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Sample records for als mouse spinal

  1. Voltage-gated calcium channels are abnormal in cultured spinal motoneurons in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motoneurons. Hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity have been implicated in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Studies addressing excitotoxic motoneuron death and intracellular Ca(2+) overload have mostly focused on Ca(2+) influx through AMPA glutamate receptors. However, intrinsic excitability of motoneurons through voltage-gated ion channels may also have a role in the neurodegeneration. In this study we examined the function and localization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cultured spinal cord motoneurons from mice expressing a mutant form of human superoxide dismutase-1 with a Gly93→Ala substitution (G93A-SOD1). Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we showed that high voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents are increased in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, but low voltage activated Ca(2+) currents are not affected. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons also have altered persistent Ca(2+) current mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Quantitative single-cell RT-PCR revealed higher levels of Ca1a, Ca1b, Ca1c, and Ca1e subunit mRNA expression in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, indicating that the increase of HVA Ca(2+) currents may result from upregulation of Ca(2+) channel mRNA expression in motoneurons. The localizations of the Ca1B N-type and Ca1D L-type Ca(2+) channels in motoneurons were examined by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons had increased Ca1B channels on the plasma membrane of soma and dendrites. Ca1D channels are similar on the plasma membrane of soma and lower on the plasma membrane of dendrites of G93A-SOD1 motoneurons. Our study demonstrates that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels have aberrant functions and localizations in ALS mouse motoneurons. The increased HVA Ca(2+) currents and PCCa current could contribute to early pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27151771

  2. Glycoconjugates Distribution during Developing Mouse Spinal Cord Motor Organizers

    OpenAIRE

    Vojoudi, Elham; Ebrahimi, Vahid; Ebrahimzadeh-Bideskan, Alireza; Fazel, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to study the distribution and changes of glycoconjugates particularly their terminal sugars by using lectin histochemistry during mouse spinal cord development. Methods: Formalin-fixed sections of mouse embryo (10-16 fetal days) were processed for lectin histochemical method. In this study, two groups of horseradish peroxidase -labeled specific lectins were used: N-acetylgalactosamine, including Dolichos biflorus, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), ...

  3. Protein composition and synthesis in the adult mouse spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of spinal cord proteins were studied in adult mice subjected to unilateral crush or electrical stimulation of sciatic nerve. The protein composition of spinal tissue was determined using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with subcellular fractionation. Comparisons of mouse spinal cord and brain revealed similarities in the types but differences in the concentrations of myelin associated proteins, nuclear histones and other proteins. Comparisons with sciatic nerve proteins demonstrated differences in types of proteins but similarities in the concentration of myelin proteins and nuclear histones. The short term (less than 2 hrs.) incorporation of radioactive amino acids into spinal cord proteins revealed heterogeneous rates of incorporation. Neither nerve crush six days prior to testing nor sciatic nerve stimulation had a significant effect on the protein composition or amino acid incorporation rates of spinal cord tissue. These observations suggest that known differences in spinal cord function following alterations in nerve input may be dependent upon different mechanisms than have been found in the brain

  4. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  5. A Neural Model of Demyelination of the Mouse Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Petreska, Biljana; Yovel, Yossi

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network model of demyelination of the mouse motor pathways, coupled to a central pattern generation (CPG) model for quadruped walking. Demyelination is the degradation of the myelin layer covering the axons which can be caused by several neurodegenerative autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We use this model - to our knowledge first of its kind - to investigate the locomotion deficits that appear following demyelination of axons in the spinal cord. Our...

  6. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking similarities to ALS. The cellular effects of the wobbler mutation, cellular transport defects, neurofilament aggregation, neuronal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation closely resemble human ALS. Now,...

  7. Transformation from a neuroprotective to a neurotoxic microglial phenotype in a mouse model of ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Bing; Zhao, Weihua; Beers, David R.; Henkel, Jenny S; Appel, Stanley H.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a prominent pathological feature in the spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as in transgenic mouse models of inherited ALS, and is characterized by activated microglia. Earlier studies showed that activated microglia play important roles in both motoneuron protection and injury. More recent studies investigating the pathoprogression of disease in ALS mice have demonstrated that the in vivo activation states of microglia, including th...

  8. [Gene expression profile of spinal ventral horn in ALS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2007-10-01

    The causative pathomechanism of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not clearly understood. Using microarray technology combined with laser-captured microdissection, gene expression profiles of degenerating spinal motor neurons as well as spinal ventral horn from autopsied patients with sporadic ALS were examined. Spinal motor neurons showed a distinct gene expression profile from the whole spinal ventral horn. Three percent of genes examined were significantly downregulated, and 1% were upregulated in motor neurons. In contrast with motor neurons, the total spinal ventral horn homogenates demonstrated 0.7% and 0.2% significant upregulation and downregulation of gene expression, respectively. Downregulated genes in motor neurons included those associated with cytoskeleton/axonal transport, transcription and cell surface antigens/receptors, such as dynactin 1 (DCTN1) and early growth response 3 (EGR3). In particular, DCTN1 was markedly downregulated in most residual motor neurons prior to the accumulation of pNF-H and ubiquitylated protein. Promoters for cell death pathway, death receptor 5 (DR5), cyclins C (CCNC) and A1 (CCNA), and caspases were upregulated, whereas cell death inhibitors, acetyl-CoA transporter (ACATN) and NF-kappaB (NFKB) were also upregulated. In terms of spinal ventral horn, the expression of genes related to cell surface antigens/receptors, transcription and cell adhesion/ECM were increased. The gene expression resulting in neurodegenerative and neuroprotective changes were both present in spinal motor neurons and ventral horn. Moreover, Inflammation-related genes, such as belonging to the cytokine family were not, however, significantly upregulated in either motor neurons or ventral horn. The sequence of motor neuron-specific gene expression changes from early DCTN1 downregulation to late CCNC upregulation in sporadic ALS can provide direct information on the genes leading to neurodegeneration and neuronal death, and are helpful

  9. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking...... disease mechanism and testing various therapeutic approaches and discuss the relevance of these advances for human ALS. The identification of the causative mutation linking the wobbler mutation to a vesicle transport factor and the research focussed on the cellular basis and the therapeutic treatment of...

  10. Neurogenesis in spinal cord of mouse: an autoradiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic analysis of the time and sites of origin, and the migration and setting patterns of neurons was made in the spinal cord of the mouse. The neurons originated on days 10-15 of gestation with temporal gradients along the ventrodorsal and rostrocaudal axes. The motor neurons originated on days 10-11 of gestation; the neurons in the intermediate gray region originated on days 11-14 of gestation; the neurons of the head of the dorsal horn originated on days 12-14 of gestation. The neurons that originated on days 10 and 11 originated and migrated primarily from the basal plate, and they settled in the adjacent regions of the intermediate zone; those neurons formed on days 12-14 originated and migrated primarily from the alar plate, and it was concluded that these neuroblasts similarly settled in the adjacent regions of the intermediate zone. Extraventricular proliferation, which presumably signaled the initial stages of gliogenesis, was first observed on day 12 of gestation. This study supports the classical idea of the mosaic pattern of neurogenesis in the embryonic spinal cord. (Auth.)

  11. Characterisation of the primary afferent spinal innervation of mouse uterus

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    NickJSpencer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary afferent innervation of the uterus is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the location and characteristics of primary afferent neurons that innervate the uterine horn of mice and correlate the different morphological types of putative primary afferent nerve endings, immunoreactive to the sensory marker, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP. Using retrograde tracing, injection of 5-10µL of 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI into discrete single sites in each uterine horn revealed a biomodal distribution of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG with peak labelling occurring between T13-L3 and a second smaller peak between L6-S1. The mean cross sectional area of labelled cells was 463 µm2 +/- SEM. A significantly greater proportion of labelled neurons consisted of small cell bodies (<300 µm2 in the sacral spinal cord (S2 compared with peak labelling at the lumbar (L2 region. In both sections and whole mount preparations, immunohistochemical staining for CGRP revealed substantial innervation of the uterus by CGRP-positive nerve fibres located primarily at the border between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (N=4. The nerve endings were classified into three distinct types: “single”, “branching” or “complex”, that often aligned preferentially in either the circular or longitudinal axis of the smooth muscles. Complex endings were often associated with mesenteric vessels. We have identified that the cell bodies of primary afferent neurons innervating the mouse uterus lie primarily in DRG at L2 and S1 spinal levels. Also, the greatest density of CGRP immunoreactivity lies within the myometrium, with at least three different morphological types of nerve endings identified. These findings will facilitate further investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction in mouse uterus.

  12. Functional effect of mouse embryonic stem cell implantation after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    We transplanted mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to improve functional loss in a rat model of clip-compression spinal cord injury (SCI). The mouse embryonic stem cells were transplanted to injured cord 7 days after injury. We include minimizing the progression of secondary injury, manipulating the neuroinhibitory environment of the spinal cord, replacing lost tissue with transplanted cells and substantial improvement of motor. A number of potential approaches optimize functional recovery af...

  13. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    OpenAIRE

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facili...

  14. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Mouse Brain Stem and Cervical Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2008-01-01

    In vivo diffusion tensor imaging measurements of the mouse brain stem and cervical spinal cord are presented. Utilizing actively decoupled transmit/receive coils, high resolution diffusion images (117 × 59 × 500 μm3) were acquired at 4.7 T within an hour. Both brain stem and cervical spine displayed clear gray-white matter contrast. The cervical spinal cord white matter showed similar tissue characteristics as seen in the thoracic cord. The coherent fiber orientation in the white matter was o...

  15. Effect of misonidazole on radiation injury to mouse spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of hind limb paralysis in unanaesthetized mice following spinal cord X irradiation and/or misonidazole (MISO) was studied at 7 and 18 months after treatment. The sensitizer enhancement ratios calculated from the ED50 at 7 and 18 months showed a small enhancement of radiation paralysis when MISO was given before X-irradiation but it was not statistically significant. Enhancement of spinalcord injury at lower MISO doses has been observed in previous studies but this may have been due to anaesthesia-induced hypoxia. (U.K.)

  16. Retinoic acid receptor beta2 and neurite outgrowth in the adult mouse spinal cord in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jonathan; So, Po-Lin; Barber, Robert D; Vincent, Karen J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Maden, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Retinoic acid, acting through the nuclear retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2), stimulates neurite outgrowth from peripheral nervous system tissue that has the capacity to regenerate neurites, namely, embryonic and adult dorsal root ganglia. Similarly, in central nervous system tissue that can regenerate, namely, embryonic mouse spinal cord, retinoic acid also stimulates neurite outgrowth and RARbeta2 is upregulated. By contrast, in the adult mouse spinal cord, which cannot regenerate, no such upregulation of RARbeta2 by retinoic acid is observed and no neurites are extended in vitro. To test our hypothesis that the upregulation of RARbeta2 is crucial to neurite regeneration, we have transduced adult mouse or rat spinal cord in vitro with a minimal equine infectious anaemia virus vector expressing RARbeta2. After transduction, prolific neurite outgrowth occurs. Outgrowth does not occur when the cord is transduced with a different isoform of RARbeta nor does it occur following treatment with nerve growth factor. These data demonstrate that RARbeta2 is involved in neurite outgrowth, at least in vitro, and that this gene may in the future be of some therapeutic use. PMID:12235288

  17. Isolation of a Mouse Motoneuron-Enriched Fraction from Mouse Spinal Cord on a Density Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    John Graham

    2002-01-01

    After a combined enzymic and mechanical disruption of the spinal cord tissue, the low-density motoneurons band at the interface of a 1.06-g/ml barrier through which other contaminating cells sediment.

  18. Germline ablation of dermatan-4O-sulfotransferase1 reduces regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, S; Akyüz, N; Martinovic, T; Huckhagel, T; Jakovcevski, I; Schachner, M

    2016-01-15

    Chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs/DSPGs) are major components of the extracellular matrix. Their expression is generally upregulated after injuries to the adult mammalian central nervous system, which is known for its low ability to restore function after injury. Several studies support the view that CSPGs inhibit regeneration after injury, whereas the functions of DSPGs in injury paradigms are less certain. To characterize the functions of DSPGs in the presence of CSPGs, we studied young adult dermatan-4O-sulfotransferase1-deficient (Chst14(-/-)) mice, which express chondroitin sulfates (CSs), but not dermatan sulfates (DSs), to characterize the functional outcome after severe compression injury of the spinal cord. In comparison to their wild-type (Chst14(+/+)) littermates, regeneration was reduced in Chst14(-/-) mice. No differences between genotypes were seen in the size of spinal cords, numbers of microglia and astrocytes neither in intact nor injured spinal cords after injury. Monoaminergic innervation and re-innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the lesion site as well as expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and myelin basic protein (MBP) were similar in both genotypes, independent of whether they were injured and examined 6weeks after injury or not injured. These results suggest that, in contrast to CSPGs, DSPGs, being the products of Chst14 enzymatic activity, promote regeneration after injury of the adult mouse central nervous system. PMID:26586562

  19. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, Yanina L; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L; Schinder, Alejandro F; Lanuza, Guillermo M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3(+) V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells. PMID:26839365

  20. Effect of fluoxetine on disease progression in a mouse model of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschnitzky, J E; Quinlan, K A; Lukas, T J; Kajtaz, E; Kocevar, E J; Mayers, W F; Siddique, T; Heckman, C J

    2014-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants are often prescribed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients; however, the impact of these prescriptions on ALS disease progression has not been systematically tested. To determine whether SSRIs impact disease progression, fluoxetine (Prozac, 5 or 10 mg/kg) was administered to mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mice during one of three age ranges: neonatal [postnatal day (P)5-11], adult presymptomatic (P30 to end stage), and adult symptomatic (P70 to end stage). Long-term adult fluoxetine treatment (started at either P30 or P70 and continuing until end stage) had no significant effect on disease progression. In contrast, neonatal fluoxetine treatment (P5-11) had two effects. First, all animals (mutant SOD1(G93A) and control: nontransgenic and SOD1(WT)) receiving the highest dose (10 mg/kg) had a sustained decrease in weight from P30 onward. Second, the high-dose SOD1(G93A) mice reached end stage ∼8 days (∼6% decrease in life span) sooner than vehicle and low-dose animals because of an increased rate of motor impairment. Fluoxetine increases synaptic serotonin (5-HT) levels, which is known to increase spinal motoneuron excitability. We confirmed that 5-HT increases spinal motoneuron excitability during this neonatal time period and therefore hypothesized that antagonizing 5-HT receptors during the same time period would improve disease outcome. However, cyproheptadine (1 or 5 mg/kg), a 5-HT receptor antagonist, had no effect on disease progression. These results show that a brief period of antidepressant treatment during a critical time window (the transition from neonatal to juvenile states) can be detrimental in ALS mouse models. PMID:24598527

  1. Novel mouse model of spinal cord injury-induced heterotopic ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heejae Kang, BA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic ossification (HO develops in about 20% to 30% of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI and significantly impairs their rehabilitation. There is no effective prevention or treatment for this condition at this time. Our current understanding of its etiology and pathophysiology is limited partially due to the lack of clinically relevant animal models. In this study, we report a novel mouse model of SCI-induced HO by administering a subthreshold dose of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2 to muscles in mice after SCI. Microcomputed tomography scanning showed that an intramuscular injection of 0.25 micrograms of BMP-2 causes significant HO in mice with SCI but not in control (sham surgery mice. Our analysis of gene expression showed significantly increased BMP signaling in quadriceps following SCI, suggesting that BMP signaling may play a role in SCI-induced HO. Administering 0.25 micrograms of BMP-2 to the front arms of the mice with SCI also results in the development of significant HO but not in control mice. This suggests that SCI causes a systematic osteogenic effect, which is not limited to paralyzed limbs. This novel mouse model will serve as a powerful tool in exploring the molecular mechanisms of SCI-induced HO, which may lead to novel treatment for this disease.

