated in 3 of 6 MTCs. We then performed LOH analysis using D3S1038 and D3S1110 which map to the VHL gene locus at 3p25/26. VHL gene deletion was present in 3 MTCs. These 3 MTCs also had an allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET. Mutation analysis of the VHL gene showed a somatic frameshift mutation in 1 MTC that also demonstrated LOH at 3p25/26. In the 2 other MTCs with allelic imbalance of RET and somatic VHL gene deletion, no somatic VHL mutation could be detected. The CCH specimen did neither reveal RET imbalance nor somatic VHL gene alterations. These data suggest that a RET germline mutation is necessary for development of CCH, that allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET may set off tumorigenesis, and that somatic VHL gene alterations may not play a major role in tumorigenesis of MEN2A-associated MTC

  13. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth1[OPEN

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    De Milde, Liesbeth; Maleux, Katrien

    2016-01-01

    Leaves are the plant’s powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  14. Effect of growth temperature on chloroplast structure and activity in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, R M; Critchley, C; Bain, J M; Nott, R

    1978-08-01

    Seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Abyssinian) were grown at constant temperature and light intensity and the properties and structure of chloroplasts in the primary leaf were examined. Seventeen growth temperatures ranging from 2 to 37 C were employed. Three major effects of the growth temperature were seen. (a) At very low and high growth temperatures chloroplast biogenesis was inhibited. This occurred in plants grown at temperatures above 32 C while growth at 2 C resulted in a mixed population of pale yellow, pale green, and green plants. (b) Chloroplasts were produced at all other temperatures tested but growth temperatures within a few degrees of those inhibitory to chloroplast development resulted in chloroplasts with abnormal properties and structure. Chloroplasts in the green plants grown at 2 and 5 C showed a number of structural peculiarities, including a characteristic crimping of granal thylakoids. Photoreductive activity, measured using ferricyanide as the Hill oxidant in the presence of gramicidin D, was high, but this activity in chloroplasts isolated from plants grown at 2 C showed thermal inactivation at temperatures 5 degrees lower than was the case with plants grown at higher temperatures. High growth temperatures (30 to 32 C) yielded chloroplasts with reduced photoreductive activity and a tendency toward the formation of large grana and disorientation of the lamellar systems with respect to one another. Chloroplasts of the most affected plants (grown at 32 C) frequently contained a very large elongated granum, with narrow intrathylakoid spaces. (c) Photoreductive activity was not constant at intermediate growth temperatures but steadily declined with decreasing growth temperatures between 27 and 11 C. Some alterations in chloroplast structure were also observed.The changes in chloroplast activity and structure indicate that acclimation to temperature takes place over the entire temperature range in which chloroplast development is

  15. Altered gene expression in highly purified enterocytes from patients with active coeliac disease

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    Jackson John

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease is a multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the intestine caused by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genes within the HLA-DQ locus are considered to contribute some 40% of the genetic influence on this disease. However, information on other disease causing genes is sparse. Since enterocytes are considered to play a central role in coeliac pathology, the aim of this study was to examine gene expression in a highly purified isolate of these cells taken from patients with active disease. Epithelial cells were isolated from duodenal biopsies taken from five coeliac patients with active disease and five non-coeliac control subjects. Contaminating T cells were removed by magnetic sorting. The gene expression profile of the cells was examined using microarray analysis. Validation of significantly altered genes was performed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Enterocyte suspensions of high purity (98–99% were isolated from intestinal biopsies. Of the 3,800 genes investigated, 102 genes were found to have significantly altered expression between coeliac disease patients and controls (p Conclusion This study provides a profile of the molecular changes that occur in the intestinal epithelium of coeliac patients with active disease. Novel candidate genes were revealed which highlight the contribution of the epithelial cell to the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  16. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development.

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    Juan de Dios Barajas-López

    Full Text Available The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the Mg-ProtoIX and its methyl ester Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Phytochrome-Associated Protein Phosphatase 5 (PAPP5 was isolated in a previous study as a putative Mg-ProtoIX interacting protein. In order to elucidate if there is a biological link between PAPP5 and the tetrapyrrole mediated signal we generated double mutants between the Arabidopsis papp5 and the crd mutants. The crd mutant over-accumulates Mg-ProtoIX and Mg-ProtoIX-ME and the tetrapyrrole accumulation triggers retrograde signalling. The crd mutant exhibits repression of PhANG expression, altered chloroplast morphology and a pale phenotype. However, in the papp5crd double mutant, the crd phenotype is restored and papp5crd accumulated wild type levels of chlorophyll, developed proper chloroplasts and showed normal induction of PhANG expression in response to light. Tetrapyrrole feeding experiments showed that PAPP5 is required to respond correctly to accumulation of tetrapyrroles in the cell and that PAPP5 is most likely a component in the plastid signalling pathway down stream of the tetrapyrrole Mg-ProtoIX/Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Inhibition of phosphatase activity phenocopied the papp5crd phenotype in the crd single mutant demonstrating that PAPP5 phosphatase activity is essential to mediate the retrograde signal and to suppress PhANG expression in the crd mutant. Thus, our results suggest that PAPP5 receives an inbalance in the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis through the accumulation of Mg-ProtoIX and acts as a negative

  17. Gene Body Methylation can alter Gene Expression and is a Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Han, Han; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation in promoters is well known to silence genes and is the presumed therapeutic target of methylation inhibitors. Gene body methylation is positively correlated with expression yet its function is unknown. We show that 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment not only reactivates genes but decreases the over-expression of genes, many of which are involved in metabolic processes regulated by c-MYC. Down-regulation is caused by DNA demethylation of the gene bodies and restoration of high levels of expression requires remethylation by DNMT3B. Gene body methylation may therefore be an unexpected therapeutic target for DNA methylation inhibitors, resulting in the normalization of gene over-expression induced during carcinogenesis. Our results provide direct evidence for a causal relationship between gene body methylation and transcription. PMID:25263941

  18. Structure and transcription of the spinach chloroplast rDNA leader region.

    OpenAIRE

    Briat, J F; Dron, M; Loiseaux, S; Mache, R

    1982-01-01

    A cloned fragment of spinach chloroplast DNA carrying 140 bp of the 16S rRNA gene and 691 bp upstream this gene has been analysed by DNA sequencing, by in vitro transcription, by S1 mapping with chloroplast RNAs and purified 16S rRNA from 30S ribosomal subunits. A tRNAVal gene has been located between the position 394 and 465. Crude chloroplast RNA polymerase has been purified by heparin sepharose chromatography of a 80 000 g supernatant from pure lysed spinach plastids and used to transcribe...

  19. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  20. MicroRNA-Offset RNA Alters Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Aronovitz, Mark J.; Baur, Wendy E.; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-offset RNAs (moRs) were first identified in simple chordates and subsequently in mouse and human cells by deep sequencing of short RNAs. MoRs are derived from sequences located immediately adjacent to microRNAs (miRs) in the primary miR (pri-miR). Currently moRs are considered to be simply a by-product of miR biosynthesis that lack biological activity. Here we show for the first time that a moR is biologically active. We demonstrate that endogenous or over-expressed moR-21 significantly alters gene expression and inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In addition, we find that miR-21 and moR-21 may regulate different genes in a given pathway and can oppose each other in regulating certain genes. We report that there is a “seed region” of moR-21 as well as a “seed match region” in the target gene 3’UTR that are indispensable for moR-21-mediated gene down-regulation. We further demonstrate that moR-21-mediated gene repression is Argonaute 2 (Ago2) dependent. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that microRNA offset RNA alters gene expression and is biologically active. PMID:27276022

  1. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  2. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Angelina [University of Arizona; Park, Sang-Hycuk [University of Arizona; Kyndt, John [Bellevue University; Fitzsimmons, Kevin [University of Arizona; Brown, Judith K [University of Arizona

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  3. Induction of Gene Expression Alterations by Culture Medium from Trypsinized Cells

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    M. Ahmad Chaudhry

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study hypothesized that trypsin treatment itself could be a stress inducer before any other physical or chemical mediated stress is introduced. To further understand the role of trypsin treatment, we incubated adherent cells with conditioned growth medium isolated from trypsinized cells after several hours of trypsin action and examined global gene expression profile with microarray technology. Microarray data identified large-scale gene expression alterations in cells receiving conditioned medium from trypsin treated cells compared to control cells that did not receive such medium. Twenty eight genes were found to be upregulated with at least two-fold change in the expression level, while 70 genes were downregulated. Gene expression signature clearly identified stress response. Taken together this data cautions the contribution of background stress while assessing the effects of radiation, certain drugs or environmental mutagens. Further attention is required while determining the role of conditioned medium in elucidating radiobiological phenomenon such as bystander effect.

  4. Chloroplast phosphoproteins: distribution of phosphoproteins within spinach chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of phosphoproteins within spinach chloroplasts was studied. Intact chloroplasts with good rates of CO2-dependent oxygen evolution were fed (γ-32P)ATP and then separated into stroma and membrane fractions. Only one major labelled stroma protein was identified by gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, with a mol. wt. of 66000. The membranes were separated into envelopes and thylakoid fractions. Three labelled proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis in the envelope with mol. wt. of 50500, 29000 and 13000. (author)

  5. Di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate and flutamide alter gene expression in the testis of immature male rats

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    Yu Frank H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We previously demonstrated that the androgenic and anti-androgenic effects of endocrine disruptors (EDs alter reproductive function and exert distinct effects on developing male reproductive organs. To further investigate these effects, we used an immature rat model to examine the effects of di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP and flutamide (Flu on the male reproductive system. Immature male SD rats were treated daily with DEHP and Flu on postnatal days (PNDs 21 to 35, in a dose-dependent manner. As results, the weights of the testes, prostate, and seminal vesicle and anogenital distances (AGD decreased significantly in response to high doses of DEHP or Flu. Testosterone (T levels significantly decreased in all DEHP- treated groups, whereas luteinizing hormone (LH plasma levels were not altered by any of the two treatments at PND 36. However, treatment with DEHP or Flu induced histopathological changes in the testes, wherein degeneration and disorders of Leydig cells, germ cells and dilatation of tubular lumen were observed in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, hyperplasia and denseness of Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells were observed in rats given with high doses of Flu. The results by cDNA microarray analysis indicated that 1,272 genes were up-regulated by more than two-fold, and 1,969 genes were down-regulated in response to DEHP, Flu or both EDs. These genes were selected based on their markedly increased or decreased expression levels. These genes have been also classified on the basis of gene ontology (e.g., steroid hormone biosynthetic process, regulation of transcription, signal transduction, metabolic process, biosynthetic process.... Significant decreases in gene expression were observed in steroidogenic genes (i.e., Star, Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b. In addition, the expression of a common set of target genes, including CaBP1, Vav2, Plcd1, Lhx1 and Isoc1, was altered following exposure to EDs, suggesting that they may be marker genes to

  6. Whole genome sequencing of enriched chloroplast DNA using the Illumina GAII platform

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    Shepherd Lara D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete chloroplast genome sequences provide a valuable source of molecular markers for studies in molecular ecology and evolution of plants. To obtain complete genome sequences, recent studies have made use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify overlapping fragments from conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and can be more difficult to implement where gene organisation differs among plants. An alternative approach is to first isolate chloroplasts and then use the capacity of high-throughput sequencing to obtain complete genome sequences. We report our findings from studies of the latter approach, which used a simple chloroplast isolation procedure, multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of chloroplast DNA, Illumina Genome Analyzer II sequencing, and de novo assembly of paired-end sequence reads. Results A modified rapid chloroplast isolation protocol was used to obtain plant DNA that was enriched for chloroplast DNA, but nevertheless contained nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of this mixed template produced sufficient quantities of chloroplast DNA, even when the amount of starting material was small, and improved the template quality for Illumina Genome Analyzer II (hereafter Illumina GAII sequencing. We demonstrate, using independent samples of karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus, that there is high fidelity in the sequence obtained from this template. Although less than 20% of our sequenced reads could be mapped to chloroplast genome, it was relatively easy to assemble complete chloroplast genome sequences from the mixture of nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast reads. Conclusions We report successful whole genome sequencing of chloroplast DNA from karaka, obtained efficiently and with high fidelity.

  7. Altered gene expression profiles in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of type 2 diabetic rats

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    Abdul-Rahman Omar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an increasing body of epidemiologic and biochemical evidence implying the role of cerebral insulin resistance in Alzheimer-type dementia. For a better understanding of the insulin effect on the central nervous system, we performed microarray-based global gene expression profiling in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of streptozotocin-induced and spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats as model animals for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Results Following pathway analysis and validation of gene lists by real-time polymerase chain reaction, 30 genes from the hippocampus, such as the inhibitory neuropeptide galanin, synuclein gamma and uncoupling protein 2, and 22 genes from the prefrontal cortex, e.g. galanin receptor 2, protein kinase C gamma and epsilon, ABCA1 (ATP-Binding Cassette A1, CD47 (Cluster of Differentiation 47 and the RET (Rearranged During Transfection protooncogene, were found to exhibit altered expression levels in type 2 diabetic model animals in comparison to non-diabetic control animals. These gene lists proved to be partly overlapping and encompassed genes related to neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, neuronal development, insulin secretion, oxidative damage and DNA repair. On the other hand, no significant alterations were found in the transcriptomes of the corpus striatum in the same animals. Changes in the cerebral gene expression profiles seemed to be specific for the type 2 diabetic model, as no such alterations were found in streptozotocin-treated animals. Conclusions According to our knowledge this is the first characterization of the whole-genome expression changes of specific brain regions in a diabetic model. Our findings shed light on the complex role of insulin signaling in fine-tuning brain functions, and provide further experimental evidence in support of the recently elaborated theory of type 3 diabetes.

  8. Mitral valve prolapse is associated with altered extracellular matrix gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, David G; Murphy, Alison; Mignatti, Paolo; Zavadil, Jiri; Galloway, Aubrey C; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-07-15

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the leading indication for isolated mitral valve surgery in the United States. Disorganization of collagens and glycosaminoglycans in the valvular extracellular matrix (ECM) are histological hallmarks of MVP. We performed a transcriptome analysis to study the alterations in ECM-related gene expression in humans with sporadic MVP. Mitral valve specimens were obtained from individuals undergoing valve repair for MVP (n=7 patients) and from non-beating heart-tissue donors (n=3 controls). Purified RNA was subjected to whole-transcriptome microarray analysis. Microarray results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Gene ontology enrichment analysis was performed. 2046 unique genes showed significant differential expression (false discovery rate Functional annotation clustering calculated enrichment of ECM-related ontology groups (enrichment score=4.1). ECM-related gene expression is significantly altered in MVP. Our study is consistent with the histologically observed alterations in collagen and mucopolysaccharide profiles of myxomatous mitral valves. Furthermore, whole-transcriptome analyses suggest dysregulation of multiple pathways, including TGF-beta signaling. PMID:27063507

  9. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. PMID:26063602

  10. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  11. Altered gene expression pattern in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

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    Marek Kiliszek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI were included. The blood was collected on the 1(st day of myocardial infarction, after 4-6 days, and after 6 months. Control group comprised 14 patients with stable coronary artery disease, without history of myocardial infarction. Gene expression analysis was performed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarrays and GCS3000 TG system. Lists of genes showing altered expression levels (fold change >1.5, p<0.05 were submitted to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Gene lists from each group were examined for canonical pathways and molecular and cellular functions. Comparing acute phase of MI with the same patients after 6 months (stable phase and with control group we found 24 genes with changed expression. In canonical analysis three pathways were highlighted: signaling of PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, IL-10 and IL-6 (interleukin 10 and 6. CONCLUSIONS: In the acute phase of STEMI, dozens of genes from several pathways linked with lipid/glucose metabolism, platelet function and atherosclerotic plaque stability show altered expression. Up-regulation of SOCS3 and FAM20 genes in the first days of myocardial infarction is observed in the vast majority of patients.

  12. Chapter 2: Genetic Variability in Nuclear Ribosomal and Chloroplast DNA in Utah (Juniperus Osteosperma) and Western (J. Occidentalis) Juniper (Cupressaceae): Evidence for Interspecific Gene Flow1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Randall G.; Tausch, Robin J.; Nowak, Robert S.

    1998-02-14

    Early studies of evolutionary change in chloroplast DNA indicated limited variability within species. This finding has been attributed to relatively low rates of sequence evolution and has been maintained as justification for the lack of intraspecific sampling in studies examining, relationships at the species level and above. However, documentation of intraspecific variation in cpDNA has become increasingly common and has been attributed in many cases to ''chloroplast capture'' following genetic exchange across species boundaries. Rleseberg and Wendel (1993) list 37 cases of proposed hybridization in plants that include intraspecific variation in cpDNA, 24 (65%) of which they considered to be probable instances of introgression. Rieseberg (1995) suspected that a review of the literature at that time would reveal over 100 cases of intraspecific variation in CPDNA that could be attributed to hybridization and introgression. That intraspecific variation in cpDNA is potentially indicative of hybridization is founded on the expectation that slowly evolving loci or genomes will produce greater molecular variation between than within species. In cases where a species is polymorphic for CPDNA and at least one of the molecular variants is diagnostic for a second species, interspecific hybridization is a plausible explanation. Incongruence between relationships suggested by cpDNA variation and those supported by other types of data (e.g., morphology or molecular data from an additional locus) provides additional support for introgression. One aspect of hybridization in both animals and plants that has become increasingly evident is incongruence in the phylogenetic and geographic distribution of cytoplasmic and nuclear markers. In most cases cytoplasmic introgression appears to be more pervasive than nuclear exchange. This discordance appears attributable to several factors including differences in the mutation rate, number of effective alleles, and modes

  13. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, E. H.; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles i...

  14. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed

  15. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, R.; Ramanis, Z.

    1976-06-01

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed.

  16. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Amber E.; Graham, Linda E.; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  17. Altered gene expression in blood and sputum in COPD frequent exacerbators in the ECLIPSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Singh

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD who are defined as frequent exacerbators suffer with 2 or more exacerbations every year. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenotype are poorly understood. We investigated gene expression profile patterns associated with frequent exacerbations in sputum and blood cells in a well-characterised cohort. Samples from subjects from the ECLIPSE COPD cohort were used; sputum and blood samples from 138 subjects were used for microarray gene expression analysis, while blood samples from 438 subjects were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR testing. Using microarray, 150 genes were differentially expressed in blood (>±1.5 fold change, p≤0.01 between frequent compared to non-exacerbators. In sputum cells, only 6 genes were differentially expressed. The differentially regulated genes in blood included downregulation of those involved in lymphocyte signalling and upregulation of pro-apoptotic signalling genes. Multivariate analysis of the microarray data followed by confirmatory PCR analysis identified 3 genes that predicted frequent exacerbations; B3GNT, LAF4 and ARHGEF10. The sensitivity and specificity of these 3 genes to predict the frequent exacerbator phenotype was 88% and 33% respectively. There are alterations in systemic immune function associated with frequent exacerbations; down-regulation of lymphocyte function and a shift towards pro-apoptosis mechanisms are apparent in patients with frequent exacerbations.

  18. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  19. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  20. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Wiborg, Ove; Bouzinova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We......: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes are likely to associate with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model....

  1. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Bouzinova, Elena; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We......: The present results suggest that altered expression of investigated clock genes are likely to associate with the induction of a depression-like state in the CMS model...

  2. Sequential Infection with Common Pathogens Promotes Human-like Immune Gene Expression and Altered Vaccine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Tiffany A; Bi, Kevin; Kambal, Amal; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Beura, Lalit K; Bürger, Matheus C; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David; Haining, W Nicholas; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-05-11

    Immune responses differ between laboratory mice and humans. Chronic infection with viruses and parasites are common in humans, but are absent in laboratory mice, and thus represent potential contributors to inter-species differences in immunity. To test this, we sequentially infected laboratory mice with herpesviruses, influenza, and an intestinal helminth and compared their blood immune signatures to mock-infected mice before and after vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV-17D). Sequential infection altered pre- and post-vaccination gene expression, cytokines, and antibodies in blood. Sequential pathogen exposure induced gene signatures that recapitulated those seen in blood from pet store-raised versus laboratory mice, and adult versus cord blood in humans. Therefore, basal and vaccine-induced murine immune responses are altered by infection with agents common outside of barrier facilities. This raises the possibility that we can improve mouse models of vaccination and immunity by selective microbial exposure of laboratory animals to mimic that of humans. PMID:27107939

  3. Altered Gene Expression, Mitochondrial Damage and Oxidative Stress: Converging Routes in Motor Neuron Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Rossi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron diseases (MNDs are a rather heterogeneous group of diseases, with either sporadic or genetic origin or both, all characterized by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons. At the cellular level, MNDs share features such as protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial damage and energy deficit, and excitotoxicity and calcium mishandling. This is particularly well demonstrated in ALS, where both sporadic and familial forms share the same symptoms and pathological phenotype, with a prominent role for mitochondrial damage and resulting oxidative stress. Based on recent data, however, altered control of gene expression seems to be a most relevant, and previously overlooked, player in MNDs. Here we discuss which may be the links that make pathways apparently as different as altered gene expression, mitochondrial damage, and oxidative stress converge to generate a similar motoneuron-toxic phenotype.

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Fagopyrum cymosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Lu, Chaolong; Shen, Qi; Yan, Yuying; Xu, Changjiang; Song, Chi

    2016-07-01

    Fagopyrum cymosum is a traditional medicinal plant. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Fagopyrum cymosum is presented. The total genome size is 160,546 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 32,598 bp, separated by large single copy (LSC) and small single copy (SSC) of 84,237 bp and 11,014 bp, respectively. Overall GC contents of the genome were 36.9%. The chloroplast genome harbors 126 annotated genes, including 91 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and six rRNA genes. Eighteen genes contain one or two introns. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a clear evolutionary relationship among species of Caryophyllales. PMID:26119127

  5. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an important medicinal plant Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Kyu-Yeob; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Seong, Rack Seon; Shim, Young Hun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. is a traditional medicinal herb belonging to the Asclepiadoideae subfamily, whose dried roots have been used as traditional medicine in Asia. The complete chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was generated by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was 161 241 bp long, composed of large single copy region (91 995 bp), small single copy region (19 930 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (24 658 bp). The overall GC contents of the chloroplast genome was 37.8%. A total of 114 genes were annotated, which included 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that C. wilfordii is most closely related to Asclepias nivea (Caribbean milkweed) and Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) within the Asclepiadoideae subfamily. PMID:26358391

  6. Alterations of c-Myc and c-erbB-2 genes in ovarian tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Tibor; Popović Branka; Gvozdenović Ana; Boro Aleksandar; Petrović Bojana; Novaković Ivana; Puzović Dragana; Luković Ljiljana; Milašin Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. According to clinical and epidemiological studies, ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women. The causes of ovarian cancer remain largely unknown but various factors may increase the risk of developing it, such as age, family history of cancer, childbearing status etc. This cancer results from a succession of genetic alterations involving oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, which have a critical role in normal cell growth regulation. Mutations and/or overexpress...

  7. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney E. Cross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50 significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development.

  8. Genome profiling of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: frequent alterations of RAS and RUNX1 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematological disease close to, but separate from both myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and myelodysplastic syndromes and may show either myeloproliferative (MP-CMML) or myelodysplastic (MD-CMML) features. Not much is known about the molecular biology of this disease. We studied a series of 30 CMML samples (13 MP- and 11 MD-CMMLs, and 6 acutely transformed cases) from 29 patients by using Agilent high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and sequencing of 12 candidate genes. Two-thirds of samples did not show any obvious alteration of aCGH profiles. In one-third we observed chromosome abnormalities (e.g. trisomy 8, del20q) and gain or loss of genes (e.g. NF1, RB1 and CDK6). RAS mutations were detected in 4 cases (including an uncommon codon 146 mutation in KRAS) and PTPN11 mutations in 3 cases. We detected 11 RUNX1 alterations (9 mutations and 2 rearrangements). The rearrangements were a new, cryptic inversion of chromosomal region 21q21-22 leading to break and fusion of RUNX1 to USP16. RAS and RUNX1 alterations were not mutually exclusive. RAS pathway mutations occurred in MP-CMMLs (~46%) but not in MD-CMMLs. RUNX1 alterations (mutations and cryptic rearrangement) occurred in both MP and MD classes (~38%). We detected RAS pathway mutations and RUNX1 alterations. The latter included a new cryptic USP16-RUNX1 fusion. In some samples, two alterations coexisted already at this early chronic stage

  9. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  10. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu, E-mail: nemoto@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hironori [Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro [Department of Medicinal Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji 192-0392 (Japan); Ohizumi, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Laboratory of Kampo Medicines, Yokohama College of Pharmacy, 601 Matano-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0066 (Japan); Degawa, Masakuni [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  11. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  12. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development

    OpenAIRE

    Juan de Dios Barajas-López; Dmitry Kremnev; Jehad Shaikhali; Aurora Piñas-Fernández; Asa Strand

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the...

  13. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    OpenAIRE

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A.; Lewis, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophy...

  14. RNA transcription in isolated chloroplasts during senescence and rejuvenation of intact cotyledons of CUCURBITA PEPO L. (ZUCCHINI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA transcription was studied in intact chloroplasts isolated from cotyledons of Cucurbita pepoL. (zucchini) during their growth and development including natural senescence and rejuvenation. Rejuvenation of cotyledons was studied after decapitation of the epicotyl above the senescing yellow cotyledons. Maximal incorporation of [32P] UTP into overall chloroplast RNA was measured two days after exposure of seedlings to light (day 6 th after the onset of germination), followed by a gradual decrease reaching minimal values at the age of 25-28 days when cotyledons began to yellow and eventually die. Rejuvenation of cotyledons completely restored chloroplast RNA synthesis and fifteen days after decapitation (at the age of 40 days), the values of chloroplast transcription even exceeded that of the maximal transcriptional activity in young cotyledons. Inhibitory analysis with tagetitoxin (a specific inhibitor of plastid encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase (PEP)) showed that in young and rejuvenated cotyledons about 85% of chloroplast RNA polymerase activity was due to PEP and only 15% corresponded to the nuclear encoded plastid RNA polymerase (NEP). Definite regions of two chloroplast encoded genes were amplified by means of PCR technique using specific DNA primers for Rubisco large subunit gene (rbcL) and the housekeeping gene for chloroplast 16S rRNA as well as chloroplast DNA as a template. The appropriate lengths of the amplified DNA fragments were checked by restriction analysis

  15. The novel protein DELAYED PALE-GREENING1 is required for early chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Li, Weichun; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is one of the most important subjects in plant biology. In this study, an Arabidopsis early chloroplast biogenesis mutant with a delayed pale-greening phenotype (dpg1) was isolated from a T-DNA insertion mutant collection. Both cotyledons and true leaves of dpg1 mutants were initially albino but gradually became pale green as the plant matured. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed a delayed proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. Sequence and transcription analyses showed that AtDPG1 encodes a putatively chloroplast-localized protein containing three predicted transmembrane helices and that its expression depends on both light and developmental status. GUS staining for AtDPG1::GUS transgenic lines showed that this gene was widely expressed throughout the plant and that higher expression levels were predominantly found in green tissues during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were substantially down-regulated in the dpg1 mutant. These data indicate that AtDPG1 plays an essential role in early chloroplast biogenesis, and its absence triggers chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signalling, which ultimately down-regulates the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. PMID:27160321

  16. Altered gene expression in schizophrenia: findings from transcriptional signatures in fibroblasts and blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cattane

    Full Text Available Whole-genome expression studies in the peripheral tissues of patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ can provide new insight into the molecular basis of the disorder and innovative biomarkers that may be of great utility in clinical practice. Recent evidence suggests that skin fibroblasts could represent a non-neural peripheral model useful for investigating molecular alterations in psychiatric disorders.A microarray expression study was conducted comparing skin fibroblast transcriptomic profiles from 20 SCZ patients and 20 controls. All genes strongly differentially expressed were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in fibroblasts and analyzed in a sample of peripheral blood cell (PBC RNA from patients (n = 25 and controls (n = 22. To evaluate the specificity for SCZ, alterations in gene expression were tested in additional samples of fibroblasts and PBCs RNA from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD (n = 16; n = 21, respectively and Bipolar Disorder (BD patients (n = 15; n = 20, respectively.Six genes (JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1, TCF4 were significantly upregulated in SCZ compared to control fibroblasts. In blood, an increase in expression levels was confirmed only for EGR1, whereas JUN was downregulated; no significant differences were observed for the other genes. EGR1 upregulation was specific for SCZ compared to MDD and BD.Our study reports the upregulation of JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1 and TCF4 in the fibroblasts of SCZ patients. A significant alteration in EGR1 expression is also present in SCZ PBCs compared to controls and to MDD and BD patients, suggesting that this gene could be a specific biomarker helpful in the differential diagnosis of major psychoses.

  17. The expression of petunia strigolactone pathway genes is altered as part of the endogenous developmental program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revel S M Drummond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of mutants with increased branching has revealed the strigolactone synthesis/perception pathway which regulates branching in plants. However, whether variation in this well conserved developmental signalling system contributes to the unique plant architectures of different species is yet to be determined. We examined petunia orthologues of the Arabidopsis MAX1 and MAX2 genes to characterise their role in petunia architecture. A single orthologue of MAX1, PhMAX1 which encodes a cytochrome P450, was identified and was able to complement the max1 mutant of Arabidopsis. Petunia has two copies of the MAX2 gene, PhMAX2A and PhMAX2B which encode F-Box proteins. Differences in the transcript levels of these two MAX2-like genes suggest diverging functions. Unlike PhMAX2B, PhMAX2A mRNA levels increase as leaves age. Nonetheless, this gene functionally complements the Arabidopsis max2 mutant indicating that the biochemical activity of the PhMAX2A protein is not significantly different from MAX2. The expression of the petunia strigolactone pathway genes (PhCCD7, PhCCD8, PhMAX1, PhMAX2A, and PhMAX2B was then further investigated throughout the development of wild-type petunia plants. Three of these genes showed changes in mRNA levels over the development series. Alterations to the expression of these genes over time, or in different regions of the plant, may influence the branching growth habit of the plant. Alterations to strigolactone production and/or sensitivity could allow both subtle and dramatic changes to branching within and between species.

  18. Spaceflight induces both transient and heritable alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved, which may provoke stress responses and jeopardize genome integrity. Given the inherent property of epigenetic modifications to respond to intrinsic as well as external perturbations, it is conceivable that epigenetic markers like DNA methylation may undergo alterations in response to spaceflight. We report here that extensive alteration in both DNA methylation and gene expression occurred in rice plants subjected to a spaceflight, as revealed by a set of characterized sequences including 6 transposable elements (TEs) and 11 cellular genes. We found that several features characterize the alterations: (1) All detected alterations are hypermethylation events; (2) whereas alteration in both CG and CNG methylation occurred in the TEs, only alteration in CNG methylation occurred in the cellular genes; (3) alteration in expression includes both up- and down-regulations, which did not show a general correlation with alteration in methylation; (4) altered methylation patterns in both TEs and cellular genes are heritable to progenies at variable frequencies; however, stochastic reversion to wild-type patterns and further de novo changes in progenies are also apparent; and (5) the altered expression states in both TEs and cellular genes are also heritable to selfed progenies but with markedly lower transmission frequencies than altered DNA methylation states. Furthermore, we found that a set of genes encoding for the various putative DNA methyltransferases, 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeller (DDM1) and siRNA-related proteins are extremely sensitive to perturbation by spaceflight, which might be an underlying cause for the altered methylation patterns in the space-flown plants. We discuss implications of spaceflight-induced epigenetic variations with regard to health safety

  19. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  20. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  1. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  2. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells

  3. Alterations in Mc1r gene expression are associated with regressive pigmentation in Astyanax cavefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Bethany A; Gross, Joshua B

    2015-11-01

    Diverse changes in coloration across distant taxa are mediated through alterations in certain highly conserved pigmentation genes. Among these genes, Mc1r is a frequent target for mutation, and many documented alterations involve coding sequence changes. We investigated whether regulatory mutations in Mc1r may also contribute to pigmentation loss in the blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. This species comprises multiple independent cave populations that have evolved reduced (or absent) melanic pigmentation as a consequence of living in darkness for millions of generations. Among the most salient cave-associated traits, complete absence (albinism) or reduced levels of pigmentation (brown) have long been the focus of degenerative pigmentation research in Astyanax. These two Mendelian traits have been linked to specific coding mutations in Oca2 (albinism) and Mc1r (brown). However, four of the seven caves harboring the brown phenotype exhibit unaffected coding sequences compared to surface fish. Thus, diverse genetic changes involving the same genes likely impact reduced pigmentation among cavefish populations. Using both sequence and expression analyses, we show that certain cave-dwelling populations harboring the brown mutation have substantial alterations to the putative Mc1r cis-regulatory region. Several of these sequence mutations in the Mc1r 5' region were present across multiple, independent cave populations. This study suggests that pigmentation reduction in Astyanax cavefish evolves through a combination of both coding and cis-regulatory mutations. Moreover, this study represents one of the first attempts to identify regulatory alterations linked to regressive changes in cave-dwelling populations of A. mexicanus. PMID:26462499

  4. Genetic Alterations within the DENND1A Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette B; Nielsen, Michael F B; Brusgaard, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene...... in white patients with PCOS to identify possible alterations that may be implicated in the PCOS pathogenesis. Patients were referred with PCOS and/or hirsutism between 1998 and 2011 (n = 261). PCOS was diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria (n = 165). Sequence analysis was performed in 10...... patients with PCOS. Additional patients (n = 251) and healthy female controls (n = 248) were included for SNP genotyping. Patients underwent clinical examination including Ferriman-Gallwey score (FG-score), biochemical analyses and transvaginal ultrasound. Mutation analysis was carried out by bidirectional...

  5. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pornima Phatak; S Kalai Selvi; T Divya; A S Hegde; Sridevi Hegde; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2002-12-01

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing. Sequencing analysis revealed six missense mutations. The incidence of p53 mutations was 13.6% (6 of 44). All the six mutations were found to be located in the central core domain of p53, which carries the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain. These results suggest a rather low incidence but a definite involvement of p53 mutations in the gliomas of Indian patients.

