WorldWideScience

Sample records for alter carbon nitrogen

  1. Nitrogen deposition alters nitrogen cycling and reduces soil carbon content in low-productivity semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic N deposition poses a threat to European Mediterranean ecosystems. We combined data from an extant N deposition gradient (4.3–7.3 kg N ha−1 yr−1) from semiarid areas of Spain and a field experiment in central Spain to evaluate N deposition effects on soil fertility, function and cyanobacteria community. Soil organic N did not increase along the extant gradient. Nitrogen fixation decreased along existing and experimental N deposition gradients, a result possibly related to compositional shifts in soil cyanobacteria community. Net ammonification and nitrification (which dominated N-mineralization) were reduced and increased, respectively, by N fertilization, suggesting alterations in the N cycle. Soil organic C content, C:N ratios and the activity of β-glucosidase decreased along the extant gradient in most locations. Our results suggest that semiarid soils in low-productivity sites are unable to store additional N inputs, and that are also unable to mitigate increasing C emissions when experiencing increased N deposition. -- Highlights: •Soil organic N does not increase along the extant N deposition gradient. •Reduced N fixation is related to compositional shifts in soil cyanobacteria community. •Nitrogen cycling is altered by simulated N deposition. •Soil organic C content decrease along the extant N deposition gradient. •Semiarid soils are unable to mitigate CO2 emissions after increased N deposition. -- N deposition alters N cycling and reduces soil C content in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems

  2. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  3. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiene Maria Jesus

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis (SIA is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i freshly processed (control; preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii 15 and (iii 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv 15 and (v 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi 15 and (vii 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%, C(% and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls. We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets.

  4. Long-term reactive nitrogen loading alters soil carbon and microbial community properties in a subalpine forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Claudia M; Hall, Ed K.; Denef, Karolien; Baron, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition due to increased fossil fuel combustion and agricultural practices has altered global carbon (C) cycling. Additions of reactive N to N-limited environments are typically accompanied by increases in plant biomass. Soil C dynamics, however, have shown a range of different responses to the addition of reactive N that seem to be ecosystem dependent. We evaluated the effect of N amendments on biogeochemical characteristics and microbial responses of subalpine forest organic soils in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of how soils are affected by N amendments in subalpine ecosystems. We measured a suite of responses across three years (2011–2013) during two seasons (spring and fall). Following 17 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic (control mean 5.09, fertilized mean 4.68), and had lower %C (control mean 33.7% C, fertilized mean 29.8% C) and microbial biomass C by 22% relative to control plots. Shifts in biogeochemical properties in fertilized plots were associated with an altered microbial community driven by reduced arbuscular mycorrhizal (control mean 3.2 mol%, fertilized mean 2.5 mol%) and saprotrophic fungal groups (control mean 17.0 mol%, fertilized mean 15.2 mol%), as well as a decrease in N degrading microbial enzyme activity. Our results suggest that decreases in soil C in subalpine forests were in part driven by increased microbial degradation of soil organic matter and reduced inputs to soil organic matter in the form of microbial biomass.

  5. Key ecological responses to nitrogen are altered by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaver, T.L.; Clark, C.M.; Compton, J.E.; Vallano, D.; Talhelm, A. F.; Weaver, C.P.; Band, L.E.; Baron, J. S.; Davidson, E.A.; Tague, C.L.; Felker-Quinn, E.; Lynch, J.A.; Herrick, J.D.; Liu, L.; Goodale, C.L.; Novak, K. J.; Haeuber, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition are both important ecological threats. Evaluating their cumulative effects provides a more holistic view of ecosystem vulnerability to human activities, which would better inform policy decisions aimed to protect the sustainability of ecosystems. Our knowledge of the cumulative effects of these stressors is growing, but we lack an integrated understanding. In this Review, we describe how climate change alters key processes in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems related to nitrogen cycling and availability, and the response of ecosystems to nitrogen addition in terms of carbon cycling, acidification and biodiversity.

  6. Key ecological responses to nitrogen are altered by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaver, T. L.; Clark, C. M.; Compton, J. E.; Vallano, D.; Talhelm, A. F.; Weaver, C. P.; Band, L. E.; Baron, J. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Tague, C. L.; Felker-Quinn, E.; Lynch, J. A.; Herrick, J. D.; Liu, L.; Goodale, C. L.; Novak, K. J.; Haeuber, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Climate change and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition are both important ecological threats. Evaluating their cumulative effects provides a more holistic view of ecosystem vulnerability to human activities, which would better inform policy decisions aimed to protect the sustainability of ecosystems. Our knowledge of the cumulative effects of these stressors is growing, but we lack an integrated understanding. In this Review, we describe how climate change alters key processes in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems related to nitrogen cycling and availability, and the response of ecosystems to nitrogen addition in terms of carbon cycling, acidification and biodiversity.

  7. Directive Production of Pullulan by Altering Cheap Source of Carbons and Nitrogen at 5 L Bioreactor Level

    OpenAIRE

    Sheoran, Sunil K.; Kashyap Kumar Dubey; Tiwari, D. P.; Singh, Bhanu P.

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, attempts have been made to control the production of pullulan by supplementing commercial source of carbons and protein, timely. Pullulan production was regulated by supplying full fat soya flour and hydrolyzed soya extract, individually and in combination. Pullulan quantification was assayed for sensitivity to pullulanase. Aureobasidium pullulans was found to produce 125.7 gL−1 of pullulan. The rotation speed of shake flask, the pH of broth, and the supply of air were m...

  8. Nitrogen-doped hydrothermal carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; White, Robin J. [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; Zhao, Li [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon materials are now playing an important role in cutting edge innovations for energy conversion and storage technologies such as supercapacitors and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as well as in catalytic applications, adsorption and CO{sub 2} capture. The production of such materials using benign aqueous based processes, mild temperatures and renewable precursors is of great promise in addressing growing environmental concerns for cleaner power sources at a time of increasing global demand for energy. In this perspective, we show that nitrogen doped carbons prepared using sustainable processes such as ''Hydrothermal Carbonisation'' has advantages in many applications over the conventional carbons. We also summarize an array of synthetic strategies used to create such nitrogen doped carbons, and discuss the application of these novel materials. (orig.)

  9. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  10. Parasite infection alters nitrogen cycling at the ecosystem scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischler, John; Johnson, Pieter T J; McKenzie, Valerie J; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Despite growing evidence that parasites often alter nutrient flows through their hosts and can comprise a substantial amount of biomass in many systems, whether endemic parasites influence ecosystem nutrient cycling, and which nutrient pathways may be important, remains conjectural. A framework to evaluate how endemic parasites alter nutrient cycling across varied ecosystems requires an understanding of the following: (i) parasite effects on host nutrient excretion; (ii) ecosystem nutrient limitation; (iii) effects of parasite abundance, host density, host functional role and host excretion rate on nutrient flows; and (iv) how this infection-induced nutrient flux compares to other pools and fluxes. Pathogens that significantly increase the availability of a limiting nutrient within an ecosystem should produce a measurable ecosystem-scale response. Here, we combined field-derived estimates of trematode parasite infections in aquatic snails with measurements of snail excretion and tissue stoichiometry to show that parasites are capable of altering nutrient excretion in their intermediate host snails (dominant grazers). We integrated laboratory measurements of host nitrogen excretion with field-based estimates of infection in an ecosystem model and compared these fluxes to other pools and fluxes of nitrogen as measured in the field. Eighteen nitrogen-limited ponds were examined to determine whether infection had a measurable effect on ecosystem-scale nitrogen cycling. Because of their low nitrogen content and high demand for host carbon, parasites accelerated the rate at which infected hosts excreted nitrogen to the water column in a dose-response manner, thereby shifting nutrient stoichiometry and availability at the ecosystem scale. Infection-enhanced fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen were similar to other commonly important environmental sources of bioavailable nitrogen to the system. Additional field measurements within nitrogen-limited ponds indicated that

  11. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  12. Key ecological responses to nitrogen are altered by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we review the effects of nitrogen and climate (e.g. temperature and precipitation) on four aspects of ecosystem structure and function including hydrologic-coupled nitrogen cycling, carbon cycling, acidification and biodiversity.

  13. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  14. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Berg, Bjørn; Currie, W.S.;

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project “CarbonNitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems” (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C...... accumulation on N storage and release. Based on compiled databases on element pools and fluxes from several hundred forest sites, process studies in long-term nitrogen manipulation experiments and modelling efforts we estimated C sequestration and N retention in European forest soils. Further, we studied...... the impact of forest management on C sequestration, N retention and N leaching....

  15. Soil warming, carbon–nitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Butler, Sarah; Johnson, Jennifer,; Mohan, Jacqueline; Steudler, Paul; Lux, Heidi; Burrows, Elizabeth; Bowles, Francis; Smith, Rose; Scott, Lindsay; Vario, Chelsea; Hill, Troy; Burton, Andrew; Zhou, Yu-mei; Tang, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Soil warming has the potential to alter both soil and plant processes that affect carbon storage in forest ecosystems. We have quantified these effects in a large, long-term (7-y) soil-warming study in a deciduous forest in New England. Soil warming has resulted in carbon losses from the soil and stimulated carbon gains in the woody tissue of trees. The warming-enhanced decay of soil organic matter also released enough additional inorganic nitrogen into the soil solution to support the observ...

  16. Sequestration of Carbon in Mycorrhizal Fungi Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Turner, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are root symbionts that facilitate plant uptake of soil nutrients in exchange for plant carbohydrates. They grow in almost every terrestrial ecosystem on earth, form relationships with about 80% of plant species, and receive 10 to 20% of the carbon fixed by their host plants. As such, they could potentially sequester a significant amount of carbon in ecosystems. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would decrease carbon storage in mycorrhizal fungi, because plants should reduce investment of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi when nitrogen availability is high. We measured the abundance of two major groups of mycorrhizal fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, in control and nitrogen-fertilized plots within three boreal ecosystems of inland Alaska. The ecosystems represented different recovery stages following severe fire, and comprised a young site dominated by AM fungi, an old site dominated by ECM fungi, and an intermediate site co-dominated by both groups. Pools of mycorrhizal carbon included root-associated AM and ECM structures, soil-associated AM hyphae, and soil-associated glomalin. Glomalin is a glycoprotein produced only by AM fungi. It is present in the cell walls of AM hyphae, and then is deposited in the soil as the hyphae senesce. Nitrogen significantly altered total mycorrhizal carbon pools, but its effect varied by site (site * N interaction, P = 0.05). Under nitrogen fertilization, mycorrhizal carbon was reduced from 99 to 50 g C m2 in the youngest site, was increased from 124 to 203 g C m2 in the intermediate-aged site, and remained at 35 g C m2 in the oldest site. The changes in total mycorrhizal carbon stocks were driven mostly by changes in glomalin (site * N interaction, P = 0.05), and glomalin stocks were strongly correlated with AM hyphal abundance (P P = 0.001), as did root-associated ECM structures (P = 0.021). The amount of carbon sequestered within living mycorrhizal structures (0.013 to 0

  17. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  18. On The Cosmic Origins Of Carbon & Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C; Köppen, J

    2001-01-01

    We employ analytical and numerical chemical evolution models to study observed trends in abundance ratios involving carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Several sets of published stellar yields for both intermediate-mass and massive stars are considered, and the most appropriate sets are selected through the use of analytical models. These yields are then used in the numerical models to match observed data trends in C/O, N/O, and O/H. We conclude that the principal production site for carbon is massive stars, while that for nitrogen is intermediate-mass stars.

  19. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A Varotsos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of air pollution are inextricably linked to the mechanisms underlying the physicochemical functioning of the biosphere which together with the atmosphere, the cryosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere constitute the climate system. We herewith present a review of the achievements and unresolved problems concerning the modeling of the biochemical cycles of basic chemicals of the climate system, such as carbon and nitrogen. Although the achievements in this area can roughly describe the carbon and nitrogen cycles, serious problems still remain associated with the accuracy and precision of the processes and assessments employed in the relevant modeling.

  20. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  1. Warming alters coupled carbon and nutrient cycles in experimental streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanner J; Cross, Wyatt F; Benstead, Jonathan P; Gíslason, Gísli M; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Welter, Jill R

    2016-06-01

    Although much effort has been devoted to quantifying how warming alters carbon cycling across diverse ecosystems, less is known about how these changes are linked to the cycling of bioavailable nitrogen and phosphorus. In freshwater ecosystems, benthic biofilms (i.e. thin films of algae, bacteria, fungi, and detrital matter) act as biogeochemical hotspots by controlling important fluxes of energy and material. Understanding how biofilms respond to warming is thus critical for predicting responses of coupled elemental cycles in freshwater systems. We developed biofilm communities in experimental streamside channels along a gradient of mean water temperatures (7.5-23.6 °C), while closely maintaining natural diel and seasonal temperature variation with a common water and propagule source. Both structural (i.e. biomass, stoichiometry, assemblage structure) and functional (i.e. metabolism, N2 -fixation, nutrient uptake) attributes of biofilms were measured on multiple dates to link changes in carbon flow explicitly to the dynamics of nitrogen and phosphorus. Temperature had strong positive effects on biofilm biomass (2.8- to 24-fold variation) and net ecosystem productivity (44- to 317-fold variation), despite extremely low concentrations of limiting dissolved nitrogen. Temperature had surprisingly minimal effects on biofilm stoichiometry: carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios were temperature-invariant, while carbon:phosphorus (C:P) ratios declined slightly with increasing temperature. Biofilm communities were dominated by cyanobacteria at all temperatures (>91% of total biovolume) and N2 -fixation rates increased up to 120-fold between the coldest and warmest treatments. Although ammonium-N uptake increased with temperature (2.8- to 6.8-fold variation), the much higher N2 -fixation rates supplied the majority of N to the ecosystem at higher temperatures. Our results demonstrate that temperature can alter how carbon is cycled and coupled to nitrogen and phosphorus. The

  2. Can land use changes alter carbon, nitrogen and major ion transport in subtropical brazilian streams? Modificações no uso da terra podem alterar o transporte fluvial de carbono, nitrogênio e íons maiores?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mariano Lopes da Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies in tropical watersheds have evaluated the impact of urbanization and agricultural practices on water quality. In Brazil, savannas (known regionally as Cerrados represent 23% of the country's surface, representing an important share to the national primary growth product, especially due to intense agriculture. The purpose of this study is to present a comprehensive evaluation, on a yearly basis, of carbon, nitrogen and major ion fluxes in streams crossing areas under different land use (natural vegetation, sugar cane and eucalyptus in a savanna region of SE Brazil. Eucalyptus and sugar cane alter the transport of the investigated elements in small watersheds. The highest concentration of all parameters (abiotic parameters, ions, dissolved organic carbon DOC - and dissolved inorganic carbon - DIC were found in Sugar Cane Watersheds (SCW. The observed concentrations of major cations in Eucalyptus Watersheds (EW (Mg, Ca, K, Na, as well as DIN and DOC, were found frequently to be intermediate values between those of Savanna Watersheds (SW and SCW, suggesting a moderate impact of eucalyptus plantations on the streamwater. Same trends were found in relation to ion and nutrient fluxes, where the higher values corresponded to SCW. It is suggested that sugar cane plantations might be playing an important role in altering the chemistry of water bodies.Diversos estudos têm sido desenvolvidos em bacias de drenagem tropicais no intuito de avaliar o impacto da urbanização e das práticas agrícolas na qualidade dos corpos d'água. No Brasil, as savanas (conhecidas regionalmente como Cerrado representam 23% do território brasileiro, sendo uma região importante no crescimento nacional, especialmente devido às intensas atividades agrícolas. A finalidade deste trabalho é apresentar uma avaliação dos fluxos de carbono, nitrogênio e principais íons em córregos com diferentes usos do solo (vegetação, cana de açúcar e eucalipto em uma

  3. Carbon-nitrogen interactions and biomass partitioning of Carex rostrata grown at three levels of nitrogen supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Systematics

    1996-12-31

    Biomass and production of vascular plants constitutes a major source of carbon input in peatlands. As rates of decomposition vary considerably with depth, the vertical distribution of biomass may substantially affect accumulation of carbon in peatlands. Therefore, allocation patterns between shoot and roots are particularly important when considering carbon balance of peatland ecosystems. The stimulatory effect of increasing atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} or photosynthesis may increase availability of carbon to most C3 plants. Availability of nitrogen may also alter both due to increased atmospheric deposition and changer in mineralisation rates associated with climate change. Most root-shoot partitioning models predict that allocation of biomass is dependent of the availability and uptake of carbon and nitrogen. A decrease in supply of carbon would favour allocation to shoots and a decrease in supply of nitrogen would increase allocation to roots. At a cellular level, non structural carbohydrates and free amino acids are thought to represent the biochemically available fraction of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The aim of this work is study the long-term growth responses of Carex rostrata to changes in the availability of nitrogen. Special attention is paid to soluble sugars ant free amino acids, which may control partitioning of biomass. (10 refs.)

  4. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-22

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations.

  5. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a subtropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianru; Sun, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xu, Xingliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    In most soils, more than 90% nitrogen is bonded with carbon in organic forms. This indicates that carbon mineralization should be closely coupled with nitrogen mineralization, showing a positive correlation between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. To test this hypothesis above, we conducted an incubation using a subtropical soil for 10 days at 15 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled glucose and 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate was used to separate CO2 and mineral N released from mineralization of soil organic matter and added glucose or inorganic nitrogen. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and four exoenzymes (i.e. β-1,4- Glucosaminidase, chitinase, acid phosphatase, β-1,4-N- acetyl glucosamine glycosidase) were also analyzed to detect change in microbial activities during the incubation. Our results showed that CO2 release decreased with increasing nitrogen mineralization rates. Temperature did not change this relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Although some changes in PLFA and the four exoenzymes were observed, these changes did not contribute to changes in carbon and nitrogen mineralization. These findings indicates that carbon and nitrogen mineralization in soil are more complicated than as previously expected. Future investigation should focus on why carbon and nitrogen mineralization are coupled in a negative correlation not in a positive correlation in many soils for a better understanding of carbon and nitrogen transformation during their mineralization.

  6. Alteration of Oceanic Nitrification Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J.; Chow, C. E.; Popp, B. N.; Fuhrman, J. A.; Feng, Y.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing exponentially and expected to double by the year 2100. Dissolution of excess CO2 in the upper ocean reduces pH, alters carbonate chemistry, and also represents a potential resource for autotrophic organisms that convert inorganic carbon into biomass--including a broad spectrum of marine microbes. These bacteria and archaea drive global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen and constitute the vast majority of biomass in the sea, yet their responses to reduced pH and increased pCO2 remain largely undocumented. Here we show that elevated pCO2 may sharply reduce nitrification rates and populations of nitrifying microorganisms in the ocean. Multiple experiments were performed in the Sargasso Sea and the Southern California Bight under glacial maximum (193 ppm), present day (390 ppm), and projected (750 ppm) pCO2 concentrations, over time scales from hours to multiple days, and at depths of 45 m to 240 m. Measurement of nitrification rates using isotopically-labeled nitrogen showed 2-5 fold reduction under elevated pCO2--as well as an increase under glacial maximum pCO2. Marine Crenarchaeota are likely involved in nitrification as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, yet this group decreased by 40-80% under increased pCO2, based on quantification of both 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene copies. Crenarchaeota also steadily declined over the course of multiple days under elevated pCO2, whereas ammonia-oxidizing (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more variable in their responses or were not detected. These findings suggest that projected increases in pCO2 and subsequent decreases in pH may strongly influence marine biogeochemistry and microbial community structure in the sea.

  7. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley L Gallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a glass wastebasket. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction.

  8. Nitrogen restrictions buffer modeled interactions of water with the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Gerber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are coupled at multiple spatiotemporal scales and are crucial to carbon sequestration. Water related climate extremes, such as drought and intense precipitation, can substantially affect the carbon cycle. Meanwhile, nitrogen is a limiting resource to plant and has therefore the potential to alter the coupling of water and carbon cycles on land. Here we assess the effect of nitrogen limitation on the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to moisture anomalies using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's land surface model LM3V-N. We analyzed the response of three central carbon fluxes: net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP, the difference between NPP and Rh) and how these fluxes were altered under anomalies of the standardized precipitation and evapotranspiration index (SPEI). We found that globally, the correlations between each of the carbon flux and SPEI depended on the timescale and a strong legacy effect of SPEI anomalies on Rh. Consideration of nitrogen constraints reduced anomalies in carbon fluxes in response to extreme dry/wet events. This nitrogen-induced buffer constrained the growth of plants under wet extremes and allowed for enhanced growth during droughts. Extra gain of soil moisture from the downregulation of canopy transpiration by nitrogen limitation and shifts in the relative importance of water and nitrogen limitation during dry/wet extreme events are possible mechanisms contributing to the buffering of modeled NPP and NEP. Responses of Rh to moisture anomalies were much weaker compared to NPP, and N buffering effects were less evident.

  9. Intercropping enhances soil carbon and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wen-Feng; Hoffland, Ellis; Li, Long; Six, Johan; Sun, Jian-Hao; Bao, Xing-Guo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Van Der Werf, Wopke

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping, the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crop species in a single field, increases aboveground productivity due to species complementarity. We hypothesized that intercrops may have greater belowground productivity than sole crops, and sequester more soil carbon over time due to greater input of root litter. Here, we demonstrate a divergence in soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content over 7 years in a field experiment that compared rotational strip intercrop systems and ordinary crop rotations. Soil organic C content in the top 20 cm was 4% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in C sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 184 ± 86 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1). Soil organic N content in the top 20 cm was 11% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in N sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 45 ± 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Total root biomass in intercrops was on average 23% greater than the average root biomass in sole crops, providing a possible mechanism for the observed divergence in soil C sequestration between sole crop and intercrop systems. A lowering of the soil δ(15) N signature suggested that increased biological N fixation and/or reduced gaseous N losses contributed to the increases in soil N in intercrop rotations with faba bean. Increases in soil N in wheat/maize intercrop pointed to contributions from a broader suite of mechanisms for N retention, e.g., complementary N uptake strategies of the intercropped plant species. Our results indicate that soil C sequestration potential of strip intercropping is similar in magnitude to that of currently recommended management practises to conserve organic matter in soil. Intercropping can contribute to multiple agroecosystem services by increased yield, better soil quality and soil C sequestration.

  10. Properties of nitrogen containing diamond-like carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical and mechanical properties of nitrogen containing diamond- like carbon (NC-DLC) films deposited by RF plasma decomposition of CH4:H2:N2 gas mixture were investigated. Nitrogen was incorporated into DLC films both during film growth and after deposition of film by implantation of nitrogen ions. It was shown that both optical and mechanical properties of the films strongly depend on nitrogen content in the films. In some cases the mechanical properties of nitrogen implanted films were improved in comparison with unimplanted samples. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen evolution in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chiappini, C; Matteucci, F; Chiappini, Cristina; Romano, Donatella; Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the evolution of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in galaxies of different morphological type by adopting detailed chemical evolution models with different star formation histories (continuous star formation or starbursts). We start by computing chemical evolution models for the Milky Way with different stellar nucleosynthesis prescriptions. Then, a comparison between model results and ``key'' observational constraints allows us to choose the best set of stellar yields. Once the best set of yields is identified for the Milky Way, we apply the same nucleosynthesis prescriptions to other spirals (in particular M101) and dwarf irregular galaxies. We compare our model predictions with the [C,N,O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], log(C/O) vs. 12+ log(O/H), log(N/O) vs. 12+ log(O/H) and [C/O] vs. [Fe/H] relations observed in the solar vicinity, along the disk and in other galaxies. By taking into account the results obtained for all the studied galaxies (Milky Way, M101, dwarf galaxies and DLAs) our main conclusions are: a) on...

  12. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  13. Nitrogen deposition alters soil chemical properties and bacterial communities in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximei Zhang; Xingguo Han

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition has dramatically altered biodiversity and ecosystem functioning on the earth; however,its effects on soil bacterial community and the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not been thoroughly examined.Changes in ecosystems caused by nitrogen deposition have traditionally been attributed to increased nitrogen content.In fact,nitrogen deposition not only leads to increased soil total N content,but also changes in the NH4+-N content,NO3--N content and pH,as well as changes in the heterogeneity of the four indexes.The soil indexes for these four factors,their heterogeneity and even the plant community might be routes through which nitrogen deposition alters the bacterial community.Here,we describe a 6-year nitrogen addition experiment conducted in a typical steppe ecosystem to investigate the ecological mechanism by which nitrogen deposition alters bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.We found that various characteristics of the bacterial community were explained by different environmental factors.Nitrogen deposition decreased bacterial abundance that is positively related to soil pH value.In addition,nitrogen addition decreased bacterial diversity,which is negatively related to soil total N content and positively related to soil NO3--N heterogeneity.Finally,nitrogen.addition altered bacterial composition that is significantly related to soil NH4+-N content.Although nitrogen deposition significantly altered plant biomass,diversity and composition,these characteristics of plant community did not have a significant impact on processes of nitrogen deposition that led to alterations in bacterial abundance,diversity and composition.Therefore,more sensitive molecular technologies should be adopted to detect the subtle shifts of microbial community structure induced by the changes of plant community upon nitrogen deposition.

  14. Nitrogen/Sulfur-Codoped Carbon Materials from Chitosan for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Han, Xianlong; Chang, Xiaoqing; Yin, Wenchao; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-08-01

    d-Methionine and chitosan have been used for fabrication of nitrogen/sulfur-codoped carbon materials by a hydrothermal process followed by carbonization at 750°C for 3 h. The as-prepared carbon materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, combining electrical double-layer capacitance with pseudocapacitance owing to the doping with sulfur and nitrogen. The specific capacitance of the obtained carbon material reached 135 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1, which is much higher than undoped chitosan (67 F g-1). The capacitance retention of the carbon material was almost 97.2% after 5000 cycles at current density of 1 A g-1. With such improved electrochemical performance, the nitrogen/sulfur-codoped carbon material may have promising potential for use in energy-storage electrodes of supercapacitors.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen-functionalized carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kevin N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA; Christensen, Steven T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd Menlo Park CA 94023 USA; Dameron, Arrelaine A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Ngo, Chilan [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Dinh, Huyen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; Gennett, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy Golden CO 80401 USA; O' Hayre, Ryan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA; Pylypenko, Svitlana [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 1012 14th Street Golden CO 80401 USA

    2016-04-07

    Carbon materials are used in a diverse set of applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to catalysis. Nitrogen modification of carbon powders has shown to be an effective method for enhancing both surface and bulk properties of as-received material for a number of applications. Unfortunately, control of the nitrogen modification process is challenging and can limit the effectiveness and reproducibility of N-doped materials. Additionally, the assignment of functional groups to specific moieties on the surface of nitrogen-modified carbon materials is not straightforward. Herein, we complete an in-depth analysis of functional groups present at the surface of ion-implanted Vulcan and Graphitic Vulcan through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Our results show that regardless of the initial starting materials used, nitrogen ion implantation conditions can be tuned to increase the amount of nitrogen incorporation and to obtain both similar and reproducible final distributions of nitrogen functional groups. The development of a well-controlled/reproducible nitrogen implantation pathway opens the door for carbon supported catalyst architectures to have improved numbers of nucleation sites, decreased particle size, and enhanced catalyst-support interactions.

  16. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang K Kim

    Full Text Available We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Hanxu Ji; Feng Zhou; Jiangjiang Gu; Chen Shu; Kai Xi; Xudong Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalyti...

  18. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  19. The effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien Ming eEaslon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial higher plants are composed of roots and shoots, distinct organs that conduct complementary functions in dissimilar environments. For example, roots are responsible for acquiring water and nutrients such as inorganic nitrogen from the soil, yet shoots consume the majority of these resources. The success of such a relationship depends on excellent root-shoot communications. Increased net photosynthesis and decreased shoot nitrogen and water use at elevated CO2 fundamentally alter these source-sink relations. Lower than predicted productivity gains at elevated CO2 under nitrogen or water stress may indicate shoot-root signaling lacks plasticity to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The following presents recent research results on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling, emphasizing the influence that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are having on these source-sink interactions.

  20. In vivo measurements of nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon in genetically obese and lean pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristic gamma-rays are emitted promptly by elements during exposure to neutrons. These emissions enable a radioanalytical analysis of the body's composition of protein (nitrogen), water (hydrogen), and fat (carbon). We have used this method in vivo to determine the body composition of obese and lean pigs (10 to 20 kg body wt) fed an altered cholesterol diet. (author) 10 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Permafrost collapse alters soil carbon stocks, respiration, CH4 , and N2O in upland tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Jones, Jeremy B

    2015-12-01

    Release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost is potentially the largest terrestrial feedback to climate change and one of the most likely to occur; however, estimates of its strength vary by a factor of thirty. Some of this uncertainty stems from abrupt thaw processes known as thermokarst (permafrost collapse due to ground ice melt), which alter controls on carbon and nitrogen cycling and expose organic matter from meters below the surface. Thermokarst may affect 20-50% of tundra uplands by the end of the century; however, little is known about the effect of different thermokarst morphologies on carbon and nitrogen release. We measured soil organic matter displacement, ecosystem respiration, and soil gas concentrations at 26 upland thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Features included the three most common upland thermokarst morphologies: active-layer detachment slides, thermo-erosion gullies, and retrogressive thaw slumps. We found that thermokarst morphology interacted with landscape parameters to determine both the initial displacement of organic matter and subsequent carbon and nitrogen cycling. The large proportion of ecosystem carbon exported off-site by slumps and slides resulted in decreased ecosystem respiration postfailure, while gullies removed a smaller portion of ecosystem carbon but strongly increased respiration and N2 O concentration. Elevated N2 O in gully soils persisted through most of the growing season, indicating sustained nitrification and denitrification in disturbed soils, representing a potential noncarbon permafrost climate feedback. While upland thermokarst formation did not substantially alter redox conditions within features, it redistributed organic matter into both oxic and anoxic environments. Across morphologies, residual organic matter cover, and predisturbance respiration explained 83% of the variation in respiration response. Consistent differences between upland thermokarst types may contribute to the

  2. Permafrost collapse alters soil carbon stocks, respiration, CH4 , and N2O in upland tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Jones, Jeremy B

    2015-12-01

    Release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost is potentially the largest terrestrial feedback to climate change and one of the most likely to occur; however, estimates of its strength vary by a factor of thirty. Some of this uncertainty stems from abrupt thaw processes known as thermokarst (permafrost collapse due to ground ice melt), which alter controls on carbon and nitrogen cycling and expose organic matter from meters below the surface. Thermokarst may affect 20-50% of tundra uplands by the end of the century; however, little is known about the effect of different thermokarst morphologies on carbon and nitrogen release. We measured soil organic matter displacement, ecosystem respiration, and soil gas concentrations at 26 upland thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Features included the three most common upland thermokarst morphologies: active-layer detachment slides, thermo-erosion gullies, and retrogressive thaw slumps. We found that thermokarst morphology interacted with landscape parameters to determine both the initial displacement of organic matter and subsequent carbon and nitrogen cycling. The large proportion of ecosystem carbon exported off-site by slumps and slides resulted in decreased ecosystem respiration postfailure, while gullies removed a smaller portion of ecosystem carbon but strongly increased respiration and N2 O concentration. Elevated N2 O in gully soils persisted through most of the growing season, indicating sustained nitrification and denitrification in disturbed soils, representing a potential noncarbon permafrost climate feedback. While upland thermokarst formation did not substantially alter redox conditions within features, it redistributed organic matter into both oxic and anoxic environments. Across morphologies, residual organic matter cover, and predisturbance respiration explained 83% of the variation in respiration response. Consistent differences between upland thermokarst types may contribute to the

  3. Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-10

    Mixtures of phenols/ketones and urea show eutectic behavior upon gentle heating. These mixtures possess liquid-crystalline-like phases that can be processed. The architecture of phenol/ketone acts as structure-donating motif, while urea serves as melting-point reduction agent. Condensation at elevated temperatures results in nitrogen-containing carbons with remarkably high nitrogen content of mainly pyrazinic nature. PMID:26178584

  4. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  5. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  6. tert-Butanesulfinamides as Nitrogen Nucleophiles in Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Forming Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Hernandez, Johana; Chemla, Fabrice; Ferreira, Franck; Jackowski, Olivier; Oble, Julie; Perez-Luna, Alejandro; Poli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The use of tert-butanesulfinamides as nitrogen nucleophiles in carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions is reviewed. This field has grown in the shadow of the general interest in N-tert-butanesulfinyl imines for asymmetric synthesis and occupies now an important place in its own right in the chemistry of the chiral amine reagent tert-butanesulfinamide. This article provides an overview of the area and emphasizes recent contributions wherein the tert-butanesulfinamides act as chiral auxiliaries or perform as nitrogen donors in metal-catalyzed amination reactions. PMID:26931222

  7. Evolving Human Alteration of the Carbon Cycle: the Watershed Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Delaney Newcomb, K.; Newcomer Johnson, T.; Pennino, M. J.; Smith, R. M.; Beaulieu, J. J.; Belt, K.; Grese, M.; Blomquist, J.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Likens, G.; Mayer, P. M.; Murthy, S.; Utz, R.; Yepsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Watersheds experiencing land development are constantly evolving, and their biogeochemical signatures are expected to evolve across both space and time in drainage waters. We investigate how land development influences spatial and temporal evolution of the carbon cycle from small streams to major rivers in the Eastern U.S. Along the watershed continuum, we show that there is spatial evolution in: (1) the amount, chemical form, and bioavailability of carbon; (2) carbon retention/release at the reach scale; and (3) ecosystem metabolism of carbon from headwaters to coastal waters. Over shorter time scales, the interaction between land use and climate variability alters magnitude and frequency of carbon "pulses" in watersheds. Amounts and forms of carbon pulses in agricultural and urban watersheds respond similarly to climate variability due to headwater alteration and loss of ecosystem services to buffer runoff and temperature changes. Over longer time scales, land use change has altered organic carbon concentrations in tidal waters of Chesapeake Bay, and there have been increased bicarbonate alkalinity concentrations in rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. due to human activities. In summary, our analyses indicates that the form and reactivity of carbon have evolved over space and time along the watershed continuum with major implications for downstream ecosystem metabolism, biological oxygen demand, carbon dioxide production, and river alkalinization.

  8. Carbon dioxide capture by means of cyclic organic nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    García Abuín, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The research work included in present PhD Thesis involves the research studies to capture carbon dioxide using different cyclic nitrogen organic compounds (glucosamine (GA), chitosan (C), alkyl-pyrrolidones, pyrrolidine (PYR) and piperidine (PIP). This investigation is based on the study of three experimental systems. Each of them has characteristics potentially suitable to achieve the aim of this work, that is to say, to improve the carbon dioxide capture process, which is pre...

  9. Comparison of tillage treatments on greenhouse gas and soil carbon and nitrogen cycling in established winter wheat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillage is commonly used to control weeds and prepare fields for planting. Repeated tillage can result in soil drying, sudden bursts of mineralized carbon and nitrogen from soil organic matter, and alterations in soil microbial communities. The effects of tillage on winter wheat cropping systems an...

  10. XPS of nitrogen-containing functional groups on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.J.J.; Bekkum, van H.

    1995-01-01

    XPS is used to study the binding energy of the Cls, Nls and Ols photoelectrons of surface groups on several nitrogen-containing activated carbons. Specific binding energies are assigned to amide (399.9 eV). lactam and imidc (399.7 eV). pyridine (398.7 eV), pyrrole (400.7 eV), alkylamine. secondary a

  11. Intercropping enhances soil carbon and nitrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, W.; Hoffland, E.; Li, L.; Six, J.; Sun, J.H.; Bao, X.G.; Zhang, F.S.; Werf, van der W.

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping, the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crop species in a single field, increases aboveground productivity due to species complementarity. We hypothesized that intercrops may have greater belowground productivity than sole crops, and sequester more soil carbon over time due to greate

  12. Effects of Nitrogen Forms on Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation in Tomato Seedling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ti-da; SONG Shi-wei; CHI Ming-han; HUANG Dan-feng; K Iwasaki

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of organic nitrogen (N) is an important aspect of plant N assimilation and has potential application in sustainable agriculture. The aim of this study was to investigate the plant growth, C and N accumulation in leaves and roots of tomato seedlings in response to inorganic (NH4+-N, NO3--N) and organic nitrogen (Gly-N). Different forms of nitrogen (NH4+-N, NO3--N, Gly-N) were supplied to two tomato cultivars (Shenfen 918 and Huying 932) using a hydroponics system. The plant dry biomass, chlorophyll content, root activity, total carbon and nitrogen content in roots and leaves, and total N absorption, etc. were assayed during the cultivation. Our results showed that no significant differences in plant height, dry biomass, and total N content were found within the first 16 d among three treatments; however, significant differences in treatments on 24 d and 32 d were observed, and the order was NO3--N > GIy-N > NH4+-N. Significant differences were also observed between the two tomato cultivars. Chlorophyll contents in the two cultivars were significantly increased by the GIy-N treatment, and root activity showed a significant decrease in NH4+-N treatment. Tomato leaf total carbon content was slightly affected by different N forms; however, total carbon in root and total nitrogen in root and leaf were promoted significantly by inorganic and organic N. Among the applied N forms, the increasing effects of the NH4+-N treatment were larger than that of the Gly-N. In a word, different N resources resulted in different physiological effects in tomatoes. Organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) can be a proper resource of plant N nutrition. Tomatoes of different genotypes had different responses under organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) supplies.

  13. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2013-08-01

    Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG) for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1) daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2) competition among three plants functional types (PFTs), production and litter production of plants; (3) decomposition of peat; and (4) production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  14. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1 daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2 competition among three plants functional types (PFTs, production and litter production of plants; (3 decomposition of peat; and (4 production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  15. Carbon Nanomaterials Alter Global Gene Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Sara; Short, John C W; McDermott, Hyoeun; Linan, Alexander; Bartlett, Katelyn; Gadila, Shiva Kumar Goud; Schmelzle, Katie; Wanekaya, Adam; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), which include carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their derivatives, have diverse technological and biomedical applications. The potential toxicity of CNMs to cells and tissues has become an important emerging question in nanotechnology. To assess the toxicity of CNTs and fullerenol C60(OH)24, we in the present work used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the simplest eukaryotic organisms that share fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. We found that treatment with CNMs, regardless of their physical shape, negatively affected the growth rates, end-point cell densities and doubling times of CNM-exposed yeast cells when compared to unexposed cells. To investigate potential mechanisms behind the CNMs-induced growth defects, we performed RNA-Seq dependent transcriptional analysis and constructed global gene expression profiles of fullerenol C60(OH)24- and CNT-treated cells. When compared to non-treated control cells, CNM-treated cells displayed differential expression of genes whose functions are implicated in membrane transporters and stress response, although differentially expressed genes were not consistent between CNT- and fullerenol C60(OH)24-treated groups, leading to our conclusion that CNMs could serve as environmental toxic factors to eukaryotic cells. PMID:27483901

  16. The key role of metal dopants in nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sisi; Deng, Chengwei; Yao, Lan; Zhong, Hexiang; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Highly active non-precious metal catalysts based on nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel (NCX) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is prepared with resorcinol(R)-formaldehyde (F) resin as carbon precursor and NH3 as nitrogen source. NCX samples doped with various transition metal species are investigated to elucidate the effect of transition metals on the structure and ORR activity of the products. As-prepared NCX catalysts with different metals are characterized using nitrogen-adsorption analysis, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The structural properties and ORR activities of the catalysts are altered by addition of different metals, and NCX doped with iron exhibits the best ORR activity. Metal doping evidently promotes the formation of more micropores and mesopores. Raman and XPS studies reveal that iron, cobalt, and nickel can increase pyridinic-N contents and that iron can catalyse the formation of graphene structures and enhance quaternary-N contents. Whereas the total N-content does not determine ORR activity, Metal-N4/C-like species generated from the interaction of the metals with nitrogen and carbon atoms play important roles in achieving high ORR activity.

  17. Changes in soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus due to land-use changes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Groppo

    2015-02-01

    vegetation. The original vegetation soil phosphorus stocks were equal to 11, 22, and 43 kg ha−1 in the three soil depths, respectively. The soil phosphorus stocks increased in the CPS systems to 30, 50, and 63 kg ha−1, respectively, and in the pasture pair sites to 22, 47, and 68 kg ha−1, respectively. In the regional pasture survey, the soil phosphorus stocks were lower than in the native vegetation, and equal to 9 and 15 kg ha−1 at 0–10 and 0–30 depth layer. The findings of this paper illustrate that land-use changes that are currently common in Brazil alter soil concentrations, stocks and elemental ratios of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. These changes could have an impact on the subsequent vegetation, decreasing soil carbon, increasing nitrogen limitation, but alleviating soil phosphorus deficiency.

  18. Nitrogen Addition Altered the Effect of Belowground C Allocation on Soil Respiration in a Subtropical Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongxin; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Zhang, Fangyue

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil play an important role in soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. However, the variation in the soil respiration (Rs) and response of microbial community to the combined changes in belowground C and N inputs in forest ecosystems are not yet fully understood. Stem girdling and N addition were performed in this study to evaluate the effects of C supply and N availability on Rs and soil microbial community in a subtropical forest. The trees were girdled on 1 July 2012. Rs was monitored from July 2012 to November 2013, and soil microbial community composition was also examined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) 1 year after girdling. Results showed that Rs decreased by 40.5% with girdling alone, but N addition only did not change Rs. Interestingly, Rs decreased by 62.7% under the girdling with N addition treatment. The reducing effect of girdling and N addition on Rs differed between dormant and growing seasons. Girdling alone reduced Rs by 33.9% in the dormant season and 54.8% in the growing season compared with the control. By contrast, girdling with N addition decreased Rs by 59.5% in the dormant season and 65.4% in the growing season. Girdling and N addition significantly decreased the total and bacterial PLFAs. Moreover, the effect of N addition was greater than girdling. Both girdling and N addition treatments separated the microbial groups on the basis of the first principal component through principal component analysis compared with control. This indicated that girdling and N addition changed the soil microbial community composition. However, the effect of girdling with N addition treatment separated the microbial groups on the basis of the second principal component compared to N addition treatment, which suggested N addition altered the effect of girdling on soil microbial community composition. These results suggest that the increase in soil N availability by N deposition alters the effect of

  19. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in thermally heated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M.; Vennelakanti, S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally heated sediment environments, such as are found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park, host fully functional microbial ecosystems. As with any ecosystem, both sources and sinks of carbon, nitrogen, and a myriad of other nutrients and energy-driving factors must be supplied. While we know microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse, we know little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in sediments and biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that the four best studied carbon fixation pathways [Calvin, reverse tricarboxylic acid, acetyl-CoA, 3-hydroxypropionate cycles] may all be functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Microcosm experiments using biofilms from this hot spring as inoculae with 13C labeled carbon substrates indicate heterotrophic growth [2]. In addition, metagenomic analysis of environmental DNA has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [3]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [4, 5]. Of particular interest is the role of individuals in carbon and nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions suitable for chemosynthetic and photosynthetic growth vary. This study explores the diversity of cbbM/cbbL [Calvin cycle], aclB/oor/porA [rTCA cycle], nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. The transition of genetic diversity within sediments and biofilms is focused on the chemosynthetic

  20. Short-term fertilizer application alters phenotypic traits of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsen, Anna K.; Han, Shery; Rekret, Phil; Rentschler, Christine S.; Heath, Katy D.; Stinchcombe, John R

    2015-01-01

    Fertilizer application is a common anthropogenic alteration to terrestrial systems. Increased nutrient input can impact soil microbial diversity or function directly through altered soil environments, or indirectly through plant-microbe feedbacks, with potentially important effects on ecologically-important plant-associated mutualists. We investigated the impacts of plant fertilizer, containing all common macro and micronutrients on symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), a group of ba...

  1. Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somasundar, K.; Rajendran, A.; DileepKumar, M.; SenGupta, R.

    and nitrogen budgets have been estimated for the Arabian Sea (0- 25 °N, 50-80°E), taking into consideration the possible sources of fluxes. By our model calculations the annual fluxes into and out of the Arabian Sea were estimated to be 446 and 530 trillion...) were obtained from Brewer and Dyrssen (1985 ) and Papaud and Poisson (1986), respectively. The details of the data and their sources are given in Table 1. The methods of calculating the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen are discussed below. RESULTS...

  2. Changes in soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus due to land-use changes in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppo, J. D.; Lins, S. R. M.; Camargo, P. B.; Assad, E. D.; Pinto, H. S.; Martins, S. C.; Salgado, P. R.; Evangelista, B.; Vasconcellos, E.; Sano, E. E.; Pavão, E.; Luna, R.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2015-08-01

    run. The main cause of the increase in soil phosphorus stocks in the CPS and pastures of the plot-level paired site seems to be linked to phosphorus fertilization by mineral and organics fertilizers. The findings of this paper illustrate that land-use changes that are currently common in Brazil alter soil concentrations, stocks and elemental ratios of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. These changes could have an impact on the subsequent vegetation, decreasing soil carbon and increasing nitrogen limitation but alleviating soil phosphorus deficiency.

  3. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  4. [Interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil labile carbon and nitrogen and greenhouse gas emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng-Hao; Wang, Nan; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Kang-Li; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A 3 x 2 factorial design of microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and nitrogen (N(mic)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), mineral nitrogen (NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N), and greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. Results showed that straw amendment remarkably increased the numbers of bacterivorous nematodes and the contents of Cmic and Nmic, but Cmic and Nmic decreased with the increasing dose of nitrogen fertilization. The effects of bacterivorous nematodes strongly depended on either straw or nitrogen fertilization. The interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilization and bacterivorous nematodes on soil DOC, DON and mineral nitrogen were strong. Straw and nitrogen fertilization increased DOC and mineral nitrogen contents, but their influences on DON depended on the bacterivorous nematodes. The DOC and mineral nitrogen were negatively and positively influenced by the bacterivorous nematodes, re- spectively. Straw significantly promoted CO2 and N2O emissions but inhibited CH4 emission, while interactions between nematodes and nitrogen fertilization on emissions of greenhouse gases were obvious. In the presence of straw, nematodes increased cumulative CO2 emissions with low nitrogen fertilization, but decreased CO2 and N2O emissions with high nitrogen fertilization on the 56th day after incubation. In summary, mechanical understanding the soil ecological process would inevitably needs to consider the roles of soil microfauna.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  6. Field Emission Properties of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon thin films are deposited on the ceramic substrates coated with Ti film by using direct current magnetron sputtering technique at N2 and Ar gas mixture atmosphere during deposition. The field emission properties of the deposited films have been investigated. The threshold field as low as 5.93V/μm is obtained and the maximum current density increases from 4μA/cm2 to 20.67μA/cm2 at 10.67V/μm comparing with undoped amorphous film. The results show that nitrogen doping plays an important role in field emission of amorphous carbon thin films.

  7. Recombination pumped atomic nitrogen and carbon afterglow lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that lasing of atomic nitrogen and carbon can be obtained during the afterglow of an electrical discharge in gas mixtures of either neon or helium containing low partial pressures of N/sub 2/ or CO. In addition, the neon-nitrogen laser has recently been pumped directly by nuclear radiation. Microwave quenching experiments have shown conclusively that the afterglow lasers are being pumped directly by the recombination of electron-ion pairs. This result differs from the mechanisms previously proposed for these systems. Measurements comparing the relative sensitivity to the electron temperature of the neon to atomic nitrogen and carbon afterglow light infer that the recombination process pumping these lasers is collisional-radiative, allowing the recombining ions to be identified as N/sup +/ and C/sup +/. Since this process is highly compatible with nuclear-radiation generated plasmas, it is not unreasonable to infer that this process is also the pumping mechanism in the nuclear-excited, neon-nitrogen laser.

  8. Wettability and biocompatibility of nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon films: Effect of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films have been applied in biomedical fields as potential biocompatible materials with wettability that can be adjusted by doping with other elements, including F, Si, Ti, O and N. In this study, nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:N) films were deposited by PIII-D using C2H2 + N2 gas mixtures. The biocompatibility and anti-thrombotic properties of the films were assessed in vitro. The surface morphology and surface wettability of the films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact angle method. The results show no cytotoxicity for all films, and films with appropriate nitrogen doping possess much better endothelial cell growth and anti-thrombotic properties

  9. Carbon - Nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems. Final report

    OpenAIRE

    Gundersen, P.; Berg, B.; Currie, W. S.; Dise, N.B.; Emmett, B.A.; Gauci, V.; M. Holmberg; Kjønaas, O. J.; Mol-Dijkstra, J. P.; Salm, van der, C.; Schmidt, I. K.; A. Tietema; Wessel, W.W.; L. S. Vestgarden; Akselsson, C.

    2006-01-01

    Databases on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes and pools in European forests were compiled for 400 sites and explored thoroughly to create empirical models that predict C accumulation and N retention/nitrate leaching from N input, climate, and ecosystem characteristics. For nitrate leaching, analyses show that there is a threshold N deposition of 8-10 kg N/ha/yr below which almost no leaching occurs. The important parameters that determine N leaching (and thus N retention) are: N deposition,...

  10. Mathematical Model of Prediction of Nitrogen Pickup in Nitriding Process of Low Carbon Ferromanganese

    OpenAIRE

    Ghali, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Low carbon ferromanganese was nitrided through gas-solid reaction. The nitriding process has been carried out on lab scale at temperature range 800°C–950°C at different nitrogen pressures. Temperature, time, and partial nitrogen pressure of nitriding process of fine low carbon ferromanganese were investigated. Nitrogen content, in weight percent, was more than 9%. MATLAB software was used to derive mathematical model to predict nitrogen content as a function of temperature and nitrogen pressu...

  11. On The Cosmic Origins Of Carbon And Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C; Köppen, J

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of N/O and C/O abundance ratios as a function of metallicity as gauged by O/H in large, extant Galactic and extragalactic H II region abundance samples. Numerical chemical evolution models are computed using published stellar yields implied by comparing analytical models to the observations. Our results suggest that carbon and nitrogen originate from separate production sites and are decoupled from one another. Massive stars (M>8M_sun) dominate the production of carbon, while intermediate-mass stars between 4 and 8 solar masses, with a characteristic ejection delay time of 250 Myr after their formation, dominate nitrogen production. Carbon production is positively sensitive to metallicity through mass loss processes in massive stars and has a pseudo-secondary character. Nitrogen production in intermediate mass stars is primary at low metallicity, but clearly secondary (and perhaps tertiary) when 12+log(O/H)>8.3. The observed flat behavior of N/O versus O/H in metal-poor galaxies is exp...