  2. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

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    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spadon, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Defaults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal systems is a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with neither contrast agent nor a destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is a crucial tool for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries. In particular, it s...

  3. A neonatal mouse spinal cord injury model for assessing post-injury adaptive plasticity and human stem cell integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Boulland

    Full Text Available Despite limited regeneration capacity, partial injuries to the adult mammalian spinal cord can elicit variable degrees of functional recovery, mediated at least in part by reorganization of neuronal circuitry. Underlying mechanisms are believed to include synaptic plasticity and collateral sprouting of spared axons. Because plasticity is higher in young animals, we developed a spinal cord compression (SCC injury model in the neonatal mouse to gain insight into the potential for reorganization during early life. The model provides a platform for high-throughput assessment of functional synaptic connectivity that is also suitable for testing the functional integration of human stem and progenitor cell-derived neurons being considered for clinical cell replacement strategies. SCC was generated at T9-T11 and functional recovery was assessed using an integrated approach including video kinematics, histology, tract tracing, electrophysiology, and high-throughput optical recording of descending inputs to identified spinal neurons. Dramatic degeneration of axons and synaptic contacts was evident within 24 hours of SCC, and loss of neurons in the injured segment was evident for at least a month thereafter. Initial hindlimb paralysis was paralleled by a loss of descending inputs to lumbar motoneurons. Within 4 days of SCC and progressively thereafter, hindlimb motility began to be restored and descending inputs reappeared, but with examples of atypical synaptic connections indicating a reorganization of circuitry. One to two weeks after SCC, hindlimb motility approached sham control levels, and weight-bearing locomotion was virtually indistinguishable in SCC and sham control mice. Genetically labeled human fetal neural progenitor cells injected into the injured spinal cord survived for at least a month, integrated into the host tissue and began to differentiate morphologically. This integrative neonatal mouse model provides opportunities to explore early

  4. Changes in Synapses and Axons Demonstrated by Synaptophysin Immunohistochemistry Following Spinal Cord Compression Trauma in the Rat and Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI-LIN LI; MOHAMMAD FAROOQUE; JONAS ISAKSSON; YNGVE OLSSON

    2004-01-01

    and methods To evaluate synaptic changes using synaptophysin immunohistochemstry in rat and mouse, which spinal cords were subjected to graded compression trauma at the level of Th8-9. Results Normal animals showed numerous fine dots of synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the gray matter. An increase in synaptophysin immunoreactivity was observed in the neuropil and synapses at the surface of motor neurons of the anterior horns in the Th8-9 segments lost immunoreactivity at 4-hour point after trauma. The immunoreactive synapses reappeared around motor neurons at 9-day point. Unexpected accumulation of synaptophysin immunoreactivity occurred in injured axons of the white matter of the compressed spinal cord. Conclusion Synaptic changes were important components of secondary injuries in spinal cord trauma. Loss of synapses on motor neurons may be one of the factors causing motor dysfunction of hind limbs and formation of new synapses may play an important role in recovery of motor function. Synaptophysin immunohistochemistry is also a good tool for studies of axonal swellings in spinal cord injuries.

  5. Brain hypermetabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a FDG PET study in ALS of spinal and bulbar onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the neurobiological traits of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to elucidate functional differences between ALS of spinal and bulbar onset. We hypothesized that glucose metabolism distribution might vary between groups. The study groups comprised 32 patients with ALS of either bulbar (n = 13) or spinal (n=19) onset and 22 subjects as controls. They were investigated by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (FDG PET), comparing the patient groups with each other and with the controls by statistical parametric mapping. Highly significant relative increases in glucose metabolism distribution were found in the group comprising all 32 ALS patients as compared with the controls in the bilateral amygdalae, midbrain, pons and cerebellum. Relative hypermetabolism was also found in patients with spinal onset as compared with the controls in the right midbrain. In patients with bulbar onset compared with the controls and with patients with spinal onset, large relatively hypometabolic areas were found in the bilateral frontal cortex, right insula, anterior cingulate, precuneus and inferior parietal lobe. Patients with spinal onset had significantly higher scores in a neuropsychological test assessing verbal fluency compared with patients with bulbar onset. This large FDG PET investigation provided unprecedented evidence of relatively increased metabolism in the amygdalae, midbrain and pons in ALS patients as compared with control subjects, possibly due to local activation of astrocytes and microglia. Highly significant relative decreases in metabolism were found in large frontal and parietal regions in the bulbar onset patients as compared with the spinal onset patients and the controls, suggesting a differential metabolic and neuropsychological state between the two conditions. (orig.)

  6. Brain hypermetabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a FDG PET study in ALS of spinal and bulbar onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cistaro, Angelina; Fania, Piercarlo [Positron Emission Tomography Center IRMET S.p.A, Turin (Italy); Consuelo Valentini, Maria; Carrara, Giovanna [CTO Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Turin (Italy); Chio, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Montuschi, Anna [University of Turin, Department of Neuroscience, ALS Center, Turin (Italy); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Department of Neurosciences, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia [University of Genoa, Department of Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Genoa (Italy); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Padua (Italy); Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Padua (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    To identify the neurobiological traits of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to elucidate functional differences between ALS of spinal and bulbar onset. We hypothesized that glucose metabolism distribution might vary between groups. The study groups comprised 32 patients with ALS of either bulbar (n = 13) or spinal (n=19) onset and 22 subjects as controls. They were investigated by [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (FDG PET), comparing the patient groups with each other and with the controls by statistical parametric mapping. Highly significant relative increases in glucose metabolism distribution were found in the group comprising all 32 ALS patients as compared with the controls in the bilateral amygdalae, midbrain, pons and cerebellum. Relative hypermetabolism was also found in patients with spinal onset as compared with the controls in the right midbrain. In patients with bulbar onset compared with the controls and with patients with spinal onset, large relatively hypometabolic areas were found in the bilateral frontal cortex, right insula, anterior cingulate, precuneus and inferior parietal lobe. Patients with spinal onset had significantly higher scores in a neuropsychological test assessing verbal fluency compared with patients with bulbar onset. This large FDG PET investigation provided unprecedented evidence of relatively increased metabolism in the amygdalae, midbrain and pons in ALS patients as compared with control subjects, possibly due to local activation of astrocytes and microglia. Highly significant relative decreases in metabolism were found in large frontal and parietal regions in the bulbar onset patients as compared with the spinal onset patients and the controls, suggesting a differential metabolic and neuropsychological state between the two conditions. (orig.)

  7. Spinal cord pathology is ameliorated by P2X7 antagonism in a SOD1-mutant mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Apolloni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the role of P2X7, a receptor for extracellular ATP, in modulating physiopathological mechanisms in the central nervous system. In particular, P2X7 has been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatry, chronic pain, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Remarkably, P2X7 has also been shown to be a ‘gene modifier’ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS: the receptor is upregulated in spinal cord microglia in human and rat at advanced stages of the disease; in vitro, activation of P2X7 exacerbates pro-inflammatory responses in microglia that have an ALS phenotype, as well as toxicity towards neuronal cells. Despite this detrimental in vitro role of P2X7, in SOD1-G93A mice lacking P2X7, the clinical onset of ALS was significantly accelerated and disease progression worsened, thus indicating that the receptor might have some beneficial effects, at least at certain stages of disease. In order to clarify this dual action of P2X7 in ALS pathogenesis, in the present work we used the antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG, a blood-brain barrier permeable and safe drug that has already been proven to reduce neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, neuropathic pain and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. We tested BBG in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model at asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and late pre-symptomatic phases of disease. BBG at late pre-onset significantly enhanced motor neuron survival and reduced microgliosis in lumbar spinal cord, modulating inflammatory markers such as NF-κB, NADPH oxidase 2, interleukin-1β, interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This was accompanied by delayed onset and improved general conditions and motor performance, in both male and female mice, although survival appeared unaffected. Our results prove the twofold role of P2X7 in the course of ALS and establish that P2X7 modulation might represent a promising

  8. Early functional impairment of sensory-motor connectivity in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mentis, George Z.; Blivis, Dvir; Liu, Wenfang; Drobac, Estelle; Crowder, Melissa E.; Kong, Lingling; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    To define alterations of neuronal connectivity that occur during motor neuron degeneration, we characterized the function and structure of spinal circuitry in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model mice. SMA motor neurons show reduced proprioceptive reflexes that correlate with decreased number and function of synapses on motor neuron somata and proximal dendrites. These abnormalities occur at an early stage of disease in motor neurons innervating proximal hindlimb muscles and medial motor neuro...

  9. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces robust allodynia without major motor function deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Gui-Lan; Savelieva, Katerina V; Vogel, Peter; Baker, Kevin B; Mason, Sara; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Rajan, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    Spinal nerve L5/L6 ligation (SNL) in rats has become the standard for mechanistic studies of peripheral neuropathy and screening for novel analgesics. Conventional SNL in our hybrid mice resulted in a wide range of allodynia. Anatomical evaluation indicated that a variable number of lumbar vertebrae existed, resulting in L4/L5 or L5/L6 being ligated. Surprisingly, L4/L5 ligation did not result in ipsilateral hind limb paralysis and produced robust allodynia. Following a recent report that the mouse L4 neural segment is homologous with rat L5 we generated L4, L5 or both L4 and L5 (L4/L5) ligations in C57 mice after establishing a modified set of surgical landmarks. In contrast to rats, L4 ligation in these mice did not result in hind limb paralysis. Robust allodynia was observed in all three ligation groups. Nerve degeneration confirmed that L4 and L5, respectively, are primary contributors to the tibial and sural branches of the sciatic nerve in mice. A larger von Frey sensitive area reflected the wider distribution of Wallerian degeneration in the hindlimb of L4- compared to L5-ligated mice. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces consistent, robust neuropathic pain behaviors and is suitable as a model for investigating mechanisms of neuropathic pain and for testing of novel analgesics. Gabapentin, used as a validation drug in neuropathic pain models and as a reference compound for novel analgesics, significantly reduced allodynia in the mice tested (L4/L5 ligations). Given the ease of surgery, robust allodynia, and larger von Frey sensitive area, we conclude that combined ligation of spinal nerves L4 and L5 optimizes the SNL model in mice. PMID:24786331

  10. Abnormal growth of the corticospinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord of the hyt/hyt mouse with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Stein, Stuart A; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency may cause severe neurological disorders resulting from developmental deficits of the central nervous system. The mutant hyt/hyt mouse, characterized by fetal-onset, life-long hypothyroidism resulting from a point mutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor of the thyroid gland, displays a variety of abnormalities in motor behavior that are likely associated with dysfunctions of specific brain regions and a defective corticospinal tract (CST). To test the hypothesis that fetal and neonatal hypothyroidism cause abnormal CST development, the growth of the CST was investigated in hypothyroid hyt/hyt mice and their euthyroid progenitors, the BALB/cByJ mice. Anterograde labeling with biotinylated dextran amine demonstrated a decrease in the number of CST axons in the hyt/hyt mouse at the first lumbar level at postnatal day (P) 10. After retrograde tracing with fast blue (FB), fewer FB-labeled neurons were found in the motor cortex, the red nucleus, and the lateral vestibular nucleus of the hyt/hyt mouse. At the fourth lumbar level, the hyt/hyt mouse also showed smaller CST cross-sectional areas and significantly lower numbers of unmyelinated axons, myelinated axons, and growth cones within the CST during postnatal development. At P10, the hyt/hyt mouse demonstrated significantly lower immunoreactivity of embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule in the CST at the seventh cervical level, whereas the expression of growth-associated protein 43 remained unchanged. Our study demonstrated an abnormal development of the CST in the hyt/hyt mouse, manifested by reduced axon quantity and retarded growth pattern at the lumbar spinal cord. PMID:18543337

  11. Early and progressive impairment of spinal blood flow–glucose metabolism coupling in motor neuron degeneration of ALS model mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Kazunori; Masamoto, Kazuto; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Kurata, Tomoko; Mimoto, Takahumi; Obata, Takayuki; Kanno, Iwao; Abe, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The exact mechanism of selective motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains still unclear. In the present study, we performed in vivo capillary imaging, directly measured spinal blood flow (SBF) and glucose metabolism, and analyzed whether if a possible flow–metabolism coupling is disturbed in motor neuron degeneration of ALS model mice. In vivo capillary imaging showed progressive decrease of capillary diameter, capillary density, and red blood cell speed during the di...

  12. Calcium Imaging of Living Astrocytes in the Mouse Spinal Cord following Sensory Stimulation

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    Giovanni Cirillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic Ca2+ dynamics have been extensively studied in ex vivo models; however, the recent development of two-photon microscopy and astrocyte-specific labeling has allowed the study of Ca2+ signaling in living central nervous system. Ca2+ waves in astrocytes have been described in cultured cells and slice preparations, but evidence for astrocytic activation during sensory activity is lacking. There are currently few methods to image living spinal cord: breathing and heart-beating artifacts have impeded the widespread application of this technique. We here imaged the living spinal cord by two-photon microscopy in C57BL6/J mice. Through pressurized injection, we specifically loaded spinal astrocytes using the red fluorescent dye sulforhodamine 101 (SR101 and imaged astrocytic Ca2+ levels with Oregon-Green BAPTA-1 (OGB. Then, we studied astrocytic Ca2+ levels at rest and after right electrical hind paw stimulation. Sensory stimulation significantly increased astrocytic Ca2+ levels within the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to rest. In conclusion, in vivo morphofunctional imaging of living astrocytes in spinal cord revealed that astrocytes actively participate to sensory stimulation.

  13. Multiple intravenous administrations of human umbilical cord blood cells benefit in a mouse model of ALS.

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    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A promising therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is the use of cell-based therapies that can protect motor neurons and thereby retard disease progression. We recently showed that a single large dose (25 × 10⁶ cells of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB administered intravenously to pre-symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice is optimal in delaying disease progression and increasing lifespan. However, this single high cell dose is impractical for clinical use. The aim of the present pre-clinical translation study was therefore to evaluate the effects of multiple low dose systemic injections of MNC hUCB cell into G93A SOD1 mice at different disease stages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice received weekly intravenous injections of MNC hUCB or media. Symptomatic mice received 10⁶ or 2.5 × 10⁶ cells from 13 weeks of age. A third, pre-symptomatic, group received 10⁶ cells from 9 weeks of age. Control groups were media-injected G93A and mice carrying the normal hSOD1 gene. Motor function tests and various assays determined cell effects. Administered cell distribution, motor neuron counts, and glial cell densities were analyzed in mouse spinal cords. Results showed that mice receiving 10⁶ cells pre-symptomatically or 2.5 × 10⁶ cells symptomatically significantly delayed functional deterioration, increased lifespan and had higher motor neuron counts than media mice. Astrocytes and microglia were significantly reduced in all cell-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that multiple injections of MNC hUCB cells, even beginning at the symptomatic disease stage, could benefit disease outcomes by protecting motor neurons from inflammatory effectors. This multiple cell infusion approach may promote future clinical studies.