  6. The complete chloroplast genome of banana (Musa acuminata, Zingiberales: insight into plastid monocotyledon evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Banana (genus Musa is a crop of major economic importance worldwide. It is a monocotyledonous member of the Zingiberales, a sister group of the widely studied Poales. Most cultivated bananas are natural Musa inter-(sub-specific triploid hybrids. A Musa acuminata reference nuclear genome sequence was recently produced based on sequencing of genomic DNA enriched in nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Musa acuminata chloroplast genome was assembled with chloroplast reads extracted from whole-genome-shotgun sequence data. The Musa chloroplast genome is a circular molecule of 169,972 bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a Large Single Copy region (LSC, 88,338 bp and a Small Single Copy region (SSC, 10,768 bp separated by Inverted Repeat regions (IRs, 35,433 bp. Two forms of the chloroplast genome relative to the orientation of SSC versus LSC were found. The Musa chloroplast genome shows an extreme IR expansion at the IR/SSC boundary relative to the most common structures found in angiosperms. This expansion consists of the integration of three additional complete genes (rps15, ndhH and ycf1 and part of the ndhA gene. No such expansion has been observed in monocots so far. Simple Sequence Repeats were identified in the Musa chloroplast genome and a new set of Musa chloroplastic markers was designed. CONCLUSION: The complete sequence of M. acuminata ssp malaccensis chloroplast we reported here is the first one for the Zingiberales order. As such it provides new insight in the evolution of the chloroplast of monocotyledons. In particular, it reinforces that IR/SSC expansion has occurred independently several times within monocotyledons. The discovery of new polymorphic markers within Musa chloroplast opens new perspectives to better understand the origin of cultivated triploid bananas.

  7. Addiction and Reward-related Genes Show Altered Expression in the Postpartum Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiu eZhao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET indicated that postpartum (relative to virgin NAC gene expression profile was significantly enriched for genes related to addiction and reward in 5 of 5 independently curated databases (e.g., Malacards, Phenopedia. Over 100 addiction/reward related genes were identified and these included: Per1, Per2, Arc, Homer2, Creb1, Grm3, Fosb, Gabrb3, Adra2a, Ntrk2, Cry1, Penk, Cartpt, Adcy1, Npy1r, Htr1a, Drd1a, Gria1, and Pdyn. ToppCluster analysis found maternal NAC expression profile to be significantly enriched for genes related to the drug action of nicotine, ketamine, and dronabinol. Pathway analysis indicated postpartum NAC as enriched for RNA processing, CNS development/differentiation, and transcriptional regulation. Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis identified possible networks for transcription factors, including Nr1d1, Per2, Fosb, Egr1, and Nr4a1. The postpartum state involves increased risk for mental health disorders and MSET analysis indicated postpartum NAC to be enriched for genes related to depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Mental health related genes included: Fabp7, Grm3, Penk, and Nr1d1. We confirmed via quantitative PCR Nr1d1, Per2, Grm3, Penk, Drd1a, and Pdyn. This study indicates for the first time that postpartum NAC involves large scale gene expression alterations linked to addiction and reward. Because the postpartum state also involves decreased response to drugs, the findings could provide insights into how to mitigate addictions.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ke; Gao, Lei; Li, Jia; Chen, Shanshan; Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae), a relic plant endemic to China, is presented in this study. The genome is 137 075 bp in length, with 35.47% average GC content. One copy of the large inverted repeats is lost from this genome. The T. fargesii chloroplast genome encodes 118 unique genes, in which trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG, trnN-GUU are duplicated. Protein-coding, tRNA and rRNA genes represent 54.7%, 1.9% and 3.4% of the genome, respectively. There are 17 intron-containing genes, of which 6 are tRNA genes. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed a strong sister relationship between Torreya and Amentotaxus. PMID:27158868

  9. Progressive obesity leads to altered ovarian gene expression in the Lethal Yellow mouse: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannian John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal yellow (LY; C57BL/6J Ay/a mice exhibit adult-onset obesity, altered metabolic regulation, and early reproductive senescence. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that obese LY mice possess differences in expression of ovarian genes relative to age-matched lean mice. Methods 90- and 180-day-old LY and lean black (C57BL/6J a/a mice were suppressed with GnRH antagonist (Antide®, then stimulated with 5 IU eCG. cRNA derived from RNA extracts of whole ovarian homogenates collected 36 h post-eCG were run individually on Codelink Mouse Whole Genome Bioarrays (GE Healthcare Life Sciences. Results Fifty-two genes showed ≥ 2-fold differential (p Cyp51, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star. Fewer genes showed lower expression in LY mice, e.g. angiotensinogen. In contrast, none of these genes showed differential expression in 90-day-old LY and black mice, which are of similar body weight. Interestingly, 180-day-old LY mice had a 2-fold greater expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (Hsd11b1 and a 2-fold lesser expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (Hsd11b2, differences not seen in 90-day-old mice. Consistent with altered Hsd11b gene expression, ovarian concentrations of corticosterone (C were elevated in aging LY mice relative to black mice, but C levels were similar in young LY and black mice. Conclusion The data suggest that reproductive dysfunction in aging obese mice is related to modified intraovarian gene expression that is directly related to acquired obesity.

  10. Long-term oil contamination alters the molecular ecological networks of soil microbial functional genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting eLiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001. Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential keystone genes, defined as either hubs or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions.

  11. Chloroplast genome sequencing analysis of Heterosigma akashiwo CCMP452 (West Atlantic and NIES293 (West Pacific strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lybrand Terry

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterokont algae form a monophyletic group within the stramenopile branch of the tree of life. These organisms display wide morphological diversity, ranging from minute unicells to massive, bladed forms. Surprisingly, chloroplast genome sequences are available only for diatoms, representing two (Coscinodiscophyceae and Bacillariophyceae of approximately 18 classes of algae that comprise this taxonomic cluster. A universal challenge to chloroplast genome sequencing studies is the retrieval of highly purified DNA in quantities sufficient for analytical processing. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a simplified method for sequencing chloroplast genomes, using fosmids selected from a total cellular DNA library. The technique has been used to sequence chloroplast DNA of two Heterosigma akashiwo strains. This raphidophyte has served as a model system for studies of stramenopile chloroplast biogenesis and evolution. Results H. akashiwo strain CCMP452 (West Atlantic chloroplast DNA is 160,149 bp in size with a 21,822-bp inverted repeat, whereas NIES293 (West Pacific chloroplast DNA is 159,370 bp in size and has an inverted repeat of 21,665 bp. The fosmid cloning technique reveals that both strains contain an isomeric chloroplast DNA population resulting from an inversion of their single copy domains. Both strains contain multiple small inverted and tandem repeats, non-randomly distributed within the genomes. Although both CCMP452 and NIES293 chloroplast DNAs contains 197 genes, multiple nucleotide polymorphisms are present in both coding and intergenic regions. Several protein-coding genes contain large, in-frame inserts relative to orthologous genes in other plastids. These inserts are maintained in mRNA products. Two genes of interest in H. akashiwo, not previously reported in any chloroplast genome, include tyrC, a tyrosine recombinase, which we hypothesize may be a result of a lateral gene transfer event, and an

  12. Alterations of c-Myc and c-erbB-2 genes in ovarian tumours

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    Pastor Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to clinical and epidemiological studies, ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women. The causes of ovarian cancer remain largely unknown but various factors may increase the risk of developing it, such as age, family history of cancer, childbearing status etc. This cancer results from a succession of genetic alterations involving oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, which have a critical role in normal cell growth regulation. Mutations and/or overexpression of three oncogenes, c-erbB-2, c-Myc and K-ras, and of the tumour suppressor gene p53, have been frequently observed in a sporadic ovarian cancer. Objective. The aim of the present study was to analyze c-Myc and c-erbB-2 oncogene alterations, specifically amplification, as one of main mechanisms of their activation in ovarian cancers and to establish a possible association with the pathogenic process. Methods. DNA was isolated from 15 samples of malignant and 5 benign ovarian tumours, using proteinase K digestion, followed by phenol-chloroform isoamyl extraction and ethanol precipitation. C-Myc and c-erbB-2 amplification were detected by differential PCR. The level of gene copy increase was measured using the Scion image software. Results. The amplification of both c-Myc and c-erbB-2 was detected in 26.7% of ovarian epithelial carcinoma specimens. Only one tumour specimen concomitantly showed increased gene copy number for both studied genes. Interestingly, besides amplification, gene deletion was also detected (26.7% for c-erbB-2. Most of the ovarian carcinomas with alterations in c-Myc and c-erbB-2 belonged to advanced FIGO stages. Conclusion. The amplification of c-Myc and c-erbB-2 oncogenes in ovarian epithelial carcinomas is most probably a late event in the pathogenesis conferring these tumours a more aggressive biological behaviour. Similarly, gene deletions point to genomic instability in epithelial carcinomas in higher clinical stages as the

  13. Genetic variation and identification of cultivated Fallopia multiflora and its wild relatives by using chloroplast matK and 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Pang, Qi-Hua; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhao, Xuan; Shen, Yan-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Jin

    2008-10-01

    FALLOPIA MULTIFLORA (Thunb.) Harald . has been widely and discriminatingly used in China for the study and treatment of anemia, swirl, deobstruent, pyrosis, insomnia, amnesia, atheroma and also for regulating immune functions. However, there is still confusion about the herbal drug's botanical origins and the phylogenetic relationship between the cultivars and the wild relatives. In order to develop an efficient method for identification, a molecular analysis was performed based on 18 S rRNA gene and partial MATK gene sequences. The 18 S rRNA gene sequences of F. MULTIFLORA were 1809 bp in length and were highly conserved, indicating that the cultivars and the wild F. MULTIFLORA have the same botanical origin. Based on our 18 S rRNA gene sequences analysis, F. MULTIFLORA could be easily distinguished at the DNA level from adulterants and some herbs with similar components. The MATK gene partial sequences were found to span 1271 bp. The phylogenetic relation of F. MULTIFLORA based on the MATK gene showed that all samples in this paper were divided into four clades. The sequences of the partial MATK gene had many permutations, which were related to the geographical distributions of the samples. MATK gene sequences provided valuable information for the identification of F. MULTIFLORA. New taxonomic information could be obtained to authenticate the botanical origin of the F. MULTIFLORA, the species and the medicines made of it. PMID:18759218

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Curcuma flaviflora (Curcuma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Deng, Jiabin; Li, Yangyi; Gao, Gang; Ding, Chunbang; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Yonghong; Yang, Ruiwu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Curcuma flaviflora, a medicinal plant in Southeast Asia, was sequenced. The genome size was 160 478 bp in length, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 946 bp were separated by a large single copy (LSC) of 88 008 bp and a small single copy (SSC) of 18 578 bp, respectively. The cp genome contained 132 annotated genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. And 19 of these genes were duplicated in inverted repeat regions. PMID:26367332

  15. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC) - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that thymosin-β4 may have a role in chondrosarcoma metastasis

  16. A clade uniting the green algae Mesostigma viride and Chlorokybus atmophyticus represents the deepest branch of the Streptophyta in chloroplast genome-based phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turmel Monique

    2007-01-01

    reflects the true organismal relationships. Conclusion In disclosing a sister relationship between the Mesostigmatales and Chlorokybales, our study resolves the long-standing debate about the nature of the unicellular flagellated ancestors of land plants and alters significantly our concepts regarding the evolution of streptophyte algae. Moreover, in predicting a richer chloroplast gene repertoire than previously inferred for the common ancestor of all streptophytes, our study has contributed to a better understanding of chloroplast genome evolution in the Viridiplantae.

  17. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  18. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Anderson, J.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  19. Biosynthesis of starch in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, T; Nakayama, N; Murata, T; Akazawa, T

    1967-03-01

    The enzymic synthesis of ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose by chloroplastic pyrophosphorylase of bean and rice leaves has been demonstrated by paper chromatographic techniques. In both tissues, the activity of UDP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase was much higher than ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase. Glycerate-3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate did not stimulate ADP-glucose formation by a pyrophosphorylation reaction. The major metabolic pathway for UDP-glucose utilization appears to be the synthesis of either sucrose or sucrose-P. On the other hand, a specific precursor role of ADP-glucose for synthesizing chloroplast starch by the ADP-glucose-starch transglucosylase reaction is supported by the coupled enzyme system of ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase and transglucosylase, isolated from chloroplasts. None of the glycolytic intermediates stimulated the glucose transfer in the enzyme sequence of reaction system employed. PMID:4292567

  20. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  1. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  2. Clock genes and behavioral responses to light are altered in a mouse model of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M; Bennis, Mohamed; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are altered in retinal pathologies. Using a streptozotocin-induced (STZ) model of diabetes, we investigated the impact of diabetic retinopathy on non-visual functions by analyzing ipRGCs morphology and light-induced c-Fos and Period 1-2 clock genes in the central clock (SCN). The ability of STZ-diabetic mice to entrain to light was challenged by exposure animals to 1) successive light/dark (LD) cycle of decreasing or increasing light intensities during the light phase and 2) 6-h advance of the LD cycle. Our results show that diabetes induces morphological changes of ipRGCs, including soma swelling and dendritic varicosities, with no reduction in their total number, associated with decreased c-Fos and clock genes induction by light in the SCN at 12 weeks post-onset of diabetes. In addition, STZ-diabetic mice exhibited a reduction of overall locomotor activity, a decrease of circadian sensitivity to light at low intensities, and a delay in the time to re-entrain after a phase advance of the LD cycle. These novel findings demonstrate that diabetes alters clock genes and behavioral responses of the circadian timing system to light and suggest that diabetic patients may show an increased propensity for circadian disturbances, in particular when they are exposed to chronobiological challenges. PMID:25006976

  3. Tumor promoters alter gene expression and protein phosphorylation in avian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on the synthesis and modification of polypeptides in normal avian cells and cells infected by wild-type and temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected alterations in both the abundance of cellular polypeptides and in their phosphorylation that seem unique to TPA treatment. However, the state of phosphorylation of the major putative substrate for the action of the src gene-associated protein kinase, the 34- to 36-kilodalton protein, was not altered. Moreover, examination of the phosphorylated amino acid content of total cellular phosphoproteins revealed that the response to TPA was not associated with detectable increases in their phosphotyrosine content. These results make it unlikely that TPA acts by the activation of the phosphorylating activity of the cellular proto-src gene or by the activation of other cellular phosphotyrosine-specific kinases. We have shown previously that temperature-sensitive RSV-infected cells at nonpermissive temperature demonstrate an increased sensitivity to TPA treatment [Bissell, M.J., Hatie, C. and Calfin, M. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 348-352]. Our present results indicate that this is not due to reactivation of the phosphorylating activity of the defective src gene product or to its leakiness, and they lend support to the notion of multistep viral carcinogenesis

  4. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  5. Altered ultrasonic vocalization in mice with a disruption in the Foxp2 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Weiguo; Cho, Julie Y.; Jiang, Yuhui; Zhang, Minhua; Weisz, Donald; Elder, Gregory A.; Schmeidler, James; De Gasperi, Rita; Sosa, Miguel A. Gama; Rabidou, Donald; Santucci, Anthony C.; Perl, Daniel; Morrisey, Edward; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    Neurobiology of speech and language has previously been studied in the KE family, in which half of the members have severe impairment in both speech and language. The gene responsible for the phenotype was mapped to chromosome 7q31 and identified as the FOXP2 gene, coding for a transcription factor containing a polyglutamine tract and a forkhead DNA-binding domain. Because of linkage studies implicating 7q31 in autism, where language impairment is a component of the disorder, and in specific language impairment, FOXP2 has also been considered as a potential susceptibility locus for the language deficits in autism and/or specific language impairment. In this study, we characterized mice with a disruption in the murine Foxp2 gene. Disruption of both copies of the Foxp2 gene caused severe motor impairment, premature death, and an absence of ultrasonic vocalizations that are elicited when pups are removed from their mothers. Disruption of a single copy of the gene led to modest developmental delay but a significant alteration in ultrasonic vocalization in response to such separation. Learning and memory appear normal in the heterozygous animals. Cerebellar abnormalities were observed in mice with disruptions in Foxp2, with Purkinje cells particularly affected. Our findings support a role for Foxp2 in cerebellar development and in a developmental process that subsumes social communication functions in diverse organisms. PMID:15983371

  6. RNA-Seq identifies key reproductive gene expression alterations in response to cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hanyang; Lu, Xing; Cen, Xiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Feng; Zhong, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice. PMID:24982889

  7. RNA-Seq Identifies Key Reproductive Gene Expression Alterations in Response to Cadmium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice.

  8. The chloroplast genome of a symbiodinium sp. clade C3 isolate

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium form important symbioses within corals and other benthic marine animals. Dinoflagellates possess an extremely reduced plastid genome relative to those examined in plants and other algae. In dinoflagellates the plastid genes are located on small plasmids, commonly referred to as \\'minicircles\\'. However, the chloroplast genomes of dinoflagellates have only been extensively characterised from a handful of species. There is also evidence of considerable variation in the chloroplast genome organisation across those species that have been examined. We therefore characterised the chloroplast genome from an environmental coral isolate, in this case containing a symbiont belonging to the Symbiodinium sp. clade C3. The gene content of the genome is well conserved with respect to previously characterised genomes. However, unlike previously characterised dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes we did not identify any \\'empty\\' minicircles. The sequences of this chloroplast genome show a high rate of evolution relative to other algal species. Particularly notable was a surprisingly high level of sequence divergence within the core polypeptides of photosystem I, the reasons for which are currently unknown. This chloroplast genome also possesses distinctive codon usage and GC content. These features suggest that chloroplast genomes in Symbiodinium are highly plastic. © 2013 Adrian C. Barbrook.

  9. Altered surfactant function and structure in SP-A gene targeted mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Korfhagen, T R; Bruno, M D; Ross, G F; Huelsman, K. M.; Ikegami, M; Jobe, A H; Wert, S E; Stripp, B R; Morris, R E; Glasser, S W; Bachurski, C J; Iwamoto, H S; Whitsett, J A

    1996-01-01

    The surfactant protein A (SP-A) gene was disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells that were used to generate homozygous SP-A-deficient mice. SP-A mRNA and protein were not detectable in the lungs of SP-A(-/-) mice, and perinatal survival of SP-A(-/-) mice was not altered compared with wild-type mice. Lung morphology, surfactant proteins B-D, lung tissue, alveolar phospholipid pool sizes and composition, and lung compliance in SP-A(-/-) mice were unaltered. At the highest ...

  10. Cytotoxic effects and specific gene expression alterations induced by I-125-labeled triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Dahmen, Volker; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) bind to the DNA double helix in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, TFO seem to be a suitable carrier for Auger electron emitters to damage exclusively targeted DNA sequences, e.g., in tumor cells. We studied the influence of I-125 labeled TFO with regard to cell survival and induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) using TFO with different genomic targets and target numbers. Furthermore, the ability of TFO to alter the gene expression of ...

  11. Clock Genes and Behavioral Responses to Light Are Altered in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Mohamed BENNIS; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are altered in retinal pathologies. Using a streptozotocin-induced (STZ) model of diabetes, we investigated the impact of diabetic retinopathy on non-visual functions by analyzing ipRGCs morphology and light-induced c-Fos and Period 1–2 clock genes in the central clock (SCN). The ability of STZ-diabetic mice to entrain to light was challenged by exposure animals to 1) successive light/dark (LD) cycle of decreasing...

  12. The complete chloroplast genome of North American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zeng-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    We report complete nucleotide sequence of the Panax quinquefolius chloroplast genome using next-generation sequencing technology. The genome size is 156 359 bp, including two inverted repeats (IRs) of 52 153 bp, separated by the large single-copy (LSC 86 184 bp) and small single-copy (SSC 18 081 bp) regions. This cp genome encodes 114 unigenes (80 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes), in which 18 are duplicated in the IR regions. Overall GC content of the genome is 38.08%. A phylogenomic analysis of the 10 complete chloroplast genomes from Araliaceae using Daucus carota from Apiaceae as outgroup showed that P. quinquefolius is closely related to the other two members of the genus Panax, P. ginseng and P. notoginseng. PMID:27158867

  13. YGL9, encoding the putative chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 kDa protein in rice, is involved in chloroplast development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-wei; LI Yun-feng; LING Ying-hua; SANG Xian-chun; HE Guang-hua; ZHANG Tian-quan; XING Ya-di; ZENG Xiao-qin; WANG Ling; LIU Zhong-xian; SHI Jun-qiong; ZHU Xiao-yan; MA Ling

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded light-harvesting chlorophyla/b-binding proteins (LHCPs) are speciifcaly translocated from the stroma into the thylakoid membrane through the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) pathway. The cpSRP is composed of a cpSRP43 protein and a cpSRP54 protein, and it forms a soluble transit complex with LHCP in the chloroplast stroma. Here, we identiifed theYGL9gene that is predicted to encode the probable rice cpSRP43 protein from a rice yelow-green leaf mutant. A phylogenetic tree showed that an important conserved protein family, cpSRP43, is present in almost al green photosynthetic organisms such as higher plants and green algae. Sequence analysis showed that YGL9 comprises a chloroplast transit peptide, three chromodomains and four ankyrin repeats, and the chromodomains and ankyrin repeats are probably involved in protein-protein interactions. Subcelular localization showed that YGL9 is localized in the chloroplast. Expression pattern analysis indicated thatYGL9is mainly expressed in green leaf sheaths and leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of genes associated with pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis were distinctly affected in theygl9mutant. These results indicated thatYGL9 is possibly involved in pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis in rice.

  14. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A; Lewis, Paul O

    2016-06-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in "Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution" (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  15. The complete chloroplast genome of Eleutherococcus gracilistylus (W.W.Sm.) S.Y.Hu (Araliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Junki; Lee, Sang-Choon; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Jang, Woojong; Kim, Soonok; Sung, Sangmin; Lee, Jungho; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Eleutherococcus gracilistylus is a plant species that is close to E. senticosus, a famous medicinal plant called Siberian ginseng. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the E. gracilistylus was determined by de novo assembly using whole genome next generation sequences. The chloroplast genome of E. gracilistylus was 156 770 bp long and showed distinct four partite structures such as a large single copy region of 86 729 bp, a small single copy region of 18 175 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions of 25 933 bp. The overall GC contents of the genome sequence were 36.8%. The chloroplast genome of E. gracilistylus contains 79 protein-coding sequences, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. The phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes confirmed close taxonomical relationship of E. gracilistylus with E. senticosus. PMID:26358682

  16. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:21076481

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Hibiscus syriacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hae-Yun; Kim, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Sea-Hyun; Park, Ji-Min; Lee, Hyoshin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Hibiscus syriacus L. is presented in this study. The genome is composed of 161 019 bp in length, with a typical circular structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 745 bp of length separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 89 698 bp and 19 831 bp of length, respectively. The overall GC content is 36.8%. One hundred and fourteen genes were annotated, including 81 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes and 29 transfer RNA genes. PMID:26357910

  18. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Jian; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length), separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively). The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya). Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species. PMID:27275817

  19. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length, separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya. Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species.

  20. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    OpenAIRE

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antib...

  1. Genetic interactions reveal that specific defects of chloroplast translation are associated with the suppression of var2-mediated leaf variegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiayan; Zheng, Mengdi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ruijuan; An, Lijun; Rodermel, Steve R; Yu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development. PMID:23721655

  2. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  3. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  4. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  5. Alternative acetate production pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during dark anoxia and the dominant role of chloroplasts in fermentative acetate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenqiang; Catalanotti, Claudia; D'Adamo, Sarah; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl J; Mackinder, Luke; Miller, Tarryn E; Heuberger, Adam L; Peers, Graham; Smith, Kerry S; Jonikas, Martin C; Grossman, Arthur R; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii insertion mutants disrupted for genes encoding acetate kinases (EC 2.7.2.1) (ACK1 and ACK2) and a phosphate acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.8) (PAT2, but not PAT1) were isolated to characterize fermentative acetate production. ACK1 and PAT2 were localized to chloroplasts, while ACK2 and PAT1 were shown to be in mitochondria. Characterization of the mutants showed that PAT2 and ACK1 activity in chloroplasts plays a dominant role (relative to ACK2 and PAT1 in mitochondria) in producing acetate under dark, anoxic conditions and, surprisingly, also suggested that Chlamydomonas has other pathways that generate acetate in the absence of ACK activity. We identified a number of proteins associated with alternative pathways for acetate production that are encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome. Furthermore, we observed that only modest alterations in the accumulation of fermentative products occurred in the ack1, ack2, and ack1 ack2 mutants, which contrasts with the substantial metabolite alterations described in strains devoid of other key fermentation enzymes. PMID:25381350

  6. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  7. Sustained alterations in neuroimmune gene expression after daily, but not intermittent, alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gano, Anny; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Deak, Terrence

    2016-09-01

    Acute ethanol intoxication is associated with Rapid Alterations in Neuroimmune Gene Expression (RANGE), including increased Interleukin (IL)-6 and Nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα), and suppressed IL-1β and Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, yet little is known about adaptations in cytokines across the first few ethanol exposures. Thus, the present studies examined central cytokines during intoxication (3h post-ethanol) following 2, 4 or 6 intragastric ethanol challenges (4g/kg) delivered either daily or every-other-day (EOD). Subsequent analyses of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) and corticosterone were performed to determine whether the schedule of ethanol delivery would alter the pharmacokinetics of, or general sensitivity to, subacute ethanol exposure. As expected, ethanol led to robust increases in IL-6 and IκBα gene expression in hippocampus, amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), whereas IL-1β and TNFα were suppressed, thereby replicating our prior work. Ethanol-dependent increases in IL-6 and IκBα remained significant in all structures - even after 6 days of ethanol. When these doses were administered EOD, modest IL-6 increases in BNST were observed, with TNFα and IL-1β suppressed exclusively in the hippocampus. Analysis of BECs revealed a small but significant reduction in ethanol after 4 EOD exposures - an effect which was not observed when ethanol was delivered after 6 daily intubations. These findings suggest that ethanol-induced RANGE effects are not simply a function of ethanol load per se, and underscore the critical role that ethanol dosing interval plays in determining the neuroimmune consequences of alcohol. PMID:27208497

  8. Altered expression of mitochondrial and extracellular matrix genes in the heart of human fetuses with chromosome 21 trisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olla Carlo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Down syndrome phenotype has been attributed to overexpression of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes. However, the expression profile of Hsa21 genes in trisomic human subjects as well as their effects on genes located on different chromosomes are largely unknown. Using oligonucleotide microarrays we compared the gene expression profiles of hearts of human fetuses with and without Hsa21 trisomy. Results Approximately half of the 15,000 genes examined (87 of the 168 genes on Hsa21 were expressed in the heart at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Hsa21 gene expression was globally upregulated 1.5 fold in trisomic samples. However, not all genes were equally dysregulated and 25 genes were not upregulated at all. Genes located on other chromosomes were also significantly dysregulated. Functional class scoring and gene set enrichment analyses of 473 genes, differentially expressed between trisomic and non-trisomic hearts, revealed downregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes and upregulation of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins. There were no significant differences between trisomic fetuses with and without heart defects. Conclusion We conclude that dosage-dependent upregulation of Hsa21 genes causes dysregulation of the genes responsible for mitochondrial function and for the extracellular matrix organization in the fetal heart of trisomic subjects. These alterations might be harbingers of the heart defects associated with Hsa21 trisomy, which could be based on elusive mechanisms involving genetic variability, environmental factors and/or stochastic events.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xiao-Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Xu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae) has been reconstructed from the whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The genome is 161 541 bp in length, and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86 518 bp) and small (SSC, 13 111 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 30 956 bp each). The chloroplast genome contains 131 genes, including 84 protein-coding genes (78 PCG species), eight ribosomal RNA genes (four rRNA species) and 37 transfer RNA genes (28 tRNA species). Phylogenetic tree based on the maximum parsimony (MP) analysis of 65 chloroplast protein-coding genes for 13 taxa demonstrated a close relationship between R. palmatum and Fagopyrum esculentum subsp. ancestrale in Polygonaceae. PMID:26153751

  10. Cytotoxicity and altered c-myc gene expression by medical polyacrylamide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, T F; Fan, C X; Feng, X M; Wan, Z Y; Wang, C R; Chou, L L

    2006-08-01

    Medical Polyacrylamide Hydrogel (PAMG)has been used in plastic and aesthetic surgery for years. However, its safety is still in doubt in many countries. In the current research, first an approach, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to determine the amount of residual acrylamide monomer (AM) in the PAMG was presented. Then the cytotoxicity of PAMG was investigated using cell counting and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. To explore the mechanism of this toxicity, normal human fibroblasts cultured in medium extracts were analyzed. Membrane changes and other related parameters were investigated using flow cytometry (FCM). Real time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (real time PCR) was also introduced to determine the biological response of the fibroblasts. During this process, three representative genes (p53, beta-actin, and c-myc, which are tumor suppressor genes, housekeeping genes, and proto-oncogenes respectively) were selected for examination. Results indicated that a method based on HPLC is practical and simple for determining AM in PAMG. The detection limits can reach the desired ppb level, and so it can fully meet the requirements of the studies of PAMG. Polyacylamide Hydrogel inhibits the growth of human fibroblasts and may cause the apoptosis of human fibroblasts. Moreover, it can alter physical parameters such as the size and the granularity of these cells. Furthermore, these three genes have a relatively typical amplification plot and highly related, wide-range standard curves, and so this reaction system is definitely suitable for the semiquantification of these genes. PAMG induces the increase of the message ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression of c-myc, while the p53 and beta-actin remain even. This change is not related to the concentration of AM in the gel and may be incited by other components in the extract of PMAG. PMID:16637045

  11. Rotating wall vessel exposure alters protein secretion and global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Helena; O'Neill, Alex J.; Blake, Katy L.; Walther, Meik; Long, Paul F.; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is routinely recovered from air and surface samples taken aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and poses a health threat to crew. As bacteria respond to the low shear forces engendered by continuous rotation conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the reduced gravitational field of near-Earth flight by altering gene expression, we examined the effect of low-shear RWV growth on protein secretion and gene expression by three S. aureus isolates. When cultured under 1 g, the total amount of protein secreted by these strains varied up to fourfold; under continuous rotation conditions, protein secretion by all three strains was significantly reduced. Concentrations of individual proteins were differentially reduced and no evidence was found for increased lysis. These data suggest that growth under continuous rotation conditions reduces synthesis or secretion of proteins. A limited number of changes in gene expression under continuous rotation conditions were noted: in all isolates vraX, a gene encoding a polypeptide associated with cell wall stress, was down-regulated. A vraX deletion mutant of S. aureus SH1000 was constructed: no differences were found between SH1000 and ΔvraX with respect to colony phenotype, viability, protein export, antibiotic susceptibility, vancomycin kill kinetics, susceptibility to cold or heat and gene modulation. An ab initio protein-ligand docking simulation suggests a major binding site for β-lactam drugs such as imipenem. If such changes to the bacterial phenotype occur during spaceflight, they will compromise the capacity of staphylococci to cause systemic infection and to circumvent antibacterial chemotherapy.

  12. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. II. Mapping by cosegregation frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents segregation and cosegregation data for a set of 15 chloroplast genes of Chlamydomonas, and uses these data to generate a linear map of the chloroplast genome. The data were derived from pedigree analysis of a total of 1596 zoospore clones resulting from 12 crosses in each of which 4 to 7 pairs of chloroplast alleles were segregating. The crosses are a subset of those previously described. By means of pedigree analysis, Type III segregations (nonreciprocal conversion-like events) were distinguished from Type III segregations (reciprocal events). The average frequency of Type II segregation was found to be the same for all 15 genes, indicating randomness of this event with respect to map location. Type III segregations occurred with a different and characteristic frequency for each gene, and were interpreted as a measure of the distance of each gene from the postulated centromere-like attachment point. Cosegregations, involving two or more genes, occurred with frequencies characteristic of the particular genes and much lower than expected for the product of single-gene events, indicating strong positive interference. Pairwise cosegregation frequencies provided unambiguous data for the gene order, confirmed by cosegregation runs of three or more genes. Apparent lengths of cosegregation runs, as fractions of the total map, indicate much longer stretches of gene conversion-like events than have been reported for other genetic systems. Comparisons of cosegregation frequencies in cross 20 after 15'', 30'', and 15'' uv irradiation of the mt+ before mating, indicate little if any consistent effect of this irradiation on segregation events

  13. The combined effects of temperature and CO2 lead to altered gene expression in Acropora aspera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, D.; Bobeszko, T.; Ainsworth, T.; Leggat, W.

    2013-12-01

    This study explored the interactive effects of near-term CO2 increases (40-90 ppm above current ambient) during a simulated bleaching event (34 °C for 5 d) of Acropora aspera by linking physiology to expression patterns of genes involved in carbon metabolism. Symbiodinium photosynthetic efficiency ( F v / F m ) was significantly depressed by the bleaching event, while elevated pressure of CO2 (pCO2) slightly mitigated the effects of increased temperature on F v / F m during the final 4 d of the recovery period, however, did not affect the loss of symbionts. Elevated pCO2 alone had no effect on F v / F m or symbiont density. Expression of targeted Symbiodinium genes involved in carbon metabolism and heat stress response was not significantly altered by either increased temperature and/or CO2. Of the selected host genes, two carbonic anhydrase isoforms (coCA2 and coCA3) exhibited the largest changes, most notably in crossed bleaching and elevated pCO2 treatments. CA2 was significantly down-regulated on day 14 in all treatments, with the greatest decrease in the crossed treatment (relative expression compared to control = 0.16; p bleaching were evident during this study and demonstrate that increased pCO2 in surface waters will impact corals much sooner than many studies utilising end-of-century pCO2 concentrations would indicate.