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation Rates in Salt Marshes in Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  13. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  14. The electrical transport properties of nitrogen doped carbon microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four samples of nitrogen-doped carbon microspheres were synthesised using a horizontal chemical vapour deposition process. Characterization of the samples using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed spherical graphitic carbon microparticles with substitutional nitrogen in the lattice structure. The average diameter of the microspheres was 1.7 μm. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was also used as a technique to measure the percentage of substitutional nitrogen in each sample. This was determined to be 3.4% in two of the samples and 1.7% in the other two. Temperature dependent electrical transport measurements were performed on the samples and resistance measurements showed clear semiconducting behaviour in two of the samples and a transition from metallic to semiconducting behaviour in the other two samples. IV characteristics measurements display curves with increasing non-linearity as temperature decreases in two samples and saturation behaviour is seen at higher temperatures in the other two samples. An anomaly is present in the IV characteristics at 300 K in all samples. A combination of fluctuation induced tunnelling and electronphonon scattering is used to model the data. These models provide a satisfactory description of the data for both the IV characteristics and the resistance measurements. - Highlights: • Nitrogen doped carbon spheres were synthesised using a horizontal CVD technique. • SEM, EPR, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis was successful. • Electrical transport measurements (resistance and IV characteristics) were done. • Variable temperature resistance measurements showed the samples conducted via FIT. • This result was confirmed with variable temperature IV characteristics

  15. Nitrogen deposition enhances carbon sequestration by plantations in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Du

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N deposition and its ecological effects on forest ecosystems have received global attention. Plantations play an important role in mitigating climate change through assimilating atmospheric CO2. However, the mechanisms by which increasing N additions affect net ecosystem production (NEP of plantations remain poorly understood. A field experiment was initialized in May 2009, which incorporated additions of four rates of N (control (no N addition, low-N (5 g N m⁻² yr⁻¹, medium-N (10 g N m⁻² yr⁻¹, and high-N (15 g N m⁻² yr⁻¹ at the Saihanba Forestry Center, Hebei Province, northern China, a locality that contains the largest area of plantations in China. Net primary production (NPP, soil respiration, and its autotrophic and heterotrophic components were measured. Plant tissue carbon (C and N concentrations (including foliage, litter, and fine roots, microbial biomass, microbial community composition, extracellular enzyme activities, and soil pH were also measured. N addition significantly increased NPP, which was associated with increased litter N concentrations. Autotrophic respiration (AR increased but heterotrophic respiration (HR decreased in the high N compared with the medium N plots, although the HR in high and medium N plots did not significantly differ from that in the control. The increased AR may derive from mycorrhizal respiration and rhizospheric microbial respiration, not live root respiration, because fine root biomass and N concentrations showed no significant differences. Although the HR was significantly suppressed in the high-N plots, soil microbial biomass, composition, or activity of extracellular enzymes were not significantly changed. Reduced pH with fertilization also could not explain the pattern of HR. The reduction of HR may be related to altered microbial C use efficiency. NEP was significantly enhanced by N addition, from 149 to 426.6 g C m⁻² yr⁻¹. Short-term N addition may

  16. Tracking Nonpoint Source Nitrogen and Carbon in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.; Duan, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have altered nitrogen and carbon cycles in rivers regionally with important impacts on coastal ecosystems. Nonpoint source nitrogen pollution is a leading contributor to coastal eutrophication and hypoxia. Shifts in sources of carbon impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants in coastal zones. We used a combination of stable isotopes and optical tracers to investigate fate and transport of nitrogen and carbon sources in tributaries of the largest estuary in the U.S., the Chesapeake Bay. We analyzed isotopic composition of water samples from major tributaries including the Potomac River, Susquehanna River, Patuxent River, and Choptank River during routine and storm event sampling over multiple years. A positive correlation between δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- in the Potomac River above Washington D.C. suggested denitrification or biological uptake in the watershed was removing agriculturally-derived N during summer months. In contrast, the Patuxent River in Maryland showed elevated δ15N-NO3- (5 - 12 per mil) with no relationship to δ18O-NO3- suggesting the importance of wastewater sources. From the perspective of carbon sources, there were distinct isotopic values of the δ13C-POM of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMS) for rivers influenced by their dominant watershed land use. EEMS showed that there were increases in the humic and fulvic fractions of dissolved organic matter during spring floods, particularly in the Potomac River. Stable isotopic values of δ13C-POM also showed rapid depletion suggesting terrestrial carbon "pulses" in the Potomac River each spring. The δ15N-POM peaked to 10 - 15 per mil each spring suggested a potential manure source or result of biological processing within the watershed. Overall, there were considerable changes in sources and transformations of nitrogen and carbon that varied across rivers and that contribute to nitrogen and carbon loads

  17. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  18. Soil microbial community and its interaction with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics following afforestation in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Cheng, Xiaoli; Hui, Dafeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ming; Zhang, Quanfa

    2016-01-15

    Afforestation may alter soil microbial community structure and function, and further affect soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Here we investigated soil microbial carbon and nitrogen (MBC and MBN) and microbial community [e.g. bacteria (B), fungi (F)] derived from phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis in afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) and adjacent croplands in central China. Relationships of microbial properties with biotic factors [litter, fine root, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and inorganic N], abiotic factors (soil temperature, moisture and pH), and major biological processes [basal microbial respiration, microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2), net N mineralization and nitrification] were developed. Afforested soils had higher mean MBC, MBN and MBN:TN ratios than the croplands due to an increase in litter input, but had lower MBC:SOC ratio resulting from low-quality (higher C:N ratio) litter. Afforested soils also had higher F:B ratio, which was probably attributed to higher C:N ratios in litter and soil, and shifts of soil inorganic N forms, water, pH and disturbance. Alterations in soil microbial biomass and community structure following afforestation were associated with declines in basal microbial respiration, qCO2, net N mineralization and nitrification, which likely maintained higher soil carbon and nitrogen storage and stability.

  19. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Libault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2. In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  20. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  1. Carbon and Nitrogen Requirement of Colletotrichum Gloeosporioides Penz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Srivastava

    1967-04-01

    Full Text Available Effect of various carbon and nitroged compounds on the growth ahe sporulatice of Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes Penz., is lated from diseased leaves of Manihot utilissima Pohl. (a plant of great economic value for its starchy tuberous roots, was studied in liquid cultures. Of the various carbon compounds used starch, glycrine, sucrose and maltose supported good growth of the organism. Fructose, glucose and gala ctose were comparatively poor supporteds while lactose supported least growth of the organism. The sporulation of the fungus fungus was satisfactory on all the carbon sources used in the investigation, best being on starh, Comparatively poor sporulation was recorded on fructose and galactose. Among organic sources of nitrogen, which were better utilized by the fungus than inorganic ones, tryptophane, aspartic acid and asparagin showed good growth of fungs. Among inorgonic sources potassium nitrate was the best. No growth was recorded on sodium nitrite. There was no correlation between the sporulation and growth of the fungus in relation to the source from which nitrogen was obtained.

  2. Carbon-nitrogen feedbacks in the UVic ESCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wania

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A representation of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle is introduced into the UVic Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM. The UVic ESCM now contains five terrestrial carbon pools and seven terrestrial nitrogen pools: soil, litter, leaves, stem and roots for both elements and ammonium and nitrate in the soil for nitrogen. Nitrogen cycles through plant tissue, litter, soil and the mineral pools before being taken up again by the plant. Biological N2 fixation and nitrogen deposition represent external inputs to the plant-soil system while losses occur via leaching. Simulated carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes are in the range of other models and observations. Gross primary production (GPP for the 1990s in the CN-coupled version is 129.6 Pg C a−1 and net C uptake is 0.83 Pg C a−1, whereas the C-only version results in a GPP of 133.1 Pg C a−1 and a net C uptake of 1.57 Pg C a−1. At the end of a transient experiment for the years 1800–1999, where radiative forcing is held constant but CO2 fertilisation for vegetation is permitted to occur, the CN-coupled version shows an enhanced net C uptake of 1.05 Pg C a−1, whereas in the experiment where CO2 is held constant and temperature is transient the land turns into a C source of 0.60 Pg C a−1 by the 1990s. The arithmetic sum of the temperature and CO2 effects is 0.45 Pg C a−1, 0.38 Pg C a−1 lower than seen in the fully forced model, suggesting a strong nonlinearity in the CN-coupled version. Anthropogenic N deposition has a positive effect on Net Ecosystem Production of 0.35 Pg C a−1. Overall, the UVic CN-coupled version shows similar characteristics to other CN-coupled Earth System Models, as measured by net C balance and sensitivity to changes in climate, CO2 and temperature.

  3. Variations in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Cryoconite is biogenic surface dust on snow and ice, and is commoly observed on glaciers worldwide. Because of their dark coloration, cryoconite substantially reduce surface albedo and accelerate melting of glaciers. Therefore, it is important to understand formation process of cryoconite to evaluate its effect on glacier melting. Although cryoconite consists of mineral particles and organic matter, organic fraction is more important in terms of albedo effect because it is usually darker color and accounts for major part of cryoconite in volume. The organic matter is derived from photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria, and/or from windblown organic matter from ground soil around glaciers. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes of the organic matter could be useful to know their sources and to understand their cycles on glaciers. In this study, I analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of cryoconite collected from 6 sites of different elevation from May to September on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier) to know their spatial and seasonal variations. I also analyze those collected from glaciers in Asia and Arctic to compare them among different geographical locations. Results on the Alaska glacier show that C and N stable isotopes of cryoconite organic mater significantly varied among elevations and seasons. C isotope was generally higher in lower elevation, probably due to higher photosynthetic activity in the lower elevation. In contrast, N isotope was constant on the ice area, but was lower in the snow area where the red snow algae were blooming. N isotope may be reflective of nitrogen availavility on the glacier surface. Geograpical comparison shows large variations in C and N isotopes among regions: higher C and N isotopes on Asian glaciers, lower C and N isotopes in Alaska, and lower C and higher N isotopes on Arctic glaciers. The isotope values suggest that algal production is a major carbon source on most of glaciers, but their productivity

  4. Nanoscale High Energetic Materials: A Polymeric Nitrogen Chain N8 Confined inside a Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Hu, Anguang; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Song, Yanfeng; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2008-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of a new hybrid material, nanostructured polymeric nitrogen, where a polymeric nitrogen chain is encapsulated in a carbon nanotube. The electronic and structural properties of the new system are studied by means of ab initio electronic structure and molecular dynamics calculations. Finite temperature simulations demonstrate the stability of this nitrogen phase at ambient pressure and room temperature using carbon nanotube confinement. This nanostructured confinement may open a new path towards stabilizing polynitrogen or polymeric nitrogen at ambient conditions.

  5. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon from Camellia oleifera shells with enhanced electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunbo; Xu, Bibo; Zhu, Yun; Qing, Renpeng; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen doped porous activated carbon was prepared by annealing treatment of Camellia oleifera shell activated carbon under NH3. We found that nitrogen content of activated carbon up to 10.43 at.% when annealed in NH3 at 800 °C. At 600 °C or above, the N-doped carbon further reacts with NH3, leads to a low surface area down to 458 m(2)/g and low graphitization degree. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that the nitrogen functional groups on the nitrogen-doped activated carbons (NACs) were mostly in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. We discovered that the oxygen groups and carbon atoms at the defect and edge sites of graphene play an important role in the reaction, leading to nitrogen atoms incorporated into the lattice of carbon. When temperatures were lower than 600 °C the nitrogen atoms displaced oxygen groups and formed nitrogen function groups, and when temperatures were higher than 600 °C and ~4 at.% carbon atoms and part of oxygen function groups reacted with NH3. When compared to pure activated carbon, the nitrogen doped activated carbon shows nearly four times the capacitance (191 vs 51 F/g).

  6. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  7. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  8. Carbon/Nitrogen Imbalance Associated with Drought-Induced Leaf Senescence in Sorghum bicolor

    OpenAIRE

    Daoqian Chen; Shiwen Wang; Binglin Xiong; Beibei Cao; Xiping Deng

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress triggers mature leaf senescence, which supports plant survival and remobilization of nutrients; yet leaf senescence also critically decreases post-drought crop yield. Drought generally results in carbon/nitrogen imbalance, which is reflected in the increased carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio in mature leaves, and which has been shown to be involved in inducing leaf senescence under normal growth conditions. Yet the involvement of the carbon/nitrogen balance in regulation of drought-i...

  9. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in early stages of forest litter decomposition as affected by nitrogen addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiao-wen; LIU Ying; HAN Shi-jie

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) availability and tree species on the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen at early stage of decomposition of forest litter were studied in a 13-week laboratory incubation experiment. Fresh litter samples including needle litter (Pinus koraiensis) and two types of broadleaf litters (Quercus mongolica and Tilia amurensis) were collected from a broadleaf-korean pine mixed forest in the northern slope of Changbai Mountain (China). Different doses of N (equal to 0, 30 and 50 kg·ha-1yr-1, respectively, as NH4NO3) were added to litter during the experiment period. The litter decomposition rate expressed as mass loss and respiration rate increased significantly with increasing N availability. The mass loss and cumulative CO2-C emission were higher in leaf litter compared to that in needle litter. The dissolved organic Carbon (DOC) concentrations in litter leachate varied widely between the species, but were not greatly affected by N treatments. Regardless of the N addition rate, both N treatments and species had no significant effect on dissolved organic N (DON) concentrations in litter leachate. About 52·78% of added N was retained in the litter. The percentage of N retention was positively correlated (R2=0.91, p<0.05) with the litter mass loss. This suggested that a forest floor with easily decomposed litter might have higher potential N sink strength than that with more slowly decomposed litter.

  10. Changes in soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus due to land-use changes in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppo, J. D.; Lins, S. R. M.; Camargo, P. B.; Assad, E. D.; Pinto, H. S.; Martins, S. C.; Salgado, P. R.; Evangelista, B.; Vasconcellos, E.; Sano, E. E.; Pavão, E.; Luna, R.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    , respectively. In the regional pasture survey, the soil phosphorus stocks were lower than in the native vegetation, and equal to 9 and 15 kg ha-1 at 0-10 and 0-30 depth layer. The findings of this paper illustrate that land-use changes that are currently common in Brazil alter soil concentrations, stocks and elemental ratios of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. These changes could have an impact on the subsequent vegetation, decreasing soil carbon, increasing nitrogen limitation, but alleviating soil phosphorus deficiency.

  11. Synthesis of polybenzoxazine based nitrogen-rich porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Liu; Wang, Jianlong; Feng, Chong; Sun, Yahui; Li, Kaixi

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-rich porous carbons (NPCs) were synthesized from 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene, urea, and formaldehyde based on benzoxazine chemistry by a soft-templating method with KOH chemical activation. They possess high surface areas of 856.8-1257.8 m2 g-1, a large pore volume of 0.15-0.65 cm3 g-1, tunable pore structure, high nitrogen content (5.21-5.32 wt%), and high char yields. The amount of the soft-templating agent F127 has multiple influences on the textural and chemical properties of the carbons, affecting the surface area and pore structure, impacting the compositions of nitrogen species and resulting in an improvement of the CO2 capture performance. At 1 bar, high CO2 uptake of 4.02 and 6.35 mmol g-1 at 25 and 0 °C was achieved for the sample NPC-2 with a molar ratio of F127 : urea = 0.010 : 1. This can be attributed to its well-developed micropore structure and abundant pyridinic nitrogen, pyrrolic nitrogen and pyridonic nitrogen functionalities. The sample NPC-2 also exhibits a remarkable selectivity for CO2/N2 separation and a fast adsorption/desorption rate and can be easily regenerated. This suggests that the polybenzoxazine-based NPCs are desirable for CO2 capture because of possessing a high micropore surface area, a large micropore volume, appropriate pore size distribution, and a large number of basic nitrogen functionalities.Nitrogen-rich porous carbons (NPCs) were synthesized from 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene, urea, and formaldehyde based on benzoxazine chemistry by a soft-templating method with KOH chemical activation. They possess high surface areas of 856.8-1257.8 m2 g-1, a large pore volume of 0.15-0.65 cm3 g-1, tunable pore structure, high nitrogen content (5.21-5.32 wt%), and high char yields. The amount of the soft-templating agent F127 has multiple influences on the textural and chemical properties of the carbons, affecting the surface area and pore structure, impacting the compositions of nitrogen species and resulting in an improvement of the

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Urban Landscapes: Global, Regional Dynamics and Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirejeva-Hopkins, A.; Nardoto, G. B.; Schellnhuber, H.

    2008-12-01

    The urban population has been growing rapidly in the last decades and is predicted to continue its exponential trend, especially in the developing countries, which would create additional pressure on the environment by overpopulated unsustainable cities and will continue to substantially change the main Biogeochemical cycles. Such disturbances in the main driving cycle of the Biosphere (global carbon cycle) and the nitrogen cycle, induced by sprawling urban human activities, lead to global, regional and local environmental problems, i.e. global warming, photochemical smog, stratospheric ozone depletion, soil acidification, nitrate pollution of surface and ground water, coastal ecosystem disturbances. Since urban areas are expected to continue their rapid expansion in the 21st century, accompanied by growing energy production, increased food demand, expanding transportation and industrialization it becomes more and more important to be able to describe and forecast the dynamics of biogeochemical functioning of these landscapes (which have altered characteristics compared to the natural ecosystems). Moreover, from the environmental policy perspective, a high density of people makes cities focal points of vulnerability to global environmental change. The model based on the forecasting the dynamics of urban area growth, allows us to forecast the dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen on the urban territories at different scales. However, nitrogen cycle is very complex and is closely interlinked with the other major biogeochemical cycles, such as oxygen and water. The system of water supply and liquid waste carried by water out of the system 'city' is investigated. In order to better understand the mechanisms of cycling, we consider the case studies, when we investigated the detailed fluxes of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sao Paolo (Brazil) and Paris (France). When we know the yearly amounts of carbon and nitrogen, produced by a city, we should be capable of coming up with what

  13. Sources and Transformations of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Potomac River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S.; Murthy, S.

    2011-12-01

    Urbanization has altered the transport of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in river ecosystems, making it important to understand how rivers are responding to these increased inputs of C and N. This study examines the capacity of a major tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, the Potomac River, to transform N and C inputs from the world's largest advanced wastewater treatment facility (Washington D.C. Water and Sewer Authority). Surface water and effluent samples were collected monthly for one year, along longitudinal transects of the Potomac River. Water samples were analyzed for the major dissolved and particulate forms of C and N. Nitrate stable isotopes were used to trace the fate of wastewater nitrate, as well as how other nitrate sources vary downriver. Sources of carbon downriver were traced using fluorescence spectroscopy, excitation emission matrices (EEMs), and PARAFAC modeling. Historical influent and effluent data on C and N levels were also compared with regional population growth data, climate change data, and long-term interannual records of C and N levels within downstream stations along the Potomac River. Improvements in treatment technology over the past two decades have shown significant decreases in effluent nitrogen levels, with corresponding decreases overtime of nutrients at downstream sampling stations. Levels of nitrate show increases within the vicinity of the wastewater treatment outfall, but decrease rapidly downstream, potentially indicating nutrient uptake and/or denitrification. Total organic carbon levels show a smaller decrease downstream, resulting in an increase in the C:N ratio downstream. Longitudinal river chemistry data also show that dissolved inorganic nitrogen goes down while total organic nitrogen goes up with distance downriver, indicating biological transformations are taking place along the river. Preliminary data from fluorescence EEMs suggested that more humic-like organic matter is important above the wastewater treatment plant

  14. Studies on organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous in the sediments of Mandovi Estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nasnolkar, C.M.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Sediment organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and hydrography of the overlying waters of the estuarine region in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India have been studied. The relationship of carbon and nutrients with sediment characteristics...

  15. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility

  16. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  17. Carbon and nitrogen stock and fluxes in coastal Atlantic Forest of southeast Brazil: potential impacts of climate change on biogeochemical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela, D M; Mattos, E A de; Pinto, A S; Vieira, S A; Martinelli, L A

    2012-08-01

    The Atlantic Forest is one of the most important biomes of Brazil. Originally covering approximately 1.5 million of km², today this area has been reduced to 12% of its original size. Climate changes may alter the structure and the functioning of this tropical forest. Here we explore how increases in temperature and changes in precipitation distribution could affect dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in coastal Atlantic Forest of the southeast region of Brazil The main conclusion of this article is that the coastal Atlantic Forest has high stocks of carbon and nitrogen above ground, and especially, below ground. An increase in temperature may transform these forests from important carbon sinks to carbon sources by increasing loss of carbon and nitrogen to the atmosphere. However, this conclusion should be viewed with caution because it is based on limited information. Therefore, more studies are urgently needed to enable us to make more accurate predictions.

  18. Transgenic poplar expressing the pine GS1a show alterations in nitrogen homeostasis during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Rueda, Juan Jesús; Kirby, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    Transgenic hybrid poplars engineered to express ectopically the heterologous pine cytosolic GS1a display a number of significant pleiotropic phenotypes including enhanced growth, enhanced nitrogen use efficiency, and resistance to drought stress. The present study was undertaken in order to assess mechanisms whereby ectopic expression of pine GS1a in transgenic poplars results in enhanced agronomic phenotypes. Microarray analysis using the Agilent Populus whole genome array has allowed identification of genes differentially expressed between wild type (WT) and GS transgenics in four tissues (sink leaves, source leaves, stems, and roots) under three growth conditions (well-watered, drought, and recovery). Analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes in functional categories related to nitrogen metabolism show a trend of significant down-regulation in GS poplars compared to the WT, including genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases. The down-regulation of these genes was verified using qPCR, and downstream effects were further tested using NR activity assays. Results suggest that higher glutamine levels in GS transgenics regulate nitrate uptake and reduction. Transcript levels of nitrogen-related genes in leaves, including GS/GOGAT cycle enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, GABA shunt enzymes, photorespiration enzymes, asparagine synthetase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PII, were also assessed using qPCR revealing significant differences between GS poplars and the WT. Moreover, metabolites related to these differentially expressed genes showed alterations in levels, including higher levels of GABA, hydroxyproline, and putrescine in the GS transgenic. These alterations in nitrogen homeostasis offer insights into mechanisms accounting for drought tolerance observed in GS poplars. PMID:26113157

  19. Carbon and Nitrogen Contents in Typical Plants and Soil Profiles in Yanqi Basin of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Juan; WANG Xiu-jun; WANG Jia-ping; WANG Wei-xia

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are the most important elements in the terrestrial ecosystem. Studying carbon and nitrogen distributions in plant and soil is important for our understanding of the ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle on arid lands. A study was conducted in a typical arid area, the Yanqi Basin, Northwest China. Carbon and nitrogen distributions in plant tissues and soil proifles were determined at 21 sites with typical native plants and crops. Our results indicated that carbon content was similar between crops and native plants, and the average carbon contents in aboveground (42.4%) and belowground (42.8%) tissues were almost the same. Average nitrogen contents in crops were nearly the same (~0.7%) in aboveground and belowground tissues whereas mean nitrogen content was approximately 100% higher in aboveground (2.2%) than in belowground (1.2%) tissues for native species. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in cropland (9.4 and 0.9 g kg-1) were signiifcantly higher than those in native land (6.2 and 0.7 g kg-1). Multiple regression analyses indicated that carbon content in belowground tissue and nitrogen content in aboveground tissue were key factors connecting plant and soil in native land. However, there was no signiifcant relationship for carbon or nitrogen between soil and crop, which might relfect human disturbance, such as plowing and applications of various organic materials.

  20. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage.

  1. Soil nitrogen and carbon impacts of raising chickens on pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryals, R.; Leach, A.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Galloway, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Chicken is the most consumed meat in the US, and production continues to intensify rapidly around the world. Chicken manure from confined feeding operations is typically applied in its raw form to nearby croplands, resulting in hotspots of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Pasture-raised chicken is an alternative to industrial production and is growing in popularity with rising consumer demand for more humanely raised protein sources. In this agricultural model, manure is deposited directly onto grassland soils where it is thought to increase pools of soil carbon and nitrogen. The fate of manure nitrogen from pasture-raised chicken production remains poorly understood. We conducted a controlled, replicated experiment on a permaculture farm in Charlottesville, Virginia (Timbercreek Organics) in which small chicken coops (10 ft x 12 ft) were moved daily in a pasture. We measured manure deposition rates, soil inorganic nitrogen pools, soil moisture, and soil N2O and CO2 emissions. Measurements were made for the 28-day pasture life of three separate flocks of chickens in the spring, summer, and fall. Each flock consisted of approximately 200-300 chickens occupying three to five coops (~65 chickens/coop). Measurements were also made in paired ungrazed control plots. Manure deposition rates were similar across flocks and averaged 1.5 kgdrywt ha-1 during the spring grazing event and 4.0 kgdrywt ha-1 during the summer and fall grazing events. Manure deposition was relatively constant over the four weeks pasture-lifetime of the chickens. Compared to control plots, grazed areas exhibited higher soil N2O and CO2 fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes diminished significantly over the four-week span. Soil gas fluxes significantly increased following rainfall events. For a given rainfall event, higher fluxes were observed from transects that were grazed more recently. Soil gaseous reactive nitrogen losses were less in this pasture system compared to cultivated field amended

  2. Short and long-term impacts of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Du, E.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon to nitrogen response of forest ecosystems depends on the possible occurrence of nitrogen limitation versus possible co-limitations by other drivers, such as low temperature or availability of phosphorus. A combination of nitrogen retention estimates and stoichiometric scaling is used to i

  3. Controllable-nitrogen doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes as novel carbon support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, P.L.; Hsu, C.H.; Wu, H.M.; Hsu, W.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Kuo, D. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Novel nitrogen-doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes composite (NC-CNT) (N/C ratio 3.3-14.3 wt.%) as catalyst support has been prepared using aniline as a dispersant to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and as a source for both carbon and nitrogen coated on the surface of the CNTs, where the amount of doped nitrogen is controllable. The NC-CNT so obtained were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 1.5-2.0 nm) was then anchored on the surface of NC-CNT by using aromatic amine as a stabilizer. For these Pt/NC-CNTs, cyclic voltammogram measurements show a high electrochemical activity surface area (up to 103.7 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commercial E-TEK catalyst (55.3 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). In single cell test, Pt/NC-CNT catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in mass activity compared with that of E-TEK. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Does canopy nitrogen uptake enhance carbon sequestration by trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Richard K F; Perks, Micheal P; Weatherall, Andrew; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    Temperate forest (15) N isotope trace experiments find nitrogen (N) addition-driven carbon (C) uptake is modest as little additional N is acquired by trees; however, several correlations of ambient N deposition against forest productivity imply a greater effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition than these studies. We asked whether N deposition experiments adequately represent all processes found in ambient conditions. In particular, experiments typically apply (15) N to directly to forest floors, assuming uptake of nitrogen intercepted by canopies (CNU) is minimal. Additionally, conventional (15) N additions typically trace mineral (15) N additions rather than litter N recycling and may increase total N inputs above ambient levels. To test the importance of CNU and recycled N to tree nutrition, we conducted a mesocosm experiment, applying 54 g N/(15) N ha(-1)  yr(-1) to Sitka spruce saplings. We compared tree and soil (15) N recovery among treatments where enrichment was due to either (1) a (15) N-enriched litter layer, or mineral (15) N additions to (2) the soil or (3) the canopy. We found that 60% of (15) N applied to the canopy was recovered above ground (in needles, stem and branches) while only 21% of (15) N applied to the soil was found in these pools. (15) N recovery from litter was low and highly variable. (15) N partitioning among biomass pools and age classes also differed among treatments, with twice as much (15) N found in woody biomass when deposited on the canopy than soil. Stoichiometrically calculated N effect on C uptake from (15) N applied to the soil, scaled to real-world conditions, was 43 kg C kg N(-1) , similar to manipulation studies. The effect from the canopy treatment was 114 kg C kg N(-1) . Canopy treatments may be critical to accurately represent N deposition in the field and may address the discrepancy between manipulative and correlative studies. PMID:26391113

  5. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur metabolism in natural Thioploca samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S.; Kuenen, JG; Nielsen, LP;

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Thioploca occur as dense mats on the continental shelf off the coast of Chile and Peru. Since little is known about their nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, this study was undertaken to investigate their (eco)physiology. Thioploca is able to store...... internally high concentrations of sulfur globules and nitrate. It has been previously hypothesized that these large vacuolated bacteria can oxidize sulfide by reducing their internally stored nitrate. We examined this nitrate reduction by incubation experiments of washed Thioploca sheaths,vith trichomes in......) mg of protein(-1). The ammonium and sulfate production rates were not influenced by the addition of sulfide, suggesting that sulfide is first oxidized to elemental sulfur, and in a second independent step elemental sulfur is oxidized to sulfate. The average sulfide oxidation rate measured was 5 nmol...

  6. Carbon and nitrogen trade-offs in biomass energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucek, Lidija; Klemes, Jiri Jaromir [University of Pannonia, Centre for Process Integration and Intensification (CPI" 2), Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, Veszprem (Hungary); Kravanja, Zdravko [University of Maribor, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Maribor (Slovenia)

    2012-06-15

    This contribution provides an overview of carbon (CFs) and nitrogen footprints (NFs) concerning their measures and impacts on the ecosystem and human health. The adversarial relationship between them is illustrated by the three biomass energy production applications, which substitute fossil energy production applications: (i) domestic wood combustion where different fossil energy sources (natural gas, coal, and fuel oil) are supplemented, (ii) bioethanol production from corn grain via the dry-grind process, where petrol is supplemented, and (iii) rape methyl ester production from rape seed oil via catalytic trans-esterification, where diesel is supplemented. The life cycle assessment is applied to assess the CFs and NFs resulting from different energy production applications from 'cradle-to-grave' span. The results highlighted that all biomass-derived energy generations have lower CFs and higher NFs whilst, on the other hand, fossil energies have higher CFs and lower NFs. (orig.)

  7. Early Galactic Evolution of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Israelian, G; Rebolo, R; Rebolo, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    We present results on carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances for a sample of unevolved metal-poor stars with metallicities in the range -0.3[Fe/H]>-3.0, the [O/Fe] ratio increases from approximately 0 to 1. We find a good agreement between abundances based on the forbidden line, the OH and IR triplet lines when gravities based on Hipparcos} parallaxes are considered for the sample stars. Gravities derived from LTE ionization balance in metal-poor stars with [Fe/H]< -1 are likely too low, and could be responsible for an underestimation of the oxygen abundances derived using the [OI] line. [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] ratios appear to be constant, independently of metallicity, in the same range. However, they show larger scatter than oxygen at a given metallicity, which could reflect the larger variety of stellar production sites for these other elements.

  8. Current-voltage characteristics of carbon nanotubes with substitutional nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaun, C.C.; Larade, B.; Mehrez, H.;

    2002-01-01

    We report ab initio analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of carbon nanotubes with nitrogen substitution doping. For zigzag semiconducting tubes, doping with a single N impurity increases current flow and, for small radii tubes, narrows the current gap. Doping a N impurity per nanotube...... unit cell generates a metallic transport behavior. Nonlinear I-V characteristics set in at high bias and a negative differential resistance region is observed for the doped tubes. These behaviors can be well understood from the alignment/mis-alignment of the current carrying bands in the nanotube leads...... due to the applied bias voltage. For a armchair metallic nanotube, a reduction of current is observed with substitutional doping due to elastic backscattering by the impurity....

  9. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  10. Low Carbon Costs of Nitrogen Fixation in Tropical Dry Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Legume tree species with the ability to fix nitrogen (N) are highly diverse and widespread across tropical forests but in particular in the dry tropics. Their ecological success in lower latitudes has been called a "paradox": soil N in the tropics is thought to be high, while acquiring N through fixation incurs high energetic costs. However, the long held assumptions that N fixation is limited by photosynthate and that N fixation penalizes plant productivity have rarely been tested, particularly in legume tree species. We show results from three different experiments where we grew eleven species of tropical dry forest legumes. We quantified plant biomass and N fixation using nodulation and the 15N natural isotope abundance (Ndfa or nitrogen derived from fixation). These data show little evidence for costs of N fixation in seedlings grown under different soil fertility, light regimes, and with different microbial communities. Seedling productivity did not incur major costs because of N fixation: indeed, the average slope between Ndfa and biomass was positive (range in slopes: -0.03 to 0.3). Moreover, foliar N, which varied among species, was tightly constrained and not correlated with Ndfa. This finding implies that legume species have a target N that does not change depending on N acquisition strategies. The process of N fixation in tropical legumes may be more carbon efficient than previously thought. This view is more consistent with the hyperabundance of members of this family in tropical ecosystems.

  11. Particulate organic carbon and nitrogen export from major Arctic rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Raymond, P. A.; Striegl, R. G.; Zhulidov, A. V.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.; Tank, S. E.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Staples, R.; Gurtovaya, T. Y.; Griffin, C. G.

    2016-05-01

    Northern rivers connect a land area of approximately 20.5 million km2 to the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas. These rivers account for ~10% of global river discharge and transport massive quantities of dissolved and particulate materials that reflect watershed sources and impact biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. In this paper, multiyear data sets from a coordinated sampling program are used to characterize particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) export from the six largest rivers within the pan-Arctic watershed (Yenisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, Yukon, Kolyma). Together, these rivers export an average of 3055 × 109 g of POC and 368 × 109 g of PN each year. Scaled up to the pan-Arctic watershed as a whole, fluvial export estimates increase to 5767 × 109 g and 695 × 109 g of POC and PN per year, respectively. POC export is substantially lower than dissolved organic carbon export by these rivers, whereas PN export is roughly equal to dissolved nitrogen export. Seasonal patterns in concentrations and source/composition indicators (C:N, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N) are broadly similar among rivers, but distinct regional differences are also evident. For example, average radiocarbon ages of POC range from ~2000 (Ob') to ~5500 (Mackenzie) years before present. Rapid changes within the Arctic system as a consequence of global warming make it challenging to establish a contemporary baseline of fluvial export, but the results presented in this paper capture variability and quantify average conditions for nearly a decade at the beginning of the 21st century.

  12. Cellular Composition Changes and Nitrogen Uptake under Extra-Limited Nitrogen Conditions by Thermosynechococcus sp. CL-1 Carbon Biofixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of culture systems were used (continuous and batch which were fed using a simulated absorbent from a scrubber with carbonate/bicarbonate as the carbon source and nitrate as the nitrogen source by a thermophile strain, Thermosynechococcus sp. CL-1 (TCL-1 at 50°C. The lipid, carbohydrate, and protein cellular components which can be used as bioenergy precursors along with their content as a function of various C/N ratios are quantified. Maximum lipid productivity of about 150 mg L−1 d−1 is obtained while the CO2 uptake rate is 917 mg L−1 d−1 at a dilution rate of 0.06 h−1 when both carbon and nitrogen sources are not limited. With high range of nitrogen concentrations batch culture test, TCL-1 reveals extra-high affinity on nitrogen source under limited carbon source conditions since the affinity constant is 0.12 mM. In addition, the flow of carbon fixed during photosynthesis seems to switch from the protein synthesis pathway to forming carbohydrate rather than lipid under N-limitation and a high C/N ratio for TCL-1, resulting in a maximal carbohydrate content of 61%. Consequently, TCL-1 is an appropriate candidate to treat the wastewater of environment and produce the bioenergy precursors under extreme limited nitrogen conditions.

  13. Earth's early atmosphere as seen from carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of Archean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Carr, L. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere has long been a topic of great interest but determination of actual compositions over geologic time is a difficult problem. However, recent systematic studies of stromatolite deposits (Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group) has extended our knowledge of Archean ecosystems. It has been shown that many stromatolite deposits have undergone negligible alteration since their time of formation. The discovery of primary fluid inclusions within unaltered 3.5 b.y. old Archiean sediments and the observation that the 3.3 b.y. old Barberton cherts have remained closed to argon loss and have not been subjected to thermal metamorphism suggests that an opportunity exists for the direct measurement of the volatile constituents present at their time of formation. Of primary interest to this study was the possibility that the stromatolites and other Archean sediments might retain a vestige of the atmosphere and thus afford an indication of the variations in carbon dioxide and nitrogen isotopic compositions with time. A suite of essentially unaltered Archean stromatolites and the cherts of different ages and geologic sites have been analyzed for their trapped carbon dioxide and nitrogen compositions by the stepped combustion extraction tech nique utilizing static mass spectrometers for the isotope measurements.

  14. Tillage and manure effects on soil and aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Mikha, M.M.; Rice, C W

    2004-01-01

    Metadata only record This study assesses the impacts of tillage methods (conventional(CT) versus no-tillage(NT)) and nitrogen source (fertilizer(F) versus manure(M)) on soil aggregate size and the associated soil carbon and nitrogen. They find that both no-tillage and manure increase soil aggregate size, with the combination of the two producing the greatest soil aggregation. Likewise, there was greater total carbon and nitrogen in the soil for the no-tillage and manure treatments.

  15. Soil Inorganic Nitrogen and Microbial biomass Carbon and Nitrogen Under Pine Plantations in Zhanggutai Sandy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhan-Yuan; CHEN Fu-Sheng; ZENG De-Hui; ZHAO Qiong; CHEN Guang-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen (NH+4-N and NO-3N) and microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) under 30-year-old fenced Pinus sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SF), unfenced P. sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SUF), and unfenced Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zucc. (DUF) plantations in the Zhanggutai sandy soil of China were studied during Apr. to Oct. 2004 by the in situ closed-top core incubation method. All mentioned C and N indices in each stand type fluctuated over time. The ranges of inorganic N, Cmic, and Nmic contents in the three stand types were 0.7-2.6, 40.0-128.9, and 5.4-15.2 μg g-1, respectively. The average contents of soil NH+4-N and Cmic under the three 30-year-old pine plantations were not different. However, soil NO-3-N and total inorganic N contents decreased in the order of SUF > SF > DUF, the Nmic content was in the order of SF = SUF > DUF, and the Cmic:Nmic ratio was in the order of SUF = DUF > SF. Seasonal variations were observed in soil inorganic N, microbial biomass, and plant growth. These seasonal variations had certain correlations with microbe and plant N use in the soil, and their competition for NH+4-N was mostly regulated by soil N availability. The influence of tree species on inorganic N and Nmic were mainly because of differences in litter quality. Lack of grazing decreased the Cmic:N ratio owing to decreased carbon output and increased the ability of soil to supply N. The soil N supply under the P. sylvestris var. mongolica plantation was lower than under the P. densiflora plantation.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  17. Plant hydraulic responses to long-term dry season nitrogen deposition alter drought tolerance in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Santiago, Louis S; Vourlitis, George L; Grantz, David A; Allen, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition represents a significant N input for many terrestrial ecosystems. N deposition can affect plants on scales ranging from photosynthesis to community composition, yet few studies have investigated how changes in N availability affect plant water relations. We tested the effects of N addition on plant water relations, hydraulic traits, functional traits, gas exchange, and leaf chemistry in a semi-arid ecosystem in Southern California using long-term experimental plots fertilized with N for over a decade. The dominant species were Artemisia california and Salvia mellifera at Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and Adenostoma fasciculatum and Ceanothus greggii at Sky Oaks Field Station. All species, except Ceanothus, showed increased leaf N concentration, decreased foliar carbon to N ratio, and increased foliar N isotopic composition with fertilization, indicating that added N was taken up by study species, yet each species had a differing physiological response to long-term N addition. Dry season predawn water potentials were less negative with N addition for all species except Adenostoma, but there were no differences in midday water potentials, or wet season water potentials. Artemisia was particularly responsive, as N addition increased stem hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf carbon isotopic composition, and decreased wood density. The alteration of water relations and drought resistance parameters with N addition in Artemisia, as well as Adenostoma, Ceanothus, and Salvia, indicate that N deposition can affect the ability of native Southern California shrubs to respond to drought. PMID:27017604

  18. Plant hydraulic responses to long-term dry season nitrogen deposition alter drought tolerance in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Santiago, Louis S; Vourlitis, George L; Grantz, David A; Allen, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition represents a significant N input for many terrestrial ecosystems. N deposition can affect plants on scales ranging from photosynthesis to community composition, yet few studies have investigated how changes in N availability affect plant water relations. We tested the effects of N addition on plant water relations, hydraulic traits, functional traits, gas exchange, and leaf chemistry in a semi-arid ecosystem in Southern California using long-term experimental plots fertilized with N for over a decade. The dominant species were Artemisia california and Salvia mellifera at Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and Adenostoma fasciculatum and Ceanothus greggii at Sky Oaks Field Station. All species, except Ceanothus, showed increased leaf N concentration, decreased foliar carbon to N ratio, and increased foliar N isotopic composition with fertilization, indicating that added N was taken up by study species, yet each species had a differing physiological response to long-term N addition. Dry season predawn water potentials were less negative with N addition for all species except Adenostoma, but there were no differences in midday water potentials, or wet season water potentials. Artemisia was particularly responsive, as N addition increased stem hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf carbon isotopic composition, and decreased wood density. The alteration of water relations and drought resistance parameters with N addition in Artemisia, as well as Adenostoma, Ceanothus, and Salvia, indicate that N deposition can affect the ability of native Southern California shrubs to respond to drought.

  19. Exogenous nutrients and carbon resource change the responses of soil organic matter decomposition and nitrogen immobilization to nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wan, Song-Ze; Fang, Xiang-Min; Wang, Fang-Chao; Chen, Fu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether exogenous nutrients and carbon (C) additions alter substrate immobilization to deposited nitrogen (N) during decomposition. In this study, we used laboratory microcosm experiments and (15)N isotope tracer techniques with five different treatments including N addition, N+non-N nutrients addition, N+C addition, N+non-N nutrients+C addition and control, to investigate the coupling effects of non-N nutrients, C addition and N deposition on forest floor decomposition in subtropical China. The results indicated that N deposition inhibited soil organic matter and litter decomposition by 66% and 38%, respectively. Soil immobilized (15)N following N addition was lowest among treatments. Litter (15)N immobilized following N addition was significantly higher and lower than that of combined treatments during the early and late decomposition stage, respectively. Both soil and litter extractable mineral N were lower in combined treatments than in N addition treatment. Since soil N immobilization and litter N release were respectively enhanced and inhibited with elevated non-N nutrient and C resources, it can be speculated that the N leaching due to N deposition decreases with increasing nutrient and C resources. This study should advance our understanding of how forests responds the elevated N deposition. PMID:27020048

  20. Nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system treating high nitrate nitrogen organic pharmaceutical wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 段送华; 陈垚; 胡斌

    2009-01-01

    The nitrate nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system was discussed in treating pharmaceutical wastewater with high nitrogen and refractory organic concentration. The results show that the granularity of fillings,pH,volume ratios of iron-carbon and gas-water,and HRT. have significant effects on the nitrogen removal efficiency of iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system. The iron-carbon micro-electrolysis system has a good removal efficiency of pharmaceutical wastewater with high nitrogen and refractory organic concentration when the influent TN,NH4+-N,NO3--N and BOD5/CODCr are 823 mg/L,30 mg/L,793 mg/L and 0.1,respectively,at the granularity of iron and carbon 0.425 mm,pH 3,iron-carbon ratio 3,gas-water ratio 5,HRT 1.5 h,and the removal rates of TN,NH4+-N and NO3--N achieve 51.5%,70% and 50.94%,respectively.

  1. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  2. Predicted phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hantao; Yao, Sanxi; Widom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Noting the structural relationships between phases of carbon and boron carbide with phases of boron nitride and boron subnitride, we investigate their mutual solubilities using a combination of first-principles total energies supplemented with statistical mechanics to address finite temperatures. Thus we predict the solid-state phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen (B-C-N). Owing to the large energy costs of substitution, we find that the mutual solubilities of the ultrahard materials diamond and cubic boron nitride are negligible, and the same for the quasi-two-dimensional materials graphite and hexagonal boron nitride. In contrast, we find a continuous range of solubility connecting boron carbide to boron subnitride at elevated temperatures. An electron-precise ternary compound B13CN consisting of B12 icosahedra with NBC chains is found to be stable at all temperatures up to melting. It exhibits an order-disorder transition in the orientation of NBC chains at approximately T =500 K. We also propose that the recently discovered binary B13N2 actually has composition B12.67N2 .

  3. Importance of Nitrogen Availability on Land Carbon Sequestration in Northern Eurasia during the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicklighter, D. W.; Melillo, J. M.; Monier, E.; Sokolov, A. P.; Lu, X.; Zhuang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition, nitrogen fixation, and the application of nitrogen fertilizers provide subsidies to land ecosystems that can increase nitrogen availability for vegetation production and thereby influence land carbon dynamics. In addition, enhanced decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) from warming soils and permafrost degradation may also increase nitrogen availability in Northern Eurasia. Here, we examine how changes in nitrogen availability may influence land carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century by comparing results for a "business as usual" scenario (the IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways or RCP 8.5) and a stabilization scenario (RCP 4.5) between a version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model that does not consider the effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, nitrogen fixation and soil thermal dynamics on land carbon dynamics (TEM 4.4) and a version that does consider these dynamics (TEM 6.0). In these simulations, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, nitrogen fixation, and fertilizer applications provide an additional 3.3 Pg N (RCP 4.5) to 3.9 Pg N (RCP 8.5) to Northern Eurasian ecosystems over the 21st century. Land ecosystems retain about 38% (RCP4.5) to 48% (RCP 8.5) of this nitrogen subsidy. Net nitrogen mineralization estimated by TEM 6.0 provide an additional 1.0 Pg N to vegetation than estimated by TEM 4.4 over the 21st century from enhanced decomposition of SOM including SOM formerly protected by permafrost. The enhanced nitrogen availability in TEM 6.0 allows Northern Eurasian ecosystems to sequester 1.8x (RCP 8.5) to 2.4x (RCP 4.5) more carbon over the 21st century than estimated by TEM 4.4. Our results indicate that consideration of nitrogen subsidies and soil thermal dynamics have a large influence on how simulated land carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia will respond to future changes in climate, atmospheric chemistry, and disturbances.

  4. Nitrogen feedbacks increase future terrestrial ecosystem carbon uptake in an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wårlind, D.; Smith, B.; Hickler, T.; Arneth, A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently a considerable amount of effort has been put into quantifying how interactions of the carbon and nitrogen cycle affect future terrestrial carbon sinks. Dynamic vegetation models, representing the nitrogen cycle with varying degree of complexity, have shown diverging constraints of nitrogen dynamics on future carbon sequestration. In this study, we use LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic vegetation model employing a detailed individual- and patch-based representation of vegetation dynamics, to evaluate how population dynamics and resource competition between plant functional types, combined with nitrogen dynamics, have influenced the terrestrial carbon storage in the past and to investigate how terrestrial carbon and nitrogen dynamics might change in the future (1850 to 2100; one representative "business-as-usual" climate scenario). Single-factor model experiments of CO2 fertilisation and climate change show generally similar directions of the responses of C-N interactions, compared to the C-only version of the model as documented in previous studies using other global models. Under an RCP 8.5 scenario, nitrogen limitation suppresses potential CO2 fertilisation, reducing the cumulative net ecosystem carbon uptake between 1850 and 2100 by 61%, and soil warming-induced increase in nitrogen mineralisation reduces terrestrial carbon loss by 31%. When environmental changes are considered conjointly, carbon sequestration is limited by nitrogen dynamics up to the present. However, during the 21st century, nitrogen dynamics induce a net increase in carbon sequestration, resulting in an overall larger carbon uptake of 17% over the full period. This contrasts with previous results with other global models that have shown an 8 to 37% decrease in carbon uptake relative to modern baseline conditions. Implications for the plausibility of earlier projections of future terrestrial C dynamics based on C-only models are discussed.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for "green" Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Pengfei; Cong, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Yi, Qinghua; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Considering the environment protection, "green" materials are increasingly explored for photovoltaics. Here, we developed a kind of quantum dots solar cell based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots were prepared by direct pyrolysis of citric acid and ammonia. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots' excitonic absorption depends on the N-doping content in the carbon dots. The N-doping can be readily modified by the mass ratio of reactants. The constructed "green" nitrogen-doped carbon dots solar cell achieves the best power conversion efficiency of 0.79 % under AM 1.5 G one full sun illumination, which is the highest efficiency for carbon dot-based solar cells. PMID:26781285

  6. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg N ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N ha−1 yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. DON loss from SB and CP was not much higher than from unpolluted forests, and its relative contribution to TDN leaching was mainly determined by

  7. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders, Belgium, under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. The relative contribution to TDN leaching from DON loss from SB and CP was mainly determined by (large differences in DIN leaching. The large TDN leaching

  8. Grassland Degradation Alters Soil Carbon Turnover through Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, C.; Prober, S. M.; Chappell, A.; Farrell, M.; Baldock, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem degradation is widespread and changes in aboveground plant communities alter belowground soil processes. In Australia, grassy eucalyptus woodlands dominated by kangaroo grasses (Themeda trianda) were widely cleared during European settlement for agriculture, with only fragments remaining of this now threatened ecosystem. As remnant grassland fragments are used for livestock grazing, Themeda transitions through states of degradation, starting with red grasses (Bothriochloa spp) and then proceeding to less productive, increasingly degraded states dominated by either annual exotic weeds or native wallaby grasses (Rytidosperma spp) and spear grasses (Austrastipa spp). The aim of our experiment was to determine how soil organic matter dynamics (including erosion, root biomass, C storage and turnover) have been altered by the transition from deeply-rooted Themeda grass systems to more shallowly-rooted annual exotic weeds and wallaby/spear grass states. We sampled soils in five depth-based increments (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-100 cm) across this ecosystem transition at five sites across New South Wales, Australia. Caseium-137 analysis indicated erosion rates were similar among all ecosystems and were consistent with levels for grasslands in the region. Compared to the remnant Themeda grass systems, the degraded states had lower root biomass, lower carbon stocks and C:N ratios in the coarse fraction (> 50 μm), lower fungal : bacterial ratios, higher available phosphate, higher alkyl : O-alkyl C ratios, and faster mineralization of synthetic root-exudate carbon. All these metrics indicate the surprising finding of more microbially processed OM and faster turnover of newly added C in the degraded sites. Compared to one another, the two degraded sites differed in both C and N turnover, with the exotic weeds having higher dissolved organic N, inorganic N, and coarse fraction N, higher fine fraction C stocks, and greater microbial biomass. These differences likely

  9. Carbon and nitrogen abundance variations in globular cluster red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2008-06-01

    This dissertation describes investigations into two of the persistent questions of elemental abundances in Galactic globular clusters: the phenomenon of deep mixing, observed through the progressive depletion of surface carbon abundance as stars evolve along the red giant branch, and abundance bimodality, a phenomenon observed only in globular clusters, in which a subset of stars in a given globular cluster have a distinctive pattern of elemental enhancements and depletions relative to the Solar pattern. The first chapter gives an introduction to the history of globular cluster abundance studies, with particular focus on low-resolution spectroscopy. For both deep mixing and abundance bimodality, the leading theoretical models and the data which support and challenge them are laid out. Each section ends with a description of presently-unanswered questions; these are the motivation for the various projects contained in this dissertation. The second chapter describes the use of molecular handstrengths for determining elemental abundances from low-resolution spectra, and introduces a new CH bandstrength index that is designed to be sensitive to carbon abundance and insensitive to nitrogen abundance in Pop. II red giants over a wide range of metallicity. Various CH indices defined elsewhere in the literature are also discussed, and are shown to have comparable accuracy to the new index only over a limited range of stellar properties. Carbon abundances determined using the new CH index are compared to literature abundances for a few stars, and general concordance with published abundances is found. The third chapter contains a large-scale application of the new CH index: a survey of present-day carbon abundances and calculated carbon depletion rates in bright red giants belonging to eleven Galactic globular clusters spanning the full metallicity range of halo globular clusters. Targets were selected with similar evolutionary states, were observed with one instrument on

  10. Global warming alters carbon sink and source situation of the Tibetan lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Ni, Q.; Yang, J.; Liu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming would accelerate glacier retreat and permafrost degeneration on the Tibetan Plateau. The carbon stored in permafrost would be released to nearby lakes. However, little is known about how the carbon sink and source situation could be altered and what role the microbial community could play in Tibetan lakes in response to global warming. To fill this knowledge gap, six lakes (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, Tuosu Lake, Gahai Lake, Xiaochaidan Lake and Lake Chaka) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. In order to compare the seasonal variations in geochemistry and microbial communities, two sampling cruises were performed (May and July of 2015, corresponding to dry and wet seasons, respectively). For each lake, salinity, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll were measured for water samples, and salinity and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured for sediments. Chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurement were performed on the surface of each lake. Microbial communities were analyzed by using MiSeq sequencing technique. The results showed that in response to seasonal variation (from dry to set season), lake surface increased by 5-20% (calculated on the basis of satellite data) and salinity decreased by 4-30% for the studied lakes, suggesting the studied lakes were diluted by precipitations. The DOC contents of the lake waters were almost stable for the studied lakes, whereas TN increased by more than 70% for the lakes with salinity less than 100g/L. In the meanwhile, chlorophyll content increased by more than 180% for lakes with low salinities (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, and Tuosu Lake) and decreased by 17-94% for lakes with high salinities (Gahai Lake, Xiaoxhaidan Lake, and Lake Chaka. This indicated that desalination (precipitation plus glacier melt) would increase carbon fixation potential in Tibetan lakes. Microbial community analyses showed that microbial diversity increased in response to desalination. All in all

  11. Modelling soil nitrogen: The MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new formulation of the acidification model MAGIC that uses decomposer dynamics to link nitrogen (N) cycling to carbon (C) turnover in soils. The new model is evaluated by application to 15–30 years of water chemistry data at three coniferous-forested sites in the Czech Republic where deposition of sulphur (S) and N have decreased by >80% and 40%, respectively. Sulphate concentrations in waters have declined commensurately with S deposition, but nitrate concentrations have shown much larger decreases relative to N deposition. This behaviour is inconsistent with most conceptual models of N saturation, and with earlier versions of MAGIC which assume N retention to be a first-order function of N deposition and/or controlled by the soil C/N ratio. In comparison with earlier versions, the new formulation more correctly simulates observed short-term changes in nitrate leaching, as well as long-term retention of N in soils. The model suggests that, despite recent deposition reductions and recovery, progressive N saturation will lead to increased future nitrate leaching, ecosystem eutrophication and re-acidification. - Highlights: ► New version of the biogeochemical model MAGIC developed to simulate C/N dynamics. ► New formulation of N retention based directly on the decomposer processes. ► The new formulation simulates observed changes in nitrate leaching and in soil C/N. ► The model suggests progressive N saturation at sites examined. ► The model performance meets a growing need for realistic process-based simulations. - Process-based modelling of nitrogen dynamics and acidification in forest ecosystems.

  12. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Visible-light Induced Photocatalyst with Nitrogen and Carbon Doping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen and/or carbon doped titania photocatalysts were prepared by a novel mechanochemical method. The prepared powders possessed two absorption edges around 400 and 540 nm wavelengths and showed excellent photocatalytic ability for nitrogen monoxide oxidation under visible light irradiation. Under the irradiation of visible light of wavelength >510 nm, 37% of nitrogen monoxide could be continuously removed by the carbon and nitrogen co-doped titania prepared by planetary ball milling of P-25 titania-10% hexamethylenetetramine mixture followed by calcination in air at 400 ℃.