  14. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  15. Widespread and efficient transduction of spinal cord and brain following neonatal AAV injection and potential disease modifying effect in ALS mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Jacob I; Fromholt, Susan; Sinyavskaya, Olga; Siemienski, Zoe; Rosario, Awilda M; Li, Andrew; Crosby, Keith W; Cruz, Pedro E; DiNunno, Nadia M; Janus, Christopher; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Borchelt, David R; Golde, Todd E; Chakrabarty, Paramita; Levites, Yona

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of the spinal cord makes efficient delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors throughout the neuraxis challenging. We describe a paradigm in which small amounts of virus delivered intraspinally to newborn mice result in robust rAAV-mediated transgene expression in the spinal cord. We compared the efficacy of rAAV2/1, 2/5, 2/8, and 2/9 encoding EGFP delivered to the hindlimb muscle (IM), cisterna magna (ICM), or lumbar spinal cord (IS) of neonatal pups. IS injection of all four capsids resulted in robust transduction of the spinal cord with rAAV2/5, 2/8, and 2/9 vectors appearing to be transported to brain. ICM injection resulted in widespread expression of EGFP in the brain, and upper spinal cord. IM injection resulted in robust muscle expression, with only rAAV2/8 and 2/9 transducing spinal motor and sensory neurons. As proof of concept, we use the IS paradigm to express murine Interleukin (IL)-10 in the spinal cord of the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We show that expression of IL-10 in the spinal axis of SOD1-G93A mice altered the immune milieu and significantly prolonged survival. These data establish an efficient paradigm for somatic transgene delivery of therapeutic biologics to the spinal cord of mice. PMID:25228069

  16. Calcium dynamics and buffering in motoneurones of the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, J; Lips, M B; Keller, B U

    1999-10-15

    1. A quantitative analysis of endogenous calcium homeostasis was performed on 65 motoneurones in slices of the lumbar spinal cord from 2- to 8-day-old mice by simultaneous patch-clamp and microfluorometric calcium measurements. 2. Somatic calcium concentrations were monitored with a temporal resolution in the millisecond time domain. Measurements were performed by using a monochromator for excitation and a photomultiplier detection system. 3. Somatic calcium signalling was investigated during defined voltage-clamp protocols. Calcium responses were observed for membrane depolarizations positive to -50 mV. A linear relation between depolarization time and free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) indicated that voltage-dependent calcium influx dominated the response. 4. Endogenous calcium homeostasis was quantified by using the 'added buffer' approach. In the presence of fura-2 and mag-fura-5, calcium transients decayed according to a monoexponential function. Decay-time constants showed a linear dependence on dye concentration and the extrapolated constant in the absence of indicator dye was 371 +/- 120 ms (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 5. For moderate elevations (< 1 microM), recovery kinetics of depolarization-induced calcium transients were characterized by a calcium-independent, 'effective' extrusion rate gamma = 140 +/- 47 s-1 (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 6. The endogenous calcium binding ratio for fixed buffers in spinal motoneurones was kappaB' = 50 +/- 17 (n = 13 cells), indicating that less than 2 % of cytosolic calcium ions contributed to [Ca2+]i. 7. Endogenous binding ratios in spinal motoneurones were small compared to those found in hippocampal or cerebellar Purkinje neurones. From a functional perspective, they provided motoneurones with rapid dynamics of cytosolic [Ca2+]i for a given set of influx, extrusion and uptake mechanisms. 8. With respect to pathophysiological conditions, our measurements are in agreement with a model where the selective vulnerability of spinal

  17. Lentivector-mediated SMN replacement in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Le, Thanh; Ralph, G. Scott; Walmsley, Lucy; Monani, Umrao R.; Lee, Debbie C P; Wilkes, Fraser; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Mazarakis, Nicholas D.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent recessive autosomal disorder. It is caused by mutations or deletion of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, leading to depletion in SMN protein levels. The treatment rationale for SMA is to halt or delay the degeneration of motor neurons, but to date there are no effective drug treatments for this disease. We have previously demonstrated that pseudotyping of the nonprimate equine infectious anemia virus (using the lentivector ...

  18. Loss of ALS2/Alsin exacerbates motor dysfunction in a SOD1-expressing mouse ALS model by disturbing endolysosomal trafficking.

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    Shinji Hadano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ALS2/alsin is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rab5 and involved in macropinocytosis-associated endosome fusion and trafficking, and neurite outgrowth. ALS2 deficiency accounts for a number of juvenile recessive motor neuron diseases (MNDs. Recently, it has been shown that ALS2 plays a role in neuroprotection against MND-associated pathological insults, such as toxicity induced by mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between ALS2-associated cellular function and its neuroprotective role remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this issue, we investigated the molecular and pathological basis for the phenotypic modification of mutant SOD1-expressing mice by ALS2 loss. Genetic ablation of Als2 in SOD1(H46R, but not SOD1(G93A, transgenic mice aggravated the mutant SOD1-associated disease symptoms such as body weight loss and motor dysfunction, leading to the earlier death. Light and electron microscopic examinations revealed the presence of degenerating and/or swollen spinal axons accumulating granular aggregates and autophagosome-like vesicles in early- and even pre-symptomatic SOD1(H46R mice. Further, enhanced accumulation of insoluble high molecular weight SOD1, poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and macroautophagy-associated proteins such as polyubiquitin-binding protein p62/SQSTM1 and a lipidated form of light chain 3 (LC3-II, emerged in ALS2-deficient SOD1(H46R mice. Intriguingly, ALS2 was colocalized with LC3 and p62, and partly with SOD1 on autophagosome/endosome hybrid compartments, and loss of ALS2 significantly lowered the lysosome-dependent clearance of LC3 and p62 in cultured cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these observations, although molecular basis for the distinctive susceptibilities to ALS2 loss in different mutant SOD1-expressing ALS models is still elusive, disturbance of the endolysosomal system by ALS2 loss

  19. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal® Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

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    Erika K. Ross

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH, underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal®, in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Immunocal® is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1G93A mice receiving Immunocal® displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1G93A controls. Additionally, Immunocal® treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1G93A mice. However, Immunocal® did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal® and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1G93A mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal® only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1G93A mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal® to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS.

  20. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  1. Intrathecal application of neuroectodermally converted stem cells into a mouse model of ALS: limited intraparenchymal migration and survival narrows therapeutic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habisch, H-J; Janowski, M; Binder, D; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, M; Widmann, A; Habich, A; Schwalenstöcker, B; Hermann, A; Brenner, R; Lukomska, B; Domanska-Janik, K; Ludolph, A C; Storch, A

    2007-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells provide a promising therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To comparatively evaluate the therapeutic potentials of human bone marrow-derived mesodermal stromal cells (hMSCs) and umbilical cord blood cells (hUBCs) in ALS, we transplanted hMSCs and hUBCs and their neuroectodermal derivatives (hMSC-NSCs and hUBC-NSCs) into the ALS mouse model over-expressing the G93A mutant of the human SOD1 gene. We used a standardized protocol similar to clinical studies by performing a power calculation to estimate sample size prior to transplantation, matching the treatment groups for gender and hSOD-G93A gene content, and applying a novel method for directly injecting 100,000 cells into the CSF (the cisterna magna). Ten days after transplantation we found many cells within the subarachnoidal space ranging from frontal basal cisterns back to the cisterna magna, but only a few cells around the spinal cord. hMSCs and hMSC-NSCs were also located within the Purkinje cell layer. Intrathecal cell application did not affect survival times of mice compared to controls. Consistently, time of disease onset and first pareses, death weight, and motor neuron count in lumbar spinal cord did not vary between treatment groups. Interestingly, transplantation of hMSCs led to an increase of pre-symptomatic motor performance compared to controls in female animals. The negative outcome of the present study is most likely due to insufficient cell numbers within the affected brain regions (mainly the spinal cord). Further experiments defining the optimal cell dose, time point and route of application and particularly strategies to improve the homing of transplanted cells towards the CNS region of interest are warranted to define the therapeutic potential of mesodermal stem cells for the treatment of ALS. PMID:17510731

  2. Dynorphin A (1-13) Neurotoxicity In Vitro: Opioid and Non-Opioid Mechanisms in Mouse Spinal Cord Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Kurt F.; Foldes, Jane K.; Turbek, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynorphin A is an endogenous opioid peptide that preferentially activates κ opioid receptors and is antinociceptive at physiological concentrations. Levels of dynorphin A and a major metabolite, dynorphin A (1-13), increase significantly following spinal cord trauma and reportedly contribute to neurodegeneration associated with secondary injury. Interestingly, both κ opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists can modulate dynorphin toxicity, suggesting that dynorphin is acting (directly or indirectly) through κ opioid and/or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) types. Despite these findings, few studies have systematically explored dynorphin toxicity at the cellular level in defined populations of neurons co-expressing κ opioid and NMDA receptors. To address this question, we isolated populations of neurons enriched in both κ opioid and NMDA receptors from embryonic mouse spinal cord and examined the effects of dynorphin A (1-13) on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and neuronal survival in vitro. Time-lapse photography was used to repeatedly follow the same neurons before and during experimental treatments. At micromolar concentrations, dynorphin A (1-13) elevated [Ca2+]i and caused a significant loss of neurons. The excitotoxic effects were prevented by MK-801 (Dizocilpine) (10 μM), 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP-5) (100 μM), or 7-chlorokynurenic acid (100 μM)— suggesting that dynorphin A (1-13) was acting (directly or indirectly) through NMDA receptors. In contrast, co-treatment with (−)-naloxone (3 μM), or the more selective κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (3 μM), exacerbated dynorphin A (1-13)-induced neuronal loss; however, cell losses were not enhanced by the inactive stereoisomer (+)-naloxone (3 μM). Neuronal losses were not seen with exposure to the opioid antagonists alone (10 μM). Thus, opioid receptor blockade significantly increased toxicity, but only in the presence of excitotoxic levels of

  3. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

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    Rodrigo I. Santos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Powassan virus (POWV belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice.

  4. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo I.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  5. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo I; Hermance, Meghan E; Gelman, Benjamin B; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  6. Lentivector-mediated SMN replacement in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Le, Thanh; Ralph, G Scott; Walmsley, Lucy; Monani, Umrao R; Lee, Debbie C P; Wilkes, Fraser; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Burghes, Arthur H M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent recessive autosomal disorder. It is caused by mutations or deletion of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, leading to depletion in SMN protein levels. The treatment rationale for SMA is to halt or delay the degeneration of motor neurons, but to date there are no effective drug treatments for this disease. We have previously demonstrated that pseudotyping of the nonprimate equine infectious anemia virus (using the lentivector gene transfer system) with the glycoprotein of the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth strain of the rabies virus confers retrograde axonal transport on these vectors. Here, we report that lentivector expressing human SMN was successfully used to restore SMN protein levels in SMA type 1 fibroblasts. Multiple single injections of a lentiviral vector expressing SMN in various muscles of SMA mice restored SMN to motor neurons, reduced motor neuron death, and increased the life expectancy by an average of 3 and 5 days (20% and 38%) compared with LacZ and untreated animals, respectively. Further extension of survival by SMN expression constructs will likely require a knowledge of when and/or where high levels of SMN are needed. PMID:15599397

  7. Intraparenchymal spinal cord delivery of adeno-associated virus IGF-1 is protective in the SOD1G93A model of ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Lepore, Angelo C.; Haenggeli, Christine; Gasmi, Mehdi; Bishop, Kathie M.; Bartus, Raymond T.; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    The potent neuroprotective activities of neurotrophic factors, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), make them promising candidates for treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an effort to maximize rate of motor neuron transduction, achieve high levels of spinal IGF-1, and thus enhance therapeutic benefit, we injected an adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2)-based vector encoding human IGF-1 (CERE-130) into lumbar spinal cord parenchyma of SOD1G93A mice. We observed robust an...

  8. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents, encoding both

  9. Thermomineral water promotes axonal sprouting but does not reduce glial scar formation in a mouse model of spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dubravka Aleksi; Milan Aksi; Nevena Divac; Vidosava Radonji; Branislav Filipovi; Igor Jakovevski

    2014-01-01

    Thermomineral water from the Atomic Spa Gornja Trepča has been used for a century in the treatment of neurologic disease. The thermomineral water contains microelements, including lithium and magnesium, which show neural regeneration-promoting effects after central nervous system injury. In this study, we investigated the effects of oral intake of thermomineral water from the Atomic Spa Gornja Trepča on nerve regeneration in a 3-month-old mouse model of spinal cord injury. The mice receiving oral intake of thermomineral water showed better locomo-tor recovery than those without administration of thermomineral water at 8 and 12 weeks after lower thoracic spinal cord compression. At 12 weeks after injury, sprouting of catecholaminergic axons was better in mice that drank thermomineral water than in those without administration of thermomineral water, but there was no difference in glial reaction to injury between mice with and without administration of thermomineral water. These ifndings suggest that thermomineral water can promote the nerve regeneration but cannot reduce glial scar formation in a mouse model of spinal cord injury.

  10. VEGF delivery with retrogradely transported lentivector prolongs survival in a mouse ALS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Ralph, G Scott; Storkebaum, Erik; Walmsley, Lucy E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-05-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes adult-onset, progressive motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis and death three to five years after onset in most patients. ALS is still incurable, in part because its complex aetiology remains insufficiently understood. Recent reports have indicated that reduced levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is essential in angiogenesis and has also been implicated in neuroprotection, predispose mice and humans to ALS. However, the therapeutic potential of VEGF for the treatment of ALS has not previously been assessed. Here we report that a single injection of a VEGF-expressing lentiviral vector into various muscles delayed onset and slowed progression of ALS in mice engineered to overexpress the gene coding for the mutated G93A form of the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1(G93A)) (refs 7-10), even when treatment was only initiated at the onset of paralysis. VEGF treatment increased the life expectancy of ALS mice by 30 per cent without causing toxic side effects, thereby achieving one of the most effective therapies reported in the field so far. PMID:15164063

  11. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  12. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  13. Changes of gene expression profiles in the cervical spinal cord by acupuncture in an MPTP-intoxicated mouse model: microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2011-07-15

    It has been shown that acupuncture at acupoints GB34 and LR3 inhibits the degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The degeneration of spinal cord was reported to be induced in the MPTP-treated pre-symptomatic mouse. In this study, the gene expression profile changes following acupuncture at the acupoints were investigated in the cervical spinal cord of an MPTP-induced parkinsonism model using a whole transcript array (Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 1.0 ST array). It was shown that 8 of the probes up-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were down-regulated after acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 8 probes, 6 probes (4 annotated genes in 6 probes: Ctla2a, EG383229, Ppbp and Ube2l6) were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for 2 probes as these 2 probes were commonly down-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. In addition, 11 of the probes down-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 11 probes, 10 probes (5 annotated genes in 10 probes: EG665033, ENSMUSG00000055323, Obox6, Pbp2 and Tmem150) were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for the Fut11 because the Fut11 was commonly up-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. The expression levels of the representative genes in the microarray were validated by real-time RT-PCR. These data suggest that the expression of these exclusively regulated 16 probes (9 genes) may be, at least in part, affected by acupuncture at the acupoints in the cervical spinal cord which can be damaged by MPTP intoxication. PMID:21440609

  14. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  15. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  16. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1, encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs, leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  17. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. ► β-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. ► Wnt3a, β-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. ► BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. ► BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, β-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1G93A ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, β-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, β-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP+ astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that neurodegeneration activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice. This

  18. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanchun [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Guan, Yingjun, E-mail: guanyj@wfmc.edu.cn [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu, Huancai [Department of Orthopedic, Affiliated Hospital, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: xwang@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  19. Human umbilical cord blood treatment in a mouse model of ALS: optimization of cell dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a multicausal disease characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the spinal cord and brain. Cell therapy may be a promising new treatment for this devastating disorder. We recently showed that a single low dose (10(6 cells of mononuclear human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB cells administered intravenously to G93A mice delayed symptom progression and modestly prolonged lifespan. The aim of this pre-clinical translation study is to optimize the dose of MNC hUCB cells to retard disease progression in G93A mice. Three different doses of MNC hUCB cells, 10x10(6, 25x10(6 and 50x10(6, were administered intravenously into pre-symptomatic G93A mice. Motor function tests and various assays to determine cell effects were performed on these mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results showed that a cell dose of 25x10(6 cells significantly increased lifespan of mice by 20-25% and delayed disease progression by 15%. The most beneficial effect on decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain and spinal cord was found in this group of mice. Human Th2 cytokines were found in plasma of mice receiving 25x10(6 cells, although prevalent human Th1 cytokines were indicated in mice with 50x10(6 cells. High response of splenic cells to mitogen (PHA was indicated in mice receiving 25x10(6 (mainly and 10x10(6 cells. Significantly increased lymphocytes and decreased neutrophils in the peripheral blood were found only in animals receiving 25x10(6 cells. Stable reduction in microglia density in both cervical and lumbar spinal cords was also noted in mice administered with 25x10(6 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that treatment for ALS with an appropriate dose of MNC hUCB cells may provide a neuroprotective effect for motor neurons through active involvement of these cells in modulating the host immune inflammatory system response.