  14. Arsenic-induced alteration in the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The present revision focuses on the effect of arsenic on tissues that participate directly in glucose homeostasis, integrating the most important published information about the impairment of the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes by arsenic as one of the possible mechanisms by which it leads to the disease. Many factors are involved in the manner in which arsenic contributes to the occurrence of diabetes. The reviewed studies suggest that arsenic might increase the risk for type 2 diabetes via multiple mechanisms, affecting a cluster of regulated events, which in conjunction trigger the disease. Arsenic affects insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue by modifying the expression of genes involved in insulin resistance and shifting away cells from differentiation to the proliferation pathway. In the liver arsenic disturbs glucose production, whereas in pancreatic beta-cells arsenic decreases insulin synthesis and secretion and reduces the expression of antioxidant enzymes. The consequences of these changes in gene expression include the reduction of insulin secretion, induction of oxidative stress in the pancreas, alteration of gluconeogenesis, abnormal proliferation and differentiation pattern of muscle and adipocytes as well as peripheral insulin resistance

  15. Chloroplast engineering: boon for third - world countries as therapeutic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts are the site of photosynthesis in plants mostly seen in leaves and some eukaryotic algae that provides the primary sources of the world’s food productivity. Plastids of higher plants are generally semiautonomous with 120–150 kb genome. Chloroplast transformation has become an attractive alternative to nuclear gene transformation due to its advantages, high protein levels, the feasibility of expressing multiple proteins from polycistronic mRNAs, and gene containment through the lack of pollen transmission. The review presents the recent trends and methods for plastid genome engineering and transgene expression and summarizes the potential of plastid transformation in various fields of biotechnology and also as a source of therapeutic proteins.

  16. Two Wheat Glutathione Peroxidase Genes Whose Products Are Located in Chloroplasts Improve Salt and H2O2 Tolerances in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Chao-Zeng; ZHAO Lei; Yin, Li-Juan; Chen, Ming; Wang, Qing-yu; Li, Lian-Cheng; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Ma, You-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is capable of damaging effects on numerous cellular components. Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs, EC 1.11.1.9) are key enzymes of the antioxidant network in plants. In this study, W69 and W106, two putative GPX genes, were obtained by de novo transcriptome sequencing of salt-treated wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings. The purified His-tag fusion proteins of W69 and W106 reduced H2O2 and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) using ...

  17. The complete chloroplast genome of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta) gives new insight into the evolution of family Gracilariaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingwei; Bi, Guiqi; Mao, Yunxiang; Sui, Zhenghong

    2016-06-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was recovered from a Next Generation Sequencing data set. Without quadripartite structure, this chloroplast genome (183,013 bp, 27.40% GC content) contains 202 protein-coding genes, 34 tRNA genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 1 tmRNA gene. Synteny analysis showed plasmid incorporation regions in chloroplast genomes of three species of family Gracilariaceae and in Grateloupia taiwanensis of family Halymeniaceae. Combined with reported red algal plasmid sequences in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, we postulated that red algal plasmids may have played an important role in ancient horizontal gene transfer among nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Substitution rate analysis showed that purifying selective forces maintaining stability of protein-coding genes of nine red algal chloroplast genomes over long periods must be strong and that the forces acting on gene groups and single genes of nine red algal chloroplast genomes were similar and consistent. The divergence of Gp. lemaneiformis occurred ~447.98 million years ago (Mya), close to the divergence time of genus Pyropia and Porphyra (443.62 Mya). PMID:27273536

  18. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid [14C]-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H2O2 stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed

  19. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These

  20. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H. PMID:25257191

  1. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Lilium hansonii Leichtlin ex D.D.T.Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Hwang, Yoon-Jung; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2016-09-01

    Lilium hansonii is a lily species native to Korea and an important wild species for lily breeding. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was completed by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was 152 655 bp long and consisted of large single copy region (82 051 bp), small single copy region (17 620 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (26 492 bp). A total of 115 genes were annotated, which included 81 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that L. hansonii is most closely related to L. superbum (Turk's-cap lily) and L. longiflorum (Easter lily). PMID:26404645

  2. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with [3H-methyl]-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile [3H]methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the [3H]methyl group

  3. Targeted genomic sequencing of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma reveals recurrent alterations in NF-κB regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gabriel K; Sholl, Lynette M; Lindeman, Neal I; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm with a variable and unpredictable clinical course. The genetic alterations that drive tumorigenesis in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma are largely unknown. One recent study performed BRAF sequencing and found V600E mutations in 5 of 27 (19%) cases. No other recurrent genetic alterations have been reported. The aim of the present study was to identify somatic alterations in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma by targeted sequencing of a panel of 309 known cancer-associated genes. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 13 cases of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and submitted for hybrid capture-based enrichment and massively parallel sequencing with the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Recurrent loss-of-function alterations were observed in tumor suppressor genes involved in the negative regulation of NF-κB activation (5 of 13 cases, 38%) and cell cycle progression (4 of 13 cases, 31%). Loss-of-function alterations in the NF-κB regulatory pathway included three cases with frameshift mutations in NFKBIA and two cases with bi-allelic loss of CYLD. Both cases with CYLD loss were metastases and carried concurrent alterations in at least one cell cycle regulatory gene. Alterations in cell cycle regulatory genes included two cases with bi-allelic loss of CDKN2A, one case with bi-allelic loss of RB1, and one case with a nonsense mutation in RB1. Last, focal copy-number gain of chromosome 9p24 including the genes CD274 (PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (PD-L2) was noted in three cases, which represents a well-described mechanism of immune evasion in cancer. These findings provide the first insight into the unique genomic landscape of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and suggest shared mechanisms of tumorigenesis with a subset of other tumor types, notably B-cell lymphomas. PMID:26564005

  4. Combined analysis of the chloroplast genome and transcriptome of the Antarctic vascular plant Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungeun Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antarctic hairgrass (Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is the only natural grass species in the maritime Antarctic. It has been researched as an important ecological marker and as an extremophile plant for studies on stress tolerance. Despite its importance, little genomic information is available for D. antarctica. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome, transcriptome profiles of the coding/noncoding genes, and the posttranscriptional processing by RNA editing in the chloroplast system. RESULTS: The complete chloroplast genome of D. antarctica is 135,362 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure, including the large (LSC: 79,881 bp and small (SSC: 12,519 bp single-copy regions, separated by a pair of identical inverted repeats (IR: 21,481 bp. It contains 114 unique genes, including 81 unique protein-coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Sequence divergence analysis with other plastomes from the BEP clade of the grass family suggests a sister relationship between D. antarctica, Festuca arundinacea and Lolium perenne of the Poeae tribe, based on the whole plastome. In addition, we conducted high-resolution mapping of the chloroplast-derived transcripts. Thus, we created an expression profile for 81 protein-coding genes and identified ndhC, psbJ, rps19, psaJ, and psbA as the most highly expressed chloroplast genes. Small RNA-seq analysis identified 27 small noncoding RNAs of chloroplast origin that were preferentially located near the 5'- or 3'-ends of genes. We also found >30 RNA-editing sites in the D. antarctica chloroplast genome, with a dominance of C-to-U conversions. CONCLUSIONS: We assembled and characterized the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. antarctica and investigated the features of the plastid transcriptome. These data may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of D. antarctica within the Poaceae family for use in molecular phylogenetic studies and may also help researchers

  5. Operator Sequence Alters Gene Expression Independently of Transcription Factor Occupancy in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan G. Garcia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A canonical quantitative view of transcriptional regulation holds that the only role of operator sequence is to set the probability of transcription factor binding, with operator occupancy determining the level of gene expression. In this work, we test this idea by characterizing repression in vivo and the binding of RNA polymerase in vitro in experiments where operators of various sequences were placed either upstream or downstream from the promoter in Escherichia coli. Surprisingly, we find that operators with a weaker binding affinity can yield higher repression levels than stronger operators. Repressor bound to upstream operators modulates promoter escape, and the magnitude of this modulation is not correlated with the repressor-operator binding affinity. This suggests that operator sequences may modulate transcription by altering the nature of the interaction of the bound transcription factor with the transcriptional machinery, implying a new layer of sequence dependence that must be confronted in the quantitative understanding of gene expression.

  6. Ketamine influences CLOCK:BMAL1 function leading to altered circadian gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina M Bellet

    Full Text Available Major mood disorders have been linked to abnormalities in circadian rhythms, leading to disturbances in sleep, mood, temperature, and hormonal levels. We provide evidence that ketamine, a drug with rapid antidepressant effects, influences the function of the circadian molecular machinery. Ketamine modulates CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation when these regulators are ectopically expressed in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Inhibition occurs in a dose-dependent manner and is attenuated after treatment with the GSK3β antagonist SB21673. We analyzed the effect of ketamine on circadian gene expression and observed a dose-dependent reduction in the amplitude of circadian transcription of the Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 genes. Finally, chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ketamine altered the recruitment of the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex on circadian promoters in a time-dependent manner. Our results reveal a yet unsuspected molecular mode of action of ketamine and thereby may suggest possible pharmacological antidepressant strategies.

  7. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation. (paper)

  8. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  9. Csf2 Null Mutation Alters Placental Gene Expression and Trophoblast Glycogen Cell and Giant Cell Abundance in Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Macpherson, Anne M.; Roberts, Claire T.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic deficiency in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF2, GM-CSF) results in altered placental structure in mice. To investigate the mechanism of action of CSF2 in placental morphogenesis, the placental gene expression and cell composition were examined in Csf2 null mutant and wild-type mice. Microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses on Embryonic Day (E) 13 placentae revealed that the Csf2 null mutation caused altered expression of 17 genes not previously known to be ass...

  10. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: ► Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. ► mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear genes associated with tumorigenesis. ► MMP-9 is up-regulated and

  11. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  12. Pressure Load: The Main Factor for Altered Gene Expression in Right Ventricular Hypertrophy in Chronic Hypoxic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christian D.; Schou, Uffe K.; Jensen, Jens L.; Magnusson, Nils E.; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether changes in gene expression in the right ventricle following pulmonary hypertension can be attributed to hypoxia or pressure loading. Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish hypoxia from pressure-induced alterations, a group of rats underwent banding of the pulmonary trunk (PTB), sham operation, or the rats were exposed to normoxia or chronic, hypobaric hypoxia. Pressure measurements were performed and the right ventricle was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip, and selected genes were confirmed by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting. Right ventricular systolic blood pressure and right ventricle to body weight ratio were elevated in the PTB and the hypoxic rats. Expression of the same 172 genes was altered in the chronic hypoxic and PTB rats. Thus, gene expression of enzymes participating in fatty acid oxidation and the glycerol channel were downregulated. mRNA expression of aquaporin 7 was downregulated, but this was not the case for the protein expression. In contrast, monoamine oxidase A and tissue transglutaminase were upregulated both at gene and protein levels. 11 genes (e.g. insulin-like growth factor binding protein) were upregulated in the PTB experiment and downregulated in the hypoxic experiment, and 3 genes (e.g. c-kit tyrosine kinase) were downregulated in the PTB and upregulated in the hypoxic experiment. Conclusion/Significance Pressure load of the right ventricle induces a marked shift in the gene expression, which in case of the metabolic genes appears compensated at the protein level, while both expression of genes and proteins of importance for myocardial function and remodelling are altered by the increased pressure load of the right ventricle. These findings imply that treatment of pulmonary hypertension should also aim at reducing right ventricular pressure. PMID:21246034

  13. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

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    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  14. Impact of altered actin gene expression on vinculin, talin, cell spreading, and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schevzov, G; Lloyd, C; Gunning, P

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a strong correlation between the expression of vinculin and the shape and motility of a cell (Rodriguez Fernandez et al., 1992a, b, 1993). This hypothesis was tested by comparing the expression of vinculin and talin with the motility of morphologically altered myoblasts. These mouse C2 myoblasts were previously generated by directly perturbing the cell cytoskeleton via the stable transfection of a mutant-form of the beta-actin gene (beta sm) and three different forms of the gamma-actin gene; gamma, gamma minus 3'UTR (gamma delta'UTR), and gamma minus intron III (gamma delta IVSIII) (Schevzov et al., 1992; Lloyd and Gunning, 1993). In the case of the beta sm and gamma-actin transfectants, a two-fold decrease in the cell surface area was coupled, as predicted, with a decrease in vinculin and talin expression. In contrast, the gamma delta IVSIII transfectants with a seven-fold decrease in the cell surface area showed an unpredicted slight increase in vinculin and talin expression and the gamma delta 3'-UTR transfectants with a slight increase in the cell surface area showed no changes in talin expression and a decrease in vinculin expression. We conclude that changes in actin gene expression alone can impact on the expression of vinculin and talin. Furthermore, we observed that these actin transfectants failed to show a consistent relationship between cell shape, motility, and the expression of vinculin. However, a relationship between talin and cell motility was found to exist, suggesting a role for talin in the establishment of focal contacts necessary for motility. PMID:7646816

  15. PEX11β induces peroxisomal gene expression and alters peroxisome number during early Xenopus laevis development

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    Damjanovski Sashko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisomes are organelles whose roles in fatty acid metabolism and reactive oxygen species elimination have contributed much attention in understanding their origin and biogenesis. Many studies have shown that de novo peroxisome biogenesis is an important regulatory process, while yeast studies suggest that total peroxisome numbers are in part regulated by proteins such as Pex11, which can facilitate the division of existing peroxisomes. Although de novo biogenesis and divisions are likely important mechanisms, the regulation of peroxisome numbers during embryonic development is poorly understood. Peroxisome number and function are particularly crucial in oviparous animals such as frogs where large embryonic yolk and fatty acid stores must be quickly metabolized, and resulting reactive oxygen species eliminated. Here we elucidate the role of Pex11β in regulating peroxisomal gene expression and number in Xenopus laevis embryogenesis. Results Microinjecting haemagglutinin (HA tagged Pex11β in early embryos resulted in increased RNA levels for peroxisome related genes PMP70 and catalase at developmental stages 10 and 20, versus uninjected embryos. Catalase and PMP70 proteins were found in punctate structures at stage 20 in control embryos, whereas the injection of ectopic HA-Pex11β induced their earlier localization in punctate structures at stage 10. Furthermore, the peroxisomal marker GFP-SKL, which was found localized as peroxisome-like structures at stage 20, was similarly found at stage 10 when co-microinjected with HA-Pex11β. Conclusions Overexpressed Pex11β altered peroxisomal gene levels and induced the early formation of peroxisomes-like structures during development, both of which demonstrate that Pex11β may be a key regulator of peroxisome number in early Xenopus embryos.

  16. Relationship between Microsatellite Alterations of RASSF1A Gene and Development of Cervical Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fu-xi; YAN Jie; LIU Run-hua; WANG Xi-ying; CUI Ke

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between microsatellite alterations of RASSF1A gene and the development of cervical carcinoma, and its relationship with HPV16 infection. Methods: Two sites of microsatellite polymorphism of RASSF1A gene were selected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect LOH and MSI in 50 cases of cervical carcinoma and 40 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and to detect the infection state of HPV16. Results: At D3S1478 and D3S4604, the LOH rates of cervical carcinomas were 32.6% (14/43) and 48.9% (23/47), the MSI rates were 14% (6/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively. The LOH rates of CINs were 31.4% (11/35) and 39.5% (15/38), the MSI rates were 11.4% (4/35) and 15.8% (6/38), respectively. There were no significant differences between cervical carcinomas and CINs in respect to their positive rates of LOH and MSI at D3S1478 and D3S4604 (P>0.05). There were significant differences in LOH rates at D3S1478 and D3S4604 between the stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ and Ⅲ-Ⅳ cervical carcinomas and between the well/moderately differentiated cervical carcinomas and the poorly differentiated cervical carcinomas (P<0.05). The positive rates of LOH and MSI for CIN Ⅲ and noninvasive cervical carcinomas were higher than those in CIN Ⅰ-Ⅱ. The rates of the infection of HPV16 in cervical cancer was obviously higher than that in CIN and in normal cervical tissues (P<0.05), and the incidence of LOH of RASSF1A gene was higher in HPV16(+) than that in HPV16(-) (P<0.05). Conclusion: The RASSF1A gene change is a relatively late event in cervical carcinomas. The detection of LOH and MSI of RASSF1A gene might be helpful to the early diagnosis and the screening of cervical carcinoma. It might also be useful for predicting the prognosis of cervical carcinoma.

  17. Ozone-induced changes in the chloroplast structure of conifer needles, and their use in ozone diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozone induces characteristic symptoms in the chloroplasts of the needles of several coniferous species. Chloroplasts are (1) reduced in size and (2) the stroma is electron dense. Moreover (3) these chloroplast alterations are more pronounced in the outer mesophyll cell layers and in the upper side of the needle compared to the inner layers and lower side. The syndrome, including the three symptoms (1)-(3), is found in the green needles of Scots pine and Norway spruce not only in the experimental fumigations, but also in mature trees in the field, and has potential for diagnosis of ozone stress. For sound ozone diagnostics all three symptoms must be present in the samples studied. The symptoms in relation to needle anatomy and physiology is discussed, and recommendations for sampling and analysis are given. - Ozone-induced alterations in chloroplast structure of conifer needles are reviewed, and recommendations for field monitoring given

  18. Inactivation of the clpC1 gene encoding a chloroplast Hsp100 molecular chaperone causes growth retardation, leaf chlorosis, lower photosynthetic activity, and a specific reduction in photosystem content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; MacDonald, Tara M; Sutinen, Sirkka; Clarke, Adrian K

    2004-12-01

    ClpC is a molecular chaperone of the Hsp100 family. In higher plants there are two chloroplast-localized paralogs (ClpC1 and ClpC2) that are approximately 93% similar in primary sequence. In this study, we have characterized two independent Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) clpC1 T-DNA insertion mutants lacking on average 65% of total ClpC content. Both mutants display a retarded-growth phenotype, leaves with a homogenous chlorotic appearance throughout all developmental stages, and more perpendicular secondary influorescences. Photosynthetic performance was also impaired in both knockout lines, with relatively fewer photosystem I and photosystem II complexes, but no changes in ATPase and Rubisco content. However, despite the specific drop in photosystem I and photosystem II content, no changes in leaf cell anatomy or chloroplast ultrastructure were observed in the mutants compared to the wild type. Previously proposed functions for envelope-associated ClpC in chloroplast protein import and degradation of mistargeted precursors were examined and shown not to be significantly impaired in the clpC1 mutants. In the stroma, where the majority of ClpC protein is localized, marked increases of all ClpP paralogs were observed in the clpC1 mutants but less variation for the ClpR paralogs and a corresponding decrease in the other chloroplast-localized Hsp100 protein, ClpD. Increased amounts of other stromal molecular chaperones (Cpn60, Hsp70, and Hsp90) and several RNA-binding proteins were also observed. Our data suggest that overall ClpC as a stromal molecular chaperone plays a vital role in chloroplast function and leaf development and is likely involved in photosystem biogenesis. PMID:15563614

  19. The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae Hayata (Lauraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Ho, Cheng-Kuen; Chang, Shu-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae (Hayata), the first to be completely sequenced of Lauraceae family, is presented in this study. The total genome size is 152,700 bp, with a typical circular structure including a pair of inverted repeats (IRa/b) of 20,107 bp of length separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 93,642 bp and 18,844 bp of length, respectively. The overall GC content of the genome is 39.1%. The nucleotide sequence shows 91% identities with Liriodendron tulipifera in the Magnoliaceae. In total, 123 annotated genes consisted of 79 coding genes, eight rRNA genes, and 36 tRNA genes. Among all 79 coding genes, seven genes (rpoC1, atpF, rpl2, ndhB, ndhA, rps16, and rpl2) contain one intron, while two genes (ycf3 and clpP) contain two introns. The maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. kanehirae chloroplast genome is closely related to Calycanthus fertilis within Laurales order. PMID:26053940

  20. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  1. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in C4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana eManandhar-Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second green revolution will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M and bundle sheath (BS chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts (cp. 74% have a known or predicted membrane association. 21 membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 proteins were more abundant in M cp envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of thirteen candidate genes. Cp association was confirmed using GFP labeling. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is increased in the immature part of the leaf and was lower in the fully developed parts of the leaf, suggesting a need for/incorporation of the protein during chloroplast

  2. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  3. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. de Picoli Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold. Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60% ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold, and decreased heart rate (5%, fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (20% in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (14%. These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  4. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood

  5. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picoli Souza, K. de [Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-24

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  6. Network-guided analysis of genes with altered somatic copy number and gene expression reveals pathways commonly perturbed in metastatic melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armand Valsesia

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes frequently contain somatic copy number alterations (SCNA that can significantly perturb the expression level of affected genes and thus disrupt pathways controlling normal growth. In melanoma, many studies have focussed on the copy number and gene expression levels of the BRAF, PTEN and MITF genes, but little has been done to identify new genes using these parameters at the genome-wide scale. Using karyotyping, SNP and CGH arrays, and RNA-seq, we have identified SCNA affecting gene expression ('SCNA-genes' in seven human metastatic melanoma cell lines. We showed that the combination of these techniques is useful to identify candidate genes potentially involved in tumorigenesis. Since few of these alterations were recurrent across our samples, we used a protein network-guided approach to determine whether any pathways were enriched in SCNA-genes in one or more samples. From this unbiased genome-wide analysis, we identified 28 significantly enriched pathway modules. Comparison with two large, independent melanoma SCNA datasets showed less than 10% overlap at the individual gene level, but network-guided analysis revealed 66% shared pathways, including all but three of the pathways identified in our data. Frequently altered pathways included WNT, cadherin signalling, angiogenesis and melanogenesis. Additionally, our results emphasize the potential of the EPHA3 and FRS2 gene products, involved in angiogenesis and migration, as possible therapeutic targets in melanoma. Our study demonstrates the utility of network-guided approaches, for both large and small datasets, to identify pathways recurrently perturbed in cancer.

  7. The complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of the green microalga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Barbi, Tommaso; Waterhouse, Janet C; Shtaida, Nastassia; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy; Purton, Saul; Vallon, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We hereby report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of the green unicellular alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa (strain SAG 2468). The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 156,028 bp, which is 72% A-T rich and does not contain a large rRNA-encoding inverted repeat. It is predicted to encode a total of 111 genes including 78 protein-coding, three rRNA, and 30 tRNA genes. The genome sequence also carries a self-splicing group I intron and a group II intron remnant. Overall, the gene and intron content of the L. incisa chloroplast genome is highly similar to that of other species of Trebouxiophyceae. In contrast, the L. incisa chloroplast genome harbors 88 copies of various intergenic dispersed DNA repeat sequences that are all unique to L. incisa. PMID:25423517

  8. Azithromycin treatment alters gene expression in inflammatory, lipid metabolism, and cell cycle pathways in well-differentiated human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Maria P Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Prolonged macrolide antibiotic therapy at low doses improves clinical outcome in patients affected with diffuse panbronchiolitis and cystic fibrosis. Consensus is building that the therapeutic effects are due to anti-inflammatory, rather than anti-microbial activities, but the mode of action is likely complex. To gain insights into how the macrolide azithromycin (AZT modulates inflammatory responses in airways, well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelia were exposed to AZT alone, an inflammatory stimulus consisting of soluble factors from cystic fibrosis airways, or AZT followed by the inflammatory stimulus. RNA microarrays were conducted to identify global and specific gene expression changes. Analysis of gene expression changes revealed that the AZT treatment alone altered the gene profile of the cells, primarily by significantly increasing the expression of lipid/cholesterol genes and decreasing the expression of cell cycle/mitosis genes. The increase in cholesterol biosynthetic genes was confirmed by increased filipin staining, an index of free cholesterol, after AZT treatment. AZT also affected genes with inflammatory annotations, but the effect was variable (both up- and down-regulation and gene specific. AZT pretreatment prevented the up-regulation of some genes, such as MUC5AC and MMP9, triggered by the inflammatory stimulus, but the up-regulation of other inflammatory genes, e.g., cytokines and chemokines, such as interleukin-8, was not affected. On the other hand, HLA genes were increased by AZT. Notably, secreted IL-8 protein levels did not reflect mRNA levels, and were, in fact, higher after AZT pretreatment in cultures exposed to the inflammatory stimulus, suggesting that AZT can affect inflammatory pathways other than by altering gene expression. These findings suggest that the specific effects of AZT on inflamed and non-inflamed airway epithelia are likely relevant to its clinical activity, and their apparent

  9. alpha-Globin genes: thalassemic and structural alterations in a Brazilian population

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    M.R.S.C. Wenning

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven unrelated patients with hemoglobin (Hb H disease and 27 individuals with alpha-chain structural alterations were studied to identify the alpha-globin gene mutations present in the population of Southeast Brazil. The -alpha3.7, --MED and -(alpha20.5 deletions were investigated by PCR, whereas non-deletional alpha-thalassemia (alphaHphalpha, alphaNcoIalpha, aaNcoI, alphaIcalpha and alphaTSaudialpha was screened with restriction enzymes and by nested PCR. Structural alterations were identified by direct DNA sequencing. Of the seven patients with Hb H disease, all of Italian descent, two had the -(alpha20.5/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/alphaHphalpha genotype and three showed interaction of the -alpha3.7 deletion with an unusual, unidentified form of non-deletional alpha-thalassemia [-alpha3.7/(aaT]. Among the 27 patients with structural alterations, 15 (of Italian descent had Hb Hasharon (alpha47Asp->His associated with the -alpha3.7 deletion, 4 (of Italian descent were heterozygous for Hb J-Rovigo (alpha53Ala->Asp, 4 (3 Blacks and 1 Caucasian were heterozygous for Hb Stanleyville-II (alpha78Asn->Lys associated with the alpha+-thalassemia, 1 (Black was heterozygous for Hb G-Pest (alpha74Asp->Asn, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Kurosaki (alpha7Lys->Glu, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Westmead (alpha122His->Gln, and 1 (Caucasian was the carrier of a novel silent variant (Hb Campinas, alpha26Ala->Val. Most of the mutations found reflected the Mediterranean and African origins of the population. Hbs G-Pest and Kurosaki, very rare, and Hb Westmead, common in southern China, were initially described in individuals of ethnic origin differing from those of the carriers reported in the present study and are the first cases to be reported in the Brazilian population.

  10. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  11. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

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    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  12. On the structure of the spinach chloroplast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Bustraan, M.; Paris, C.H.

    1952-01-01

    The structure of spinach chloroplasts was investigated with the aid of the electron microscope. It has been established that: 1. 1. the outer membrane of the chloroplasts is composed of both proteins and lipoids. 2. 2. the stroma is also built up by these components. 3. 3. within the stroma memb

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Euonymus japonicus (Celastraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of the Euonymus japonicus, the first sequenced of the genus Euonymus, was reported in this study. The total length was 157 637 bp, containing a pair of 26 678 bp inverted repeat region (IR), which were separated by small single copy (SSC) region and large single copy (LSC) region of 18 340 bp and 85 941 bp, respectively. This genome contains 107 unique genes, including 74 coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 29 tRNA genes. Seventeen genes contain intron of E. japonicus, of which three genes (clpP, ycf3, and rps12) include two introns. The maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis revealed that E. japonicus was closely related to Manihot and Populus. PMID:26407184

  14. Circadian rhythm-dependent alterations of gene expression in Drosophila brain lacking fragile X mental retardation protein.

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    Shunliang Xu

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is caused by the loss of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. The loss of FMRP leads to altered circadian rhythm behaviors in both mouse and Drosophila; however, the molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon remains elusive. Here we performed a series of gene expression analyses, including of both mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs, and identified a number of mRNAs and miRNAs (miRNA-1 and miRNA-281 with circadian rhythm-dependent altered expression in dfmr1 mutant flies. Identification of these RNAs lays the foundation for future investigations of the molecular pathway(s underlying the altered circadian rhythms associated with loss of dFmr1.

  15. Comparative chloroplast genomics and phylogenetics of Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale – A wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra Amit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplast genome sequences are extremely informative about species-interrelationships owing to its non-meiotic and often uniparental inheritance over generations. The subject of our study, Fagopyrum esculentum, is a member of the family Polygonaceae belonging to the order Caryophyllales. An uncertainty remains regarding the affinity of Caryophyllales and the asterids that could be due to undersampling of the taxa. With that background, having access to the complete chloroplast genome sequence for Fagopyrum becomes quite pertinent. Results We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of a wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale. The sequence was rapidly determined using a previously described approach that utilized a PCR-based method and employed universal primers, designed on the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of chloroplast genomes. The gene content and order in buckwheat chloroplast genome is similar to Spinacia oleracea. However, some unique structural differences exist: the presence of an intron in the rpl2 gene, a frameshift mutation in the rpl23 gene and extension of the inverted repeat region to include the ycf1 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of 61 protein-coding gene sequences from 44 complete plastid genomes provided strong support for the sister relationships of Caryophyllales (including Polygonaceae to asterids. Further, our analysis also provided support for Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, but interestingly, in the bayesian phylogeny inference based on first two codon positions Amborella united with Nymphaeales. Conclusion Comparative genomics analyses revealed that the Fagopyrum chloroplast genome harbors the characteristic gene content and organization as has been described for several other chloroplast genomes. However, it has some unique structural features distinct from previously reported complete chloroplast genome sequences. Phylogenetic

  16. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Mongolia medicine Artemisia frigida and phylogenetic relationships with other plants.

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    Yue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemisia frigida Willd. is an important Mongolian traditional medicinal plant with pharmacological functions of stanch and detumescence. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for Artemisia frigida, which makes phylogenetic identification, evolutionary studies, and genetic improvement of its value very difficult. We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida based on 454 pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The complete chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida is 151,076 bp including a large single copy (LSC region of 82,740 bp, a small single copy (SSC region of 18,394 bp and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 24,971 bp. The genome contains 114 unique genes and 18 duplicated genes. The chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida contains a small 3.4 kb inversion within a large 23 kb inversion in the LSC region, a unique feature in Asteraceae. The gene order in the SSC region of Artemisia frigida is inverted compared with the other 6 Asteraceae species with the chloroplast genomes sequenced. This inversion is likely caused by an intramolecular recombination event only occurred in Artemisia frigida. The existence of rich SSR loci in the Artemisia frigida chloroplast genome provides a rare opportunity to study population genetics of this Mongolian medicinal plant. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a sister relationship between Artemisia frigida and four other species in Asteraceae, including Ageratina adenophora, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and Lactuca sativa, based on 61 protein-coding sequences. Furthermore, Artemisia frigida was placed in the tribe Anthemideae in the subfamily Asteroideae (Asteraceae based on ndhF and trnL-F sequence comparisons. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida was assembled and analyzed in this study, representing the first plastid genome sequenced in the Anthemideae tribe. This complete chloroplast genome

  17. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Phosphoprotein Governs Expression of the Photosystem I Subunit PsaC in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchi, Damien; Qu, Yujiao; Longoni, Paolo; Legendre-Lefebvre, Linnka; Johnson, Xenie; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The nucleo-cytoplasmic compartment exerts anterograde control on chloroplast gene expression through numerous proteins that intervene at posttranscriptional steps. Here, we show that the maturation of psaC mutant (mac1) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is defective in photosystem I and fails to accumulate psaC mRNA. The MAC1 locus encodes a member of the Half-A-Tetratricopeptide (HAT) family of super-helical repeat proteins, some of which are involved in RNA transactions. The Mac1 protein localizes to the chloroplast in the soluble fraction. MAC1 acts through the 5' untranslated region of psaC transcripts and is required for their stability. Small RNAs that map to the 5'end of psaC RNA in the wild type but not in the mac1 mutant are inferred to represent footprints of MAC1-dependent protein binding, and Mac1 expressed in bacteria binds RNA in vitro. A coordinate response to iron deficiency, which leads to dismantling of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain and in particular of photosystem I, also causes a decrease of Mac1. Overexpression of Mac1 leads to a parallel increase in psaC mRNA but not in PsaC protein, suggesting that Mac1 may be limiting for psaC mRNA accumulation but that other processes regulate protein accumulation. Furthermore, Mac 1 is differentially phosphorylated in response to iron availability and to conditions that alter the redox balance of the electron transfer chain. PMID:27113776

  18. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    was found for suggested targeting via the secretory system. This study provides the most comprehensive chloroplast proteome analysis to date and an expanded Plant Proteome Database (PPDB in which all MS data are projected on identified gene models.