  13. The biogeochemistry of bioenergy landscapes: carbon, nitrogen, and water considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G Philip; Hamilton, Stephen K; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Parton, William J

    2011-06-01

    The biogeochemical liabilities of grain-based crop production for bioenergy are no different from those of grain-based food production: excessive nitrate leakage, soil carbon and phosphorus loss, nitrous oxide production, and attenuated methane uptake. Contingent problems are well known, increasingly well documented, and recalcitrant: freshwater and coastal marine eutrophication, groundwater pollution, soil organic matter loss, and a warming atmosphere. The conversion of marginal lands not now farmed to annual grain production, including the repatriation of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and other conservation set-aside lands, will further exacerbate the biogeochemical imbalance of these landscapes, as could pressure to further simplify crop rotations. The expected emergence of biorefinery and combustion facilities that accept cellulosic materials offers an alternative outcome: agricultural landscapes that accumulate soil carbon, that conserve nitrogen and phosphorus, and that emit relatively small amounts of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Fields in these landscapes are planted to perennial crops that require less fertilizer, that retain sediments and nutrients that could otherwise be transported to groundwater and streams, and that accumulate carbon in both soil organic matter and roots. If mixed-species assemblages, they additionally provide biodiversity services. Biogeochemical responses of these systems fall chiefly into two areas: carbon neutrality and water and nutrient conservation. Fluxes must be measured and understood in proposed cropping systems sufficient to inform models that will predict biogeochemical behavior at field, landscape, and regional scales. Because tradeoffs are inherent to these systems, a systems approach is imperative, and because potential biofuel cropping systems and their environmental contexts are complex and cannot be exhaustively tested, modeling will be instructive. Modeling alternative biofuel cropping systems converted

  14. Short-term fertilizer application alters phenotypic traits of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Anna K; Han, Shery; Rekret, Phil; Rentschler, Christine S; Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2015-01-01

    Fertilizer application is a common anthropogenic alteration to terrestrial systems. Increased nutrient input can impact soil microbial diversity or function directly through altered soil environments, or indirectly through plant-microbe feedbacks, with potentially important effects on ecologically-important plant-associated mutualists. We investigated the impacts of plant fertilizer, containing all common macro and micronutrients on symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), a group of bacteria that are important for plant productivity and ecosystem function. We collected rhizobia nodule isolates from natural field soil that was treated with slow-release plant fertilizer over a single growing season and compared phenotypic traits related to free-living growth and host partner quality in these isolates to those of rhizobia from unfertilized soils. Through a series of single inoculation assays in controlled glasshouse conditions, we found that isolates from fertilized field soil provided legume hosts with higher mutualistic benefits. Through growth assays on media containing variable plant fertilizer concentrations, we found that plant fertilizer was generally beneficial for rhizobia growth. Rhizobia isolated from fertilized field soil had higher growth rates in the presence of plant fertilizer compared to isolates from unfertilized field soil, indicating that plant fertilizer application favoured rhizobia isolates with higher abilities to utilize fertilizer for free-living growth. We found a positive correlation between growth responses to fertilizer and mutualism benefits among isolates from fertilized field soil, demonstrating that variable plant fertilizer induces context-dependent genetic correlations, potentially changing the evolutionary trajectory of either trait through increased trait dependencies. Our study shows that short-term application is sufficient to alter the composition of rhizobia isolates in the population or community, either directly

  15. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  16. Managing Semi-Arid Rangelands for Carbon Storage: Grazing and Woody Encroachment Effects on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Hasen M; Treydte, Anna C; Sauerborn, Jauchim

    2015-01-01

    High grazing intensity and wide-spread woody encroachment may strongly alter soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools. However, the direction and quantity of these changes have rarely been quantified in East African savanna ecosystem. As shifts in soil C and N pools might further potentially influence climate change mitigation, we quantified and compared soil organic carbon (SOC) and total soil nitrogen (TSN) content in enclosures and communal grazing lands across varying woody cover i.e. woody encroachment levels. Estimated mean SOC and TSN stocks at 0-40 cm depth varied across grazing regimes and among woody encroachment levels. The open grazing land at the heavily encroached site on sandy loam soil contained the least SOC (30 ± 2.1 Mg ha-1) and TSN (5 ± 0.57 Mg ha-1) while the enclosure at the least encroached site on sandy clay soil had the greatest mean SOC (81.0 ± 10.6 Mg ha-1) and TSN (9.2 ± 1.48 Mg ha-1). Soil OC and TSN did not differ with grazing exclusion at heavily encroached sites, but were twice as high inside enclosure compared to open grazing soils at low encroached sites. Mean SOC and TSN in soils of 0-20 cm depth were up to 120% higher than that of the 21-40 cm soil layer. Soil OC was positively related to TSN, cation exchange capacity (CEC), but negatively related to sand content. Our results show that soil OC and TSN stocks are affected by grazing, but the magnitude is largely influenced by woody encroachment and soil texture. We suggest that improving the herbaceous layer cover through a reduction in grazing and woody encroachment restriction are the key strategies for reducing SOC and TSN losses and, hence, for climate change mitigation in semi-arid rangelands.

  17. Managing Semi-Arid Rangelands for Carbon Storage: Grazing and Woody Encroachment Effects on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Hasen M.; Treydte, Anna C.; Sauerborn, Jauchim

    2015-01-01

    High grazing intensity and wide-spread woody encroachment may strongly alter soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools. However, the direction and quantity of these changes have rarely been quantified in East African savanna ecosystem. As shifts in soil C and N pools might further potentially influence climate change mitigation, we quantified and compared soil organic carbon (SOC) and total soil nitrogen (TSN) content in enclosures and communal grazing lands across varying woody cover i.e. woody encroachment levels. Estimated mean SOC and TSN stocks at 0–40 cm depth varied across grazing regimes and among woody encroachment levels. The open grazing land at the heavily encroached site on sandy loam soil contained the least SOC (30 ± 2.1 Mg ha-1) and TSN (5 ± 0.57 Mg ha-1) while the enclosure at the least encroached site on sandy clay soil had the greatest mean SOC (81.0 ± 10.6 Mg ha-1) and TSN (9.2 ± 1.48 Mg ha-1). Soil OC and TSN did not differ with grazing exclusion at heavily encroached sites, but were twice as high inside enclosure compared to open grazing soils at low encroached sites. Mean SOC and TSN in soils of 0–20 cm depth were up to 120% higher than that of the 21–40 cm soil layer. Soil OC was positively related to TSN, cation exchange capacity (CEC), but negatively related to sand content. Our results show that soil OC and TSN stocks are affected by grazing, but the magnitude is largely influenced by woody encroachment and soil texture. We suggest that improving the herbaceous layer cover through a reduction in grazing and woody encroachment restriction are the key strategies for reducing SOC and TSN losses and, hence, for climate change mitigation in semi-arid rangelands. PMID:26461478

  18. Long-term nitrogen addition decreases carbon leaching in nitrogen-rich forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC plays a critical role in the carbon (C cycle of forest soils, and has been recently connected with global increases in nitrogen (N deposition. Most studies on effects of elevated N deposition on DOC have been carried out in N-limited temperate regions, with far fewer data available from N-rich ecosystems, especially in the context of chronically elevated N deposition. Furthermore, mechanisms for excess N-induced changes of DOC dynamics have been suggested to be different between the two kinds of ecosystems, because of the different ecosystem N status. The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine how long-term N addition affects DOC dynamics below the primary rooting zones (the upper 20 cm soils in typically N-rich lowland tropical forests. We have a primary assumption that long-term continuous N addition minimally affects DOC concentrations and effluxes in N-rich tropical forests. Experimental N addition was administered at the following levels: 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Results showed that seven years of N addition significantly decreased DOC concentrations in soil solution, and chemo-physical controls (solution acidity change and soil sorption rather than biological controls may mainly account for the decreases, in contrast to other forests. We further found that N addition greatly decreased annual DOC effluxes from the primary rooting zone and increased water-extractable DOC in soils. Our results suggest that long-term N deposition could increase soil C sequestration in the upper soils by decreasing DOC efflux from that layer in N-rich ecosystems, a novel mechanism for continued accumulation of soil C in old-growth forests.

  19. Long-term nitrogen addition decreases carbon leaching in a nitrogen-rich forest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC plays a critical role in the carbon (C cycle of forest soils, and has been recently connected with global increases in nitrogen (N deposition. Most studies on effects of elevated N deposition on DOC have been carried out in N-limited temperate regions, with far fewer data available from N-rich ecosystems, especially in the context of chronically elevated N deposition. Furthermore, mechanisms for excess N-induced changes of DOC dynamics have been suggested to be different between the two kinds of ecosystems, because of the different ecosystem N status. The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine how long-term N addition affects DOC dynamics below the primary rooting zones (the upper 20 cm soils in typically N-rich lowland tropical forests. We have a primary assumption that long-term continuous N addition minimally affects DOC concentrations and effluxes in N-rich tropical forests. Experimental N addition was administered at the following levels: 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Results showed that seven years of N addition significantly decreased DOC concentrations in soil solution, and chemo-physical controls (solution acidity change and soil sorption rather than biological controls may mainly account for the decreases, in contrast to other forests. We further found that N addition greatly decreased annual DOC effluxes from the primary rooting zone and increased water-extractable DOC in soils. Our results suggest that long-term N deposition could increase soil C sequestration in the upper soils by decreasing DOC efflux from that layer in N-rich ecosystems, a novel mechanism for continued accumulation of soil C in old-growth forests.

  20. Mycorrhizal Controls on Nitrogen Uptake Drive Carbon Cycling at the Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, M.; Fisher, J. B.; Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly all plants form symbiotic relationships with one of two types of mycorrhizal fungi—arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, which are essential to global biogeochemical cycling of nutrient elements. In soils with higher rates of nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization from organic matter, AM-associated plants can be better adapted than ECM-associated plants. Importantly, the photosynthate costs of nutrient uptake for AM-associated plants are usually lower than that for ECM-associated plants. Thus, the global carbon cycle is closely coupled with mycorrhizal controls on N uptake. To investigate the potential climate dependence of terrestrial environments from AM- and ECM-associated plants, this study uses the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) with a plant productivity-optimized N acquisition model—the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model—integrated into its land model—the Community Land Model (CLM). This latest version of CLM coupled with FUN allows for the assessment of mycorrhizal controls on global biogeochemical cycling. Here, we show how the historical evolution of AM- and ECM-associations altered regional and global biogeochemical cycling and climate, and future projections over the next century.

  1. Effects of nitrogen content on structure and electrical properties of nitrogen-doped fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian-rong; LI Xin-hai; WANG Zhi-xing

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped fluorinated diamond-like carbon (FN-DLC) films were prepared on single crystal silicon substrate by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) under different deposited conditions with CF4,CH4 and nitrogen as source gases.The influence of nitrogen content on the structure and electrical properties of the films was studied.The films were investigated in terms of surface morphology,microstructure,chemical composition and electrical properties.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results revealed that the surface morphology of the films became smooth due to doping nitrogen.Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrometry (FTIR) results showed that amouts of C=N and C≡N bonds increased gradually with increasing nitrogen partial pressure r (r=p(N_2)/p(N_2+CF_4+CH_4)).Gaussian fit results of C 1s and N 1s in X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) showed that the incorporation of nitrogen presented mainly in the forms of β-C_3N_4 and a-CN_x (x=1,2,3) in the films.The current-voltage (I-V) measurement results showed that the electrical conductivity of the films increased with increasing nitrogen content.

  2. A one-step carbonization route towards nitrogen-doped porous carbon hollow spheres with ultrahigh nitrogen content for CO 2 adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nitrogen doped porous carbon hollow spheres (N-PCHSs) with an ultrahigh nitrogen content of 15.9 wt% and a high surface area of 775 m2 g-1 were prepared using Melamine-formaldehyde nanospheres as hard templates and nitrogen sources. The N-PCHSs were completely characterized and were found to exhibit considerable CO2 adsorption performance (4.42 mmol g-1).

  3. Metabolic profiling reveals altered nitrogen nutrient regimes have diverse effects on the metabolism of hydroponically-grown tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-01-01

    The role of inorganic nitrogen assimilation in the production of amino acids is one of the most important biochemical processes in plants. For this reason, a detailed broad-range characterization of the metabolic response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves to the alteration of nitrate level was performed. Tomato plants were grown hydroponically in liquid culture under three different nitrate regimes: saturated (8 mM NO3-), replete (4 mM NO3-) and deficient (0.4 mM NO3-). All treatments were performed under varied light intensity, with leaf samples being collected after 7, 14, and 21 d. In addition, the short-term response (after 1, 24, 48, and 94 h) to varying nutrient status was evaluated at the higher light intensity. GC-MS analysis of the levels of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, sugars, sugar alcohols, and representative compounds of secondary metabolism revealed substantial changes under the various growth regimes applied. The data presented here suggest that nitrate nutrition has wide-ranging effects on plant leaf metabolism with nitrate deficiency resulting in decreases in many amino and organic acids and increases in the level of several carbohydrates and phosphoesters, as well as a handful of secondary metabolites. These results are compared with previously reported transcript profiles of altered nitrogen regimes and discussed within the context of current models of carbon nitrogen interaction. PMID:15596475

  4. Submicron structures provide preferential spots for carbon and nitrogen sequestration in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Cordula; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Buegger, Franz; Heister, Katja; Schulz, Stefanie; Schloter, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The sequestration of carbon and nitrogen by clay-sized particles in soils is well established, and clay content or mineral surface area has been used to estimate the sequestration potential of soils. Here, via incubation of a sieved (

  5. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in suspended matter and sediments from the Godavari estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Arya, J.; Subbaiah, Ch.V.; Naidu, S.A.; Gawade, L.; PraveenKumar, P.; Reddy, N.P.C.

    Spatial distribution of the carbon and nitrogen content and their isotopic enrichment in suspended matter and sediments were measured in the Godavari estuary to identify the sources and transformation mechanism of organic matter. Significant...

  6. Impact of nitrogen seeding on carbon erosion in the JET divertor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Jachmich, S.; Rapp, J.; Meigs, A. G.; Nicholas, C.; O' Mullane, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen has been introduced in H-mode plasmas in JET in order to study its radiation cooling capability and impact on the erosion of divertor plasma-facing components made of carbon-fiber composites (CFC). Experiments in the ionizing plasma regime with low nitrogen injection show a reduction of the

  7. Modeling the effects of organic nitrogen uptake by plants on the carbon cycling of boreal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forest and tundra are the major ecosystems in the northern high latitudes in which a large amount of carbon is stored. These ecosystems are nitrogen-limited due to slow mineralization rate of the soil organic nitrogen. Recently, abundant field studies have found that organic nitrogen is another important nitrogen supply for boreal ecosystems. In this study, we incorporated a mechanism that allowed boreal plants to uptake small molecular amino acids into a process-based biogeochemical model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, to evaluate the impact of organic nitrogen uptake on ecosystem carbon cycling. The new version of the model was evaluated at both boreal forest and tundra sites. We found that the modeled organic nitrogen uptake accounted for 36–87% of total nitrogen uptake by plants in tundra ecosystems and 26–50% for boreal forests, suggesting that tundra ecosystem might have more relied on the organic form of nitrogen than boreal forests. The simulated monthly gross ecosystem production (GPP and net ecosystem production (NEP tended to be larger with the new version of the model since the plant uptake of organic nitrogen alleviated the soil nitrogen limitation especially during the growing season. The sensitivity study indicated that the most important factors controlling the plant uptake of organic nitrogen were the maximum root uptake rate (Imax and the radius of the root (r0 in our model. The model uncertainty due to uncertain parameters associated with organic nitrogen uptake at tundra ecosystem was larger than at boreal forest ecosystems. This study suggests that considering the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is important to boreal ecosystem carbon modeling.

  8. Role of Nitrogen and Carbon Transport, Regulation, and Metabolism Genes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Survival In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M Kingsbury; Goldstein, Alan L.; McCusker, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both an emerging opportunistic pathogen and a close relative of pathogenic Candida species. To better understand the ecology of fungal infection, we investigated the importance of pathways involved in uptake, metabolism, and biosynthesis of nitrogen and carbon compounds for survival of a clinical S. cerevisiae strain in a murine host. Potential nitrogen sources in vivo include ammonium, urea, and amino acids, while potential carbon sources include glucose, lactate,...

  9. Initiation of Yeast Sporulation by Partial Carbon, Nitrogen, or Phosphate Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Freese, Elisabeth Bautz; Chu, Martha I.; Freese, Ernst

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we show that partial deprivation of a carbon source, a nitrogen source, or phosphate in the presence of all other nutrients needed for growth initiates meiosis and sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homothallic strain Y55. For carbon deprivation experiments, cells were grown in synthetic medium (pH 5.5) containing an excess of one carbon source and then transferred to the same medium containing different concentrations of the same carbon source. In the case of transfer to d...

  10. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in ureilitic fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Downes, Hilary; Abernethy, F.A.J.; Smith, C.L.; Ross, A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Grady, M. M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopic compositions in ureilitic fragments of Almahata Sitta. Ureilites are carbon-rich (containing up to 7 wt% C) and were formed early in solar system history, thus the origin of carbon in ureilites has significance for the origin of solar system carbon. These samples were collected soon after they fell, so they are among the freshest ureilite samples available and were analyzed using stepped combustion mass spectrometry. They co...

  11. Understanding spatial heterogeneity in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling in regenerating tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, B. G.; Powers, J. S.; Branco, S.; Adams, R.; Schilling, E.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) currently store significant amounts of carbon in their biomass and soils, but these highly seasonal ecosystems may be uniquely sensitive to altered climates. The ability to quantitatively predict C cycling in TDFs under global change is constrained by tremendous spatial heterogeneity in soil parent material, land-use history, and plant community composition. To explore this variation, we examined soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in 18 permanent plots spanning orthogonal gradients of stand age and soil fertility. Soil C and N pools, microbial biomass, and microbial extracellular enzyme activities were most variable at small (m2) spatial scales. However, the ratio of organic vs. inorganic N cycling was consistently higher in forest stands dominated by slow-growing, evergreen trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Similarly, although bulk litter stocks and turnover rates varied greatly among plots, litter decomposition tended to be slower in ectomycorrhizae-dominated stands. Soil N cycling tended to be more conservative in older plots, although the relationship between stand age and element cycling was weak. Our results emphasize that microscale processes, particularly interactions between mycorrhizal fungi and free-living decomposers, are important controls on ecosystem-scale element cycling.

  12. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7–overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  13. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7-overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  14. Effect of nitrogen deposition reduction on biodiversity and carbon sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Dobben, van H.F.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Schouwenberg, E.P.A.G.; Kros, J.; Vries, de W.; Berendse, F.

    2009-01-01

    Global warming and loss of biodiversity are among the most prominent environmental issues of our time. Large sums are spent to reduce their causes, the emission of CO2 and nitrogen compounds. However, the results of such measures are potentially conflicting, as the reduction of nitrogen deposition m

  15. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube/Graphite Felts as Advanced Electrode Materials for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangyin; Zhao, Xinsheng; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-08-16

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes have been grown, for the first time, on graphite felt (N-CNT/GF) by a chemical vapor deposition approach and examined as an advanced electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The unique porous structure and nitrogen doping of N-CNT/GF with increased surface area enhances the battery performance significantly. The enriched porous structure of N-CNTs on graphite felt could potentially facilitate the diffusion of electrolyte, while the N-doping could significantly contribute to the enhanced electrode performance. Specifically, the N-doping (i) modifies the electronic properties of CNT and thereby alters the chemisorption characteristics of the vanadium ions, (ii) generates defect sites that are electrochemically more active, (iii) increases the oxygen species on CNT surface, which is a key factor influencing the VRFB performance, and (iv) makes the N-CNT electrochemically more accessible than the CNT. PMID:26295765

  16. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube/Graphite Felts as Advanced Electrode Materials for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangyin; Zhao, Xinsheng; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-08-16

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes have been grown, for the first time, on graphite felt (N-CNT/GF) by a chemical vapor deposition approach and examined as an advanced electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The unique porous structure and nitrogen doping of N-CNT/GF with increased surface area enhances the battery performance significantly. The enriched porous structure of N-CNTs on graphite felt could potentially facilitate the diffusion of electrolyte, while the N-doping could significantly contribute to the enhanced electrode performance. Specifically, the N-doping (i) modifies the electronic properties of CNT and thereby alters the chemisorption characteristics of the vanadium ions, (ii) generates defect sites that are electrochemically more active, (iii) increases the oxygen species on CNT surface, which is a key factor influencing the VRFB performance, and (iv) makes the N-CNT electrochemically more accessible than the CNT.

  17. Seabird nutrient subsidies benefit non-nitrogen fixing trees and alter species composition in South American coastal dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Havik

    Full Text Available Marine-derived nutrients can increase primary productivity and change species composition of terrestrial plant communities in coastal and riverine ecosystems. We hypothesized that sea nutrient subsidies have a positive effect on nitrogen assimilation and seedling survival of non-nitrogen fixing species, increasing the relative abundance of non-nitrogen fixing species close to seashore. Moreover, we proposed that herbivores can alter the effects of nutrient supplementation by preferentially feeding on high nutrient plants. We studied the effects of nutrient fertilization by seabird guano on tree recruitment and how these effects can be modulated by herbivorous lizards in the coastal dry forests of northwestern Peru. We combined field studies, experiments and stable isotope analysis to study the response of the two most common tree species in these forests, the nitrogen-fixing Prosopis pallida and the non-nitrogen-fixing Capparis scabrida. We did not find differences in herbivore pressure along the sea-inland gradient. We found that the non-nitrogen fixing C. scabrida assimilates marine-derived nitrogen and is more abundant than P. pallida closer to guano-rich soil. We conclude that the input of marine-derived nitrogen through guano deposited by seabirds feeding in the Pacific Ocean affects the two dominant tree species of the coastal dry forests of northern Peru in contrasting ways. The non-nitrogen fixing species, C. scabrida may benefit from sea nutrient subsidies by incorporating guano-derived nitrogen into its foliar tissues, whereas P. pallida, capable of atmospheric fixation, does not.

  18. Effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on ecosystem carbon fluxes on the Sanjiang plain wetland in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N deposition across the globe may affect ecosystem CO2 exchanges and ecosystem carbon cycles. Additionally, it remains unknown how increased N deposition and N addition will alter the effects of elevated CO2 on wetland ecosystem carbon fluxes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Beginning in 2010, a paired, nested manipulative experimental design was used in a temperate wetland of northeastern China. The primary factor was elevated CO2, accomplished using Open Top Chambers, and N supplied as NH4NO3 was the secondary factor. Gross primary productivity (GPP was higher than ecosystem respiration (ER, leading to net carbon uptake (measured by net ecosystem CO2 exchange, or NEE in all four treatments over the growing season. However, their magnitude had interannual variations, which coincided with air temperature in the early growing season, with the soil temperature and with the vegetation cover. Elevated CO2 significantly enhanced GPP and ER but overall reduced NEE because the stimulation caused by the elevated CO2 had a greater impact on ER than on GPP. The addition of N stimulated ecosystem C fluxes in both years and ameliorated the negative impact of elevated CO2 on NEE. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this ecosystem, future elevated CO2 may favor carbon sequestration when coupled with increasing nitrogen deposition.

  19. Carbon-nitrogen place exchange on NO exposed beta-Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaj, Mohamed; Maltais, Carl; Zahidi, El Mamoune; Oudghiri-Hassani, Hicham; Wang, Jiqing; Rosei, Federico; McBreen, Peter H

    2005-08-18

    Atomic nitrogen and oxygen were deposited on beta-Mo(2)C through dissociative adsorption of NO. Reflectance absorbance infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), thermal desorption, and synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were used to investigate the interplay between atomic nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen in the 400-1250 K region. The combination of the high resolution and high surface sensitivity offered by the synchrotron XPS technique was used to show that atomic nitrogen displaces interstitial carbon onto the carbide surface. Thermal desorption measurements show that the burnoff of the displaced carbon occurs at approximately 890 K. The incorporation of nitrogen into interstitial sites inhibits oxygen dissolution into the bulk. RAIRS spectroscopy was used to identify surface oxo, terminal oxygen, species formed from O(2) and NO on beta-Mo(2)C.

  20. Alteration of forest succession and carbon cycling under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam D; Dietze, Michael C; DeLucia, Evan H; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J

    2016-01-01

    Regenerating forests influence the global carbon (C) cycle, and understanding how climate change will affect patterns of regeneration and C storage is necessary to predict the rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) increase in future decades. While experimental elevation of CO2 has revealed that young forests respond with increased productivity, there remains considerable uncertainty as to how the long-term dynamics of forest regrowth are shaped by elevated CO2 (eCO2 ). Here, we use the mechanistic size- and age- structured Ecosystem Demography model to investigate the effects of CO2 enrichment on forest regeneration, using data from the Duke Forest Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment, a forest chronosequence, and an eddy-covariance tower for model parameterization and evaluation. We find that the dynamics of forest regeneration are accelerated, and stands consistently hit a variety of developmental benchmarks earlier under eCO2 . Because responses to eCO2 varied by plant functional type, successional pathways, and mature forest composition differed under eCO2 , with mid- and late-successional hardwood functional types experiencing greater increases in biomass compared to early-successional functional types and the pine canopy. Over the simulation period, eCO2 led to an increase in total ecosystem C storage of 9.7 Mg C ha(-1) . Model predictions of mature forest biomass and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and H2 O were sensitive to assumptions about nitrogen limitation; both the magnitude and persistence of the ecosystem response to eCO2 were reduced under N limitation. In summary, our simulations demonstrate that eCO2 can result in a general acceleration of forest regeneration while altering the course of successional change and having a lasting impact on forest ecosystems.

  1. Carbon and nitrogen balance of leaf-eating sesarmid crabs ( Neoepisesarma versicolor) offered different food sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongtham, Nalinee; Kristensen, Erik

    2005-10-01

    Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the leaf-eating crab, Neoepisesarma versicolor, were established for individuals living on pure leaf diets. Crabs were fed fresh (green), senescent (yellow) and partly degraded (brown) leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora apiculata. Ingestion, egestion and metabolic loss of carbon and nitrogen were determined from laboratory experiments. In addition, bacterial abundance in various compartments of the crabs' digestive tract was enumerated after dissection of live individuals. Ingestion and egestion rates (in terms of dry weight) were highest, while the assimilation efficiency was poorest for crabs fed on brown leaves. The low assimilation efficiency was more than counteracted by the high ingestion rate providing more carbon for growth than for crabs fed green and yellow leaves. In any case, the results show that all types of leaves can provide adequate carbon while nitrogen was insufficient to support both maintenance (yellow leaves) and growth (green, yellow and brown leaves). Leaf-eating crabs must therefore obtain supplementary nitrogen by other means in order to meet their nitrogen requirement. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (1) crabs supplement their diet with bacteria and benthic microalgae by ingesting own faeces and/or selective grazing at the sediment surface; (2) assimilation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the crabs' own intestinal system; and (3) nitrogen storage following occasional feeding on animal tissues (e.g. meiofauna and carcasses). It appears that hypothesis 1 is of limited importance for N. versicolor since faeces and sediment can only supply a minor fraction of the missing nitrogen due to physical constraints on the amount of material the crabs can consume. Hypothesis 2 can be ruled out because tests showed no nitrogen fixation activity in the intestinal system of N. versicolor. It is therefore likely that leaf-eating crabs provide most of their nitrogen requirement from intracellular deposits

  2. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades

  3. The impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by European forests and heathlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Solberg, S.; Dobbertin, M.; Sterba, H.; Laubhann, D.; Oijen, van M.; Evans, C.; Gundersen, P.; Kros, H.; Wamelink, W.; Reinds, G.J.; Sutton, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present estimated ranges in carbon (C) sequestration per kg nitrogen (N) addition in above-ground biomass and in soil organic matter for forests and heathlands, based on: (i) empirical relations between spatial patterns of carbon uptake and influencing environmental factors includi

  4. Precipitation Variability and Nitrogen Deposition Alter Root Distribution in a Tallgrass Prairie

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Emmalyn P; Schuster, Michael; Dukes, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Climate change and increases in nitrogen deposition impact ecosystems globally. Projected atmospheric warming allows rain to fall in larger events with longer dry periods in between, increasing rainfall variability in many regions. Concurrently, the combustion of fossil fuels and the heavy use of nitrogen fertilizers continue to increase the availability of nitrogen globally. However, not much is known about how these global change factors, increased rainfall variability and nitrogen depositi...

  5. Nitrogen and carbon interactions in controlling terrestrial greenhouse gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    The increased input of N to terrestrial systems may have profound impacts on net greenhouse gas (GHGs) fluxes and, consequently, our future climate; however, fully capturing and quantifying these interactions under field conditions urgently requires new, more efficient, measurement approaches. We have recently developed and deployed a novel system for the automation of terrestrial GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scales, using the approach of 'flying' a single measurement chamber to multiple points in an experimental field arena. As an example of the value of this approach, we shall describe the results from a field experiment investigating the interactions between increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) additions on net ecosystem exchanges of N2O, CH4 and CO2, enabling the simultaneous application of 25 treatments, replicated five times in a fully replicated block field design. We will describe how the ability to deliver automated GHG flux measurements, highly replicated in space and time, has revealed hitherto unreported findings on N and C interactions in field soil. In our experiments we found insignificant N2O fluxes from bare field soil, even at very high inorganic N addition rates, but the interactive addition of even small amounts of available C resulted in very large and rapid N2O fluxes. The SkyGas experimental system enabled investigation of the underlying interacting response surfaces on the fluxes of the major soil-derived GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) to increasing N and C inputs, and revealed unexpected interactions. In addition to these results we will also discuss some of the technical problems which have been overcome in developing these 'flying' systems and the potential of the systems for automatically screening the impacts of large numbers of treatments on GHG fluxes, and other ecosystem responses, under field conditions. We describe here technological advances that can facilitate the development of more robust GHG mitigation

  6. Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nanofibers: Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution without Cocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qing; Wang, Bing; Gao, Jian; Qu, Liangti

    2016-08-26

    An interconnected framework of mesoporous graphitic-C3 N4 nanofibers merged with in situ incorporated nitrogen-rich carbon has been prepared. The unique composition and structure of the nanofibers as well as strong coupling between the components endow them with efficient light-harvesting properties, improved charged separation, and a multidimensional electron transport path that enhance the performance of hydrogen production. The as-obtained catalyst exhibits an extremely high hydrogen-evolution rate of 16885 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) , and a remarkable apparent quantum efficiency of 14.3 % at 420 nm without any cocatalysts, which is much higher than most reported g-C3 N4 -based photocatalysts even in the presence of Pt-based cocatalysts.

  7. Effects of nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes compared to pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes on human small airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ND-MWCNTs) are modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with enhanced electrical properties that are used in a variety of applications, including fuel cells and sensors; however, the mode of toxic action of ND-MWCNT has yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we compared the interaction of ND-MWCNT or pristine MWCNT-7 with human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) and evaluated their subsequent bioactive effects. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction suggested the presence of N-containing defects in the lattice of the nanotube. The ND-MWCNTs were determined to be 93.3% carbon, 3.8% oxygen, and 2.9% nitrogen. A dose–response cell proliferation assay showed that low doses of ND-MWCNT (1.2 μg/ml) or MWCNT-7 (0.12 μg/ml) increased cellular proliferation, while the highest dose of 120 μg/ml of either material decreased proliferation. ND-MWCNT and MWCNT-7 appeared to interact with SAEC at 6 h and were internalized by 24 h. ROS were elevated at 6 and 24 h in ND-MWCNT exposed cells, but only at 6 h in MWCNT-7 exposed cells. Significant alterations to the cell cycle were observed in SAEC exposed to either 1.2 μg/ml of ND-MWCNT or MWCNT-7 in a time and material-dependent manner, possibly suggesting potential damage or alterations to cell cycle machinery. Our results indicate that ND-MWCNT induce effects in SAEC over a time and dose-related manner which differ from MWCNT-7. Therefore, the physicochemical characteristics of the materials appear to alter their biological effects

  8. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P NPK and OM increased the NH4(+) -N, DOC, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01), while NH4(+) -N contents in soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01). PMID:25338383

  9. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01).

  10. The Effects of Nitrogen Enrichment and a Simulated Rainfall Event on Soil Carbon Dioxide Efflux in an Annual California Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. P.; Strong, A. L.; Chiariello, N.; Field, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and play a critical role in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that enhanced precipitation (projected by climate models) and human activities (such as increased fertilizer use) may alter this cycle by enhancing soil microbial activity, although effects are often variable. Soils in semi-arid grasslands play a vital role in the global carbon cycle and may be responsive to environmental perturbations. Previous studies have demonstrated that wet-up treatments positively influence soil carbon dioxide efflux rates, which are otherwise low during dry summers. A preliminary study performed in a semi-arid annual grassland has shown that long-term nitrogen enrichment (equivalent to 70kg N per hectare) positively influences soil carbon dioxide efflux during peak biomass in the wet season. However, the combined effect and seasonal dynamics of these environmental changes is poorly understood. In order to assess this interaction, we explore the short-term response of soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in a semi-arid grassland to a combination of long-term nitrogen enrichment and a simulated 20-mm rainfall event in the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRCGE), a long-term, multi-factorial experiment in a semi-arid annual grassland located in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. We measured soil carbon dioxide efflux rates from pre-installed soil respiration collars for forty-eight hours after a simulated rainfall event (20mm) during the dry season in late July 2013. Both the enhanced and non-enhanced nitrogen treatments had an immediate pronounced response to the wet-up stimulation in which efflux rates increased by an average of more than six-fold. In contrast with previous studies of soil carbon dioxide efflux at JRGCE during the wet season in which N enrichment elevated efflux rates relative to controls, however, the soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in response

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures and nitrogen profile to identify adulteration in organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenitch, Sergei; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-08-29

    Recently it has been shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic fertilizers, but the robustness of the approach is questionable. This work developed a comprehensive method that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers of various types (manures, composts, blood meal, bone meal, fish meal, products of poultry and plant productions, molasses and seaweed based, and others) available on the North American market were analyzed to reveal the most sensitive criteria as well as their quantitative ranges, which can be used in their authentication. Organic nitrogen fertilizers of known origins with a wide δ(15)N range between -0.55 and 28.85‰ (n = 1258) were characterized for C and N content, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, viscosity, pH, and nitrogen profile (urea, ammonia, organic N, water insoluble N, and NO3). A statistically significant data set of characterized unique organic nitrogen fertilizers (n = 335) of various known origins has been assembled. Deliberately adulterated samples of different types of organic fertilizers mixed with synthetic fertilizers at a wide range of proportions have been used to develop the quantitative critical characteristics of organic fertilizers as the key indicators of their adulteration. Statistical analysis based on the discriminant functions of the quantitative critical characteristics of organic nitrogen fertilizers from 14 different source materials revealed a very high average rate of correct classification. The developed methodology has been successfully used as a source identification tool for numerous commercial nitrogen fertilizers available on the North American market.

  12. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  13. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles.

  14. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of carbon and nitrogen assimilation mechanisms in three indigenous bioleaching bacteria: predictions and validations

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenfeld Nicole; Ugalde Juan A; Levicán Gloria; Maass Alejandro; Parada Pilar

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Carbon and nitrogen fixation are essential pathways for autotrophic bacteria living in extreme environments. These bacteria can use carbon dioxide directly from the air as their sole carbon source and can use different sources of nitrogen such as ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, or even nitrogen from the air. To have a better understanding of how these processes occur and to determine how we can make them more efficient, a comparative genomic analysis of three bioleaching bacter...

  16. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to analyze impacts of long-term nitrogen (N fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP, ecosystem respiration (ER and net ecosystem exchange (NEE were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behavior. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to high tolerance of Sphagnum to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8 year response of GEP and NEE to N was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthesis capacity to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m−2 yr−1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modeling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxu Ji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of O2. The specific amino-carboxyl reaction provides strong and stable immobilization of GOx on electrodes. The developed biosensor responds efficiently to the presence of glucose in serum samples over the concentration range from 1 to 12 mM with a detection limit of 0.25 mM. This novel biosensor has good reproducibility and stability, and is highly selective for glucose determination under physiological conditions. These results indicate that N-doped quantum dots represent a novel candidate material for the construction of electrochemical biosensors.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hanxu; Zhou, Feng; Gu, Jiangjiang; Shu, Chen; Xi, Kai; Jia, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of O₂. The specific amino-carboxyl reaction provides strong and stable immobilization of GOx on electrodes. The developed biosensor responds efficiently to the presence of glucose in serum samples over the concentration range from 1 to 12 mM with a detection limit of 0.25 mM. This novel biosensor has good reproducibility and stability, and is highly selective for glucose determination under physiological conditions. These results indicate that N-doped quantum dots represent a novel candidate material for the construction of electrochemical biosensors. PMID:27153071

  19. Carbon and nitrogen - The key to biological activity, diversity and productivity in a Haplic Acrisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil organic matter is important because it impacts all soil quality functions. Much less information is available on the dynamics of the residual carbon and nitrogen content and their distribution in continuously cropped arable fields. We described the values of the soil properties, pH, moisture content, organic carbon and total nitrogen considering them to be random variables. We treated their spatial variation as a function of the distance between observations within the study site, a continuously-cropped field dominated by Haplic Acrisols. We discussed the nature and structure of the modeled functions, the semivariograms, and interpreted these in the light of the potential of these soils to sustain agricultural productivity. At these sites there had been no conversion of natural forests to agriculture so the paper does not discuss soil carbon storage for either the regional or global storage. All the properties studied showed spatial non-stationarity for the distances covered, indicating that the variance between pairs of observations increased as separating distances also increased. pH, moisture content and total nitrogen were fitted with the power model whereas the linear model best fitted organic carbon. Total nitrogen had the least nugget variance and pH the highest estimated exponent, α, from the power equations. The soils are highly variable in terms of input or return of organic residue to provide a sink for carbon and nitrogen and the breakdown of these materials as affected by pH, moisture availability and microorganisms. (author)

  20. Effect of Nitrogen Source and Carbon to Nitrogen Ratio on Hydrogen Production using C. acetobutylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sahaid Kalil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the nitrogen source and its concentration. Approach: Using different nitrogen source with different concentration on bacterial productivity of hydrogen showed to affect on both bacterial productivity of hydrogen and biomass concentration. Results: Yeast extract as nitrogen source at concentration of 13 g L-1 was the best organic nitrogen source and resulted in hydrogen yield YP/S of 308 mL g-1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.1 g L-1, hydrogen yield per biomass YP/X of 280 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized YX/S of 0.22 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized YH2/S of 0.0275. C/N of 70 enhanced the YP/S from 308-350 mL g?1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.22 gL-1, YP/X of 287 mL g-1 L-1, YX/S of 0.244 and YH2/S of 0.03125. Conclusion: Nitrogen source with proper C:N ratio enhanced the hydrogen production.

  1. Effects of land use alteration on tropical carbon exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The net annual release of carbon from tropical forests of the world is estimated to range from 0.6 to 1.1 billion tons (Gt), based on computer model simulations. The simulations incorporate the most recent data on tropical land use change, regional differences in biomass and soil carbon density, and the conversion of forest to both shifting cultivation and to permanent agriculture. Carbon accumulation in fallow and immature forests and in organic soil wetlands also is included. In general, biomass increases with temperature and moisture. Model simulations indicate that releases of 0.30 to 0.48 Gt/yr occur in South America, the region with the largest forest area, although deforestation rates are lower than the global average. In Southeast Asia, where mean regional forest biomass is high, carbon release rates range from 0.17 to 0.34 Gt/yr. The simulated releases are significantly lower than those resulting from some earlier analyses which evaluated less detailed data on land-use change and carbon densities. The results suggest that tropical forests, when compared to fossil-fuel sources, are presently a relatively small carbon source. However, understanding of the biosphere's role in the global carbon cycle requires further refinement in analysis of the many asynchronous regional carbon pools. 61 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  3. Combined Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen XANES Spectroscopy on Hydrated and Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, M.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth s stratosphere generally contain percent-level concentrations of organic matter. This organic matter in IDPs is important for several reasons: 1) some IDPs contain interstellar organic matter, identified by high D/H or N-15, providing the opportunity to characterize this interstellar material, 2) comparison of the organic matter in anhydrous IDPs to that in hydrated IDPs can help establish the effects of parent body aqueous alteration, and, 3) IDPs are believed to have delivered to the surface of the early Earth pre-biotic organic matter important for the origin of life. X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy provides information on the functional groups present in a sample, and XANES can be performed on the nano-scale, comparable to the size of some of the sub-units of the IDPs. The energies of the XANES transitions are diagnostic of the type of bonding of the C, N, and O, allowing identification of the functional groups present in the sample. As part of our ongoing effort to characterize the organic matter in the IDPs, we have performed carbon- and oxygen- and the first nitrogen-XANES spectroscopy on two IDPs and acid-insoluble residue from the CM2 meteorite Murchison.

  4. Mineral elements of subtropical tree seedlings in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Huang

    Full Text Available Mineral elements in plants have been strongly affected by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and nitrogen (N deposition due to human activities. However, such understanding is largely limited to N and phosphorus in grassland. Using open-top chambers, we examined the concentrations of potassium (K, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, aluminum (Al, copper (Cu and manganese (Mn in the leaves and roots of the seedlings of five subtropical tree species in response to elevated CO2 (ca. 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1 and N addition (100 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 from 2005 to 2009. These mineral elements in the roots responded more strongly to elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the leaves. Elevated CO2 did not consistently decrease the concentrations of plant mineral elements, with increases in K, Al, Cu and Mn in some tree species. N addition decreased K and had no influence on Cu in the five tree species. Given the shifts in plant mineral elements, Schima superba and Castanopsis hystrix were less responsive to elevated CO2 and N addition alone, respectively. Our results indicate that plant stoichiometry would be altered by increasing CO2 and N deposition, and K would likely become a limiting nutrient under increasing N deposition in subtropics.

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen Mineralization in Soil Combining Sewage Sludge and Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro José Giacomini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The combined incorporation of sewage sludge (SS and oat straw (OS to the soil can increase straw carbon mineralization and microbial nitrogen immobilization. This hypothesis was tested in two laboratory experiments, in which SS was incorporated in the soil with and without OS. One treatment in which only straw was incorporated and a control with only soil were also evaluated. The release of CO2 and mineral N in the soil after organic material incorporation was evaluated for 110 days. The cumulative C mineralization reached 30.1 % for SS and 54.7 % for OS. When these organic materials were incorporated together in the soil, straw C mineralization was not altered. About 60 % of organic N in the SS was mineralized after 110 days. This N mineralization index was twice as high as that defined by Resolution 375/2006 of the National Environmental Council. The combined incorporation of SS and OS in the soil caused an immobilization of microbial N of 5.9 kg Mg-1 of OS (mean 3.5 kg Mg-1. The results of this study indicated that SS did not increase straw C mineralization, but the SS rate should be adjusted to compensate for the microbial N immobilization caused by straw.

  6. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon of extraordinary capacitance for electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tianquan; Chen, I.-Wei; Liu, Fengxin; Yang, Chongyin; Bi, Hui; Xu, Fangfang; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors can provide high electrical power, but they do not have sufficient energy density to directly compete with batteries. We found that a nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous few-layer carbon has a capacitance of 855 farads per gram in aqueous electrolytes and can be bipolarly charged or discharged at a fast, carbon-like speed. The improvement mostly stems from robust redox reactions at nitrogen-associated defects that transform inert graphene-like layered carbon into an electrochemically active substance without affecting its electric conductivity. These bipolar aqueous-electrolyte electrochemical cells offer power densities and lifetimes similar to those of carbon-based supercapacitors and can store a specific energy of 41 watt-hours per kilogram (19.5 watt-hours per liter).

  7. Nitrogen doping in camphoric carbon films and its application to photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mominuzzaman, Sharif M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Rusop, Mohamad; Soga, Tetsuo; Jimbo, Takashi [Department of Environmental Technology and Urban Planning, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Umeno, Masayoshi [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chubu University, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan)

    2006-11-23

    Carbon films have been deposited on quartz and single-crystal silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique. The soot for the target was obtained from burning camphor, a natural source. The effect of nitrogen (N) incorporation in camphoric carbon film is investigated. Optical gap for the undoped film is about 0.95eV. The optical gap remains unchanged for low N content and decreases to about 0.7eV. With higher N content the optical gap increases. The resistivity of the carbon film is increased with N content initially and decreases with higher N content till the film is deposited at 30mTorr. The results indicate successful doping for the film deposited at low nitrogen content. The J-V characteristics of N-incorporated carbon/silicon photovoltaic cell under illumination are observed to improve upon N-incorporation in carbon layer. (author)

  8. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  9. Electronic state modification in laser deposited amorphous carbon films by the inclusion of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adamopoulos, G; Henley, SJ; V.Stolojan; Tison, Y; Garcia-Caurel, E; Drevillon, B.; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the inclusion of nitrogen in amorphous carbon thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition, which results in stress induced modifications to the band structure and the concomitant changes to the electronic transport properties. The microstructural changes due to nitrogen incorporation were examined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The band structure was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry data in the range o...

  10. Enhanced tunnel transport in disordered carbon superlattice structures incorporated with nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkov, Mikhail V.; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2012-06-01

    The possibility for enhanced tunnel transport through the incorporation of nitrogen in a quasi-one dimensional superlattice structure of amorphous carbon (a -C) made of sp2-C and sp3-C rich phases is shown by using a tight-binding model. The proposed superstructure can be described by a set of disordered graphite-like carbon clusters (acting as quantum wells) separated by a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (barriers) where the variation of the width and depth of the carbon clusters significantly control the electron transmission peaks. A large structural disorder in the pure carbon system, introduced through the variation of the bond length and associated deformation potential for respective carbon phases, was found to suppress the sharp features of the transmission coefficients. A small percentage of nitrogen addition to the carbon clusters can produce a distinct transmission peak at the low energy; however, it can be practically destroyed due to increase of the level of disorder of carbon sites. Whereas pronounced resonance peaks, both for C and N sites can be achieved through controlling the arrangement of the nitrogen sites of increased concentration within the disordered sp2-C clusters. The interplay of disorder associated with N and C sites illustrated the tunable nature of resistance of the structures as well as their characteristic times.

  11. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase on Novel Free-Standing Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanospheres@Carbon Nanofibers Composite Film

    OpenAIRE

    Xueping Zhang; Dong Liu; Libo Li; Tianyan You

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a novel free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres@carbon nanofibers (NCNSs@CNFs) composite film with high processability for the investigation of the direct electron transfer (DET) of glucose oxidase (GOx) and the DET-based glucose biosensing. The composites were simply prepared by controlled thermal treatment of electrospun polypyrrole nanospheres doped polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PPyNSs@PAN NFs). Without any pretreatment, the as-prepared material can directly serve ...

  12. The effects of contacts and ambipolar electrical transport in nitrogen doped multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W J; Zhang, J Y; Li, P J; Shen, X; Zhang, Q F; Wu, J L [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: jlwu@pku.edu.cn

    2008-02-27

    The electrical transport properties of pristine single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and lower nitrogen content doped multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) (lower than in the experiments of Xiao et al (2005 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 8614)) in contact with Au and Pt were studied. Compared with pristine SWCNTs, the Fermi level of the lower nitrogen content doped MWCNTs also moved to the valence band edge with the contact metal's work function increasing. In contrast to Derycke et al' s results (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 2773), the lower nitrogen content doped MWCNTs exhibited ambipolar behavior, and increasing the doping level led to a reduction of the Schottky barrier height of electrons. Consistent with theoretical calculations, the results support the opinion that the degree of Fermi level pinning is minor for doped carbon nanotubes.

  13. Determination of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in calcium by the gamma activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-activation determination of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in technical calcium is described. The method involves (γ,n) reactions of 16O, 12C and 14N. To determine the concentration of the admixtures the activities of 15O, 11C and 13N have been compared with those of the reference samples (LAVSAN polyester, boron nitride and aluminium nitride). Upon irradiation the calcium samples have undergone surface cleaning by 20-30 sec. etching in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Because of the matrix activation and the presence of other admixtures the determination of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen requires their radiochemical isolation. The average concentrations of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in six calcium samples have been 3x10sup(-1), 3x10sup(-3) and 7x10sup(-3) % wt

  14. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui;

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst’s activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90% current efficiency...... for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2, which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2C). The initial...... reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction.The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion,thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most...

  15. Determination of organic milk authenticity using carbon and nitrogen natural isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Park, Inmyoung; Yoon, Jae-Yeon; Yang, Ye-Seul; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Natural stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen ((12)C, (13)C, (14)N, (15)N) have abundances unique to each living creature. Therefore, measurement of the stable isotope ratio of carbon and nitrogen (δ(13)C=(13)C/(12)C, δ(15)N=(15)N/(14)N) in milk provides a reliable method to determine organic milk (OM) authenticity. In the present study, the mean δ(13)C value of OM was higher than that of conventional milk (CM), whereas the mean δ(15)N value of OM was lower than that of CM; nonetheless both δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were statistically different for the OM and CM (Pauthenticity using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen.

  16. Aspects of Grafting Influence on Carbon and Nitrogen Movement of Some Pear (Pyrus sativa Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghii CIOBOTARI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Among carbon and nitrogen contents, the interaction residing in the Interdependence Theory is one of the important components of plants. To elucidate how grafting influences the flow of carbon from shoots to tree roots and nitrogen from the roots to the shoots two sets of tests were carried out that have targeted the dosage of soluble sugars (to emphasize the relative flow of carbon and nitrogen content dosage around the grafting union area. After many laboratory analyses, we obtained average values that reflect the dynamics of soluble sugars content depending on grafting, namely: 24% in the scion, 41% into the union area and 35% in the rootstock, in a ratio of about 1:1.7:1.4. In what concerns the total nitrogen content, we observed that the values are very similar between variants. Instead, somewhat higher nitrogen quantities (36% were obtained in the rootstocks compared to the union area (32% and scions (32% representing a ratio of 1:1:1.1. Performing our experiments we found that the distribution of soluble sugars and nitrogen, in particular, in the grafting union area and the flow of photoassimilates and mineral elements, in general, for first year grafted trees depends not so much on the compatibility between scion and rootstock, but on grafting itself. Furthermore, we concluded that grafting itself is a barrier in photoassimilates and mineral elements flow in trees.

  17. Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon-Nitrogen Alloy Thin Films for Solar Cell Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-Bin; DING Zheng-Ming; PANG Qian-Jun; CUI Rong-Qiang

    2001-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen alloy (a-CNx :H) thin films have been deposited on silicon substratesby improved dc magnetron sputtering from a graphite target in nitrogen and hydrogen gas discharging. Thefilms are investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectral ellipsometer and electron spin resonance techniques. The optimized process condition for solar cell application is discussed. Thephotovoltaic property of a-CNx:H/silicon heterojunctions can be improved by the adjustment of the pressureratio of hydrogen to nitrogen and unbalanced magnetic field intensity. Open-circuit voltage and short-circuitcurrent reach 300mV and 5.52 Ma/cm2, respectively.

  18. Benthic biogeochemical cycling, nutrient stoichiometry, and carbon and nitrogen mass balances in a eutrophic freshwater bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.V.; Fitzgerald, S.A.; Waplesa, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Green Bay, while representing only ,7% of the surface area and ??1.4% of the volume of Lake Michigan, contains one-third of the watershed of the lake, and receives approximately one-third of the total nutrient loading to the Lake Michigan basin, largely from the Fox River at the southern end of the bay. With a history of eutrophic conditions dating back nearly a century, the southern portion of the bay behaves as an efficient nutrient and sediment trap, sequestering much of the annual carbon and nitrogen input within sediments accumulating at up to 1 cm per year. Depositional fluxes of organic matter varied from ??0.1 mol C m-2 yr-1 to >10 mol C m-2 yr-1 and were both fairly uniform in stoichiometric composition and relatively labile. Estimates of benthic recycling derived from pore-water concentration gradients, whole-sediment incubation experiments, and deposition-burial models of early diagenesis yielded an estimated 40% of the carbon and 50% of the nitrogen recycled back into the overlying water. Remineralization was relatively rapid with ??50% of the carbon remineralized within <15 yr of deposition, and a mean residence time for metabolizable carbon and nitrogen in the sediments of 20 yr. On average, organic carbon regeneration occurred as 75% CO2, 15% CH4, and 10% dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the southern bay were based upon direct measurements of inputs and burial and upon estimates of export and production derived stoichiometrically from a coupled phosphorus budget. Loadings of organic carbon from rivers were ??3.7 mol m-2 yr-1, 80% in the form of DOC and 20% as particulate organic carbon. These inputs were lost through export to northern Green Bay and Lake Michigan (39%), through sediment burial (26%), and net CO2 release to the atmosphere (35%). Total carbon input, including new production, was 4.54 mol m-2 C yr-1, equivalent to ??10% of the gross annual primary production. Nitrogen budget terms were less well quantified

  19. The Effect of Different Nitrogen Form on Key Enzyme Activity of Sugarbeet (Vulgaris L.) Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of the proportion of the different nitrogen forms on key enzyme activity of carbon and nitrogen metabolism under the condition of nutritional water while Tian Yan-7 was used as experimental material. The result showed that nitrate reductase(NR) activity in the leaves gradually enhanced with the increase of NO-3. No matter in root or leaves ,glutamina synthetase (GS) activity first enhanced with increasing NH4+ when NH4+ was lower than that of NO-3 ,and GS activity was the highest when NH4+and NO3-was equal ,then GS activity declined with NH4+ increasing further. In the anaphase of growth ,synthetic activity in root of sucrose synthetase(SS) in the mixed NH4+ and NO3- was obviously highr than or NO3- alone. Both of the root and sugar yields were the highest when the proportion of NH4+ and NO3- was 1: 1.