  20. Characterisation of Transcriptional Changes in the Spinal Cord of the Progressive Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Biozzi ABH Mouse Model by RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David; Selwood, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating immune-mediated neurological disorder affecting young adults. MS is primarily relapsing-remitting, but neurodegeneration and disability accumulate from disease onset. The most commonly used mouse MS models exhibit a monophasic immune response with fast accumulation of neurological damage that does not allow the study of progressive neurodegeneration. The chronic relapsing and secondary progressive EAE (pEAE) Biozzi ABH mouse model of MS exhibits a reproducible relapsing-remitting disease course that slowly accumulates permanent neurological deficit and develops a post-relapsing progressive disease that permits the study of demyelination and neurodegeneration. RNA sequencing (RNAseq) was used to explore global gene expression in the pEAE Biozzi ABH mouse. Spinal cord tissue RNA from pEAE Biozzi ABH mice and healthy age-matched controls was sequenced. 2,072 genes were differentially expressed (q<0.05) from which 1,397 were significantly upregulated and 675 were significantly downregulated. This hypothesis-free investigation characterised the genomic changes that describe the pEAE mouse model. The differentially expressed genes revealed a persistent immunoreactant phenotype, combined with downregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis superpathway and the LXR/RXR activation pathway. Genes differentially expressed include the myelination genes Slc17a7, Ugt8A and Opalin, the neuroprotective genes Sprr1A, Osm and Wisp2, as well as genes identified as MS risk factors, including RGs14 and Scap2. Novel genes with unestablished roles in EAE or MS were also identified. The identification of differentially expressed novel genes and genes involved in MS pathology, opens the door to their functional study in the pEAE mouse model which recapitulates some of the important clinical features of progressive MS. PMID:27355629

  1. The use of PRV-Bartha to define premotor inputs to lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal spinal cord of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Jovanovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neonatal mouse has become a model system for studying the locomotor function of the lumbar spinal cord. However, information about the synaptic connectivity within the governing neural network remains scarce. A neurotropic pseudorabies virus (PRV Bartha has been used to map neuronal connectivity in other parts of the nervous system, due to its ability to travel trans-neuronally. Its use in spinal circuits regulating locomotion has been limited and no study has defined the time course of labelling for neurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the ability of PRV Bartha, expressing green and/or red fluorescence, to label spinal neurons projecting monosynaptically to motoneurons of two principal hindlimb muscles, the tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius (GC. As revealed by combined immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, 24-32 h after the viral muscle injection the label was restricted to the motoneuron pool while at 32-40 h the fluorescence was seen in interneurons throughout the medial and lateral ventral grey matter. Two classes of ipsilateral interneurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons (Renshaw cells and cells of origin of C-terminals were consistently labeled at 40 h post-injection but also a group in the ventral grey matter contralaterally. Our results suggest that the labeling of last order interneurons occurred 8-12 h after motoneuron labeling and we presume this is the time taken by the virus to cross one synapse, to travel retrogradely and to replicate in the labeled cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study establishes the time window for virally-labelling monosynaptic projections to lumbar motoneurons following viral injection into hindlimb muscles. Moreover, it provides a good foundation for intracellular targeting of the labeled neurons in future physiological studies and better understanding the functional organization of

  2. Immunostaining for Homer reveals the majority of excitatory synapses in laminae I-III of the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Kuehn, Emily D.; Abraira, Victoria E.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn processes somatosensory information before conveying it to the brain. The neuronal organization of the dorsal horn is still poorly understood, although recent studies have defined several distinct populations among the interneurons, which account for most of its constituent neurons. All primary afferents, and the great majority of neurons in laminae I–III are glutamatergic, and a major factor limiting our understanding of the synaptic circuitry has been the difficulty i...

  3. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine directly into the space around your spinal nerves or spinal cord. Spinal stenosis symptoms often become worse over ... Surgery is done to relieve pressure on the nerves or spinal cord. You and your doctor can decide when ...

  4. Detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase in the developing spinal cord of the mouse embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraishi, Toshiya, E-mail: saiseihassei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Miura, Kenji, E-mail: kmiura@ndmc.ac.jp [Department of Developmental Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in developing spinal cord. {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs by an improved method. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 were detected in the marginal layer and the dorsal horn. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 might play critical roles in the developing spinal cord. {yields} Constructing phosphoprotein atlases will be possible if expanding this work. -- Abstract: Global understanding of the proteome is a major research topic. The comprehensive visualization of the distribution of proteins in vivo or the construction of in situ protein atlases may be a valuable strategy for proteomic researchers. Information about the distribution of various proteins under physiological and pathological conditions should be extremely valuable for the basic and clinical sciences. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays an essential role in intracellular signaling in organisms. This cascade also regulates biological processes involving development, differentiation, and proliferation. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are integral reactions in regulating the activity of MAPKs. Changes in the phosphorylation state of MAPKs are rapid and reversible; therefore, the localizations of physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo are difficult to accurately detect. Furthermore, phosphorylated MAPKs are likely to change phosphorylated states through commonly used experimental manipulations. In the present study, as a step toward the construction of in situ phosphoprotein atlases, we attempted to detect physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo in developing spinal cords of mice. We previously reported an improved immunohistochemical method for detecting unstable phosphorylated MAPKs. The distribution patterns of phosphorylated MAPKs in the spinal cords of embryonic mice from embryonic day 13 (E13) to E17 were observed with an improved immunohistochemical method. Phosphorylated

  5. Spinal but not cortical microglia acquire an atypical phenotype with high VEGF, galectin-3 and osteopontin, and blunted inflammatory responses in ALS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemova, Maria; Small, Alissa L; Smith, Stephanie M C; Mitchell, Gordon S; Watters, Jyoti J

    2014-09-01

    Activation of microglia, CNS resident immune cells, is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. Despite evidence that microglia contribute to disease progression, the exact role of these cells in ALS pathology remains unknown. We immunomagnetically isolated microglia from different CNS regions of SOD1(G93A) rats at three different points in disease progression: presymptomatic, symptom onset and end-stage. We observed no differences in microglial number or phenotype in presymptomatic rats compared to wild-type controls. Although after disease onset there was no macrophage infiltration, there were significant increases in microglial numbers in the spinal cord, but not cortex. At disease end-stage, microglia were characterized by high expression of galectin-3, osteopontin and VEGF, and concomitant downregulated expression of TNFα, IL-6, BDNF and arginase-1. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of at least two phenotypically distinct microglial populations in the spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry showed that galectin-3/osteopontin positive microglia were restricted to the ventral horns of the spinal cord, regions with severe motor neuron degeneration. End-stage SOD1(G93A) microglia from the cortex, a less affected region, displayed similar gene expression profiles to microglia from wild-type rats, and displayed normal responses to systemic inflammation induced by LPS. On the other hand, end-stage SOD1(G93A) spinal microglia had blunted responses to systemic LPS suggesting that in addition to their phenotypic changes, they may also be functionally impaired. Thus, after disease onset, microglia acquired unique characteristics that do not conform to typical M1 (inflammatory) or M2 (anti-inflammatory) phenotypes. This transformation was observed only in the most affected CNS regions, suggesting that overexpression of mutated hSOD1 is not sufficient to trigger these changes in microglia. These

  6. Complement upregulation and activation on motor neurons and neuromuscular junction in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Heurich; N.B. El Idrissi; R.M. Donev; S. Petri; P. Claus; J. Neal; B.P. Morgan; V. Ramaglia

    2011-01-01

    Complement activation products are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid, spinal cord and motor cortex of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but are untested in models. We determined complement expression and activation in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of familial ALS (fALS). At 126 days, C3 mR

  7. C9orf72 BAC Mouse Model with Motor Deficits and Neurodegenerative Features of ALS/FTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanjing; Pattamatta, Amrutha; Zu, Tao; Reid, Tammy; Bardhi, Olgert; Borchelt, David R; Yachnis, Anthony T; Ranum, Laura P W

    2016-05-01

    To define how the C9orf72 GGGGCC expansion mutation causes ALS/FTD and to facilitate therapy development, a mouse model that recapitulates the molecular and phenotypic features of the disease is urgently needed. Two groups recently reported BAC mouse models that produce RNA foci and RAN proteins but, surprisingly, do not develop the neurodegenerative or behavioral features of ALS/FTD. We now report a BAC mouse model of C9orf72 ALS/FTD that shows decreased survival, paralysis, muscle denervation, motor neuron loss, anxiety-like behavior, and cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration. These mice express C9orf72 sense transcripts and upregulated antisense transcripts. In contrast to sense RNA foci, antisense foci preferentially accumulate in ALS/FTD-vulnerable cell populations. RAN protein accumulation increases with age and disease, and TDP-43 inclusions are found in degenerating brain regions in end-stage animals. The ALS/FTD phenotypes in our mice provide a unique tool that will facilitate developing therapies targeting pathways that prevent neurodegeneration and increase survival. PMID:27112499

  8. EGFR inhibitor erlotinib delays disease progression but does not extend survival in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Le Pichon

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive paralysis due to motor neuron death. Several lines of published evidence suggested that inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling might protect neurons from degeneration. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we treated the SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS with erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor clinically approved for oncology indications. Although erlotinib failed to extend ALS mouse survival it did provide a modest but significant delay in the onset of multiple behavioral measures of disease progression. However, given the lack of protection of motor neuron synapses and the lack of survival extension, the small benefits observed after erlotinib treatment appear purely symptomatic, with no modification of disease course.

  9. A novel acylaminoimidazole derivative, WN1316, alleviates disease progression via suppression of glial inflammation in ALS mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Tanaka

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset motor neuron degenerative disease. Given that oxidative stress and resulting chronic neuronal inflammation are thought to be central pathogenic, anti-oxidative agents and modulators of neuronal inflammation could be potential therapies for ALS. We report here that the novel small molecular compound, 2-[mesityl(methylamino]-N-[4-(pyridin-2-yl-1H-imidazol-2-yl] acetamide trihydrochloride (WN1316 selectively suppresses oxidative stress-induced cell death and neuronal inflammation in the late-stage ALS mice. WN1316 has high blood-brain-barrier permeability and water solubility, and boosts both neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 which governed glutathione (GSH-related anti-oxidation pathway protecting motor neurons against oxidative injuries. Post-onset oral administration of low dose (1-100 µg/kg/day WN1316 in ALS(SOD1(H46R and ALS(SOD1(G93A mice resulted in sustained improved motor function and post onset survival rate. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed less DNA oxidative damage and motor neuronal inflammation as well as repression of both microgliosis and astrocytosis, concomitant down regulation of interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and preservation of the motoneurons in anterior horn of lumbar spinal cord and skeletal muscle (quadriceps femoris. Thus, WN1316 would be a novel therapeutic agent for ALS.

  10. Testosterone treatment fails to accelerate disease in a transgenic mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Chevalier-Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from multiple animal models demonstrates that testosterone plays a crucial role in the progression of symptoms in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a condition that results in neurodegeneration and muscle atrophy in affected men. Mice bearing a transgene encoding a human androgen receptor (AR that contains a stretch of 112 glutamines (expanded polyglutamine tract; AR112Q mice reproduce several aspects of the human disease. We treated transgenic male AR112Q mice with testosterone for 6 months. Surprisingly, testosterone treatment of AR112Q males did not exacerbate the disease. Although transgenic AR112Q males exhibited functional deficits when compared with non-transgenics, long-term testosterone treatment had no effect on motor function. Testosterone treatment also failed to affect cellular markers of disease, including inclusion formation (the accumulation of large nuclear aggregates of mutant AR protein and levels of unphosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain. These data suggest that the mechanism of disease in SBMA saturates at close to endogenous hormone levels and that individuals with SBMA who take, or have taken, testosterone for its putative therapeutic properties are unlikely to suffer adverse effects.

  11. Indirect measurement of regional axon diameter in excised mouse spinal cord with q-space imaging: simulation and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Henry H; Wright, Alex C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Souza, Andre; Schwartz, Eric D; Hwang, Scott N; Wehrli, Felix W

    2008-05-01

    Q-space imaging (QSI), a diffusion MRI technique, can provide quantitative tissue architecture information at cellular dimensions not amenable by conventional diffusion MRI. By exploiting regularities in molecular diffusion barriers, QSI can estimate the average barrier spacing such as the mean axon diameter in white matter (WM). In this work, we performed ex vivo QSI on cervical spinal cord sections from healthy C57BL/6 mice at 400 MHz using a custom-designed uniaxial 50T/m gradient probe delivering a 0.6 microm displacement resolution capable of measuring axon diameters on the scale of 1 microm. After generating QSI-derived axon diameter maps, diameters were calculated using histology from seven WM tracts (dorsal corticospinal, gracilis, cuneatus, rubrospinal, spinothalamic, reticulospinal, and vestibulospinal tracts) each with different axon diameters. We found QSI-derived diameters from regions drawn in the seven WM tracts (1.1 to 2.1 microm) to be highly correlated (r(2)=0.95) with those calculated from histology (0.8 to 1.8 microm). The QSI-derived values overestimated those obtained by histology by approximately 20%, which is likely due to the presence of extra-cellular signal. Finally, simulations on images of synthetic circular axons and axons from histology suggest that QSI-derived diameters are informative despite diameter and axon shape variation and the presence of intra-cellular and extra-cellular signal. QSI may be able to quantify nondestructively changes in WM axon architecture due to pathology or injury at the cellular level. PMID:18342541

  12. Immunostaining for Homer reveals the majority of excitatory synapses in laminae I-III of the mouse spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Kuehn, Emily D; Abraira, Victoria E; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    The spinal dorsal horn processes somatosensory information before conveying it to the brain. The neuronal organization of the dorsal horn is still poorly understood, although recent studies have defined several distinct populations among the interneurons, which account for most of its constituent neurons. All primary afferents, and the great majority of neurons in laminae I-III are glutamatergic, and a major factor limiting our understanding of the synaptic circuitry has been the difficulty in identifying glutamatergic synapses with light microscopy. Although there are numerous potential targets for antibodies, these are difficult to visualize with immunocytochemistry, because of protein cross-linking following tissue fixation. Although this can be overcome by antigen retrieval methods, these lead to difficulty in detecting other antigens. The aim of this study was to test whether the postsynaptic protein Homer can be used to reveal glutamatergic synapses in the dorsal horn. Immunostaining for Homer gave punctate labeling when viewed by confocal microscopy, and this was restricted to synapses at the ultrastructural level. We found that Homer puncta were colocalized with the AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit, but not with the inhibitory synapse-associated protein gephyrin. We also examined several populations of glutamatergic axons and found that most boutons were in contact with at least one Homer punctum. These results suggest that Homer antibodies can be used to reveal the great majority of glutamatergic synapses without antigen retrieval. This will be of considerable value in tracing synaptic circuits, and also in investigating plasticity of glutamatergic synapses in pain states. PMID:27185486

  13. Intracerebroventricular injection of encapsulated human mesenchymal cells producing glucagon-like peptide 1 prolongs survival in a mouse model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knippenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As pharmacological therapies have largely failed so far, stem cell therapy has recently come into the focus of ALS research. Neuroprotective potential was shown for several types of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to release of trophic factors. In the present study, we assessed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 releasing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC in mutant SOD1 (G93A transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve the neuroprotective effects of native MSC, they had been transfected with a plasmid vector encoding a GLP-1 fusion gene prior to the injection, as GLP-1 was shown to exhibit neuroprotective properties before. Cells were encapsulated and therefore protected against rejection. After intracerebroventricular injection of these GLP-1 MSC capsules in presymptomatic SOD1 (G93A mice, we assessed possible protective effects by survival analysis, measurement of body weight, daily monitoring and evaluation of motor performance by rotarod and footprint analyses. Motor neuron numbers in the spinal cord as well as the amount of astrocytosis, microglial activation, heat shock response and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS expression were analyzed by immunohistological methods. Treatment with GLP-1 producing MSC capsules significantly prolonged survival by 13 days, delayed symptom onset by 15 days and weight loss by 14 days and led to significant improvements in motor performance tests compared to vehicle treated controls. Histological data are mainly in favour of anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 producing MSC capsules with reduced detection of inflammatory markers and a significant heat shock protein increase. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intracerebroventricular injection of GLP-1 MSC capsules shows neuroprotective potential in the SOD1 (G93A mouse model.