  19. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  20. Aminoaciduria and altered renal expression of luminal amino acid transporters in mice lacking novel gene collectrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakauskas, Sandra M; Quan, Hui; Fields, Timothy A; McCall, Shannon J; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Kourany, Wissam M; Frey, Campbell W; Le, Thu H

    2007-02-01

    Defects in renal proximal tubule transport manifest in a number of human diseases. Although variable in clinical presentation, disorders such as Hartnup disease, Dent's disease, and Fanconi syndrome are characterized by wasting of solutes commonly recovered by the proximal tubule. One common feature of these disorders is aminoaciduria. There are distinct classes of amino acid transporters located in the apical and basal membranes of the proximal tubules that reabsorb >95% of filtered amino acids, yet few details are known about their regulation. We present our physiological characterization of a mouse line with targeted deletion of the gene collectrin that is highly expressed in the kidney. Collectrin-deficient mice display a reduced urinary concentrating capacity due to enhanced solute clearance resulting from profound aminoaciduria. The aminoaciduria is generalized, characterized by loss of nearly every amino acid, and results in marked crystalluria. Furthermore, in the kidney, collectrin-deficient mice have decreased plasma membrane populations of amino acid transporter subtypes B(0)AT1, rBAT, and b(0,+)AT, as well as altered cellular distribution of EAAC1. Our data suggest that collectrin is a novel mediator of renal amino acid transport and may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of a number of human disease correlates. PMID:16985211

  1. Female Mice are Resistant to Fabp1 Gene Ablation-Induced Alterations in Brain Endocannabinoid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Murphy, Eric J; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) is not detectable in the brain, Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) markedly increases endocannabinoids (EC) in brains of male mice. Since the brain EC system of females differs significantly from that of males, it was important to determine if LKO differently impacted the brain EC system. LKO did not alter brain levels of arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing EC, i.e. arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but decreased non-ARA-containing N-acylethanolamides (OEA, PEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) that potentiate the actions of AEA and 2-AG. These changes in brain potentiating EC levels were not associated with: (1) a net decrease in levels of brain membrane proteins associated with fatty acid uptake and EC synthesis; (2) a net increase in brain protein levels of cytosolic EC chaperones and enzymes in EC degradation; or (3) increased brain protein levels of EC receptors (CB1, TRVP1). Instead, the reduced or opposite responsiveness of female brain EC levels to loss of FABP1 (LKO) correlated with intrinsically lower FABP1 level in livers of WT females than males. These data show that female mouse brain endocannabinoid levels were unchanged (AEA, 2-AG) or decreased (OEA, PEA, 2-OG) by complete loss of FABP1 (LKO). PMID:27450559

  2. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R.; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  3. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  4. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

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    Hicks Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1 was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5 showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left

  5. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  6. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (μg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl2) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 μg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 μg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 μg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 μg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  7. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  8. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Sanchez, Brian C; Szabo, Nancy J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (microg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl(2)) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 microg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 microg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 microg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 microg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants. PMID:19781795

  9. Ginseng Extracts Restore High-Glucose Induced Vascular Dysfunctions by Altering Triglyceride Metabolism and Downregulation of Atherosclerosis-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Hoi-huen Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  10. Altered expression of apoptotic genes in response to OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Ali; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Asadi, Malek Hosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2014-10-01

    OCT4B1 is a newly discovered spliced variant of OCT4 which is primarily expressed in pluripotent and tumor cells. Based on our previous studies, OCT4B1 is significantly overexpressed in tumors, where it endows an anti-apoptotic property to tumor cells. However, the mechanism by which OCT4B1 regulates the apoptotic pathway is not yet elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of OCT4B1 suppression on the expression alteration of 84 genes involved in apoptotic pathway. The AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor), and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines were transfected with OCT4B1 or irrelevant siRNAs. The expression level of apoptotic genes was then quantified using a human apoptosis panel-PCR kit. Our data revealed an almost similar pattern of alteration in the expression profile of apoptotic genes in all three studied cell lines, following OCT4B1 suppression. In general, the expression of more than 54 apoptotic genes (64 % of arrayed genes) showed significant changes. Among these, some up-regulated (CIDEA, CIDEB, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF11B, TNFRSF10B, and CASP7) and down-regulated (BCL2, BCL2L11, TP73, TP53, BAD, TRAF3, TRAF2, BRAF, BNIP3L, BFAR, and BAX) genes had on average more than tenfold gene expression alteration in all three examined cell lines. With some minor exceptions, suppression of OCT4B1 caused upregulation of pro-apoptotic and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes in transfected tumor cells. Uncovering OCT4B1 down-stream targets could further elucidate its part in tumorigenesis, and could lead to finding a new approach to combat cancer, based on targeting OCT4B1. PMID:25008565

  11. High-Resolution Analysis of Gene Copy Number Alterations in Human Prostate Cancer Using CGH on cDNA Microarrays: Impact of Copy Number on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of target genes for genetic rearrangements in prostate cancer and the impact of copy number changes on gene expression are currently not well understood. Here, we applied high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH on cDNA microarrays for analysis of prostate cancer cell lines. CGH microarrays identified most of the alterations detected by classical chromosomal CGH, as well as a number of previously unreported alterations. Specific recurrent regions of gain (28 and loss (18 were found, their boundaries defined with sub-megabasepair accuracy. The most common changes included copy number decreases at 13% and gains at iq and 5p. Refined mapping identified several sites, such as at 13q (33-44, 49-51, 74-76 Mbp from the p-telomere, which matched with minimal regions of loss seen in extensive loss of heterozygosity mapping studies of large numbers of tumors. Previously unreported recurrent changes were found at 2p, 2q, 3p, 17q (losses, at 3q, 5p, 6p (gains. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic data revealed the role of individual candidate target genes for genomic alterations as well as a highly significant (P < .0001 overall association between copy number levels and the percentage of differentially expressed genes. Across the genome, the overall impact of copy number on gene expression levels was, to a large extent, attributable to low-level gains and losses of copy number, corresponding to common deletions and gains of often large chromosomal regions.

  12. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Harris, Cassandra A.; Beale, Michael H.; Andersen, Mathias; Mant, Alexandra; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Camara, Bilal; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 pro...... pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates that...

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Andrographis paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ping; Shao, Yanhua; Li, Qian; Gao, Junli; Zhang, Runjing; Lai, Xiaoping; Wang, Deqin; Zhang, Huiye

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Andrographis paniculata, an important medicinal plant with great economic value, has been studied in this article. The genome size is 150,249 bp in length, with 38.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,300 bp) are separated by a large single copy region (LSC, 82,459 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,190 bp). The chloroplast genome contains 114 unique genes, 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. In these genes, 15 genes contained 1 intron and 3 genes comprised of 2 introns. PMID:25856518

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuying; Niu, Zhitao; Yan, Wenjin; Xue, Qingyun; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis, an extremely endangered medical plant with important economic value, was determined and characterized. The genome size was 152 650 bp, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) (26 319 bp) which were separated by a large single copy (LSC) (82 670 bp) and a small single copy (SSC) (17 342 bp). The cpDNA of A. emeiensis contained 113 unique genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Among them, 18 genes contained one or two introns. The overall AT content of the genome was 63.1%. PMID:26403535

  15. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  16. Gene expression profile and genomic alterations in colonic tumours induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoxymethane (AOM) or 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats shares many phenotypical similarities with human sporadic colon cancer and is a reliable model for identifying chemopreventive agents. Genetic mutations relevant to human colon cancer have been described in this model, but comprehensive gene expression and genomic analysis have not been reported so far. Therefore, we applied genome-wide technologies to study variations in gene expression and genomic alterations in DMH-induced colon cancer in F344 rats. For gene expression analysis, 9 tumours (TUM) and their paired normal mucosa (NM) were hybridized on 4 × 44K Whole rat arrays (Agilent) and selected genes were validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Functional analysis on microarray data was performed by GenMAPP/MappFinder analysis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) was performed on 10 paired TUM-NM samples hybridized on Rat genome arrays 2 × 105K (Agilent) and the results were analyzed by CGH Analytics (Agilent). Microarray gene expression analysis showed that Defcr4, Igfbp5, Mmp7, Nos2, S100A8 and S100A9 were among the most up-regulated genes in tumours (Fold Change (FC) compared with NM: 183, 48, 39, 38, 36 and 32, respectively), while Slc26a3, Mptx, Retlna and Muc2 were strongly down-regulated (FC: -500; -376, -167, -79, respectively). Functional analysis showed that pathways controlling cell cycle, protein synthesis, matrix metalloproteinases, TNFα/NFkB, and inflammatory responses were up-regulated in tumours, while Krebs cycle, the electron transport chain, and fatty acid beta oxidation were down-regulated. a-CGH analysis showed that four TUM out of ten had one or two chromosomal aberrations. Importantly, one sample showed a deletion on chromosome 18 including Apc. The results showed complex gene expression alterations in adenocarcinomas encompassing many altered pathways. While a-CGH analysis showed a low degree of genomic imbalance, it is interesting to

  17. Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplast sequence data are widely used to infer phylogenies of plants and algae. With the increasing availability of complete chloroplast genome sequences, the opportunity arises to resolve ancient divergences that were heretofore problematic. On the flip side, properly analyzing large multi-gene data sets can be a major challenge, as these data may be riddled with systematic biases and conflicting signals. Our study contributes new data from nine complete and four fragmentary chloroplast genome sequences across the green algal order Sphaeropleales. Our phylogenetic analyses of a 56-gene data set show that analyzing these data on a nucleotide level yields a well-supported phylogeny - yet one that is quite different from a corresponding amino acid analysis. We offer some possible explanations for this conflict through a range of analyses of modified data sets. In addition, we characterize the newly sequenced genomes in terms of their structure and content, thereby further contributing to the knowledge of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:26903036

  18. Cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells alter their gene expression when challenged with endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to interfere with the hormonal system and may negatively influence human health. Microarray analysis was used in this study to investigate differential gene expression in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) after in vitro exposure to EDCs. PBMCs, isolated from blood samples of four male and four female healthy individuals, were exposed in vitro for 18 h to either a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126, 1 μM), a non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB153, 10 μM), a brominated flame retardant (BDE47, 10 μM), a perfluorinated alkyl acid (PFOA, 10 μM) or bisphenol (BPA, 10 μM). ANOVA analysis revealed a significant change in the expression of 862 genes as a result of EDC exposure. The gender of the donors did not affect gene expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis created three groups and clustered: (1) PCB126-exposed samples, (2) PCB153 and BDE47, (3) PFOA and BPA. The number of differentially expressed genes varied per compound and ranged from 60 to 192 when using fold change and multiplicity corrected p-value as filtering criteria. Exposure to PCB126 induced the AhR signaling pathway. BDE47 and PCB153 are known to disrupt thyroid metabolism and exposure influenced the expression of the nuclear receptors PPARγ and ESR2, respectively. BPA and PFOA did not induce significant changes in the expression of known nuclear receptors. Overall, each compound produced a unique gene expression signature affecting pathways and GO processes linked to metabolism and inflammation. Twenty-nine genes were significantly altered in expression under all experimental conditions. Six of these genes (HSD11B2, MMP11, ADIPOQ, CEL, DUSP9 and TUB) could be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, microarray analysis identified that PBMCs altered their gene expression response in vitro when challenged with EDCs. Our screening approach has identified a number of gene candidates that warrant

  19. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  20. Genetic Association and Altered Gene Expression of Mir-155 in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Asselta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by chronic inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. As microRNA (miRNA-dependent alterations in gene expression in hematopoietic cells are critical for mounting an appropriate immune response, miRNA deregulation may result in defects in immune tolerance. In this frame, we sought to explore the possible involvement of miRNAs in MS pathogenesis by monitoring the differential expression of 22 immunity-related miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients and healthy controls, by using a microbead-based technology. Three miRNAs resulted >2 folds up-regulated in MS vs controls, whereas none resulted down-regulated. Interestingly, the most up-regulated miRNA (mir-155; fold change = 3.30; P = 0.013 was previously reported to be up-regulated also in MS brain lesions. Mir-155 up-regulation was confirmed by qPCR experiments. The role of mir-155 in MS susceptibility was also investigated by genotyping four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs mapping in the mir-155 genomic region. A haplotype of three SNPs, corresponding to a 12-kb region encompassing the last exon of BIC (the B-cell Integration Cluster non-coding RNA, from which mir-155 is processed, resulted associated with the disease status (P = 0.035; OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.05–1.77, suggesting that this locus strongly deserves further investigations.

  1. Chloroplast protein targeting involves localized translation in Chlamydomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Uniacke, James; Zerges, William

    2009-01-01

    The compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells requires that newly synthesized proteins be targeted to the compartments in which they function. In chloroplasts, a few thousand proteins function in photosynthesis, expression of the chloroplast genome, and other processes. Most chloroplast proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm, imported, and then targeted to a specific chloroplast compartment. The remainder are encoded by the chloroplast genome, synthesized within the organelle, and targeted ...

  2. The structure of cell chloroplasts of spring cereals

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav V. Zhuk; Mykola M. Musyenko

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that in wheat chloroplasts thylakoids are localized on the periphery and in the central part are strong starch grains. In the chloroplasts of barley found small stack of thylakoids. Unlike wheat, the number of starch grains in chloroplasts of barley is more, but they are smaller. Oat chloroplasts were significantly smaller than the other studied cereals. Thus, cell chloroplasts of leaves of wheat, barley and oats differed significantly in size and structure, but had have clearly o...

  3. Alternative Acetate Production Pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Dark Anoxia and the Dominant Role of Chloroplasts in Fermentative Acetate Production[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalanotti, Claudia; D’Adamo, Sarah; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl J.; Mackinder, Luke; Miller, Tarryn E.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Peers, Graham; Smith, Kerry S.; Jonikas, Martin C.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii insertion mutants disrupted for genes encoding acetate kinases (EC 2.7.2.1) (ACK1 and ACK2) and a phosphate acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.8) (PAT2, but not PAT1) were isolated to characterize fermentative acetate production. ACK1 and PAT2 were localized to chloroplasts, while ACK2 and PAT1 were shown to be in mitochondria. Characterization of the mutants showed that PAT2 and ACK1 activity in chloroplasts plays a dominant role (relative to ACK2 and PAT1 in mitochondria) in producing acetate under dark, anoxic conditions and, surprisingly, also suggested that Chlamydomonas has other pathways that generate acetate in the absence of ACK activity. We identified a number of proteins associated with alternative pathways for acetate production that are encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome. Furthermore, we observed that only modest alterations in the accumulation of fermentative products occurred in the ack1, ack2, and ack1 ack2 mutants, which contrasts with the substantial metabolite alterations described in strains devoid of other key fermentation enzymes. PMID:25381350

  4. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Benoit, Vivian; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Nielsen, Ole; Johansen, Lene Egedal; Ditzel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Medullary breast cancer (MCB) is a morphologically and biologically distinct subtype that, despite cytologically highly malignant characteristics, has a favorable prognosis compared to the more common infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma. MCB metastasizes less frequently, which has been attributed...... to both immunological and endogenous cellular factors, although little is known about the distinct biology of MCB that may contribute to the improved outcome of MCB patients. To identify candidate genes, we performed gene array expression analysis of cell lines of MCB, ductal breast cancer and normal......) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  5. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Benoit, Vivian M; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke;

    2006-01-01

    to both immunological and endogenous cellular factors, although little is known about the distinct biology of MCB that may contribute to the improved outcome of MCB patients. To identify candidate genes, we performed gene array expression analysis of cell lines of MCB, ductal breast cancer and normal......Medullary breast cancer (MCB) is a morphologically and biologically distinct subtype that, despite cytologically highly malignant characteristics, has a favorable prognosis compared to the more common infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma. MCB metastasizes less frequently, which has been attributed......) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  6. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  7. Obesity and age-related alterations in the gene expression of zinc-transporter proteins in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, R H; Hyde, T M; Kleinman, J E;

    2016-01-01

    participate in intracellular zinc homeostasis. Altered expression of zinc-regulatory proteins has been described in AD patients. Using microarray data from human frontal cortex (BrainCloud), this study investigates expression of the SCLA30A (ZNT) and SCLA39A (ZIP) families of genes in a Caucasian and African...... available for crucial intracellular processes. In the brain, zinc co-localizes with glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and modulates NMDA receptor activity. Intracellular zinc is involved in apoptosis and fluctuations in cytoplasmic Zn(2+) affect modulation of intracellular signaling. The ZNT and ZIP proteins...... expression similar to what is seen in the early stages of AD. Increasing BMI also correlated with reduced expression of ZNT6. In conclusion, we found that the expression of genes that regulate intracellular zinc homeostasis in the human frontal cortex is altered with increasing age and affected by increasing...

  8. CURE-Chloroplast: A chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing predictor for seed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yanda

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA editing is a type of post-transcriptional modification of RNA and belongs to the class of mechanisms that contribute to the complexity of transcriptomes. C-to-U RNA editing is commonly observed in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts. The in vivo mechanism of recognizing C-to-U RNA editing sites is still unknown. In recent years, many efforts have been made to computationally predict C-to-U RNA editing sites in the mitochondria of seed plants, but there is still no algorithm available for C-to-U RNA editing site prediction in the chloroplasts of seed plants. Results In this paper, we extend our algorithm CURE, which can accurately predict the C-to-U RNA editing sites in mitochondria, to predict C-to-U RNA editing sites in the chloroplasts of seed plants. The algorithm achieves over 80% sensitivity and over 99% specificity. We implement the algorithm as an online service called CURE-Chloroplast http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/pure. Conclusion CURE-Chloroplast is an online service for predicting the C-to-U RNA editing sites in the chloroplasts of seed plants. The online service allows the processing of entire chloroplast genome sequences. Since CURE-Chloroplast performs very well, it could be a helpful tool in the study of C-to-U RNA editing in the chloroplasts of seed plants.

  9. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  10. Feeding Period Restriction Alters the Expression of Peripheral Circadian Rhythm Genes without Changing Body Weight in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gung; Kong, Jinuk; Choi, Goun; Park, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Jae Bum

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the circadian clock is closely associated with metabolic regulation. However, whether an impaired circadian clock is a direct cause of metabolic dysregulation such as body weight gain is not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that body weight gain in mice is not significantly changed by restricting feeding period to daytime or nighttime. The expression of peripheral circadian clock genes was altered by feeding period restriction, while the ex...

  11. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  12. The whole chloroplast genomes of two Eutrema species (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guoqian; Bi, Hao; Li, Yuanshuo; He, Qi; Ma, Yazhen; Guo, Xinyi; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the complete chloroplast genomes from two crucifer species of the Eutrema genus. The sizes of the two cp genomes were 153 948 bp (E. yunnanense) and 153 876 bp (E. heterophyllum). Both genomes have the typical quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy region, a small single copy region and two inverted repeats. Gene contents and their relative positions of the 132 individual genes (87 protein-coding genes, eight rRNA, and 37 tRNA genes) of either genome were identical to each other. Phylogenetic analysis supports the idea that the currently recognized Eutrema genus is monophyletic and that E. salsugineum and Schrenkiella parvula evolved salt tolerance independently. PMID:26329763

  13. Solar energy conversion by chloroplast photoelectrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, R.; Pan, R. L.; Gross, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical cell based on chloroplasts which generates large photovoltages and photocurrents from solar energy is presented. The cell contains broken Type C chloroplasts placed on a filter separating compartments containing an electron acceptor and electron donor with platinum electrodes in each. Photovoltages were observed across a load resistance of 3000 ohms with either flavin mononucleotide or anthroquinone 2-sulphonate as the electron acceptor and dichlorophenol indophenol as the donor, and persisted for 1-2 hr after the light was turned off. The powers and short circuit currents obtained in the chloroplast cells are nearly equal to those obtained in cells based on isolated photosystem I particles. Finally, an efficiency of 2.3% has been measured for the chloroplast contribution to the total power in flavin mononucleotide cells.

  14. Chloroplasts in tissues of some herbaceous stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Maksymowych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Serial sections of mature stems of ten species of herbaceous dicotyledonous plants were examined by light microscopy and the number of chloroplasts per cell was estimated in epidermis, collenchyma and cortex. Chloroplast identification was made by both light and transmission electron microscopy. Chloroplasts were present in epidermis, collenchyma and cortex tissues of all stems examined. The smallest number of chloroplasts was observed in the epidermis. Collenchyma cells had the largest number of plastids in four of the genera and cortex cells had the largest number in the remaining six genera. The stem epidermis of all genera contained stomates as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and aceto-orcein stained epidermal peels.

  15. A comparison of rice chloroplast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiabin; Xia, Hong'ai; Cao, Mengliang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zeng, Wanyong; Hu, Songnian; Tong, Wei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Zhu, Lihuang

    2004-01-01

    ), which are both parental varieties of the super-hybrid rice, LYP9. Based on the patterns of high sequence coverage, we partitioned chloroplast sequence variations into two classes, intravarietal and intersubspecific polymorphisms. Intravarietal polymorphisms refer to variations within 93-11 or PA64S...... intersubspecific polymorphisms. In our study, we found that the intersubspecific variations of 93-11 (indica) and PA64S (japonica) chloroplast genomes consisted of 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 27 insertions or deletions. The intersubspecific polymorphism rates between 93-11 and PA64S were 0.05% for...... single nucleotide polymorphisms and 0.02% for insertions or deletions, nearly 8 and 10 times lower than their respective nuclear genomes. Based on the total number of nucleotide substitutions between the two chloroplast genomes, we dated the divergence of indica and japonica chloroplast genomes as...

  16. Domestication-driven Gossypium profilin 1 (GhPRF1) gene transduces early flowering phenotype in tobacco by spatial alteration of apical/floral-meristem related gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Dhananjay K.; Chaudhary, Bhupendra

    2016-01-01

    Background Plant profilin genes encode core cell-wall structural proteins and are evidenced for their up-regulation under cotton domestication. Notwithstanding striking discoveries in the genetics of cell-wall organization in plants, little is explicit about the manner in which profilin-mediated molecular interplay and corresponding networks are altered, especially during cellular signalling of apical meristem determinacy and flower development. Results Here we show that the ectopic expressio...

  17. Tolerance and responsive gene expression of Sogatella furcifera under extreme temperature stresses are altered by its vectored plant virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Donglin; Zhong, Ting; Feng, Wendi; Zhou, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a newly emerged fijivirus causing great loss to rice production in eastern and southeastern Asian countries in recent years, is efficiently transmitted by a rice pest, white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent, circulative propagative manner and can be considered as an insect virus. In this study, SRBSDV infection in WBPH was found to increase the vector's death rate under extreme cold stress but improve its survival rate under extreme heat stress. Digital gene expression profiling based on RNA-Seq revealed different gene regulation patterns in WBPH under viral and/or temperature stress. Under cold stress, the virus infection upregulated 1540 genes and downregulated 131 genes in the insect, most of which were related to membrane properties and biological processes of actin and cytoskeleton; whereas under heat stress, it upregulated 363 genes and downregulated 548 genes, most of which were associated to metabolism and intracellular organelles. Several types of stress-responsive genes involving intestinal mucin, cuticle protein, ubiquitin protease, immune response, RNA interference and heat shock response, were largely upregulated under cold stress, but largely downregulated under heat stress, by SRBSDV infection. Our results suggest two distinct mechanisms of virus-altered vector insect tolerance to temperature stress. PMID:27531640

  18. Alteration of tobacco floral organ identity by expression of combinations of Antirrhinum MADS-box genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B; Di Rosa, A; Eneva, T; Saedler, H; Sommer, H

    1996-10-01

    Floral organ identity is largely controlled by the spatially restricted expression of several MADS-box genes. In Antirrhinum majus these organ identity genes include DEF, GLO and PLE. Single and double mutant analyses indicated that the type of organ found in a particular whorl is dependent on which combination of these genes is expressed there. This paper reports the ectopic expression of Antirrhinum organ identity genes, alone and in combinations, in transgenic tobacco. Although the phenotypes are broadly in agreement with the genetic predictions, several unexpected features are observed which provide information concerning the action of the organ identity genes. The presumed tobacco homologue of DEF, NTDEF, has been isolated and used to investigate the influence of ectopic expression of the Antirrhinum organ identity genes on the endogenous tobacco genes. Analysis of the spatial and temporal expression patterns of NTDEF and NTGLO reveals that the boundaries are not coincident and that differences exist in the regulatory mechanisms of the two genes concerning both induction and maintenance of gene expression. Evidence is provided which indicates that organ development is sensitive to the relative levels of organ identity gene expression. Expression of the organ identity genes outside the flower or inflorescence produced no effects, suggesting that additional factors are required to mediate their activity. These results demonstrate that heterologous genes can be used to predictably influence floral organ identity but also reveal the existence of unsuspected control mechanisms. PMID:8893543

  19. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46–0.72 mg kg−1, induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4–2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3–1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish. - Highlights: • 48 h-LC50 value of arsenite (AsIII) was 42 mg L−1 for zebrafish. • AsIII exposure elevated oxidative stress and caused oxidative damage in zebrafish. • AsIII exposure increased the content of thyroid hormone thyroxine. • AsIII exposure altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish. - Short-term exposure of arsenite caused oxidative stress, disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in Zebrafish

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection in elderly mice results in altered antiviral gene expression and enhanced pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terianne M Wong

    Full Text Available Elderly persons are more susceptible to RSV-induced pneumonia than young people, but the molecular mechanism underlying this susceptibility is not well understood. In this study, we used an aged mouse model of RSV-induced pneumonia to examine how aging alters the lung pathology, modulates antiviral gene expressions, and the production of inflammatory cytokines in response to RSV infection. Young (2-3 months and aged (19-21 months mice were intranasally infected with mucogenic or non-mucogenic RSV strains, lung histology was examined, and gene expression was analyzed. Upon infection with mucogenic strains of RSV, leukocyte infiltration in the airways was elevated and prolonged in aged mice compared to young mice. Minitab factorial analysis identified several antiviral genes that are influenced by age, infection, and a combination of both factors. The expression of five antiviral genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and osteopontin (OPN, was altered by both age and infection, while age was associated with the expression of 15 antiviral genes. Both kinetics and magnitude of antiviral gene expression were diminished as a result of older age. In addition to delays in cytokine signaling and pattern recognition receptor induction, we found TLR7/8 signaling to be impaired in alveolar macrophages in aged mice. In vivo, induction of IL-1β and OPN were delayed but prolonged in aged mice upon RSV infection compared to young. In conclusion, this study demonstrates inherent differences in response to RSV infection in young vs. aged mice, accompanied by delayed antiviral gene induction and cytokine signaling.

  1. Inheritance of chloroplast DNA in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, David M; Nicholas W. Gillham; Boynton, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Two symmetrically located deletions of approximately 100 base pairs each have been identified in chloroplast DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although present in a mutant strain that requires acetate for growth, both deletions have been shown to be distinct from the nonphotosynthetic phenotype of this strain. These physical markers in the chloroplast genome and maternally inherited genetic markers showed strict cotransmission in reciprocal crosses. Thus, our results are consistent with the l...

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ledebouriella seseloides (Hoffm.) H. Wolff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Oh; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Soonok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Ledebouriella seseloides (Hoffm.) H.Wolff is a traditional medicinal herb belonging to Apiaceae family, whose dried roots and rhizomes have been used as traditional medicine in East Asian countries. The complete chloroplast genome of L. seseloides was obtained by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of L. seseloides was 147 880 bp in length, which consisted of large single copy region (93 222 bp), small single copy region (17 324 bp), and a pair of inverted repeat regions (18 667 bp). The overall GC contents of the chloroplast genome were 37.5%. A total of 113 genes were annotated, which included 79 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that L. seseloides is most closely related to Petroselinum crispum (parsley), an herb widely used in cooking. PMID:26218226

  3. Export of carbon from chloroplasts at night

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleucher, J.; Vanderveer, P.J.; Sharkey, T.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Hexose export from chloroplasts at night has been inferred in previous studies of mutant and transgenic plants. The authors have tested whether hexose export is the normal route of carbon export from chloroplasts at night. The authors used nuclear magnetic resonance to distinguish glucose (Glc) made from hexose export and Glc made from triose export. Glc synthesized in vitro from fructose-6-phosphate in the presence of deuterium-labeled water had deuterium incorporated at C-2, whereas synthesis from triose phosphates caused C-2 through C-5 to become deuterated. In both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.), Glc from sucrose made at night in the presence of deuterium-enriched water was deuterated only in the C-2 position, indicating that >75% of carbon is exported as hexoses at night. In darkness the phosphate in the cytosol was 28 mM, whereas that in the chloroplasts was 5 mW, but hexose phosphates were 10-fold higher in the cytosol than in the chloroplasts. Therefore, hexose phosphates would not move out of chloroplasts without the input of energy. The authors conclude that most carbon leaves chloroplasts at night as Glc, maltose, or higher maltodextrins under normal conditions.

  4. Detection of Gene Alteration for Color Vision Defects by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    According to the fact that the abnormalities of visual pigment genes were always involved in the changing of the exon 5, two oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify the exon 5 of red pigment gene and green pigment gene. After electrophoresis of the PCR products digested with Rsal or Sau3A, the DNA fragments from the exon 5 of red pigment gene (RPG) and green pigment gene (GPG) were separated since there are different restriction endonuclease sites. On the other hand, we analyzed the exon 5 rela...

  5. Exploring Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection-induced alterations in gene expression in macrophage by microarray hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 徐永忠; 黄达蔷; 梁莉; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious threat to public health. Its causative agent Mycobacte- rium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen which survives and replicates within cells of the host immune system, primarily macrophages. Knowledge of the bacteria-macrophage interaction can help to develop novel measures to combat the disease. The global gene expression of macro- phage following invasion by and growth of M. tuberculosis was studied by cDNA microarray. Of the 12800 human genes analyzed, totally 473 (3.7%) macrophage genes were differentially expressed after being infected by M. tuberculosis, among which, only 25 (5.2%, corresponding to less than 0.2% of the 12800 genes) genes were up-regulated, while others (94.8%) were down-regulated against the control. Of the 473 genes, 376 genes are registered in the GenBank, and 97 are novel genes. Expression of 5 up-regulated genes has been induced by more than 3-fold. 25 genes were down-regulated by more than 3-fold. Syndecan binding protein has been down-regu- lated up to 12.5-fold. The data gave an insight into the early gene expression in macrophage ensuing M. tuberculosis infection and a basis for further study.

  6. Phytoplasma adapt to the diverse environments of their plant and insect hosts by altering gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarova, Olga; MacLean, Allyson M.; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    role in host adaptation. 74 genes were up-regulated in insects and included genes involved in stress response, phospholipid synthesis, malate and pyruvate metabolism, hemolysin and transporter genes, multiple copies of thymidylate kinase, sigma factor and Zn-proteases genes. In plants, 34 genes......Phytoplasmas are intracellular insect-transmitted phytopathogenic bacteria with small genomes. To understand how Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain witches' broom (AY-WB) adapts to their hosts, we performed qRT-PCR analysis of 179 in silico functionally annotated AY-WB genes that are likely to have a...... encoding an immune dominant membrane protein, membrane-associated proteins, and multidrug resistance ABC-type transporters, were up-regulated. Differential regulation of gene expression thus appears to play an important role in host adaptation of phytoplasmas....

  7. Alteration of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 gene expression in pancreatic tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-Yi Qin; Ru-Liang Fang; Manoj Kumar Gupta; Zheng-Ren Liu; Da-Yu Wang; Qing Chang; Yi-Bei Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the difference of somatostatin receptorsubtype 2 (SST2R) gene expression in pancreatic canceroustissue and its adjacent tissue, and the relationship betweenthe change of SST2R gene expression and pancreatic tumorangiogenesis related genes.METHODS: The expressions of SST2R, DPC4, p53 and ras genes in cancer tissues of 40 patients with primary pancreatic cancer, and the expression of SST2R gene in its adjacent tissue were determined by immunohistochemiscal LSAB method and EnVisionTM method. Chi-square test was used to analyze the difference in expression of SST2R in pancreatic cancer tissue and its adjacent tissue, and the correlation of SST2R gene expression with the expression of p53, ras and DPC4 genes.RESULTS: Of the tissue specimens from 40 patients with primary pancreatic cancer, 35 (87.5%) cancer tissues showed a negative expression of SST2R gene, whereas 34 (85%) a positive expression of SST2R gene in its adjacent tissues.Five (12.5%) cancer tissues and its adjacent tissues simultaneously expressed SST2R. The expression of SST2R gene was markedly higher in pancreatic tissues adjacent to cancer than in pancreatic cancer tissues (P<0.05). The expression rates of p53, ras and DPC4 genes were 50%,60% and 72.5%, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation of SST2R with p53 and ras genes (X12=9.33,X22=15.43, P<0.01), but no significant correlation with DPC4 gene (X2=2.08, P >0.05).CONCLUSION: There was a significant difference of SST2R gene expression in pancreatic cancer tissues and its adjacent tissues, which might be one cause for the different therapeutic effects of somatostatin and its analogs on pancreatic cancer patients. There were abnormal expressions of SST2R, DPC4, p53 and ras genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis, and moreover, the loss or decrease of SST2R gene expression was significantly negatively correlated with the overexpression of tumor angiogenesis correlated p53 and ras genes, suggesting that SST2R gene

  8. Diaphragm Unloading via Controlled Mechanical Ventilation Alters the Gene Expression Profile

    OpenAIRE

    DeRuisseau, Keith C.; Shanely, R Andrew; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Hamilton, Marc T.; Van Gammeren, Darin; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; McKenzie, Michael; Powers, Scott K.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Prolonged controlled mechanical ventilation results in diaphragmatic inactivity and promotes oxidative injury, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in this important inspiratory muscle. However, the impact of controlled mechanical ventilation on global mRNA alterations in the diaphragm remains unknown.

  9. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matt C Danzi; Dario Motti; Donna L Avison; John L Bixby; Vance P Lemmon

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regen-eration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientiifc goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These ifndings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Glehnia littoralis F.Schmidt ex Miq. (Apiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Oh Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Soonok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Glehnia littoralis F. Schmidt ex Miq is an oriental medicinal herb belonging to Apiaceae family, and its dried roots and rhizomes are known to show various pharmacological effects. The complete chlorplast genome of G. littoralis was generated by de novo assembly using whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of G. littoralis was 147 467 bp in length and divided into four distinct regions: large single copy region (93 493 bp), small single copy region (17 546 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (18 214 bp). A total of 114 genes including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes were predicted and accounted for 57.1% of the chloroplast genome. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that G. littoralis is an herbal species closely related to Ledebouriella seseloides, an herbal medicinal plant. PMID:26367483

  11. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Jiun Su

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia. The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  12. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US EPA, Duluth, MN (United States); Knoebl, Iris [US EPA, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Larkin, Patrick [Sante Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL (United States); EcoArray, Alachua, FL (United States); Miracle, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carter, Barbara J. [EcoArray, Alachua, FL (United States); Denslow, Nancy D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US EPA, Duluth, MN (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  13. Studies on the Photoperiod Sensitive Characters of Male Fertility Alteration of Peiai64S' Main Male Genic Sterile Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Han-lai; ZHANG Duan-pin; ZHANG Zhi-yu; YI Wen-kai; ZHU Xin; MENG Hui-jun

    2002-01-01

    Peiai64S, an indica male sterile rice with a male fertility alteration under different environments, is selected from the offspring of indica rice crossed with Nongken58S. Nongken58S, a japonica photoperiod sensitive genic male sterile rice (PGMS), deriving from a natural mutant plant individual of normal japonica rice variety, Nongken58, is used as a male sterile gene donor of Peiai64S. But Peiai64S is not a typical PGMS rice, the male fertility is sensitive to temperature just as thermo-sensitive genic male sterile rice (TGMS). We have selected typical PGMS plants in F2 population of Peiai64S × Nongken58, whose ratio of fertile plants to sterile plants is nearly 3:1. The sterility inheritance conformed to one pair of gene segregation model. The result indicates the main male sterile gene in Peiai64S is not other than the PGMS gene, and comes from Nongken58S. The genetic background affects effective expression of the PGMS gene. This suggests that we ought to focus on optimizing the genetic background of the PGMS gene in PGMS rice breeding, and select an ideal genetic background as a transgenic background in molecular breeding.