  20. Effects of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions on Carbon Cycling of Tropical Mountain Rainforests in Hainan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) deposition is projected to increase significantly in tropical regions in the coming decades, which has changed and will change the structure and function of ecosystems, and affects on ecosystem Carbon (C) cycle. As an important part in global C cycle, how the C cycle of tropical rainforests will be influenced by the N and P deposition should be focused on. This study simulated N and P deposition in a primary and secondary forest of tropical mountain rainforest in Jianfengling, Hainan, China, during five-year field experiment to evaluate the effects of N and P deposition on C cycling processes and relate characteristics. Six levels of N and P treatments were treated: Control, Low-N, Medium-N, High-N, P and N+P. The relative growth rates (RGR) of tree layer in treatment plots were different from that in control plots after years of N and P addition. Simulated N and P deposition also increased ANPP in primary forest. N and P addition changed the growth of trees by altering soil nutrient and microbial activities. N and P addition increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total N (TN) content, and significantly increased soil total P (TP) content, not changing soil pH. During the whole process of N and P addition, as net nitrification rate and net N mineralization rate were promoted by N and P addition, and effective N content (nitrate) of soil increased in the plot treated with N treatments compared to the control treatment. The microbial P content was increased by N and P addition, and microbial N was not changed. The increasing N deposition may enhance soil nutrient and stimulate growth of trees, which will lead to an increase of the C sequestration.

  1. Denitrification in an anoxic rotating biological contactor under two carbon/nitrogen ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Cortez, Susana; Teixeira, P; Oliveira, Rosário; Mota, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to compare the performance of an anoxic bench-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC), in terms of the denitrification process, applied to treat synthetic wastewater under two carbon/nitrogen (C/N) molar ratios (1.5 and 3). The average removal efficiency in terms of nitrogen-nitrate was of about 90.4% at a C/N=1.5 lowering to 73.7% at a C/N=3. Considering carbon-acetate removal an overall efficiency of 82.0% and 63.6% was attained at a C/N rati...

  2. Quantum Chemistry Calculation on Oxygen and Nitrogen Adsorption in Carbon Nanotude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen and nitrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is studied by density function and discrete variational (DFT-DVM) method.The models of O2 and N2 adsorption in the SWCNT are optimized based on the energy minimization.The calculated results of density of state,populations and energy gaps of the molecular orbitals show that oxygen adsorption in SWCNT increases the carbon nanotube`s electrical conductivity more notably than nitrogen adsorption,which is consistent with the experiment.

  3. Nitrogen removal from coal gasification wastewater by activated carbon technologies combined with short-cut nitrogen removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Zhuang, Haifeng; Jia, Shengyong; Fang, Fang

    2014-11-01

    A system combining granular activated carbon and powdered activated carbon technologies along with shortcut biological nitrogen removal (GAC-PACT-SBNR) was developed to enhance total nitrogen (TN) removal for anaerobically treated coal gasification wastewater with less need for external carbon resources. The TN removal efficiency in SBNR was significantly improved by introducing the effluent from the GAC process into SBNR during the anoxic stage, with removal percentage increasing from 43.8%-49.6% to 68.8%-75.8%. However, the TN removal rate decreased with the progressive deterioration of GAC adsorption. After adding activated sludge to the GAC compartment, the granular carbon had a longer service-life and the demand for external carbon resources became lower. Eventually, the TN removal rate in SBNR was almost constant at approx. 43.3%, as compared to approx. 20.0% before seeding with sludge. In addition, the production of some alkalinity during the denitrification resulted in a net savings in alkalinity requirements for the nitrification reaction and refractory chemical oxygen demand (COD) degradation by autotrophic bacteria in SBNR under oxic conditions. PACT showed excellent resilience to increasing organic loadings. The microbial community analysis revealed that the PACT had a greater variety of bacterial taxons and the dominant species associated with the three compartments were in good agreement with the removal of typical pollutants. The study demonstrated that pre-adsorption by the GAC-sludge process could be a technically and economically feasible method to enhance TN removal in coal gasification wastewater (CGW). PMID:25458677

  4. ZIF-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbons for Xe Adsorption and Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shan; Wang, Qian; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-02-01

    Currently, finding high capacity adsorbents with large selectivity to capture Xe is still a great challenge. In this work, nitrogen-doped porous carbons were prepared by programmable temperature carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) and ZIF-8/xylitol composite precursors and the resultant samples are marked as Carbon-Z and Carbon-ZX, respectively. Further adsorption measurements indicate that ZIF-derived nitrogen-doped Carbon-ZX exhibits extremely high Xe capacity of 4.42 mmol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar, which is higher than almost all other pristine MOFs such as CuBTC, Ni/DOBDC, MOF-5 and Al-MIL-53, and even more than three times of the matrix ZIF-8 at similar conditions. Moreover, Carbon-ZX also shows the highest Xe/N2 selectivity about ~120, which is much larger than all other reported MOFs. These remarkable features illustrate that ZIF-derived nitrogen-doped porous carbon is an excellent adsorbent for Xe adsorption and separation at room temperature.

  5. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S.; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g-1 and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  6. ZIF-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbons for Xe Adsorption and Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shan; Wang, Qian; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Currently, finding high capacity adsorbents with large selectivity to capture Xe is still a great challenge. In this work, nitrogen-doped porous carbons were prepared by programmable temperature carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) and ZIF-8/xylitol composite precursors and the resultant samples are marked as Carbon-Z and Carbon-ZX, respectively. Further adsorption measurements indicate that ZIF-derived nitrogen-doped Carbon-ZX exhibits extremely high Xe capacity of 4.42 mmol g(-1) at 298 K and 1 bar, which is higher than almost all other pristine MOFs such as CuBTC, Ni/DOBDC, MOF-5 and Al-MIL-53, and even more than three times of the matrix ZIF-8 at similar conditions. Moreover, Carbon-ZX also shows the highest Xe/N2 selectivity about ~120, which is much larger than all other reported MOFs. These remarkable features illustrate that ZIF-derived nitrogen-doped porous carbon is an excellent adsorbent for Xe adsorption and separation at room temperature. PMID:26883471

  7. Nitrogen Additions Increase the Diversity of Carbon Compounds Degraded by Fungi in Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, T. B.; Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    Boreal forest soils in North America harbor a large reservoir of organic C, and this region is increasingly exposed to long-range atmospheric N transport from Eurasia. By examining the responses of decomposers to N deposition in these forests, we hope to improve predictions of the fate of boreal carbon pools under global change. We tested the hypothesis that the functional diversity of decomposer fungi would increase under N fertilization in boreal forests where fungal growth was otherwise N-limited, owing to a reduction in competitive exclusion of fungal groups. We collected soil and leaf litter from three Alaskan sites that represent different successional stages at 5, 17, or 80 years following severe forest fire. Each site had been exposed for two years to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization in a factorial design, with four plots per treatment. Nutrient limitation of fungal growth varied depending on successional stage. The standing hyphal length of decomposer fungi in soil (i.e. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) responded to neither N nor P in the 5-year old site, increased under N fertilization in the 17-year old site, and increased where N and P was added simultaneously in the 80-year old site (site x N x P interaction: P = 0.001). We used BIOLOG microplates for filamentous fungi to obtain an index of the diversity of carbon use by decomposer fungi; each of 95 wells of these plates contains a different carbon-based compound, as well as a dye that changes color upon metabolism of the compound. Saline leaf litter extracts were mixed with fungal growth medium and then added to the microplates. The number of wells displaying metabolic activity was counted following incubation for five days. We found that N fertilization raised the average number of positive wells per plate from 14 to 27 (P = 0.012), with no significant differences in responses among sites. Phosphorus additions did not alter functional diversity of fungi in any site. Since increases in functional

  8. Influence of carbon dioxide content in the biogas to nitrogen oxides emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Marija A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are an alternative solution for the fossil fuel shortage. Usually this kind of fuels is called low calorific value fuels, due to the large proportion of inert components in their composition. The most common is carbon dioxide, and its proportion in biogas can be different, from 10 up to 40%, or even more. The presence of inert component in the composition of biogas causes the problems that are related with flame blow off limits. One of the possibilities for efficient combustion of biogas is the combustion in swirling flow including a pilot burner, aimed to expand the borders of stable combustion. This paper presents an analysis of the influence of the carbon dioxide content to the nitrogen oxides emissions. Laboratory biogas was used with different content of CO2 (10, 20, 30 and 40%. Investigation was carried out for different nominal powers, coefficients of excess air and carbon dioxide content. With increasing content of carbon dioxide, emission of nitrogen oxides was reduced, and this trend was the same throughout the whole range of excess air, carried out through measurements. Still, the influence of carbon dioxide content is significantly less than the influence of excess air. The coefficient of excess air greatly affects the production of radicals which are essential for the formation of nitrogen oxides, O, OH and CH. Also, the results show that the nominal power has no impact on the emission of nitrogen oxides.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen balances for six shrublands across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Claus; Emmett, Bridget A.; Tietema, Albert;

    2009-01-01

    Shrublands constitute significant and important parts of European landscapes providing a large number of important ecosystem services. Biogeochemical cycles in these ecosystems have gained little attention relative to forests and grassland systems, but data on such cycles are required...... for developing and testing ecosystem models. As climate change progresses, the potential feedback from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere through changes in carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and general knowledge on biogeochemical cycles becomes increasingly important. Here we present carbon...... that in the future a climate-driven land cover change between grasslands and shrublands in Europe will likely lead to increased ecosystem C where shrublands are promoted and less where grasses are promoted. However, it also emphasizes that if feedbacks on the global carbon cycle are to be predicted it is critically...

  10. Carbon and carbon dioxide accumulation by marandu grass under nitrogen fertilization and irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Dupas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen (N is the most limiting nutrient for growth of forage grasses, especially in conditions of low water availability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effect of N fertilization and irrigation on the accumulation of carbon (C and carbon dioxide (CO2 by marandu grass in the Cerrado Paulista, in the rainy and dry seasons. Experiments were conducted to evaluate N fertilization in each season, with and without irrigation. Five N rates were used (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1 per cutting, using urea as N source, totaling 0, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 kg ha-1 in the rainy season and 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kg ha-1 in the dry season. The experiments were arranged in a split-plot randomized block design. There was no significant interaction (p > 0.05 between N and time of fertilization in the irrigated experiment. However, N promoted a quadratic effect in organic matter production (OMP, accumulation of C and CO2 by marandu grass, while there was no influence of the seasons. In the non-irrigated experiment, the interaction between N rates and seasons was significant (p < 0.05 only for the rainy season. Organic matter production and C and CO2 accumulation was greater in the rainy season than in the dry season. Irrigation provided increases of approximately 20% in C and CO2 accumulation. The use of N and irrigation increases the accumulation of C and CO2 by marandu grass, and this increase is higher during the rainy season.

  11. Introducing non-flooded crops in rice-dominated landscapes: Impact on carbon, nitrogen and water budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauker, Frank; Wassmann, Reiner; Amelung, Wulf; Breuer, Lutz; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Conrad, Ralf; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Goldbach, Heiner; He, Yao; John, Katharina; Kiese, Ralf; Kraus, David; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Siemens, Jan; Weller, Sebastian; Wolters, Volkmar

    2013-04-01

    Rice production consumes about 30% of all freshwater used worldwide and 45% in Asia. Turning away from permanently flooded rice cropping systems for mitigating future water scarcity and reducing methane emissions, however, will alter a variety of ecosystem services with potential adverse effects to both the environment and agricultural production. Moreover, implementing systems that alternate between flooded and non-flooded crops increases the risk of disruptive effects. The multi-disciplinary DFG research unit ICON aims at exploring and quantifying the ecological consequences of altered water regimes (flooded vs. non-flooded), crop diversification (irrigated rice vs. aerobic rice vs. maize), and different fertilization strategies (conventional, site-specific, and zero N fertilization). ICON particularly focuses on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen, green-house gas (GHG) emissions, water balance, soil biotic processes and other important ecosystem services. The overarching goal is to provide the basic process understanding that is necessary for balancing the revenues and environmental impacts of high-yield rice cropping systems while maintaining their vital ecosystem services. To this aim, a large-scale field experiment has been established at the experimental farm of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI, Philippines). Ultimately, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of management scenarios by an integrated modeling of crop development (ORYZA), carbon and nitrogen cycling (MoBiLE-DNDC), and water fluxes (CMF), providing the basis for developing pathways to a conversion of rice-based systems towards higher yield potentials under minimized environmental impacts. In our presentation, we demonstrate the set-up of the controlled large-scale field experiment for simultaneous assessment of carbon and nitrogen fluxes and water budgets. We show and discuss first results for: - Quantification and assessment of the net-fluxes of CH4

  12. Carbon sequestration and Jerusalem artichoke biomass under nitrogen applications in coastal saline zone in the northern region of Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li; Manxia, Chen; Xiumei, Gao; Xiaohua, Long; Hongbo, Shao; Zhaopu, Liu; Zed, Rengel

    2016-10-15

    Agriculture is an important source of greenhouse gases, but can also be a significant sink. Nitrogen fertilization is effective in increasing agricultural production and carbon storage. We explored the effects of different rates of nitrogen fertilization on biomass, carbon density, and carbon sequestration in fields under the cultivation of Jerusalem artichoke as well as in soil in a coastal saline zone for two years. Five nitrogen fertilization rates were tested (in guream(-2)): 4 (N1), 8 (N2), 12 (N3), 16 (N4), and 0 (control, CK). The biomass of different organs of Jerusalem artichoke during the growth cycle was significantly higher in N2 than the other treatments. Under different nitrogen treatments, carbon density in organs of Jerusalem artichoke ranged from 336 to 419gCkg(-1). Carbon sequestration in Jerusalem artichoke was higher in treatments with nitrogen fertilization compared to the CK treatment. The highest carbon sequestration was found in the N2 treatment. Soil carbon content was higher in the 0-10cm than 10-20cm layer, with nitrogen fertilization increasing carbon content in both soil layers. The highest soil carbon sequestration was measured in the N2 treatment. Carbon sequestration in both soil and Jerusalem artichoke residue was increased by nitrogen fertilization depending on the rates in the coastal saline zone studied. PMID:27317133

  13. Carbon and nitrogen flows during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi: Modelling a mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joassin, P.; Delille, B.; Soetaert, K.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Chou, L.; Riebesell, U.; Suykens, K.; Grégoire, M.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during experimental blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi induced in mesocosms over a period of 23 days. The model describes carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling through E. huxleyi and the microbial loop, and computes pH and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO 2) from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The main innovations are: 1) the representation of E. huxleyi dynamics using an unbalanced growth model in carbon and nitrogen, 2) the gathering of formulations describing typical processes involved in the export of carbon such as primary production, calcification, cellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) excretion, transparent exopolymer (TEP) formation and viral lyses, and 3) an original and validated representation of the calcification process as a function of the net primary production with a modulation by the intra-cellular N:C ratio mimicking the effect of nutrients limitation on the onset of calcification. It is shown that this new mathematical formulation of calcification provides a better representation of the dynamics of TA, DIC and calcification rates derived from experimental data compared to classicaly used formulations (e.g. function of biomass or of net primary production without any modulation term). In a first step, the model has been applied to the simulations of present pCO 2 conditions. It adequately reproduces the observations for chemical and biological variables and provides an overall view of carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Carbon and nitrogen budgets are derived from the model for the different phases of the bloom, highlighting three distinct phases, reflecting the evolution of the cellular C:N ratio and the interaction between hosts and viruses. During the first phase, inorganic nutrients are massively consumed by E. huxleyi increasing its biomass. Uptakes of carbon and nitrogen are

  14. Oxygen and nitrogen-doped metal-free carbon catalysts for hydrochlorination of acetylene☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongtong Zhang; Jia Zhao; Jiangtao Xu; Jinhui Xu; Xiaoxia Di; Xiaonian Li

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon was tested as metal-free catalyst for hydrochlorination of acetylene in order to circumvent the problem of environment pollution caused by mercury and high cost by noble metals. Oxygen-doped and nitrogen-doped activated carbons were prepared and characterized by XPS, TPD and N2 physisorption methods. The influences of the surface functional groups on the catalytic performance were discussed base on these results. Among al the samples tested, a nitrogen-doped sample, AC-n-U500, exhibited the best performance, the acety-lene conversion being 92%and vinyl chloride selectivity above 99%at 240 °C and C2H2 hourly space velocity 30 h−1. Moreover, the AC-n-U500 catalyst exhibited a stable performance during a 200 h test with a conversion of acetylene higher than 76%at 210 °C at a C2H2 hourly space velocity 50 h−1. In contrary, oxygen-doped catalyst had lower catalytic activities. A linear relationship between the amount of pyrrolic-N and quaternary-N species and the catalytic activity was observed, indicating that these nitrogen-doped species might be the active sites and the key in tuning the catalytic performance. It is also found that the introduction of nitrogen species into the sample could significantly increase the adsorption amount of acetylene. The deactivation of nitrogen-doped activated carbon might be caused by the decrease of the accessibility to or the total amount of active sites.

  15. Experimental evaluation of biomass burning emissions: Nitrogen and carbon containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the nitrogen and carbon emissions of biomass burning. The results of the authors' experiments enable them to calculate new source strengths for many compounds, considering different burning stages and fire conditions on the one hand, and different fuel types and properties, on the other hand. They also presented a method for balancing elemental budgets of fires, which had already been described for carbon compounds by other authors but which is new for the nitrogen inventory. Based on their measurements they show that biomass burning contributes significantly to the global budgets of HCN, CH3CN (possibly the major source), NOx (12%), CO(22%), C2 to C4 hydrocarbons (14%), CH3Cl(41%), and probably also to the global source of C1-C5 aliphatic amines. Further, pyrogenic CO2 amounts are likely to represent a substantial contribution to the global greenhouse warming. An important result, from the study is the identification of N2 emissions, which causes a significant loss of fixed nitrogen (pyro-denitrification) in tropical ecosystems in the order of 5% to 20% of the global nitrogen fixation rate. Because of an interesting interplay between an enhanced postfire nitrogen fixation and an enhanced postfire N2O emission, it is not yet known if losses due to pyro-denitrification are balanced by nitrogen fixation

  16. Pyrolysis of cellulose under ammonia leads to nitrogen-doped nanoporous carbon generated through methane formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Bao; Heron, Christopher G; Allen, Marshall J; Morre, Jeff; Maier, Claudia S; Stickle, William F; Ji, Xiulei

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present a simple one-step fabrication methodology for nitrogen-doped (N-doped) nanoporous carbon membranes via annealing cellulose filter paper under NH3. We found that nitrogen doping (up to 10.3 at %) occurs during cellulose pyrolysis under NH3 at as low as 550 °C. At 700 °C or above, N-doped carbon further reacts with NH3, resulting in a large surface area (up to 1973.3 m(2)/g). We discovered that the doped nitrogen, in fact, plays an important role in the reaction, leading to carbon gasification. CH4 was experimentally detected by mass spectrometry as a product in the reaction between N-doped carbon and NH3. When compared to conventional activated carbon (1533.6 m(2)/g), the N-doped nanoporous carbon (1326.5 m(2)/g) exhibits more than double the unit area capacitance (90 vs 41 mF/m(2)).

  17. Ozone-biological activated carbon integrated treatment for removal of precursors of halogenated nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Pilot-scale tests were performed to reduce the formation of several nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) with an integrated ozone and biological activated carbon (O(3)-BAC) treatment process following conventional water treatment processes (coagulation-sedimentation-filtration). Relative to the conventional processes alone, O(3)-BAC significantly improved the removal of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic nitrogen from 98-99%, 58-72%, 31-53%, 16-93% and 35-74%, respectively, and enhanced the removal efficiency of the precursors for the measured DBPs. The conventional process was almost ineffective in removing the precursors of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm). Ozonation could not substantially reduce the formation of DCAcAm, and actually increased the formation potential of TCNM; it chemically altered the molecular structures of the precursors and increased the biodegradability of N-containing organic compounds. Consequently, the subsequent BAC filtration substantially reduced the formation of the both TCNM and DCAcAm, thus highlighting a synergistic effect of O(3) and BAC. Additionally, O(3)-BAC was effective at controlling the formation of the total organic halogen, which can be considered as an indicator of the formation of unidentified DBPs.

  18. Microtribology of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong F. Wang

    2004-01-01

    The friction, wear and lubrication of carbon nitride coatings on silicon substrates are studied using a spherical diamond counter-face with nano-scale asperities. The first part of this paper clarifies the coating thickness effect on frictional behavior of carbon nitride coatings. The second part of this paper reports empirical data on wear properties in repeated sliding contacts through in situ examination and post-sliding observation. The third part will concentrate on wear mechanisms for the transition from "No observable wear particles" to "Wear particle generation." In light of the above tribological study, the application of carbon nitride coatings to MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) is therefore discussed from view points of both microtribology and micromachining.

  19. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoils with Adjustable Morphology using Ni–Fe Layered Double Hydroxides as Catalyst Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Tomohiro Iwasaki; Masashi Tomisawa; Takuma Yoshimura; Hideya Nakamura; Masao Ohyama; Katsuya Asao; Satoru Watano

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanocoils (CNCs) with adjusted morphologies were synthesized in a one-step catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using acetoni‐ trile as the carbon and nitrogen source. The nickel iron oxide/nickel oxide nanocomposites, which were derived from nickel–iron layered double hydroxide (LDH) precur‐ sors, were employed as catalysts for the synthesis of CNCs. In this method, precursor-to-catalyst transformation, catalyst activation, formation of CNCs, and nitrogen ...

  20. Theoretical Investigation on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Nitrogen, Pyridine-Like Nitrogen Defects, and Transition Metal Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the inherent difficulty in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with uniform chirality and well-defined electronic properties through the introduction of dopants, topological defects, and intercalation of metals. Depending on the desired application, one can modify the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNTs through an appropriate introduction of imperfections. This scheme broadens the application areas of SWCNTs. Under this motivation, we present our ongoing investigations of the following models: (i (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT doped with nitrogen (CNxNT, (ii (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT with pyridine-like defects (3NV-CNxNT, (iii (10, 0 SWCNT with porphyrine-like defects (4ND-CNxNT. Models (ii and (iii were chemically functionalized with 14 transition metals (TMs: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Ag, Pt and Au. Using the spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT, stable configurations, deformations, formation and binding energies, the effects of the doping concentration of nitrogen, pyridine-like and porphyrine-like defects on the electronic properties were all examined. Results reveal that the electronic properties of SWCNTs show strong dependence on the concentration and configuration of nitrogen impurities, its defects, and the TMs adsorbed.

  1. Electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture: first principle computational exploration of carbon nanotubes with pyridinic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Smith, Sean C; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes with specific nitrogen doping are proposed for controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO2 capture. Using density functional theory incorporating long-range dispersion corrections, we investigated the adsorption behavior of CO2 on (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with several nitrogen doping configurations and varying charge states. Pyridinic-nitrogen incorporation in CNTs is found to induce an increasing CO2 adsorption strength with electron injecting, leading to a highly selective CO2 adsorption in comparison with N2 . This functionality could induce intrinsically reversible CO2 adsorption as capture/release can be controlled by switching the charge carrying state of the system on/off. This phenomenon is verified for a number of different models and theoretical methods, with clear ramifications for the possibility of implementation with a broader class of graphene-based materials. A scheme for the implementation of this remarkable reversible electrocatalytic CO2 -capture phenomenon is considered.

  2. BIOLOGICAL AERATED FILTERS (BAFs FOR CARBON AND NITROGEN REMOVAL: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSHAFIE AHMED

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological aerated filters (BAFs are an emerging wastewater treatment technology designed for a wide range of municipal and industrial applications. This review paper presents and discusses of the influence C/N ratio, nitrification and denitrification principle, effect of pH, DO and alkalinity on the nitrification and denitrification systems, organic and hydraulic loading of BAF reactor, etc. Results from upflow and downflow biofilter pilot at different condition, with nitrification and denitrification are reviewed. Under the optimal conditions, significant amount of COD, ammonia-nitrogen and total nitrogen were removed. Removal rates based on reactor volume for different carbon-aceous COD and ammonia loading rate are reported. The BAF system for the nitrification and denitrification processes for carbon and nitrogen removal from the wastewater need to be evaluated and applied properly to protect of our environment and resources.

  3. Phase Equilibria of Three Binary Mixtures: Methanethiol + Methane, Methanethiol + Nitrogen, and Methanethiol + Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Coquelet, Christophe;

    2012-01-01

    New vapor–liquid equilibrium (VLE) data for methanethiol (MM) + methane (CH4), methanethiol (MM) + nitrogen (N2), and methanethiol (MM) + carbon dioxide (CO2) is reported for temperatures of (304, 334, and 364) K in the pressure range (1 to 8) MPa. A “static–analytic” method was used for performi...

  4. Contribution of chloroplast biogenesis to carbon-nitrogen balance during early leaf development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Kensuke; Hirotsuka, Shoko; Shimada, Hiroshi; Chono, Yoko; Matsuda, Osamu; Iba, Koh

    2010-07-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is most significant during the changes in cellular organization associated with leaf development in higher plants. To examine the physiological relationship between developing chloroplasts and host leaf cells during early leaf development, we investigated changes in the carbon and nitrogen contents in leaves at the P4 developmental stage of rice, during which leaf blade structure is established and early events of chloroplast differentiation occur. During the P4 stage, carbon content on a dry mass basis remained constant, whereas the nitrogen content decreased by 30%. Among carbohydrates, sucrose and starch accumulated to high levels early in the P4 stage, and glucose, fructose and cellulose degradation increased during the mid-to-late P4 stage. In the chloroplast-deficient leaves of the virescent-1 mutant of rice, however, the carbon and nitrogen contents, as well as the C/N ratio during the P4 stage, were largely unaffected. These observations suggest that developing rice leaves function as sink organs at the P4 stage, and that chloroplast biogenesis and carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the leaf cell is regulated independently at this stage.

  5. The ternary Fe-C-N system: Homogeneous distributions of nitrogen and carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin;

    2017-01-01

    Porous iron foils were used for synthesizing homogeneous samples of iron carbides and (carbo)nitrides. Homogeneous distributions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon were obtained without long treatment times due to limited required diffusion distances in the porous material. By adjustments of the...

  6. Developing Ecological Models on Carbon and Nitrogen in Secondary Facultative Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aponte-Reyes Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecological models formulated for TOC, CO2, NH4+, NO3- and NTK, based in literature reviewed and field work were obtained monitoring three facultative secondary stabilization ponds, FSSP, pilots: conventional pond, CP, baffled pond, BP, and baffled-meshed pond, BMP. Models were sensitive to flow inlet, solar radiation, pH and oxygen content; the sensitive parameters in Carbon Model were KCOT Ba, umax Ba, umax Al, K1OX, VAl, R1DCH4, YBh. The sensitive parameters in the Nitrogen model were KCOT Ba, umax Ba, umax Al, VAl, KOPH, KOPA, r4An. The test t–paired showed a good simulating of Carbon model refers to TOC in FSSP; on the other side, the Nitrogen model showed a good simulating of NH4+. Different topological models modify ecosystem ecology forcing different transformation pathways of Nitrogen; equal transformations of the Carbon BMP topology could be achieved using lower volumes, however, a calibration for a new model would be required. Carbon and Nitrogen models developed could be coupled to hydrodynamics models for better modeling of FSSP.

  7. Long-term changes in soil organic carbon and nitrogen under semiarid tillage and cropping practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding long-term changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) and total soil nitrogen (TSN) is important for evaluating C fluxes and optimizing N management. We evaluated long-term SOC and TSN changes under dryland rotations for historical stubble-mulch (HSM) and graded terrace (GT) plots on a clay l...

  8. Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen responses after 34 years of tillage of a sandy ultisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation tillage and crop management strategies are available to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents, but long-term (> 30 yrs) field results quantifying these increases are sparse. Our objectives were to quantity above ground biomass inputs and changes in vertica...

  9. Feeding ecology of harbour porpoises: stable isotope anlaysis of carbon and nitrogen in muscle and bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, O.E.; Aarts, G.M.; Das, K.; Lepoint, G.; Michel, L.; Reijnders, P.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Harbour porpoises are the most common small cetaceans in the North Sea and Dutch coastal waters. To study their trophic level and feeding location, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (d13C and d15N) were analysed in muscle and bone samples collected from 157 porpoises stranded along the Dutch

  10. Carbon and nitrogen stocks in the soils of Central and Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen stocks are presented for Central and Eastern Europe. The study uses the soil geographic and attribute data held in a 1:2 500 000 scale Soil and Terrain (SOTER) database, covering Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, P

  11. The QQS orphan gene regulates carbon and nitrogen partitioning across species via NF-YC interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The allocation of carbon and nitrogen resources to the synthesis of plant proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids is complex and under the control of many genes; much remains to be understood about this process. QQS (Qua Quine Starch, At3g30720), an orphan gene unique to Arabidopsis thaliana, regulates...

  12. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  13. ANALYTICAL EMPLOYMENT OF STABLE ISOTOPES OF CARBON, NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND HYDROGEN FOR FOOD AUTHENTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Novelli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen were used for analytical purposes for the discrimination of the type of production (farming vs. fishing in the case of sea bass and for geographical origin in the case of milk. These results corroborate similar experimental evidences and confirm the potential of this analytical tool to support of food traceability.

  14. Novel porous carbon materials with ultrahigh nitrogen contents for selective CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials were prepared by a nanocasting route using tri-continuous mesoporous silica IBN-9 as a hard template. Rationally choosing carbon precursors and carefully controlling activation conditions result in an optimized material denoted as IBN9-NC1-A, which possesses a very high nitrogen doping concentration (∼13 wt%) and a large surface area of 890 m 2 g -1 arising from micropores (<1 nm). It exhibits an excellent performance for CO 2 adsorption over a wide range of CO 2 pressures. Specifically, its equilibrium CO 2 adsorption capacity at 25 °C reaches up to 4.50 mmol g -1 at 1 bar and 10.53 mmol g -1 at 8 bar. In particular, it shows a much higher CO 2 uptake at low pressure (e.g. 1.75 mmol g -1 at 25 °C and 0.2 bar) than any reported carbon-based materials, owing to its unprecedented nitrogen doping level. The high nitrogen contents also give rise to significantly enhanced CO 2/N 2 selectivities (up to 42), which combined with the high adsorption capacities, make these new carbon materials promising sorbents for selective CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas and other relevant applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen flows through the benthic food web of a photic subtidal sandy sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evrard, V.P.E.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Heip, C.H.R.; Huettel, M.; Xenopoulos, M.A.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen flows within the food web of a subtidal sandy sediment were studied using stable isotope natural abundances and tracer addition. Natural abundances of 13C and 15N stable isotopes of the consumers and their potential benthic and pelagic resources were measured. δ13C data revealed

  16. Carbon and nitrogen assimilation activities of deep subseafloor microbes analyzed by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2009-12-01

    Deep subseafloor microbes play significant roles on biogeochemical cycles with extremely low metabolic activities. The subseafloor microbial community consists mainly of uncultured components; hence, their growth and metabolic characteristics remain almost completely unknown. Here, we presnet in vitro isotopic evidence that the deep subseafloor microbes actively incooporate multiple carbon and nitrogen compounds into their biomass using NanoSIMS. We incubated methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments with small 13C-labeled glucose, acetate, pyruvate, bicarbonate, amino-acids and methane in the presence of 15N-labeled ammonia as a nitrogen source for 2 and 6 monthes under the anaerobic condition. Using NanoSIMS, we observed the cells that incooprated 13C- or 15N-labeled substrates such as 13C-glucose, pyruvate, and 15N-ammonia up to 50% of their cellular carbon or nitrogen mass. Assimilation of 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids as well as 13C-bicarbonates by autotrophs was also observed while 13C-methane was found to be difficult to be used for the carbon source, regardless of the presence of some additional electron acceptors for the energy respiration. These results indicate that the metabolic activities of deep subseafloor microbes can be stimulated in vitro by adding potential carbon and nitrogen sources, providing new insights into the biogeochemical functioning of the deep subseaflor microbes and its ecosystem.

  17. Carbon respiration and nitrogen dynamics in Corsican pine litter amended with aluminium and tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kraal; K.G.J. Nierop; J. Kaal; A. Tietema

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the carbon (C) mineralisation and nitrogen (N) dynamics in litter from a Corsican pine forest in response to individual and combined additions of aluminium (M), condensed tannin (extracted from fresh Corsican pine needles) and hydrolysable tannin (commercial tannic acid). Production

  18. Carbon and nitrogen in forest floor and mineral soil under six common European tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lars; Schmidt, Inger K.; Callesen, Ingeborg;

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of tree species effects on soil C and N pools is scarce, particularly for European deciduous tree species. We studied forest floor and mineral soil carbon and nitrogen under six common European tree species in a common garden design replicated at six sites in Denmark. Three decades...

  19. Enhancement of carbon and nitrogen transformations during composting of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Qdais, H A; Hamoda, M F

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is viewed as an integrated system encompassing waste minimization, recycling, and resource recovery. This has increased the interest in the composting process, in which the biodegradable portion of MSW is biologically converted into a valuable product that can be utilized as a soil conditioner or fertilizer. Effective operation of the composting process can be achieved by determining the optimal conditions for the controlling parameters in order to enhance the biological reactions during composting. Information on biodegradation rates are also essential for process design. Therefore, this study was conducted in order to examine the factors affecting process performance and transformation of essential elements of MSW such as carbon and nitrogen. A pilot study of in-vessel aerobic composting of MSW was carried out and the operating parameters, which affect biodegradation of carbonaceous and nitrogenous matter were studied using a specially designed rotating drum and a carbon-rich MSW. The effects of temperature, moisture content, and air flow rate were examined. The performance of the composting process was evaluated by measuring the carbon and nitrogen content during experiments, each of which lasted for 30 days. The study showed that enhanced transformations of carbon and nitrogen occur at 55 degrees C for temperature, 60% for moisture content, and 10L/kgh for air flow rate using the food-rich MSW generated in the Gulf countries. PMID:15027824

  20. Dust storm erosion and its impact on soil carbon and nitrogen losses in Northern China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang Xiaobin,; Oenema, O.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Perdok, U.D.; Cai, D.

    2006-01-01

    There is increased awareness of the environmental impacts of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) losses through wind erosion, especially in areas heavily affected by dust storm erosion. This paper reviews the recent literature concerning dust storm-related soil erosion and its impact on soil C and N lo

  1. New phosphorus analogues of nitrogen classics--no carbon copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudat, Dietrich

    2014-05-01

    Getting heavy: The recently prepared phosphorus analogues of two old acquaintances, urea and dinitrogen tetroxide, bear some structural resemblance to their archetypes but are no carbon copies. Their syntheses and chemical properties reveal rather certain peculiarities, which back the doctrine that the electronic properties of the heavier elements in a group differ from those of the lightest congener. PMID:24718995

  2. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization in vineyard acid soils amended with a bentonitic winery waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification processes were determined in different vineyard soils. The measurements were performed in samples non-amended and amended with different bentonitic winery waste concentrations. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO2 released by the soil under laboratory conditions, whereas NH4+ was determined after its extraction with KCl 2M. The time evolution of both, carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification, was followed during 42 days. The released CO2 was low in the analyzed vineyard soils, and hence the metabolic activity in these soils was low. The addition of the bentonitic winery waste to the studied soils increased highly the carbon mineralization (2-5 fold), showing that the organic matter added together the bentonitic waste to the soil have low stability. In both cases, amended and non-amended samples, the maximum carbon mineralization was measured during the first days (2-4 days), decreasing as the incubation time increased. The NH4+ results showed an important effect of bentonitic winery waste on the ammonification behavior in the studied soils. In the non-amended samples the ammonification was no detected in none of the soils, whereas in the amended soils important NH4+ concentrations were detected. In these cases, the ammonification was fast, reaching the maximum values of NH4 between 7 and 14 days after the bentonitic waste additions. Also, the percentages of ammonification respect to the total nitrogen in the soil were high, showing that the nitrogen provided by the bentonitic waste to the soil is non-stable. The fast carbon mineralization found in the soils amended with bentonitic winery wastes shows low possibilities of the use of this waste for the increasing the organic carbon pools in the soil.On the other hand, the use of this waste as N-fertilizer can be possible. However, due its fast ammonification, the waste should be added to the soils during active plant growth periods.

  3. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  4. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  5. The experimental studies on the carbon and nitrogen budgets of Pseudeuphausia sinica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Donghui; Li Shaojing; Chen Feng; Wang Guizhong; Chen Gang

    2003-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen budgets were estimated on the adult females, juveniles and postfurcilia larvae of Pseudeuphausia sinica fed on newly hatching nauplii of Artemia salina in the laboratory. It was found that the ingestion rate was linearly related to the food concentration, suggesting high feeding potential. The linear correlation could be established between the respirating rate (carbon consumption rate) and carbon ingestion rate, as well as carbon assimilation rate. The regression coefficients (i.e.specific dynamic action coefficients) were in the range from 9% to 16% (ingested C) or 10% to 17% (assimilated C) respectively, with lower in the post-furcilia larvae. There also existed a linear correlation equation between estimated total nitrogen excretion rate and the rates of nitrogen ingestion and assimilation separately, except for the juveniles. The defecation rates increased with the increase of the ingestion rate; as a result, assimilation efficiency was not related to the ingestion rate, ranging from 0.84 to 0.95. The results inducated that the nitrogen content in food particles was a key factor limiting the growth of P. sinica. The critical ingestion rate was 10 μgN@mg-1body dry weight per day. Assimilated N was lost mostly by excretion, following allocated to somatic growth. The nitrogen loss by moult only accounted for a minor part. As for carbon budget, respiration and somatic growth also accounted for most of assimilation, but varied with ingestion rates. Moult loss was minor. Estimated reproductive growth (C&N) in the adult females accounted for somewhat higher percent of assimilation than the moult growth. The net growth efficiency (K2) increased with the increase of the ingestion rates, but decreased slightly for juvenile and post-furcilia larvae after the rates up to a certain value.

  6. Selective adsorption for removal of nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon streams over carbon-based adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarri, Masoud S.

    The ultimate goal of this thesis is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of surface oxygen functional groups on carbon-based adsorbents in the adsorption of nitrogen compounds that are known to be present in liquid fuels. N2 adsorption was used to characterize pore structures. The surface chemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques with a mass spectrometer to identify and quantify the type and concentration of oxygen functional groups on the basis of CO2 and CO evolution profiles. It was found that although surface area and pore size distribution are important for the adsorption process, they are not primary factors in the adsorption of nitrogen compounds. On the other hand, both the type and concentration of surface oxygen-containing functional groups play an important role in determining adsorptive denitrogenation performance. Higher concentrations of the oxygen functional groups on the adsorbents resulted in a higher adsorption capacity for the nitrogen compounds. A fundamental insight was gained into the contributions of different oxygen functional groups by analyzing the changes in the monolayer maximum adsorption capacity, qm, and the adsorption constant, K, for nitrogen compounds on different activated carbons. Acidic functional groups such as carboxylic acids and carboxylic anhydrides appear to contribute more to the adsorption of quinoline, while the basic oxygen functional groups such as carbonyls and quinones enhance the adsorption of indole. Despite the high number of publications on the adsorptive desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, these studies did not consider the presence of coexisting nitrogen compounds. It is well-known that, to achieve ultraclean diesel fuel, sulfur must be reduced to a very low level, where the concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds are comparable. The adsorptive denitrogenation and

  7. Synthesis of boron/nitrogen substituted carbons for aqueous asymmetric capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomko, Timothy [Energy and Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan, E-mail: rur12@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, 270 MRL Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Aksoy, Parvana [Energy Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Foley, Henry C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Highlights: > Synthesis of highly substituted boron and nitrogen containing carbons (BCN) for ultracapacitor applications. > Evidence for strong electroadsorption of protons on BCN. > Increased specific capacitance per unit area and improved cell voltage in aqueous asymmetric capacitors. - Abstract: Boron/nitrogen substituted carbons were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of polyborazylene/coal tar pitch blends to yield a carbon with a boron and nitrogen content of 14 at% and 10 at%, respectively. The presence of heteroatoms in these carbons shifted the hydrogen evolution overpotential to -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl in aqueous electrolytes, providing a large electrochemical potential window ({approx}2.4 V) as well as a specific capacitance of 0.6 F/m{sup 2}. An asymmetric capacitor was fabricated using the as-prepared low surface area carbon as the negative electrode along with a redox active manganese dioxide as the positive electrode. The energy density of the capacitor exceeded 10 Wh/kg at a power density of 1 kW/kg and had a cycle life greater than 1000 cycles.

  8. COMPLEX COMPOST AND CIRCULATION OF NITROGEN AND CARBON AT THE AGROLANDSCAPE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyuchenko I. S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex compost includes all elements of the periodic table and is valuable due to the complexity of its system. Among the elements forming a chemical composition of the complex compost we can identify two most important, which are distinguishing a specific character of the interaction with each other and defining the basic processes to ensure vegetation of living system - nitrogen and carbon. Nitrogen determines the rate of energy and connects with living forms of organic matter; it is included as the part of protein and is a major element in determining the productivity of ecosystems. At the cycle of carbon its organic forms and carbon dioxide take a part, presenting the main factors of the processes of respiration and photosynthesis

  9. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C increased from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios showed positive correlations with local wind speeds, suggesting that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray significantly contributes to marine organic aerosols over the

  10. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  11. Organic carbon and nitrogen export from a tropical dam-impacted floodplain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbrügg, R.; Suter, S.; Lehmann, M. F.; Wehrli, B.; Senn, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical floodplains play an important role in organic matter transport, storage, and transformation between headwaters and oceans. However, the fluxes and quality of organic carbon (OC) and organic nitrogen (ON) in tropical river-floodplain systems are not well constrained. We explored the quantity and characteristics of dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively) in the Kafue River flowing through the Kafue Flats (Zambia), a tropical river-floodplain system in the Zambezi River basin. During the flooding season, > 80% of the Kafue River water passed through the floodplain, mobilizing large quantities of OC and ON, which resulted in a net export of 69-119 kg OC km-2 d-1 and 3.8-4.7 kg ON km-2 d-1, 80% of which was in the dissolved form. The elemental C : N ratio of ~ 20, the comparatively high δ13C values of -25‰ to -21‰, and its spectroscopic properties (excitation-emission matrices) showed that DOM in the river was mainly of terrestrial origin. Despite a threefold increase in OC loads due to inputs from the floodplain, the characteristics of the riverine DOM remained relatively constant along the sampled 410-km river reach. This suggests that floodplain DOM displayed properties similar to those of DOM leaving the upstream reservoir and implied that the DOM produced in the reservoir was relatively short-lived. In contrast, the particulate fraction was 13C-depleted (-29‰) and had a C : N ratio of ~ 8, which indicated that POM originated from phytoplankton production in the reservoir and in the floodplain, rather than from plant debris or resuspended sediments. While the upstream dam had little effect on the DOM pool, terrestrial particles were retained, and POM from algal and microbial sources was released to the river. A nitrogen mass balance over the 2200 km2 flooded area revealed an annual deficit of 15 500-22 100 t N in the Kafue Flats. The N isotope budget suggests that these N losses are balanced by intense N-fixation. Our

  12. Organic carbon and nitrogen export from a tropical dam-impacted floodplain system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zurbrügg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical floodplains play an important role in organic matter transport, storage, and transformation between headwaters and oceans. However, the fluxes and quality of organic carbon (OC and organic nitrogen (ON in tropical river-floodplain systems are not well constrained. We explored the quantity and characteristics of dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively in the Kafue River flowing through the Kafue Flats (Zambia, a tropical river-floodplain system in the Zambezi River basin. During the flooding season, > 80% of the Kafue River water passed through the floodplain, mobilizing large quantities of OC and ON, which resulted in a net export of 69–119 kg OC km−2 d−1 and 3.8–4.7 kg ON km−2 d−1, 80% of which was in the dissolved form. The elemental C : N ratio of ~ 20, the comparatively high δ13C values of −25‰ to −21‰, and its spectroscopic properties (excitation-emission matrices showed that DOM in the river was mainly of terrestrial origin. Despite a threefold increase in OC loads due to inputs from the floodplain, the characteristics of the riverine DOM remained relatively constant along the sampled 410-km river reach. This suggests that floodplain DOM displayed properties similar to those of DOM leaving the upstream reservoir and implied that the DOM produced in the reservoir was relatively short-lived. In contrast, the particulate fraction was 13C-depleted (−29‰ and had a C : N ratio of ~ 8, which indicated that POM originated from phytoplankton production in the reservoir and in the floodplain, rather than from plant debris or resuspended sediments. While the upstream dam had little effect on the DOM pool, terrestrial particles were retained, and POM from algal and microbial sources was released to the river. A nitrogen mass balance over the 2200 km2 flooded area revealed an annual deficit of 15 500–22 100 t N in

  13. Soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization under different tillage systems and Permanent Groundcover cultivation between Orange trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the alterations in carbon and nitrogen mineralization due to different soil tillage systems and groundcover species for intercropped orange trees. The experiment was established in an Ultisol soil (Typic Paleudults originated from Caiuá sandstone in northwestern of the state of Paraná, Brazil, in an area previously cultivated with pasture (Brachiaria humidicola. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated: conventional tillage (CT in the entire area and strip tillage (ST with a 2-m width, each with different groundcover vegetation management systems. The citrus cultivar utilized was the 'Pera' orange (Citrus sinensis grafted onto a 'Rangpur' lime rootstock. The soil samples were collected at a 0-15-cm depth after five years of experiment development. Samples were collected from under the tree canopy and from the inter-row space after the following treatments: (1 CT and annual cover crop with the leguminous Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT and perennial cover crop with the leguminous peanut Arachis pintoi; (3 CT and evergreen cover crop with Bahiagrass Paspalum notatum; (4 CT and cover crop with spontaneous B. humidicola grass vegetation; and (5 ST and maintenance of the remaining grass (pasture of B. humidicola. The soil tillage systems and different groundcover vegetation influenced the C and N mineralization, both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space. The cultivation of B. humidicola under strip tillage provided higher potential mineralization than the other treatments in the inter-row space. Strip tillage increased the C and N mineralization compared to conventional tillage. The grass cultivation increased the C and N mineralization when compared to the others treatments cultivated in the inter-row space.

  14. Regulation of CO2 and N2O fluxes by coupled carbon and nitrogen availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) interactions contribute to uncertainty in current biogeochemical models that aim to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG, including CO2 and N2O) emissions from soil to atmosphere. In this study, we quantified CO2 and N2O flux patterns and their relationship along with increasing C additions only, N additions only, a C gradient combined with excess N, and an N gradient with excess C via laboratory incubations. Conventional trends, where labile C or N addition results in higher CO2 or N2O fluxes, were observed. However, at low levels of C availability, saturating N amendments reduced soil CO2 flux while with high C availability N amendments enhanced it. At saturating C conditions increasing N amendments first reduced and then increased CO2 fluxes. Similarly, N2O fluxes were initially reduced by adding labile C under N limited conditions, but additional C enhanced N2O fluxes by more than two orders of magnitude in the saturating N environment. Changes in C or N use efficiency could explain the altered gas flux patterns and imply a critical level in the interactions between N and C availability that regulate soil trace gas emissions and biogeochemical cycling. Compared to either N or C amendment alone, the interaction of N and C caused ∼60 and ∼5 times the total GHG emission, respectively. Our findings suggested that the response of CO2 and N2O fluxes along stoichiometric gradients in C and N availability should be accounted for interpreting or modeling the biogeochemistry of GHG emissions. (letter)

  15. Effects of moso bamboo encroachment into native, broad-leaved forests on soil carbon and nitrogen pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shangbin; Conant, Richard T.; Zhou, Guomo; Wang, Yixiang; Wang, Nan; Li, Yanhua; Zhang, Kaiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Across southern China, Moso bamboo has been encroaching on most neighboring secondary broad-leaved forests and/or coniferous plantations, leading to the land cover changes that alter abiotic and biotic conditions. Little is known about how this conversion alters soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). We selected three sites, each with three plots arrayed along the bamboo encroachment pathway: moso bamboo forest (BF); transition zone, mixed forest plots (MF); and broad-leaved forest (BLF), and examined how bamboo encroachment affects soil organic C (SOC), soil total N, microbial biomass C (MBC), microbial biomass N (MBN), water-soluble organic C (WSOC), and water-soluble organic N (WSON) in three forests. Over nine years, moso bamboo encroachment leads to a decrease in SOC and total soil N, an increase in MBC and WSOC, and a decrease in MBN and WSON. Changes in soil C and N occurred mainly in the topsoil. We conclude that moso bamboo encroachment on broadleaved forest not only substantially altered soil C and N pools, but also changed the distribution pattern of C and N in the studied forest soils. Continued bamboo encroachment into evergreen broadleaved forests seems likely to lead to net CO2 emissions to the atmosphere as ecosystem C stocks decline. PMID:27526781

  16. Effect of nitrogen post-doping on a commercial platinum-ruthenium/carbon anode catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpuz, April R.; Wood, Kevin N.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Joghee, Prabhuram; Olson, Tim S.; Bender, Guido; Dinh, Huyen N.; Gennett, Thomas; Richards, Ryan M.; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    This work investigates the effects of after-the-fact chemical modification of a state-of-the-art commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). A commercial PtRu/C (JM HiSPEC-10000) catalyst is post-doped with nitrogen by ion-implantation, where "post-doped" denotes nitrogen doping after metal is carbon-supported. Composition and performance of the PtRu/C catalyst post-modified with nitrogen at several dosages are evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), rotating disk electrode (RDE), and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for DMFC. Overall, implantation at high dosage results in 16% higher electrochemical surface area and enhances performance, specifically in the mass transfer region. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) results show that after 5000 cycles of accelerated durability testing to high potential, the modified catalyst retains 34% more electrochemical surface area (ECSA) than the unmodified catalyst. The benefits of nitrogen post-doping are further substantiated by DMFC durability studies (carried out for 425 h), where the MEA with the modified catalyst exhibits higher surface area and performance stability in comparison to the MEA with unmodified catalyst. These results demonstrate that post-doping of nitrogen in a commercial PtRu/C catalyst is an effective approach, capable of improving the performance of available best-in-class commercial catalysts.

  17. Simultaneous removal of COD and nitrogen using a novel carbon-membrane aerated biofilm reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A membrane aerated biofilm reactor is a promising technology for wastewater treatment. In this study, a carbon-membrane aerated biofilm reactor (CMABR) has been developed, to remove carbon organics and nitrogen simultaneously from one reactor. The results showed that CMABR has a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen removal efficiency, as it is operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20 h, and it also showed a perfect performance, even if the HRT was shortened to 12 h. In this period, the removal efficiencies of COD, ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N), and total nitrogen (TN) reached 86%, 94%, and 84%, respectively. However,the removal efficiencies of NH4+-N and TN declined rapidly as the HRT was shortened to 8 h. This is because of the excessive growth of biomass on the nonwoven fiber and very high organic loading rate. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were mainly distributed in the inner layer of the biofilm. The coexistence of AOB and eubacteria in one biofilm can enhance the simultaneous removal of COD and nitrogen.

  18. Assessing potential diagenetic alteration of primary iodine-to-calcium ratios in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, D. S.; Lu, Z.; Swart, P. K.; Planavsky, N.; Gill, B. C.; Loyd, S. J.; Lyons, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    We have evaluated iodine-to-calcium (I/Ca) ratios from a series of carbonate samples with well-constrained histories of diagenetic alteration to assess the likelihood of overprints on primary water column-derived signals. Because only the oxidized iodine species, iodate, is incorporated during carbonate precipitation, I/Ca ratios have strong potential as proxies for both marine redox and carbon cycling. This utility lies with the combination of iodate's redox sensitivity as well as the close association between iodine and marine organic matter. However, despite the possibility of large pore water iodine enrichments relative to overlying seawater, carbonate alteration under reducing diagenetic conditions, and iodate-to-iodide reduction, no study has assessed the prospect of diagenetic alteration of primary I/Ca ratios. Here, we evaluated aragonite-to-calcite transformations and dolomitization within the Key Largo Limestone of South Florida and the Clino and Unda drill cores of the Bahamas Bank. Also, early burial diagenesis was studied through analysis of I/Ca ratios in short cores from a variety of shallow settings within the Exuma Bay, Bahamas. Further, we evaluated authigenic carbonates through analysis of iodine in concretions constrained to have formed during varying stages of evolving pore fluid chemistry. In all cases, I/Ca ratios show the potential for diagenetic iodine loss relative to water-column derived values, consistent with observations of quantitative reduction of dissolved iodate to iodide in pore waters before or synchronous with carbonate alteration. In no case, however, did we observe an increase in I/Ca during diagenetic transformation. Our results suggest both that primary I/Ca values and trends can be preserved but that maximum I/Ca ratios should be considered a minimum estimate of seawater iodate. We recommend that ancient carbonates with distinct I/Ca trends not indicative of diagenetic iodine loss reflect preservation of or very early

  19. Functionalization of terminal carbon atoms of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene by polyazido nitrogen rich molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajavelu Murali Sankar; Tapta Kanchan Roy; Tushar Jana

    2011-07-01

    We report a novel synthetic approach for the attachment of the polyazido nitrogen rich molecule on to the hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) backbone. The terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB are functionalized by attaching cyanuric chloride (CYC) covalently on the HTPB backbone. Further reaction of this modified HTPB with sodium azide yields polyazido nitrogen rich HTPB. The unique physico-chemical properties and the microstructure of the HTPB do not get affected upon modification. IR, gel permeable chromatography (GPC) and absorption spectroscopy studies prove that the polyazido nitrogen rich molecules are covalently attached at the terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB. The π electron delocalization owing to long butadiene chain, strong electron withdrawing effect of the triazine molecules are the major driving forces for the covalent attachment of the triazine at the terminal carbon atoms of the HTPB. The disruption of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the terminal hydroxyl groups of the HTPB chains and the presence of hydrogen bonding between the N atoms of the triazine ring with OH group of the HTPB are observed. Theoretical study also reveals the existence of the hydrogen bonding between the OH and N. Theoretical calculation shows that the detonation performance of the polyazido nitrogen rich HTPB are very promising.