  14. The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal, degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse%The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal,degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhengyu; XIONG Liang; HUANG Xiaolin; ZHOU Ning; Kozlova-Aldskogius Elena

    2008-01-01

    目的:研究止常、退行性病变以及脱髓鞘小鼠脊髓内Mtsl/S100A4蛋白的表达模式,及其对胶质细胞反应的影响.方法:以野生型和Mtsl/S100A4基因敲除型小鼠为试验动物,采用背根损伤、坐骨神经损伤、溴乙啶局部微量注射的方法复制退行性病变及脱髓鞘脊髓动物模型,应用免疫荧光技术,检测S100A4、GFAP、NG2、Mac1的表达情况.结果:野生型小鼠脊髓内,仅白质星型胶质细胞表达S100A4蛋白,且主要分布于Lissauer束:背根或坐骨神经损伤后,白质星形胶质细胞内的S100A4及GFAP表达上调.野生型与S100A4基因敲除小鼠GFAP表达量无显著差异;溴乙啶注射7d后,野生型小鼠脊髓脱髓鞘区域内她S100A4呈云雾状分布,胶质细胞反应局限于注射侧,并且形成清晰的胶质瘢痕,而S100A4基凶敲除小鼠则未见上述病理变化.结论:S100A4蛋白在小鼠脊髓内的表达模式与大鼠相似;退行性变的脊髓内,细胞内上调的S100A4蛋白并不影响胶质细胞的反应;脱髓鞘脊髓内,细胞外的S100A4蛋白明显影响胶质细胞反应,包括胶质瘢痕的形成.%Objective:To investigate the expression pattern of Mtsl/S100A4 in mouse spinal cord;to investigate the effects of Mtsl/S100A4 on glial cell responses.Method:The study was carried out on Mtsl/S100A4 wild type and knock-out mice.The degenerative spinal cord model was established by dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury.The de-myelinated spinal cord model was established by ethidium bromide injections.Then the expressions of S100A4,GFA P,NG2 and Mael were measured.Result:The expressions of Mtsl/S100A4 in mice spinal cord were similar to that in rats.In WT mice this protein expressed in a thin layer of fiber bundles in the tract of Lissauer,and in white matter astrocytes.There was intracellular up-regulation of Mtsl/S100A4 in white matter astrocytes of WT mice after dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury,with no difference in glial cell response

  15. Vitamin B(12) dependent changes in mouse spinal cord expression of vitamin B(12) related proteins and the epidermal growth factor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutti, Elena; Lildballe, Dorte L; Kristensen, Lise;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) deficiency in the mammalian central nervous system causes degenerative damage, especially in the spinal cord. Previous studies have shown that cobalamin status alters spinal cord expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor in rats. Employing a...... cobinamide (4.25nmol/h), saline or cobalamin (1.75nmol/h) the spinal cords were analyzed for cobalamin and for the mRNA levels of cobalamin related proteins and members of the EGF system using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The median spinal cord cobalamin content was 17, 32, and 52pmol/gr of...

  16. The Prevalence and Phenotype of Activated Microglia/Macrophages within the Spinal Cord of the Hyperostotic Mouse (twy/twy) Changes in Response to Chronic Progressive Spinal Cord Compression: Implications for Human Cervical Compressive Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Takayuki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Takeura, Naoto; Watanabe, Shuji; Sugita, Daisuke; Yoshida, Ai; Johnson, William E B; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical compressive myelopathy, e.g. due to spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. Although human pathological studies have reported neuronal loss and demyelination in the chronically compressed spinal cord, little is known about the mechanisms involved. In particular, the neuroinflammatory processes that are thought to underlie the condition are poorly understood. The present study assessed the localized pr...

  17. TWIK-Related Spinal Cord K+ Channel Expression Is Increased in the Spinal Dorsal Horn after Spinal Nerve Ligation

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Hee Youn; Zhang, Enji; Park, Sangil; Chung, Woosuk; Lee, Sunyeul; Kim, Dong Woon; Ko, Youngkwon; Lee, Wonhyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel (TRESK) has recently been discovered and plays an important role in nociceptor excitability in the pain pathway. Because there have been no reports on the TRESK expression or its function in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in neuropathic pain, we analyzed TRESK expression in the spinal dorsal horn in a spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. Materials and Methods We established a SNL mouse model by using the L5-6 spinal nerves ligation. We used re...

  18. Antiallodynic effects of alpha lipoic acid in an optimized RR-EAE mouse model of MS-neuropathic pain are accompanied by attenuation of upregulated BDNF-TrkB-ERK signaling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nemat; Gordon, Richard; Woodruff, Trent M; Smith, Maree T

    2015-06-01

    Neuropathic pain may affect patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) even in early disease. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-mouse model of MS, chronic alpha lipoic acid (ALA) treatment reduced clinical disease severity, but MS-neuropathic pain was not assessed. Hence, we investigated the pain-relieving efficacy and mode of action of ALA using our optimized relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE mouse model of MS-associated neuropathic pain. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG35-55 and adjuvants (Quil A and pertussis toxin) to induce RR-EAE; sham-mice received adjuvants only. RR-EAE mice received subcutaneous ALA (3 or 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) or vehicle for 21 days (15-35 d.p.i.; [days postimmunization]); sham-mice received vehicle. Hindpaw hypersensitivity was assessed blinded using von Frey filaments. Following euthanasia (day 35 d.p.i.), lumbar spinal cords were removed for immunohistochemical and molecular biological assessments. Fully developed mechanical allodynia in the bilateral hindpaws of vehicle-treated RR-EAE mice was accompanied by marked CD3(+) T-cell infiltration, microglia activation, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) signaling in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Consequently, phospho-ERK, a marker of central sensitization in neuropathic pain, was upregulated in the spinal dorsal horn. Importantly, hindpaw hypersensitivity was completely attenuated in RR-EAE mice administered ALA at 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) but not 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1). The antiallodynic effect of ALA (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was associated with a marked reduction in the aforementioned spinal dorsal horn markers to match their respective levels in the vehicle-treated sham-mice. Our findings suggest that ALA at 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) produced its antiallodynic effects in RR-EAE mice by reducing augmented CD3(+) T-cell infiltration and BDNF-TrkB-ERK signaling in the spinal dorsal horn. PMID:26171221

  19. The prevalence and phenotype of activated microglia/macrophages within the spinal cord of the hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy changes in response to chronic progressive spinal cord compression: implications for human cervical compressive myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hirai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cervical compressive myelopathy, e.g. due to spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. Although human pathological studies have reported neuronal loss and demyelination in the chronically compressed spinal cord, little is known about the mechanisms involved. In particular, the neuroinflammatory processes that are thought to underlie the condition are poorly understood. The present study assessed the localized prevalence of activated M1 and M2 microglia/macrophages in twy/twy mice that develop spontaneous cervical spinal cord compression, as a model of human disease. METHODS: Inflammatory cells and cytokines were assessed in compressed lesions of the spinal cords in 12-, 18- and 24-weeks old twy/twy mice by immunohistochemical, immunoblot and flow cytometric analysis. Computed tomography and standard histology confirmed a progressive spinal cord compression through the spontaneously development of an impinging calcified mass. RESULTS: The prevalence of CD11b-positive cells, in the compressed spinal cord increased over time with a concurrent decrease in neurons. The CD11b-positive cell population was initially formed of arginase-1- and CD206-positive M2 microglia/macrophages, which later shifted towards iNOS- and CD16/32-positive M1 microglia/macrophages. There was a transient increase in levels of T helper 2 (Th2 cytokines at 18 weeks, whereas levels of Th1 cytokines as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF and macrophage antigen (Mac-2 progressively increased. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal cord compression was associated with a temporal M2 microglia/macrophage response, which may act as a possible repair or neuroprotective mechanism. However, the persistence of the neural insult also associated with persistent expression of Th1 cytokines and increased prevalence of activated M1 microglia/macrophages, which may lead to neuronal loss and

  20. Persistent At-Level Thermal Hyperalgesia and Tactile Allodynia Accompany Chronic Neuronal and Astrocyte Activation in Superficial Dorsal Horn following Mouse Cervical Contusion Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Jaime L.; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can le...

  1. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Luchetti; Silvia Anna Ciafrè; Michela Murdocca; Arianna Malgieri; Andrea Masotti; Massimo Sanchez; Maria Giulia Farace; Giuseppe Novelli; Federica Sangiuolo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidatin...

  2. Myelosuppressive conditioning using busulfan enables bone marrow cell accumulation in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coral-Ann B Lewis

    Full Text Available Myeloablative preconditioning using irradiation is the most commonly used technique to generate rodents having chimeric bone marrow, employed for the study of bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in the healthy and diseased central nervous system. However, irradiation has been shown to alter the blood-brain barrier, potentially creating confounding artefacts. To better study the potential of bone marrow-derived cells to function as treatment vehicles for neurodegenerative diseases alternative preconditioning regimens must be developed. We treated transgenic mice that over-express human mutant superoxide dismutase 1, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with busulfan to determine whether this commonly used chemotherapeutic leads to stable chimerism and promotes the entry of bone marrow-derived cells into spinal cord. Intraperitoneal treatment with busulfan at 60 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg followed by intravenous injection of green fluorescent protein-expressing bone marrow resulted in sustained levels of chimerism (~80%. Bone marrow-derived cells accumulated in the lumbar spinal cord of diseased mice at advanced stages of pathology at both doses, with limited numbers of bone marrow derived cells observed in the spinal cords of similarly treated, age-matched controls; the majority of bone marrow-derived cells in spinal cord immunolabelled for macrophage antigens. Comparatively, significantly greater numbers of bone marrow-derived cells were observed in lumbar spinal cord following irradiative myeloablation. These results demonstrate bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in diseased spinal cord is possible without irradiative preconditioning.

  3. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M; Held, Heather E; Landon, Carol S; Goldhagen, Craig R; Mavromates, Nicholas; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong

  4. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Ari

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG, the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD, would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A. ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD, KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001 and 4.2% (p = 0.006, respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which

  5. Effect of fluoxetine on disease progression in a mouse model of ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Koschnitzky, J. E.; Quinlan, K. A.; Lukas, T J; Kajtaz, E.; Kocevar, E. J.; Mayers, W. F.; Siddique, T.; Heckman, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants are often prescribed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients; however, the impact of these prescriptions on ALS disease progression has not been systematically tested. To determine whether SSRIs impact disease progression, fluoxetine (Prozac, 5 or 10 mg/kg) was administered to mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mice during one of three age ranges: neonatal [postnatal day (P)5–11], adult presymptomatic (P30 to ...

  6. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detec...

  7. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M. [Univ. of Bielefeld (Germany)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Inflammation and neuronal death in the motor cortex of the wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlke, Carolin; Saberi, Darius; Ott, Bastian;

    2015-01-01

    microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques, we analyze the proliferation behavior of microglial cells and astrocytes. We also investigate possible motor neuron death in the mouse motor cortex at different stages of the wobbler disease, which so far has not received much attention. Results An...... area show caspase 3 activation indicating neurodegenerative processes, which may cause progressive paralysis of the WR mice. It could also cause cell degeneration, such as vacuolization, dilation of the ER, and swollen mitochondria at the same time, and support the assumption that inflammation might be...... the immune response is primary or secondary and how harmful or beneficial it is in the WR motor neuron disease, anti-inflammatory treatment might be considered....

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...... controversial. SCS is not effective in relieving central neuropathic pain states....

  10. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  11. A surviving intact branch stabilizes remaining axon architecture after injury as revealed by in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzana, Ariana O; Lee, Jae K; Mui, Matthew; Chang, Amy; Zheng, Binhai

    2015-05-20

    The complex morphology of axons presents a challenge in understanding axonal responses to injury and disease. By in vivo two-photon imaging of spinal dorsal column sensory axons, we systematically examined the effect of injury location relative to the main bifurcation point on axon degeneration and regeneration following highly localized laser injuries. Retrograde but not anterograde degeneration was strongly blocked at the bifurcation point at both the acute and subacute phases. Eliminating either the ascending or descending branch led to a poor regenerative response, while eliminating both led to a strong regenerative response. Thus, a surviving intact branch suppresses both retrograde degeneration and regeneration of the injured branch, thereby preserving the remaining axon architecture. Regenerating axons exhibited a dynamic pattern with alternating phases of regeneration and pruning over a chronic period. In vivo imaging continues to reveal new insights on axonal responses to injury in the mammalian spinal cord. PMID:25937174

  12. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells are chemoattractive and accelerate motor recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Agirman, Gulistan; Coste, Cécile; Marquet, Alice; Dion, Valérie; Rogister, Bernard; Franzen, Rachelle; Wislet, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cells from adult tissues were considered for a long time as promising tools for regenerative therapy of neurological diseases, including spinal cord injuries (SCI). Indeed, mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) together constitute the bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) that were used as therapeutic options in various models of experimental SCI. However, as clinical approaches remained disappointing, we thought that reducing BMSC heterogeneity should be a...

  13. Loss of inhibitory tone on spinal cord dorsal horn spontaneously and nonspontaneously active neurons in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Maria Carmen; Dhanasobhon, Dhanasak; Yalcin, Ipek; Schlichter, Rémy; Cordero-Erausquin, Matilde

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity of inhibitory transmission in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) is believed to be a key mechanism responsible for pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain syndromes. We evaluated this plasticity by recording responses to mechanical stimuli in silent neurons (nonspontaneously active [NSA]) and neurons showing ongoing activity (spontaneously active [SA]) in the SDH of control and nerve-injured mice (cuff model). The SA and NSA neurons represented 59% and 41% of recorded neurons, respectively, and were predominantly wide dynamic range (WDR) in naive mice. Nerve-injured mice displayed a marked decrease in the mechanical threshold of the injured paw. After nerve injury, the proportion of SA neurons was increased to 78%, which suggests that some NSA neurons became SA. In addition, the response to touch (but not pinch) was dramatically increased in SA neurons, and high-threshold (nociceptive specific) neurons were no longer observed. Pharmacological blockade of spinal inhibition with a mixture of GABAA and glycine receptor antagonists significantly increased responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli in SA and NSA neurons from sham animals, but had no effect in sciatic nerve-injured animals, revealing a dramatic loss of spinal inhibitory tone in this situation. Moreover, in nerve-injured mice, local spinal administration of acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, restored responses to touch similar to those observed in naive or sham mice. These results suggest that a shift in the reversal potential for anions is an important component of the abnormal mechanical responses and of the loss of inhibitory tone recorded in a model of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26934510

  14. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity. PMID:25749859

  15. Optimised and rapid pre-clinical screening in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    OpenAIRE

    Mead, Richard J.; Bennett, Ellen J.; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Paul Sharp; Claire Sunyach; Paul Kasher; Jason Berwick; Brigitte Pettmann; Guiseppe Battaglia; Mimoun Azzouz; Andrew Grierson; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    The human SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse has been used extensively since its development in 1994 as a model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In that time, a great many insights into the toxicity of mutant SOD1 have been gained using this and other mutant SOD transgenic mouse models. They all demonstrate a selective toxicity towards motor neurons and in some cases features of the pathology seen in the human disease. These models have two major drawbacks. Firstly the generation of robust p...