  14. Phylogenomic analysis of transcriptomic sequences of mitochondria and chloroplasts of essential brown algae (Phaeophyceae) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Shangang; LIU Tao; WU Shuangxiu; WANG Xumin; LI Tianyong; QIAN Hao; SUN Jing; WANG Liang; YU Jun; REN Lufeng; YIN Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast and mitochondrion of brown algae (Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta) may have originated from different endosymbiosis. In this study, we carried out phylogenomic analysis to distinguish their evolutionary lineages by using algal RNA-seq datasets of the 1 000 Plants (1KP) Project and publicly available complete genomes of mitochondria and chloroplasts of Kingdom Chromista. We have found that there is a split between Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta and the others (Phylum Cryptophyta and Haptophyta) in Kingdom Chromista, and identified more diversity in chloroplast genes than mitochondrial ones in their phylogenetic trees. Taxonomy resolution for Class Phaeophyceae showed that it was divided into Laminariales-Ectocarpales clade and Fucales clade, and phylogenetic positions of Kjellmaniella crassi-folia, Hizikia fusifrome and Ishige okamurai were confirmed. Our analysis provided the basic phylogenetic relationships of Chromista algae, and demonstrated their potential ability to study endosymbiotic events.

  15. Adenovirus-induced alterations in host cell gene expression prior to the onset of viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Fredrik; Svensson, Catharina; Pettersson, Ulf; Zhao, Hongxing

    2006-09-15

    In this report, we have studied gene expression profiles in human primary lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) during the very early phase of an adenovirus infection. Eight out of twelve genes with known functions encoded transcription factors linked to two major cellular processes; inhibition of cell growth (ATF3, ATF4, KLF4, KLF6 and ELK3) and immune response (NR4A1 and CEBPB), indicating that the earliest consequences of an adenovirus infection are growth arrest and induction of an immune response. A time course analysis showed that the induction of these immediate-early response genes was transient and suppressed after the onset of the adenovirus early gene expression. PMID:16860366

  16. Modulation of biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and light-harvesting complex in wild-type and gun5 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana during impaired chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-05-01

    Plants in response to different environmental cues need to modulate the expression of nuclear and chloroplast genomes that are in constant communication. To understand the signals that are responsible for inter-organellar communication, levulinic acid (LA), an inhibitor of 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, was used to suppress the synthesis of pyrrole-derived tetrapyrroles chlorophylls. Although, it does not specifically inhibit carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes, LA reduced the carotenoid contents during photomorphogenesis of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings. The expression of nuclear genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis, i.e., geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase, was downregulated in LA-treated seedlings. Similarly, the transcript abundance of nuclear genes, i.e., Lhcb1, PsbO, and RcbS, coding for chloroplastic proteins was severely attenuated in LA-treated samples. In contrast, LA treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of chalcone synthase, a marker gene for cytoplasm, and β-ATP synthase, a marker gene for mitochondria. This demonstrates the retrograde signaling from chloroplast to nucleus to suppress chloroplastic proteins during impaired chloroplast development. However, under identical conditions in LA-treated tetrapyrrole-deficient gun5 mutant, retrograde signal continued. The tetrapyrrole biosynthesis inhibitor LA suppressed formation of all tetrapyrroles both in WT and gun5. This rules out the role of tetrapyrroles as signaling molecules in WT and gun5. The removal of LA from the Arabidopsis seedlings restored the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents and expression of nuclear genes coding for chloroplastic proteins involved in chloroplast biogenesis. Therefore, LA could be used to modulate chloroplast biogenesis at a desired phase of chloroplast development. PMID:27001427

  17. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of the green macroalga Ulva sp. UNA00071828 (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T Melton

    Full Text Available Sequencing mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes has become an integral part in understanding the genomic machinery and the phylogenetic histories of green algae. Previously, only three chloroplast genomes (Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, Pseudendoclonium akinetum, and Bryopsis hypnoides and two mitochondrial genomes (O. viridis and P. akinetum from the class Ulvophyceae have been published. Here, we present the first chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from the ecologically and economically important marine, green algal genus Ulva. The chloroplast genome of Ulva sp. was 99,983 bp in a circular-mapping molecule that lacked inverted repeats, and thus far, was the smallest ulvophycean plastid genome. This cpDNA was a highly compact, AT-rich genome that contained a total of 102 identified genes (71 protein-coding genes, 28 tRNA genes, and three ribosomal RNA genes. Additionally, five introns were annotated in four genes: atpA (1, petB (1, psbB (2, and rrl (1. The circular-mapping mitochondrial genome of Ulva sp. was 73,493 bp and follows the expanded pattern also seen in other ulvophyceans and trebouxiophyceans. The Ulva sp. mtDNA contained 29 protein-coding genes, 25 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes for a total of 56 identifiable genes. Ten introns were annotated in this mtDNA: cox1 (4, atp1 (1, nad3 (1, nad5 (1, and rrs (3. Double-cut-and-join (DCJ values showed that organellar genomes across Chlorophyta are highly rearranged, in contrast to the highly conserved organellar genomes of the red algae (Rhodophyta. A phylogenomic investigation of 51 plastid protein-coding genes showed that Ulvophyceae is not monophyletic, and also placed Oltmannsiellopsis (Oltmannsiellopsidales and Tetraselmis (Chlorodendrophyceae closely to Ulva (Ulvales and Pseudendoclonium (Ulothrichales.

  18. Yeast prt1 mutations alter heat-shock gene expression through transcript fragmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, C.A.; Singer, R A; Johnston, G C

    1993-01-01

    The inhibition of translation initiation by modification or mutation of initiation factors can lead to disproportionate effects on gene expression. Here we report disproportionate decreases in gene expression in cells with mutated Prt1 activity. The PRT1 gene product of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is necessary for translation initiation and is thought to be a component of initiation factor 3. At a restrictive temperature the prt1-1 mutation, in addition to decreasing global pro...

  19. Altered Gene Transcription in Human Cells Treated with Ludox® Silica Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Fede

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Silica (SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have found extensive applications in industrial manufacturing, biomedical and biotechnological fields. Therefore, the increasing exposure to such ultrafine particles requires studies to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects in order to provide exhaustive information to assess the impact of nanomaterials on human health. The understanding of the biological processes involved in the development and maintenance of a variety of pathologies is improved by genome-wide approaches, and in this context, gene set analysis has emerged as a fundamental tool for the interpretation of the results. In this work we show how the use of a combination of gene-by-gene and gene set analyses can enhance the interpretation of results of in vitro treatment of A549 cells with Ludox® colloidal amorphous silica nanoparticles. By gene-by-gene and gene set analyses, we evidenced a specific cell response in relation to NPs size and elapsed time after treatment, with the smaller NPs (SM30 having higher impact on inflammatory and apoptosis processes than the bigger ones. Apoptotic process appeared to be activated by the up-regulation of the initiator genes TNFa and IL1b and by ATM. Moreover, our analyses evidenced that cell treatment with LudoxÒ silica nanoparticles activated the matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP10 and MMP9. The information derived from this study can be informative about the cytotoxicity of Ludox® and other similar colloidal amorphous silica NPs prepared by solution processes.

  20. The Mutational Spectrum of Holoprosencephaly-Associated Changes within the SHH Gene in Humans Predicts Loss-of-Function Through Either Key Structural Alterations of the Ligand or Its Altered Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roessler, Erich; El-Jaick, Kenia B.; Dubourg, Christèle; Vélez, Jorge I.; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Pineda-Álvarez, Daniel E.; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Zhou, Nan; Ouspenskaia, Maia; Paulussen, Aimée; Smeets, Hubert J.; Hehr, Ute; Bendavid, Claude; Bale, Sherri; Odent, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Mutations within either the SHH gene or its related pathway components are the most common, and best understood, pathogenetic changes observed in holoprosencephaly patients; this fact is consistent with the essential functions of this gene during forebrain development and patterning. Here we summarize the nature and types of deleterious sequence alterations among over one hundred distinct mutations in the SHH gene (64 novel mutations) and compare these to over a dozen mutations in disease-rel...

  1. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  2. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  3. Gene deletion of cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase leads to altered organic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Olsson, Lisbeth;

    2009-01-01

    factory platform for production of chemicals. Using molecular biology techniques, this study focused on metabolic engineering of A. niger to manipulate its organic acid production in the direction of succinic acid. The gene target for complete gene deletion was cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase (acl), which...

  4. Molecular cause and functional impact of altered synaptic lipid signaling due to a prg-1 gene SNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Johannes; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Mobascher, Arian; Cheng, Jin; Li, Yunbo; Liu, Xingfeng; Baumgart, Jan; Thalman, Carine; Kirischuk, Sergei; Unichenko, Petr; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Stroh, Albrecht; Richers, Sebastian; Sahragard, Nassim; Distler, Ute; Tenzer, Stefan; Qiao, Lianyong; Lieb, Klaus; Tüscher, Oliver; Binder, Harald; Ferreiros, Nerea; Tegeder, Irmgard; Morris, Andrew J; Gropa, Sergiu; Nürnberg, Peter; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Luhmann, Heiko J; Huai, Jisen; Nitsch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Loss of plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG-1), which regulates synaptic phospholipid signaling, leads to hyperexcitability via increased glutamate release altering excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance in cortical networks. A recently reported SNP in prg-1 (R345T/mutPRG-1) affects ~5 million European and US citizens in a monoallelic variant. Our studies show that this mutation leads to a loss-of-PRG-1 function at the synapse due to its inability to control lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels via a cellular uptake mechanism which appears to depend on proper glycosylation altered by this SNP. PRG-1(+/-) mice, which are animal correlates of human PRG-1(+/mut) carriers, showed an altered cortical network function and stress-related behavioral changes indicating altered resilience against psychiatric disorders. These could be reversed by modulation of phospholipid signaling via pharmacological inhibition of the LPA-synthesizing molecule autotaxin. In line, EEG recordings in a human population-based cohort revealed an E/I balance shift in monoallelic mutPRG-1 carriers and an impaired sensory gating, which is regarded as an endophenotype of stress-related mental disorders. Intervention into bioactive lipid signaling is thus a promising strategy to interfere with glutamate-dependent symptoms in psychiatric diseases. PMID:26671989

  5. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal. PMID:11571577

  6. Altered gene synchrony suggests a combined hormone-mediated dysregulated state in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Gaiteri

    Full Text Available Coordinated gene transcript levels across tissues (denoted "gene synchrony" reflect converging influences of genetic, biochemical and environmental factors; hence they are informative of the biological state of an individual. So could brain gene synchrony also integrate the multiple factors engaged in neuropsychiatric disorders and reveal underlying pathologies? Using bootstrapped Pearson correlation for transcript levels for the same genes across distinct brain areas, we report robust gene transcript synchrony between the amygdala and cingulate cortex in the human postmortem brain of normal control subjects (n = 14; Control/Permutated data, p<0.000001. Coordinated expression was confirmed across distinct prefrontal cortex areas in a separate cohort (n = 19 subjects and affected different gene sets, potentially reflecting regional network- and function-dependent transcriptional programs. Genewise regional transcript coordination was independent of age-related changes and array technical parameters. Robust shifts in amygdala-cingulate gene synchrony were observed in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD, denoted here "depression" (n = 14; MDD/Permutated data, p<0.000001, significantly affecting between 100 and 250 individual genes (10-30% false discovery rate. Biological networks and signal transduction pathways corresponding to the identified gene set suggested putative dysregulated functions for several hormone-type factors previously implicated in depression (insulin, interleukin-1, thyroid hormone, estradiol and glucocorticoids; p<0.01 for association with depression-related networks. In summary, we showed that coordinated gene expression across brain areas may represent a novel molecular probe for brain structure/function that is sensitive to disease condition, suggesting the presence of a distinct and integrated hormone-mediated corticolimbic homeostatic, although maladaptive and pathological, state in major depression.

  7. Short-term weightlessness produced by parabolic flight maneuvers altered gene expression patterns in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Jirka; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Ma, Xiao; Ulbrich, Claudia; Schulz, Herbert; Saar, Katrin; Hübner, Norbert; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Braun, Markus; van Loon, Jack; Vagt, Nicole; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Egli, Marcel; Richter, Peter; Baltz, Theo; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush; Grimm, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    This study focused on the effects of short-term microgravity (22 s) on the gene expression and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs) and evaluated gravisensitive signaling elements. ECs were investigated during four German Space Agency (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) parabolic flight campaigns. Hoechst 33342 and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining showed no signs of cell death in ECs after 31 parabolas (P31). Gene array analysis revealed 320 significantly regulated genes after the first parabola (P1) and P31. COL4A5, COL8A1, ITGA6, ITGA10, and ITGB3 mRNAs were down-regulated after P1. EDN1 and TNFRSF12A mRNAs were up-regulated. ADAM19, CARD8, CD40, GSN, PRKCA (all down-regulated after P1), and PRKAA1 (AMPKα1) mRNAs (up-regulated) provide a very early protective mechanism of cell survival induced by 22 s microgravity. The ABL2 gene was significantly up-regulated after P1 and P31, TUBB was slightly induced, but ACTA2 and VIM mRNAs were not changed. β-Tubulin immunofluorescence revealed a cytoplasmic rearrangement. Vibration had no effect. Hypergravity reduced CARD8, NOS3, VASH1, SERPINH1 (all P1), CAV2, ADAM19, TNFRSF12A, CD40, and ITGA6 (P31) mRNAs. These data suggest that microgravity alters the gene expression patterns and the cytoskeleton of ECs very early. Several gravisensitive signaling elements, such as AMPKα1 and integrins, are involved in the reaction of ECs to altered gravity. PMID:22024737

  8. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibition alters gene expression and improves isoniazid-mediated clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rabbit lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Subbian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB treatment is hampered by the long duration of antibiotic therapy required to achieve cure. This indolent response has been partly attributed to the ability of subpopulations of less metabolically active Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb to withstand killing by current anti-TB drugs. We have used immune modulation with a phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4 inhibitor, CC-3052, that reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α production by increasing intracellular cAMP in macrophages, to examine the crosstalk between host and pathogen in rabbits with pulmonary TB during treatment with isoniazid (INH. Based on DNA microarray, changes in host gene expression during CC-3052 treatment of Mtb infected rabbits support a link between PDE4 inhibition and specific down-regulation of the innate immune response. The overall pattern of host gene expression in the lungs of infected rabbits treated with CC-3052, compared to untreated rabbits, was similar to that described in vitro in resting Mtb infected macrophages, suggesting suboptimal macrophage activation. These alterations in host immunity were associated with corresponding down-regulation of a number of Mtb genes that have been associated with a metabolic shift towards dormancy. Moreover, treatment with CC-3052 and INH resulted in reduced expression of those genes associated with the bacterial response to INH. Importantly, CC-3052 treatment of infected rabbits was associated with reduced ability of Mtb to withstand INH killing, shown by improved bacillary clearance, from the lungs of co-treated animals compared to rabbits treated with INH alone. The results of our study suggest that changes in Mtb gene expression, in response to changes in the host immune response, can alter the responsiveness of the bacteria to antimicrobial agents. These findings provide a basis for exploring the potential use of adjunctive immune modulation with PDE4 inhibitors to enhance the efficacy of existing anti-TB treatment.

  9. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  10. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  11. Phenotypic alterations of petal and sepal by ectopic expression of a rice MADS box gene in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H G; Noh, Y S; Chung, Y Y; Costa, M A; An, K; An, G

    1995-10-01

    Floral organ development is controlled by a group of regulatory factors containing the MADS domain. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a cDNA clone from rice, OsMADS3, which encodes a MADS-domain containing protein. The OsMADS3 amino acid sequence shows over 60% identity to AG of Arabidopsis, PLE of Antirrhinum majus, and AG/PLE homologues of petunia, tobacco, tomato, Brassica napus, and maize. Homology in the MADS box region is most conserved. RNA blot analysis indicated that the rice MADS gene was preferentially expressed in reproductive organs, especially in stamen and carpel. In situ localization studies showed that the transcript was present primarily in stamen and carpel. The function of the rice OsMADS3 was elucidated by ectopic expression of the gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in a heterologous tobacco plant system. Transgenic plants exhibited an altered morphology and coloration of the perianth organs. Sepals were pale green and elongated. Limbs of the corolla were split into sections which in some plants became antheroid structures attached to tubes that resembled filaments. The phenotypes mimic the results of ectopic expression of dicot AG gene or AG homologues. These results indicate that the OsMADS3 gene is possibly an AG homologue and that the AG genes appear to be structurally and functionally conserved between dicot and monocot. PMID:7579155

  12. The role of germline alterations in the DNA damage response genes BRIP1 and BRCA2 in melanoma susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Rainer; Engström, Pär G; Helgadottir, Hildur; Eriksson, Hanna; Unneberg, Per; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Yang, Muyi; Lindén, Diana; Edsgärd, Daniel; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    We applied a targeted sequencing approach to identify germline mutations conferring a moderately to highly increased risk of cutaneous and uveal melanoma. Ninety-two high-risk melanoma patients were screened for inherited variation in 120 melanoma candidate genes. Observed gene variants were filtered based on frequency in reference populations, cosegregation with melanoma in families and predicted functional effect. Several novel or rare genetic variants in genes involved in DNA damage response, cell-cycle regulation and transcriptional control were identified in melanoma patients. Among identified genetic alterations was an extremely rare variant (minor allele frequency of 0.00008) in the BRIP1 gene that was found to cosegregate with the melanoma phenotype. We also found a rare nonsense variant in the BRCA2 gene (rs11571833), previously associated with cancer susceptibility but not with melanoma, which showed weak association with melanoma susceptibility in the Swedish population. Our results add to the growing knowledge about genetic factors associated with melanoma susceptibility and also emphasize the role of DNA damage response as an important factor in melanoma etiology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074266

  13. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of DLC-1, a Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene, in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan PENG; Cai-Ping REN; Hong-Mei YI; Liang ZHOU; Xu-Yu YANG; Hui LI; Kai-Tai YAO

    2006-01-01

    The DLC-1 gene, located at the human chromosome region 8p22, behaves like a tumor suppressor gene and is frequently deleted in diverse tumors. The deletion of 8p22 is not an uncommon event in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), therefore we explored the expression levels of the DLC-1 gene in NPCs and NPC cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed the mRNA level of DLC-1 was downregulated. To identify the mechanism of DLC-1 downregulation in NPC, we investigated the methylation status of the DLC-1 gene using methylation-specific PCR, and found that 79% (31 of 39) of the NPC tissues and two DLC-1 nonexpressing NPC cell lines, 6-10B and 5-8F, were methylated in the DLC-1 CpG island. Microsatellite PCR was also carried out, and loss of heterozygosity was found at four microsatellite sites (D8S552, D8S1754, D8S1790 and D8S549) covering the whole DLC-1 gene with ratios of 33% (4 of 12 informative cases), 18% (2 of 11), 5% (1 of 18), and 25% (3 of 12), respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that DLC-1 might be an NPC-related tumor suppressor gene affected by aberrant promoter methylation and gene deletion.

  14. Altered Gene Expression Profiles of Wheat Genotypes against Fusarium Head Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Kosaka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB, which is a destructive disease of wheat that makes its quality unsuitable for end use. To understand the temporal molecular response against this pathogen, microarray gene expression analysis was carried out at two time points on three wheat genotypes, the spikes of which were infected by Fusarium graminearum. The greatest number of genes was upregulated in Nobeokabouzu-komugi followed by Sumai 3, whereas the minimum expression in Gamenya was at three days after inoculation (dai. In Nobeokabouzu-komugi, high expression of detoxification genes, such as multidrug-resistant protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, UDP-glycosyltransferase and ABC transporters, in addition to systemic defense-related genes, were identified at the early stage of infection. This early response of the highly-resistant genotype implies a different resistance response from the other resistant genotype, Sumai 3, primarily containing local defense-related genes, such as cell wall defense genes. In Gamenya, the expression of all three functional groups was minimal. The differences in these molecular responses with respect to the time points confirmed the variation in the genotypes. For the first time, we report the nature of gene expression in the FHB-highly resistant cv. Nobeokabouzu-komugi during the disease establishment stage and the possible underlying molecular response.

  15. An altered GABA-A receptor function in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with the CACNA1A gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kono

    2014-12-01

    General significance: An altered GABA-A receptor function has previously been reported in models of inherited murine cerebellar ataxia caused by a mutation in the CACNA1A gene. This study showed novel clinical characteristics of alteration in the GABA-A receptor in vivo, which may provide clinical evidence indicating a pathological mechanism common to neurological disorders associated with CACNA1A gene mutation.

  16. Strong motion deficits in dyslexia associated with DCDC2 gene alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Guido Marco; Marino, Cecilia; Mascheretti, Sara; Perani, Daniela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-05-27

    Dyslexia is a specific impairment in reading that affects 1 in 10 people. Previous studies have failed to isolate a single cause of the disorder, but several candidate genes have been reported. We measured motion perception in two groups of dyslexics, with and without a deletion within the DCDC2 gene, a risk gene for dyslexia. We found impairment for motion particularly strong at high spatial frequencies in the population carrying the deletion. The data suggest that deficits in motion processing occur in a specific genotype, rather than the entire dyslexia population, contributing to the large variability in impairment of motion thresholds in dyslexia reported in the literature. PMID:26019324

  17. ALTERATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN LEUKOCYTES FROM RECOMBINANT SOMATOTROPIN TREATED ANIMALS: SEARCHING FOR INSPECTION INDICATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NR Brizioli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides immunochemical approaches, biomolecular studies can be carried out in order to discover a greater number of biological indicators to be exploited for the identification of bovines treated with recombinant somatotropin (rbST. With this aim, we analysed the expression of a number of genes related to the somatotropic axis in leucocytes from rbST treated cows and non-treated animals. Significant differences were observed in the genes IGF-1,IGFBP-1, IGFBP-4 and the I- 5’UTR variant of the GHR gene.

  18. Alteration of gene expression profiles during mycoplasma-induced malignant cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycoplasmas are the smallest microorganisms capable of self-replication. Our previous studies show that some mycoplasmas are able to induce malignant transformation of host mammalian cells. This malignant transformation is a multistage process with the early infection, reversible and irreversible stages, and similar to human tumor development in nature. The purpose of this study is to explore mechanisms for this malignant transformation. To better understand mechanisms for this unique process, we examined gene expression profiles of C3H cells at different stages of the mycoplasma-induced transformation using cDNA microarray technology. A total of 1185 genes involved in oncogenesis, apoptosis, cell growth, cell-cycle regulation, DNA repair, etc. were examined. Differences in the expression of these genes were compared and analyzed using the computer software AtlasImage. Among 1185 genes screened, 135 had aberrant expression at the early infection stage, 252 at the reversible stage and 184 at the irreversible stage. At the early infection stage, genes with increased expression (92 genes) were twice more than those with decreased expression (42 genes). The global gene expression at the reversible stage appeared to be more volatile than that at any other stages but still resembled the profile at the early infection stage. The expression profile at the irreversible stage shows a unique pattern of a wide range of expression levels and an increased number of expressing genes, especially the cancer-related genes. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors are a group of molecules that showed significant changes in expression during the transformation. The majority of these changes occurred in the reversible and irreversible stages. A prolonged infection by mycoplasmas lead to the expression of more cancer related genes at the irreversible stage. The results indicate that the expression profiles correspond with the phenotypic features of the cells in the mycoplasma induced

  19. Erythroid-specific gene chromatin has an altered association with linker histones.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridsdale, J A; Rattner, J.B.; Davie, J R

    1988-01-01

    The chromatin of several genes was assayed for sensitivity to DNAase I and for solubility as polynucleosomes in 0.15 M NaCl. The degree of solubility of chromatin fragments as polynucleosomes in 0.15 M NaCl correlates well with the sensitivity to DNAase I for several genes. Chromatin of repressed, housekeeping and erythroid-specific genes can be distinguished as distinct groups by the degree to which they display these properties. NaCl precipitation of chromatin fragments stripped and then re...

  20. Alteration of Topoisomerase II–Alpha Gene in Human Breast Cancer: Association With Responsiveness to Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Michael F.; Sauter, Guido; Buyse, Marc; Bernstein, Leslie; Guzman, Roberta; Santiago, Angela; Villalobos, Ivonne E.; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Martin, Miguel; Robert, Nicholas; Crown, John; Bee, Valerie; Taupin, Henry; Flom, Kerry J.; Tabah-Fisch, Isabelle; Pauletti, Giovanni; Lindsay, Mary-Ann; Riva, Alessandro; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 35% of HER2-amplified breast cancers have coamplification of the topoisomerase II-alpha (TOP2A) gene encoding an enzyme that is a major target of anthracyclines. This study was designed to evaluate whether TOP2A gene alterations may predict incremental responsiveness to anthracyclines in some breast cancers. Methods A total of 4,943 breast cancers were analyzed for alterations in TOP2A and HER2. Primary tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer treated in a trial of chemotherapy plus/minus trastuzumab were studied for amplification/deletion of TOP2A and HER2 as a test set followed by evaluation of malignancies from two separate, large trials for changes in these same genes as a validation set. Association between these alterations and clinical outcomes was determined. Results Test set cases containing HER2 amplification treated with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) plus trastuzumab, demonstrated longer progression-free survival compared to those treated with AC alone (P = .0002). However, patients treated with AC alone whose tumors contain HER2/TOP2A coamplification experienced a similar improvement in survival (P = .004). Conversely, for patients treated with paclitaxel, HER2/TOP2A coamplification was not associated with improved outcomes. These observations were confirmed in a larger validation set, where HER2/TOP2A coamplification was again associated with longer survival when only anthracycline-containing chemotherapy was used for treatment compared with outcome in HER2-positive cancers lacking TOP2A coamplification. Conclusion In a study involving nearly 5,000 breast malignancies, both test set and validation set demonstrate that TOP2A coamplification, not HER2 amplification, is the clinically useful predictive marker of an incremental response to anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Absence of HER2/TOP2A coamplification may indicate a more restricted efficacy advantage for breast cancers than previously thought. PMID

  1. Downregulation of chloroplast-targeted beta-amylase leads to a starch-excess phenotype in leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidig, A.; Fröhlich, A.; Schulze, S.;

    2002-01-01

    A functional screen in Escherichia coli was established to identify potato genes coding for proteins involved in transitory starch degradation. One clone isolated had a sequence very similar to a recently described chloroplast-targeted 5-amylase of Arabidopsis. Expression of the gene in E. coli s...

  2. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of [14C]glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H+ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on [1-14C]D-glycerate transport

  3. U94 alters FN1 and ANGPTL4 gene expression and inhibits tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cell line PC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Wai-Yee

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insensitivity of advanced-stage prostate cancer to androgen ablation therapy is a serious problem in clinical practice because it is associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Targeted therapeutic drug discovery efforts are thwarted by lack of adequate knowledge of gene(s associated with prostate tumorigenesis. Therefore there is the need for studies to provide leads to targeted intervention measures. Here we propose that stable expression of U94, a tumor suppressor gene encoded by human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A, could alter gene expression and thereby inhibit the tumorigenicity of PC3 cell line. Microarray gene expression profiling on U94 recombinant PC3 cell line could reveal genes that would elucidate prostate cancer biology, and hopefully identify potential therapeutic targets. Results We have shown that stable expression of U94 gene in PC3 cell line inhibited its focus formation in culture, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. Moreover gene expression profiling revealed dramatic upregulation of FN 1 (fibronectin, 91 ± 16-fold, and profound downregulation of ANGPTL 4 (angiopoietin-like-4, 20 ± 4-fold in U94 recombinant PC3 cell line. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR analysis showed that the pattern of expression of FN 1 and ANGPTL 4 mRNA were consistent with the microarray data. Based on previous reports, the findings in this study implicate upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 in the anti tumor activity of U94. Genes with cancer inhibitory activities that were also upregulated include SERPINE 2 (serine/cysteine protease inhibitor 2, 7 ± 1-fold increase and ADAMTS 1 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 7 ± 2-fold increase. Additionally, SPUVE 23 (serine protease 23 that is pro-tumorigenic was significantly downregulated (10 ± 1-fold. Conclusion The dramatic upregulation of FN 1 and downregulation of ANGPTL 4 genes in PC3 cell line

  4. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  5. Alterations in gene expression of proprotein convertases in human lung cancer have a limited number of scenarios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V Demidyuk

    Full Text Available Proprotein convertases (PCs is a protein family which includes nine highly specific subtilisin-like serine endopeptidases in mammals. The system of PCs is involved in carcinogenesis and levels of PC mRNAs alter in cancer, which suggests expression status of PCs as a possible marker for cancer typing and prognosis. The goal of this work was to assess the information value of expression profiling of PC genes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used for the first time to analyze mRNA levels of all PC genes as well as matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP2 and MMP14, which are substrates of PCs, in 30 matched pairs of samples of human lung cancer tumor and adjacent tissues without pathology. Significant changes in the expression of PCs have been revealed in tumor tissues: increased FURIN mRNA level (p<0.00005 and decreased mRNA levels of PCSK2 (p<0.007, PCSK5 (p<0.0002, PCSK7 (p<0.002, PCSK9 (p<0.00008, and MBTPS1 (p<0.00004 as well as a tendency to increase in the level of PCSK1 mRNA. Four distinct groups of samples have been identified by cluster analysis of the expression patterns of PC genes in tumor vs. normal tissue. Three of these groups covering 80% of samples feature a strong elevation in the expression of a single gene in cancer: FURIN, PCSK1, or PCSK6. Thus, the changes in the expression of PC genes have a limited number of scenarios, which may reflect different pathways of tumor development and cryptic features of tumors. This finding allows to consider the mRNAs of PC genes as potentially important tumor markers.

  6. Antenatal maternal long-term hypoxia: acclimatization responses with altered gene expression in ovine fetal carotid arteries.

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    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available In humans and other species, long-term hypoxia (LTH during pregnancy can lead to intrauterine growth restriction with reduced body/brain weight, dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF, and other problems. To identify the signal transduction pathways and critical molecules, which may be involved in acclimatization to high altitude LTH, we conducted microarray with advanced bioinformatic analysis on carotid arteries (CA from the normoxic near-term ovine fetus at sea-level and those acclimatized to high altitude for 110+ days during gestation. In response to LTH acclimatization, in fetal CA we identified mRNA from 38 genes upregulated >2 fold (P2-fold (P<0.05. The major genes with upregulated mRNA were SLC1A3, Insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding protein 3, IGF type 2 receptor, transforming growth factor (TGF Beta-3, and genes involved in the AKT and BCL2 signal transduction networks. Most genes with upregulated mRNA have a common motif for Pbx/Knotted homeobox in the promoter region, and Sox family binding sites in the 3' un translated region (UTR. Genes with downregulated mRNA included those involved in the P53 pathway and 5-lipoxygenase activating proteins. The promoter region of all genes with downregulated mRNA, had a common 49 bp region with a binding site for DOT6 and TOD6, components of the RPD3 histone deacetylase complex RPD3C(L. We also identified miRNA complementary to a number of the altered genes. Thus, the present study identified molecules in the ovine fetus, which may play a role in the acclimatization response to high-altitude associated LTH.

  7. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  8. Low-power millimeter wave radiations do not alter stress-sensitive gene expression of chaperone proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadobov, M; Sauleau, R; Le Coq, L; Debure, L; Thouroude, D; Michel, D; Le Dréan, Y

    2007-04-01

    This article reports experimental results on the influence of low-power millimeter wave (MMW) radiation at 60 GHz on a set of stress-sensitive gene expression of molecular chaperones, namely clusterin (CLU) and HSP70, in a human brain cell line. Selection of the exposure frequency is determined by its near-future applications for the new broadband civil wireless communication systems including wireless local area networks (WLAN) for domestic and professional uses. Frequencies around 60 GHz are strongly attenuated in the earth's atmosphere and such radiations represent a new environmental factor. An exposure system operating in V-band (50-75 GHz) was developed for cell exposure. U-251 MG glial cell line was sham-exposed or exposed to MMW radiation for different durations (1-33 h) and two different power densities (5.4 microW/cm(2) or 0.54 mW/cm(2)). As gene expression is a multiple-step process, we analyzed chaperone proteins induction at different levels. First, using luciferase reporter gene, we investigated potential effect of MMWs on the activation of transcription factors (TFs) and gene promoter activity. Next, using RT-PCR and Western blot assays, we verified whether MMW exposure could alter RNA accumulation, translation, or protein stability. Experimental data demonstrated the absence of significant modifications in gene transcription, mRNA, and protein amount for the considered stress-sensitive genes for the exposure durations and power densities investigated. The main results of this study suggest that low-power 60 GHz radiation does not modify stress-sensitive gene expression of chaperone proteins. PMID:17080454

  9. Low Doses of the Carcinogen Furan Alter Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Gene Expression in Rat Liver Independent of DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Tao CHEN; Mally, Angela; Ozden, Sibel; Chipman, J. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence of potent rodent carcinogenicity via an unclear mechanism suggests that furan in various foods [leading to an intake of up to 3.5 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day] may present a potential risk to human health. Objectives We tested the hypothesis that altered expression of genes related to cell cycle control, apoptosis, and DNA damage may contribute to the carcinogenicity of furan in rodents. In addition, we investigated the reversibility of such changes and the potential role of...

  10. Conditions that alter intracellular cAMP levels affect expression of the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene in Dictyostelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, B B; Barclay, S L

    1990-01-01

    We examined expression of the Dictyostelium cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene under conditions that alter intracellular cAMP levels during in vitro differentiation of wild-type strain V12M2 and a sporogenous derivative, HB200. In control cultures, cellular PDE activity peaked at 6 hr and declined by 8 hr, while secreted PDE activity continued to increase through 8 hr. Lowering intracellular cAMP levels with caffeine or progesterone increased cellular and secreted PDE activities 2-fold, increa...