  20. Correlation among carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and physiological parameters of Rinodina sophodes found at Kanpur city, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satya; Upreti, D K

    2009-09-30

    Accumulation of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur content in Rinodina sophodes, crustose poleotolerent lichen growing naturally in and around six sites of Kanpur city was estimated, and their influence on the photosynthetic pigments of the lichen was studied. Maximum carbon concentration was recorded at highly polluted area while higher accumulation of nitrogen was recorded near village in outskirt of the city having higher ammonia emission. The concentration of sulphur was not detected in most of the sites except a single site where it had a quite lower value (0.22%). Photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a and b) increased parallel to the level of traffic density. Multiple correlation analysis revealed that chlorophyll a had highly significant correlation (1%) with chlorophyll b (r=0.9986) and total chlorophyll (r=0.9307). Carbon is directly correlated with nitrogen (r=0.3035), sulphur (r=0.1743) and chlorophyll degradation (r=0.2685) while negatively correlated with chlorophyll a (-0.3323), chlorophyll b (r=-0.3429) and total chlorophyll (r=-0.0824). Nitrogen showed negative correlation between all photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll degradation, while in case of sulphur, it was high positive correlation at 1% with chlorophyll degradation (0.9445). PMID:19520501

  1. Rectifying Properties of a Nitrogen/Boron-Doped Capped-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Molecular Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng; LIU De-Sheng; ZHANG Ying; WANG Pei-Ji; ZHANG Zhong

    2011-01-01

    @@ Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbonnanotube-based molecular junction.Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site.The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer.Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the Cso nanotube caps.%Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbon-nanotube-based molecular junction. Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site. The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer. Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the C60 nanotube caps.

  2. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  3. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon for energy storage in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Xiqing; Engelhard, Mark; Wang, Chongmin; Dai, Sheng; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo; Lin, Yuehe

    We demonstrate an excellent performance of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (N-MPC) for energy storage in vanadium redox flow batteries. Mesoporous carbon (MPC) is prepared using a soft-template method and doped with nitrogen by heat-treating MPC in NH 3. N-MPC is characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The redox reaction of [VO] 2+/[VO 2] + is characterized with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electrocatalytic kinetics of the redox couple [VO] 2+/[VO 2] + is significantly enhanced on N-MPC electrode compared with MPC and graphite electrodes. The reversibility of the redox couple [VO] 2+/[VO 2] + is greatly improved on N-MPC (0.61 for N-MPC vs. 0.34 for graphite), which is expected to increase the energy storage efficiency of redox flow batteries. Nitrogen doping facilitates the electron transfer on electrode/electrolyte interface for both oxidation and reduction processes. N-MPC is a promising material for redox flow batteries. This also opens up new and wider applications of nitrogen-doped carbon.

  4. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  5. Coupled, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Ion Chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger; Vuitton, Veronique; Lavvas, Panayotis; Klippenstein, Stephen; Horst, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    We present simulations of the coupled nitrogen, oxygen, and ion chemistry on Titan using a state-of-the-art photochemical model. The model is one dimensional and extends from the surface to the exobase. The chemistry linking 160 neutral species and 172 ion species is described through networks including 1139 neutral reactions and 4361 ion reactions. UV photolysis of 59 species is included as well as dissociation and ionization of 16 species due to suprathermal electrons. Reaction rate coefficients are obtained from a thorough review of the literature supplemented by calculations of rates of important reactions when laboratory values are not available. Comparison of the model with available observational constraints helps to determine the fundamental chemical pathways in the atmosphere. We will discuss in particular the importance of recent measurements of HNC, HC15N, CO2, and H2O and the role of ion chemistry in the synthesis of neutral species. Key reactions that require further laboratory of theoretical study will be identified.

  6. Carbon and nitrogen abundance determinations from transition layer lines. [giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1988-01-01

    For red giants a smooth increase in the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratio for increasing B-V as is expected for the first dredge up phase when the outer convection zone deepens is found. An average increase in the nitrogen to silicon ratio for B-V = 0.6 which goes back to almost solar values for cool giants with B - V approximately 1.0 is reported. It looks as if Si would be enriched for deeper mixing contrary to expectations from standard evolution theory.

  7. Nitrogen input effectiveness on carbon sequestration in rainfed cropping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Poma, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The combined effect of total N and C/N ratio had a large influence on the decomposition rate and consequently on potential soil organic carbon sequestration. The aim of the work was to evaluate Carbon sequestration potentiality under three mineral N fertilization levels in interaction with two cropping systems characterized by addition of N input due to leguminous species in the rotation. The study was carried out in the semiarid Mediterranean environment in a 18years long-term experiment. Is well know that in the semiarid environment the excess of N fertilization reduces biomass yield and the consequent C input. On the contrary, both N and C input determine high difference in C/N input ratio and faster organic matter mineralization. Results showed no influence of N fertilization on SOC sequestration and a reduction of SOC stock due to crop rotation due to lower C input. Crop residue quality of durum wheat-pea crop rotation characterized by a faster decomposition rate could explain the lower ability of crop rotation to sequester C in the semiarid environment.

  8. Chemical bonding modifications of tetrahedral amorphous carbon and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films induced by rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.sinha-roy@ulster.ac.uk; Papakonstantinou, P. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Bain, M.F. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Gamble, H.S. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-22

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-CN {sub x}), deposited by double bend off plane Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc were annealed up to 1000 deg. C in flowing argon for 2 min. Modifications on the chemical bonding structure of the rapidly annealed films, as a function of temperature, were investigated by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The interpretation of these spectra is discussed. The results demonstrate that the structure of undoped ta-C films prepared at floating potential with an arc current of 80 A remains stable up to 900 deg. C, whereas that of ta-CN {sub x} containing 12 at.% nitrogen is stable up to 700 deg. C. At higher temperatures, all the spectra indicated the predominant formation of graphitic carbon. Through NEXAFS studies, we clearly observed three {pi}* resonance peaks at the {sup '}N K edge structure. The origin of these three peaks is not well established in the literature. However our temperature-dependant study ascertained that the first peak originates from C=N bonds and the third peak originates from the incorporation of nitrogen into the graphite like domains.

  9. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flege, S.; Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A.; Baba, K.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C2H4 and N2, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of carbon and nitrogen assimilation mechanisms in three indigenous bioleaching bacteria: predictions and validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenfeld Nicole

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon and nitrogen fixation are essential pathways for autotrophic bacteria living in extreme environments. These bacteria can use carbon dioxide directly from the air as their sole carbon source and can use different sources of nitrogen such as ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, or even nitrogen from the air. To have a better understanding of how these processes occur and to determine how we can make them more efficient, a comparative genomic analysis of three bioleaching bacteria isolated from mine sites in Chile was performed. This study demonstrated that there are important differences in the carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation mechanisms among bioleaching bacteria that coexist in mining environments. Results In this study, we probed that both Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans incorporate CO2 via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle; however, the former bacterium has two copies of the Rubisco type I gene whereas the latter has only one copy. In contrast, we demonstrated that Leptospirillum ferriphilum utilizes the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. Although all the species analyzed in our study can incorporate ammonia by an ammonia transporter, we demonstrated that Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans could also assimilate nitrate and nitrite but only Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans could fix nitrogen directly from the air. Conclusion The current study utilized genomic and molecular evidence to verify carbon and nitrogen fixation mechanisms for three bioleaching bacteria and provided an analysis of the potential regulatory pathways and functional networks that control carbon and nitrogen fixation in these microorganisms.

  11. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrailov, Simeon; Ivanova, Viara

    2016-03-01

    The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein) leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4) 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4) 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  12. Nitrogen reduction pathways in estuarine sediments: Influences of organic carbon and sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Patrick; Tobias, Craig; Cady, David

    2015-10-01

    Potential rates of sediment denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were mapped across the entire Niantic River Estuary, CT, USA, at 100-200 m scale resolution consisting of 60 stations. On the estuary scale, denitrification accounted for ~ 90% of the nitrogen reduction, followed by DNRA and anammox. However, the relative importance of these reactions to each other was not evenly distributed through the estuary. A Nitrogen Retention Index (NIRI) was calculated from the rate data (DNRA/(denitrification + anammox)) as a metric to assess the relative amounts of reactive nitrogen being recycled versus retained in the sediments following reduction. The distribution of rates and accompanying sediment geochemical analytes suggested variable controls on specific reactions, and on the NIRI, depending on position in the estuary and that these controls were linked to organic carbon abundance, organic carbon source, and pore water sulfide concentration. The relationship between NIRI and organic carbon abundance was dependent on organic carbon source. Sulfide proved the single best predictor of NIRI, accounting for 44% of its observed variance throughout the whole estuary. We suggest that as a single metric, sulfide may have utility as a proxy for gauging the distribution of denitrification, anammox, and DNRA.

  13. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  14. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, α-ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  15. QQS orphan gene regulates carbon and nitrogen partitioning across species via NF-YC interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zheng, Wenguang; Zhu, Yanbing; Ye, Huaxun; Tang, Buyun; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Jones, Dallas; Li, Ruoran; Ortiz, Diego; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Chuanlong; Nettleton, Dan; Scott, M Paul; Salas-Fernandez, Maria G; Yin, Yanhai; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2015-11-24

    The allocation of carbon and nitrogen resources to the synthesis of plant proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids is complex and under the control of many genes; much remains to be understood about this process. QQS (Qua-Quine Starch; At3g30720), an orphan gene unique to Arabidopsis thaliana, regulates metabolic processes affecting carbon and nitrogen partitioning among proteins and carbohydrates, modulating leaf and seed composition in Arabidopsis and soybean. Here the universality of QQS function in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation is exemplified by a series of transgenic experiments. We show that ectopic expression of QQS increases soybean protein independent of the genetic background and original protein content of the cultivar. Furthermore, transgenic QQS expression increases the protein content of maize, a C4 species (a species that uses 4-carbon photosynthesis), and rice, a protein-poor agronomic crop, both highly divergent from Arabidopsis. We determine that QQS protein binds to the transcriptional regulator AtNF-YC4 (Arabidopsis nuclear factor Y, subunit C4). Overexpression of AtNF-YC4 in Arabidopsis mimics the QQS-overexpression phenotype, increasing protein and decreasing starch levels. NF-YC, a component of the NF-Y complex, is conserved across eukaryotes. The NF-YC4 homologs of soybean, rice, and maize also bind to QQS, which provides an explanation of how QQS can act in species where it does not occur endogenously. These findings are, to our knowledge, the first insight into the mechanism of action of QQS in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation across species. They have major implications for the emergence and function of orphan genes, and identify a nontransgenic strategy for modulating protein levels in crop species, a trait of great agronomic significance.

  16. Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive properties of nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra by direct carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Fei; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaohua, E-mail: mickyxie@hnu.edu.cn; Chen, Jinhua, E-mail: chenjinhua@hnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were prepared from ZIF-11. • The activated N-PCMPs with fused KOH (N-PCMPs-A) have high specific surface area. • N-PCMPs-A exhibits high specific capacitance. • N-PCMPs-A reveals good cycling performance even at a high current density. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were successfully prepared by direct carbonization of ZIF-11 polyhedra and further activated with fused KOH to obtain N-PCMPs-A. The morphology and microstructure of samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and micropore and chemisorption analyzer. Electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge method in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution on a standard three-electrode system. Results show that, compared with N-PCMPs, N-PCMPs-A has higher specific surface area (2188 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and exhibits improved electrochemical capacitive properties (307 F g{sup −1} at 1.0 A g{sup −1}). The mass specific capacitance of N-PCMPs-A is also higher than that of most MOF-derived carbons, some carbide-derived carbons and carbon aerogel-derived carbons. In addition, the capacitance of the N-PCMPs-A retains 90% after 4000 cycles even at a high current density of 10 A g{sup −1}. These imply that N-PCMPs-A is the promising materials for the construction of a high-performance supercapacitor.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive properties of nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra by direct carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were prepared from ZIF-11. • The activated N-PCMPs with fused KOH (N-PCMPs-A) have high specific surface area. • N-PCMPs-A exhibits high specific capacitance. • N-PCMPs-A reveals good cycling performance even at a high current density. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were successfully prepared by direct carbonization of ZIF-11 polyhedra and further activated with fused KOH to obtain N-PCMPs-A. The morphology and microstructure of samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and micropore and chemisorption analyzer. Electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge method in 1.0 M H2SO4 aqueous solution on a standard three-electrode system. Results show that, compared with N-PCMPs, N-PCMPs-A has higher specific surface area (2188 m2 g−1) and exhibits improved electrochemical capacitive properties (307 F g−1 at 1.0 A g−1). The mass specific capacitance of N-PCMPs-A is also higher than that of most MOF-derived carbons, some carbide-derived carbons and carbon aerogel-derived carbons. In addition, the capacitance of the N-PCMPs-A retains 90% after 4000 cycles even at a high current density of 10 A g−1. These imply that N-PCMPs-A is the promising materials for the construction of a high-performance supercapacitor

  18. Vegetation Dynamics and Carbon-Nitrogen Cycles in NCAR CLM4-CNDV Under Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, K.; Zeng, X.; Shao, P.

    2012-12-01

    The global biogeochemical cycle has become a major component of climate change studies. There are numerous important aspects in the biogeochemical feedbacks to the externally forced climate, and two of them are vegetation dynamics and coupling of carbon-nitrogen cycles. It is well established that evolution of vegetation cover substantially influences biogeophysical interactions with the atmosphere. More recently several studies suggest that the nitrogen cycle can significantly change the feedback of the land biosphere to the warming climate (commonly noted as γ) and to the increase of CO2 (β) compared to the models considering only the carbon cycle. The number of such studies is still small, however, particularly with dynamic vegetation models. Here we report several characteristics of a global land model NCAR CLM4-CNDV, which simulates the interactions between the vegetation dynamics and carbon-nitrogen cycles (but not the anthropogenic land use and land cover changes). A series of global off-line simulations are run with reanalysis-based atmospheric data as well as the model output from one member of the fully coupled CCSM4 simulations contributing to phase five of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). They cover pre-industrial conditions, the historical period, and future projection under RCP8.5 scenario in CMIP5. The topics will include the diagnosis of the simulated vegetation distribution, global-scale quantities (total carbon storage, average albedo, etc), and the sensitivity of the land carbon pool to warming climate and CO2 (γ, β). For the vegetation dynamics, grid-level evolution in time from the initial conditions to quasi-equilibrium and the regional change over the tropics and Arctic regions in the future will be summarized. The other results will be compared to previous studies on carbon-nitrogen coupling within NCAR CLM to augment them by dynamic vegetation and/or transient simulations extending to the future. The results will be

  19. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bala

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a~large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2-fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4. In our equilibrium simulations, only 12–17% of the deposited Nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C : N ratio of 20:1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2-fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of Nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since preindustrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been approximately compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2-fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  20. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, G.; Devaraju, N.; Chaturvedi, R. K.; Caldeira, K.; Nemani, R.

    2013-11-01

    Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2 fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4). In our equilibrium simulations, only 12-17% of the deposited nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C : N ratio of 20 : 1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2 fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, the terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since pre-industrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been more or less compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2 fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating that climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  1. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks within the Leka Ophiolite Complex, Central Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerga, A.; Konopásek, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of partly and completely serpentinized and carbonated peridotites within the ultramafic section of the Leka Ophiolite Complex have been used to elucidate the evolution of alterations and identify possible fluid sources. The alterations show no evidence for any major deformation and are located along low-angle structures that were formed in a late stage of the structural evolution of the ophiolite complex. Modeling of mineral equilibria in the SiO2-MgO-FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-H2O ± CO2 system has been utilized to constrain the conditions during serpentinization and carbonation. The partly altered peridotites consist of the mineral assemblage olivine-clinopyroxene-serpentine-magnetite-brucite and formed at temperatures isotope values determined for dolomite from crosscutting carbonate lenses within the talc-carbonate rock yield δ13C values of ~- 5 indicative of a mantle source for the carbon required for the carbonation. Oxygen isotope values δSMOW18O of ~ 10.8-11.3‰ together with initial 87Sr/86Sri = 400Ma values of 0.7029 and 0.7063, suggest dehydration of rocks with mantle affinity as a source for the fluids. Based on analytical results and field observations we propose that the formation of the talc- and carbonate-bearing alteration zones is caused by the focused infiltration of fluids that originated at the bottom of already partly serpentinized ophiolite complex during extension-driven burial at the late stage of the Caledonian orogeny.

  2. Effect of powdered activated carbon technology on short-cut nitrogen removal for coal gasification wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Han, Hongjun; Xu, Chunyan; Zhuang, Haifeng; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Linghan

    2013-08-01

    A combined process consisting of a powdered activated carbon technology (PACT) and short-cut biological nitrogen removal reactor (SBNR) was developed to enhance the removal efficiency of the total nitrogen (TN) from the effluent of an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor, which was used to treat coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The SBNR performance was improved with the increasing of COD and TP removal efficiency via PACT. The average removal efficiencies of COD and TP in PACT were respectively 85.80% and 90.30%. Meanwhile, the NH3-N to NO2-N conversion rate was achieved 86.89% in SBNR and the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was 75.54%. In contrast, the AOB in SBNR was significantly inhibited without PACT or with poor performance of PACT in advance, which rendered the removal of TN. Furthermore, PAC was demonstrated to remove some refractory compounds, which therefore improved the biodegradability of the coal gasification wastewater. PMID:23735800

  3. A Combined System for Biological Removal of Nitrogen and Carbon from Nylon-6 Production Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; LIU Guo-hua; TIAN Qing; ZHANG Man; CHEN Ji-hua

    2007-01-01

    A combined system consisting of hydrolysisacidification, denitrification and nitrification reactors wasused to remove carbon and nitrogen from the nylon - 6production wastewater, which was characterized by goodbiodegradability and high nitrogen concentration. Theinfluences of Chemical Oxygen Demand(COD) in theinfluent, recirculation ratio, Hydraulic Residence Time(HRT) and Dissolved Oxygen(DO) concentration on thesystem performances were investigated. From results itcould be seen that good performances have been achievedduring the overall experiments periods, and COD, TotalNitrogen(TN), NH+-N and Suspended Solids(SS) in theeffluent were 53, 16, 2 and 24 mg·L-1, respectively,which has satisfied the first standard of wastewaterdischarge established by Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) of China. Furthermore, results showed thatoperation factors, viz. COD in the influent, recirculationratio, HRT and DO concentration, all had importantinfluences on the system performances.

  4. Cometary origin of carbon, nitrogen, and water on the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, two assumptions on the origin of the earth are substantiated: (1) that the earth accreted from fine hot degassed dust particles containing no volatiles; and (2) that, after the accretion was finished, all the volatiles of the biosphere, including the atmosphere and the oceans, were brought to the earth by cometary bombardment. A temperature of more than 1000 K is deduced at the time when the dust that was going to form the earth was separated from the gas phase. This implies grains of anhydrous silicates and of reduced iron, without either water, carbon, or any labile elements, which remained in gas phase; thus, the minor bodies could not produce atmosphere or oceans. The second assumption is based on the evidence that cometary nuclei are formed in the outer space, by accumulation of frosty particles containing large amounts of ice and volatile molecules. It is shown that the icy bodies which hit the earth are more than enough to explain the whole biosphere.

  5. Carbon dynamics in subtropical forest soil. Effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment and nitrogen addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juxiu X.; Zhou, Guoyi Y.; Zhang, Deqiang Q.; Duan, Honglang L.; Deng, Qi; Zhao, Liang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Xu, Zhihong H. [Griffith Univ., Nathan, Queensland (Australia). Environmental Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences

    2010-06-15

    The levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) are rapidly increasing. Understanding carbon (C) dynamics in soil is important for assessing the soil C sequestration potential under elevated [CO{sub 2}]. Nitrogen (N) is often regarded as a limiting factor in the soil C sequestration under future CO{sub 2} enrichment environment. However, few studies have been carried out to examine what would happen in the subtropical or tropical areas where the ambient N deposition is high. In this study, we used open-top chambers to study the effect of elevated atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] alone and together with N addition on the soil C dynamics in the first 4 years of the treatments applied in southern China. Materials and methods Above- and below-ground C input (tree biomass) into soil, soil respiration, soil organic C, and total N as well as dissolved organic C (DOC) were measured periodically in each of the open-top chambers. Soil samples were collected randomly in each chamber from each of the soil layers (0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm) using a standard soil sampling tube (2.5-cm inside diameter). Soil leachates were collected at the bottom of the chamber below-ground walls in stainless steel boxes. Results and discussion The highest above- and below-ground C input into soil was found in the high CO{sub 2} and high N treatment (CN), followed by the only high N treatment (N+), the only high CO{sub 2} treatment (C+), and then the control (CK) without any CO{sub 2} enrichment or N addition. DOC in the leachates was small for all the treatments. Export of DOC played a minor role in C cycling in our experiment. Generally, soil respiration rate in the chambers followed the order: CN treatment > C + treatment > N + treatment > the control. Except for the C+ treatment, there were no significant differences in soil total N among the CN treatment, N + treatment, and the control. Overall, soil organic C (SOC) was significantly affected by the treatments (p < 0.0001). SOC

  6. The effect of nutrients on carbon and nitrogen fixation by the UCYN-A-haptophyte symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Andreas; Mohr, Wiebke; LaRoche, Julie; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-07-01

    Symbiotic relationships between phytoplankton and N2-fixing microorganisms play a crucial role in marine ecosystems. The abundant and widespread unicellular cyanobacteria group A (UCYN-A) has recently been found to live symbiotically with a haptophyte. Here, we investigated the effect of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), iron (Fe) and Saharan dust additions on nitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production by the UCYN-A-haptophyte association in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic Ocean using nifH expression analysis and stable isotope incubations combined with single-cell measurements. N2 fixation by UCYN-A was stimulated by the addition of Fe and Saharan dust, although this was not reflected in the nifH expression. CO2 fixation by the haptophyte was stimulated by the addition of ammonium nitrate as well as Fe and Saharan dust. Intriguingly, the single-cell analysis using nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that the increased CO2 fixation by the haptophyte in treatments without added fixed N is likely an indirect result of the positive effect of Fe and/or P on UCYN-A N2 fixation and the transfer of N2-derived N to the haptophyte. Our results reveal a direct linkage between the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles that is fuelled by the atmospheric deposition of dust. The comparison of single-cell rates suggests a tight coupling of nitrogen and carbon transfer that stays balanced even under changing nutrient regimes. However, it appears that the transfer of carbon from the haptophyte to UCYN-A requires a transfer of nitrogen from UCYN-A. This tight coupling indicates an obligate symbiosis of this globally important diazotrophic association.

  7. [Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on 5-keto-gluconic acid production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhilei; Wang, Hongcui; Wei, Yuqiao; Li, Yanyan; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2014-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is known to oxidize glucose to gluconic acid (GA), and subsequently, to 2-keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-gluconic acid (5KGA), while 5KGA can be converted to L-(+)-tartaric acid. In order to increase the production of 5KGA, Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 that converts GA to 5KGA exclusively was chosen in this study, and effects of carbon sources (lactose, maltose, sucrose, amylum and glucose) and nitrogen sources (yeast extract, fish meal, corn steep liquor, soybean meal and cotton-seed meal) on 5KGA production were investigated. Results of experiment in 500 mL shake-flask show that the highest yield of 5KGA (98.20 g/L) was obtained using 100 g/L glucose as carbon source. 5KGA reached 100.20 g/L, 109.10 g/L, 99.83 g/L with yeast extract, fish meal and corn steep liquor as nitrogen source respectively, among which the optimal nitrogen source was fish meal. The yield of 5KGA by corn steep liquor is slightly lower than that by yeast extract. For the economic reason, corn steep liquor was selected as nitrogen source and scaled up to 5 L stirred-tank fermentor, and the final concentration of 5KGA reached 93.80 g/L, with its maximum volumetric productivity of 3.48 g/(L x h) and average volumetric productivity of 1.56 g/(L x h). The result obtained in this study showed that carbon and nitrogen sourses for large-scale production of 5KGA by Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 were glucose and corn steep liquor, respectively, and the available glucose almost completely (85.93%) into 5KGA.

  8. Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Accumulation and Partitioning, and C:N:P Stoichiometry in Late-Season Rice under Different Water and Nitrogen Managements

    OpenAIRE

    Yushi Ye; Xinqiang Liang; Yingxu Chen; Liang Li; Yuanjing Ji; Chunyan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle) of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD...

  9. Accelerating the spin-up of the coupled carbon and nitrogen cycle model in CLM4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The commonly adopted biogeochemistry spin-up process in earth system model is to run the model for hundreds to thousands of years subject to periodic atmospheric forcing to reach dynamic steady state of the carbon-nitrogen (CN models. A variety of approaches have been proposed to reduce the computation time of the spin-up process. Significant improvement in computational efficiency has been made recently. However, a long simulation time is still required to reach the common convergence criteria of the coupled carbon/nitrogen model. A gradient projection method was proposed and used to further reduce the computation time after examining the trend of the dominant carbon pools. The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4 with carbon and nitrogen component was used in this study. From point scale simulations we found that the method can reduce the computation time by 20–69% compared to the fastest approach in the literature. We also found that the cyclic stability of total carbon for some cases differs from that of the periodic atmospheric forcing, and some cases even showed instability. Close examination showed that one case has a carbon periodicity much longer than that of the atmospheric forcing due to the annual fire disturbance that is longer than half a year. The rest was caused by the instability of water table calculation in the hydrology model of CLM4. The instability issue is resolved after we replaced the hydrology scheme in CLM4 with a low model for variably saturated porous media.

  10. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C6+ and N7+. The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  11. Temporal Variations in Concentrations of Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Carbon Monoxide at Osijek, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Kovač-Andrić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide variations and their correlation with meteorological parameters in Osijek (Eastern Croatia during the summer seasons of 2002, 2007, and 2012. The measured data are discussed in relation to the EU guidelines (Directive 2002/3/EC, Directive 2008/50/EC. In order to characterize ambient air with respect to ozone photochemical pollution we calculated three photochemical pollution indicators. These indicators may also be a valid measure for harmful effects on living organisms. The influence of local meteorological parameters on the measured concentrations of ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide was also investigated. We have attempted to establish correlations between measured pollutant concentrations and meteorological parameters using the technique of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA.

  12. Reprocessing of Ices in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks: Carbon and Nitrogen Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r < 30 AU, because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) are two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The fo...

  13. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  14. Determination of the geographical origin of Chinese teas based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long ZHANG; Jia-rong PAN; Cheng ZHU

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the geographical origin of Chinese teas using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio technology.The results showed that inter-provincial dispersion of teas in Guangdong (GD),Guangxi (GX),Hainan (HA),Fujian (F J),Shandong (SD),Sichuan (SC),Chongqing (CQ),and Henan (HN) provinces was high,while in Zhejiang (ZJ),Hubei (HB),Yunnan (YN),and Anhui (AH) provinces,it was low.Tea samples from GD,GX,HA,and FJ provinces were clustered in one group and separated from those from AH and HB provinces.Thus,carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio technology could discriminate teas from among some provinces of China,but not from among others.Better separation might be obtained with a combination of isotopic ratios and other indexes,such as elemental data and organic components.

  15. Mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Lanzani, Giorgio; Nasibulin, Albert G; Ayala, Paola; Jiang, Tao; Bligaard, Thomas; Laasonen, Kari; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2011-06-21

    We have studied the mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth illustrated for the case of a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system, which uses carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH(3)) as precursors and iron as a catalyst. We performed first-principles electronic-structure calculations, fully incorporating the effects of spin polarization and magnetic moments, to investigate the bonding and chemistry of CO, NH(3), and their fragments on a model Fe(55) icosahedral cluster. A possible dissociation path for NH(3) to atomic nitrogen and hydrogen was identified, with a reaction barrier consistent with an experimentally determined value we measured by tandem infrared and mass spectrometry. Both C-C and C-N bond formation reactions were found to be barrierless and exothermic, while a parasitic reaction of HCN formation had a barrier of over 1 eV.

  16. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of 11C, 18F and 13N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume

  17. The influence of land use on soil organic carbon and nitrogen content and redox potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate organic matter status in the soil according to the organic carbon content, total and mineral nitrogen amounts, carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio and redox potential depending on land usage and plant spieces. Soil samples were taken from the fields under...... different farming systems (conventional and organic) as well as abandoned lands. We choose the plants of two botanical species (Poaceae and Fabaceae) in organic and conventional farming systems as well as abandoned lands. Experimental results show that the best soil organic matter status according...... to the investigated indexes is in the soils of conventional and orgaic farming systems occupied with mixtures of Poaceae and Fabaceae and the worst - in the soils of abandoned Poaceae meadowa. In the abandoned lands, Fabaceae (galega) had better influence on soil organic matter status than Poaceae....

  18. Biotransformation of Meloxicam by Cunninghamella blakesleeana: Significance of Carbon and Nitrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam Prasad, Gurram; Narasimha Rao, Kollu; Preethi, Rama; Girisham, Sivasri; Reddy, S M

    2011-01-01

    Influence of carbon and nitrogen source, on biotransformation of meloxicam was studied by employing Cunninghamella blakesleeana NCIM 687 with an aim to achieve maximum transformation of meloxicam and in search of new metabolites. The transformation was confirmed by HPLC and based on LC-MS-MS data and previous reports the metabolites were predicted as 5-hydroxymethyl meloxicam, 5-carboxy meloxicam and a novel metabolite. The quantification of metabolites was performed using HPLC peak areas. The results obtained indicate that glucose as carbon source, ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source, were found to be optimum for maximum transformation of meloxicam. The study suggests the significance of these factors in biotransformation of meloxicam using microbial cultures. The fermentation was scaled up to 1 l level. PMID:22282633

  19. Templated synthesis of nitrogen-enriched nanoporous carbon materials from porogenic organic precursors prepared by ATRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dingcai; Li, Zhenghui; Zhong, Mingjiang; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    A facile templated synthesis of functional nanocarbon materials with well-defined spherical mesopores is developed using all-organic porogenic precursors comprised of hairy nanoparticles with nitrogen-rich polyacrylonitrile shells grafted from sacrificial cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) cores (xPMMA-g-PAN). Such shape-persistent all-organic nanostructured precursors, prepared using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), assure robust formation of template nanostructures with continuous PAN precursor matrix over wide range of compositions, and allow for removal of the sacrificial template through simple thermal decomposition. Carbon materials prepared using this method combine nitrogen enrichment with hierarchical nanostructure comprised of microporous carbon matrix interspersed with mesopores originating from sacrificial xPMMA cores, and thus perform well as CO2 adsorbents and as supercapacitor electrodes. PMID:24596246

  20. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  1. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (<10km sq2), relatively bright rock units that are commonly fractured (Ehlmann et al., 2008b). We have analyzed spectra from CRISM images and used co-located HiRISE images in order to further characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  2. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Fuzzy Control of Nitrate Recirculation and External Carbon Addition in A/O Nitrogen Removal Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇; 彭永臻; 王淑莹; 王晓莲

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of effluent water must be taken into account for the design and operation of wastewater treatment plants. In addition, the requirement for effluent quality is becoming strict.Therefore, intelligent control approaches are recently required in removing biological nutrient. In this study, fuzzy control has been successfully applied to improve the nitrogen removal. Experimental results showed that a close relationship between nitrate concentration and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at the end of anoxic zone was found for anoxic/oxic (A/O) nitrogen removal process treating synthetic wastewater. ORP can be used as online fuzzy control parazneter of nitrate recirculation and external carbon addition. The established fuzzy logic controller that includes two inputs and one output can maintain ORP value at-86 mV and -90 mV by adjusting the nitrate recirculation flow and external carbon dosage respectively to realize the optimal control of nitrogen removal, improving the effluent quality and reducing the operating cost.

  4. Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil

    KAUST Repository

    Keuskamp, Joost A.

    2013-02-01

    Mangrove forests are sites of intense carbon and nutrient cycling, which result in soil carbon sequestration on a global scale. Currently, mangrove forests receive increasing quantities of exogenous nutrients due to coastal development. The present paper quantifies the effects of nutrient loading on microbial growth rates and the mineralisation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in two mangrove soils contrasting in carbon content. An increase in SOC mineralisation rates would lead to the loss of historically sequestered carbon and an enhanced CO2 release from these mangrove soils.In an incubation experiment we enriched soils from Avicennia and Rhizophora mangrove forests bordering the Red Sea with different combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and glucose to mimic the effects of wastewater influx. We measured microbial growth rates as well as carbon mineralisation rates in the natural situation and after enrichment. The results show that microbial growth is energy limited in both soils, with nitrogen as a secondary limitation. Nitrogen amendment increased the rate at which labile organic carbon was decomposed, while it decreased SOC mineralisation rates. Such an inhibitory effect on SOC mineralisation was not found for phosphorus enrichment.Our data confirm the negative effect of nitrogen enrichment on the mineralisation of recalcitrant carbon compounds found in other systems. Based on our results it is not to be expected that nutrient enrichment by itself will cause degradation of historically sequestered soil organic carbon in nitrogen limited mangrove forests. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Discharge characteristics in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and pure water preparatory to fabrication of carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discharge characteristics and emission spectra of the discharges in low-temperature liquid such as liquid helium have been measured to investigate the conditions for fabrication of carbon nanomaterial by arc discharge in low-temperature liquid. Measurements of the discharge characteristics of the resulting plasma and observation of the associated optical emission spectra show that the behaviour of discharge current over time and the associated spectra depend strongly on discharge voltage and both may be related to the temperature of the carbon target. However, discharge voltage and current with time are almost the same regardless of whether the liquid is pure water, liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and superfluid liquid helium

  6. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Torbert, H.A.; Johnson, H. B.; H. W. Polley

    2012-01-01

    Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (Huisache). Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient), 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 ...

  7. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen balances of direct land use changes from energy crops in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Jørgensen, Uffe; Petersen, Bjørn Molt;

    2012-01-01

    rate reductions in response to the absence of tillage for some perennial crops (0%, 25%, 50%). For all crop systems, nutrient balances, balances between above- and below-ground residues, soil carbon changes, biogenic carbon dioxide flows, emissions of nitrogen compounds and losses of macro......This paper addresses the conversion of Danish agricultural land from food/feed crops to energy crops. To this end, a life cycle inventory, which relates the input and output flows from and to the environment of 528 different crop systems, is built and described. This includes seven crops (annuals...

  8. ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS AND POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF NITROGEN ON VARIOUS ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of four activated carbons (Norit RB1, Chemviron BPL, Monolit, and Ambersorb-572) have been examined by nitrogen adsorption at 77.5 K. A method for adsorption potential distribution calculation has been proposed based on the adsorption isotherms. This distribution provides information about possible changes in the Gibbs free energy caused by the energetic and geometrical heterogeneities of an activated carbon as well as by the adsorbate-related entropic effects. The general character of the adsorption potential distribution is clearly visible by its simple relation to the micropore and mesopore distribution.

  9. Nitrogen--sulfur--carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium--sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun; Wang, Xiqing; Mayes, Richard T.; Ben, Teng; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-09-27

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to electron-conducting porous compositions comprising an organic polymer matrix doped with nitrogen atoms and having elemental sulfur dispersed therein, particularly such compositions having an ordered framework structure. The invention is also directed to composites of such S/N-doped electron-conducting porous aromatic framework (PAF) compositions, or composites of an S/N-doped mesoporous carbon composition, which includes the S/N-doped composition in admixture with a binder, and optionally, conductive carbon. The invention is further directed to cathodes for a lithium-sulfur battery in which such composites are incorporated.

  10. Bonding preference of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in niobium-based rock-salt structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Wada, Satoshi; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are essential components in solid-state materials. However, understanding their preference on the bonding to metals has not been straightforward. Here, niobium carbide, nitride, and oxide with simple rock-salt-based structures were analyzed by first-principles calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We found that an increase in the atomic number from carbon to oxygen formed fewer and shorter bonds to metals with better hybridization of atomic orbitals. This can provide a simple guiding principle for understanding the bonding and designing carbides, nitrides, oxides, and mixed-anion compounds. PMID:23937352

  11. Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon from first principles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Li; ZHU JiaQi; GAO Wei; HAN Xiao; DU ShanYi

    2009-01-01

    The non-resonant vibrational Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon have been calculated from first principles, including the generation of s structural model, and the calculation of vibrational frequencies, vibrational eigenmodes and Raman coupling tensors. The calculated Raman spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results. The broad band at around 500 cm~(-1) arises from mixed bonds. The T peak originates from the vibrations of sp~3 carbon and the G peak comes from the stretching vibrations of sp~2-type bonding of C=C and C=N. The simulation results indicate the direct contribution of N vibrations to Raman spectra.

  12. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization and persistence of organic residues under conservation and conventional tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvaney, Michael J.; Wood, C.W.; Balkcom, K.S.; D. A. Shannon; Kemble, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Metadata only record Combining high biomass cover crops with in situ organic mulches may achieve adequate weed control for no-till production, but the persistence and nutrient release rates from cover crops and mulches is unknown. This article describes carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates from three organic mulches (mimosa (Albizia julibrissin Durazz.), lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours.) G. Don)), and oat (Avena sativa L.) straw) and one summer cover crop (soybean (Glycine max...

  13. Temporal Variations in Concentrations of Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Carbon Monoxide at Osijek, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Kovač-Andrić; Tatjana Radanović; Iva Topalović; Berislav Marković; Nikola Sakač

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide variations and their correlation with meteorological parameters in Osijek (Eastern Croatia) during the summer seasons of 2002, 2007, and 2012. The measured data are discussed in relation to the EU guidelines (Directive 2002/3/EC, Directive 2008/50/EC). In order to characterize ambient air with respect to ozone photochemical pollution we calculated three photochemical pollution indicators. These indic...

  14. Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Millstein, Dev

    2009-01-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM) affects public health, visibility, climate, and influences ecosystem productivity and species diversity. Diesel engines are an important source of air pollution and will face a variety of new regulations, so emissions from these vehicles are expected to undergo changes over the next decade that will have important effects on primary PM emissions, especially black carbon (BC) emissions, as well as nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and therefore secondary pollutants su...

  15. On the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in urine of persons living at different locations show considerable variations. A distinct relation to the isotope ratio of the local drinking water has only been observed in the case of hydrogen. The variations are far from being within the experimental limits of error. Therefore, they are decisive in selecting the relative abundance of the labelling isotope in tracer experiments on human metabolism. (author)

  16. Energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced by high energy bremsstrahlung in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron energy spectra in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen were calculated for various bremsstrahlung end-point energies and, from these, tissue spectra were calculated using the tissue equivalent molecular formula C5H40O18N. The method involves folding the known bremsstrahlung spectrum shape with the cross section for each possible decay mode in each element which leads to neutron production. The partial photoneutron cross sections used have been derived from published data

  17. Carbon and nitrogen limitation increase chitosan antifungal activity in Neurospora crassa and fungal human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Moya, Federico; Colom-Valiente, Maria F.; Martínez Peinado, Pascual; Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Puelles, Eduardo; Sempere Ortells, José Miguel; López Llorca, Luis Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan permeabilizes plasma membrane and kills sensitive filamentous fungi and yeast. Membrane fluidity and cell energy determine chitosan sensitivity in fungi. A five-fold reduction of both glucose (main carbon (C) source) and nitrogen (N) increased 2-fold Neurospora crassa sensitivity to chitosan. We linked this increase with production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plasma membrane permeabilization. Releasing N. crassa from nutrient limitation reduced chitosan antifun...

  18. High-performance lithium storage in nitrogen-enriched carbon nanofiber webs derived from polypyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • N-enriched carbon nanofiber webs are prepared via direct carbonization route with polyporrole as template. • The pyrolysis time plays an important role in N doping level and existing type. • Effect of N-doping on performance of the carbon anode material is investigated. • High reversible capacity of 238 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 is attained. -- Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) are prepared by direct pyrolyzation of polypyrrole (PPy) nanofiber webs at 600 °C. The structure and morphology of N-CNFWs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra and elemental analysis. Both the doped N content and the N existing type in carbon, change with the pyrolysis time. As anode material for lithium-ion battery, the N-CNFWs show high capacity and good rate capability. The reversible capacity is up to 668 mAh g−1 at a current density of 0.1 A g−1 and 238 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1, which can be ascribed to the nanofiber structure and high nitrogen content

  19. Cement Pastes and Mortars Containing Nitrogen-Doped and Oxygen-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Martínez-Alanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement pastes and mortars based on ordinary Portland cement containing nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Nx or oxygen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Ox are investigated. To incorporate MWCNTs into the cementitious matrix, the as-produced carpets are dispersed over periods of 1 and 2 hours in distilled water at pH levels of 1 and 7. The cement pastes are prepared by adding 0.1 wt% of MWCNTs to cement powder, followed by characterization with SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD at an early age (first hours of hydration. The mortars are mechanically characterized during the hydration process for a period of 28 days. SEM characterization of cement pastes revealed that the carbon nanotubes are well incorporated in the cementitious matrix, with the hydrated cement grains interconnected by long carbon nanotubes. XRD characterizations demonstrated that, during the hydration of cement pastes, different peaks emerged that were associated with ettringite, hydrated calcium silicate, and calcium hydroxide, among other structures. Results of the compressive strength measurements for mortars simultaneously mixed with MWCNT-Nx and MWCNT-Ox reached an increment of approximately 30% in compressive strength. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in nitrogen-doped and oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes interacting with a cement grain.

  20. Moisture effects on carbon and nitrogen emission from burning of wildland biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-W. A. Chen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C and nitrogen (N released from biomass burning have multiple effects on the Earth's biogeochemical cycle, climate change, and ecosystem. These effects depend on the relative abundances of C and N species emitted, which vary with fuel type and combustion conditions. This study systematically investigates the emission characteristics under different fuel moisture contents, through controlled burning experiments with biomass and soil collected from a typical alpine forest. Fuel moisture in general lowers combustion efficiency, shortens flaming phase, and introduces prolonged smoldering before ignition. It increases emission factors of incompletely oxidized C and N species, such as carbon monoxide (CO and ammonia (NH3. Substantial particulate carbon and nitrogen (up to 4 times C in CO and 75% of N in NH3 were measured mainly from the pre-flame smoldering of fuels with high moisture contents; this process emits particles larger than soot agglomerates commonly observed in flaming smoke. Hydrogen (H/C ratio and optical properties of particulate carbon from the high-moisture fuels show their resemblance to plant cellulous and brown carbon, respectively. These findings have implications for modeling biomass burning emission and impacts.

  1. CO{sub 2} removal potential of carbons prepared by co-pyrolysis of sugar and nitrogen containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Drage, T.C.; Smith, K.; Snape, C.E. [University of Nottingham, Fuel Science Group, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-15

    The nitrogen enrichment of active carbons is reported to be effective in enhancing the specific adsorbate-adsorbent interactions for CO{sub 2}. In this work, nitrogen-enriched carbons were prepared by co-pyrolysis of sugar and a series of nitrogen compounds with different nitrogen functionalities. The results show that although the amount of nitrogen incorporated to the final adsorbent is important, the N-functionality seems to be more relevant for increasing CO{sub 2} uptake. Thus, the adsorbent obtained from urea co-pyrolysis presents the highest nitrogen content but the lowest CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. However, the adsorbent obtained from carbazole co-pyrolysis, despite the lower amount of N incorporated, shows high CO{sub 2} uptake, up to 9wt.%, probably because the presence of more basic functionalities as determined by XPS analysis.

  2. Consumption and utilization of experimentally altered corn by southern armyworm: Iron, nitrogen, and cyclic hydroxamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuwoto, S; Scriber, J M

    1985-11-01

    The effects of differential leaf water, leaf nitrogen and cyclic hydroxamate (DIMBOA) concentrations in corn seedlings were analyzed for a polyphagous insect, the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Cram.). Six different combinations of nutrients and allelochemicals [DIMBOA = 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy(2H)-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one] were generated using two corn genotypes (WF9 and CI3IA) and three fertility regimes (complete nutrient, Fe-deficient, and N-deficient solutions) in the University Biotron. Poorest larval growth was observed in the low-nitrogen treatments (1.2% and 1.7% leaf N) and was the result of both low consumption rates and high metabolic costs (low efficiency of conversion of digested food, ECD). Fastest growth rates were observed forthe larvae fed leaves from the high-nitrogen treatments (4.6% and 4.4% leaf N). It is noteworthy that these treatments also contained the highest concentration of cyclic hydroxamates, which are generally believed to be the primary defensive chemicals mediating resistance against the European corn borer,Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner). If these hydroxamates do have any deleterious or costly effects (perhaps accounting for a large portion of metabolic expenditures), the high digestibility of the leaf tissue and the increased consumption rates more than compensate, resulting in rapid growth (growth rate = consumption rate × approximate digestibility × efficiency of conversion of the digested food). These studies illustrate that variation in key nutrients and allelochemicals within a single plant species (Zea mays L.) may have significantly different effects upon various potential leaf-chewing caterpillars, such as these armyworms versus corn borers (which cannot handle the cyclic hydroxamates, even if provided with young nutritious leaf tissues). PMID:24311240

  3. Reassessing carbon sequestration in the North China Plain via addition of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenxu; Duan, Yongmei; Wang, Yuying; Hu, Chunsheng

    2016-09-01

    Soil inorganic carbon (SIC) exerts a strong influence on the carbon (C) sequestered in response to nitrogen (N) additions in arid and semi-arid ecosystems, but limited information is available on in situ SIC storage and dissolution at the field level. This study determined the soil organic/inorganic carbon storage in the soil profile at 0-100cm depths and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in soil leachate in 4N application treatments (0, 200, 400, and 600kgNha(-1)yr(-)(1)) for 15years in the North China Plain. The objectives were to evaluate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on total amount of carbon sequestration and the uptake of atmospheric CO2 in an agricultural system. Results showed that after 15years of N fertilizer application the SOC contents at depths of 0-100cm significantly increased, whereas the SIC contents significantly decreased at depths of 0-60cm. However, the actual measured loss of carbonate was far higher than the theoretical maximum values of dissolution via protons from nitrification. Furthermore, the amount of HCO3(-) and the HCO3(-)/(Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)) ratio in soil leachate were higher in the N application treatments than no fertilizer input (CK) for the 0-80cm depth. The result suggested that the dissolution of carbonate was mainly enhanced by soil carbonic acid, a process which can absorb soil or atmosphere CO2 and less influenced by protons through the nitrification which would release CO2. To accurately evaluate soil C sequestration under N input scenarios in semi-arid regions, future studies should include both changes in SIC storage as well as the fractions of dissolution with different sources of acids in soil profiles. PMID:27135576

  4. Carbon dioxide level and form of soil nitrogen regulate assimilation of atmospheric ammonia in young trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Salamanca-Jimenez, Alveiro; Doane, Timothy A; Horwath, William R

    2015-08-21

    The influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and soil fertility on the physiological performance of plants has been extensively studied, but their combined effect is notoriously difficult to predict. Using Coffea arabica as a model tree species, we observed an additive effect on growth, by which aboveground productivity was highest under elevated CO2 and ammonium fertilization, while nitrate fertilization favored greater belowground biomass allocation regardless of CO2 concentration. A pulse of labelled gases ((13)CO2 and (15)NH3) was administered to these trees as a means to determine the legacy effect of CO2 level and soil nitrogen form on foliar gas uptake and translocation. Surprisingly, trees with the largest aboveground biomass assimilated significantly less NH3 than the smaller trees. This was partly explained by declines in stomatal conductance in plants grown under elevated CO2. However, unlike the (13)CO2 pulse, assimilation and transport of the (15)NH3 pulse to shoots and roots varied as a function of interactions between stomatal conductance and direct plant response to the form of soil nitrogen, observed as differences in tissue nitrogen content and biomass allocation. Nitrogen form is therefore an intrinsic component of physiological responses to atmospheric change, including assimilation of gaseous nitrogen as influenced by plant growth history.

  5. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs. PMID:27396293

  6. Effects of bimetallic catalysts on synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as nanoscale energetic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Liu; Yong Zhang; Ruying Li; Xueliang Sun; Hakima Abou-Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Well aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNx-NTs),as energetic materials,are synthesized on a silicon substrate by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) metals are respectively introduced to combine with iron (Fe) to act as a bimetallic co-catalyst layer.Correlations between the composition and shape of the co-catalyst and morphology,size,growth rate and nitrogen doping amount of the synthesized CNx-NTs are investigated by secondary and backscattered electron imaging in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS).Compared to pure iron catalyst.W-Fe co-catalyst can result in lower growth rate,larger diameter and wider size distribution of the CNx-NTs; while incorporation of molybdenum into the iron catalyst layer can reduce the diameter and size distribution of the nanotubes.Compared to the sole iron catalyst,Fe-W catalyst impedes nitrogen doping while Fe-Mo catalyst promotes the incorporation of nitrogen into the nanotubes.The present work indicates that CNx-NTs with modulated size,growth rate and nitrogen doping concentration are expected to be synthesized by tuning the size and composition of co-catalysts,which may find great potential in producing CNx-NTs with controlled structure and properties.

  7. Influence of oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber growth directly on nichrome foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Shinde, Sachin M.; Saufi Rosmi, Mohamad; Takahashi, Chisato; Papon, Remi; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D.; Ishii, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of various nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanostructures has been significantly explored as an alternative material for energy storage and metal-free catalytic applications. Here, we reveal a direct growth technique of N-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on flexible nichrome (NiCr) foil using melamine as a solid precursor. Highly reactive Cr plays a critical role in the nanofiber growth process on the metal alloy foil in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Oxidation of Cr occurs in the presence of oxygen impurities, where Ni nanoparticles are formed on the surface and assist the growth of nanofibers. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly show the transformation process of the NiCr foil surface with annealing in the presence of oxygen impurities. The structural change of NiCr foil assists one-dimensional (1D) CNF growth, rather than the lateral two-dimensional (2D) growth. The incorporation of distinctive graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen in the graphene lattice are observed in the synthesized nanofiber, owing to better nitrogen solubility. Our finding shows an effective approach for the synthesis of highly N-doped carbon nanostructures directly on Cr-based metal alloys for various applications.

  8. Incorporation of Nitrogen into Amorphous Carbon Films Produced by Surface-Wave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yuxiang(吴玉祥); Zhu Xiaodong(朱晓东); Zhan Rujuan(詹如娟)

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the influence of nitrogen incorporated into amorphous carbon films,nitrogenated amorphous carbon films have been deposited by using surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition under various ratios of N2/CH4 gas flow. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to monitor plasma features near the deposition zone. After deposition, the samples are checked by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS). Optical emission intensities of CH and N atom in the plasma are found to be enhanced with the increase in the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio, and then reach their maximums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. A contrary variation is found in Raman spectra of deposited films. The intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (ID/IG) and the peak positions of the G and D bands all reach their minimums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. These show that the structure of amorphous carbon films has been significantly modified by introduction of nitrogen.

  9. Seasonal Variation in Rates of Nitrification associated With Patterns of Carbon and Nitrogen Supply in a Southern Appalachian Headwater Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Starry, Olyssa Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Abstract. Nitrification, the chemoautotrophic process via which ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) is converted to nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), is an important nitrogen (N) transformation in stream ecosystems. Experimental addition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been shown to inhibit rates of nitrification, and rates have been stimulated by NH4-N addition. Insights regarding the role of particulate organic matter (POM) in this scenario could further enhance our understanding of linkages between...

  10. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  11. Synthesis of High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon Microflowers and Their Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Cao, Minhua

    2015-07-01

    Sustainable carbon materials have received particular attention in CO2 capture and storage owing to their abundant pore structures and controllable pore parameters. Here, we report high-surface-area hierarchically porous N-doped carbon microflowers, which were assembled from porous nanosheets by a three-step route: soft-template-assisted self-assembly, thermal decomposition, and KOH activation. The hydrazine hydrate used in our experiment serves as not only a nitrogen source, but also a structure-directing agent. The activation process was carried out under low (KOH/carbon=2), mild (KOH/carbon=4) and severe (KOH/carbon=6) activation conditions. The mild activated N-doped carbon microflowers (A-NCF-4) have a hierarchically porous structure, high specific surface area (2309 m(2)  g(-1)), desirable micropore size below 1 nm, and importantly large micropore volume (0.95 cm(3)  g(-1)). The remarkably high CO2 adsorption capacities of 6.52 and 19.32 mmol g(-1) were achieved with this sample at 0 °C (273 K) and two pressures, 1 bar and 20 bar, respectively. Furthermore, this sample also exhibits excellent stability during cyclic operations and good separation selectivity for CO2 over N2.