  16. Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W Scott; Shea, John F

    2003-09-01

    Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery is becoming increasingly more popular because this anaesthetic technique allows the patient to self-position and avoid neurological injury that may occur with prone positioning under general anaesthesia. Spinal anaesthesia reduces intraoperative surgical blood loss, improves perioperative haemodynamic stability and reduces pain in the immediate postoperative period. This leads to a reduced need for analgesics and a reduction in the incidence of nausea and vomiting in the postoperative setting. Spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgery also decreases the incidence of lower extremity thrombo-embolic complications and does not increase the occurrence of problems with micturition. These benefits increase the patient's satisfaction, and they expedite discharge of the patient from the hospital. Combination anaesthetic techniques, using both subarachnoid and epidural dosing schemes, may be beneficial for improving postoperative pain control and add further to the benefit of spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgical procedures. PMID:14529005

  17. Ultrastructural studies of ALS mitochondria connect altered function and permeability with defects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Frati; Francesco Fornai

    2015-01-01

    The key role of mitochondria in patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is well documented by electron microscopy studies of motor neurons within spinal cord and brainstem. Nonetheless, recent studies challenged the role of mitochondria placed within the cell body of motor neuron. In fact, it was demonstrated that, despite preservation of mitochondria placed within this compartment, there is no increase in the lifespan of transgenic mouse models of ALS. Thus, the present mini...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Psychological Issues After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury The Psychologist's Role After ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities After Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  1. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the wound or vertebral bones Damage to a spinal nerve, causing weakness, pain, loss of sensation, problems with your bowels or bladder The vertebrae above and below the fusion are more likely to wear away, leading to more problems later

  2. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make some changes in their activities or work. Spine surgery will often partly or fully relieve symptoms in ... disease of the bone Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 7/13/2015 Updated by: ...

  3. Spinal Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Norkin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  4. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  5. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  6. Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée L Salazar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in partial or complete paralysis and is characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, axonal injury, and demyelination/dysmyelination of spared axons. Approximately 1,250,000 individuals have chronic SCI in the U.S.; therefore treatment in the chronic stages is highly clinically relevant. Human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns were prospectively isolated based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting for a CD133(+ and CD24(-/lo population from fetal brain, grown as neurospheres, and lineage restricted to generate neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. hCNS-SCns have recently been transplanted sub-acutely following spinal cord injury and found to promote improved locomotor recovery. We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery. METHODS AND FINDINGS: hCNS-SCns were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD-scid mice 30 days post spinal cord contusion injury. hCNS-SCns transplanted mice demonstrated significantly improved locomotor recovery compared to vehicle controls using open field locomotor testing and CatWalk gait analysis. Transplanted hCNS-SCns exhibited long-term engraftment, migration, limited proliferation, and differentiation predominantly to oligodendrocytes and neurons. Astrocytic differentiation was rare and mice did not exhibit mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, differentiated hCNS-SCns integrated with the host as demonstrated by co-localization of human cytoplasm with discrete staining for the paranodal marker contactin-associated protein. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that hCNS-SCns are capable of surviving, differentiating, and promoting improved locomotor recovery when transplanted into an early chronic injury microenvironment. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns transplantation has efficacy in an early chronic SCI setting and thus expands the "window of opportunity" for

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Empowering the Patient After Spinal ...

  8. Early detection of motor dysfunction in the SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS using home cage running wheels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen J Bennett

    Full Text Available The SOD1G93A mouse has been used since 1994 for preclinical testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Despite recent genetic advances in our understanding of ALS, transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1 remain the best available, and most widely used, vertebrate model of the disease. We previously described an optimised and rapid approach for preclinical studies in the SOD1G93A mouse. Here we describe improvements to this approach using home cage running wheels to obtain daily measurements of motor function, with minimal intervention. We show that home cage running wheels detect reductions in motor function at a similar time to the rotarod test, and that the data obtained are less variable allowing the use of smaller groups of animals to obtain satisfactory results. This approach refines use of the SOD1G93A model, and reduces the number of animals undergoing procedures of substantial severity, two central principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement of animal use in research. The small group sizes and rapid timescales enable affordable large-scale therapeutic pre-screening in the SOD1G93A mouse, as well as rapid validation of published positive effects in a second laboratory, one of the major stumbling blocks in ALS preclinical therapy development.

  9. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  10. Perinatal modification of a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus in the spinal cord of the B6D2F1 house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C K; Clemens, L G

    1989-04-01

    The sexually dimorphic dorsomedial nucleus (DM) of the spinal cord of mice is affected by gonadal steroids in adulthood and these effects are dependent upon genotype. Following castration of adult mice there is a decrease in DM cell size in DBA/2J and hybrid B6D2F1 strains and a decrease in the number of cells staining with thionin in C57B1/6J and B6D2F1 strains. The effects of androgens on development of the DM nucleus were examined in B6D2F1 mice, which exhibit both characteristics in adulthood. Testosterone propionate (TP) administered to females pre- or postnatally resulted in a significantly larger number of motoneurons in the region of the DM when compared to administration of the vehicle alone, while soma area remained unchanged. Adult males castrated on the day of birth had significantly fewer cells in the DM than did intact males. Differences in cell size between shams and castrates were dependent upon age. PMID:2780856

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available Experts \\ Spinal Cord Injury 101 Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... in countries outside the US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is the level of a spinal cord ... stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell ...

  13. Non-peptidergic small diameter primary afferents expressing VGluT2 project to lamina I of mouse spinal dorsal horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Jennifer N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unmyelinated primary afferent nociceptors are commonly classified into two main functional types: those expressing neuropeptides, and non-peptidergic fibers that bind the lectin IB4. However, many small diameter primary afferent neurons neither contain any known neuropeptides nor bind IB4. Most express high levels of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2 and are assumed to be glutamatergic nociceptors but their terminations within the spinal cord are unknown. We used in vitro anterograde axonal tracing with Neurobiotin to identify the central projections of these putative glutamatergic nociceptors. We also quantitatively characterised the spatial arrangement of these terminals with respect to those that expressed the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. Results Neurobiotin-labeled VGluT2-immunoreactive (IR terminals were restricted to lamina I, with a medial-to-lateral distribution similar to CGRP-IR terminals. Most VGluT2-IR terminals in lateral lamina I were not labeled by Neurobiotin implying that they arose mainly from central neurons. 38 ± 4% of Neurobiotin-labeled VGluT2-IR terminals contained CGRP-IR. Conversely, only 17 ± 4% of Neurobiotin-labeled CGRP-IR terminals expressed detectable VGluT2-IR. Neurobiotin-labeled VGluT2-IR or CGRP-IR terminals often aggregated into small clusters or microdomains partially surrounding intrinsic lamina I neurons. Conclusions The central terminals of primary afferents which express high levels of VGluT2-IR but not CGRP-IR terminate mainly in lamina I. The spatial arrangement of VGluT2-IR and CGRP-IR terminals suggest that lamina I neurons receive convergent inputs from presumptive nociceptors that are primarily glutamatergic or peptidergic. This reveals a previously unrecognized level of organization in lamina I consistent with the presence of multiple nociceptive processing pathways.

  14. Neuroendocrine and cardiac metabolic dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in adipose tissue and pancreas following chronic spinal cord injury in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Nash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immuno-histochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition ...

  17. 本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内的发育变化%DEVELOPMENTAL ALTERNATIONS IN PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENT PROJECTIONS IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静; 冯枫; 刘翔宇; 李云庆; 武胜昔

    2006-01-01

    目的观察本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内投射和终止的发育变化. 方法采用小牛白蛋白(PV)免疫组织化学染色特异标记本体觉传入纤维,用免疫荧光单标记和双标记方法观察本体觉传入纤维在脊髓内的生长模式以及与运动神经元的关系.染色后的切片用激光共聚焦显微镜进行观察. 结果PV样免疫阳性(LI)本体觉纤维最早于胚胎(E)14 d出现在后索,E15时进入脊髓灰质.E16时,已有较多的PV-LI纤维到达中间带灰质和前角(VH).此后,随着发育阶段的增长,脊髓VH内PV-LI本体觉纤维和终末的数量和密度逐渐增加,并在生后早期P0-P7达到最高水平.P14后,上述本体觉纤维和终末的数量逐渐减少.本体觉传入纤维的终末在E17时开始与脊髓VH运动神经元形成密切的接触.结论本体觉传入纤维在脊髓内的定位模式形成于小鼠胚胎后期和生后早期,本研究结果为深入理解脊髓反射运动环路的发育特点提供了依据.%Objective To observe the developmental changes of projection and termination of proprioceptive afferent fibers in the mouse spinal cord. Methods Parvalbumin (PV) immunohistochemistry was used to label the proprioceptive afferents. Single and dual immunofluorescence histochemistry were used to examine the growth pattern of proprioceptive afferents and their relationships with motoneurons in the spinal ventral horn (VH). The stained sections were observed under a confocal laserscanning microscope. Results PV-like immunoreactive (LI) proprioceptive fibers first appeared in the dorsal column on embryonic (E) day 14, then entered the gray matter on El5 and reached the intermediate gray matter and VH more obviously on E16. The number and intensity of PV-LI proprioceptive afferent fibers and punctata increased in the VH with age and reached a maximum during earlier postnatal (P) period (P0-P7). After P14, the number and intensity of proprioceptive afferents gradually

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work ...

  20. Metabolic Therapy with Deanna Protocol Supplementation Delays Disease Progression and Extends Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M.; Held, Heather E.; Landon, Carol S.; Goldhagen, Craig R.; Mavromates, Nicholas; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic t...

  1. Estudio anatómico de la transferencia de los nervios accesorio y toracodorsal al nervio cubital en el gato Anatomic study of spinal accesory and thoracodorsal nerves transfer to ulnar nerve in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Martínez-Méndez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones del plexo braquial son una de las patologías más graves y con mayor número de secuelas del miembro superior. En el momento actual las transferencias nerviosas se encuentran en primera línea del armamento terapéutico para reconstruir funciones proximales del miembro superior. En el estudio que presentamos se realizaron 20 transferencias nerviosas al nervio cubital del gato común, tomando bien el nervio accesorio del espinal (10 casos o bien el nervio toracodorsal (10 casos. Como grupo control se utilizó el lado contralateral al intervenido. Durante el año siguiente, se evaluó la reinervación mediante estudios electromiográficos, histológicos de nervio y músculo, así como histoquímicos de médula espinal. Tras el análisis de los resultados encontramos que las motoneuronas de ambos nervios donantes son capaces de conseguir reinervaciones parciales del territorio cubital.A brachial plexus injury is one of the most severe pathologies of the upper limb, and also has severe sequels. In the actual state of the art, nerve transfers are being used as first line of therapeutic approach in the reconstruction of proximal functions of the upper limb. In this study 20 nerve transfers were made to the ulnar nerve of the cat, using the spinal accessory nerve (10 cases or the thoracodorsal nerve (10 cases. The opposite side was used as control. During next year, reinnervation was assessed by electromyography, nerve and muscle histology and histochemical evaluation of the spinal cord. We found that motoneurons of both donor nerves are able to make partial reinervation of the ulnar nerve territory.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is ...

  3. Penatalaksanaan Trauma Spinal

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafiah, Hafas

    2010-01-01

    Spinal trauma has a potential capability for catastrophic neurologic injury and physical injury. Spinal Trauma usually involved bony elements (vertebral spine), spinal cord, nerve roots, peripheral nerves and soft tissue. Early treatment should begun at the site of injury and during transportation to hospital. Protection to cervical spine and cervical spinal cord and patent respiration are the top priorities. There has been an established definitive procedures for the treatment of spinal trauma.

  4. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  5. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  6. Optimised and rapid pre-clinical screening in the SOD1(G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Mead

    Full Text Available The human SOD1(G93A transgenic mouse has been used extensively since its development in 1994 as a model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. In that time, a great many insights into the toxicity of mutant SOD1 have been gained using this and other mutant SOD transgenic mouse models. They all demonstrate a selective toxicity towards motor neurons and in some cases features of the pathology seen in the human disease. These models have two major drawbacks. Firstly the generation of robust preclinical data in these models has been highlighted as an area for concern. Secondly, the amount of time required for a single preclinical experiment in these models (3-4 months is a hurdle to the development of new therapies. We have developed an inbred C57BL/6 mouse line from the original mixed background (SJLxC57BL/6 SOD1(G93A transgenic line and show here that the disease course is remarkably consistent and much less prone to background noise, enabling reduced numbers of mice for testing of therapeutics. Secondly we have identified very early readouts showing a large decline in motor function compared to normal mice. This loss of motor function has allowed us to develop an early, sensitive and rapid screening protocol for the initial phases of denervation of muscle fibers, observed in this model. We describe multiple, quantitative readouts of motor function that can be used to interrogate this early mechanism. Such an approach will increase throughput for reduced costs, whilst reducing the severity of the experimental procedures involved.

  7. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  8. Serotonin 2B receptor slows disease progression and prevents degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear phagocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Oussini, Hajer; Bayer, Hanna; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Larmet, Yves; Müller, Kathrin; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Thal, Dietmar R; van Rheenen, Wouter; van Eijk, Kristel; Lawson, Roland; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc; Roumier, Anne; Wong, Philip C; van den Berg, Leonard H; Ludolph, Albert C; Veldink, Jan H; Witting, Anke; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the central nervous system and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During neurodegeneration, microglial activation is accompanied by infiltration of circulating monocytes, leading to production of multiple inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord. Degenerative alterations in mononuclear phagocytes are commonly observed during neurodegenerative diseases, yet little is known concerning the mechanisms leading to their degeneration, or the consequences on disease progression. Here we observed that the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2B), a serotonin receptor expressed in microglia, is upregulated in the spinal cord of three different transgenic mouse models of ALS. In mutant SOD1 mice, this upregulation was restricted to cells positive for CD11b, a marker of mononuclear phagocytes. Ablation of 5-HT2B receptor in transgenic ALS mice expressing mutant SOD1 resulted in increased degeneration of mononuclear phagocytes, as evidenced by fragmentation of Iba1-positive cellular processes. This was accompanied by decreased expression of key neuroinflammatory genes but also loss of expression of homeostatic microglial genes. Importantly, the dramatic effect of 5-HT2B receptor ablation on mononuclear phagocytes was associated with acceleration of disease progression. To determine the translational relevance of these results, we studied polymorphisms in the human HTR2B gene, which encodes the 5-HT2B receptor, in a large cohort of ALS patients. In this cohort, the C allele of SNP rs10199752 in HTR2B was associated with longer survival. Moreover, patients carrying one copy of the C allele of SNP rs10199752 showed increased 5-HT2B mRNA in spinal cord and displayed less pronounced degeneration of Iba1 positive cells than patients carrying two copies of the more common A allele. Thus, the 5-HT2B receptor limits degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear

  9. Spinal but not cortical microglia acquire an atypical phenotype with high VEGF, galectin-3 and osteopontin, and blunted inflammatory responses in ALS rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nikodemova, Maria; Small, Alissa L.; Smith, Stephanie M.C.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of microglia, CNS resident immune cells, is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. Despite evidence that microglia contribute to disease progression, the exact role of these cells in ALS pathology remains unknown. We immunomagnetically isolated microglia from different CNS regions of SOD1G93A rats at three different points in disease progression: presymptomatic, symptom onset and end-stage. We observed n...