  11. Molecular biologic study about the non-small cell lung carcinoma (2) : p53 gene alteration in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this research was to identify of the p53 and 3p gene alteration in non-small cell lung cancer patients residing in Korea. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship between the p53 and 3p gene alterations and the clinicopathologic results of lung cancer patients. And we have investigated the role of PCR-LOH in analyzing tumor samples for LOH of defined chromosomal loci. We have used the 40 samples obtained from the lung cancer patients who were diagnosed and operated curatively at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. We have isolated the high molecular weight. DNA from the tumors and normal tissues. And we have amplified the DNA with PCR method and used the microsatellite assay method to detect the altered p53 and 3p gene. The conclusions were as follow: 1) The 3p gene alteration was observed in 9/39 (23.1%) and p53 gene alteration was observed in 15/40 (37.5%) of resected non-small cell lung cancer. 2) There was no correlations between the 3p or p53 gene alterations and prognosis of patients, but further study is necessary. 3) PCR-LOH is a very useful tool for analyzing small amount of tumor samples for loss of heterozygosity of defined chromosomal loci. (author). 10 refs

  12. Altered Gene Expression Pattern in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Kiliszek; Beata Burzynska; Marcin Michalak; Monika Gora; Aleksandra Winkler; Agata Maciejak; Agata Leszczynska; Ewa Gajda; Janusz Kochanowski; Grzegorz Opolski

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twe...

  13. Altering the selection capabilities of common cloning vectors via restriction enzyme mediated gene disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Manna, Sam; Harman, Ashley; Accari, Jessica; Barth, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background The cloning of gene sequences forms the basis for many molecular biological studies. One important step in the cloning process is the isolation of bacterial transformants carrying vector DNA. This involves a vector-encoded selectable marker gene, which in most cases, confers resistance to an antibiotic. However, there are a number of circumstances in which a different selectable marker is required or may be preferable. Such situations can include restrictions to host strain choice,...

  14. Altered Gene Expression Pattern in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Kiliszek, Marek; Burzynska, Beata; Michalak, Marcin; Gora, Monika; Winkler, Aleksandra; Maciejak, Agata; Leszczynska, Agata; Gajda, Ewa; Kochanowski, Janusz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. Methods and Results Twent...

  15. Complete chloroplast genome of Oncidium Gower Ramsey and evaluation of molecular markers for identification and breeding in Oncidiinae

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    Daniell Henry

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncidium spp. produce commercially important orchid cut flowers. However, they are amenable to intergeneric and inter-specific crossing making phylogenetic identification very difficult. Molecular markers derived from the chloroplast genome can provide useful tools for phylogenetic resolution. Results The complete chloroplast genome of the economically important Oncidium variety Onc. Gower Ramsey (Accession no. GQ324949 was determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger based ABI sequencing. The length of the Oncidium chloroplast genome is 146,484 bp. Genome structure, gene order and orientation are similar to Phalaenopsis, but differ from typical Poaceae, other monocots for which there are several published chloroplast (cp genome. The Onc. Gower Ramsey chloroplast-encoded NADH dehydrogenase (ndh genes, except ndhE, lack apparent functions. Deletion and other types of mutations were also found in the ndh genes of 15 other economically important Oncidiinae varieties, except ndhE in some species. The positions of some species in the evolution and taxonomy of Oncidiinae are difficult to identify. To identify the relationships between the 15 Oncidiinae hybrids, eight regions of the Onc. Gower Ramsey chloroplast genome were amplified by PCR for phylogenetic analysis. A total of 7042 bp derived from the eight regions could identify the relationships at the species level, which were supported by high bootstrap values. One particular 1846 bp region, derived from two PCR products (trnHGUG -psbA and trnFGAA-ndhJ was adequate for correct phylogenetic placement of 13 of the 15 varieties (with the exception of Degarmoara Flying High and Odontoglossum Violetta von Holm. Thus the chloroplast genome provides a useful molecular marker for species identifications. Conclusion In this report, we used Phalaenopsis. aphrodite as a prototype for primer design to complete the Onc. Gower Ramsey genome sequence. Gene annotation showed

  16. Tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1 alters tumorigenic growth properties and gene expression

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    Murakami Yoshinori

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of cDNA or genomic clones of the tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1 gene into the non-small cell lung cancer line, A549, reverses tumorigenic growth properties of these cells. These results and the observation that TSLC1 is down-regulated in a number of tumors suggest that TSLC1 functions as a critical switch mediating repression of tumorigenesis. Results To investigate this mechanism, we compared growth properties of A549 with the TSLC1-containing derivative. We found a G1/S phase transition delay in 12.2. Subtractive hybridization, quantitative PCR, and TranSignal Protein/DNA arrays were used to identify genes whose expression changed when TSLC1 was up-regulated. Members of common G1/S phase regulatory pathways such as TP53, MYC, RB1 and HRAS were not differentially expressed, indicating that TSLC1 may function through an alternative pathway(s. A number of genes involved in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis were differentially expressed, notably genes in the Ras-induced senescence pathway. We examined expression of several of these key genes in human tumors and normal lung tissue, and found similar changes in expression, validating the physiological relevance of the A549 and 12.2 cell lines. Conclusion Gene expression and cell cycle differences provide insights into potential downstream pathways of TSLC1 that mediate the suppression of tumor properties in A549 cells.

  17. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VHH antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Barrera; Rosenberg, Julian N.; Chiu, Joanna G.; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.; George A Oyler; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHH) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydom...

  18. Chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails hydrolyse lignocellulosic biomass and release fermentable sugars

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Dheeraj; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.; Daniell, Henry

    2010-01-01

    It is widely recognized that biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials is limited by inadequate technology to efficiently and economically release fermentable sugars from the complex multi-polymeric raw materials. Therefore, endoglucanases, exoglucanase, pectate lyases, cutinase, swollenin, xylanase, acetyl xylan esterase, beta glucosidase and lipase genes from bacteria or fungi were expressed in E. coli or tobacco chloroplasts. A PCR based method was used to clone genes without intro...

  19. Gene Expression Profiles are Altered in Human Papillomavirus-16 E6 D25E-Expressing Cell Lines

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    Jang Dai-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 E6 D25E is the most prevalent variant in Korean women at high risk for cervical cancers. Several studies have identified an association between the increased frequency of this variant and the elevated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma. To investigate whether the HPV-16 E6 D25E variant might influence cervical cancer progression, we used an oligonucleotide microarray approach to identify transcriptionally altered gene expression patterns in recombinant wild-type E6 or E6 D25E variant-expressing HPV-negative cancer cells. We found that 211 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated (at least 1.5-fold, p

  20. Low Doses of Cisplatin Induce Gene Alterations, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Dasari, Shaloam R; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a known antitumor drug, but its mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we studied the anticancer potential of cisplatin at doses of 1, 2, or 3 µM using HL-60 cells as a test model. We investigated cisplatin effects at the molecular level using RNA sequencing, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assay after 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours of treatment. The results show that many genes responsible for molecular and cellular functions were significantly altered. Cisplatin treatment also caused the cells to be arrested at the DNA synthesis phase, and as the time increases, the cells gradually accumulated at the sub-G1 phase. Also, as the dose increases, a significant number of cells entered into the apoptotic and necrotic stages. Altogether, the data show that low doses of cisplatin significantly impact the viability of HL-60 cells, through modulation of gene expression, cell cycle, and apoptosis. PMID:27594783

  1. Alterations in LMTK2, MSMB and HNF1B gene expression are associated with the development of prostate cancer

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    McCullagh Paul

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified several genetic variants that are associated with prostate cancer. Most of these variants, like other GWAS association signals, are located in non-coding regions of potential candidate genes, and thus could act at the level of the mRNA transcript. Methods We measured the expression and isoform usage of seven prostate cancer candidate genes in benign and malignant prostate by real-time PCR, and correlated these factors with cancer status and genotype at the GWAS risk variants. Results We determined that levels of LMTK2 transcripts in prostate adenocarcinomas were only 32% of those in benign tissues (p = 3.2 × 10-7, and that an independent effect of genotype at variant rs6465657 on LMTK2 expression in benign (n = 39 and malignant tissues (n = 21 was also evident (P = 0.002. We also identified that whilst HNF1B(C and MSMB2 comprised the predominant isoforms in benign tissues (90% and 98% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression, HNF1B(B and MSMB1 were predominant in malignant tissue (95% and 96% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression; P = 1.7 × 10-7 and 4 × 10-4 respectively, indicating major shifts in isoform usage. Conclusions Our results indicate that the amount or nature of mRNA transcripts expressed from the LMTK2, HNF1B and MSMB candidate genes is altered in prostate cancer, and provides further evidence for a role for these genes in this disorder. The alterations in isoform usage we detect highlights the potential importance of alternative mRNA processing and moderation of mRNA stability as potentially important disease mechanisms.

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication

  3. Alterations in LMTK2, MSMB and HNF1B gene expression are associated with the development of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic variants that are associated with prostate cancer. Most of these variants, like other GWAS association signals, are located in non-coding regions of potential candidate genes, and thus could act at the level of the mRNA transcript. We measured the expression and isoform usage of seven prostate cancer candidate genes in benign and malignant prostate by real-time PCR, and correlated these factors with cancer status and genotype at the GWAS risk variants. We determined that levels of LMTK2 transcripts in prostate adenocarcinomas were only 32% of those in benign tissues (p = 3.2 × 10-7), and that an independent effect of genotype at variant rs6465657 on LMTK2 expression in benign (n = 39) and malignant tissues (n = 21) was also evident (P = 0.002). We also identified that whilst HNF1B(C) and MSMB2 comprised the predominant isoforms in benign tissues (90% and 98% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression), HNF1B(B) and MSMB1 were predominant in malignant tissue (95% and 96% of total HNF1B or MSMB expression; P = 1.7 × 10-7 and 4 × 10-4 respectively), indicating major shifts in isoform usage. Our results indicate that the amount or nature of mRNA transcripts expressed from the LMTK2, HNF1B and MSMB candidate genes is altered in prostate cancer, and provides further evidence for a role for these genes in this disorder. The alterations in isoform usage we detect highlights the potential importance of alternative mRNA processing and moderation of mRNA stability as potentially important disease mechanisms

  4. Ambient particulate air pollution induces oxidative stress and alterations of mitochondria and gene expression in brown and white adipose tissues

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    Harkema Jack R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior studies have demonstrated a link between air pollution and metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes. Changes in adipose tissue and its mitochondrial content/function are closely associated with the development of insulin resistance and attendant metabolic complications. We investigated changes in adipose tissue structure and function in brown and white adipose depots in response to chronic ambient air pollutant exposure in a rodent model. Methods Male ApoE knockout (ApoE-/- mice inhaled concentrated fine ambient PM (PM 2.5 or filtered air (FA for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 2 months. We examined superoxide production by dihydroethidium staining; inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry; and changes in white and brown adipocyte-specific gene profiles by real-time PCR and mitochondria by transmission electron microscopy in response to PM2.5 exposure in different adipose depots of ApoE-/- mice to understand responses to chronic inhalational stimuli. Results Exposure to PM2.5 induced an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in brown adipose depots. Additionally, exposure to PM2.5 decreased expression of uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue as measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Mitochondrial number was significantly reduced in white (WAT and brown adipose tissues (BAT, while mitochondrial size was also reduced in BAT. In BAT, PM2.5 exposure down-regulated brown adipocyte-specific genes, while white adipocyte-specific genes were differentially up-regulated. Conclusions PM2.5 exposure triggers oxidative stress in BAT, and results in key alterations in mitochondrial gene expression and mitochondrial alterations that are pronounced in BAT. We postulate that exposure to PM2.5 may induce imbalance between white and brown adipose tissue functionality and thereby predispose to metabolic dysfunction.

  5. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L; Sander, Guy W; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a "fine-tune" regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  6. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yao eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Towards this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a fine-tune regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression.

  7. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with (3H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented

  8. The reduced state of the plastoquinone pool is required for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure in response to calcium stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Hua; He, En-Ming; Chen, Juan; Guo, Ying; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-04-01

    Besides their participation in photosynthesis, leaf chloroplasts function in plant responses to stimuli, yet how they direct stimulus-induced stomatal movement remains elusive. Here, we showed that over-reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) was closely associated with stomatal closure in plants which required chloroplastic H2 O2 generation in the mesophyll. External application of H2 O2 reduced the PQ pool, whereas the cell-permeable reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the DBMIB-induced over-reduction of the PQ pool and stomatal closure. Mesophyll chloroplasts are key players of extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) o )-induced stomatal closure, but when treated with either 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) or NAC they failed to facilitate Ca(2+) o -induced stomatal closure due to the inhibition of chloroplastic H2 O2 synthesis in mesophyll. Similarly, the Arabidopsis electron transfer chain-related mutants npq4-1, stn7 and cas-1 exhibited diverse responses to Ca(2+) o or DBMIB. Transcriptome analysis also demonstrated that the PQ pool signaling pathway shared common responsive genes with the H2 O2 signaling pathway. These results implicated a mechanism for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure involving the generation of mesophyll chloroplastic H2 O2 based on the reduced state of the PQ pool, which is calcium-sensing receptor (CAS) and LHCII phosphorylation dependent. PMID:26945669

  9. Altered Skeletal Muscle Phenotypes in Calcineurin Aα and Aβ Gene-Targeted Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Stephanie A.; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Bueno, Orlando F.; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2003-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calcium-regulated serine-threonine protein phosphatase that controls developmental and inducible biological responses in diverse cell types, in part through activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). In skeletal muscle, calcineurin has been implicated in the regulation of myoblast differentiation, hypertrophy of mature myofibers, and fiber type switching in response to alterations in intracellular calcium concentration. However, conside...

  10. Motor Deficits and Altered Striatal Gene Expression in aphakia(ak) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhupinder; Wilson, Jean H.; Vasavada, Hema H; Guo, Zhenchao; Allore, Heather G.; Zeiss, Caroline J.

    2007-01-01

    Like humans with Parkinsons disease (PD), the ak mouse lacks the majority of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and experiences striatal denervation. The purpose of this study was to test whether motor abnormalities in the ak mouse progress over time, and whether motor function could be associated with temporal alterations in the striatal transcriptome. Ak and wt mice (28 to 180 days old) were tested using paradigms sensitive to nigrostriatal dysfunction. Results were analyzed using a l...

  11. Genomics and chloroplast evolution: what did cyanobacteria do for plants?

    OpenAIRE

    Raven, J.A.; Allen, John

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria and of the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana leave no doubt that the plant chloroplast originated, through endosymbiosis, from a cyanobacterium. But the genomic legacy of cyanobacterial ancestry extends far beyond the chloroplast itself, and persists in organisms that have lost chloroplasts completely.

  12. Collections of simultaneously altered genes as biomarkers of cancer cell drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-03-15

    Computational analysis of cancer pharmacogenomics data has resulted in biomarkers predictive of drug response, but the majority of response is not captured by current methods. Methods typically select single biomarkers or groups of related biomarkers but do not account for response that is strictly dependent on many simultaneous genetic alterations. This shortcoming reflects the combinatorics and multiple-testing problem associated with many-body biologic interactions. We developed a novel approach, Multivariate Organization of Combinatorial Alterations (MOCA), to partially address these challenges. Extending on previous work that accounts for pairwise interactions, the approach rapidly combines many genomic alterations into biomarkers of drug response, using Boolean set operations coupled with optimization; in this framework, the union, intersection, and difference Boolean set operations are proxies of molecular redundancy, synergy, and resistance, respectively. The algorithm is fast, broadly applicable to cancer genomics data, is of immediate use for prioritizing cancer pharmacogenomics experiments, and recovers known clinical findings without bias. Furthermore, the results presented here connect many important, previously isolated observations. PMID:23338612

  13. Storage Temperature Alters the Expression of Differentiation-Related Genes in Cultured Oral Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Islam, Rakibul; Fostad, Ida G.; Eidet, Jon R.; Sehic, Amer; Olstad, Ole K.; Dartt, Darlene A.; Messelt, Edward B.; Griffith, May; Pasovic, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Storage of cultured human oral keratinocytes (HOK) allows for transportation of cultured transplants to eye clinics worldwide. In a previous study, one-week storage of cultured HOK was found to be superior with regard to viability and morphology at 12°C compared to 4°C and 37°C. To understand more of how storage temperature affects cell phenotype, gene expression of HOK before and after storage at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C was assessed. Materials and Methods Cultured HOK were stored in HEPES- and sodium bicarbonate-buffered Minimum Essential Medium at 4°C, 12°C, and 37°C for one week. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression profile was determined using DNA microarrays and analyzed with Partek Genomics Suite software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Differentially expressed genes (fold change > 1.5 and P < 0.05) were identified by one-way ANOVA. Key genes were validated using qPCR. Results Gene expression of cultures stored at 4°C and 12°C clustered close to the unstored control cultures. Cultures stored at 37°C displayed substantial change in gene expression compared to the other groups. In comparison with 12°C, 2,981 genes were differentially expressed at 37°C. In contrast, only 67 genes were differentially expressed between the unstored control and the cells stored at 12°C. The 12°C and 37°C culture groups differed most significantly with regard to the expression of differentiation markers. The Hedgehog signaling pathway was significantly downregulated at 37°C compared to 12°C. Conclusion HOK cultures stored at 37°C showed considerably larger changes in gene expression compared to unstored cells than cultured HOK stored at 4°C and 12°C. The changes observed at 37°C consisted of differentiation of the cells towards a squamous epithelium-specific phenotype. Storing cultured ocular surface transplants at 37°C is therefore not recommended. This is particularly interesting as 37°C is the standard incubation temperature used for cell

  14. Altered Levels of Aroma and Volatiles by Metabolic Engineering of Shikimate Pathway Genes in Tomato Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Tzin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum fruit is an excellent source of antioxidants, dietary fibers, minerals and vitamins and therefore has been referred to as a “functional food”. Ripe tomato fruits produce a large number of specialized metabolites including volatile organic compounds. These volatiles serve as key components of the tomato fruit flavor, participate in plant pathogen and herbivore defense, and are used to attract seed dispersers. A major class of specialized metabolites is derived from the shikimate pathway followed by aromatic amino acid biosynthesis of phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. We attempted to modify tomato fruit flavor by overexpressing key regulatory genes in the shikimate pathway. Bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive variants of 3-Deoxy-D-Arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthase (DAHPS; AroG209-9 and bi-functional Chorismate Mutase/Prephenate Dehydratase (CM/PDT; PheA12 were expressed under the control of a fruit-specific promoter. We crossed these transgenes to generate tomato plants expressing both the AroG209 and PheA12 genes. Overexpression of the AroG209-9 gene had a dramatic effect on the overall metabolic profile of the fruit, including enhanced levels of multiple volatile and non-volatile metabolites. In contrast, the PheA12 overexpression line exhibited minor metabolic effects compared to the wild type fruit. Co-expression of both the AroG209-9 and PheA12 genes in tomato resulted overall in a similar metabolic effect to that of expressing only the AroG209-9 gene. However, the aroma ranking attributes of the tomato fruits from PheA12//AroG209-9 were unique and different from those of the lines expressing a single gene, suggesting a contribution of the PheA12 gene to the overall metabolic profile. We suggest that expression of bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive enzymes of the shikimate pathway in tomato fruits provides a useful metabolic engineering tool for the modification of

  15. Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Shibata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis for phenotypic differences between humans and other primates remains an outstanding challenge. Mutations in non-coding regulatory DNA that alter gene expression have been hypothesized as a key driver of these phenotypic differences. This has been supported by differential gene expression analyses in general, but not by the identification of specific regulatory elements responsible for changes in transcription and phenotype. To identify the genetic source of regulatory differences, we mapped DNaseI hypersensitive (DHS sites, which mark all types of active gene regulatory elements, genome-wide in the same cell type isolated from human, chimpanzee, and macaque. Most DHS sites were conserved among all three species, as expected based on their central role in regulating transcription. However, we found evidence that several hundred DHS sites were gained or lost on the lineages leading to modern human and chimpanzee. Species-specific DHS site gains are enriched near differentially expressed genes, are positively correlated with increased transcription, show evidence of branch-specific positive selection, and overlap with active chromatin marks. Species-specific sequence differences in transcription factor motifs found within these DHS sites are linked with species-specific changes in chromatin accessibility. Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species.

  16. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:26363150

  17. Cognitive dysfunction and epigenetic alterations of the BDNF gene are induced by social isolation during early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Du, Wei; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-10-15

    Early life adversity, such as social isolation, causes a variety of changes to the development of cognitive abilities and the nervous system. Increasing evidence has shown that epigenetic modifications mediate gene-environment interactions throughout the lifespan. In this study, we investigated the effect of adolescent social isolation on cognitive behaviours and epigenetic alterations of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either group-reared or isolation-reared conditions during post-natal days (PNDs) 21-34. On PND 56, all rats underwent behavioural testing and were then sacrificed for biochemical testing. Adolescent social isolation induced impaired PPI. Regarding BDNF, the isolation-reared rats demonstrated increased BDNF mRNA levels, H3 acetylation at the BDNF gene and BDNF protein expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In contrast, the BDNF mRNA levels, H3 acetylation of the BDNF gene and BDNF protein expression were decreased in the hippocampus of the isolation-reared rats. The present study indicated that epigenetic regulation of BDNF may be one of the molecular mechanisms that mediated the cognitive dysfunction. Moreover, the interaction between the mPFC and hippocampus might play an important role in the regulation of cognitive behaviour. PMID:27435421

  18. Slugs' last meals: molecular identification of sequestered chloroplasts from different algal origins in Sacoglossa (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händeler, Katharina; Wägele, Heike; Wahrmund, Ute; Rüdinger, Mareike; Knoop, Volker

    2010-11-01

    Some sacoglossan sea slugs have become famous for their unique capability to extract and incorporate functional chloroplasts from algal food organisms (mainly Ulvophyceae) into their gut cells. The functional incorporation of the so-called kleptoplasts allows the slugs to rely on photosynthetic products for weeks to months, enabling them to survive long periods of food shortage over most of their life-span. The algal food spectrum providing kleptoplasts as temporary, non-inherited endosymbionts appears to vary among sacoglossan slugs, but detailed knowledge is sketchy or unavailable. Accurate identification of algal donor species, which provide the chloroplasts for long-term retention is of primary importance to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms allowing long-term functionality of the captured chloroplast in the foreign animal cell environment. Whereas some sacoglossans forage on a variety of algal species, (e.g. Elysia crispata and E. viridis) others are more selective. Hence, characterizing the range of functional sacoglossan-chloroplast associations in nature is a prerequisite to understand the basis of this enigmatic endosymbiosis. Here, we present a suitable chloroplast gene (tufA) as a marker, which allows identification of the respective algal kleptoplast donor taxa by analysing DNA from whole animals. This novel approach allows identification of donor algae on genus or even species level, thus providing evidence for the taxonomic range of food organisms. We report molecular evidence that chloroplasts from different algal sources are simultaneously incorporated in some species of Elysia. NeigborNet analyses for species assignments are preferred over tree reconstruction methods because the former allow more reliable statements on species identification via barcoding, or rather visualize alternative allocations not to be seen in the latter. PMID:21565106

  19. A tetO Toolkit To Alter Expression of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Josh T; Lo, Russell S; Shumaker, Lucia; Proctor, Julia; Fields, Stanley

    2015-07-17

    Strategies to optimize a metabolic pathway often involve building a large collection of strains, each containing different versions of sequences that regulate the expression of pathway genes. Here, we develop reagents and methods to carry out this process at high efficiency in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identify variants of the Escherichia coli tet operator (tetO) sequence that bind a TetR-VP16 activator with differential affinity and therefore result in different TetR-VP16 activator-driven expression. By recombining these variants upstream of the genes of a pathway, we generate unique combinations of expression levels. Here, we built a tetO toolkit, which includes the I-OnuI homing endonuclease to create double-strand breaks, which increases homologous recombination by 10(5); a plasmid carrying six variant tetO sequences flanked by I-OnuI sites, uncoupling transformation and recombination steps; an S. cerevisiae-optimized TetR-VP16 activator; and a vector to integrate constructs into the yeast genome. We introduce into the S. cerevisiae genome the three crt genes from Erwinia herbicola required for yeast to synthesize lycopene and carry out the recombination process to produce a population of cells with permutations of tetO variants regulating the three genes. We identify 0.7% of this population as making detectable lycopene, of which the vast majority have undergone recombination at all three crt genes. We estimate a rate of ∼20% recombination per targeted site, much higher than that obtained in other studies. Application of this toolkit to medically or industrially important end products could reduce the time and labor required to optimize the expression of a set of metabolic genes. PMID:25742460

  20. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subit Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development.

  1. Clofibrate causes an upregulation of PPAR-{alpha} target genes but does not alter expression of SREBP target genes in liver and adipose tissue of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Sebastian; Giemsa, Beatrice; Kluge, Holger; Eder, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of clofibrate treatment on expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and various genes of the lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. An experiment with 18 pigs was performed in which pigs were fed either a control diet or the same diet supplemented with 5 g clofibrate/kg for 28 days. Pigs treated with clofibrate had heavier livers, moderately increased mRNA concentrations of various PPAR-alpha target genes in liver and adipose tissue, a higher concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and markedly lower concentrations of triglycerides and cholesterol in plasma and lipoproteins than control pigs (P liver and adipose tissue and mRNA concentrations of apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and C-III in the liver were not different between both groups of pigs. In conclusion, this study shows that clofibrate treatment activates PPAR-alpha in liver and adipose tissue and has a strong hypotriglyceridemic and hypocholesterolemic effect in pigs. The finding that mRNA concentrations of some proteins responsible for the hypolipidemic action of fibrates in humans were not altered suggests that there were certain differences in the mode of action compared with humans. It is also shown that PPAR-alpha activation by clofibrate does not affect hepatic expression of SREBP target genes involved in synthesis of triglycerides and cholesterol homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. PMID:17363680

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana DNA gyrase is targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Melisa K.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the bacterial DNA topoisomerase (topo) that supercoils DNA by using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme, an A2B2 tetramer encoded by the gyrA and gyrB genes, catalyses topological changes in DNA during replication and transcription, and is the only topo that is able to introduce negative supercoils. Gyrase is essential in bacteria and apparently absent from eukaryotes and is, consequently, an important target for antibacterial agents (e.g., quinolones and coumarins). We have identified four putative gyrase genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana; one gyrA and three gyrB homologues. DNA gyrase protein A (GyrA) has a dual translational initiation site targeting the mature protein to both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and there are individual targeting sequences for two of the DNA gyrase protein B (GyrB) homologues. N-terminal fusions of the organellar targeting sequences to GFPs support the hypothesis that one enzyme is targeted to the chloroplast and another to the mitochondrion, which correlates with supercoiling activity in isolated organelles. Treatment of seedlings and cultured cells with gyrase-specific drugs leads to growth inhibition. Knockout of A. thaliana gyrA is embryo-lethal whereas knockouts in the gyrB genes lead to seedling-lethal phenotypes or severely stunted growth and development. The A. thaliana genes have been cloned in Escherichia coli and found to complement gyrase temperature-sensitive strains. This report confirms the existence of DNA gyrase in eukaryotes and has important implications for drug targeting, organelle replication, and the evolution of topos in plants. PMID:15136745

  3. Distinguishing between cancer driver and passenger gene alteration candidates via cross-species comparison: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a cross-species comparison strategy to distinguish between cancer driver- and passenger gene alteration candidates, by utilizing the difference in genomic location of orthologous genes between the human and other mammals. As an initial test of this strategy, we conducted a pilot study with human colorectal cancer (CRC) and its mouse model C57BL/6J ApcMin/+, focusing on human 5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2. We first performed bioinformatics analysis on the evolution of 5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2 regions. Then, we performed exon-targeted sequencing, real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and real time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses on a number of genes of both regions with both human and mouse colon tumors. These two regions (5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2) are frequently deleted in human CRCs and encode genuine colorectal tumor suppressors APC and SMAD4. They also encode genes such as MCC (mutated in colorectal cancer) with their role in CRC etiology unknown. We have discovered that both regions are evolutionarily unstable, resulting in genes that are clustered in each human region being found scattered at several distinct loci in the genome of many other species. For instance, APC and MCC are within 200 kb apart in human 5q22.2 but are 10 Mb apart in the mouse genome. Importantly, our analyses revealed that, while known CRC driver genes APC and SMAD4 were disrupted in both human colorectal tumors and tumors from ApcMin/+ mice, the questionable MCC gene was disrupted in human tumors but appeared to be intact in mouse tumors. These results indicate that MCC may not actually play any causative role in early colorectal tumorigenesis. We also hypothesize that its disruption in human CRCs is likely a mere result of its close proximity to APC in the human genome. Expanding this pilot study to the entire genome may identify more questionable genes like MCC, facilitating the discovery of new CRC driver gene candidates

  4. Change in Auxin and Cytokinin Levels Coincides with Altered Expression of Branching Genes during Axillary Bud Outgrowth in Chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierck, Robrecht; De Keyser, Ellen; De Riek, Jan; Dhooghe, Emmy; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Prinsen, Els; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    transition and an increased expression in C18 with continuous vegetative growth. These results offer a case study for Chrysanthemum, showing an altered cytokinin to auxin balance and differential gene expression between vegetative growth with apical dominance and transition to generative growth with loss of apical dominance and axillary bud outgrowth. This suggests a conservation of several aspects of the hormonal and genetical regulation of bud outgrowth in Chrysanthemum. Furthermore, 15 previously uncharacterised genes in chrysanthemum, were described in this study. Of those genes involved in axillary bud outgrowth we identified CmDRM1, CmBRC1 and CmMAX1 as having an altered expression preceding axillary bud outgrowth, which could be useful as markers for bud activity. PMID:27557329

  5. Specific genes involved in synthesis and editing of heparan sulfate proteoglycans show altered expression patterns in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of a specific set of genes controls the different structures of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which are involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge of HSPG alterations in breast cancer. Twenty-three infiltrating ductal adenocarcinomas (IDCs), both metastatic and non-metastatic were studied. A transcriptomic approach to the structure of heparan sulfate (HS) chains was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and editing, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate chains, we extended the study to include the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Histochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissular expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. No significant change in transcription was detected in approximately 70% of analyzed genes. However, 13 demonstrated changes in both tumor types (40% showing more intense deregulation in the metastatic), while 5 genes showed changes only in non-metastatic tumors. Changes were related to 3 core proteins: overexpression of syndecan-1 and underexpression of glypican-3 and perlecan. HS synthesis was affected by lower levels of some 3-O-sulfotransferase transcripts, the expression of NDST4 and, only in non metastatic tumors, higher levels of extracellular sulfatases. Furthermore, the expression of chondroitin sulfate also was considerably affected, involving both the synthesis of the saccharidic chains and sulfations at all locations. However, the pro-metastatic enzyme heparanase did not exhibit significant changes in mRNA expression, although in metastatic tumors it appeared related to increased levels of the most stable form of mRNA. Finally, the expression of heparanase 2, which displays anti-metastatic features

  6. Chromosomal alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in subgroups of gene expression-defined Burkitt's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salaverria, Itziar; Zettl, Andreas; Bea, Silvia; Hartmann, Elena M.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Wright, George W.; Boerma, Evert-Jan; Kluin, Philip M.; Ott, German; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Delabie, Jan; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Braziel, Rita M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Staudt, Louis M.; Mueller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by typical morph 0 logical, immunophenotypic and molecular features. Gene expression profiling provided a molecular signature of Burkitt's lymphoma, but also demonstrated that a subset of aggressive B-cell lymphomas not ful

  7. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of the blood group ABO gene in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Worm, Jesper; Guldberg, Per;

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A and B antigen expression is a frequent event in oral carcinomas and is associated with decreased activity of glycosyltransferases encoded by the ABO gene. We examined 30 oral squamous cell carcinomas for expression of A and B antigens and glycosyltransferases. We also...

  8. The human insulin gene linked polymorphic region exhibits an altered DNA structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond-Kosack, M.C.U.; Docherty, K.; Kilpatrick, M.W. (Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)); Dobrinski, B.; Lurz, R. (Max-Planck-Inst., Berlin (West Germany))

    1992-01-25

    Regulation of transcription of the human insulin gene appears to involve a series of DNA sequences in the 5{prime} region. Hypersensitivity to DNA structural probes has previously been demonstrated in regulatory regions of cloned genomic DNA fragments, and been correlated with gene activity. To investigate the structure of the DNA in the human insulin gene, bromoacetaldehyde and S1 nuclease were reacted with a supercoiled plasmid containing a 5kb genomic insulin fragment. Both probes revealed the human insulin gene linked polymorphic region (ILPR), a region ({minus}363) upstream of the transcriptional start site which contains multiple repeats of a 14-15mer oligonucleotide with the consensus sequence ACAGGGGT(G/C)(T/C)GGGG, as the major hypersensitive site. Fine mapping and electron microscopic analysis both show a very different behavior of the two DNA strands in the region of the ILPR and suggest the G-rich strand may be adopting a highly structured conformation with the complementary strand remaining largely single stranded.

  9. Altered cell cycle gene expression and apoptosis in post-implantation dog parthenotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Ha, Seung Kwon; Hong, So Gun; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Park, Eun Jung; Kang, Jung Taek; Saadeldin, Islam M; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2012-01-01

    Mature oocytes can be parthenogenetically activated by a variety of methods and the resulting embryos are valuable for studies of the respective roles of paternal and maternal genomes in early mammalian development. In the present study, we report the first successful development of parthenogenetic canine embryos to the post-implantation stage. Nine out of ten embryo transfer recipients became pregnant and successful in utero development of canine parthenotes was confirmed. For further evaluation of these parthenotes, their fetal development was compared with artificially inseminated controls and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were compared using ACP RT-PCR, histological analysis and immunohistochemistry. We found formation of the limb-bud and no obvious differences in histological appearance of the canine parthenote recovered before degeneration occurred; however canine parthenotes were developmentally delayed with different cell cycle regulating-, mitochondria-related and apoptosis-related gene expression patterns compared with controls. In conclusion, our protocols were suitable for activating canine oocytes artificially and supported early fetal development. We demonstrated that the developmental abnormalities in canine parthenotes may result from defective regulation of apoptosis and aberrant gene expression patterns, and provided evidence that canine parthenotes can be a useful tool for screening and for comparative studies of imprinted genes. PMID:22905100

  10. Female Aging Alters Expression of Human Cumulus Cells Genes that Are Essential for Oocyte Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamadir Al-Edani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of female aging is an important issue in human reproduction. There was a need for an extensive analysis of age impact on transcriptome profile of cumulus cells (CCs to link oocyte quality and developmental potential with patient’s age. CCs from patients of three age groups were analyzed individually using microarrays. RT-qPCR validation was performed on independent CC cohorts. We focused here on pathways affected by aging in CCs that may explain the decline of oocyte quality with age. In CCs collected from patients >37 years, angiogenic genes including ANGPTL4, LEPR, TGFBR3, and FGF2 were significantly overexpressed compared to patients of the two younger groups. In contrast genes implicated in TGF-β signaling pathway such as AMH, TGFB1, inhibin, and activin receptor were underexpressed. CCs from patients whose ages are between 31 and 36 years showed an overexpression of genes related to insulin signaling pathway such as IGFBP3, PIK3R1, and IGFBP5. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to identify the microRNAs that are potential regulators of the differentially expressed genes of the study. It revealed that the pathways impacted by age were potential targets of specific miRNAs previously identified in our CCs small RNAs sequencing.