  12. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in Deforested and Pristine Upland (2400m) Forest Catchments in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Haberer, J.; McClain, M.; Ramos, O.; Gardner, W.; McCarthy, M.; Brandes, J.

    2001-12-01

    Nitrogen and carbon cycling were examined within two upland (2400m) forest catchments in the Peruvian Andes. One catchment was partially deforested within the last 3 years, while the other has remained untouched. Tracer amended samples were analyzed to determine the pathways and rates of nitrogen cycling in streams draining each catchment. Both streams exhibited very low inorganic nitrogen levels, on the order of 1 to 2 uM. A large percentage (>1/3) of the total fixed nitrogen flux from these systems was in the form of particulates. Preliminary results suggest a very high rate of nitrogen cycling in these systems. Isotopic measurements of plant samples from both catchments also suggest that these forests are highly efficient in trapping and using atmospheric nitrogen sources. The partially deforested catchment had significantly more species using C4 and CAM carbon fixation pathways. Leaf litter from both streams and leaves from trees in the area were also analyzed for carbon and nitrogen isotopes to compare and contrast nitrogen and carbon cycling between the two sites. This and other data to be presented suggest that deforestation has subtle but significant effects upon the ability of tropical upland forests to retain and use nutrients.

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Microbial Communities in Antarctic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Spohn, Marie; Klaus, Karoline; Kusch, Stephanie; Wanek, Wolfgang; Dercon, Gerd; Richter, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems in the Antarctic experience harsh environmental conditions including very low temperatures and a low carbon input leading to poorly developed ecosystems with low diversity and a low soil organic matter content, which may be vulnerable to perturbations in a future climate. Microbial transformation and decomposition of soil organic matter under the extreme climatic conditions in the Antarctic has received little attention so far. Specifically, little is known about microbial process rates and how they might be affected by climate warming. We here report on C and N transformation rates and their corresponding microbial use efficiencies in two soil horizons of two sites on King George Island, the maritime Antarctica. We used novel isotope techniques to estimate microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE; based on incorporation of 18O from water into DNA) and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE; based on a 15N isotope pool dilution assays). The investigated two contrasting sites at marine terraces on basaltic rocks that were characterized by a stable surface. While both sites were similar in exposition, distance from sea and elevation, they differed in their vegetation cover and several biogeochemical parameters, such as soil pH and soil organic carbon and nitrogen content. Surprisingly, we found low soil C:N ratios at both sites and for both horizons, i.e. below 12 in the organic crust and below 8 in the first mineral horizon. This indicates a low carbon availability relative to nitrogen and would thus imply a high microbial CUE. However, our results showed also a low CUE at both sites and in both horizons (CUE of 24% and 9% in the organic crust and mineral layer, respectively). In contrast, NUE was very high in organic layers (98%), pointing towards a strong nitrogen limitation, while in the mineral horizons, NUE was lower (between 84% and 72%), as expected for soil horizons with a C:N ratio below 8. Thus, the NUE pattern followed stoichiometric theory (i

  14. An Analysis of Nitrogen Controls on Terrestrial Carbon and Energy Dynamics Using the Carbon-Nitrogen Coupled CLASS-CTEMN+ Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, M. A.; Huang, S.; Bartlett, P. A.; Windeler, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of biophysical land surface schemes, in which photosynthesis and the structure of plant functional types is modelled explicitly, allows detailed carbon budgets to be simulated in Earth System Models (ESMs), including the response of ecosystems to increasing atmospheric CO2. Projections of future carbon balances are often viewed in terms of enhanced photosynthesis in response to increased atmospheric CO2, the so-called 'CO2 fertilization effect', versus increased respiration caused by warming. However, most ESMs do not represent nutrient cycles, most notably nitrogen (N), the availability of which can act as a strong constraint on photosynthesis, and carbon turnover in the soil.In the Canadian ESM (CanESM), surface processes are represented by the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which models surface energy and water exchanges, coupled with the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM), which models carbon-related processes. We present global and site-level results from incorporating a nitrogen cycle (C-N coupled) into CLASS coupled with CTEM. Flux, forcing and initializing data sets developed by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) and NACP- Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) were used.The C-N coupled model yielded global annual estimates (over 1980-2010) of 122.7 Pg C yr-1 for gross ecosystem production (GEP), and 62.7 Pg C yr-1 for net primary productivity (NPP). Ecosystem respiration (Re) was 119.1 Pg C yr-1 which is about 25% larger than observed, and results in a low estimate of 3.64 Pg C yr-1 for net ecosystem productivity (NEP = GEP - Re). On regional and site-level scales, larger differences were seen between the C-only and C-N coupled model, especially at high latitudes during summer months where N is limiting. Analysis of the long-term annual variations over 1901-2010 also showed different responses to evolving climate, CO2 and N deposition. For 1970-2010, the C-N coupled model indicated a

  15. Integration of a Physically based Distributed Hydrological Model with a Model of Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling: A Case Study at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, S.; Dialynas, Y. G.; Bras, R. L.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of carbon and nitrogen cycles, increasingly influenced by human activities, are the key to the functioning of ecosystems. These cycles are influenced by the composition of the substrate, availability of nitrogen, the population of microorganisms, and by environmental factors. Therefore, land management and use, climate change, and nitrogen deposition patterns influence the dynamics of these macronutrients at the landscape scale. In this work a physically based distributed hydrological model, the tRIBS model, is coupled with a process-based multi-compartment model of the biogeochemical cycle to simulate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen (CN) in the Mameyes River basin, Puerto Rico. The model includes a wide range of processes that influence the movement, production, alteration of nutrients in the landscape and factors that affect the CN cycling. The tRIBS integrates geomorphological and climatic factors that influence the cycling of CN in soil. Implementing the decomposition module into tRIBS makes the model a powerful complement to a biogeochemical observation system and a forecast tool able to analyze the influences of future changes on ecosystem services. The soil hydrologic parameters of the model were obtained using ranges of published parameters and observed streamflow data at the outlet. The parameters of the decomposition module are based on previously published data from studies conducted in the Luquillio CZO (budgets of soil organic matter and CN ratio for each of the dominant vegetation types across the landscape). Hydrological fluxes, wet depositon of nitrogen, litter fall and its corresponding CN ratio drive the decomposition model. The simulation results demonstrate a strong influence of soil moisture dynamics on the spatiotemporal distribution of nutrients at the landscape level. The carbon in the litter pool and the nitrate and ammonia pool respond quickly to soil moisture content. Moreover, the CN ratios of the plant litter have

  16. Primary carbon sources for juvenile penaeid shrimps in a mangrove-fringed Bay of Inhaca Island, Mozambique: a dual carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Macia, A.

    2004-01-01

    A study to estimate the relative importance of mangrove primary carbon and nitrogen sources to five commercial penaeid shrimps species was done at Saco da Inhaca, a non-estuarine mangrove-fringed bay on Inhaca Island, southern Mozambique. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of primary producers (mangroves, epiphytes, phytoplankton and seagrasses), sediments and in five penaeid shrimp species (Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) indicus, P. japonicus, P. semisulcatus, M...

  17. First-principles study of palladium atom adsorption on the boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Guoxiang [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); School of Science, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an 710065, Shaanxi (China); Zhang Jianmin, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.co [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062, Shaanxi (China); Wang Doudou [Institute of Telecommunication Engineering of the Air Force Engineering University (AFEU1), Xi' an 710077, Shaanxi (China); Xu Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2009-11-15

    We have performed first-principles calculation to investigate the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the surface of the pristine and boron- or nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results show that for the adsorption of a single palladium atom on the pristine CNT surface, the most stable site is Bridge1 site above the axial carbon-carbon bond. Either boron- or nitrogen-doped CNTs can assist palladium surface adsorption, but the detailed mechanisms are different. The enhanced palladium adsorption on boron-doped CNT is attributed to the palladium d orbital strongly hybridized with both boron p orbital and carbon p orbital. The enhancement in palladium adsorption on nitrogen-doped CNT results from activating the nitrogen-neighboring carbon atoms due to the large electron affinity of nitrogen. Furthermore, the axial bond is preferred over the zigzag bond for a palladium atom adsorbed on the surface of all three types of CNTs. The most energetically favorable site for a palladium atom adsorbed on three types of CNTs is above the axial boron-carbon bond in boron-doped CNT. The enhancement in palladium adsorption is more significant for the boron-doped CNT than it is for nitrogen-doped CNT with a similar configuration. So we conclude that accordingly, the preferred adsorption site is determined by the competition between the electron affinity of doped and adsorbed atoms and preferred degree of the axial bond over the zigzag bond.

  18. Process characterization and influence of alternative carbon sources and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio on organic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae DSM1863.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Fischer, Christian; Neumann, Anke; Syldatk, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    L-Malic acid and fumaric acid are C4 dicarboxylic organic acids and considered as promising chemical building blocks. They can be applied as food preservatives and acidulants in rust removal and as polymerization starter units. Molds of the genus Aspergillus are able to produce malic acid in large quantities from glucose and other carbon sources. In order to enhance the production potential of Aspergillus oryzae DSM 1863, production and consumption rates in an established bioreactor batch-process based on glucose were determined. At 35 °C, up to 42 g/L malic acid was produced in a 168-h batch process with fumaric acid as a by-product. In prolonged shaking flask experiments (353 h), the suitability of the alternative carbon sources xylose and glycerol at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 200:1 and the influence of different C/N ratios in glucose cultivations were tested. When using glucose, 58.2 g/L malic acid and 4.2 g/L fumaric acid were produced. When applying xylose or glycerol, both organic acids are produced but the formation of malic acid decreased to 45.4 and 39.4 g/L, respectively. Whereas the fumaric acid concentration was not significantly altered when cultivating with xylose (4.5 g/L), it is clearly enhanced by using glycerol (9.3 g/L). When using glucose as a carbon source, an increase or decrease of the C/N ratio did not influence malic acid production but had an enormous influence on fumaric acid production. The highest fumaric acid concentrations were determined at the highest C/N ratio (300:1, 8.44 g/L) and lowest at the lowest C/N ratio (100:1, 0.7 g/L).

  19. Phenol Adsorption on Nitrogen-enriched Activated Carbon Prepared from Bamboo Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons prepared from bamboo residues were characterized by means of BET, XPS, and elemental analysis. Then adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effects of various physicochemical parameters such as contact time, temperature, pH, and initial concentration. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 120 min at a phenol concentration of 250 mg/L. When the pH was 4 and 0.1 g of the carbon absorbent and 100 mL of phenol solution at 250 mg/L were used, the phenol adsorption of the ACs with melamine and urea modifications were 219.09 mg/g and 214.45 mg/g, respectively. Both were greater than the capacity of unmodified AC, which was 163.82 mg/g. The Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well described the experimental adsorption isotherms. The adsorption kinetics was well explained by pseudo-second-order kinetics rather than the pseudo-first-order. In conclusion, the nitrogen-enriched activated carbon proposed as adsorbents of the phenol wastewater were shown to be effective, which also means that bamboo residues have promise as activated carbon precursors for liquid phase adsorbents for environmental protection.

  20. Determination of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass of southern-Taiga soils by different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M. I.; Malysheva, T. I.; Maslov, M. N.; Kuznetsova, E. Yu.; Menyailo, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    The results of methods for determining microbial biomass carbon vary in reproducibility among soils. The fumigation-extraction and substrate-induced respiration methods give similar results for Albic Luvisol and Gleyic Fluvisol, while the results of the rehydration method are reliably higher. In Histic Fluvisol, relatively similar results are obtained using the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods, and the substrate-induced respiration method gives almost halved results. The seasonal dynamics of microbial biomass carbon also varies depending on the method used. The highest difference is typical for the warm period, when the concentrations found by the extraction and substrate-induced methods poorly agree between two out of three soils studied. The concentration of microbial biomass nitrogen is less sensitive to the analytical method: the differences between the results of the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods are statistically insignificant in the all soils. To reveal stable relationships between the results of determining microbial carbon and the soil properties and analytical method, a large diversity of soils should be studied. This will allow for proposing of conversion factors for the recalculation of the obtained values to the concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass for different soils (or soil groups) and, hence, the more correct comparison of the results obtained by different methods.

  1. Phosphorous and nitrogen dual heteroatom doped mesoporous carbon synthesized via microwave method for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasini, Udaya B.; Bairi, Venu Gopal; Ramasahayam, Sunil Kumar; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Viswanathan, Tito; Shaikh, Ali U.

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) dual heteroatom doped mesoporous carbon (PNDC) synthesized by microwave assisted carbonization of tannin cross-linked to melamine in the presence of polyphosphoric acid was evaluated electrochemically for supercapacitor application. Controlling the N content by varying the amount of tannin to melamine in the carbonization process produced varying nitrogen, phosphorus and oxygen functionalities along with different physical properties. Electrochemical characterization studies revealed that N content is responsible for pseudocapacitance and high surface area plays a vital role in improving the capacitative behavior by enhanced electric double layer formation. In 1.0 M H2SO4 and 6.0 M KOH, PNDC-2 showed a high specific capacitance of 271 F g-1 and 236 F g-1, respectively. XPS results demonstrate the presence of pyridinic-N, quaternary-N as well as quinone type oxygen functionalities, which accounts for redox reactions and likely play an important role in the transportation of electrons during the charge/discharge process. Thus, the microwave assisted synthesis of doped carbon can provide a novel method of synthesizing materials useful for the fabrication of cheap and high performance supercapacitors.

  2. Environmental impacts of coastal fish farming; Carbon and Nitrogen budgets for trout farming in Kaldbacksfjord, Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordi, Gunnvor A; Glud, Ronnie N.; Gaard, Eilif;

    2011-01-01

    Flow of organic carbon (OC) and nitrogen through a sea cage trout farm was calculated on the basis of detailed studies of the farming operation, water circulation, OC and nutrient transport and recycling processes in sediment. A third of the OC and nitrogen provided by fish food was incorporated...... with increasing food input; the divergence between carbon efflux and oxygen uptake in sediment likewise increased with increasing food input, reflecting an increasing level of sediment reduction. Directly below the farm, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) efflux was high (on average 53% of dissolved inorganic...... carbon efflux), indicating that DOC efflux is an important pathway for benthic carbon release below aquaculture farms. Overall, microbial processes removed 56 and 38% of OC and nitrogen, respectively, that settled to the seabed. During a 39 d break in farming activity, due to the combined effect...

  3. Impact of landscape characteristics on the stream carbon and nitrogen export: example of a small agricultural catchment in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlfart, T.; Exbrayat, J.F.; Schelde, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    investigates the relative influence of different landscape characteristics on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) losses into streams. It not only focuses on the "classical" agricultural nitrogen pollutants of nitrate (NO3) and ammonia (NH4) but also hypothesises that dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is an important...... organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were measured whereas DON was calculated for each grabbed sample. Electrical conductivity (EC), pH and flow velocity were simultaneously measured during sampling. Statistical analyses show significant differences in these water quality parameters between the northern...... local land use by farming....

  4. Facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-modified, nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel with enhanced electrochemical capacitance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Gang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Peng, Zhiguang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu, Jiawen, E-mail: jwhu@hnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Liu, Hongtao, E-mail: liuht@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this contribution, we report a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-modified nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel, which could be easily prepared by pyrolysis of melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins that are polymerized hydrothermally in an aqueous GO dispersion. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transformed infrared spectrometry, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption method were employed to reveal the morphologies and structures of the prepared carbon xerogel. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge–discharge were used to investigate the electrochemical properties. The results showed that the charge transfer barrier of the mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel was decreased evidently, owing to the modification of a layer of rGO on its wall, and the xerogel demonstrated a capacitance of as high as 205 F g{sup −1} at the current of 1 A g{sup −1}. - Graphical abstract: A facile synthesis of rGO-modified, N-doped carbon material for supercapacitor application. - Highlights: • Nitrogen-doping and graphene-attachment in the carbon material are simultaneously achieved. • A thin layer of graphene attached on the wall of the mesoporous carbon material speeds up the charge transfer. • The graphene-modified nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel shows great potential for supercapacitor application.

  5. Carbon rhizodeposition by plants of contrasting strategies for resource acquisition: responses to various nitrogen fertility regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Florence; Aranjuelo, I.; Lopez-Sangil, L.; Rovia, P.; Nogués, S.

    2010-05-01

    Rhizodeposition by plants is one of the most important physiological mechanisms related to carbon and nitrogen cycling which is also believed to vary along the acquisition-conservation continuum. However, owing to methodological difficulties (i.e. narrow zone of soil around roots and rapid assimilation by soil microbes), root exudation and variations between species are one of the most poorly understood belowground process. Although previous approaches such as hydroponic culture based system, permit the chemical analysis of exudates, the fact that this protocol is qualitative, conditions its utility (see review in Phillips et al. 2008). Others techniques based on pulse-labelling approach have been developed to quantify rhizodeposition but are rarely sufficient to uniformly label all plant inputs to soil. Consequently with this typical pulse chase methods, recent assimilates are labeled but the recalcitrant carbon will not be labeled and therefore the contribution of this carbon will not be considered. Hence, traditional pulse labelling is not a quantitative means of tracing carbon due to inhomogeneous labelling and so limits greatly comparative studies of rhizodeposition fluxes at the interspecific level. In this study we developped a new protocole based on a long-term (3 months) steady state 13C labelling in order (1) to quantify rhizodeposition fluxes for six graminoid species caracterized by contrasted nutrient acquisition strategies and (2) to investigate to what extent various level of nitrogen fertility regimes modulate rhizodeposition fluxes. This method will enable to quantify under natural soil conditions both the accumulation of 13C in the soil but also the quantity that has been respired by the microorganisms during a given time and so will give an integrated picture of rhizodeposition fluxes for each species under each nitrogen fertility level. Results are currently being processed and will be presented at the conference. References: Phillips RP, Erlitz

  6. The use of radiocarbon to examine effects of nitrogen fertilization on carbon turnover in a major microbial group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Masiello, C. A.; Allen, M. F.

    2001-05-01

    The turnover time of microbial tissue in the soil has implications for soil carbon storage and nutrient transformations, especially in response to anthropogenic perturbations such as widespread nitrogen deposition. However, the microbial community consists of a diverse group of organisms with varied physiologies and ecological roles, and, potentially, varied responses to nitrogen additions. We used radiocarbon to examine effects of soil nitrogen availability on the residence time of carbon in one specific microbial group: ectomycorrhizal fungi. These fungi form close symbiotic relationships with trees and are abundant in most natural soils; globally, a substantial amount of carbon may be sequestered in their live and residual tissues. We found that nitrogen fertilization in a New Mexican pinyon-juniper woodland significantly (P = 0.050) increased 14C concentrations in the most common ectomycorrhizal fungus on Pinus edulis roots. We estimate that carbon in N-fertilized ectomycorrhizal tissue may be approximately three years old; that of unfertilized tissue may be significantly younger. The radiocarbon signatures of mushrooms indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi in this system received newly-photosynthesized carbon from plants. Mushrooms last at most a few days before deteriorating and represent the signature of carbon recently acquired by ectomycorrhizal fungi. Ectomycorrhizal mushrooms collected in 1997 displayed Δ 14C values equivalent to estimated atmospheric values in the southwestern United States at that time. Finally, we found no significant nitrogen effects on Δ 14C of roots of Juniperus monosperma, which does not form ectomycorrhizal relationships. Our results suggest that carbon in N-fertilized ectomycorrhizal tissue is older, and has a longer turnover time, than carbon in unfertilized fungi. This shift in residence time of ectomycorrhizal carbon poses a potential mechanism for feedbacks of anthropogenic nitrogen deposition on soil carbon sequestration.

  7. Ecosystem services and biogeochemical cycles on a global scale: valuation of water, carbon and nitrogen processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecosystem services (ES) are provided by healthy ecosystems and are fundamental to support human life. However, natural systems have been degraded all over the world and the process of degradation is partially attributed to the lack of knowledge regarding the economic benefits associated with ES, which usually are not captured in the market. To valuate ES without using conventional approaches, such as the human's willingness-to-pay for ecosystem goods and services, this paper uses a different method based on Energy Systems Theory to estimate prices for biogeochemical flows that affect ecosystem services by considering their emergy content converted to equivalent monetary terms. Ecosystem services related to water, carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical flows were assessed since they are connected to a range of final ecosystem services including climate regulation, hydrological regulation, food production, soil formation and others. Results in this paper indicate that aquifer recharge, groundwater flow, carbon dioxide sequestration, methane emission, biological nitrogen fixation, nitrous oxide emission and nitrogen leaching/runoff are the most critical biogeochemical flows in terrestrial systems. Moreover, monetary values related to biogeochemical flows on a global scale could provide important information for policymakers concerned with payment mechanisms for ecosystem services and costs of greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  9. Effect of nitrogen pressure on optical properties and microstructure of diamond-like carbon films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-he

    2009-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen pressure on optical properties of hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation graphite in different background pressures of nitrogen is reported. By varying nitrogen pressures from 0.05 to 15.00 Pa, the photoluminescence is gradually increased and optical transmittance is gradually decreased. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to observe the surface morphology of the DLC films. The results indicate that the surface becomes unsmoothed and there are some globose particles on the films surface with the rise of nitrogen pressures. The microstructure of the films is characterized using Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling Pursuant to the Great Oxidation Event: Evidence from the Paleoproterozoic of Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, L.; Junium, C. K.; Arthur, M. A.; Brasier, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Melezhik, V.; Lepland, A.; Crne, A.; Luo, G.; Far-Deep Drilling Team

    2010-12-01

    been re-mobilized as it occurs in cross-cutting pyrobitumen veinlets. The initial isotopic signatures of both Corg and Ccarb may have therefore been modified in some intervals during post-depositional alteration. However, the strong correlation between δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg through much of the sampled interval, especially during the negative shift, leads us to tentatively interpret it as the end of the LJE and a transformation in basin characteristics from anoxic (and possibly sulfidic) to oxygenated. Highly negative δ13Ccarb values at the end of the event may be correlated with observed 13C-depletion in the time-equivalent Houtenbek Formation in southern Africa. Nitrogen isotopes reflect an apparent reduction in the role of nitrogen fixation at the close of the LJE and an increase in the oxidative cycling of N.

  11. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Barbet-Massin

    Full Text Available The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions, in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions and in field conditions (FC on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC and location (FC had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization.

  12. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet-Massin, Claire; Giuliano, Simon; Alletto, Lionel; Daydé, Jean; Berger, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys). The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N) supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions), in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions) and in field conditions (FC) on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC) and location (FC) had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC) N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization.

  13. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet-Massin, Claire; Giuliano, Simon; Alletto, Lionel; Daydé, Jean; Berger, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys). The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N) supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions), in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions) and in field conditions (FC) on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC) and location (FC) had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC) N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization. PMID:26192921

  14. Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Nalini P.; Li, Xuguang; Nallathambi, Vijayadurda; Kumaraguru, Swaminatha P.; Colon-Mercado, Hector; Wu, Gang; Lee, Jong-Won; Popov, Branko N. [Center for Electrochemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction were synthesized by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursors. The electrocatalytic properties of catalysts were studied as a function of surface pre-treatments, nitrogen and oxygen concentrations, and heat-treatment temperatures. On the optimum catalyst, the onset potential for oxygen reduction is approximately 0.76 V (NHE) and the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced at 0.5 V (NHE) is approximately 3% under our experimental conditions. The characterization studies indicated that pyridinic and graphitic (quaternary) nitrogens may act as active sites of catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. In particular, pyridinic nitrogen, which possesses one lone pair of electrons in addition to the one electron donated to the conjugated {pi} bond, facilitates the reductive oxygen adsorption. (author)

  15. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoils with Adjustable Morphology using Ni–Fe Layered Double Hydroxides as Catalyst Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon nanocoils (CNCs with adjusted morphologies were synthesized in a one-step catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD process using acetoni‐ trile as the carbon and nitrogen source. The nickel iron oxide/nickel oxide nanocomposites, which were derived from nickel–iron layered double hydroxide (LDH precur‐ sors, were employed as catalysts for the synthesis of CNCs. In this method, precursor-to-catalyst transformation, catalyst activation, formation of CNCs, and nitrogen doping were all performed in situ in a single process. The morphology (coil diameter, coil pitch, and fibre diameter and nitrogen content of the synthesized CNCs was indi‐ vidually adjusted by modulation of the catalyst composi‐ tion and CVD reaction temperature, respectively. The adjustable ranges of the coil diameter, coil pitch, fibre diameter, and nitrogen content were confirmed to be approximately 500±100 nm, 600±100 nm, 100±20 nm, and 1.1±0.3 atom%, respectively.

  16. Biogenic nitrogen and carbon in Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides from an Archean chert, Marble Bar, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Hashizume, Ko; Orberger, Beate; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Cloquet, Christophe; Massault, Marc

    2007-02-01

    To quantify and localize nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in Archean rocks from the Marble Bar formation, Western Australia, and to gain insights on their origin and potential biogenicity, we conducted nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) and carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements on various samples from the 3460-Myr-old Fe-rich Marble Bar chert. The Marble Bar chert formed during the alteration of basaltic volcanoclastic rocks with Fe- and Si-rich hydrothermal fluids, and the subsequent precipitation of magnetite, carbonates, massive silica, and, locally, sulfides. At a later stage, the magnetite, sulfides, and carbonates were replaced by Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides. Nuclear reaction analyses indicate that most of the N and C resides within these Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, but a minor fraction is found in K-feldspars and Ba-mica dispersed in the silica matrix. The N and C isotopic composition of Fe-oxides suggests the presence of a unique biogenic source with δ 15NAIR values from +6.0 +/- 0.5‰ to 7.3 +/- 1.1‰ and a δ 13CPDB value of -19.9 +/- 0.1‰. The C and N isotope ratios are similar to those observed in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic organic matter. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of N and C released during high combustion temperatures indicates that these two elements are firmly embedded within the iron oxides, with activation energies of 18.7 +/- 3.7 kJ/mol for N and 13.0 +/- 3.8 kJ/mol for C. We propose that N and C were chemisorbed on iron and were subsequently embedded in the crystals during iron oxidation and crystal growth. The Fe-isotopic composition of the Marble Bar chert (δ 56Fe = -0.38 +/- 0.02‰) is similar to that measured in iron oxides formed by direct precipitation of iron from hydrothermal plumes in contact with oxygenated waters. To explain the N and C isotopic composition of Marble Bar chert, we propose either (1) a later addition of N and C at the end of Archean when oxygen started to rise or (2) an earlier development of localized oxygenated

  17. Canopy structural alterations to nitrogen functions of the soil microbial community in a Quercus virginiana forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L. D.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Rosier, C. L.; Gay, T. E.; Wu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Forest canopy structure controls the timing, amount and chemical character of precipitation supply to soils through interception and drainage along crown surfaces. Yet, few studies have examined forest canopy structural connections to soil microbial communities (SMCs), and none have measured how this affects SMC N functions. The maritime Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) forests of St Catherine's Island, GA, USA provide an ideal opportunity to examine canopy structural alterations to SMCs and their functioning, as their throughfall varies substantially across space due to dense Tillandsia usneoides L. (spanish moss) mats bestrewn throughout. To examine the impact of throughfall variability on SMC N functions, we examined points along the canopy coverage continuum: large canopy gaps (0%), bare canopy (50-60%), and canopy of heavy T. usneoides coverage (>=85%). Five sites beneath each of the canopy cover types were monitored for throughfall water/ions and soil leachates chemistry for one storm each month over the growing period (7 months, Mar-2014 to Sep-2014) to compare with soil chemistry and SMC communities sampled every two months throughout that same period (Mar, May, Jul, Sep). DGGE and QPCR analysis of the N functioning genes (NFGs) to characterize the ammonia oxidizing bacterial (AOB-amoA), archaea (AOA-amoA), and ammonification (chiA) communities were used to determine the nitrification and decomposition potential of these microbial communities. PRS™-probes (Western Ag Innovations Inc., Saskatoon, Canada) were then used to determine the availability of NO3-N and NH4+N in the soils over a 6-week period to evaluate whether the differing NFG abundance and community structures resulted in altered N cycling.

  18. Effects of nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups of activated carbon nanotubes on the electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhang, Su; Zhou, Jisheng; Ma, Zhaokun

    2015-07-01

    A kind of nitrogen- and oxygen-containing activated carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) has been prepared by carbonization and activation of polyaniline nanotubes obtained by rapidly mixed reaction. The ACNTs show oxygen content of 15.7% and nitrogen content of 2.97% (atomic ratio). The ACNTs perform high capacitance and good rate capability (327 F g-1 at the current density of 10 A g-1) when used as the electrode materials for supercapacitors. Hydrogen reduction has been further used to investigate the effects of surface functional groups on the electrochemical performance. The changes for both structural component and electrochemical performance reveal that the quinone oxygen, pyridinic nitrogen, and pyrrolic nitrogen of carbon have the most obvious influence on the capacitive property because of their pseudocapacitive contributions.

  19. Microbiotic crusts on soil, rock and plants: neglected major players in the global cycles of carbon and nitrogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Elbert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbiotic crusts consisting of bacteria, fungi, algae, lichens, and bryophytes colonize most terrestrial surfaces, and they are able to fix carbon and nitrogen from the atmosphere. Here we show that microbiotic crusts are likely to play major roles in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen, and we suggest that they should be further characterized and taken into account in studies and models of the Earth system and climate.

    For the global annual net uptake of carbon by microbiotic crusts we present a first estimate of ~3.6 Pg a−1. This uptake corresponds to ~6% of the estimated global net carbon uptake by terrestrial vegetation (net primary production, NPP: ~60 Pg a−1, and it is of the same magnitude as the global annual carbon turnover due to biomass burning. The estimated rate of nitrogen fixation by microbiotic crusts (~45 Tg a−1 amounts to ~40% of the global estimate of biological nitrogen fixation (107 Tg a−1. With regard to Earth system dynamics and global change, the large contribution of microbiotic crusts to nitrogen fixation is likely to be important also for the sequestration of CO2 by terrestrial plants (CO2 fertilization, because the latter is constrained by the availability of fixed nitrogen.

  20. Synthesis of nitrogen-doping carbon dots with different photoluminescence properties by controlling the surface states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yun Huan; Liu, Ze Xi; Li, Rong Sheng; Zou, Hong Yan; Lin, Min; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-03-28

    Surface states of carbon dots (CDs) are critical to the photoemission properties of CDs. By carefully adjusting the reaction conditions in a hydrothermal synthesis route, we have prepared a series of CDs with excitation-dependent emission (EDE) and excitation-independent emission (EIE) properties by controlling the content of nitrogen elements, confirming that the characteristic optical properties of CDs originate from their energy levels. It has been found that surface-passivation of the as-prepared CDs by nitrogen doping can improve the emission efficiency and be beneficial to EIE features due to the single electron transition resulting from the single functional groups. And the as-prepared CDs can specifically bind with Hg(2+) with the emission quenched because of the electron transfer from the LUMO levels of CDs to Hg(2+). PMID:26955862

  1. Structural and Electrical Properties of Amorphous Hydrogen Carbon-Nitrogen Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Da-Cheng; LIU Yi-Chun; LIU Yan; QI Xiu-Ying; ZHONG Dian-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen (a-C:H:(N)) films with different nitrogen contents have been deposited by using rf-sputtering of a high purity graphite target in an Ar-H2-N2 atmosphere. Transmittance and reflectance spectra are used to characterize the Tauc gap and absorption coefficients in the wavelength range 0.185-3.2μm.The temperature dependence of conductivity demonstrates a hopping mechanism of the Fermi level in the temperature range of 77-300K. The density of state at the Fermi level is derived from the direct current conductivity.The photoluminescence properties of a-C:H:N films were investigated. The photoluminescence peak has a blue shift with increasing excitation energy. These results are discussed on the basis of a model in which the different sp2 clusters dispersed in sp3 matrices.

  2. Space-Confined Synthesis of Three-Dimensional Boron/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes/Carbon Nanosheets Line-in-Wall Hybrids and Their Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Shan; Li, Jiajun; Li, Qingfeng;

    2016-01-01

    This research demonstrates a flexible one-pot strategy for fabricating three-dimensional (3D) boron/nitrogen-doped networks of carbon nanotubes(CNTs)/carbon nanosheets "Line-in-Wall" hybrids (LIWNB) based on the space-confined template method. In the synthesis, the high rate of freezing step and ...

  3. Secondary brown carbon formation via the dicarbonyl imine pathway: nitrogen heterocycle formation and synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, C J; Filippi, A; Zuth, C; Hoffmann, T; Opatz, T

    2016-07-21

    Dicarbonyls are known to be important precursors of so-called atmospheric brown carbon, significantly affecting aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. In this systematic study we report the formation of light-absorbing nitrogen containing compounds from simple 1,2-, 1,3-, 1,4-, and 1,5-dicarbonyl + amine reactions. A combination of spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric techniques was used to characterize reaction products in solutions mimicking atmospheric particulates. Experiments with individual dicarbonyls and dicarbonyl mixtures in ammonium sulfate and glycine solutions demonstrate that nitrogen heterocycles are common structural motifs of brown carbon chromophores formed in such reaction systems. 1,4- and 1,5-dicarbonyl reaction systems, which were used as surrogates for terpene ozonolysis products, showed rapid formation of light-absorbing material and products with absorbance maxima at ∼450 nm. Synergistic effects on absorbance properties were observed in mixed (di-)carbonyl experiments, as indicated by the formation of a strong absorber in ammonium sulfate solutions containing acetaldehyde and acetylacetone. This cross-reaction oligomer shows an absorbance maximum at 385 nm, relevant for the actinic flux region of the atmosphere. This study demonstrates the complexity of secondary brown carbon formation via the imine pathway and highlights that cross-reactions with synergistic effects have to be considered an important pathway for atmospheric BrC formation. PMID:27334793

  4. Trophic ecology of small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis Bleeker): stable carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Weiwei; CHEN Xuezhong; JIANG Yazhou; LI Shengfa

    2011-01-01

    The trophic ecology of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) was studied using stable isotope analyses.Samples were collected from July to September 2009 and 34 individuals from eight sites were examined for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C)ranged from -20.67 to -15.43,while stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) ranged 9.18-12.23.The relationship between δ13C and δ15N suggested high resource partitioning in the sampling area.Significant differences in stable isotope values among the eight sampling sites may be linked to environmental diversities involving various physical processes (such as ocean current,wind and tide) and different carbon sources.Furthermore,the stable isotope ratios may also explain the ontogenetic variability in diet and feeding,because δ13C and δ15N varied significantly with increasing body size.The findings are consistent with other studies on diet analyses in small yellow croaker.It was also demonstrated that stable isotope analysis could be used to estimate the trophic characters of small yellow croaker in feeding patterns and migrating habits.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films embedded with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of substrate bias on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films embedded with nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique is discussed. High resolution transmission electron microscope exhibited initially the amorphous structure but on closer examination the film was constituted of amorphous phase with the nanoparticle embedded in the amorphous matrix. X-ray diffraction study reveals dominantly an amorphous nature of the film. A straight forward method of deconvolution of XPS spectra has been used to evaluate the sp3 and sp2 contents present in these a-C:N films. The carbon (C 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into four different peaks and nitrogen (N 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into three different peaks which attribute to different bonding state between C, N and O. The full width at half maxima (FWHM) of C 1s peak, sp3 content and sp3/sp2 ratio of a-C:N films increase up to -150 V substrate bias and beyond -150 V substrate bias these parameters are found to decrease. Thus, the parameters evaluated are found to be dependent on the substrate bias which peaks at -150 V substrate bias.

  6. [Effects of lipid extraction on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of Ommastrephes bartramii muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun; Gao, Chun-Xia; Li, Yun-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become an important tool to investigate diet shift, habitat use and trophic structure of animal population. Muscle is considered to be the most common tissue for SIA, however, lipid content in muscle causes a considerable bias to the interpretation of isotopic ratios of animals. Neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is an important economic cephalopod of Chinese distant water fishery, and plays a major role in marine ecosystems. In this study, the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios of the muscles of 53 neon flying squids were investigated and the interference mechanism of lipid in SIA was clarified with the aim of contrasting the suitability of different lipid correction models of stable carbon isotope. Results showed that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of non-lipid extracted samples significantly increased after lipid extractions by 0.71 per thousand and 0.47 per thousand, respectively, which suggested that lipid extraction in cephalopod isotope study is needed prior to stable carbon isotope analysis but not recommended for stable nitrogen isotope analysis. The results could help remove the effects of lipid contents and standardize SIA muscle samples, thereby getting better understanding of the isotopic change of neon flying squids in the future. PMID:25898636

  7. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes on silicon carbide as a metal-free catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuong Duong-Viet; Housseinou Ba; Yuefeng Liu; Lai Truong-Phuoc; Jean-Mario Nhut; Cuong Pham-Huu

    2014-01-01

    A hierarchical metal-free catalyst consisting of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes decorated onto a silicon carbide (N-CNTs/SiC) macroscopic host structure was prepared. The influence of N-CNTs incorporation on the physical properties of the support was evaluated using different characteriza-tion techniques. The catalyst was tested as a metal-free catalyst in the selective oxidation of H2S and steam-free dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. The N-CNTs/SiC catalyst exhibited extremely good desulfurization performance compared to a Fe2O3/SiC catalyst under less conducive reaction condi-tions such as low temperature, high space velocity, and a low O2-to-H2S molar ratio. For the dehy-drogenation of ethylbenzene, a higher dehydrogenation activity was obtained with the N-CNTs/SiC catalyst compared to a commercial K-Fe/Al2O3 catalyst. The N-CNTs/SiC catalyst also displayed good stability as a function of time on stream for both reactions, which was attributed to the strong anchoring of the nitrogen dopant in the carbon matrix. The extrudate shape of the SiC support al-lowed the direct macroscopic shaping of the catalyst for use in a conventional fixed-bed reactor without the problems of catalyst handling, transportation, and pressure drop across the catalyst bed that are encountered with nanoscopic carbon-based catalysts.

  8. Model-Based Analysis of the Effect of Long-term Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Nitrogen and Carbon Dynamics in Northern Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands as a unique biological community that provide important ecological, economic and protective functions are highly threatened by climate change and nitrogen deposition. A process based model has been developed to simulate short term and long term changes in peatlands biogeochemistry and ecology. The model contains three modules: Hydrothermal generates daily water table and soil temperature as environmental inputs for other modules; Plant dynamics simulates the competition of plants in natural nutrient poor condition and the potential shifting of ecosystem under high nutrient input and climate change; Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics simulates the decomposition of SOM into mineralized carbon and nitrogen and their transformation and translocation within the peat and efflux. This model especially focuses on nitrogen dynamics both in plant and soil and the coupling of nitrogen cycle to carbon cycle for peatland. Water table is modeled as a bucket model that calculates real time water storage from precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff, which in turn generates water table level and soil moisture profile in soil. Soil temperature along depth is calculated from soil thermal conductivity features and air temperature. Plant carbon and nitrogen dynamics are modeled for 3 plant functional types (moss, graminoids and shrubs) with different tolerant levels to temperate, moisture, light and nutrients. SOM decomposition is simulated in a layer structure with 5cm resolution. Within each layer one labile and one recalcitrant organic carbon and nitrogen pool are decomposed simultaneously on rates controlled by SOM quality, nitrogen availability and environment. Simulation for water table, Temperature, plant dynamics, carbon nitrogen budget and fluxes and peat initiation for Mer Bleue bog (Ottawa Canada, Fluxnet data) shows good correlation with field data. SOM decomposition simulation reveals that the extremely low decomposition rate of SOM in saturated zone plays

  9. Long-term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics at SPRUCE Revealed through Stable Isotopes in Peat Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen turnover in peatlands is of considerable interest because peat is a large reservoir of stored carbon that could emit greenhouse gases in response to climate change. Because peat cores preserve a long-term record of system carbon and nitrogen dynamics, it is possible to use stable isotopes as markers of changes in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics over time. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns throughout the depth profile of peat cores to understand controls over C-N cycling in the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, %C, %N, and each other. Negative correlation of δ15N with %N presumably reflected removal of 15N-depleted N via denitrification, diffusion, or plant N transfer via mycorrhizal fungi. A step increase in the depth coefficient for δ15N of ~3‰ from -25 cm to -35 cm suggested that the N removal process primarily operates at a discrete depth corresponding to the juncture between aerobic and anaerobic layers defined by the water table. Higher δ15N and lower δ13C in plots closer to uplands may reflect distinct hydrology and accompanying shifts in C and N dynamics in the lagg area fringing the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revoluation) and aerobic decomposition lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. Small increases in δ13C at -112 cm (4300 calibrated years BP) and -85 cm (3800 calibrated years BP) may reflect C dynamics during a suspected transitional fen stage (based on paleoecology at a nearby bog), when reduced methanotrophy retained less 13C-depleted carbon derived from methane than in later periods. The C/N decreased until about -85 cm and thereafter remained steady, suggesting that the active zone of aerobic processing during drought may extend to this depth. The inflection point in calculated carbon accumulation rates at this depth supports this conclusion.

  10. Nitrogen Fertilization of Corn: Plant Biochemistry Effects and Carbon Cycle Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; McSwiney, C. P.; Robertson, G. P.; Baldock, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are rising due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions (Alley et al. 2007; Prentice et al. 2001). About half of the anthropogenic CO2 emitted during the 1990s was absorbed by the terrestrial biosphere and ocean (Prentice et al. 2001). It is possible to estimate the size of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks individually using atmospheric CO2 and O2 measurements (Keeling et al. 1996). To best estimate the sizes of these carbon sinks, we need to accurately know the oxidative ratio (OR) of the terrestrial biosphere (Randerson et al. 2006). OR is the ratio of the moles of O2 released per moles of CO2 consumed in gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. Though it is likely that the net OR of the biosphere varies with ecosystem type and nutrient status, OR is assumed constant in carbon sink apportionment calculations (e.g. Prentice et al. 2001). Small shifts in OR can lead to large variations in the calculated sizes of the terrestrial biosphere and ocean carbon sinks (Randerson et al. 2006). OR likely shifts with changes in climate, nutrient status, and land use. These shifts are due, in part, to shifts in plant biochemistry. We are measuring ecosystem OR in corn agricultural ecosystems under a range of nitrogen fertilization treatments at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. We measure OR indirectly, through its relationship with organic carbon oxidation state (Cox) (Masiello et al. in press 2008). Cox can be measured through elemental analysis and, with basic knowledge of plant nitrogen use patterns, Cox values can be converted to OR values. Cox can also be measured through 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can be combined with a molecular mixing model to determine Cox, OR, and plant biochemical composition (i.e. percentage carbohydrates, lignin, lipids, and proteins) (Baldock et al. 2004). Here we present data showing the effects of

  11. State factor relationships of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen losses from unpolluted temperate forest watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, S.S.; Hedin, L.O.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled 100 unpolluted, old-growth forested watersheds, divided among 13 separate study areas over 5 years in temperate southern Chile and Argentina, to evaluate relationships among dominant soil-forming state factors and dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations in watershed streams. These watersheds provide a unique opportunity to examine broad-scale controls over carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in the absence of significant human disturbance from chronic N deposition and land use change. Variations in the ratio dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to nitrogen (DON) in watershed streams differed by underlying soil parent material, with average C:N = 29 for watersheds underlain by volcanic ash and basalt versus C:N = 73 for sedimentary and metamorphic parent materials, consistent with stronger adsorption of low C:N hydrophobic materials by amorphous clays commonly associated with volcanic ash and basalt weathering. Mean annual precipitation was related positively to variations in both DOC (range: 0.2-9.7 mg C/L) and DON (range: 0.008-0.135 mg N/L) across study areas, suggesting that variations in water volume and concentration may act synergistically to influence C and N losses across dry to wet gradients in these forest ecosystems. Dominance of vegetation by broadleaf versus coniferous trees had negligible effects on organic C and N concentrations in comparison to abiotic factors. We conclude that precipitation volume and soil parent material are important controls over chemical losses of dissolved organic C and N from unpolluted temperate forest watersheds. Our results raise the possibility that biotic imprints on watershed C and N losses may be less pronounced in naturally N-poor forests than in areas impacted by land use change and chronic N deposition. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O3 attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides

  13. Carbon and nitrogen accumulation in forest floor and surface soil under different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton.) plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, E.; Oral, H. V.; Akburak, S.; Makineci, E.; Yilmaz, E.

    2013-09-01

    Aim of study: To determine if plantations consisting of different geographic origins of the Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton.) could have altered C and N stocks in the forest floor and surface soils. Area of study: Forest floor and mineral soil C and N stocks were measured in four adjacent plantations of different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Gironde, Toulon, Corsica and Spain) and adjacent primary native Sessile oak (Quercus petraea L.) at Burunsuz region in Belgrad Forest where is located in the Istanbul province in the Marmara geographical region between 41° 09’-41° 12’ N latitude and 28° 54’-29° 00’ E longitude in Turkey. Material and methods: Plots were compared as common garden experiments without replications. 15 surface soil (0-10 cm) and 15 forest floor samples were taken from each Maritime pine origins and adjacent native Sessile oak forest. C and N contents were determined on LECO Truspec 2000 CN analyzer. The statistical significance of the results was evaluated by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Research highlights: Forest floor carbon mass, nitrogen concentration and nitrogen mass of forest floor showed a significant difference among origins. Soil carbon mass and nitrogen mass did not significantly differ among investigated plots. (Author)

  14. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Hierarchically Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures as Novel Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Guohai; Jeon, Ju Won; Lemmon, John P.; Du, Dan; Nune, Satish K.; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-01

    The hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon materials, derived from nitrogen-containing isoreticular metal-organic framework-3 (IRMOF-3) through direct carbonization, exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in alkaline solution for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This high activity is attributed to the 10 presence of high percentage of quaternary and pyridinic nitrogen, the high surface area as well as good conductivity. When IRMOF-3 was carbonized at 950 °C (CIRMOF-3-950), it showed four-electron reduction pathway for ORR and exhibited better stability (about 78.5% current density was maintained) than platinum/carbon (Pt/C) in the current durability test. In addition, CIRMOF-3-950 presented high selectivity to cathode reactions compared to commercial Pt/C.

  15. Metal-free Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin as oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Gyutae; Park, Joohyuk; Kim, Sun Tai; Shin, Dong-bin; Park, Noejung; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysts facilitating oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital components in advanced fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Here we report Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin and apply these easily scalable materials as metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR. These carbon nanosheets demonstrate highly comparable catalytic activity for ORR as well as better durability than commercial Vulcan carbon supported Pt catalysts in alkaline media. Physico-chemical characterization and theoretical calculations suggest that proper combination of graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen species with more exposed edge sites effectively facilitates a formation of superoxide, [O2(ad)](-), via one-electron transfer, thus increasing catalytic activities for ORR. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to expose more nitrogen doped edge sites by irregular stacked small sheets in developing better electrocatalysts for Zn-air batteries. These desirable architectures are embodied by an amphiphlilic gelatin mediated compatible synthetic strategy between hydrophobic carbon and aqueous water. PMID:24635744

  16. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period

    OpenAIRE

    Guoyong Yan; Yajuan Xing; Lijian Xu; Jianyu Wang; Wei Meng; Qinggui Wang; Jinghua Yu; Zhi Zhang; Zhidong Wang; Siling Jiang; Boqi Liu; Shijie Han

    2016-01-01

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration a...

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lee, Ju Min; Lim, Joonwon; Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-07-01

    Substitutional heteroatom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Recently, (nitrogen-) N-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. This invited feature article reviews the current research progress, emerging trends, and opening opportunities in N-doped carbon based composite structures. Underlying basic principles are introduced for the effective modulation of material properties of graphitic carbons by N-doping. Composite structures of N-doped graphitic carbons with various functional materials, including (i) polymers, (ii) transition metals, (iii) metal oxides, nitrides, sulphides, and (iv) semiconducting quantum dots are highlighted. Practical benefits of the synergistic composite structures are investigated in energy and catalytic applications, such as organic photovoltaics, photo/electro-catalysts, lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, with a particular emphasis on the optimized interfacial structures and properties. PMID:24710592

  18. Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Enriched 3D Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors of High Volumetric Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Liu, Kang; Gao, Xiang; Yao, Bin; Huo, Kaifu; Cheng, Yongliang; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Dongchang; Wang, Bo; Sun, Wanmei; Ding, Dong; Liu, Meilin; Huang, Liang

    2015-11-11

    Efficient utilization and broader commercialization of alternative energies (e.g., solar, wind, and geothermal) hinges on the performance and cost of energy storage and conversion systems. For now and in the foreseeable future, the combination of rechargeable batteries and electrochemical capacitors remains the most promising option for many energy storage applications. Porous carbonaceous materials have been widely used as an electrode for batteries and supercapacitors. To date, however, the highest specific capacitance of an electrochemical double layer capacitor is only ∼200 F/g, although a wide variety of synthetic approaches have been explored in creating optimized porous structures. Here, we report our findings in the synthesis of porous carbon through a simple, one-step process: direct carbonization of kelp in an NH3 atmosphere at 700 °C. The resulting oxygen- and nitrogen-enriched carbon has a three-dimensional structure with specific surface area greater than 1000 m(2)/g. When evaluated as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitors, the porous carbon structure demonstrated excellent volumetric capacitance (>360 F/cm(3)) with excellent cycling stability. This simple approach to low-cost carbonaceous materials with unique architecture and functionality could be a promising alternative to fabrication of porous carbon structures for many practical applications, including batteries and fuel cells.

  19. Ecosystem carbon balance of temperate forests differing in elevation and nitrogen availability

    OpenAIRE

    Caprez, Riccarda

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis addressed the carbon (C) balance of temperate deciduous forests across natural gradients of temperature and nitrogen (N) availability, the major drivers of net primary production (NPP) and the soil C balance. A mean annual temperature difference of 6 K across a 1200 m change in elevation from the Swiss Plateau to the Central Swiss Alps, and the presence or absence of the N2-fixing tree species Alnus glutinosa or Alnus incana within each elevation, offered the framework (1) to ...

  20. Hydrogen adsorption of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes functionalized with 3d-block transition metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael R Mananghaya

    2015-04-01

    A systematic study of the most stable configurations, calculation of the corresponding binding and free energies of functionalized 3d transition metals (TMs) on (10,0) Single Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) doped with porphyrin-like nitrogen defects (4ND-CNxNT) using spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) formalism with flavours of LDA and GGA exchange-correlation (XC) functionals has been made. A thorough analysis showed that the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNT are dependent on the TMs absorbed wherein, the composite material TM/4ND-CNxNT can act as a medium for storing hydrogen at room temperature manifested through favourable adsorption energy.

  1. Determination of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in cattail using cold neutron prompt-gamma activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in cattail using cold neutron prompt-gamma activation analysis (CNPGAA) has been developed and evaluated through the analysis of standard reference materials (SRM). After extensive preparation, approximately 400 mg cattail samples from the lower Apalachicola River floodplain were irradiated in the CNPGAA facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The results of numerous field samples and two standard reference materials using the nuclear method show favorable comparison to results obtained by a CHNS/O analyzer. (author)

  2. Stoichiometric deduction of activated sludge process for organic carbon and nitrogen removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-yong; ZOU Lian-pei

    2009-01-01

    The activated sludge process (ASP) is the most generally applied biological wastewater treatment method. The ASP for the removal of organic carbon and nitrogen can be looked as the combination of eight processes. In order to set up an ASP model, the stoichiometric coefficients should be deduced so that the stoichiometric matrix can be presented. The important assumptions and simplifications behind the model for ASP are enumerated. Using the matrix, mass balance equation and consistent units, the stoichiometric coefficients in the eight processes are exclusively deduced one by one.

  3. Isotope shifts in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, C.; Verdebout, S. [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Rynkun, P.; Gaigalas, G. [Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Godefroid, M., E-mail: mrgodef@ulb.ac.be [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP160/09, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 205-06 Malmö (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wavefunctions that account for valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  4. [Response of black soil organic carbon, nitrogen and its availability to longterm fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Hu, Rong-Gui; Zhang, Wen-Ju; Zhou, Bao-Ku; Xu, Ming-Gang; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Xia, Ping-Ping

    2013-02-01

    Based on the long-term fertilization experiments, effects of various fertilization practices on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in the surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) black soil in northeast China were studied. Results showed that, compared with the CK, long-term application of organic manure, especially the combination of mineral fertilizers and organic manure significantly increased the organic SOC and TN in the surface soil. Application of mineral fertilizers plus organic manure with conventional (NPM) and high application (N2P2M2) rate increased SOC significantly by 24. 6% and 25.1% , and TN by 29.5% and 32.8%, respectively. However, there was no significant difference among the treatments for SOC and TN at the subsurface. Compared with the CK (CKh), mineral fertilizer plus organic manure (NPM and N2P2M2) did not only increase the soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and nitrogen (SMBN) , dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DN), but also significantly increased the ratio of SMBC and DOC to SOC, SMBN and TN to TN. Application of the NPM and N2P2M2 increased the value of SMBC/SOC by 0.36 to 0.59 and SMBN/TN by 1.21 to 1.95 percentage points, respectively. The value of DOC/SOC and DN/TN ranged from 0.53% to 0.72% and 1.41% to 1.78%, respectively. This result indicated that SMBC, SMBN, DOC, DN and SMBC/ SOC, SMBN/TN, DOC/SOC, DN/TN were more sensitive than SOC and TN to long-term fertilization in the soil profile, and were better indicators for the impact of long-term fertilization soil fertility. The concluded that the application of manure especially manure plus mineral fertilizers can increase soil nutrients activity in the surface and subsurface black soil, acting as a helpful practice to improve soil fertility and the ability of nutrient supply, while it may cause potential environment pollution on carbon and nitrogen loss in the agroecosystem.