  10. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  11. COMBINED LITHIUM AND VALPROATE TREATMENT DELAYS DISEASE ONSET, REDUCES NEUROLOGICAL DEFICITS AND PROLONGS SURVIVAL IN AN ALS MOUSE MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    FENG, H.-L.; Leng, Y.; MA, C.-H.; Zhang, J.; Ren, M; CHUANG, D.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are two primary drugs used to treat bipolar disorder, and have been shown to have neuroprotective properties in vivo and in vitro. A recent study demonstrated that combined treatment with lithium and VPA elicits synergistic neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured brain neurons, and the synergy involves potentiated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity through enhanced GSK-3 serine phosphorylation (Leng et al., J ...

  12. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  13. Spinal cord trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that can be removed or reduced before the spinal nerves are completely destroyed, paralysis may improve. Surgery may be needed to: Realign the spinal bones (vertebrae) Remove fluid or tissue that presses ...

  14. Spinal Cord Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments Functional and Dysfunctional Spinal Circuitry: Role for Rehabilitation and Neural Prostheses Summary of NINDS New Strategies in Spinal Cord Injury workshop held June, 2000. NINDS Workshop on Re- ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? What is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? What is the "Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems" program? ... family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries ...

  17. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  18. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Partnerships How Social Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work How Occupational Therapists Work Occupational Therapy Enables Daily ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for spinal cord injuries? What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ... provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on ...

  1. Imaging of spinal tumors; Bildgebung intraduraler Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.; Roth, C.; Politi, M.; Ahlhelm, F.; Backens, M.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg-Saar (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Spinal tumors are often categorized into extradural, intradural extramedullary, or intramedullary. Although this classification represents somewhat of an overgeneralization as a lesion may reside in two compartments, it still helps to characterize spinal tumors. In the intradural, extramedullary space, primary tumors, such as neurofibroma and meningeoma, are relatively common. Secondary tumors or leptomeningeal enhancement also occur. In the intramedullary space, primary tumors are far more common than secondary tumors or metastases. (orig.) Spinale Tumoren werden oft anhand ihrer Lokalisation in extradurale, intradural extramedullaere und intramedullaere Raumforderungen unterteilt. Auch wenn diese Einteilung sehr vereinfacht ist, da eine Raumforderung auch in 2 Kompartimenten gleichzeitig auftreten kann, hilft sie dennoch, spinale Tumoren zu charakterisieren. Im intraduralen, extramedullaeren Raum finden sich haeufig primaere Tumoren, wie das Neurofibrom und Meningeom. Sekundaere Tumoren oder das leptomeningeale Enhancement treten ebenfalls auf. Im intramedullaeren Raum sind primaere Tumoren deutlich haeufiger als sekundaere Tumoren oder Metastasen. (orig.)

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life ...

  3. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  4. Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α improves motor performance and survival in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Alice

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects spinal cord and cortical motor neurons. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to motor neuron death in ALS. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1α (PGC-1α is a principal regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Results In this study, we examined whether PGC-1α plays a protective role in ALS by using a double transgenic mouse model where PGC-1α is over-expressed in an SOD1 transgenic mouse (TgSOD1-G93A/PGC-1α. Our results indicate that PGC-1α significantly improves motor function and survival of SOD1-G93A mice. The behavioral improvements were accompanied by reduced blood glucose level and by protection of motor neuron loss, restoration of mitochondrial electron transport chain activities and inhibition of stress signaling in the spinal cord. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PGC-1α plays a beneficial role in a mouse model of ALS, suggesting that PGC-1α may be a potential therapeutic target for ALS therapy.

  5. Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after chronic complete paralysis in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Angeli, Claudia A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P.; Harkema, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    A diagnosis of motor complete spinal cord injury carries a dim prognosis for recovery. However, Angeli et al. show that epidural stimulation of the spinal cord can modulate the spinal circuitry to enable completely paralysed individuals to voluntarily control muscles of their legs and recover intentional movement years after injury.

  6. PD-L1 is increased in the spinal cord and infiltrating lymphocytes in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Qi Fang; Mingyuan Wang; Xueguang Zhang; Jiandong Jiang; Bing Fu; Jiechun Chen; Qun Xue; Wanli Dong; Yanzheng Gu; Lingtao Tang; Limin Xue

    2013-01-01

    Experimental al ergic encephalomyelitis is a mouse model of human multiple sclerosis with similar pathology and pathogenesis. Th1 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental al ergic encephalomyelitis. This study determined the potential effect of programmed celldeath 1 ligand 1 in the pathogenesis of experimental al ergic encephalomyelitis induced by injecting myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, complete Freund’s adjuvant and Bordetel a pertussis toxin into C57BL/6J mice. Experimental al ergic encephalomyelitis mice developed disease and showed in-flammatory changes in the central nervous system by hematoxylin-eosin staining of spinal cord pathological sections, demyelination by Luxol fast-blue staining and clinical manifestations. The expression of programmed celldeath 1 ligand 1 in mice was detected by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The expression of programmed celldeath 1 ligand 1 in the spinal cord and splenocytes of mice was significantly increased compared with normal mice. Our findings suggest the involvement of programmed celldeath 1 ligand 1 in the pathogenesis of expe-rimental al ergic encephalomyelitis and suggest this should be studied in multiple sclerosis.

  7. Spinal canal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.)

  8. Melittin restores proteasome function in an animal model of ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang Min

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a paralyzing disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration and death of motor neurons and occurs both as a sporadic and familial disease. Mutant SOD1 (mtSOD1 in motor neurons induces vulnerability to the disease through protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, cytoskeletal abnormalities, defective axonal transport- and growth factor signaling, excitotoxicity, and neuro-inflammation. Melittin is a 26 amino acid protein and is one of the components of bee venom which is used in traditional Chinese medicine to inhibit of cancer cell proliferation and is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. The purpose of the present study was to determine if melittin could suppress motor neuron loss and protein misfolding in the hSOD1G93A mouse, which is commonly used as a model for inherited ALS. Meltittin was injected at the 'ZuSanLi' (ST36 acupuncture point in the hSOD1G93A animal model. Melittin-treated animals showed a decrease in the number of microglia and in the expression level of phospho-p38 in the spinal cord and brainstem. Interestingly, melittin treatment in symptomatic ALS animals improved motor function and reduced the level of neuron death in the spinal cord when compared to the control group. Furthermore, we found increased of α-synuclein modifications, such as phosphorylation or nitration, in both the brainstem and spinal cord in hSOD1G93A mice. However, melittin treatment reduced α-synuclein misfolding and restored the proteasomal activity in the brainstem and spinal cord of symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. Our research suggests a potential functional link between melittin and the inhibition of neuroinflammation in an ALS animal model.

  9. 痛温觉和本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内的不同发育特点%ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF NOCICEPTIVE AND PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENT FIBERS IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯枫; 黄静; 刘翔宇; 李云庆; 武胜昔

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the developmental changes in projection and termination of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferent fibers in the spinal cord by labeling those two fibers with calcitonion gene-related peptide (CGRP) and parvalbumin (PV)separately in mouse embryos and neonatal pups aged embryonic day 15 to posanatal day 3 (E15 -P3). CGRP-like immunoreactive (LI)nociceptive fibers first appeared in the superficial dorsal horn (DH) at E16. The afferent projections extended laterally to the DH and entered into the deep portions of the DH at E17 and E18. After birth, the projection pattern of CGRP-LI fibers remained unchanged but the intensity of afferent terminals increased in the superficial laminae and their branching patterns became more complicated. In addition,CGRP-LI collaterals that projected into the contralateral DH were also examined after E16. Around birth, the contralateral projections were also found originated from the lateral part of the DH. PV-LI proprioceptive afferents were first observed entering the gray matter at E15 and reached the intermediate gray matter (IG) and the ventral horn (VH) more obviously on E16. The number and intensity of PV-LI fibers increased in the the VH with age and reached a maximum during earlier postnatal period ( P0-P3 ). The proprioceptive terminals seemed to form close relationship with motoneurons in the VH from E17. Our results indicate that the somatotopic organization of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferents in the spinal cord both are established during the late embryonic and early postnatal stages. These results help to understand the development of the sensory transmission in more details.%本研究通过采用钙基因相关肽(CGRP)和小牛白蛋白(PV)分别标记胚胎15d(E15)到生后3d(P3)小鼠脊髓的痛温觉和本体觉两种初级传入纤维,观察了这两种纤维在小鼠脊髓内投射和终止的发育变化.结果显示:CGRP样免疫阳性(LI)纤维最早于E16出现

  10. Early gene expression changes in spinal cord from SOD1G93A Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pintar Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset and fast progression neurodegenerative disease that leads to the loss of motor neurons. Mechanisms of selective motor neuron loss in ALS are unknown. The early events occurring in the spinal cord that may contribute to motor neuron death are not described, neither astrocytes participation in the pre-symptomatic phases of the disease. In order to identify ALS early events, we performed a microarray analysis employing a whole mouse genome platform to evaluate the gene expression pattern of lumbar spinal cords of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and their littermate controls at pre-symptomatic ages of 40 and 80 days. Differentially expressed genes were identified by means of the Bioconductor packages Agi4x44Preprocess and limma. FunNet web based tool was used for analysis of over-represented pathways. Furthermore, immunolabeled astrocytes from 40 and 80 days old mice were submitted to laser microdissection and RNA was extracted for evaluation of a selected gene by qPCR. Statistical analysis has pointed to 492 differentially expressed genes (155 up and 337 down regulated in 40 days and 1105 (433 up and 672 down in 80 days old ALS mice. KEGG analysis demonstrated the over-represented pathways tight junction, antigen processing and presentation, oxidative phosphorylation, endocytosis, chemokine signaling pathway, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis and glutamatergic synapse at both pre-symptomatic ages. Ube2i gene expression was evaluated in astrocytes from both transgenic ages, being up regulated in 40 and 80 days astrocytes enriched samples. Our data points to important early molecular events occurring in pre-symptomatic phases of ALS in mouse model. Early SUMOylation process linked to astrocytes might account to non autonomous cell toxicity in ALS. Further studies on the signaling pathways presented here may provide new insights to better understand the events triggering motor neuron death in this devastating

  11. Pontine reticulospinal projections in the neonatal mouse: Internal organization and axon trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Magne S; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C

    2016-04-15

    We recently characterized physiologically a pontine reticulospinal (pRS) projection in the neonatal mouse that mediates synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons via parallel uncrossed and crossed pathways (Sivertsen et al. [2014] J Neurophysiol 112:1628-1643). Here we characterize the origins, anatomical organization, and supraspinal axon trajectories of these pathways via retrograde tracing from the high cervical spinal cord. The two pathways derive from segregated populations of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting pRS neurons with characteristic locations within the pontine reticular formation (PRF). We obtained estimates of relative neuron numbers by counting from sections, digitally generated neuron position maps, and 3D reconstructions. Ipsilateral pRS neurons outnumber contralateral pRS neurons by threefold and are distributed about equally in rostral and caudal regions of the PRF, whereas contralateral pRS neurons are concentrated in the rostral PRF. Ipsilateral pRS neuron somata are on average larger than contralateral. No pRS neurons are positive in transgenic mice that report the expression of GAD, suggesting that they are predominantly excitatory. Putative GABAergic interneurons are interspersed among the pRS neurons, however. Ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons have distinctly different trajectories within the brainstem. Their initial spinal funicular trajectories also differ, with ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons more highly concentrated medially and laterally, respectively. The larger size and greater number of ipsilateral vs. contralateral pRS neurons is compatible with our previous finding that the uncrossed projection transmits more reliably to spinal motoneurons. The information about supraspinal and initial spinal pRS axon trajectories should facilitate future physiological assessment of synaptic connections between pRS neurons and spinal neurons. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1270-1291, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  12. The gene of ciliary neurotrophic factor (cntf) maps to murine chromosome 19 and its expression is not affected in the hereditary motoneuron disease 'wobbler' of the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Kaupmann, Klemens; Sendtner, Michael; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Jockusch, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The cDNA for ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a polypeptide involved in the survival of motoneurons in mammals, has recently been cloned (Stöckli et al., Nature, 342, 920 - 923, 1989; Lin et al. Science, 246, 1023 - 1025, 1989). We have now localized the corresponding gene Cntf to chromosome 19 in the mouse, using an interspecific cross between Mus spretus and Mus musculus domesticus. The latter was carrying the gene wobbler (wr) for spinal muscular atrophy. DNA was prepared from backcross...

  13. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the vertebral bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine problems include: pain that interferes with daily ...

  14. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  15. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  16. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Focal Transplantation of Human iPSC-Derived Glial-Rich Neural Progenitors Improves Lifespan of ALS Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Kondo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of glial-rich neural progenitors has been demonstrated to attenuate motor neuron degeneration and disease progression in rodent models of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, translation of these results into a clinical setting requires a renewable human cell source. Here, we derived glial-rich neural progenitors from human iPSCs and transplanted them into the lumbar spinal cord of ALS mouse models. The transplanted cells differentiated into astrocytes, and the treated mouse group showed prolonged lifespan. Our data suggest a potential therapeutic mechanism via activation of AKT signal. The results demonstrated the efficacy of cell therapy for ALS by the use of human iPSCs as cell source.

  18. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  19. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  20. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G;

    2015-01-01

    the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time...

  1. Spinal arteriography: a primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A KUMPE

    2005-01-01

    Spinal arteriography is an esoteric procedure that is seldom performed by peripheral interventionalists. This presentation is intended to outline some of the essential points that the interventionalist performing the procedure should be aware of, especially about spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae (SDAVF).

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal ... is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries and the ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes ... Patient Partnerships How Social Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... after an injury? What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? What are the ...

  5. Spinal subdural metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of metastasis to the thoracic spinal subdural space is reported. Metrizamide myelography showed narrowing of the upper thoracic subarachnoid space. A tumor in the spinal subdural space is unusual; only a few cases have been reported. The myelographic appearance is not specific; and epidural metastasis can produce the same myelographic picture. (orig.)

  6. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information ... spinal cord injuries and the members of their families. Our website has more than 1,500 videos ...

  8. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Shanna L.; Welton, Amanda R.; Harwood, Kirsten M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus. Here we determined the extent and functional importance of macrophage infection by MAV-1. Bone marrow-derived macrophages expressed MAV-1 mRNAs and proteins upon ex vivo infection. Adherent perito...

  9. Antiallodynic effects of alpha lipoic acid in an optimized RR-EAE mouse model of MS-neuropathic pain are accompanied by attenuation of upregulated BDNF-TrkB-ERK signaling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nemat; Gordon, Richard; Woodruff, Trent M.; Smith, Maree T.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may affect patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) even in early disease. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-mouse model of MS, chronic alpha lipoic acid (ALA) treatment reduced clinical disease severity, but MS-neuropathic pain was not assessed. Hence, we investigated the pain-relieving efficacy and mode of action of ALA using our optimized relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE mouse model of MS-associated neuropathic pain. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG35-55 a...

  10. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  11. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is an important cause of a slowly progressive sensorimotor transverse lesion in mostly elderly patients. The disease affects men in 80% of the cases. Per year and per 1 Million inhabitants only 5-10 new cases of the disease have to be expected. Although rare, the serious disease should not be missed. Diagnosis can be made by MRI and spinal angiography. The result of treatment depends on early diagnosis. The arteriovenous shunt is located within the dural layer of the spinal canal. It connects branches of a radiculomeningeal artery with the veins of the spinal cord. Spinal cord supplying vessels are not primarily involved. Arterialisation of the venous part of the spinal cord circulation results in a chronic congestive myelopathy, which can well be demonstrated by MR imaging. The role of selective spinal angiography is to detect and exactly localize the site of the avshunt, which is rather difficult in some cases. Therapeutic alternatives are effective embolization of the fistula with liquid agents or surgical dysconnection. (orig.)