  11. Altered cell cycle gene expression and apoptosis in post-implantation dog parthenotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Park

    Full Text Available Mature oocytes can be parthenogenetically activated by a variety of methods and the resulting embryos are valuable for studies of the respective roles of paternal and maternal genomes in early mammalian development. In the present study, we report the first successful development of parthenogenetic canine embryos to the post-implantation stage. Nine out of ten embryo transfer recipients became pregnant and successful in utero development of canine parthenotes was confirmed. For further evaluation of these parthenotes, their fetal development was compared with artificially inseminated controls and differentially expressed genes (DEGs were compared using ACP RT-PCR, histological analysis and immunohistochemistry. We found formation of the limb-bud and no obvious differences in histological appearance of the canine parthenote recovered before degeneration occurred; however canine parthenotes were developmentally delayed with different cell cycle regulating-, mitochondria-related and apoptosis-related gene expression patterns compared with controls. In conclusion, our protocols were suitable for activating canine oocytes artificially and supported early fetal development. We demonstrated that the developmental abnormalities in canine parthenotes may result from defective regulation of apoptosis and aberrant gene expression patterns, and provided evidence that canine parthenotes can be a useful tool for screening and for comparative studies of imprinted genes.

  12. Differential gene expression profile and altered cytokine secretion of thyroid cancer cells in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Pietsch, Jessica; Wehland, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Saar, Katrin; Hübner, Norbert; Bauer, Johann; Braun, Markus; Schwarzwälder, Achim; Segerer, Jürgen; Birlem, Maria; Horn, Astrid; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Waßer, Kai; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-02-01

    This study focuses on the effects of short-term [22 s, parabolic flight campaign (PFC)] and long-term (10 d, Shenzhou 8 space mission) real microgravity on changes in cytokine secretion and gene expression patterns in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells. FTC-133 cells were cultured in space and on a random positioning machine (RPM) for 10 d, to evaluate differences between real and simulated microgravity. Multianalyte profiling was used to evaluate 128 secreted cytokines. Microarray analysis revealed 63 significantly regulated transcripts after 22 s of microgravity during a PFC and 2881 after 10 d on the RPM or in space. Genes in several biological processes, including apoptosis (n=182), cytoskeleton (n=80), adhesion/extracellular matrix (n=98), proliferation (n=184), stress response (n=268), migration (n=63), angiogenesis (n=39), and signal transduction (n=429), were differentially expressed. Genes and proteins involved in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, such as IL6, IL8, IL15, OPN, VEGFA, VEGFD, FGF17, MMP2, MMP3, TIMP1, PRKAA, and PRKACA, were similarly regulated under RPM and spaceflight conditions. The resulting effect was mostly antiproliferative. Gene expression during the PFC was often regulated in the opposite direction. In summary, microgravity is an invaluable tool for exploring new targets in anticancer therapy and can be simulated in some aspects in ground-based facilities. PMID:24196587

  13. Resistance training alters cytokine gene expression in skeletal muscle of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance training results in muscle hypertrophy and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether resistance training modulates inflammation in muscles of diabetic patients remains unknown. We examined the expression of genes encoding the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-al...

  14. Altered gene and protein expression in liver of the obese spontaneously hypertensive/NDmcr-cp rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to study the mechanisms of the metabolic syndrome in humans due to the heterogeneous genetic background and lifestyle. The present study investigated changes in the gene and protein profiles in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome to identify the molecular targets associated with the pathogenesis and progression of obesity related to the metabolic syndrome. Methods We extracted mRNAs and proteins from the liver tissues of 6- and 25-week-old spontaneously hypertensive/NIH –corpulent rat SHR/NDmcr-cp (CP, SHR/Lean (Lean and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY and performed microarray analysis and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE linked to a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Results The microarray analysis identified 25 significantly up-regulated genes (P 10 > 1 and 31 significantly down-regulated genes (P 10 P  Conclusion Genes with significant changes in their expression in transcriptomic analysis matched very few of the proteins identified in proteomics analysis. However, annotated functional classifications might provide an important reference resource to understand the pathogenesis of obesity associated with the metabolic syndrome.

  15. Metabolite Fingerprinting in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum Altered by the Escherichia coli Glutamate Dehydrogenase Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mungur

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With about 200 000 phytochemicals in existence, identifying those of biomedical significance is a mammoth task. In the postgenomic era, relating metabolite fingerprints, abundances, and profiles to genotype is also a large task. Ion analysis using Fourier transformed ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS may provide a high-throughput approach to measure genotype dependency of the inferred metabolome if reproducible techniques can be established. Ion profile inferred metabolite fingerprints are coproducts. We used FT-ICR-MS-derived ion analysis to examine gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.1 transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco carrying out altered glutamate, amino acid, and carbon metabolisms, that fundamentally alter plant productivity. Cause and effect between gdhA expression, glutamate metabolism, and plant phenotypes was analyzed by 13NH4+ labeling of amino acid fractions, and by FT-ICR-MS analysis of metabolites. The gdhA transgenic plants increased 13N labeling of glutamate and glutamine significantly. FT-ICR-MS detected 2 012 ions reproducible in 2 to 4 ionization protocols. There were 283 ions in roots and 98 ions in leaves that appeared to significantly change abundance due to the measured GDH activity. About 58% percent of ions could not be used to infer a corresponding metabolite. From the 42% of ions that inferred known metabolites we found that certain amino acids, organic acids, and sugars increased and some fatty acids decreased. The transgene caused increased ammonium assimilation and detectable ion variation. Thirty-two compounds with biomedical significance were altered in abundance by GDH including 9 known carcinogens and 14 potential drugs. Therefore, the GDH transgene may lead to new uses for crops like tobacco.

  16. The SNARE protein Syp71 is essential for turnip mosaic virus infection by mediating fusion of virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiyun Wei

    Full Text Available All positive-strand RNA viruses induce the biogenesis of cytoplasmic membrane-bound virus factories for viral genome multiplication. We have previously demonstrated that upon plant potyvirus infection, the potyviral 6K2 integral membrane protein induces the formation of ER-derived replication vesicles that subsequently target chloroplasts for robust genome replication. Here, we report that following the trafficking of the Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV 6K2 vesicles to chloroplasts, 6K2 vesicles accumulate at the chloroplasts to form chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures followed by chloroplast aggregation. A functional actomyosin motility system is required for this process. As vesicle trafficking and fusion in planta are facilitated by a superfamily of proteins known as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors, we screened ER-localized SNARES or SNARE-like proteins for their possible involvement in TuMV infection. We identified Syp71 and Vap27-1 that colocalize with the chloroplast-bound 6K2 complex. Knockdown of their expression using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV-based virus-induced gene silencing vector showed that Syp71 but not Vap27-1 is essential for TuMV infection. In Syp71-downregulated plant cells, the formation of 6K2-induced chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures and chloroplast aggregates is inhibited and virus accumulation is significantly reduced, but the trafficking of the 6K2 vesicles from the ER to chloroplast is not affected. Taken together, these data suggest that Syp71 is a host factor essential for successful virus infection by mediating the fusion of the virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts during TuMV infection.

  17. Imatinib causes epigenetic alterations of PTEN gene via upregulation of DNA methyltransferases and polycomb group proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently reported the possible imatinib-resistant mechanism; long-term exposure of leukemia cells to imatinib downregulated levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) via hypermethylation of its promoter region (Leukemia 2010; 24: 1631). The present study explored the molecular mechanisms by which imatinib caused methylation on the promoter region of this tumor suppressor gene in leukemia cells. Real-time reverse transcription PCR found that long-term exposure of chronic eosinophilic leukemia EOL-1 cells expressing FIP1L1/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α to imatinib induced expression of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) and histone-methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a family of polycomb group, thereby increasing methylation of the gene. Immunoprecipitation assay found the increased complex formation of DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins in these cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that amounts of both DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins bound around the promoter region of PTEN gene were increased in EOL-1 cells after exposure to imatinib. Furthermore, we found that levels of DNMT3A and EZH2 were strikingly increased in leukemia cells isolated from individuals with chronic myelogenous leukemia (n=1) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=2), who relapsed after treatment with imatinib compared with those isolated at their initial presentation. Taken together, imatinib could cause drug-resistance via recruitment of polycomb gene complex to the promoter region of the PTEN and downregulation of this gene's transcripts in leukemia patients

  18. Putative sugarcane FT/TFL1 genes delay flowering time and alter reproductive architecture in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla P. Coelho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agriculturally important grasses such as rice, maize and sugarcane are evolutionarily distant from Arabidopsis, yet some components of the floral induction process are highly conserved. Flowering in sugarcane is an important factor that negatively affects cane yield and reduces sugar/ethanol production from this important perennial bioenergy crop. Comparative studies have facilitated the identification and characterization of putative orthologs of key flowering time genes in sugarcane, a complex polyploid plant whose genome has yet to be sequenced completely. Using this approach we identified phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP gene family members in sugarcane that are similar to the archetypical FT and TFL1 genes of Arabidopsis that play an essential role in controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Expression analysis of ScTFL1, which falls into the TFL1-clade of floral repressors, showed transcripts in developing leaves surrounding the shoot apex but not at the apex itself. ScFT1 was detected in immature leaves and apical regions of vegetatively growing plants and, after the floral transition, expression also occurred in mature leaves. Ectopic over-expression of ScTFL1 in Arabidopsis caused delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, as might be expected for a gene related to TFL1. In addition, lines with the latest flowering phenotype exhibited aerial rosette formation. Unexpectedly, over-expression of ScFT1, which has greatest similarity to the florigen-encoding FT, also caused a delay in flowering. This preliminary analysis of divergent sugarcane FT and TFL1 gene family members from Saccharum spp. suggests that their expression patterns and roles in the floral transition has diverged from the predicted role of similar PEBP family members.

  19. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K; Quinn, William G; Littleton, J Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  20. A novel class of heat-responsive small RNAs derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Ruiter Marjo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding small RNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes in a wide spectrum of eukaryotic organisms. Their responses to abiotic stress have become a popular topic of economic and scientific importance in biological research. Several studies in recent years have reported a small number of non-coding small RNAs that map to chloroplast genomes. However, it remains uncertain whether small RNAs are generated from chloroplast genome and how they respond to environmental stress, such as high temperature. Chinese cabbage is an important vegetable crop, and heat stress usually causes great losses in yields and quality. Under heat stress, the leaves become etiolated due to the disruption and disassembly of chloroplasts. In an attempt to determine the heat-responsive small RNAs in chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage, we carried out deep sequencing, using heat-treated samples, and analysed the proportion of small RNAs that were matched to chloroplast genome. Results Deep sequencing provided evidence that a novel subset of small RNAs were derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage. The chloroplast small RNAs (csRNAs include those derived from mRNA, rRNA, tRNA and intergenic RNA. The rRNA-derived csRNAs were preferentially located at the 3'-ends of the rRNAs, while the tRNA-derived csRNAs were mainly located at 5'-termini of the tRNAs. After heat treatment, the abundance of csRNAs decreased in seedlings, except those of 24 nt in length. The novel heat-responsive csRNAs and their locations in the chloroplast were verified by Northern blotting. The regulation of some csRNAs to the putative target genes were identified by real-time PCR. Our results reveal that high temperature suppresses the production of some csRNAs, which have potential roles in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In addition to nucleus, the chloroplast is another important organelle that generates a number of small

  1. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH (2.5 mg/kg known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025 in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection

  2. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Brozynska; Agnelo Furtado; Robert James Henry

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genom...

  3. Altered expression of the IQGAP1 gene in human lung cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.E.; Palmisano, W.A.; Lechner, J.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    IQGAP1 is a GTPase activation protein that accelerates GTP hydrolysis by normal p21 ras proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 could act as an upstream affector of p21 ras activity by convert in excess amounts of active GTP-21 ras to inactive GDP-21 ras. IQGAP1 displays extensive sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of all previously reported ras GAPs, including the tumor suppressor gene protein neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It has been shown that abnormal NF1 protein cannot negatively regulate the activity of ras proteins in neuroblast cells. This observation supports the hypothesis that NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene whose product acts upstream of ras. IQGAP1 is primarily expressed in lung, where it may play a role similar to NF1 in regulating the activity of H-ras or K-ras proteins. IQGAP1 functions as other GAPs by controlling the activity of ras.

  4. Selective alteration of gene expression in response to natural and synthetic retinoids.

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Céline; Ségard, Pascaline; Plouvier, Pascal; Formstecher, Pierre; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinoids are very potent inducers of cellular differentiation and apoptosis, and are efficient anti-tumoral agents. Synthetic retinoids are designed to restrict their toxicity and side effects, mostly by increasing their selectivity toward each isotype of retinoic acids receptors (RARalpha,beta, gamma and RXRalpha, beta, gamma). We however previously showed that retinoids displayed very different abilities to activate retinoid-inducible reporter genes, and that these differential...

  5. Frequent biclonality and Ig gene alterations among B cell lymphomas that show multiple histologic forms

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Configurations of Ig gene DNA were examined in multiple biopsy specimens from seven cases of human B cell lymphoma that showed histologic differences among the specimens within each case. Analysis by Southern blot hybridizations with DNA probes for each of the three Ig loci revealed that the configurations of DNA within these loci were identical among the specimens in two of the cases. This result indicated the monoclonality of these lymphomas, despite differences in histology between biopsy ...

  6. Tumor suppressor gene alterations in patients with malignant mesothelioma due to environmental asbestos exposure in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Tug Esra; Tug Tuncer; Elyas Halit; Coskunsel Mehmet; Emri Salih

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Environmental asbestos exposure can cause the grave lung and pleura malignancies with a high mortality rate, and it is also associated with increased rate of other organ malignancies. Asbestos exposure can develop genotoxic effects and damage in the pleura and lungs. Objective In this study, we aimed to determine tumor suppressor gene (TSG) loss in genomic DNA which was isolated from pleural fluid and blood samples of patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) due ...

  7. Persistent alterations in mesolimbic gene expression with abstinence from cocaine self-administration

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, WM; Patel, KM; Brucklacher, RM; Lull, ME; M. Erwin; Morgan, D; Roberts, DCS; Vrana, KE

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine-responsive gene expression changes have been described after either no drug abstinence or short periods of abstinence. Little data exist on the persistence of these changes after long-term abstinence. Previously, we reported that after discrete-trial, cocaine self-administration and 10 days of forced abstinence, incubation of cocaine reinforcement was observable by a progressive ratio schedule. The present study used rat discrete-trial cocaine self-administration and long-term forced ...

  8. Zinc supplementation of young men alters metallothionein, zinc transporter, and cytokine gene expression in leukocyte populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Tolunay Beker; Blanchard, Raymond K.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    An effective measure to assess zinc status of humans has remained elusive, in contrast to iron, where a number of indicators of metabolism/function are available. Using monocytes, T lymphocytes, and granulocytes isolated by magnetic sorting and dried blood spots (DBS) derived from 50 μl of peripheral blood, we evaluated the response of metallothionein (MT), zinc transporter, and cytokine genes to a modest (15 mg of Zn per day) dietary zinc supplement in human subjects. Transcript abundance was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). Zinc supplementation increased MT mRNA abundance by up to 2-fold in RNA from leukocyte subsets, and 4-fold in RNA from DBS. Transcript levels for the zinc transporter genes ZnT1 and Zip3 were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc supplementation. Expression of the ZnT and Zip genes among leukocyte subsets differ by up to 270-fold. Monocytes and granulocytes from supplemented subjects were activated by LPS, whereas T lymphocytes were activated by mimicking antigen presentation. With zinc consumption, TNF-α and IL-1β expression was greater in activated monocytes and granulocytes, and IFN-γ mRNA levels were higher in activated T lymphocytes. These studies show that QRT-PCR is a tool to reliably measure transcript abundance for nutritionally responsive genes in human subjects, and that a small sample of whole dried blood, when appropriately collected, can be used as the source of total RNA for QRT-PCR analysis. The results obtained also show that zinc supplementation of human subjects programs specific leukocytic subsets to show enhanced cytokine expression upon activation by stimulators of immunity. PMID:16434472

  9. Patent ductus arteriosus ligation alters pulmonary gene expression in preterm baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Waleh, Nahid; McCurnin, Donald C.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Shaul, Philip W.; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2011-01-01

    Ibuprofen-induced ductus closure improves pulmonary mechanics and increases alveolar surface area in premature baboons compared with baboons with a persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Ibuprofen-treatment has no effect on the expression of genes that regulate pulmonary inflammation but does increase the expression of alpha-ENaC (the transepithelial sodium channel that is critical for alveolar water clearance). Although ligation eliminates the PDA, it does not improve pulmonary mechanics...

  10. Alteration in expression of the rat mitochondrial ATPase 6 gene during Pneumocystis carinii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlett Marilyn S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumocystis carinii causes pneumonia in immunocompromised patients with a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the interaction between this organism and the host cell is not well understood. The purpose of this research was to study the response of host cells to P. carinii infection on a molecular level. Results The technique of mRNA differential display was used to detect genes whose expression may be affected by P. carinii infection. The nucleotide sequence of one differentially displayed DNA fragment was found to be identical to that of the rat mitochondrial ATPase 6 gene, which is a subunit of the F0F1-ATP synthase complex. A four-fold increase in expression of this gene was verified by Northern blot analysis of total RNA extracted from P. carinii-infected rat lung versus that from mock-infected rat lung. Localization of the cells containing ATPase 6 mRNA was accomplished by in situ hybridization. In sections of non-infected rat lung, these cells were found lining the distal parts of the respiratory tree and in apical areas of the alveoli. Histological location of these cells suggested that they were Clara cells and type II pneumocytes. This hypothesis was confirmed by co-localizing the mRNAs for ATPase 6 and surfactant protein B (SP-B to the same cells by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization. Conclusions The ATPase 6 gene is over expressed during P. carinii infection, and type II pneumocytes and Clara cells are the cell types responsible for this over-expression.

  11. Unpredictable neonatal stress enhances adult anxiety and alters amygdala gene expression related to serotonin and GABA

    OpenAIRE

    Sarro, Emma C.; Sullivan, Regina M.; Barr, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety-related disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, thought to have both genetic and environmental causes. Early-life trauma, such as abuse from a caregiver, can be predictable or unpredictable, each resulting in increased prevalence and severity of a unique set of disorders. In this study, we examined the influence of early unpredictable trauma on both the behavioral expression of adult anxiety and gene expression within the amygdala. Neonatal rats were exposed to unpa...

  12. Addiction and reward-related genes show altered expression in the postpartum nucleus accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Changjiu; Eisinger, Brian Earl; Driessen, Terri M.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC) is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET) indicated that postpartum (relat...

  13. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  14. Identification of genes whose expression is altered by obesity throughout the arterial tree

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We used next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology on the whole transcriptome to identify genes whose expression is consistently affected by obesity across multiple arteries. Specifically, we examined transcriptional profiles of the iliac artery as well as the feed artery, first, second, and third branch order arterioles in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and diaphragm muscles from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. Within the...

  15. Common sequence motifs coding for higher-plant and prokaryotic O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyases: bacterial origin of a chloroplast transit peptide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, N; Job, D; Douce, R

    1993-08-01

    A comparison of the amino acid sequence of O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase (EC 4.2.99.8) from Escherichia coli and the isoforms of this enzyme found in the cytosolic and chloroplastic compartments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf cells allows the essential lysine residue involved in the binding of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor to be identified. The results of further sequence comparison of cDNAs coding for these proteins are discussed in the frame of the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution. The results are compatible with a mechanism in which the chloroplast enzyme originated from the cytosolic enzyme and both plant genes originated from a common prokaryotic ancestor. The comparison also suggests that the 5'-non-coding sequence of the bacterial gene was transferred to the plant cell nucleus and that it has been used to create the N-terminal portions of both plant enzymes, and possibly the transit peptide of the chloroplast enzyme. PMID:7916619

  16. Identification of Four Mouse Diabetes Candidate Genes Altering β-Cell Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kluth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Beta-cell apoptosis and failure to induce beta-cell regeneration are hallmarks of type 2-like diabetes in mouse models. Here we show that islets from obese, diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese (NZO mice, in contrast to diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J (B6-ob/ob mice, do not proliferate in response to an in-vivo glucose challenge but lose their beta-cells. Genome-wide RNAseq based transcriptomics indicated an induction of 22 cell cycle-associated genes in B6-ob/ob islets that did not respond in NZO islets. Of all genes differentially expressed in islets of the two strains, seven mapped to the diabesity QTL Nob3, and were hypomorphic in either NZO (Lefty1, Apoa2, Pcp4l1, Mndal, Slamf7, Pydc3 or B6 (Ifi202b. Adenoviral overexpression of Lefty1, Apoa2, and Pcp4l1 in primary islet cells increased proliferation, whereas overexpression of Ifi202b suppressed it. We conclude that the identified genes in synergy with obesity and insulin resistance participate in adaptive islet hyperplasia and prevention from severe diabetes in B6-ob/ob mice.

  17. Identification of Four Mouse Diabetes Candidate Genes Altering β-Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitz, Anne; Jähnert, Markus; Vogel, Heike; Scherneck, Stephan; Schulze, Matthias; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis and failure to induce beta-cell regeneration are hallmarks of type 2-like diabetes in mouse models. Here we show that islets from obese, diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice, in contrast to diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J (B6)-ob/ob mice, do not proliferate in response to an in-vivo glucose challenge but lose their beta-cells. Genome-wide RNAseq based transcriptomics indicated an induction of 22 cell cycle-associated genes in B6-ob/ob islets that did not respond in NZO islets. Of all genes differentially expressed in islets of the two strains, seven mapped to the diabesity QTL Nob3, and were hypomorphic in either NZO (Lefty1, Apoa2, Pcp4l1, Mndal, Slamf7, Pydc3) or B6 (Ifi202b). Adenoviral overexpression of Lefty1, Apoa2, and Pcp4l1 in primary islet cells increased proliferation, whereas overexpression of Ifi202b suppressed it. We conclude that the identified genes in synergy with obesity and insulin resistance participate in adaptive islet hyperplasia and prevention from severe diabetes in B6-ob/ob mice. PMID:26348837

  18. Tomato Fruit Development and Ripening Are Altered by the Silencing of LeEIN2 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Liang Zhu; Ben-Zhong Zhu; Yi Shao; Xiao-Guang Wang; Xi-Jin Lin; Yuan-Hong Xie; Ying-Cong Li; Hong-Yan Gao; Yun-Bo Luo

    2006-01-01

    Loss-of-function ethylene insensitive 2 (EIN2) mutations showed ethylene insensitivity in Arabidopsis,which indicated an essential role of EIN2 in ethylene signaling. However, the function of EIN2 in fruit ripening has not been investigated. To gain a better understanding of EIN2, the temporal regulation of LeEIN2 expression during tomato fruit development was analyzed. The expression of LeEIN2 was constant at different stages of fruit development, and was not regulated by ethylene. Moreover, LeEIN2-silenced tomato fruits were developed using a virus-induced gene silencing fruit system to study the role of LeEIN2 in tomato fruit ripening. Silenced fruits had a delay in fruit development and ripening, related to greatly descended expression of ethylene-related and ripening-related genes in comparison with those of control fruits. These results suggested LeEIN2 positively mediated ethylene signals during tomato development. In addition,there were fewer seeds and Iocules in the silenced fruit than those in the control fruit, like the phenotype of parthenocarpic tomato fruit. The content of auxin and the expression of auxin-regulated gene were declined in silenced fruit, which indicated that EIN2 might be important for crosstalk between ethylene and auxin hormones.

  19. Histopathologic alterations associated with global gene expression due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure in juvenile zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Liu

    Full Text Available The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb and male (18.04 ppb fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption.

  20. From extracellular to intracellular: the establishment of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, J M; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1979-04-11

    Paracoccus and Rhodopseudomonas are unusual among bacteria in having a majority of the biochemical features of mitochondria; blue-green algae have many of the features of chloroplasts. The theory of serial endosymbiosis proposes that a primitive eukaryote successively took up bacteria and blue-green algae to yield mitochondria and chloroplasts respectively. Possible characteristics of transitional forms are indicated both by the primitive amoeba, Pelomyxa, which lacks mitochondria but contains a permanent population of endosymbiotic bacteria, and by several anomalous eukaryotic algae, e.g. Cyanophora, which contain cyanelles instead of chloroplasts. Blue-green algae appear to be obvious precursors of red algal chloroplasts but the ancestry of other chloroplasts is less certain, though the epizoic symbiont, Prochloron, may resemble the ancestral green algal chloroplast. We speculate that the chloroplasts of the remaining algae may have been a eukaryotic origin. The evolution or organelles from endosymbiotic precursors would involve their integration with the host cell biochemically, structurally and numerically. PMID:36620

  1. The Functional Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene I/D Polymorphism Does not Alter Susceptibility to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitcomb DC

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Alterations of the renin-angiotensin system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. The angiotensin converting enzyme is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system. A deletion polymorphism of a 287-bp fragment of intron 16 of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene allele results in higher levels of circulating enzyme. ACE deletion genotype has been linked to heart diseases, sarcoidosis and liver fibrosis. The pancreatic renin-angiotensin system plays a role in the development of pancreatic fibrosis and ACE inhibitors decrease pancreatic fibrosis in experimental models. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the frequency of the ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in chronic pancreatitis patients and controls. PATIENTS: Subjects with familial pancreatitis (n=51, sporadic chronic pancreatitis (n=104, and healthy controls (n=163 were evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The presence of ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism. RESULTS: The frequency of the ACE gene deletion allele was similar in familial pancreatitis (49.0% sporadic pancreatitis (51.0% and controls (55.8%. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in clinical features between patients with ACE-insertion or insertion/deletion genotypes vs. patients with ACE-deletion genotype. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the ACE deletion genotype does not make a significant contribution to the pathogenesis and the progression of chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Global Gene Expression Alterations as a Crucial Constituent of Human Cell Response to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

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    Mykyta Sokolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR is inevitable to humans in real-life scenarios; the hazards of IR primarily stem from its mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cell killing ability. For many decades, extensive research has been conducted on the human cell responses to IR delivered at a low dose/low dose (LD rate. These studies have shown that the molecular-, cellular-, and tissue-level responses are different after low doses of IR (LDIR compared to those observed after a short-term high-dose IR exposure (HDIR. With the advent of high-throughput technologies in the late 1990s, such as DNA microarrays, changes in gene expression have also been found to be ubiquitous after LDIR. Very limited subset of genes has been shown to be consistently up-regulated by LDIR, including CDKN1A. Further research on the biological effects and mechanisms induced by IR in human cells demonstrated that the molecular and cellular processes, including transcriptional alterations, activated by LDIR are often related to protective responses and, sometimes, hormesis. Following LDIR, some distinct responses were observed, these included bystander effects, and adaptive responses. Changes in gene expression, not only at the level of mRNA, but also miRNA, have been found to crucially underlie these effects having implications for radiation protection purposes.

  3. Prolonged high fat diet reduces dopamine reuptake without altering DAT gene expression.

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    Jackson J Cone

    Full Text Available The development of diet-induced obesity (DIO can potently alter multiple aspects of dopamine signaling, including dopamine transporter (DAT expression and dopamine reuptake. However, the time-course of diet-induced changes in DAT expression and function and whether such changes are dependent upon the development of DIO remains unresolved. Here, we fed rats a high (HFD or low (LFD fat diet for 2 or 6 weeks. Following diet exposure, rats were anesthetized with urethane and striatal DAT function was assessed by electrically stimulating the dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and recording resultant changes in dopamine concentration in the ventral striatum using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We also quantified the effect of HFD on membrane associated DAT in striatal cell fractions from a separate group of rats following exposure to the same diet protocol. Notably, none of our treatment groups differed in body weight. We found a deficit in the rate of dopamine reuptake in HFD rats relative to LFD rats after 6 but not 2 weeks of diet exposure. Additionally, the increase in evoked dopamine following a pharmacological challenge of cocaine was significantly attenuated in HFD relative to LFD rats. Western blot analysis revealed that there was no effect of diet on total DAT protein. However, 6 weeks of HFD exposure significantly reduced the 50 kDa DAT isoform in a synaptosomal membrane-associated fraction, but not in a fraction associated with recycling endosomes. Our data provide further evidence for diet-induced alterations in dopamine reuptake independent of changes in DAT production and demonstrates that such changes can manifest without the development of DIO.

  4. Molecular hydrogen protects chondrocytes from oxidative stress and indirectly alters gene expressions through reducing peroxynitrite derived from nitric oxide

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    Hanaoka Teruyasu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular hydrogen (H2 functions as an extensive protector against oxidative stress, inflammation and allergic reaction in various biological models and clinical tests; however, its essential mechanisms remain unknown. H2 directly reacts with the strong reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite (ONOO- as well as hydroxyl radicals (•OH, but not with nitric oxide radical (NO•. We hypothesized that one of the H2 functions is caused by reducing cellular ONOO-, which is generated by the rapid reaction of NO• with superoxides (•O2-. To verify this hypothesis, we examined whether H2 could restore cytotoxicity and transcriptional alterations induced by ONOO- derived from NO• in chondrocytes. Methods We treated cultured chondrocytes from porcine hindlimb cartilage or from rat meniscus fibrecartilage with a donor of NO•, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP in the presence or absence of H2. Chondrocyte viability was determined using a LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit. Gene expressions of the matrix proteins of cartilage and the matrix metalloproteinases were analyzed by reverse transcriptase-coupled real-time PCR method. Results SNAP treatment increased the levels of nitrated proteins. H2 decreased the levels of the nitrated proteins, and suppressed chondrocyte death. It is known that the matrix proteins of cartilage (including aggrecan and type II collagen and matrix metalloproteinases (such as MMP3 and MMP13 are down- and up-regulated by ONOO-, respectively. H2 restoratively increased the gene expressions of aggrecan and type II collagen in the presence of H2. Conversely, the gene expressions of MMP3 and MMP13 were restoratively down-regulated with H2. Thus, H2 acted to restore transcriptional alterations induced by ONOO-. Conclusions These results imply that one of the functions of H2 exhibits cytoprotective effects and transcriptional alterations through reducing ONOO-. Moreover, novel pharmacological strategies

  5. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the

  6. Altered Expression of Signaling Genes in Jurkat Cells upon FTY720 Induced Apoptosis

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    Shaoheng He

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available FTY720, a novel immunosuppressant, has a marked activity in decreasing peripheral blood T lymphocytes upon oral administration. Recent investigations suggest that the action of FTY720 on lymphocytes may result from its ability to induce cell apoptosis. However, the cell signaling mechanism involved in the FTY720-induced cell apoptosis remains unclear. Here we examined the apoptotic signal pathways mediated by FTY720 in Jurkat cells using microarray analysis. The results showed that FTY720 can induce Jurkat cell apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner as assessed by cell viability, Hoechst 33258 staining, Annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation tests. cDNA microarray analysis showed that 10 µM of FTY720 up-regulated 54 and down-regulated 10 genes in Jurkat cells among the 458 apoptotic genes examined following the 6 h incubation period. At least five-fold increased expression of modulator of apoptosis-1 (MOAP-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAF 6, Caspase 2 (CASP 2, E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F 1 and Casapse 5 (CASP 5 genes was observed in microarray analyses; these results were confirmed with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR examination. Our findings suggest that the mitochondria related signaling pathways are the key pathways involved in the FTY720-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. And our results provide a new insight into the mechanism of FTY720, which allows us to draw the first simple diagram showing the potential pathways mediated by FTY720.

  7. Association of a Human FABP1 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Altered Serum Triglyceride Levels.

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    Xian-E Peng

    Full Text Available Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, also known as fatty acid-binding protein 1 (FABP1, is a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. Elevated FABP1 levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and metabolic syndromes. In this study, we examine the association of FABP1 gene promoter variants with serum FABP1 and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Four promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of FABP1 gene were genotyped in a cross-sectional survey of healthy volunteers (n = 1,182 from Fuzhou city of China. Results showed that only the rs2919872 G>A variant was significantly associated with serum TG concentration(P = 0.032.Compared with the rs2919872 G allele, rs2919872 A allele contributed significantly to reduced serum TG concentration, and this allele dramatically decreased the FABP1 promoter activity(P < 0.05. The rs2919872 A allele carriers had considerably lower serum FABP1 levels than G allele carriers (P < 0.01. In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the rs2919872 A allele was negatively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = -0.320, P = 0.003, while serum TG levels were positively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = 0.487, P = 0.014. Our data suggest that compared with the rs2919872 G allele, the rs2919872 A allele reduces the transcriptional activity of FABP1 promoter, and thereby may link FABP1 gene variation to TG level in humans.