  5. Growth of Bacteria on 3-Nitropropionic Acid as a Sole Source of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Energy▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Shirley F.; Shin, Kwanghee A.; Payne, Rayford B.; Spain, Jim C.

    2010-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3NPA) is a widespread nitroaliphatic toxin found in a variety of legumes and fungi. Several enzymes have been reported that can transform the compound, but none led to the mineralization of 3NPA. We report here the isolation of bacteria that grow on 3NPA and its anion, propionate-3-nitronate (P3N), as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Experiments with resting cells, cell extracts, and purified enzymes indicate that the pathway involves conversion of 3NPA ...

  6. Effects of nitrogen deposition on carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Dejun; Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa;

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in China has increased greatly, but the general impact of elevated N deposition on carbon (C) dynamics in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems is not well documented. In this study we used a meta-analysis method to compile 88 studies on the effects of N deposition C cycling...... and rate of N addition. Overall, our findings suggest that 1) decreased below-ground plant C pool may limit long-term soil C sequestration; and 2) it is better to treat N-rich and N-limited ecosystems differently in modeling effects of N deposition on ecosystem C cycle....

  7. Implications of altered phenology on the carbon dynamics of deciduous oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Matthew; Eaton, Edward; Pinnington, Ewan; Morison, James

    2016-04-01

    The widely observed advance in spring budburst across a range of temperate forest species due to climatic warming has received considerable attention. Such changes in phenology have important implications not only for the choice of species and provenances currently being planted, which need to be suited to both current and future climatic conditions, but also for the carbon dynamics of forest ecosystems. Using a combination of phenology observations and carbon balance modelling, this study examines the influence of tree phenology and growing season length on carbon sequestration. Tree phenology and seasonal carbon dynamics were measured using phenocam images and Eddy Covariance (EC) at a deciduous oak plantation in the south-east of England (Alice Holt, Hampshire, UK). Manual phenology observations of spring budburst were also recorded in a range of European oak provenances over seven years (2004 - 2009 and again in 2013) at a trial site nearby. The EC and manual observation sites were exposed to very similar meteorological conditions. At the manual observation site there was a strong correlation between mean spring air temperature and the date of budburst in all provenances. The order in which budburst occurred was largely conserved between years and was strongly linked to source latitude, provenances that originated from southerly locations consistently reached budburst prior to those from more northerly locations. The timing of budburst in the local provenance at the manual observation site was synchronous with budburst at the EC site. The Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model was optimised for the Alice Holt site. By altering the timing of budburst within the model to reflect the observed variation in the European provenances, we assessed the implications of altered phenology on the carbon dynamics of deciduous oak in southern England.

  8. Combined effect of nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups of microporous activated carbon on its electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Lu, Gao Qing [University of Queensland ARC, Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and School of Engineering Corner College, St Lucia (Australia); Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J. [City College of New York, Department of Chemistry, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-02-10

    Microporous activated carbon originating from coconut shell, as received or oxidized with nitric acid, is treated with melamine and urea and heated to 950 C in an inert atmosphere to modify the carbon surface with nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups for a systematic investigation of their combined effect on electrochemical performance in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} supercapacitors. The chemistry of the samples is characterized using elemental analysis, Boehm titration, potentiometric titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Sorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide is used to determine the textural properties. The results show that the surface chemistry is affected by the type of nitrogen precursor and the specific groups present on the surface before the treatment leading to the incorporation of nitrogen. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior of urea- and melamine-treated samples reveal pseudocapacitance from both the oxygen and the nitrogen containing functional groups located in the pores larger than 10A. On the other hand, pores between 5A and 6A are most effective in a double-layer formation, which correlates well with the size of hydrated ions. Although the quaternary and pyridinic-N-oxides nitrogen groups have enhancing effects on capacitance due to the positive charge, and thus an improved electron transfer at high current loads, the most important functional groups affecting energy storage performance are pyrrolic and pyridinic nitrogen along with quinone oxygen. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen on adhesive growth and expressions of E-cadherin and VEGF of human colon cancer cell CCL-228

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Lin Cai; Guo-Bing Wang; Li-Juan Xiong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of carbon dioxide on the metastatic capability of cancer cells, and to compare them with that of nitrogen.METHODS: The colon cancer cell CCL-228 was treated with 100 % carbon dioxide or nitrogen at different time points and then cultured under normal condition. Twelve hours after the treatment, the survival rates of suspension cells and the expressions of e-cadherin and VEGF were examined.RESULTS: After 60 min of carbon dioxide and longer time of nitrogen treatment, the suspended cells increased and the expression of e-cadherin decreased while the expression of VEGF was enhanced significantly. And the effects of nitrogen were similar to, but weaker than, those of carbon dioxide.CONCLUSION: Carbon dioxide may improve the metastatic capability of cancer cells and its effects are significantly stronger than that of nitrogen. A sequential use of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in pneumoperitoneum may take the advantage of both gases.

  10. Characterization by SEM, TEM and Quantum-Chemical Simulations of the Spherical Carbon with Nitrogen (SCN Active Carbon Produced by Thermal Decomposition of Poly(vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene Copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladyslav V. Lisnyak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous Spherical Carbon with Nitrogen (SCN active carbon has been prepared by carbonization of poly(vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene (PVPDVB copolymer. The PVPDVB dehydrogenation copolymer has been quantum chemically (QC simulated using cluster and periodic models. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX studies of the resulting product have conformed the QC computation results. Great structural similarity is found both at the nano- and micro-levels between the N-doped SCN carbon and its pure carbonic SKS analog.

  11. High-performance oxygen reduction catalyst derived from porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Cao, Yingjie; Zhu, Juntong; Jiang, Yining; Feng, Lai; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu

    2016-10-01

    A facile, self-foaming strategy is reported to synthesize porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets (N-CNSs) as a metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Benefiting from the synergistic functions of N-induced active sites, a highly specific surface area and continuous structure, the optimal N-CNS catalyst exhibits Pt-like ORR activity (positive onset potential of ˜0 V versus Ag/AgCl and limiting current density of 5 mA cm-2) through a four-electron transfer process in alkaline media with excellent cycle stability and methanol tolerance. This work not only provides a promising metal-free ORR catalyst but also opens up a new path for designing carbon-based materials towards broad applications.

  12. Low temperature Rosseland opacities with varied abundances of carbon and nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    We provide low temperature opacity data that incorporate varied abundances of the elements carbon and nitrogen. In the temperature range that we focus at, molecules are the dominant opacity source. Our dataset spans a large metallicity range and shall deliver the necessary input data for stellar evolution models as well as other applications. We conduct chemical equilibrium calculations in order to evaluate the partial pressures of neutral atoms, ions and molecules. Based on a large dataset containing atomic line and continuum data, and, most importantly, a plethora of molecular lines, we subsequently calculate Rosseland mean opacity coefficients. This is done not only for a number of different metallicities, but also for varied abundances of the isotopes 12C and 14N at each metallicity. The molecular data comprise the main opacity sources at either an oxygen-rich or carbon-rich chemistry. We tabulate the opacity coefficients as a function of temperature and, basically, density. Already within a certain chemi...

  13. Factors regulating nitrification in aquatic sediments: Effects of organic carbon, nitrogen availability, and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, E.A.; Mitchell, N.L.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the response in nitrification to organic carbon (C) availability, the interactive effects of the C: nitrogen (N) ratio and organic N availability, and differing pH in sediments from several streams in the upper midwestern United States. In addition, we surveyed 36 streams to assess variability in sediment nitrification rates. Labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) additions of 30 mg C??L-1 (as acetate) to stream sediments reduced nitrification rates (P nitrification. C:N and organic N availability strongly interacted to affect nitrification (P nitrification most at lower C:N. Nitrification was also strongly influenced by pH (P nitrification. Our results suggest that nitrification is regulated by several variables, with NH4+ availability and pH being the most important. Organic C is likely important at regulating nitrification only under high environmental C:N conditions and if most available C is relatively labile.

  14. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures indicate recovery of marine biota from sewage pollution at Moa Point, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Karyne M

    2003-07-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been used to assess sewage contamination of a sewage outfall, discharging milli-screened effluent into Moa Point Bay, New Zealand, and monitor the recovery of flora and fauna after the outfall's closure. An initial study characterising the extent of the discharge and the effects on seaweed (Ulva lactuca L.), blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and limpets (Cellana denticulata) from the area, showed effects of the sewage discharge on flora and fauna were localised within in the bay. The immediate area surrounding the discharge area was found to contain limited biodiversity, with an abundance of Ulva lactuca, a bright green lettuce-like seaweed, typically found in areas with high nutrient input, limpets and small blue mussels. The nitrogen isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 15}N) is shown to be a good tracer of sewage pollution in seaweed and associated grazers (i.e. limpets) as a result of the increased contribution of urea and ammonia to seawater nitrogen derived from the effluent. The carbon isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 13}C) is suggested as a more appropriate sewage tracer for mussels, which filter feed the effluent's particulate organic matter from the water. Lower carbon:nitrogen ratios were found in Ulva lactuca sampled from around the outfall region compared to uncontaminated control sites. However carbon:nitrogen ratios do not vary significantly amongst shellfish species. After closure, monitoring continued for 9 months and showed that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of algae (Ulva lactuca L.) returned to similar control site levels within 3 months. Limpet and blue mussels (Cellana denticulata and Mytilus galloprovincialis) showed slower recovery times than the Ulva lactuca, with detectable levels of the sewage-derived carbon and nitrogen remaining in the animal's tissue for up to 9 months.

  15. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Variation in Peat Bogs in the Midwestern US: Implications for Holocene Climate Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D.; Paytan, A.; Jackson, S.

    2008-12-01

    A peat core, from near the center of Minden Bog in Michigan, representing about 3500 years of accumulation was previously analyzed for plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, and testate amoebae to yield three independent climate proxies (Booth and Jackson, 2003). The plant macrofossil data show the site to be sensitive to bog water table fluctuations. The data suggest that this may be related to regional climatic changes. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes, as well as the carbon-nitrogen ratios in the bulk peat samples to determine if fluctuations of these records correspond to climate events as seen in the plant microfossil and amoebae records. The degree to which peat-based carbon and nitrogen isotope records reflect changes in the relative distribution of vegetation and, in turn, reflect temperature changes in effective precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration) will be assessed. Peat carbon and nitrogen isotope records will be compared with existing proxy climate records and with a temperature reconstruction based on testate amoebae in bogs. We expect that climate-related changes, in the relative abundance of vegetation remains accumulating in the peat bogs, will be recorded in the organic matter in forms of carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

  16. Consequences of nitrogen fertilization and soil acidification from acid rain on dissolved carbon and nitrogen stability in the unglaciated Appalachian Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Philip Graham

    2008-01-01

    The expansion and proliferation of reactive nitrogen (N) sources, predominantly fertilizer application and fossil fuel combustion, has enriched the earth with N and acidified ecosystems. Acid rain is a primary vector of both N fertilization and acidification, initiating a cascade of consequences that alter biogeochemical cycling and global biological structure and function. Studies on N and acid influences are however rarely linked despite their common source. We used a wide, chronic gradient...

  17. Organic carbon and total nitrogen stocks in soils of the Lena River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zubrzycki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lena River Delta, which is the largest delta in the Arctic, extends over an area of 32 000 km2 and likely holds more than half of the entire soil organic carbon mass stored in the seven major deltas in the northern permafrost regions. The geomorphic units of the Lena River Delta which were formed by true deltaic sedimentation processes are a Holocene river terrace and the active floodplains. Their mean soil organic carbon stocks for the upper 1 m of soils were estimated at 29 kg m−2 ± 10 kg m−2 and at 14 kg m−2 ± 7 kg m−2, respectively. For the depth of 1 m, the total soil organic carbon pool of the Holocene river terrace was estimated at 121 Tg ± 43 Tg, and the soil organic carbon pool of the active floodplains was estimated at 120 Tg ± 66 Tg. The mass of soil organic carbon stored within the observed seasonally thawed active layer was estimated at about 127 Tg assuming an average maximum active layer depth of 50 cm. The soil organic carbon mass which is stored in the perennially frozen ground below 50 cm soil depth, which is excluded from intense biogeochemical exchange with the atmosphere, was estimated at 113 Tg. The mean nitrogen (N stocks for the upper 1 m of soils were estimated at 1.2 kg m−2 ± 0.4 kg m−2 for the Holocene river terrace and at 0.9 kg m−2 ± 0.4 kg m−2 for the active floodplain levels, respectively. For the depth of 1 m, the total N pool of the river terrace was estimated at 4.8 Tg ± 1.5 Tg, and the total N pool of the floodplains was estimated at 7.7 Tg ± 3.6 Tg. Considering the projections for deepening of the seasonally thawed active layer up to 120 cm in the Lena River Delta region within the 21st century, these large carbon and nitrogen stocks could become increasingly available for decomposition and mineralization processes.

  18. Diamond crystallization in a CO2-rich alkaline carbonate melt with a nitrogen additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Nechaev, Denis V.

    2016-09-01

    Diamond crystallization was experimentally studied in a CO2-bearing alkaline carbonate melt with an increased content of nitrogen at pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperature of 1500 °C. The growth rate, morphology, internal structure of overgrown layers, and defect-impurity composition of newly formed diamond were investigated. The type of growth patterns on faces, internal structure, and nitrogen content were found to be controlled by both the crystallographic orientation of the growth surfaces and the structure of the original faces of diamond seed crystals. An overgrown layer has a uniform structure on the {100} plane faces of synthetic diamond and a fibrillar (fibrous) structure on the faceted surfaces of a natural diamond cube. The {111} faces have a polycentric vicinal relief with numerous twin intergrowths and micro twin lamellae. The stable form of diamond growth under experimental conditions is a curved-face hexoctahedron with small cube faces. The nitrogen impurity concentration in overgrown layers varies depending on the growth direction and surface type, from 100 to 1100 ppm.

  19. Study on boron-carbon-nitrogen; Tanchikka hoso ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-28

    Experimental investigation has been conducted to obtain fundamental knowledge of synthesis of BCN at atmospheric pressure. For the study on BCN compounds by thermo-CVD process, thermo-CVD synthesis was taken up using hydrogen compound as starting material, which is common system of CVD film synthesis. Relationship was examined between the deposition conditions and properties of the film. For the study on powder of BCN-system, a melt mixture method was developed to easily obtain a large amount of powders required as raw material for sintering and high pressure phase synthesis. For the study on BCN thin film, in order to obtain BCN as electronic material and protective coat on the low temperature substrate, BCN film was prepared by irradiating boron vapor and powders of carbon and nitrogen taken out through activation with saddle field type ion source on the substrate, simultaneously. For the study on activating state of nitrogen, fundamental knowledge was obtained concerning the prediction of behavior of nitrogen species, energy distribution of electrons, and neutral excitation species. 119 refs., 70 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Interactions between carbon metabolism and the uptake and assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corda) Ralfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate uptake in nitrogen-limited Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corba) Ralfs was found to be directly dependent on: (1) nitrate concentration; (2) the availability of carbon dioxide or recently synthesised carbon skeletons; (3) light intensity and (4) the presence of ammonium or metabolites of ammonium assimilation. Nitrate uptake was found to obey simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the absence of carbon dioxide, nitrate uptake was destabilised and resulted in nitrate efflux from the cells. If the cells were pre-adapted to high levels of carbon dioxide, a decrease in the concentration of supplied carbon dioxide resulted in only a transient suppression of nitrate uptake. These results indicate that carbon dioxide was required for the stabilisation of the nitrate uptake system and that nitrate uptake, reduction and assimilation could proceed if supplies of recently synthesised carbon skeletons were available for subsequent ammonium incorporation into amino acids. It was concluded that the mobilisation of storage carbohydrate could provide the necessary reducing potential and ATP for nitrate uptake. The addition of ammonium to A. falcatus cells accumulating nitrate resulted in the immediate cessation of nitrate uptake and subsequent nitrate efflux from the cells. Assays of nitrate reductase activity indicated that the activity of the enzyme increased under nitrogen-limitation. Nitrogen-limited, nitrate-growth and ammonium-grown cultures of A. falcatus were used to determine the effects of nitrate and ammonium addition on photosynthetic oxygen exchange, carbon fixation and the path of carbon flow. The addition of these species of inorganic nitrogen resulted in the suppression of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and carbon fixation. Labelling with 14C was used during the carbon fixation studies

  1. Bright carbonate deposits as evidence of aqueous alteration on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. C.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Ciarniello, M.; Toplis, M. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Marchi, S.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Fonte, S.; Formisano, M.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; McFadden, L. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Jaumann, R.; Schenk, P.; Mugnuolo, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    The typically dark surface of the dwarf planet Ceres is punctuated by areas of much higher albedo, most prominently in the Occator crater. These small bright areas have been tentatively interpreted as containing a large amount of hydrated magnesium sulfate, in contrast to the average surface, which is a mixture of low-albedo materials and magnesium phyllosilicates, ammoniated phyllosilicates and carbonates. Here we report high spatial and spectral resolution near-infrared observations of the bright areas in the Occator crater on Ceres. Spectra of these bright areas are consistent with a large amount of sodium carbonate, constituting the most concentrated known extraterrestrial occurrence of carbonate on kilometre-wide scales in the Solar System. The carbonates are mixed with a dark component and small amounts of phyllosilicates, as well as ammonium carbonate or ammonium chloride. Some of these compounds have also been detected in the plume of Saturn’s sixth-largest moon Enceladus. The compounds are endogenous and we propose that they are the solid residue of crystallization of brines and entrained altered solids that reached the surface from below. The heat source may have been transient (triggered by impact heating). Alternatively, internal temperatures may be above the eutectic temperature of subsurface brines, in which case fluids may exist at depth on Ceres today.

  2. 2D quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon nanohybrids for high energy density supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Kan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Baojiang; Shi, Keying; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are intercalated into the interlayers of the expanded EG with the assistance of a vacuum. Subsequently, the intercalated aniline monomers could assemble on the interlayer surface of the expanded EG, accompanied by the in situ polymerization from aniline monomers to polyaniline. Meanwhile, the expanded EG could be exfoliated to graphite nanosheets. By subsequent pyrolysis and activation processes, the QNPC nanohybrids could be prepared. As supercapacitor electrodes, a typical QNPC12-700 sample derived from the precursor containing an EG content of 12%, with a high level of nitrogen doping of 5.22 at%, offers a high specific capacitance of 305.7 F g-1 (1 A g-1), excellent rate-capability and long-term stability. Notably, an extremely high energy density of 95.7 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 449.7 W kg-1 in an ionic liquid electrolyte can be achieved. The unique structural features and moderate heteroatom doping of the QNPC nanohybrids combines electrochemical double layer and faradaic capacitance contributions, which make these nanohybrids ideal candidates as electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices.Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are

  3. Organic carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in the intertidal sediments from the Yangtze Estuary, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural isotopic compositions and C/N elemental ratios of sedimentary organic matter were determined in the intertidal flat of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that the ratios of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were respectively -29.8 per mille to - 26.0 per mille and 1.6 per mille -5.5 per mille in the flood season (July), while they were -27.3 per mille to - 25.6 per mille and 1.7 per mille -7.8 per mille in the dry season (February), respectively. The δ 13C signatures were remarkably higher in July than in February, and gradually increased from the freshwater areas to the brackish areas. In contrast, there were relatively complex seasonal and spatial changes in stable nitrogen isotopes. It was also reflected that δ 15N and C/N compositions had been obviously modified by organic matter diagenesis and biological processing, and could not be used to trace the sources of organic matter at the study area. In addition, it was considered that the mixing inputs of terrigenous and marine materials generally dominated sedimentary organic matter in the intertidal flat. The contribution of terrigenous inputs to sedimentary organic matter was roughly estimated according to the mixing balance model of stable carbon isotopes

  4. The potential of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Olley, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Moreton Bay, in South East Queensland, Australia, is a Ramsar wetland of international significance. A decline of the bay's ecosystem health has been primarily attributed to sediments and nutrients from catchment sources. Sediment budgets for three catchments indicated gully erosion dominates the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas erosion from cultivated soils is the primary sediment source in Blackfellow Creek. Sediment tracing with fallout-radionuclides confirmed subsoil erosion processes dominate the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas in Blackfellow Creek cultivated and subsoil sources contribute >90% of sediments. Other sediment properties are required to determine the relative sediment contributions of channel bank, gully and cultivated sources in these catchments. The potential of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources is presented. The conservativeness of these sediment properties was examined through evaluating particle size variations in depth core soil samples and investigating whether they remain constant in source soils over two sampling occasions. Varying conservative behavior and source discrimination was observed. TN in the

  5. Optimal nitrogen and phosphorus codoping carbon dots towards white light-emitting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yaling; Miao, Yanqin; He, Yuheng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-08-01

    Through a one-step fast microwave-assisted approach, nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped carbon dots (N,P-CDs) were synthesized using ammonium citrate (AC) as a carbon source and phosphates as additive reagent. Under the condition of an optimal reaction time of 140 s, the influence of additive with different N and P content on fluorescent performance of N,P-CDs was further explored. It was concluded that high nitrogen content and moderate phosphorus content are necessary for obtaining high quantum yield (QY) N,P-CDs, among which the TAP-CDs (CDs synthesized using ammonium phosphate as additive reagent) show high quantum yield (QY) of 62% and red-green-blue (RGB) spectral composition of 51.67%. Besides, the TAP-CDs exhibit satisfying thermal stability within 180 °C. By virtue of good optical and thermal properties of TAP-CDs, a white light-emitting device (LED) was fabricated by combining ultraviolet chip with TAP-CDs as phosphor. The white LED emits bright warm-white light with the CIE chromaticity coordinate of (0.38, 0.35) and the corresponding color temperature (CCT) of 4450 K, indicating the potential of TAP-CDs phosphor in white LED.

  6. Fabrication of Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Mesoporous Spherical Carbon Capsules for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aibing; Xia, Kechan; Zhang, Linsong; Yu, Yifeng; Li, Yuetong; Sun, Hexu; Wang, Yuying; Li, Yunqian; Li, Shuhui

    2016-09-01

    A novel "dissolution-capture" method for the fabrication of nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous spherical carbon capsules (N-HMSCCs) with high capability for supercapacitor is developed. The fabrication process is performed by depositing mesoporous silica on the surface of the polyacrylonitrile nanospheres, followed by a dissolution-capture process occurring in the polyacrylonitrile core and silica shell. The polyacrylonitrile core is dissolved by dimethylformamide treatment to form a hollow cavity. Then, the polyacrylonitrile is captured into the mesochannel of silica. After carbonization and etching of silica, N-HMSCCs with uniform mesopore size are produced. The N-HMSCCs show a high specific capacitance of 206.0 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) in 6.0 M KOH due to its unique hollow nanostructure, high surface area, and nitrogen content. In addition, 92.3% of the capacitance of N-HMSCCs still remains after 3000 cycles at 5 A g(-1). The "dissolution-capture" method should give a useful enlightenment for the design of electrode materials for supercapacitor. PMID:27529129

  7. The Implications of Growing Bioenergy Crops on Water Resources, Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. K.; Song, Y.; Kheshgi, H. S.; Landuyt, W.

    2015-12-01

    The bioenergy crops, Corn, Miscanthus and switchgrass have a potential to meet future energy demands in the US and mitigate climate change by partially replacing fossil fuels. However, the large-scale cultivation of these bioenergy crops may also impact climate change through changes in albedo, evapotranspiration (ET), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Whether these climate effects will mitigate or exacerbate climate change in the short and long terms is uncertain. The uncertainties come from our incomplete understanding of the effects of expanded bioenergy crop production on terrestrial water and energy balance, carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and their interactions. This study aims to understand the implications of growing large scale bioenergy crops on water resources, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the United States using a data- modeling framework (ISAM) that we developed. Our study indicates that both Miscanthus and Cave-in-Rock switchgrass can attain high and stable yield over parts of the Midwest, however, this high production is attained at the cost of increased soil water loss as compared to current natural vegetation. Alamo switchgrass can attain high and stable yield in the southern US without significant influence on soil water quantity.

  8. Dual mechanisms of DNA sequencing based on tunnelling between nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    The DNA sequencing approach based on the combination of nanopores and electron tunnelling has seen considerable advances in recent years, and particularly carbon nanomaterials have emerged as promising candidates to replace metal electrodes. Carrying out extensive first-principles calculations, we here show that two distinct DNA sequencing mechanisms can be achieved with different configurations of a single-type nitrogen-doped capped carbon nanotube (CNT) that has significantly enhanced transmission and chemical sensitivity over its pristine counterpart. With a small CNT-CNT gap size that induces face-on nucleobase configurations, we obtain a typical conductance ordering where the largest signal is induced from guanine due to its highest occupied molecular orbital energetic position higher than those of other bases. On the other hand, for a large CNT-CNT gap size that accommodates edge-on nucleobase configurations, we extract a completely different conductance ordering in which thymine results in the largest signal. We find that the latter novel nucleobase sensing mechanism originates from the nature of chemical connectivity between nitrogen-doped CNT caps and nucleobase functional groups that include the thymine methyl group. This work thus demonstrates the feasibility of a tunnelling-based dual-mode approach toward whole genome sequencing applications, detection of DNA base modifications, and single-molecule sensing in general.

  9. Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Codoped Hierarchically Porous Carbon for Adsorptive and Oxidative Removal of Pharmaceutical Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenjie; Zhang, Huayang; Duan, Xiaoguang; Sun, Hongqi; Tade, Moses O; Ang, Ha Ming; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-03-23

    Heteroatom (nitrogen and sulfur)-codoped porous carbons (N-S-PCs) with high surface areas and hierarchically porous structures were successfully synthesized via direct pyrolysis of a mixture of glucose, sodium bicarbonate, and thiourea. The resulting N-S-PCs exhibit excellent adsorption abilities and are highly efficient for potassium persulfate activation when employed as catalysts for the oxidative degradation of sulfachloropyridazine (SCP) solutions. The adsorption capacities of N-S-PC-2 (which contains 4.51 atom % nitrogen and 0.22 atom % sulfur and exhibits SBET of 1608 m(2) g(-1)) are 73, 7, and 3 times higher than those of graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, and commercial single-walled carbon nanotube, respectively. For oxidation, the reaction rate constant of N-S-PC-2 is 0.28 min(-1). This approach not only contributes to the large-scale production and application of high-quality catalysts in water remediation but also provides an innovative strategy for the production of heteroatom-doped PCs for energy applications. PMID:26937827

  10. Effect of climate data on simulated carbon and nitrogen balances for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Jan Hendrik; Lindeskog, Mats; Lindström, Johan; Lehsten, Veiko

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we systematically assess the spatial variability in carbon and nitrogen balance simulations related to the choice of global circulation models (GCMs), representative concentration pathways (RCPs), spatial resolutions, and the downscaling methods used as calculated with LPJ-GUESS. We employed a complete factorial design and performed 24 simulations for Europe with different climate input data sets and different combinations of these four factors. Our results reveal that the variability in simulated output in Europe is moderate with 35.6%-93.5% of the total variability being common among all combinations of factors. The spatial resolution is the most important factor among the examined factors, explaining 1.5%-10.7% of the total variability followed by GCMs (0.3%-7.6%), RCPs (0%-6.3%), and downscaling methods (0.1%-4.6%). The higher-order interactions effect that captures nonlinear relations between the factors and random effects is pronounced and accounts for 1.6%-45.8% to the total variability. The most distinct hot spots of variability include the mountain ranges in North Scandinavia and the Alps, and the Iberian Peninsula. Based on our findings, we advise to conduct the application of models such as LPJ-GUESS at a reasonably high spatial resolution which is supported by the model structure. There is no notable gain in simulations of ecosystem carbon and nitrogen stocks and fluxes from using regionally downscaled climate in preference to bias-corrected, bilinearly interpolated CMIP5 projections.

  11. Nitrogen removal for low-carbon wastewater in reversed A~2/O process by regulation technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智; 陈杰云; 谢丽华; 范功端; 尹晓静; 李勇

    2009-01-01

    Full scale experimental study on nitrogen removal for low-carbon wastewater was conducted in reversed A2/O process in Jiguanshi waste water treatment plant in Chongqing,in order to aid the operation and maintenance of similar WWTP. When the proposed measures,such as using 0.1% (volume fraction of wastewater) landfill leachate,shortening HRT by 2/3 in the primary sedimentation tank and controlling DO at 0.5 mg/L in the 3rd section of aerobic zone,are applied,15% of the carbon source can be complemented,the favorable property of activated sludge is achieved,and the nitrogen removal effect is significantly improved. The effluent NH3-N is 2 mg/L and the removal rate is 90%. The effluent TN is 17 mg/L and the removal rate is 54%. The up-to-standard discharge of the effluent is achieved. And after the optimization,the unit electricity consumption also reaches 0.21 kW/h and saves 20%.

  12. Bivalve tissue as a carbon and nitrogen isotope baseline indicator in coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumori, Kayoko; Oi, Misa; Doi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Okuda, Noboru; Miller, Todd W.; Kuwae, Michinobu; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Genkai-Kato, Motomi; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Omori, Koji; Takeoka, Hidetaka

    2008-08-01

    Pinctada fucata martensii mantle tissue and gut contents were examined as baseline indicators of carbon and nitrogen isotope composition at six stations in the Uwa Sea, Japan. Substantial variations in δ13C and δ15N values of oysters among stations were observed, with δ13C being consistently lower at Hiburi Island (-18.1‰) than at other stations (-17.2‰). Oysters from fish farm sites were enriched in δ15N (8.1‰) relative to those from unaffected sites (6.8‰), suggesting that fish farming tends to increase baseline δ15N values. The mean Δ δ13C (0.8‰) was consistent over space and time, whereas the average Δ δ15N slightly increased in summer. The relatively low δ15N enrichment compared to the theoretical isotope fractionation factor (3.4‰) may be due to oyster-specific physiological attributes. Carbon and nitrogen isotope turnover rates were roughly similar within a tissue, and mantle tissue turnover rate was estimated to be 120-180 days. These results indicated that oysters are long-term integrators of δ13C and δ15N from their diet and that δ13C of oysters is a more accurate bioindicator of isotopic baselines than δ15N for marine ecological studies.

  13. Tracking Seasonal Habitats Using Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes of Osprey Primary Flight Feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinsky, D.; Zelanko, P.; Rice, N.

    2011-12-01

    The majority of bird migration studies use the latitudinal precipitation effect of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of feathers to determine wintering and breeding grounds. Few studies have considered carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to accomplish the same goal; exploiting the variation in dietary constitutes throughout yearly migration cycles. Also, there is no standard procedure of feather sampling; some use body, while others use wing feathers. This sampling discrepancy is not an issue for most migratory species since the majority of birds molt completely in one location, i.e. wintering verse breeding ground. Large birds of prey however, have a continuous molt that may last years, growing feathers on their breeding and wintering grounds. Therefore, a stable isotopic study of Osprey could not randomly sample feathers because it is impossible to know where individual feathers were grown. Here we present an in depth study of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from Mid-Atlantic Osprey primary flight feathers. Not only did we observe three signatures indicating the breeding ground and two distinct wintering grounds, we recorded dietary seasonality shifts within 2 to 3 year olds that remain on the wintering grounds for multiple years.

  14. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G Popa-Lisseanu

    Full Text Available The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers.

  15. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  16. Lithium-sulfur batteries based on nitrogen-doped carbon and an ionic-liquid electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Xiqing; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (NC) and sulfur were used to prepare an NC/S composite cathode, which was evaluated in an ionic-liquid electrolyte of 0.5 M lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([MPPY][TFSI]) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cycle testing. To facilitate the comparison, a C/S composite based on activated carbon (AC) without nitrogen doping was also fabricated under the same conditions. Compared with the AC/S composite, the NC/S composite showed enhanced activity toward sulfur reduction, as evidenced by the lower onset sulfur reduction potential, higher redox current density in the CV test, and faster charge-transfer kinetics, as indicated by EIS measurements. At room temperature under a current density of 84 mA g(-1) (C/20), the battery based on the NC/S composite exhibited a higher discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1), whereas the battery based on the AC/S composite showed a lower discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1120 mAh g(-1). Both batteries showed similar capacity fading with cycling due to the intrinsic polysulfide solubility and the polysulfide shuttle mechanism; capacity fading can be improved by further cathode modification. PMID:22847977

  17. Influence of temperature on carbon and nitrogen dynamics during in situ aeration of aged waste in simulated landfill bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huanhuan; Yin, Ke; Giannis, Apostolos; Ge, Liya; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    The effect of temperature on carbon and nitrogen compounds during in situ aeration of aged waste was investigated in lab-scale simulated landfill bioreactors at 35, 45 and 55 °C, respectively. The bioreactor operated at 55 °C presented the highest carbon mineralization rate in the initial stage, suggesting accelerated biodegradation rates under thermophilic conditions. The nitrogen speciation study indicated that organic nitrogen was the dominant species of total N in aerobic bioreactors due to ammonia removal. Leachate organic nitrogen was further fractionated to elucidate the fate of individual constituent. Detailed investigation revealed the higher bioconversion rates of N-humic and N-fulvic compounds compared to hydrophilic compounds in thermophilic conditions. At the end, waste material in 55 °C bioreactor was richer in highly matured humic substances (HS) verifying the high bioconversion rates.

  18. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM. CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high capacity for the simultaneous adsorption/oxidation of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.The introduce of basic nitrogen groups siginificantly increases the desulfurization since it can facilitate the electron transfer process between sulfur and oxygen. The structure and chemical properties are characterized using Boehm titration, N2 adsorption-desorption method, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The results showed that the major oxidation products were dimethyl disulfide and methanesulfonic acid which adsorbed in the activated carbon.

  19. Valuing multiple eelgrass ecosystem services in Sweden: fish production and uptake of carbon and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glenn Cole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valuing nature’s benefits in monetary terms is necessary for policy-makers facing trade-offs in how to spend limited financial resources on environmental protection. We provide information to assess trade-offs associated with the management of seagrass beds, which provide a number of ecosystem services, but are presently impacted by many stressors. We develop an interdisciplinary framework for valuing multiple ecosystem services and apply it to the case of eelgrass (Zostera marina, a dominant seagrass species in the northern hemisphere. We identify and quantify links between three eelgrass functions (habitat for fish, carbon and nitrogen uptake and economic goods in Sweden, quantify these using ecological endpoints, estimate the marginal average value of the impact of losing one hectare of eelgrass along the Swedish northwest coast on welfare in monetary terms, and aggregate these values while considering double-counting. Over a 20 to 50 year period we find that compared to unvegetated habitats, a hectare of eelgrass, including the organic material accumulated in the sediment, produces an additional 626 kg cod fishes and 7,535 wrasse individuals and sequesters 98.6 ton carbon and 466 kg nitrogen. We value the flow of future benefits associated with commercial fishing, avoided climate change damages, and reduced eutrophication at 170,000 SEK in 2014 (20,700 US$ or 11,000 SEK (1,300 US$ annualized at 4%. Fish production, which is the most commonly valued ecosystem service in the seagrass literature, only represented 25% of the total value whereas a conservative estimate of nitrogen regulation constituted 46%, suggesting that most seagrass beds are undervalued. Comparing these values with historic losses of eelgrass we show that the Swedish northwest coast has suffered a substantial reduction in fish production and mineral regulation. Future work should improve the understanding of the geographic scale of eelgrass functions, how local variables

  20. Stable isotopes of helium, nitrogen and carbon in a coastal submarine hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Francisco V.; Welhan, John; Vidal, Victor M. V.

    1982-03-01

    Geothermal gases from submarine and subaerial hot springs in Ensenada, Baja California Norte, Mexico, were sampled for determination of gas chemistry and helium, nitrogen and stable carbon isotope composition. The submarine hot spring gas is primarily nitrogen (56.1% by volume) and methane (43.5% by volume), whereas nearby subaerial hot spring gases are predominantly nitrogen (95-99% by volume). The N 2/Ar ratios and σ 15N values of the subaerial hot spring gas indicate that it is atmospheric air, depleted in oxygen and enriched in helium. The submarine hot spring gas is most probably derived from marine sediments of Cretaceous age rich in organic matter. CH 4 is a major component of the gas mixture ( σ 13C = -44.05% 0), with only minor amounts of CO 2 ( σ13C= -10.46% 0). The σ 15N of N 2 is + 0.2% 0 with a very high N 2/Ar ratio of 160. The calculated isotopic equilibra tion temperature for CH 4CO 2 carbon exchange at depth in the Punta Banda submarine geothermal field is approximately 200°C in agreement with other geothermometry estimates. The 3He/ 4He ratios of the hot spring gases range from 0.3 to 0.6 times the atmospheric ratio, indicating that helium is predominantly derived from the radioactive decay of U and Th within the continental crust. Thus, not all submarine hydrothermal systems are effective vehicles for mantle degassing of primordial helium.

  1. Nitrogen deposition effects on carbon storage and fungal:bacterial ratios in coastal sage scrub soils of southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Crowley, David

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) across a deposition gradient on bacterial and fungal degradation pathways were studied in southern California coastal sage scrub soils to determine whether elevated N levels alter microbial community structure and organic matter accumulation. Three sites across an N deposition gradient having low, intermediate, and high levels of atmospheric N deposition were studied for 20 mo. Fungi:bacteria (F:B) biomass ratios were determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Plots at each location included control plots receiving ambient N deposition and treatment plots that were fertilized with an additional 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) of slow-release urea. Results showed that organic carbon (C) levels varied seasonally but that F:B ratios were relatively stable and similar across the three locations and over time. Total organic C decreased in response to N additions only at the low N deposition site. The results suggest that organic matter degradation pathways leading to C storage in soils that have been exposed to high levels of atmospheric N deposition are not responsive to additional increases in N and that N effects on organic C in semiarid soils may be significant only in areas with prior low exposure to N pollution.

  2. Nitrogen-enriched carbon sheets derived from egg white by using expanded perlite template and its high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiucun; Liu, Yinqin; Li, Wenjun; Xu, Liqun; Yang, Huan; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen-enriched carbon sheets were synthesized using egg white as a unique carbon source and expanded perlite as a novel template. The as-prepared material was further used as an electrode material for supercapacitor applications, demonstrating excellent supercapacitance with a maximum gravimetric specific capacitance of 302 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 in a 3-electrode setup for a sample carbonized at 850 °C and activated for 6 h. Moreover, the carbon sheet-based capacitor with 2-symmetric electrodes showed an excellent cycle life (2% loss at 0.1 A g-1 after 10 000 cycles). The excellent performance may be attributed to the combination of the 3D carbon structure and the highly concentrated doped nitrogen component from the natural egg source for superior pseudocapacitance.

  3. Effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon in major subtropical forests of southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui WANG; Jiangming MO; Xiankai LU; Jinghua XUE; Jiong LI; Yunting FANG

    2009-01-01

    The effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon (C) and extractable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three types of forest of southern China were studied in November, 2004 and June, 2006. Plots were established in a pine forest (PF), a mixed pine and broad-leaved forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF) in the Dinghushan Nature Reserve. Nitrogen treatments included a control (no N addition), low N (50 kg N/(hm2.a)), medium N (100 kg N/ (hm2. a)) and high N (150 kg N/(hm2. a)). Microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were determined using a chloro-form fumigation-extraction method. Results indicate that microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were higher in June, 2006 than in November, 2004 and higher in the MEBF than in the PF or the MF. The response of soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC to nitrogen deposition varied depending on the forest type and the level of nitrogen treatment. In the PF or MF forests, no significantly different effects of nitrogen addition were found on soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC. In the MEBF, however, the soil microbial biomass C generally decreased with increased nitrogen levels and high nitrogen addition significantly reduced soil microbial biomass C. The response of soil extractable DOC to added nitrogen in the MEBF shows the opposite trend to soil microbial biomass C. These results suggest that nitrogen deposition may increase the accumulation of soil organic carbon in the MEBF in the study region.

  4. [Characteristics and Coupling Relationship of Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Transformation During In-situ Mineralization Cultivation in Forestlands in the Mountain Area of Southern Ningxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yin-xia; Huang, Yi-mei; Niu, Dan; Zhao, Tong; Yan, Hao; Jiang, Yue-li

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate the characteristics and relationship between soil carbon and nitrogen transformation of artificial forestlands, which is one type of vegetation restoration in the mountain area of Southern Ningxia. Soil samples were collected every two months in a year from three forestlands, and the characteristics of soil organic carbon, dissolved carbon, microbial biomass carbon, organic nitrogen, inorganic nitrogen, soil ammonification, nitrification and mineralization rates, microbial immobilization rates and coupling of soil carbon and nitrogen were studied by the in-situ closed-top PVC tube incubation methods. The results showed that: in the process of in-situ incubation, the most obvious changes of carbon and nitrogen were in 61-120 days which was mainly affected by soil moisture; There were significantly positive correlations between the soil organic carbon and the total nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass nitrogen, dissolved carbon and dissolved nitrogen; Transformation rates of soil organic carbon had significant effects on the soil ammonification, nitrification and microbial immobilization rates. It can be well simulated by model of linear regression equation; Microbial quotient, MBN/SON were significantly increased in soil of Caragana korshinskii land. Net nitrification rates, net mineralization rates in Caragana korshinskii land were significantly higher than that in Prunus davidiana and Prunus mandshurica lands.

  5. Carbon and nitrogen isotope variations in the water column of Lake Bled (NW Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bratkič

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The variability in the stable isotope signature of carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter and dissolved species in the water column of the mesotrophic subalpine Lake Bled in NW Slovenia has been determined. After the algae bloom from August to December in 2008, samples were taken from the deepest part of the lake which develops an anoxic hypolimnion for most of the year. C/N ratios and δ13CPOC and δ15NPN values suggest an autochthonous source for particulate organic matter (POM. According to the isotope model, autochthonous carbon accounted for a major part of the particulate organic carbon (POC, ranging from 0.86 to 0.96 in September and October, while in December the proportion of allochthonous carbon was more pronounced, ranging from 0.57 to 0.59. Low δ13CPOC and δ15NPN values (from −36 to −33 ‰ and from 0.8 to 1.8 ‰, observed below 24 m in August and September, indicate the bacterial origin of POM, mainly from methanotrophic bacteria. δ15NNO3 and δ15NPN values decreased with depth. The relations between δ15NPN and NO3 and NH4+ concentrations suggest that NH4+ is the main assimilation species for nitrogen in POM. Nitrification was active between 12 and 18 m deep in September and October, indicated by increased NO3 concentrations and decreased δ15NNO3 values. The correlation between nitrate concentrations and δ15NNO3 values suggests active water column denitrification in October 2008. The decrease in δ15NNO3 values observed in December could be explained by degradation of organic matter, followed by nitrification of the degradation products. During our sampling

  6. Application of Fast Pyrolysis Biochar to a Loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben

    increased it moderately. Moreover, soil amendment of FP-biochar caused immobilization of considerable amounts of soil N, whereas SP-biochar resulted in a net mineralization of N after two months of soil incubation. Nitrogen immobilisation can be detrimental to crop yields, as shown in a Barley pot trial...... for agricultural soil, e.g. it improves soil WHC, adds minerals, enhances microbial activity/biomass, and increases the N and C turnover dynamics.......Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility...

  7. [Impacts of Land Use Changes on Soil Light Fraction and Particulate Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Jinyun Mountain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li-guo; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-07-01

    Four land types including the subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest, sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land were selected to collect soil samples from 0 to 60 cm depth at the same altitude of sunny slope in the Jinyun Mountain in this study. Soil light fraction organic carbon and nitrogen ( LFOC and LFON), and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON) were determined and the distribution ratios and C/N ratios were calculated. The results showed that the contents of LFOC and LFON decreased significantly by 71. 42% and 38. 46% after the forest was changed into sloping farmland (P 0. 05), while the contents of LFOC and LFON increased significantly by 3. 77 and 1. 38 times after the sloping farmland was changed into abandoned land (P nitrogen accumulation; on the contrary, sloping farmland was easy to lose soil labile carbon and nitrogen. The LFOC and LFON distribution ratios were significantly reduced by 31. 20% and 30. 08%, respectively after the forest was changed into the sloping farmland, and increased by 18. 74% and 20. 33% respectively after the forest was changed into the orchard. Nevertheless, the distribution ratios of LFOC and LFON were changed little by converting the forest into the sloping farmland and orchard. The distribution ratios of LFOC, LFON, POC and PON all increased significantly after the farmland was abandoned (P soil organic carbon and nitrogen was enhanced after forest reclamation, while reduced after the sloping farmland was abandoned. The ratios of carbon to nitrogen in soil organic matter, light fraction organic matter and particulate organic matter were in the order of abandoned land (12. 93) > forest (8. 53) > orchard (7. 52) > sloping farmland (4. 40), abandoned land (16. 32) > forest (14. 29) > orchard (11. 32) > sloping farmland (7. 60), abandoned land (23. 41) > sloping farmland (13. 85 ) > forest (10. 30) > orchard (9. 64), which indicated that the degree of organic nitrogen mineralization was higher after

  8. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  9. Coordinated response of photosynthesis, carbon assimilation, and triacylglycerol accumulation to nitrogen starvation in the marine microalgae Isochrysis zhangjiangensis (Haptophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Tao; Meng, Ying-Ying; Cao, Xu-Peng; Ai, Jiang-Ning; Zhou, Jian-Nan; Xue, Song; Wang, Wei-liang

    2015-02-01

    The photosynthetic performance, carbon assimilation, and triacylglycerol accumulation of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis under nitrogen-deplete conditions were studied to understand the intrinsic correlations between them. The nitrogen-deplete period was divided into two stages based on the photosynthetic parameters. During the first stage, carbon assimilation was not reduced compared with that under favorable conditions. The marked increase in triacylglycerols and the variation in the fatty acid profile suggested that triacylglycerols were mainly derived from de novo synthesized acyl groups. In the second stage, the triacylglycerol content continued increasing while the carbohydrate content decreased from 44.0% to 26.3%. These results indicated that the intracellular conversion of carbohydrates to triacylglycerols occurred. Thus, we propose that sustainable carbon assimilation and incremental triacylglycerol production can be achieved by supplying appropriate amounts of nitrogen in medium to protect the photosynthetic process from severe damage using the photosynthetic parameters as indicators.

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon/graphene hybrid anode material for sodium-ion batteries with excellent rate capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Jia, Mengqiu; Cao, Bin; Chen, Renjie; Lv, Xinying; Tang, Renjie; Wu, Feng; Xu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon/graphene (NCG) hybrid materials were prepared by an in-situ polymerization and followed pyrolysis for sodium-ion batteries. The NCG has a large interlayer distance (0.360 nm) and a high nitrogen content of 7.54 at%, resulting in a high reversible sodium storage capacity of 336 mAh g-1 at 30 mA g-1. The NCG shows a sandwich-like structure, i.e. nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets closely coated on both sides of graphene. The carbon nanosheets shorten the ion diffusion distance, while the sandwiched graphene with high electronic conductivity guarantees fast electron transport, making the NCG exhibit excellent rate capability (94 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1). It also exhibits good cycle stability with a capacity retention of 89% after 200 cycles at 50 mA g-1.

  11. Science Letters:Effect of nitrogen doping on the reduction of nitric oxide with activated carbon in the presence of oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon (AC) was performed by annealing both in ammonia and nitric oxide, and the activities of the modified carbons for NO reduction were studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that nitrogen atoms were incorporated into the carbons, mostly in the form of pyridinic nitrogen or pyridonic nitrogen. The effect of nitrogen doping on the activities of the carbons can be ignored when oxygen is absent, but the doped carbons show desirable activities in the low temperature regime (≤500 ℃) when oxygen is present. The role of the surface nitrogen species is suggested to promote the formation of NO2 in the presence of oxygen, and NO2 can facilitate decomposition of the surface oxygen species in the low temperature regime.

  12. Effect of carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio on nitrogen removal from shrimp production waste water using sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dhiriti; Hassan, Komi; Boopathy, Raj

    2010-10-01

    The United States Marine Shrimp Farming Program (USMSFP) introduced a new technology for shrimp farming called recirculating raceway system. This is a zero-water exchange system capable of producing high-density shrimp yields. However, this system produces wastewater characterized by high levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate due to 40% protein diet for the shrimp at a high density of 1,000 shrimp per square meter. The high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite (greater than 25 ppm) are toxic to shrimp and cause high mortality. So treatment of this wastewater is imperative in order to make shrimp farming viable. One simple method of treating high-nitrogen wastewater is the use of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). An SBR is a variation of the activated sludge process, which accomplishes many treatment events in a single reactor. Removal of ammonia and nitrate involved nitrification and denitrification reactions by operating the SBR aerobically and anaerobically in sequence. Initial SBR operation successfully removed ammonia, but nitrate concentrations were too high because of carbon limitation in the shrimp production wastewater. An optimization study revealed the optimum carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio of 10:1 for successful removal of all nitrogen species from the wastewater. The SBR operated with a C:N ratio of 10:1 with the addition of molasses as carbon source successfully removed 99% of ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite from the shrimp aquaculture wastewater within 9 days of operation. PMID:20835881

  13. Geochemical modeling of the influence of silicate mineral alteration on alkalinity production and carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Gerhard; Kraemer, Stephan M.; Gier, Susanne; Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    High CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in deep rock reservoirs causes acidification of the porefluid. Such conditions occur during injection and subsurface storage of CO2 (to prevent the release of greenhouse gas) but also naturally in zones of strong methanogenic microbial activity in organic matter-rich ocean margin sediments. The acidic fluids are corrosive to carbonates and bear the risk of leakage of CO2 gas to the surface. Porefluid acidification may be moderated by processes that increase the alkalinity, i.e. that produce weak acid anions capable of buffering the acidification imposed by the CO2. Often, alkalinity increases as a result of anaerobic microbial activity, such as anaerobic oxidation of methane. However, on a long term the alteration of silicates, in particular, clay minerals, may be a more efficient mechanism of alkalinity production. Under altered temperature, pressure and porefluid composition at depth, clay minerals may change to thermodynamically more stable states, thereby increasing the alkalinity of the porefluid by partial leaching of Mg-(OH)2 and Ca-(OH)2 (e.g. Wallmann et al., 2008; Mavromatis et al., 2014). This alteration may even be enhanced by a high pCO2. Thus, silicate alteration can be essential for a long-term stabilization of volatile CO2 in the form of bicarbonate or may even induce precipitation of carbonate minerals, but these processes are not fully understood yet. The goal of this study is to simulate the alkalinity effect of silicate alteration under diagenetic conditions and high pCO2 by geochemical modeling. We are using the program PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) to generate high rock/fluid ratio characteristics for deep subsurface rock reservoirs. Since we are interested in the long-term evolution of diagenetic processes, over millions of years, we do not consider kinetics but calculate the theoretically possible equilibrium conditions. In a first step we are calculating the saturation state of different clay minerals

  14. Effects of urban stream burial on nitrogen uptake and ecosystem metabolism: implications for watershed nitrogen and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanization has resulted in extensive burial and channelization of headwater streams, yet little is known about impacts on stream ecosystem functions critical for reducing downstream nitrogen pollution. To characterize the biogeochemical impact of stream burial, we measured NO3...

  15. Bottom-Up Catalytic Approach towards Nitrogen-Enriched Mesoporous Carbons/Sulfur Composites for Superior Li-S Cathodes

    OpenAIRE

    Fugen Sun; Jitong Wang; Huichao Chen; Wenming Qiao; Licheng Ling; Donghui Long

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a sustainable and efficient approach to produce high performance sulfur/carbon composite cathodes via a bottom-up catalytic approach. The selective oxidation of H2S by a nitrogen-enriched mesoporous carbon catalyst can produce elemental sulfur as a by-product which in-situ deposit onto the carbon framework. Due to the metal-free catalytic characteristic and high catalytic selectivity, the resulting sulfur/carbon composites have almost no impurities that thus can be used as cath...