  8. Association of a Human FABP1 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Altered Serum Triglyceride Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xian-E; Wu, Yun-Li; Zhu, Yi-Bing; Huang, Rong-Dong; Lu, Qing-Qing; Lin, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), also known as fatty acid-binding protein 1 (FABP1), is a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. Elevated FABP1 levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndromes. In this study, we examine the association of FABP1 gene promoter variants with serum FABP1 and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Four promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of FABP1 gene were genotyped in a cross-sectional survey of healthy volunteers (n = 1,182) from Fuzhou city of China. Results showed that only the rs2919872 G>A variant was significantly associated with serum TG concentration(P = 0.032).Compared with the rs2919872 G allele, rs2919872 A allele contributed significantly to reduced serum TG concentration, and this allele dramatically decreased the FABP1 promoter activity(P < 0.05). The rs2919872 A allele carriers had considerably lower serum FABP1 levels than G allele carriers (P < 0.01). In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the rs2919872 A allele was negatively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = -0.320, P = 0.003), while serum TG levels were positively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = 0.487, P = 0.014). Our data suggest that compared with the rs2919872 G allele, the rs2919872 A allele reduces the transcriptional activity of FABP1 promoter, and thereby may link FABP1 gene variation to TG level in humans. PMID:26439934

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon: sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of eight grass plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Olin D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat, barley, and rye, of tribe Triticeae in the Poaceae, are among the most important crops worldwide but they present many challenges to genomics-aided crop improvement. Brachypodium distachyon, a close relative of those cereals has recently emerged as a model for grass functional genomics. Sequencing of the nuclear and organelle genomes of Brachypodium is one of the first steps towards making this species available as a tool for researchers interested in cereals biology. Findings The chloroplast genome of Brachypodium distachyon was sequenced by a combinational approach using BAC end and shotgun sequences derived from a selected BAC containing the entire chloroplast genome. Comparative analysis indicated that the chloroplast genome is conserved in gene number and organization with respect to those of other cereals. However, several Brachypodium genes evolve at a faster rate than those in other grasses. Sequence analysis reveals that rice and wheat have a ~2.1 kb deletion in their plastid genomes and this deletion must have occurred independently in both species. Conclusion We demonstrate that BAC libraries can be used to sequence plastid, and likely other organellar, genomes. As expected, the Brachypodium chloroplast genome is very similar to those of other sequenced grasses. The phylogenetic analyses and the pattern of insertions and deletions in the chloroplast genome confirmed that Brachypodium is a close relative of the tribe Triticeae. Nevertheless, we show that some large indels can arise multiple times and may confound phylogenetic reconstruction.

  10. Storage Temperature Alters the Expression of Differentiation-Related Genes in Cultured Oral Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Paaske Utheim, Tor; Islam, Rakibul; Fostad, Ida G.; Eidet, Jon R.; Sehic, Amer; Ole K Olstad; Dartt, Darlene A.; Messelt, Edward B.; Griffith, May; Pasovic, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Storage of cultured human oral keratinocytes (HOK) allows for transportation of cultured transplants to eye clinics worldwide. In a previous study, one-week storage of cultured HOK was found to be superior with regard to viability and morphology at 12 degrees C compared to 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C. To understand more of how storage temperature affects cell phenotype, gene expression of HOK before and after storage at 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 37 degrees C was assessed. Materi...

  11. Cloning of the altered mRNA stability (ams) gene of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Claverie-Martin, F; Diaz-Torres, M R; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1989-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutation in the ams gene of Escherichia coli causes an increase in the chemical half-life of pulse-labeled RNA at the nonpermissive temperature. Using lambda clones containing DNA fragments from the 23- to 24-min region on the E. coli chromosome, we have isolated a 5.8-kilobase DNA fragment which, when present in a low-copy-number plasmid, complements the conditional lethality and increased mRNA stability associated with the ams-1 mutation. The approximate initiation s...

  12. Exogenous And Endogenous Factors Connected With P16 Gene Alteration In Egyptian Patients With Oesophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain areas of Egypt have a high incidence of oesophageal cancer which is one of the most common causes of cancer related deaths in the world. Comparisons of the dietary and cultural habits of people from geographically distinct high-incidence areas in the world have revealed very few similarities to suggest a common induction mechanism. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of sex, age and smoking on some biochemical parameters, p16 gene mutations, methylation and incidence of oesophageal cancer. The study included 50 Egyptian patients with oesophageal cancer with average age 55.6 years (aged between 23-79 years). The results showed significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), increase in glutathione reductase (GR), increase in lipid peroxidation end product (malonaldehyde) and incidence of oesophageal cancer. Moreover, two mutations were detected in exon 2 of gene p16 and significant increase in p16 methylation in tissues and plasma of oesophageal cancer patients, as compared to healthy control, were observed.

  13. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Do Folate Pathway Gene Alterations Influence the Expression of Mitochondrial DNA Mutation?

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    A Aleyasin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is an inherited form of bilateral optic atrophy leading to the loss of central vision.  The primary cause of vision loss is mutation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, however, unknown secon­dary genetic and/or epigenetic risk factors are suggested to influence its neuropathology.  In this study folate gene polymor­phisms were examined as a possible LHON secondary genetic risk factor in Iranian patients."nMethods: Common polymorphisms in the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C and MTRR (A66G genes were tested in 21 LHON patients and 150 normal controls."nResults:  Strong associations were observed between the LHON syndrome and C677T (P= 0.00 and A66G (P= 0.00 polymor­phisms.  However, no significant association was found between A1298C (P =0.69 and the LHON syndrome."nConclusion: This is the first study that shows MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G polymorphisms play a role in the etiology of the LHON syndrome.  This finding may help in the better understanding of mechanisms involved in neural degeneration and vision loss by LHON and hence the better treatment of patients.

  14. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  15. The schizophrenia risk gene product miR-137 alters presynaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Sandra; Seo, Jinsoo; Kwon, Ester J; Rudenko, Andrii; Cho, Sukhee; Wang, Wenyuan; Flood, Zachary; Martorell, Anthony J; Ericsson, Maria; Mungenast, Alison E; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-07-01

    Noncoding variants in the human MIR137 gene locus increase schizophrenia risk with genome-wide significance. However, the functional consequence of these risk alleles is unknown. Here we examined induced human neurons harboring the minor alleles of four disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in MIR137. We observed increased MIR137 levels compared to those in major allele-carrying cells. microRNA-137 gain of function caused downregulation of the presynaptic target genes complexin-1 (Cplx1), Nsf and synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1), leading to impaired vesicle release. In vivo, miR-137 gain of function resulted in changes in synaptic vesicle pool distribution, impaired induction of mossy fiber long-term potentiation and deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. By sequestering endogenous miR-137, we were able to ameliorate the synaptic phenotypes. Moreover, reinstatement of Syt1 expression partially restored synaptic plasticity, demonstrating the importance of Syt1 as a miR-137 target. Our data provide new insight into the mechanism by which miR-137 dysregulation can impair synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:26005852

  16. The first complete chloroplast genome sequence of a lycophyte,Huperzia lucidula (Lycopodiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Paul G.; Karol, Kenneth G.; Mandoli, Dina F.; Kuehl,Jennifer V.; Arumuganathan, K.; Ellis, Mark W.; Mishler, Brent D.; Kelch,Dean G.; Olmstead, Richard G.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-02-01

    We used a unique combination of techniques to sequence the first complete chloroplast genome of a lycophyte, Huperzia lucidula. This plant belongs to a significant clade hypothesized to represent the sister group to all other vascular plants. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate the organelles, rolling circle amplification (RCA) to amplify the genome, and shotgun sequencing to 8x depth coverage to obtain the complete chloroplast genome sequence. The genome is 154,373bp, containing inverted repeats of 15,314 bp each, a large single-copy region of 104,088 bp, and a small single-copy region of 19,671 bp. Gene order is more similar to those of mosses, liverworts, and hornworts than to gene order for other vascular plants. For example, the Huperziachloroplast genome possesses the bryophyte gene order for a previously characterized 30 kb inversion, thus supporting the hypothesis that lycophytes are sister to all other extant vascular plants. The lycophytechloroplast genome data also enable a better reconstruction of the basaltracheophyte genome, which is useful for inferring relationships among bryophyte lineages. Several unique characters are observed in Huperzia, such as movement of the gene ndhF from the small single copy region into the inverted repeat. We present several analyses of evolutionary relationships among land plants by using nucleotide data, amino acid sequences, and by comparing gene arrangements from chloroplast genomes. The results, while still tentative pending the large number of chloroplast genomes from other key lineages that are soon to be sequenced, are intriguing in themselves, and contribute to a growing comparative database of genomic and morphological data across the green plants.

  17. Chloroplast DNA rearrangements in Campanulaceae: phylogenetic utility of highly rearranged genomes

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    Jansen Robert K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Campanulaceae (the "hare bell" or "bellflower" family is a derived angiosperm family comprised of about 600 species treated in 35 to 55 genera. Taxonomic treatments vary widely and little phylogenetic work has been done in the family. Gene order in the chloroplast genome usually varies little among vascular plants. However, chloroplast genomes of Campanulaceae represent an exception and phylogenetic analyses solely based on chloroplast rearrangement characters support a reasonably well-resolved tree. Results Chloroplast DNA physical maps were constructed for eighteen representatives of the family. So many gene order changes have occurred among the genomes that characterizing individual mutational events was not always possible. Therefore, we examined different, novel scoring methods to prepare data matrices for cladistic analysis. These approaches yielded largely congruent results but varied in amounts of resolution and homoplasy. The strongly supported nodes were common to all gene order analyses as well as to parallel analyses based on ITS and rbcL sequence data. The results suggest some interesting and unexpected intrafamilial relationships. For example fifteen of the taxa form a derived clade; whereas the remaining three taxa – Platycodon, Codonopsis, and Cyananthus – form the basal clade. This major subdivision of the family corresponds to the distribution of pollen morphology characteristics but is not compatible with previous taxonomic treatments. Conclusions Our use of gene order data in the Campanulaceae provides the most highly resolved phylogeny as yet developed for a plant family using only cpDNA rearrangements. The gene order data showed markedly less homoplasy than sequence data for the same taxa but did not resolve quite as many nodes. The rearrangement characters, though relatively few in number, support robust and meaningful phylogenetic hypotheses and provide new insights into evolutionary

  18. Codon reassignment to facilitate genetic engineering and biocontainment in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of microalgae as low-cost hosts for the synthesis of recombinant products such as therapeutic proteins and bioactive metabolites. In particular, the chloroplast, with its small, genetically tractable genome (plastome) and elaborate metabolism, represents an attractive platform for genetic engineering. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of the 69 protein-coding genes in the plastome uses the stop codon UGA, therefore this spare codon can be exploited as a useful synthetic biology tool. Here, we report the assignment of the codon to one for tryptophan and show that this can be used as an effective strategy for addressing a key problem in chloroplast engineering: namely, the assembly of expression cassettes in Escherichia coli when the gene product is toxic to the bacterium. This problem arises because the prokaryotic nature of chloroplast promoters and ribosome-binding sites used in such cassettes often results in transgene expression in E. coli, and is a potential issue when cloning genes for metabolic enzymes, antibacterial proteins and integral membrane proteins. We show that replacement of tryptophan codons with the spare codon (UGG→UGA) within a transgene prevents functional expression in E. coli and in the chloroplast, and that co-introduction of a plastidial trnW gene carrying a modified anticodon restores function only in the latter by allowing UGA readthrough. We demonstrate the utility of this system by expressing two genes known to be highly toxic to E. coli and discuss its value in providing an enhanced level of biocontainment for transplastomic microalgae. PMID:26471875

  19. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  20. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States); Rise, Matthew L. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Spitsbergen, Jan M. [Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Hori, Tiago S. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven [Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McGraw, Joseph E. [School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, Mequon, WI 53097 (United States); Goetz, Giles [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, 1122 Northeast Boat Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Carvan, Michael J., E-mail: carvanmj@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  1. Research Progress of Sugarcane Chloroplast Genome%甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杨; 周会

    2013-01-01

    Along with the development of modern molecular biology technologies, complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced in various plant species to date, and the structure, function and expression of these genes have been deter-mined. The chloroplast genome structure in most higher plants is stable, since the gene number, arrangement and composition are conservative. The determination of sugarcane chloroplast genome sequence laid a good foundation for sugarcane chloroplast related research. This article gives a review on the research progress of sugarcane chloroplast genome through the chloroplast genome map, gene structure, function, chloroplast RNA editing, and phylogenetic analysis in Saccharum and relat-ed genera. This study held great potential to clarify more directions in researches, including sugarcane chloroplast genetic transformation, complete chloroplast nu-cleotide sequence determination in Saccharum and closely related genera, cpSSRs development and application.%随着现代分子生物学技术的发展,目前已经完成了多种植物叶绿体基因组的全序列测定,并研究了这些基因的结构、功能与表达。大部分高等植物的叶绿体基因组结构稳定,基因数量、排列顺序及组成上具有保守性。甘蔗叶绿体基因组测序工作的完成为甘蔗叶绿体相关研究奠定了良好基础。文章从甘蔗叶绿体基因组图谱、结构和功能基因、叶绿体RNA编辑以及甘蔗属叶绿体系统进化等方面综合概述了甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究取得的成果,并从甘蔗叶绿体遗传转化、甘蔗及近缘属叶绿体基因组测序和叶绿体基因组 cpSSRs开发利用等方面指出甘蔗叶绿体基因组今后的研究方向。

  2. MUC5AC/β-catenin expression and KRAS gene alteration in laterally spreading colorectal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kosaburo Nakae; Hiroyuki Mitomi; Tsuyoshi Saito; Michiko Takahashi; Takashi Morimoto; Yasuhiro Hidaka; Naoto Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify differences in mucin phenotype,proliferative activity and oncogenetic alteration among subtypes of colorectal laterally spreading tumor (LST).METHODS:LSTs,defined as superficial elevated lesions greater than 10 mm in diameter with a low vertical axis,were macroscopically classified into two subtypes:(1) a granular type (Gr-LST) composed of superficially spreading aggregates of nodules forming a flat-based lesion with a granulonodular and uneven surface; and (2) a non-granular type (NGr-LST) with a flat smooth surface and an absence of granulonodular formation.A total of 69 LSTs,comprising 36 Gr-LSTs and 33 NGr-LSTs,were immunohistochemically stained with MUC2,MUC5AC,MUC6,CD10 (markers of gastrointestinal cell lineage),p53,β-catenin and Ki-67 antibodies,and examined for alteration in exon 1 of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and exon 15 of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing.RESULTS:Histologically,15 Gr-LST samples were adenomas with low-grade dysplasia (LGD),12 were highgrade dysplasia (HGD) and 9 were adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa (INV),while 12 NGr-LSTs demonstrated LGD,14 HGD and 7 INV.In the proximal colon,MUC5AC expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type than the NGr-type.MUC6 was expressed only in NGr-LST.MUC2 or CD10 did not differ,P53 expression demonstrated a significant stepwise increment in progression through LGD-HGD-INV with both types of LST.Nuclear β-catenin expression was significantly higher in the NGr-type.Ki-67 expression was significantly higher in the Gr-type in the lower one third zone of the tumor.In proximal,but not distal colon tumors,the incidence of KRAS provided mutation was significantly higher in the Gr-type harboring a specific mutational pattern (G12V).BRAF mutations (V600E) were detected only in two Gr-LSTs.CONCLUSION:The two subtypes of LST,especially in the proximal colon,have differing

  3. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  4. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pląder Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes. Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile.

  5. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  6. Chloroplast FtsZ assembles into a contractible ring via tubulin-like heteropolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yamato; Mogi, Yuko; TerBush, Allan D; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast division is driven by a ring containing FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 proteins, which originated from bacterial FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein; however, mechanistic details of the chloroplast FtsZ ring remain unclear. Here, we report that FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 can heteropolymerize into a contractible ring ex vivo. Fluorescently labelled FtsZ1 and/or FtsZ2 formed single rings in cells of the yeast Pichia pastoris. Photobleaching experiments indicated that co-assembly of FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 imparts polarity to polymerization. Assembly of FtsZ chimaeras revealed that the protofilaments assemble via heteropolymerization of FtsZ2 and FtsZ1. Contraction of the ring was accompanied by an increase in the filament turnover rate. Our findings suggest that the evolutionary duplication of FtsZ in plants may have increased the mobility and kinetics of FtsZ ring dynamics in chloroplast division. Thus, the gene duplication and heteropolymerization of chloroplast FtsZs may represent convergent evolution with eukaryotic tubulin. PMID:27322658

  7. Carbonated soft drinks induce oxidative stress and alter the expression of certain genes in the brains of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Terras, Adel; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Alkhedaide, Adel; Attia, Hossam Fouad; Alharthy, Abdullah; Banaja, Abdel Elah

    2016-04-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the consumption of carbonated soft drinks is common and often occurs with each meal. Carbonated soft drink consumption has been shown to exhibit effects on the liver, kidney and bone. However, the effects of these soft drinks on brain activity have not been widely examined, particularly at the gene level. Therefore, the current study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the effects of chronic carbonated soft drink consumption on oxidative stress, brain gene biomarkers associated with aggression and brain histology. In total, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as a control and was provided access to food and water ad libitum; and groups 2‑4 were given free access to food and carbonated soft drinks only (Cola for group 2, Pepsi for group 3 and 7‑UP for group 4). Animals were maintained on these diets for 3 consecutive months. Upon completion of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed and serological and histopathological analyses were performed on blood and tissues samples. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze alterations in gene expression levels. Results revealed that carbonated soft drinks increased the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA). Carbonated soft drinks were also observed to downregulate the expression of antioxidants glutathione reductase (GR), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the brain when compared with that in the control rats. Rats administered carbonated soft drinks also exhibited decreased monoamine oxidase A (MAO‑A) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE) serum and mRNA levels in the brain. In addition, soft drink consumption upregulated mRNA expression of dopamine D2 receptor (DD2R), while 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5‑HTT) expression was decreased. However, following histological examination, all rats had a normal brain structure. The results of this study demonstrated that that carbonated soft drinks induced oxidative stress and

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Aster spathulifolius (Asteraceae); genomic features and relationship with Asteraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-11-10

    Aster spathulifolius, a member of the Asteraceae family, is distributed along the coast of Japan and Korea. This plant is used for medicinal and ornamental purposes. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of A. sphathulifolius consists of 149,473 bp that include a pair of inverted repeats of 24,751 bp separated by a large single copy region of 81,998 bp and a small single copy region of 17,973 bp. The chloroplast genome contains 78 coding genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. When compared to other cpDNA sequences of Asteraceae, A. spathulifolius showed the closest relationship with Jacobaea vulgaris, and its atpB gene was found to be a pseudogene, unlike J. vulgaris. Furthermore, evaluation of the gene compositions of J. vulgaris, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and A. spathulifolius revealed that 13.6-kb showed inversion from ndhF to rps15, unlike Lactuca of Asteraceae. Comparison of the synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates with J. vulgaris revealed that synonymous genes related to a small subunit of the ribosome showed the highest value (0.1558), while nonsynonymous rates of genes related to ATP synthase genes were highest (0.0118). These findings revealed that substitution has occurred at similar rates in most genes, and the substitution rates suggested that most genes is a purified selection. PMID:26164759

  9. Brassinosteroid-induced CO2 assimilation is associated with increased stability of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes in the chloroplasts in cucumber plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Activity of certain Calvin cycle enzymes and CO2 assimilation are induced by BRs. ► BRs upregulate the activity of the ascorbate–glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts. ► BRs increase the chloroplast thiol reduction state. ► A BR-induced reducing environment increases the stability of photosynthetic enzymes. -- Abstract: Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in plant growth, development, photosynthesis and stress tolerance; however, the mechanism underlying BR-enhanced photosynthesis is currently unclear. Here, we provide evidence that an increase in the BR level increased the quantum yield of PSII, activities of Rubisco activase (RCA) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and CO2 assimilation. BRs upregulated the transcript levels of genes and activity of enzymes involved in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts, leading to an increased ratio of reduced (GSH) to oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the chloroplasts. An increased GSH/GSSG ratio protected RCA from proteolytic digestion and increased the stability of redox-sensitive enzymes in the chloroplasts. These results strongly suggest that BRs are capable of regulating the glutathione redox state in the chloroplasts through the activation of the ascorbate–glutathione cycle. The resulting increase in the chloroplast thiol reduction state promotes CO2 assimilation, at least in part, by enhancing the stability and activity of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes through post-translational modifications.

  10. Brassinosteroid-induced CO{sub 2} assimilation is associated with increased stability of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes in the chloroplasts in cucumber plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yu Ping; Cheng, Fei; Zhou, Yan Hong; Xia, Xiao Jian; Mao, Wei Hua; Shi, Kai [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhi Xiang [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Yu, Jing Quan, E-mail: jqyu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plants Growth, Development and Quality Improvement, Ministry of Agriculture of China, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity of certain Calvin cycle enzymes and CO{sub 2} assimilation are induced by BRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BRs upregulate the activity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BRs increase the chloroplast thiol reduction state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A BR-induced reducing environment increases the stability of photosynthetic enzymes. -- Abstract: Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in plant growth, development, photosynthesis and stress tolerance; however, the mechanism underlying BR-enhanced photosynthesis is currently unclear. Here, we provide evidence that an increase in the BR level increased the quantum yield of PSII, activities of Rubisco activase (RCA) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and CO{sub 2} assimilation. BRs upregulated the transcript levels of genes and activity of enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the chloroplasts, leading to an increased ratio of reduced (GSH) to oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the chloroplasts. An increased GSH/GSSG ratio protected RCA from proteolytic digestion and increased the stability of redox-sensitive enzymes in the chloroplasts. These results strongly suggest that BRs are capable of regulating the glutathione redox state in the chloroplasts through the activation of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. The resulting increase in the chloroplast thiol reduction state promotes CO{sub 2} assimilation, at least in part, by enhancing the stability and activity of redox-sensitive photosynthetic enzymes through post-translational modifications.

  11. Hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid axis alterations in female mice with deletion of the neuromedin B receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Karen J; Paula, Gabriela S M; Império, Guinever E; Bressane, Nina O; Magalhães, Carolina M A; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C

    2014-11-01

    Neuromedin B, a peptide highly expressed at the pituitary, has been shown to act as autocrine/paracrine inhibitor of thyrotropin (TSH) release. Here we studied the thyroid axis of adult female mice lacking neuromedin B receptor (NBR-KO), compared to wild type (WT) littermates. They exhibited slight increase in serum TSH (18%), with normal pituitary expression of mRNA coding for α-glycoprotein subunit (Cga), but reduced TSH β-subunit mRNA (Tshb, 41%), lower intra-pituitary TSH content (24%) and increased thyroid hormone transporter MCT-8 (Slc16a2, 44%) and thyroid hormone receptor β mRNA expression (Thrb, 39%). NBR-KO mice exhibited normal thyroxine (T4) and reduced triiodothyronine (T3) (30%), with no alterations in the intra-thyroidal content of T4 and T3 or thyroid morphological changes. Hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) mRNA (Trh) was increased (68%), concomitant with a reduction in type 2 deiodinase mRNA (Dio2, 30%) and no changes in MCT-8 and thyroid hormone receptor mRNA expression. NBR-KO mice exhibited a 56% higher increase in serum TSH in response to an acute single intraperitoneal injection of TRH concomitant with a non-significant increase in pituitary TRH receptor (Trhr) mRNA at basal state. The phenotype of female NBR-KO mice at the hypothalamus-pituitary axis revealed alterations in pituitary and hypothalamic gene expression, associated with reduced serum T3, and higher TSH response to TRH, with apparently normal thyroid morphology and hormonal production. Thus, results confirm that neuromedin B pathways are importantly involved in secretory pathways of TSH and revealed its participation in the in vivo regulation of gene expression of TSH β-subunit and pituitary MCT8 and Thrb and hypothalamic TRH and type 2 deiodinase. PMID:25454367

  12. Antisense expression of a gene encoding a calcium-binding protein in transgenic tobacco leads to altered morphology and enhanced chlorophyll

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girdhar K Pandey; Amita Pandey; Vanga Siva Reddy; Renu Deswal; Alok Bhattacharya; Kailash C Upadhyaya; Sudhir K Sopory

    2007-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica contains a novel calcium-binding protein like calmodulin, which was discovered earlier, and we have reported the presence of its homologue(s) and a dependent protein kinase in plants. To understand the functions of these in plants, a cDNA encoding a calcium-binding protein isolated from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP) was cloned into vector pBI121 in antisense orientation and transgenic tobacco plants were raised. These plants showed variation in several phenotypic characters, of which two distinct features, more greenness and leaf thickness, were inherited in subsequent generations. The increase in the level of total chlorophyll in different plants ranged from 60% to 70%. There was no major change in chloroplast structure and in the protein level of D1, D2, LHCP and RuBP carboxylase. These morphological changes were not seen in antisense calmodulin transgenic tobacco plants, nor was the calmodulin level altered in EhCaBP antisense plants.

  13. Homologs to Cry toxin receptor genes in a de novo transcriptome and their altered expression in resistant Spodoptera litura larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Wang, Huidong; Qi, Jiangwei; Han, Lanzhi; Hu, Meiying; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2015-07-01

    Insect resistance threatens sustainability of insecticides based on Cry proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Since high levels of resistance to Cry proteins involve alterations in Cry-binding midgut receptors, their identification is needed to develop resistance management strategies. Through Illumina sequencing we generated a transcriptome containing 16,161 annotated unigenes for the Oriental leafworm (Spodoptera litura). Transcriptome mining identified 6 contigs with identity to reported lepidopteran Cry toxin receptors. Using PCR we confirmed their expression during the larval stage and compared their quantitative expression in larvae from susceptible and a field-derived Cry1Ca resistant strain of S. litura. Among reduced transcript levels detected for most tested contigs in the Cry1Ca-resistant S. litura larvae, the most dramatic reduction (up to 99%) was detected for alkaline phosphatase contigs. This study significantly expands S. litura transcriptomic resources and provides preliminary identification of putative receptor genes with altered expression in S. litura resistant to Cry1Ca toxin. PMID:25981133

  14. Differential gene regulation under altered gravity conditions in follicular thyroid cancer cells: relationship between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Pietsch, Jessica; Grosse, Jirka; Wehland, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Saar, Katrin; Hübner, Norbert; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Braun, Markus; van Loon, Jack; Vagt, Nicole; Egli, Marcel; Richter, Peter; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush; Baltz, Theo; Infanger, Manfred; Ma, Xiao; Grimm, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, and cytoskeletal proteins form a dynamic network interacting with signalling molecules as an adaptive response to altered gravity. An important issue is the exact differentiation between real microgravity responses of the cells or cellular reactions to hypergravity and/or vibrations. To determine the effects of real microgravity on human cells, we used four DLR parabolic flight campaigns and focused on the effects of short-term microgravity (22 s), hypergravity (1.8 g), and vibrations on ML-1 thyroid cancer cells. No signs of apoptosis or necrosis were detectable. Gene array analysis revealed 2,430 significantly changed transcripts. After 22 s microgravity, the F-actin and cytokeratin cytoskeleton was altered, and ACTB and KRT80 mRNAs were significantly upregulated after the first and thirty-first parabolas. The COL4A5 mRNA was downregulated under microgravity, whereas OPN and FN were significantly upregulated. Hypergravity and vibrations did not change ACTB, KRT-80 or COL4A5 mRNA. MTSS1 and LIMA1 mRNAs were downregulated/slightly upregulated under microgravity, upregulated in hypergravity and unchanged by vibrations. These data indicate that the graviresponse of ML-1 cells occurred very early, within the first few seconds. Downregulated MTSS1 and upregulated LIMA1 may be an adaptive mechanism of human cells for stabilizing the cytoskeleton under microgravity conditions. PMID:21865726

  15. A recurrent regulatory change underlying altered expression and Wnt response of the stickleback armor plates gene EDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brown, Natasha M; Summers, Brian R; Jones, Felicity C; Brady, Shannon D; Kingsley, David M

    2015-01-01

    Armor plate changes in sticklebacks are a classic example of repeated adaptive evolution. Previous studies identified ectodysplasin (EDA) gene as the major locus controlling recurrent plate loss in freshwater fish, though the causative DNA alterations were not known. Here we show that freshwater EDA alleles have cis-acting regulatory changes that reduce expression in developing plates and spines. An identical T → G base pair change is found in EDA enhancers of divergent low-plated fish. Recreation of the T → G change in a marine enhancer strongly reduces expression in posterior armor plates. Bead implantation and cell culture experiments show that Wnt signaling strongly activates the marine EDA enhancer, and the freshwater T → G change reduces Wnt responsiveness. Thus parallel evolution of low-plated sticklebacks has occurred through a shared DNA regulatory change, which reduces the sensitivity of an EDA enhancer to Wnt signaling, and alters expression in developing armor plates while preserving expression in other tissues. PMID:25629660

  16. PCBs are associated with altered gene transcript profiles in arctic Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Marie; Loseto, Lisa L; Helbing, Caren C; Veldhoen, Nik; Dangerfield, Neil J; Ross, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    High trophic level arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) are exposed to persistent organic pollutants (POP) originating primarily from southern latitudes. We collected samples from 43 male beluga harvested by Inuvialuit hunters (2008-2010) in the Beaufort Sea to evaluate the effects of POPs on the levels of 13 health-related gene transcripts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Consistent with their role in detoxification, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) (r(2) = 0.18, p = 0.045 for 2008 and 2009) and cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1a1) (r(2) = 0.20, p whales during these two years. While this provides insight into the legacy of PCBs in a remote environment, the possible impacts of a changing ice climate on the health of beluga underscores the need for long-term studies. PMID:24490950

  17. Tumor suppressor gene alterations in patients with malignant mesothelioma due to environmental asbestos exposure in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emri Salih

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental asbestos exposure can cause the grave lung and pleura malignancies with a high mortality rate, and it is also associated with increased rate of other organ malignancies. Asbestos exposure can develop genotoxic effects and damage in the pleura and lungs. Objective In this study, we aimed to determine tumor suppressor gene (TSG loss in genomic DNA which was isolated from pleural fluid and blood samples of patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM due to environmental asbestos exposure. Design and patients Prospective study of period from 2001 to 2003 in 17 patients with MPM. Methods A total of 12 chromosomal regions were researched by comparing genomic DNA samples isolated from blood and pleural effusion (using PCR, and polyacrilamid gel electrophoresis denaturizing, on 2 different chromosomes which have 9 different polymorphic determinants at 6q and 3 different polymorphic determinants at 9p using molecular genetic methods on 13 patients clinico-pathologically diagnosed MPM. Results Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH was determined at D6S275 in one patient, at D6S301 in another, at D6S474 in 2, at ARG1 in 2, at D6S1038 in 2 and at D6S1008 in 3 patients. In 7 (54% of the13 patients, we found LOH in at least one site. No LOH was determined at any informative loci in 6 patients. Of the 13 patients, no investigated markers were determined at 9p. Conclusion In this study, genomic DNA samples obtained from MPM patients with asbestos exposure revealed that they contained important genotoxic damage. We found no other study on this subject at molecular level in pleural effusion either in Turkey or in the med-line literature. We believe that this study will provide important support for other research into molecular-genetic variations, both on this subject and other malignancies, and may also constitute a base for early diagnosis and gene therapy research in the future.

  18. Gut bacteria alteration in obese people and its relationship with gene polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Jiang Zuo; Zhi-Mei Xie; Wei-Wei Zhang; Yong-Ru Li; Wei Wang; Xiao-Bei Ding; Xiao-Fang Pei

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the differences in cultivable gut bacteria and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPAR-γ2 ) gene Pro12Ala variation in obese and normal-weight Chinese people. METHODS:Using culture methods,the amounts of Escherichia coli ,Enterococci ,Bacteroides ,Lactobacilli ,Bifidobacteria and Clostridium perfringens (C.perfringens ) in the feces of 52 obese participants [body mass index (BMI):≥ 28 kg/m2] and 52 participants of normalweight (BMI:18.5-24 kg/m2) were obtained.Study participants completed comprehensive questionnaires and underwent clinical laboratory tests.The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-PFLP) assay was used to analyze PPAR-γ2 gene Pro12Ala variation. RESULTS:The obese group exhibited a lower amount of C.perfringens (6.54 ± 0.65 vs 6.94 ± 0.57,P = 0.001) and Bacteroides (9.81 ± 0.58 vs 10.06 ± 0.39,P = 0.012) than their normal-weight counterparts.No major differences were observed in Pro12Ala genotype distribution between the two groups; however,obese individuals with a Pro/Ala genotype had a significantly lower level of Bacteroides (9.45 ± 0.62 vs 9.93 ± 0.51,P = 0.027) than those with a Pro/Pro genotype.In addition, the obese group demonstrated a higher stool frequency (U = 975,P < 0.001) and a looser stool (U = 1062,P = 0.015) than the normal-weight group. CONCLUSION:Our results indicated interactions among cultivable gut flora,host genetic factors and obese phenotype and this might be helpful for obesity prevention.

  19. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis based on SMRT Sequencing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Qiushi; Li, Xiwen; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Chao

    2016-09-01

    Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis is an important medicinal plant used for the treatment of cough symptoms related to the respiratory system. The chloroplast genome of F. unibracteata var. wabuensis (GenBank accession no. KF769142) was assembled using the PacBio RS platform (Pacific Biosciences, Beverly, MA) as a circle sequence with 151 009 bp. The assembled genome contains 133 genes, including 88 protein-coding, 37 tRNA, and eight rRNA genes. This genome sequence will provide important resource for further studies on the evolution of Fritillaria genus and molecular identification of Fritillaria herbs and their adulterants. This work suggests that PacBio RS is a powerful tool to sequence and assemble chloroplast genomes. PMID:26370383

  20. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  1. Fatty acid esters of phloridzin induce apoptosis of human liver cancer cells through altered gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya V G Nair

    Full Text Available Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2'-O-glucoside is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2, growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK, cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs. These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enriched Chevon (Goat Meat Lowers Plasma Cholesterol Levels and Alters Gene Expressions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, control chevon (goat meat and omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon were obtained from goats fed a 50% oil palm frond diet and commercial goat concentrate for 100 days, respectively. Goats fed the 50% oil palm frond diet contained high amounts of α-linolenic acid (ALA in their meat compared to goats fed the control diet. The chevon was then used to prepare two types of pellets (control or enriched chevon that were then fed to twenty-male-four-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=10 in each group for 12 weeks to evaluate their effects on plasma cholesterol levels, tissue fatty acids, and gene expression. The