  16. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen content of density fractions and effect of meadow degradation to soil carbon and nitrogen of fractions in alpine Kobresia meadow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This research was conducted on the non-disturbed native alpine Kobresia meadow(YF) and the severely degraded meadow(SDL) of Dari County of Qinghai Province.By a density fractionation approach,each soil sample was divided into two fractions:light fraction(LF) and heavy fraction(HF).The obtained fractions were analyzed for organic carbon(OC) and nitrogen(N) concentrations.The results showed:(1) the OC concentration in HF and LF was 3.84% and 28.63% respectively while the nitrogen concentration in HF and LF was 0.362% and 1.192% respectively in 0-10 cm depth.C:N ratio was 10.6 in HF and 23.8 in LF respectively.(2) As far as the ratio of OC in given fraction to that in gross sample was concerned,dominance of OC in HF was obvious in the whole soil profile.OC in HF increased from 78.95% to 90.33%,while OC in LF decreased from 21.05% to 9.68% with depths.(3) Soil total OC amounted to 47.47 in YF while 17.63 g.kg-1 in SDL,in which the OC content in HF decreased from 37.31 to 16.01 g.kg-1 while OC content in LF decreased from 10.01 to 1.62 g.kg-1.In other words,results of OC and N content show meadow degradation led to the loss of 57% OC in HF and 84% OC in LF from originally native ecosystem on alpine meadow.In addition,meadow degradation led to the loss of 43% N in HF and 79% N in LF from originally native ecosystem on alpine meadow.(4) The main reason for loss of C and N in LF during meadow degradation was not attributed to the decrease of OC and N concentration in LF and LF,but to the decrease in LF dry weight.Loss of N was far lower than loss of C in HF.This may suggest that there is difference in protection mode of C and N in HF.

  17. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  18. CHANGES IN MOISTURE, CARBON, NITROGEN, SULPHUR, VOLATILES, AND CALORIFIC VALUE OF MISCANTHUS DURING TORREFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard Boardman; Christopher Wright; John Heintzelman

    2001-11-01

    Torrefaction tests were carried out on miscanthus samples in order to understand the changes in chemical composition at temperatures of 250–350°C and residence times of 30–120 minutes. The raw material chemical composition was moisture content 7.97%, moisture-free carbon (C) 47.73%, hydrogen (H) 5.85%, nitrogen (N) 0.28%, sulphur (S) 0.02%, volatiles (V) 83.29% for volatiles, and moisture and ash-free (MAF) calorific value (CV) 8423 BTU/lb (19.59 MJ/kg). Torrefaction at temperatures of 250°C and residence time of 30 minutes resulted in a significant decrease in moisture by about 82.68%, but the other components, C, H, N, S, and V changed only marginally. Increasing the torrefaction temperature to 350°C and residence time to 120 minutes further reduced the moisture to a final value of 0.54% (a 93.2% reduction compared to original) and also resulted in a significant decrease in the other components, H, N, and V by 58.29%, 14.28%, and 70.45%, respectively. The carbon content at 350°C and 120 minutes increased by about 4% and sulfur values were below detection limits. The calorific values increased by about 5.59% at 250°C and 30 minutes, whereas at 350°C and 120 minutes, the increase was much greater (about 75.61%) and resulted in a maximum degree of carbonization of 1.60. The H/C ratio decreased with an increase in torrefaction temperature, where a minimum value of 0.6 was observed at 350°C and 120 minutes. The regression equations developed with respect to torrefaction temperature and times have adequately described the changes in chemical composition. The surface plots developed based on the regression equations indicate that torrefaction temperatures of 300–350°C and residence times of 30–120 minutes residence time can help to increase carbon content, calorific value, and degree of carbonization to > 49.4%, >11,990 BTU/lb (27 MJ/kg), and 1.4, and reduce moisture, nitrogen, volatile, and the H/C ratio to 0.525–0.725, 2.9–3.9, 0.225–0.235, and

  19. Oxygen- and nitrogen-co-doped activated carbon from waste particleboard for potential application in high-performance capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: All electrodes showed excellent capacitance and retention versus discharge current density from 0.05 to 5 A/g. - Abstract: Oxygen- and nitrogen-co-doped activated carbons were obtained from phosphoric acid treated nitrogen-doped activated carbons which were prepared from waste particleboard bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin adhesives. The activated carbon samples obtained were tested as supercapacitors in two-electrode cell and extensive wetting 7 M KOH electrolytes. Their structural properties and surface chemistry, before the electrical testing, were investigated using elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, and adsorption of nitrogen. Activated carbon treated by 4 M phosphoric acid of the highest capacitance (235 F/g) was measured in spite of a relatively lower surface (1360 m2/g) than that of the activated carbon treated by 2 M phosphoric acid (1433 m2/g). The surface chemistry, and especially oxygen- and nitrogen-containing functional groups, was found of paramount importance for the capacitive behavior and for the effective pore space utilization by the electrolyte ions

  20. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  1. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase on Novel Free-Standing Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanospheres@Carbon Nanofibers Composite Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueping; Liu, Dong; Li, Libo; You, Tianyan

    2015-05-01

    We have proposed a novel free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres@carbon nanofibers (NCNSs@CNFs) composite film with high processability for the investigation of the direct electron transfer (DET) of glucose oxidase (GOx) and the DET-based glucose biosensing. The composites were simply prepared by controlled thermal treatment of electrospun polypyrrole nanospheres doped polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PPyNSs@PAN NFs). Without any pretreatment, the as-prepared material can directly serve as a platform for GOx immobilization. The cyclic voltammetry of immobilized GOx showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks in O2-free solution, indicating the DET of GOx. With the addition of glucose, the anodic peak current increased, while the cathodic peak current decreased, which demonstrated the DET-based bioelectrocatalysis. The detection of glucose based on the DET of GOx was achieved, which displayed high sensitivity, stability and selectivity, with a low detection limit of 2 μM and wide linear range of 12-1000 μM. These results demonstrate that the as-obtained NCNSs@CNFs can serve as an ideal platform for the construction of the third-generation glucose biosensor.

  2. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  3. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E.; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  4. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  5. Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, B C; Martin, L D; Jackman, C H

    2004-01-01

    We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar pla...

  6. Carbon and nitrogen distribution and accumulation in a New Zealand scrubland ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, N.A.; Townsend, J.A.; White, J.D. [Landcare Research, Palmerton North (New Zealand)] [and others

    2000-08-08

    The role that forest regeneration may play in the global carbon (C) cycle was discussed with particular emphasis on a New Zealand study which examined whole-ecosystem differences in carbon and nitrogen (N) storage and distribution in a scrubland dominated by manuka and kanuka trees. Age sequenced stands located in Tongariro National Park (TNP) were chosen for sampling. Allometric equations were developed for the two major species at the TNP site by destructively harvesting 48 individual trees. Sapwood area was measured, biomass estimates were compared and soil samples were assessed for C storage with stand age. This was done by measuring total soil C and N in each of the age-class stands. Stand age effects on C storage in soils and vegetation were determined using analysis of variance. It was determined that the ecology of manuka and kanuka influences maximum C storage in the scrubland. Manuka does well on less fertile, poorly drained soils while kanuka prefers fertile, free draining soils. Kanuka is also more likely to influence C accumulation during stand development. This paper briefly described the several hypothesis which suggest why productivity decreases with increasing stand age. It was concluded that since scrublands can accumulate C more rapidly than other vegetation types they may present a potential C sink to New Zealand's national carbon budge. 53 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  7. Nitrogen doping and structural properties of amorphous carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusop, M.; Mominuzzaman, S. M.; Tian, X. M.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    2002-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) was successfully introduced into amorphous carbon (a-C) films by ablating carbon (C) from a camphoric carbon (CC) target with varying ambient N partial pressure (NPP) using pulsed laser ablation (PLA). We found that the N content in the film changed on varying the NPP. The room temperature conductivity ( σRT) decreases initially at 0.1 mTorr and then increases at higher NPP up to 30 mTorr and decreases thereafter. We can relate this variation to doping of N in the films for low N content as the optical gap ( Eg) remains unchanged till the film is deposited at 1 mTorr. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies also suggest that no graphitization whatsoever occurs in the film after N addition up to 1 mTorr. Although no structural change in the films was found with N addition up to 1 mTorr, the σRT depends on the N content. With higher NPP up to 30 mTorr, since Eg decreases with increasing σRT, we related this phenomenon to the graphitization. However, above 30 mTorr, since Eg increases with the decrease of σRT, we related this phenomenon to the structural change in the film.

  8. Microhardness tests of stainless steel 52100 implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Mardanian, M; Taheri, Z

    2003-01-01

    In this research work, samples of stainless steel 52100 disks were implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide ions at the energy of 90 keV. Microhardness measurement were performed to determine the hardness of the surface. The N-2 sup + implanted steels at the doses of 1x10 sup 1 8 ions cm sup sub 2 gave the highest hardness of 49.70%, while for the CO sub 2 sup + ions implantation, the hardness of 17% and 5% were obtained at the doses of 3x10 sup 1 8 and 1x10 sup 1 9 ions cm sup - 2, respectively. To support the interpretation of our microhardness results the implanted surface were analyzed by the use of XRD method. Our results indicated that the hardness of the N sub 2 sup + implanted samples are due to formation of beta-Cr N phase in the surface layer, while in the CO sub 2 + implanted samples no observation of carbon as graphite or carbide was made. In addition, the absence of any hump in the XRD spectrum indicating that carbon is not in the amorphous phase either.

  9. Altering blood flow does not reveal differences between nitrogen and helium kinetics in brain or in skeletal miracle in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolette, David J; Upton, Richard N; Grant, Cliff

    2015-03-01

    In underwater diving, decompression schedules are based on compartmental models of nitrogen and helium tissue kinetics. However, these models are not based on direct measurements of nitrogen and helium kinetics. In isoflurane-anesthetized sheep, nitrogen and helium kinetics in the hind limb (n = 5) and brain (n = 5) were determined during helium-oxygen breathing and after return to nitrogen-oxygen breathing. Nitrogen and helium concentrations in arterial, femoral vein, and sagittal sinus blood samples were determined using headspace gas chromatography, and venous blood flows were monitored continuously using ultrasonic Doppler. The experiment was repeated at different states of hind limb blood flow and cerebral blood flow. Using arterial blood gas concentrations and blood flows as input, parameters and model selection criteria of various compartmental models of hind limb and brain were estimated by fitting to the observed venous gas concentrations. In both the hind limb and brain, nitrogen and helium kinetics were best fit by models with multiexponential kinetics. In the brain, there were no differences in nitrogen and helium kinetics. Hind limb models fit separately to the two gases indicated that nitrogen kinetics were slightly faster than helium, but models with the same kinetics for both gases fit the data well. In the hind limb and brain, the blood:tissue exchange of nitrogen is similar to that of helium. On the basis of these results, it is inappropriate to assign substantially different time constants for nitrogen and helium in all compartments in decompression algorithms. PMID:25525213

  10. Interference of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The interference of small concentrations (less than 4 percent by volume) of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence was measured. The sample gas consisted primarily of nitrogen, with less than 100 parts per million concentration of nitric oxide, and with small concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor added. Results obtained under these conditions indicate that although oxygen does not measurably affect the analysis for nitric oxide, the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor causes the indicated nitric oxide concentration to be too low. An interference factor - defined as the percentage change in indicated nitric oxide concentration (relative to the true nitric oxide concentration) divided by the percent interfering gas present - was determined for carbon dioxide to be -0.60 + or - 0.04 and for water vapor to be -2.1 + or - 0.3.

  11. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres derived from cocoon silk as metal-free electrocatalyst for glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongtong; Li, Yahang; Wang, Chunyu; Gao, Zhi-Da; Song, Yan-Yan

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their high activity in electrocatalysis. In the present work, cocoon silk -- a biomass material is used to prepare porous carbon fibers due to its abundant nitrogen content. The as-prepared carbon microfibers have been activated and disintegrated into carbon nanospheres (CNS) with a diameter of 20--60 nm by a simple nitric acid refluxing process. Considering their excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of oxygen, the CNS modified electrodes are further applied in the construction of glucose amperometric biosensor using glucose oxidase as a model. The proposed biosensor exhibits fast response, high sensitivity, good stability and selectivity for glucose detection with a wide linear range from 79.7 to 2038.9 μM, and a detection limit of 39.1 μM. The performance is comparable to leading literature results indicating a great potential for electrochemical sensing application. PMID:26452954

  12. The Burial of Biogenic Silica, Organic Carbon and Organic Nitrogen in the Sediments of the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lisha; ZHANG Chuansong; SHI Xiaoyong

    2015-01-01

    We sampled the sediments of the East China Sea during 2005 and 2006, and analysed the contents of the biogenic mat-ters: biogenic silica, organic carbon, and organic nitrogen. From the surface distribution we found the contents of these substances to be in the ranges of 0.72%-1.64%, 0.043%-0.82%, and 0.006%-0.11%, respectively. Their distributions were similar to each other, being high inside the Hangzhou Bay and low outside the bay. The vertical variations of the contents were also similar. In order to discuss the relation between them we analysed the variations of content with depth. They increased in the first 7cm and then de-creased with depth. The peaks were found at depths between 20 to 25cm. The distribution of carbonate showed an opposite trend to that of biogenic matters. The content of total carbon was relatively stable with respect to depth, and the ratio of high organic carbon to carbonate showed a low burial efficiency of carbonate, which means that the main burial of carbon is organic carbon. In order to discuss the source of organic matters, the ratio of organic carbon to organic nitrogen was calculated, which was 8.01 to 9.65, indicat-ing that the organic matter in the sediments was derived mainly from phytoplankton in the seawater.

  13. Declines in Soil pH due to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs Alter Buffering and Exchange Reactions in Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs may alter tropical soil buffering and exchange reactions that have important implications for nutrient cycling, forest productivity, and downstream ecosystems. In contrast to relatively young temperate soils that are typically buffered from N inputs by base cation reactions, aluminum reactions may serve to buffer highly weathered tropical soils and result in immediate increases in aluminum mobility and toxicity. Increased nitrate losses due to chronic N inputs may also deplete residual base cations in already weathered base cation-poor soils, further acidify soils, and thereby reduce nitrate mobility through pH-dependent anion exchange reactions. To test these hypotheses, I determined soil pH and cation and anion exchange capacity (CEC and AEC) and measured base cation and aluminum soil solution losses following first-time and long-term experimental N additions from two Hawaiian tropical forest soils, a 300 year old Andisol and a 4.1 million year old Oxisol. I found that elevated base cation losses accompanied increased nitrate losses after first time N additions to the young Andisol whereas immediate and large aluminum losses were associated with increased nitrate losses from the Oxisol. In the long-term, base cation and aluminum losses increased in proportion to nitrate losses. Long-term N additions at both sites resulted in significant declines in soil pH, decreased CEC and increased AEC. These results suggest that even chronic N inputs resulting in small but elevated nitrate losses may deplete residual base cations, increase mobility and toxicity of aluminum, and potentially lead to declines in forest productivity and acidification of downstream ecosystems. These findings also suggest that AEC may provide a long-term mechanism to delay nitrate losses in tropical forests with significant variable charge that are experiencing chronic anthropogenic N inputs.

  14. Short-term dynamics of carbon and nitrogen using compost, compost-biochar mixture and organo-mineral biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Ian; Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Wallace, Helen M; Joseph, Stephen; Pace, Ben; Bai, Shahla Hosseini

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effects of different organic treatments including compost (generated from cattle hide waste and plant material), compost mixed with biochar (compost + biochar) and a new formulation of organo-mineral biochar (produced by mixing biochar with clay, minerals and chicken manure) on carbon (C) nitrogen (N) cycling. We used compost at the rate of 20 t ha(-1), compost 20 t ha(-1) mixed with 10 t ha(-1) biochar (compost + biochar) and organo-mineral biochar which also contained 10 t ha(-1) biochar. Control samples received neither of the treatments. Compost and compost + biochar increased NH4 (+) -N concentrations for a short time, mainly due to the release of their NH4 (+) -N content. Compost + biochar did not alter N cycling of the compost significantly but did significantly increase CO2 emission compared to control. Compost significantly increased N2O emission compared to control. Compost + biochar did not significantly change N supply and also did not decrease CO2 and N2O emissions compared to compost, suggesting probably higher rates of biochar may be required to be added to the compost to significantly affect compost-induced C and N alteration. The organo-mineral biochar had no effect on N cycling and did not stimulate CO2 and N2O emission compared to the control. However, organo-mineral biochar maintained significantly higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than compost and compost + biochar from after day 14 to the end of the incubation. Biochar used in organo-mineral biochar had increased organic C adsorption which may become available eventually. However, increased DOC in organo-mineral biochar probably originated from both biochar and chicken manure which was not differentiated in this experiment. Hence, in our experiment, compost, compost + biochar and organo-mineral biochar affected C and N cycling differently mainly due to their different content. PMID:26924699

  15. Growth, Nitrogen Uptake and Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Barley Genotypes Grown under Saline Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurdali Fawaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different salinity levels of irrigation water (ECw range 1-12 dS/m on dry matter yield, nitrogen uptake, fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency (%NUE, stomatal conductance and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C‰ in three barley genotypes originating from different geographic areas (Arabi.Abiad, Syria; Pk-30-136, Pakistan and WI-2291, Australia was investigated in a pot experiment. An increase in salinity resulted in a decrease in Δ13C in all the genotypes. Increasing salinity reduced leaf stomatal conductance which was less pronounced in WI-2291 comparing to other genotypes. At high salinity level, the reduction in Δ13C corresponded to a considerable decrease in the ratio (Ci/Ca of intercellular (Ci and atmospheric (Ca partial pressures of CO2 in all the genotypes indicating that such a decrease was mainly due to the stomatal closure. Moreover, since the reduction in dry matter yield in all the genotypes grown at 12 dS/m did not exceed 50% in comparison with their controls, the photosynthetic apparatus of all studied genotypes seemed to be quit tolerant to salinity. At the moderate salinity level (8 dS/m, the enhancement of leaf dry matter yield in the WI2291 genotype might have been due to positive nutritional effects of the salt as indicated by a significant increase in nitrogen uptake and NUE. Thus, the lower Ci/Ca ratio could result mainly from higher rates of photosynthetic capacity rather than stomatal closure. On the other hand, relationships between dry matter yield or NUE and Δ13C seemed to be depending on plant genotype, plant organ and salinity level. Based on growth, nutritional and Δ13C data, selection of barley genotypes for saline environments was affected by salinity level. Therefore, such a selection must be achieved for each salinity level under which the plants have been grown.

  16. Enhanced selective adsorption of CO2 on nitrogen-doped porous carbon monoliths derived from IRMOF-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shunmin; Dong, Qiaoling; Hu, Jingwei; Xiao, Weiming; Liu, Xiaohui; Liao, Lieqiang; Zhang, Ning

    2016-07-28

    The N-doped porous carbon monoliths prepared by direct carbonization of IRMOF-3, through an in situ activation and self-templating process, were found to exhibit significantly enhanced performance for the selective adsorption of CO2 compared to pristine IRMOF-3. The transformation from the microporous structure to the meso-macroporous structure opens the pathway for CO2 to more easily access the nitrogen anchors. PMID:27356869

  17. Trophic Relationships and Habitat Preferences of Delphinids from the Southeastern Brazilian Coast Determined by Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Lemos Bisi; Paulo Renato Dorneles; José Lailson-Brito; Gilles Lepoint; Alexandre de Freitas Azevedo; Leonardo Flach,; Olaf Malm; Krishna Das

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the foraging habitats of delphinids in southeastern Brazil, we analyzed stable carbon (d13C) and nitrogen (d15N) isotopes in muscle samples of the following 10 delphinid species: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Tursiops truncatus, Steno bredanensis, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus sp., Lagenodelphis hosei, Stenella attenuata, Stenella longirostris and Grampus griseus. We also compared the d13C and d15N values among four populations of S. guianensis. Variation in carbon ...

  18. Effect of carbonate chemistry alteration on the early embryonic development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Gazeau

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO₂ absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae. Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition. Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions.

  19. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel; György, Enikö; Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  20. Visualizing lone pairs in compounds containing heavier congeners of the carbon and nitrogen group elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Seshadri

    2001-10-01

    In this mini-review, I discuss some recent work on the stereochemistry and bonding of lone pairs of electrons in divalent compounds of the heavier carbon group elements (SnII, PbII) and in trivalent compounds of the heavier nitrogen group elements (BiIII). Recently developed methods that permit the real-space visualization of bonding patterns on the basis of density functional calculations of electronic structure, reveal details of the nature of selectron lone pairs in compounds of the heavier main group elements - their stereochemistry and their inertness (or lack thereof). An examination of tetragonal 4/ SnO, -PbO and BiOF, and cubic $\\bar{3}$ PbS provides a segue into perovskite phases of technological significance, including ferroelectric PbTiO3 and antiferroelectric/piezoelectric PbZrO3, in both of which the lone pairs on Pb atoms play a pivotal rôle.

  1. Preparation and Photocatalytic Properties of SnO2 Coated on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SnO2 nanoparticles coated on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes were prepared successfully via a simple wet-chemical route. The as-obtained SnO2/CNx composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2/CNx for degradation Rhodamine B under UV light irradiation was investigated. The results show that SnO2/CNx nanocomposites have a higher photocatalytic activity than pure SnO2 and SnO2/CNTs nanocomposites. This enhanced photoresponse indicates that the photoinduced electrons in the SnO2 prefer separately transferring to the CNx, which has a high degree of defects. As a consequence, the radiative recombination of the electron-hole pairs is hampered and the photocatalytic activity is significantly enhanced for the SnO2/CNx photocatalysts.

  2. Soil carbon accumulation and nitrogen retention traits of four tree species grown in common gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Gundersen, Per;

    2013-01-01

    Tree species effects on soil carbon (C) accumulation are uncertain, especially with respect to the mineral soil C, and the consistency of such effects across soil types is not known. The interaction between C accumulation and nitrogen (N) retention among common tree species has also been little...... explored. Effects of four tree species on soil C and N stocks and soil water nitrate concentration below the root zone were evaluated in a common garden design replicated at eight sites in Denmark. The tree species were beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), oak (Quercus robur L.), larch (Larix leptolepis Kaempf......), and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L) Karst.). After four decades, there were significant differences in forest floor C stocks among all four species, and C stocks increased consistently in the order oak

  3. Prediction of manure nitrogen and carbon output from grower-finisher pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu Thi Khanh, Van; Prapaspongsa, Trakarn; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard;

    2009-01-01

    Intensive pig production may be a hazard to the environment due to plant nutrient leakage and losses. To facilitate efficient and sustainable manure management and reduce oversupplying of crops with nutrients, there is a need for precise assessment of nutrient content in manure and manure excretion....... This study has developed algorithms for predicting the amount of excreta and manure content of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C). Data compiled from 285 digestibility and N balance experiments with growing-finishing pigs diets fed diets varying widely in chemical composition were used to establish algorithms....... The main input variables were analysed nutrients contents together with intake of dry matter and digestibility of organic matter (diOM)....

  4. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel, E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); György, Enikö [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 76900 Bucharest V (Romania); Ballesteros, Belén [ICN2—Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-07

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  5. Understanding the Photoluminescence Mechanism of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots by Selective Interaction with Copper Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiga, Manjunatha; Cyriac, Jobin

    2016-08-01

    Doped fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) have drawn widespread attention because of their diverse applications and attractive properties. The present report focusses on the origin of photoluminescence in nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs), which is unraveled by the interaction with Cu(2+) ions. Detailed spectroscopic and microscopic studies reveal that the broad steady-state photoluminescence emission of the NCDs originates from the direct recombination of excitons (high energy) and the involvement of defect states (low energy). In addition, highly selective detection of Cu(2+) is achieved, with a detection limit of 10 μm and a dynamic range of 10 μm-0.4 mm. The feasibility of the present sensor for the detection of Cu(2+) in real water samples is also presented. PMID:27159128

  6. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-12-01

    The high cost of the catalyst material used for the oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes is one of the factors limiting practical applications of this technology. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon (MNC), prepared at different temperatures, was examined as an oxygen reduction catalyst, and compared in performance to Pt in MFCs and electrochemical cells. MNC calcined at 800 °C produced a maximum power density of 979 ± 131 mW m-2 in MFCs, which was 37% higher than that produced using MNC calined at 600 °C (715 ± 152 mW m-2), and only 14% lower than that obtained with Pt (1143 ± 54 mW m-2). The extent of COD removal and coulombic efficiencies were the same for all cathode materials. These results show that MNC could be used as an alternative to Pt in MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai;

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... and subsequently subjected to two temperature treatments (158C, low temperature; 258C, ambient control) for 2 weeks. Low-temperature stress significantly decreasedAMcolonisation, plant height and biomass. TotalNcontent and activities of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase of AM...... plants were higher than those of non-AM plants. AM plants had a higher net photosynthetic rate (Pn) than non-AM plants, although low temperature inhibited the Pn. Compared with non-AM plants, AM plants exhibited higher leaf soluble sugars, reducing sugars, root sucrose and fructose contents, and sucrose...

  8. Catalytic and capacity properties of nanocomposites based on cobalt oxide and nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Yu. Podyacheva; Andrei I. Stadnichenko; Svetlana A. Yashnik; Olga A. Stonkus; Elena M. Slavinskaya; Andrei I. Boronin; Andrei V. Puzynin; Zinfer R. Ismagilov

    2014-01-01

    The nanocomposites based on cobalt oxide and nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) with cobalt oxide contents of 10-90 wt%were examined as catalysts in the CO oxidation and superca-pacity electrodes. Depending on Со3О4 content, such nanocomposites have different morphologies of cobalt oxide nanoparticles, distributions over the bulk, and ratios of Со3+/Co2+ cations. The 90%Со3О4-N-CNFs nanocomposite showed the best activity because of the increased concentration of defects in N-CNFs. The capacitance of electrodes containing 10%Со3О4-N-CNFs was 95 F/g, which is 1.7 times higher than electrodes made from N-CNFs.

  9. Imaging columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen with sub angstrom resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported that lattice imaging with a 300 kV field emission microscope in combination with numerical reconstruction procedures can be used to reach an interpretable resolution of about 80 pm for the first time. A retrieval of the electron exit wave from focal series allows for the resolution of single atomic columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at a projected nearest neighbor spacing down to 85 pm. Lens aberrations are corrected on-line during the experiment and by hardware such that resulting image distortions are below 80 pm. Consequently, the imaging can be aberration-free to this extent. The resolution enhancement results from increased electrical and mechanical stability's of the instrument coupled with a low spherical aberration coefficient of 0.595 + 0.005 mm

  10. Carbon and nitrogen substrate utilization by archival Salmonella typhimurium LT2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Kelly K

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A collection of over 20,000 Salmonella typhimurium LT2 mutants, sealed for four decades in agar stabs, is a unique resource for study of genetic and evolutionary changes. Previously, we reported extensive diversity among descendants including diversity in RpoS and catalase synthesis, diversity in genome size, protein content, and reversion from auxotrophy to prototrophy. Results Extensive and variable losses and a few gains of catabolic functions were observed by this standardized method. Thus, 95 catabolic reactions were scored in each of three plates in wells containing specific carbon and nitrogen substrates. Conclusion While the phenotype microarray did not reveal a distinct pattern of mutation among the archival isolates, the data did confirm that various isolates have used multiple strategies to survive in the archival environment. Data from the MacConkey plates verified the changes in carbohydrate metabolism observed in the Biolog™ system.

  11. Modeling simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal (SCNR) in anaerobic/anoxic reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Carlos; Esquerre, Karla; Queiroz, Luciano Matos

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents a mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the effects of nitrate concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal (SCNR) in anaerobic/anoxic reactor treating domestic wastewater. The model was calibrated using previously published experimental data obtained from anaerobic batch tests for different COD/ [Formula: see text] ratios. Model simulations were performed to predict the SCNR in a completely mixed reactor (CSTR) operating under mesophilic conditions (35 °C). Six different scenarios were evaluated to investigate the performance of the SCNR based on typical influent characteristics of domestic wastewater. The variables analyzed were chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, nitrate concentration, methane production, nitrogen gas, volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration, pH and percentage of COD used by the denitrifying and methanogenic microorganisms. The HRT was decreased stepwise from 15 to 4 h. The results indicate that Scenario (S5) with a COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio equal to 10 and an HRT equal to 15 h ensures the occurrence of the stable SCNR. Furthermore, the accumulation of denitrification intermediates and a significant reduction in the biogas production when the organic matter is limited was verified.

  12. 200 years of soil carbon nitrogen and phosphorus change across the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, Ed; Quinton, John; Davies, Jessica; Bell, Vicky; Carnell, Ed; Dragosits, Ulli; Muhammed, Shibu; Naden, Pam; Stuart, Marianne; Tomlinson, Sam; Whitmore, Andy; Wu, Lianhai

    2015-04-01

    Human intervention over the last 200 years has resulted in vast changes to the fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) entering the United Kingdom's landscape. Industrialisation has resulted in N deposition, agricultural intensification has seen widespread use of N and P fertilizers and societal actions have resulted in extensive land use change. To understand the consequences of these anthropogenic inputs for our soils, freshwaters and ecosystems it is necessary to take an integrated long term large scale approach. Integration across the compartments of the critical zone - from atmosphere, plants to soil and stream - is necessary in order to trace the effects of deposition, fertilization, cultivation and land use change. Coherent integration of C, N and P dynamics is also crucial, as biological processes tightly couple these cycles, so that in unison C N and P control the generation of biomass and consequent production of soil organic matter, having knock on effects for dissolved and particulate fluxes and ecosystem function. The Long-Term Large-Scale (LTLS) project is developing an integrated model that simulates the pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (C, N, and P) between atmospheric, vegetation, soil and aquatic systems for the whole of the United Kingdom for a period spanning from the onset of the industrial revolution up until the present day. In this paper we will present results demonstrating the changes in the soil macronutrient cycles in response to agrarian and social change in the United Kingdom over the last 200 years

  13. Modeling simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal (SCNR) in anaerobic/anoxic reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Carlos; Esquerre, Karla; Queiroz, Luciano Matos

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents a mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the effects of nitrate concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal (SCNR) in anaerobic/anoxic reactor treating domestic wastewater. The model was calibrated using previously published experimental data obtained from anaerobic batch tests for different COD/ [Formula: see text] ratios. Model simulations were performed to predict the SCNR in a completely mixed reactor (CSTR) operating under mesophilic conditions (35 °C). Six different scenarios were evaluated to investigate the performance of the SCNR based on typical influent characteristics of domestic wastewater. The variables analyzed were chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, nitrate concentration, methane production, nitrogen gas, volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration, pH and percentage of COD used by the denitrifying and methanogenic microorganisms. The HRT was decreased stepwise from 15 to 4 h. The results indicate that Scenario (S5) with a COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio equal to 10 and an HRT equal to 15 h ensures the occurrence of the stable SCNR. Furthermore, the accumulation of denitrification intermediates and a significant reduction in the biogas production when the organic matter is limited was verified. PMID:27088208

  14. Nitrogen and carbon isotopes in soil with special reference to the diagnosis of organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of nitrogen and carbon isotopes in terrestrial ecosystems are described based on available data and our recent findings for soil organic matters. Major processes regulating N-isotope and C-isotope ratios in biogenic substances are discussed. The biological di-nitrogen fixation and the precipitation are major sources which lower the delta15N value for forested soil organic matters. Denitrification enhances delta15N value for soil in cultivated fields. An addition of chemical fertilizer lowers 15N content in soils. The permiation of soil water is an important factor controlling vertical profiles of delta15N in soil systems. Among soil organic matters, non-hydrolizable fraction seems to give unique low delta15N value, suggesting the utility of delta15N analysis in studying the nature of the fractions. delta13C of soil organic matter is significantly lower than that for marine sediments. delta13C for soil humus varies with respect to chemical forms as well as an age of soil organic matters. The variation is large in paddy fields. It is, thus, probable that delta13C is an useful parameter in studying the early epidiagenesis of soil organic matters. Based on the known delta15N-delta13C relationships, a two-source mixing model has been applied to assess sources of organic matters in coastal sediment. (author)

  15. Atomistic description of electron beam damage in nitrogen-doped graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Kotakoski, Jani; Arenal, Raul; Kurasch, Simon; Jiang, Hua; Skakalova, Viera; Stephan, Odile; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Kauppinen, Esko I; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Jannik C

    2012-10-23

    By combining ab initio simulations with state-of-the-art electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we study the mechanism of electron beam damage in nitrogen-doped graphene and carbon nanotubes. Our results show that the incorporation of nitrogen atoms results in noticeable knock-on damage in these structures already at an acceleration voltage of 80 kV, at which essentially no damage is created in pristine structures at corresponding doses. Contrary to an early estimate predicting rapid destruction via sputtering of the nitrogen atoms, in the case of substitutional doping, damage is initiated by displacement of carbon atoms neighboring the nitrogen dopant, leading to the conversion of substitutional dopant sites into pyridinic ones. Although such events are relatively rare at 80 kV, they become significant at higher voltages typically used in electron energy loss spectroscopy studies. Correspondingly, we measured an energy loss spectrum time series at 100 kV that provides direct evidence for such conversions in nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes, in excellent agreement with our theoretical prediction. Besides providing an improved understanding of the irradiation stability of these structures, we show that structural changes cannot be neglected in their characterization employing high-energy electrons.

  16. High capacity and high rate capability of nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres for capacitive deionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hui; Chen, Guorong; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong

    2016-04-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres (N-PHCS) were well prepared by using polystyrene (PS) spheres as hard templates and dopamine hydrochloride as carbon and nitrogen sources. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images demonstrate that the N-PHCS have a uniform, spherical and hollow structure. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis shows that the N-PHCS have a high specific area of 512 m2/g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result reveals that the nitrogen doping amount is 2.92%. The hollow and porous structure and effective nitrogen doping can contribute to large accessible surface area, efficient ion transport and good conductivity. In the electrochemical tests, we can conclude that the N-PHCS have a high specific capacitance value, a good stability and low inner resistance. The N-PHCS electrodes present a high salt adsorption capacity of 12.95 mg/g at a cell voltage of 1.4 V with a flow rate of 40 mL/min in a 500 mg/L NaCl aqueous solution. Moreover, the N-PHCS electrodes show high salt adsorption rate and good regeneration performance in the CDI process. With high surface specific area and effective nitrogen doping, the N-PHCS is promising to the CDI and other electrochemical applications.

  17. Effect of long-term drought on carbon allocation and nitrogen uptake of Pinus sylvestris seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Aaltonen, Heidi; Lindén, Aki; Köster, Kajar; Biasi, Christina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    Weather extremes such as drought events are expected to increase in the future as a result of climate change. The drought affects the allocation of carbon assimilated by plants e.g. by modifying the root to shoot ratio, amount of fine roots and the amount of mycorrhizal fungal hyphae. We studied the effect of long term drought on the allocation of carbon in a common garden experiment with 4-year-old Pinus sylvestris seedlings. Half of the seedlings were exposed to long-term drought by setting the soil water content close to wilting point for over two growing seasons whereas the other half was grown in soil close to field capacity. We conducted a pulse labelling with 13CO2 in the end of the study by injecting a known amount of 13C enriched CO2 to the seedlings and measuring the CO2 uptake and distribution of 13C to the biomass of the seedlings and to the root and rhizosphere respiration. In addition, we studied the effect of drought on the decomposition of needle litter and uptake of nitrogen by 15N labelled needles buried in the soil in litter bags. The litterbags were collected and harvested in the end of the experiment and the changes in microbial community in the litterbags were studied from the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition. We also determined the 15N isotope concentrations from the needles of the seedlings to study the effect of drought on the nitrogen uptake of the seedlings. Our results indicate that the drought had a significant effect both on the biomass allocation of the seedlings and on the microbial species composition. The amount of carbon allocated belowground was much higher in the seedlings exposed to drought compared to the control seedlings. The seedlings seemed to adapt their carbon allocation to long-term drought to sustain adequate needle biomass and water uptake. The seedlings also adapted their osmotic potential and photosynthesis capacity to sustain the long-term drought as was indicated by the measurements of osmotic potential

  18. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofoam derived from amino acid chelate complex for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Prakash; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel strategy to fabricate the nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanofoam structures (N-MCNF), derived from magnesium amino acid chelate complex (Mg-acc-complex) for its application towards high performance supercapacitor (SCs) system. A series of N-MCNF with well-connected carbon nanofoam structure have been developed by varying the synthesis temperature. The fabricated N-MCNF material possesses a high surface area (1564 m2 g-1) and pore volume (1.767 cm3 g-1) with nitrogen content of 3.42 wt%. A prototypical coin cell type symmetric N-MCNF SC device has been assembled with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIMBF4] ionic liquid electrolyte, and evaluated for SCs studies. The N-MCNF with high textural properties delivers unprecedented SC performance, such as high specific capacitance (204 Fg-1 at 0.25 Ag-1, 25 °C), high energy density (63.4 Wh kg-1), high power density (35.9 kW kg-1) and long-term cycle life (32,500 cycles). Significantly, N-MCNF materials exhibited high power rate performance, at 500 mV-1 (115 Fg-1) and 25 Ag-1 (166 Fg-1) owing to the uniform mesopore size distribution (∼4 nm). The N-MCNF SC device delivered maximum energy densities of 83.4 and 93.3 Wh kg-1 at 60 °C and 90 °C, respectively. Such outstanding N-MCNF SC device is successfully demonstrated in solar energy harvester applications.

  19. A global model of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles for the terrestrial biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon storage by many terrestrial ecosystems can be limited by nutrients, predominantly nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, in addition to other environmental constraints, water, light and temperature. However the spatial distribution and the extent of both N and P limitation at the global scale have not been quantified. Here we have developed a global model of carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P cycles for the terrestrial biosphere. Model estimates of steady state C and N pool sizes and major fluxes between plant, litter and soil pools, under present climate conditions, agree well with various independent estimates. The total amount of C in the terrestrial biosphere is 2767 Gt C, and the C fractions in plant, litter and soil organic matter are 19%, 4% and 77%. The total amount of N is 135 Gt N, with about 94% stored in the soil, 5% in the plant live biomass, and 1% in litter. We found that the estimates of total soil P and its partitioning into different pools in soil are quite sensitive to biochemical P mineralization. The total amount of P (plant biomass, litter and soil excluding occluded P in soil is 17 Gt P in the terrestrial biosphere, 33% of which is stored in the soil organic matter if biochemical P mineralization is modelled, or 31 Gt P with 67% in soil organic matter otherwise.

    This model was used to derive the global distribution and uncertainty of N or P limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems at steady state under present conditions. Our model estimates that the net primary productivity of most tropical evergreen broadleaf forests and tropical savannahs is reduced by about 20% on average by P limitation, and most of the remaining biomes are N limited; N limitation is strongest in high latitude deciduous needle leaf forests, and reduces its net primary productivity by up to 40% under present conditions.

  20. A global model of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles for the terrestrial biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Wang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon storage by many terrestrial ecosystems can be limited by nutrients, predominantly nitrogen (N and phosphorous (P, in additional to other environmental constraints, water, light and temperature. However the spatial distribution and the extent of both N and P limitation at global scale have not been quantified. Here we have developed a global model of carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P cycles for the terrestrial biosphere. Model estimates of steady state C and N pool sizes and major fluxes between plant, litter and soil pools, under present climate conditions, agree well with various independent estimates. The total amount of C in the terrestrial biosphere is 2526 Gt C, and the C fractions in plant, litter and soil organic matter are 21, 6 and 73%. The total amount of N is 124 Gt N, with about 94% stored in the soil, 5% in the plant live biomass, and 1% in litter. We found that the estimates of total soil P and its partitioning into different pools in soil are quite sensitive to biochemical P mineralization that has not been included in any other global models previously. The total amount of P is 26 Gt P in the terrestrial biosphere, 17% of which is stored in the soil organic matter if biochemical P mineralization is modelled, or 40 Gt P, with 60% in soil organic matter, otherwise.

    This model was used to derive the global distribution of N or P limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Our model predicts that the net primary productivity of most tropical evergreen broadleaf forests and tropical savannahs is reduced by about 20% on average by P limitation, and most of the remaining biomes are N limited; N limitation is strongest in high latitude deciduous needle leaf forests, and reduces its net primary productivity by up to 40% under present conditions.

  1. Soil Fauna Affects Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen in Foliar Litter in Alpine Forest and Alpine Meadow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liao

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN are generally considered important active biogeochemical pools of total carbon and nitrogen. Many studies have documented the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition, but the effects of the soil fauna on labile substances (i.e., DOC and TDN in litter during early decomposition are not completely clear. Therefore, a field litterbag experiment was carried out from 13th November 2013 to 23rd October 2014 in an alpine forest and an alpine meadow located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Litterbags with different mesh sizes were used to provide access to or prohibit the access of the soil fauna, and the concentrations of DOC and TDN in the foliar litter were measured during the winter (the onset of freezing, deep freezing and thawing stage and the growing season (early and late. After one year of field incubation, the concentration of DOC in the litter significantly decreased, whereas the TDN concentration in the litter increased. Similar dynamic patterns were detected under the effects of the soil fauna on both DOC and TDN in the litter between the alpine forest and the alpine meadow. The soil fauna showed greater positive effects on decreasing DOC concentration in the litter in the winter than in the growing season. In contrast, the dynamics of TND in the litter were related to seasonal changes in environmental factors, rather than the soil fauna. In addition, the soil fauna promoted a decrease in litter DOC/TDN ratio in both the alpine forest and the alpine meadow throughout the first year of decomposition, except for in the late growing season. These results suggest that the soil fauna can promote decreases in DOC and TDN concentrations in litter, contributing to early litter decomposition in these cold biomes.

  2. Reprocessing of ices in turbulent protoplanetary disks: Carbon and nitrogen chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri, E-mail: furuya@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon- and nitrogen-bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r ≲ 30 AU because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) in two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The former enhances the COMs formation in the disk surface, while the latter suppresses it in the midplane. Then, when mixing is strong, COMs are predominantly formed in the disk surface, while their parent molecules are (re)formed in the midplane. This cycle expands the COMs distribution both vertically and radially outward compared with that in the non-turbulent model. We derive the timescale of the sink mechanism by which CO and N{sub 2} are converted to less volatile molecules to be depleted from the gas phase and find that the vertical mixing suppresses this mechanism in the inner disks.

  3. Static magnetic field treatment of seeds improves carbon and nitrogen metabolism under salinity stress in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Lokesh; Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, Kadur Narayan

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness of magnetopriming was assessed for alleviation of salt-induced adverse effects on soybean growth. Soybean seeds were pre-treated with static magnetic field (SMF) of 200 mT for 1 h to evaluate the effect of magnetopriming on growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and yield of soybean plants under different salinity levels (0, 25, and 50 mM NaCl). The adverse effect of NaCl-induced salt stress was found on growth, yield, and various physiological attributes of soybeans. Results indicate that SMF pre-treatment significantly increased plant growth attributes, number of root nodules, nodules, fresh weight, biomass accumulation, and photosynthetic performance under both non-saline and saline conditions as compared to untreated seeds. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transients from magnetically treated plants gave a higher fluorescence yield at J-I-P phase. Nitrate reductase activity, PIABS , photosynthetic pigments, and net rate of photosynthesis were also higher in plants that emerged from SMF pre-treated seeds as compared to untreated seeds. Leghemoglobin content and hemechrome content in root nodules were also increased by SMF pre-treatment. Thus pre-sowing exposure of seeds to SMF enhanced carbon and nitrogen metabolism and improved the yield of soybeans in terms of number of pods, number of seeds, and seed weight under saline as well as non-saline conditions. Consequently, SMF pre-treatment effectively mitigated adverse effects of NaCl on soybeans. It indicates that magnetopriming of dry soybean seeds can be effectively used as a pre-sowing treatment for alleviating salinity stress. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:455-470, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27336791

  4. Ground cover rice production system facilitates soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice production is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, however covering paddy rice soils with films (ground cover rice production system: GCRPS can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the vegetation period resulting in increased grain yields in colder regions of rice production with seasonal water shortages. It has been speculated that the increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS may result in losses of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional scale experiment, conducted by sampling paired adjacent Paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites in the Shiyan region, which is typical for many mountainous areas across China. Parameters evaluated included soil C and N stocks, soil physical and chemical properties, potential carbon mineralization rates, fractions of soil organic carbon and stable carbon isotopic composition of plant leaves. Furthermore, root biomass was quantified at maximum tillering stage at one of our paired sites. Against expectations the study showed that: (1 GCRPS significantly increased soil organic C and N stocks 5–20 years following conversion of production systems, (2 there were no differences between GCRPS and Paddy in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths with the exception of soil bulk density, (3 GCRPS had lower mineralization potential for soil organic C compared with Paddy over the incubation period, (4 GCRPS showed lower δ15N in the soils and plant leafs indicating less NH3 volatilization in GCRPS than in Paddy; and (5 GCRPS increased yields and root biomass in all soil layers down to 40 cm depth. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative rice production technique that not only increases yields using less irrigation water, but that it also is environmentally beneficial due to increased soil C and N stocks at regional scale.

  5. Surficial gains and subsoil losses of soil carbon and nitrogen during secondary forest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Megan L; Lajtha, Kate; Kramer, Marc G; Bacon, Allan R; Heine, Paul R; Richter, Daniel Deb

    2015-02-01

    Reforestation of formerly cultivated land is widely understood to accumulate above- and belowground detrital organic matter pools, including soil organic matter. However, during 40 years of study of reforestation in the subtropical southeastern USA, repeated observations of above- and belowground carbon documented that significant gains in soil organic matter (SOM) in surface soils (0-7.5 cm) were offset by significant SOM losses in subsoils (35-60 cm). Here, we extended the observation period in this long-term experiment by an additional decade, and used soil fractionation and stable isotopes and radioisotopes to explore changes in soil organic carbon and soil nitrogen that accompanied nearly 50 years of loblolly pine secondary forest development. We observed that accumulations of mineral soil C and N from 0 to 7.5 cm were almost entirely due to accumulations of light-fraction SOM. Meanwhile, losses of soil C and N from mineral soils at 35 to 60 cm were from SOM associated with silt and clay-sized particles. Isotopic signatures showed relatively large accumulations of forest-derived carbon in surface soils, and little to no accumulation of forest-derived carbon in subsoils. We argue that the land use change from old field to secondary forest drove biogeochemical and hydrological changes throughout the soil profile that enhanced microbial activity and SOM decomposition in subsoils. However, when the pine stands aged and began to transition to mixed pines and hardwoods, demands on soil organic matter for nutrients to support aboveground growth eased due to pine mortality, and subsoil organic matter levels stabilized. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term experiments and deep measurements when characterizing soil C and N responses to land use change and the remarkable paucity of such long-term soil data deeper than 30 cm. PMID:25155991

  6. Surficial gains and subsoil losses of soil carbon and nitrogen during secondary forest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Megan L; Lajtha, Kate; Kramer, Marc G; Bacon, Allan R; Heine, Paul R; Richter, Daniel Deb

    2015-02-01

    Reforestation of formerly cultivated land is widely understood to accumulate above- and belowground detrital organic matter pools, including soil organic matter. However, during 40 years of study of reforestation in the subtropical southeastern USA, repeated observations of above- and belowground carbon documented that significant gains in soil organic matter (SOM) in surface soils (0-7.5 cm) were offset by significant SOM losses in subsoils (35-60 cm). Here, we extended the observation period in this long-term experiment by an additional decade, and used soil fractionation and stable isotopes and radioisotopes to explore changes in soil organic carbon and soil nitrogen that accompanied nearly 50 years of loblolly pine secondary forest development. We observed that accumulations of mineral soil C and N from 0 to 7.5 cm were almost entirely due to accumulations of light-fraction SOM. Meanwhile, losses of soil C and N from mineral soils at 35 to 60 cm were from SOM associated with silt and clay-sized particles. Isotopic signatures showed relatively large accumulations of forest-derived carbon in surface soils, and little to no accumulation of forest-derived carbon in subsoils. We argue that the land use change from old field to secondary forest drove biogeochemical and hydrological changes throughout the soil profile that enhanced microbial activity and SOM decomposition in subsoils. However, when the pine stands aged and began to transition to mixed pines and hardwoods, demands on soil organic matter for nutrients to support aboveground growth eased due to pine mortality, and subsoil organic matter levels stabilized. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term experiments and deep measurements when characterizing soil C and N responses to land use change and the remarkable paucity of such long-term soil data deeper than 30 cm.

  7. Remote sensing techniques to monitor nitrogen-driven carbon dynamics in field corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Daughtry, Craig S. T.

    2009-08-01

    Patterns of change in vegetation growth and condition are one of the primary indicators of the present and future ecological status of the globe. Nitrogen (N) is involved in photochemical processes and is one of the primary resources regulating plant growth. As a result, biological carbon (C) sequestration is driven by N availability. Large scale monitoring of photosynthetic processes are currently possible only with remote sensing systems that rely heavily on passive reflectance (R) information. Unlike R, fluorescence (F) emitted from chlorophyll is directly related to photochemical reactions and has been extensively used for the elucidation of the photosynthetic pathways. Recent advances in passive fluorescence instrumentation have made the remote acquisition of solar-induced fluorescence possible. The goal of this effort is to evaluate existing reflectance and emerging fluorescence methodologies for determining vegetation parameters related to photosynthetic function and carbon sequestration dynamics in plants. Field corn N treatment levels of 280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N / ha were sampled from an intensive test site for a multi-disciplinary project, Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE). Aircraft, near-ground, and leaf-level measurements were used to compare and contrast treatment effects within this experiment site assessed with both reflectance and fluorescence approaches. A number of spectral indices including the R derivative index D730/D705, the normalized difference of R750 vs. R705, and simple ratio R800/R750 differentiated three of the four N fertilization rates and yielded high correlations to three important carbon parameters: C:N, light use efficiency, and grain yield. These results advocate the application of hyperspectral sensors for remotely monitoring carbon cycle dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

  8. Characterization of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon and sulfur in nuclear fuel (UO2) and cladding nuclear rod materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur gases analysis in nuclear fuels such as UO2, U3O8, U3Si2 and in the fuel cladding such as Zircaloy, is a well known as a quality control in nuclear industry. In UO2 pellets, the Hydrogen molecule fragilizes the metal lattice causing the material cracking. In Zircaloy material the H2 molecules cause the boiling of the cladding. Other gases like Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur affect in the lattice structure change. In this way these chemical compounds have to be measure within specify parameters, these measurement are part of the quality control of the nuclear industry. The analytical procedure has to be well established by a convention of the quality assurance. Therefore, the Oxygen, Carbon, Sulfur and Hydrogen are measured by infrared absorption (IR) and the nitrogen will be measured by thermal conductivity (TC). The gas/metal analyzer made by LECO Co. model TCHEN-600 is Hydrogen, Oxygen and Nitrogen analyzer in a variety of metals, refractory and other inorganic materials, using the principle of fusion by inert gas, infrared and thermo-coupled detector. The Carbon and Sulfur compounds are measure by LECO Co. model CS-400. A sample is first weighed and placed in a high purity graphite crucible and is casted on a stream of helium gas, enough to release the oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During the fusion, the oxygen present in the sample combines with the carbon crucible to form carbon monoxide. Then, the nitrogen present in the sample is analyzed and released as molecular nitrogen and the hydrogen is released as gas. The hydrogen gas is measured by infrared absorption, and the sample gases pass through a trap of copper oxide which converts CO to CO2 and hydrogen into water. The gases enter the cell where infrared water content is then converted making the measurement of total hydrogen present in the sample. The Hydrogen detection limits for the nuclear fuel is 1 μg/g for the Nitrogen and Oxygen

  9. Comparison of the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of gill and white muscle tissue of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, E.; Freitas, V.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; van der Veer, H.W.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    The potential use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (d13C, d15N) of fish gills for studies on fish feeding ecology was evaluated by comparing the d13C and d15N of gill tissue with the more commonly used white muscle tissue. To account for the effect of lipid content on the d13C signatures

  10. Models to quantify excretion of dry matter, nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon in growing pigs fed regional diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard; Prapaspongsa, Trakarn;

    2013-01-01

    used in a digestibility and balance experiment. Excretion of dry matter (DM), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) of the experimental diets were determined. Due to the highest dietary fibre content, VN had the lowest digestibility of N, P and C (73, 49, and 73%, respectively) compared...

  11. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Variation in Sphagnum from Peat Bogs in the Midwestern Us: Implications for Holocene Climate Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D.; Paytan, A.; Jackson, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    A peat core taken from near the center of Minden Bog in Michigan, representing about 3500 years of accumulation was previously analyzed for plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, and testate amoebae to yield three independent climate proxies. The data show the site to be sensitive to bog water table fluctuations and suggest that this may be related to regional climatic changes. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes and the carbon-nitrogen ratios in the bulk peat samples and determined that the changes in these isotopes and ratios can be attributed to one or more of the following: (1) changes in the relative abundance of vegetation taxa in the site, (2) changes in the metabolism that impact isotope ratios in the vegetation contributing to the bulk organic, and (3) selective preservation and regeneration of specific organic compounds within the bulk organic matter. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes and the carbon-nitrogen ratios in a specific taxum, Sphagnum, to differentiate between these mechanisms and relate the record to water level and climate in the region.

  12. Influence of the atmospheric species water, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.; Kniknie, B.; Barreau, N.; Berkum, J. van; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N 2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical,

  13. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications. PMID:27488268

  14. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest amo