  12. Spinal angiography with iohexol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iohexol 300 was used for 55 selective spinal angiograms in 50 patients; all were of good quality. There was no significant change in vital signs during the angiographic procedure in any case. Two patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistula draining into a coronal venous plexus developed transient subjective slight increase in their disability during the immediate post-angiographic period. Eight cases embolised at the time of angiography showed improvement in their neurological deficits within 24 h of the study. The other patients were unaffected by the procedure. Iohexol 300 is a very suitable contrast medium for spinal angiography. (orig.)

  13. GNX-4728, a Novel Small Molecule Drug Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition, is Therapeutic in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J Martin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurological disorder in humans characterized by progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebral cortex causing skeletal muscle paralysis, respiratory insufficiency, and death. There are no cures or effective treatments for ALS. ALS can be inherited, but most cases are not associated with a family history of the disease. Mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis but definitive proof of causal mechanisms is lacking. Identification of new clinically translatable disease mechanism-based molecular targets and small molecule drug candidates are needed for ALS patients. We tested the hypothesis in an animal model that drug modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP is therapeutic in ALS. A prospective randomized placebo-controlled drug trial was done in a transgenic mouse model of ALS. We explored GNX-4728 as a therapeutic drug. GNX-4728 inhibits mPTP opening as evidenced by increased mitochondrial calcium retention capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Chronic systemic treatment of G37R-human mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (hSOD1 transgenic mice with GNX-4728 resulted in major therapeutic benefits. GNX-4728 slowed disease progression and significantly improved motor function. The survival of ALS mice was increased significantly by GNX-4728 treatment as evidence by a nearly 2-fold extension of lifespan (360 days to 750 days. GNX-4728 protected against motor neuron degeneration and mitochondrial degeneration, attenuated spinal cord inflammation, and preserved neuromuscular junction innervation in the diaphragm in ALS mice. This work demonstrates that a mPTP-acting drug has major disease-modifying efficacy in a preclinical mouse model of ALS and establishes mitochondrial calcium retention, and indirectly the mPTP, as targets for ALS drug development.

  14. Spinal cord trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other rehabilitation after the injury has healed. Rehabilitation will help you cope with the disability from your spinal cord injury. Support Groups Seek out organizations for additional information ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Experts Resources The Short List Government ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we expect stem-cell ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  18. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abscess: Back injuries or trauma, including minor ones Boils on the skin, especially on the back or ... of spinal cord abscess. Prevention Thorough treatment of boils, tuberculosis, and other infections decreases the risk. Early ...

  19. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  20. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...... publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 39 is July 08, 2016. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates....

  1. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  2. Pediatric spinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  3. Caprylic triglyceride as a novel therapeutic approach to effectively improve the performance and attenuate the symptoms due to the motor neuron loss in ALS disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and finally death. ALS patients suffer from asthenia and their progressive weakness negatively impacts quality of life, limiting their daily activities. They have impaired energy balance linked to lower activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzymes in ALS spinal cord, suggesting that improving mitochondrial function may present a therapeutic approach for ALS. When fed a ketogenic diet, the G93A ALS mouse shows a significant increase in serum ketones as well as a significantly slower progression of weakness and lower mortality rate. In this study, we treated SOD1-G93A mice with caprylic triglyceride, a medium chain triglyceride that is metabolized into ketone bodies and can serve as an alternate energy substrate for neuronal metabolism. Treatment with caprylic triglyceride attenuated progression of weakness and protected spinal cord motor neuron loss in SOD1-G93A transgenic animals, significantly improving their performance even though there was no significant benefit regarding the survival of the ALS transgenic animals. We found that caprylic triglyceride significantly promoted the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate in vivo. Our results demonstrated that caprylic triglyceride alleviates ALS-type motor impairment through restoration of energy metabolism in SOD1-G93A ALS mice, especially during the overt stage of the disease. These data indicate the feasibility of using caprylic acid as an easily administered treatment with a high impact on the quality of life of ALS patients.

  4. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of spinal ultrasound in spinal dysraphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of spinal ultrasound in detecting occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) in neonates and infants, and to determine the degree of agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive infants had spinal ultrasound over 31 months. Of these, 15 patients (age 1 day-7 months, mean 40 days; nine male) had follow-up MRI. Ultrasound and MRI findings were correlated retrospectively. RESULTS: Six out of 15 (40%) ultrasound examinations showed full agreement with MRI, seven of 15 (47%) had partial agreement, and two of 15 (13%) had no agreement. In the present series ultrasound failed to visualize: four of four dorsal dermal sinuses, three of four fatty filum terminales, one of one terminal lipoma, two of four partial sacral agenesis, three of four hydromyelia and one of 10 low-lying cords. CONCLUSION: Agreement between ultrasound and MRI was good, particularly for the detection of low-lying cord (90%). Therefore we recommend ultrasound as a first-line screening test for OSD. If ultrasound is abnormal, equivocal or technically limited, MRI is advised for full assessment

  6. Evaluation of spinal ultrasound in spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.A.; Bruyn, R. de; Patel, K.; Thompson, D

    2003-03-01

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of spinal ultrasound in detecting occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) in neonates and infants, and to determine the degree of agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive infants had spinal ultrasound over 31 months. Of these, 15 patients (age 1 day-7 months, mean 40 days; nine male) had follow-up MRI. Ultrasound and MRI findings were correlated retrospectively. RESULTS: Six out of 15 (40%) ultrasound examinations showed full agreement with MRI, seven of 15 (47%) had partial agreement, and two of 15 (13%) had no agreement. In the present series ultrasound failed to visualize: four of four dorsal dermal sinuses, three of four fatty filum terminales, one of one terminal lipoma, two of four partial sacral agenesis, three of four hydromyelia and one of 10 low-lying cords. CONCLUSION: Agreement between ultrasound and MRI was good, particularly for the detection of low-lying cord (90%). Therefore we recommend ultrasound as a first-line screening test for OSD. If ultrasound is abnormal, equivocal or technically limited, MRI is advised for full assessment.

  7. Human Neural Stem Cell Replacement Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis by Spinal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hefferan, Michael P.; Jan Galik; Osamu Kakinohana; Gabriela Sekerkova; Camila Santucci; Silvia Marsala; Roman Navarro; Marian Hruska-Plochan; Karl Johe; Eva Feldman; Cleveland, Don W.; Martin Marsala

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension ...

  8. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  9. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  10. Spinal vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Timo [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany); Mull, Michael; Thron, Armin [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Gilsbach, Joachim M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare diseases that consist of true inborn cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (including perimedullary fistulae, glomerular and juvenile AVMs) and presumably acquired dural arteriovenous fistulae. This review article gives an overview of the imaging features both on MRI and angiography, the differential diagnoses, the clinical symptomatology and the potential therapeutic approaches to these diseases. It is concluded that MRI is the diagnostic modality of first choice in suspected spinal vascular malformation and should be complemented by selective spinal angiography. Treatment in symptomatic patients offers an improvement in the prognosis, but should be performed in specialized centers. Patients with spinal cord cavernomas and perimedullary fistulae type I are surgical candidates. Dural arteriovenous fistulae can either be operated upon or can be treated by an endovascular approach, the former being a simple, quick and secure approach to obliterate the fistula, while the latter is technically demanding. In spinal arteriovenous malformations, the endovascular approach is the method of first choice; in selected cases, a combined therapy might be sensible. (orig.)

  11. Spinal vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare diseases that consist of true inborn cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (including perimedullary fistulae, glomerular and juvenile AVMs) and presumably acquired dural arteriovenous fistulae. This review article gives an overview of the imaging features both on MRI and angiography, the differential diagnoses, the clinical symptomatology and the potential therapeutic approaches to these diseases. It is concluded that MRI is the diagnostic modality of first choice in suspected spinal vascular malformation and should be complemented by selective spinal angiography. Treatment in symptomatic patients offers an improvement in the prognosis, but should be performed in specialized centers. Patients with spinal cord cavernomas and perimedullary fistulae type I are surgical candidates. Dural arteriovenous fistulae can either be operated upon or can be treated by an endovascular approach, the former being a simple, quick and secure approach to obliterate the fistula, while the latter is technically demanding. In spinal arteriovenous malformations, the endovascular approach is the method of first choice; in selected cases, a combined therapy might be sensible. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of A11 Neurons Projecting to the Spinal Cord of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Koblinger, Kathrin; Füzesi, Tamás; Ejdrygiewicz, Jillian; Krajacic, Aleksandra; Bains, Jaideep S.; Whelan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic A11 region has been identified in several species including rats, mice, cats, monkeys, zebrafish, and humans as the primary source of descending dopamine (DA) to the spinal cord. It has been implicated in the control of pain, modulation of the spinal locomotor network, restless leg syndrome, and cataplexy, yet the A11 cell group remains an understudied dopaminergic (DAergic) nucleus within the brain. It is unclear whether A11 neurons in the mouse contain the full complement o...

  13. Peripheral nerve injury increases glutamate-evoked calcium mobilization in adult spinal cord neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Doolen Suzanne; Blake Camille B; Smith Bret N; Taylor Bradley K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Central sensitization in the spinal cord requires glutamate receptor activation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. We used Fura-2 AM bulk loading of mouse slices together with wide-field Ca2+ imaging to measure glutamate-evoked increases in extracellular Ca2+ to test the hypotheses that: 1. Exogenous application of glutamate causes Ca2+ mobilization in a preponderance of dorsal horn neurons within spinal cord slices taken from adult mice; 2. Glutamate-evoked Ca2+ mobiliz...

  14. Neurotrophins and spinal circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Lorne M. Mendell

    2014-01-01

    Work early in the last century emphasized the stereotyped activity of spinal circuits based on studies of reflexes. However, the last several decades have focused on the plasticity of these spinal circuits. These considerations began with studies of the effects of monoamines on descending and reflex circuits. In recent years new classes of compounds called growth factors that are found in peripheral nerves and the spinal cord have been shown to affect circuit behavior in the spinal cord. In t...

  15. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  16. Spinal cord injury pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beric, Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    Awareness that SCI pain is common emerged during the past decade. However, there are a number of unresolved issues. There is a need for variety of experimental models to reflect diversity of SCI pains. Current classification is not as user-friendly as it should be. More attention should be given to a condition of the spinal cord below and above the SCI lesion. A consensus for what is an optimal SCI functional assessment for patients with sensory complaints and pain should be developed. Further extensive SCI pain research is needed prior to spinal cord regeneration trials in order to be able to cope with a potential for newly developed pains that may appear during incomplete spinal cord regenerative attempts. PMID:12821403

  17. Spinal leptomeningeal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spinal forms of neurocysticercosis are extremely rare, with a frequency under 1% in large series. The types of involvement are a) subarachnoid cysts and b) intramedullary lesions (less frequent). The authors report the case of a 56-year-old female with central nervous system infection by the larval form of Taenia Solium, which conduced to a hydrocephalus, treated by neurosurgical ventricular-peritoneal shunting. After 2 years, the patient consulted due to paraesthesia, spastic paraparesis and incontinence. MRI showed an homogeneous cystic mass compressing the spinal cord at D5-D6 level. Laminectomies were performed and the arachnoid membrane appeared thickened (arachnoiditis); the larval cyst was removed. Anatomo-pathologic exam revealed a leptomeningeal cysticercosis. The patient had a favorable clinical evolution without spinal compression sings or symptoms. (author)

  18. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  19. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  20. MRI of closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Phillips, Grace S.; Thapa, Mahesh M.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital and University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We present a pictorial review of MRI features of various closed spinal dysraphisms based on previously described clinicoradiological classification of spinal dysraphisms proposed. The defining imaging features of each dysraphism type are highlighted and a diagnostic algorithm for closed spinal dysraphisms is suggested. (orig.)

  1. Spinal actinomycosis: A rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is an indolent, slowly progressive infection caused by Actinomyces species. Of human actinomycosis, the spinal form is rare and actinomycosis-related spinal neurological deficit is uncommon. We report two cases with cervical and dorsal actinomycosis and one of them with spinal neurological deficit.

  2. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  3. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  4. Caloric restriction shortens lifespan through an increase in lipid peroxidation, inflammation and apoptosis in the G93A mouse, an animal model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkha P Patel

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR extends lifespan through a reduction in oxidative stress, delays the onset of morbidity and prolongs lifespan. We previously reported that long-term CR hastened clinical onset, disease progression and shortened lifespan, while transiently improving motor performance in G93A mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS that shows increased free radical production. To investigate the long-term CR-induced pathology in G93A mice, we assessed the mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency and oxidative capacity (CS--citrate synthase content and activity, cytochrome c oxidase--COX activity and protein content of COX subunit-I and IV and UCP3-uncoupling protein 3, oxidative damage (MDA--malondialdehyde and PC--protein carbonyls, antioxidant enzyme capacity (Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase, inflammation (TNF-alpha, stress response (Hsp70 and markers of apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase 9, cleaved caspase 9 in their skeletal muscle. At age 40 days, G93A mice were divided into two groups: Ad libitum (AL; n = 14; 7 females or CR (n = 13; 6 females, with a diet equal to 60% of AL. COX/CS enzyme activity was lower in CR vs. AL male quadriceps (35%, despite a 2.3-fold higher COX-IV/CS protein content. UCP3 was higher in CR vs. AL females only. MnSOD and Cu/Zn-SOD were higher in CR vs. AL mice and CR vs. AL females. MDA was higher (83% in CR vs. AL red gastrocnemius. Conversely, PC was lower in CR vs. AL red (62% and white (30% gastrocnemius. TNF-alpha was higher (52% in CR vs. AL mice and Hsp70 was lower (62% in CR vs. AL quadriceps. Bax was higher in CR vs. AL mice (41% and CR vs. AL females (52%. Catalase, Bcl-2 and caspases did not differ. We conclude that CR increases lipid peroxidation, inflammation and apoptosis, while decreasing mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency, protein oxidation and stress response in G93A mice.

  5. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.)

  6. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  7. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  8. Retinoic Acid Signaling during Early Spinal Cord Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Diez del Corral; Morales, Aixa V

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling is required at several steps during the development of the spinal cord, from the specification of generic properties to the final acquisition of neuronal subtype identities, including its role in trunk neural crest development. These functions are associated with the production of retinoic acid in specific tissues and are highly dependent on context. Here, we review the defects associated with retinoic acid signaling manipulations, mostly in chick and mouse models, tr...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  10. Spinal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartor, K.

    1980-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable investigative method in neuroradiology. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, with or without intravenous contrast enhancement, it can be used to diagnose paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structure changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT can in selected cases be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography as an additional procedure (secondary CT-myelography) or even as initial procedure ( primary CT-myelography), taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to provide a transverse axial image of the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in density. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly the routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, is to be expected.

  11. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Brochures News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Spinal Muscular Atrophy Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a friend ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate Sitemap Privacy ... © 2011 – 2016 Hill Foundation for Families Living With Disabilities FacingDisability.com is an informational ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate Sitemap Privacy Statement Terms of Use © 2011 – 2016 Hill Foundation for Families Living With Disabilities FacingDisability.com is an informational ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the entire family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal ... Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate Sitemap Privacy Statement Terms of Use © 2011 – 2016 Hill Foundation ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  17. Corticospinal tract insult alters GABAergic circuitry in the mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Russ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During perinatal development, corticospinal tract (CST projections into the spinal cord help refine spinal circuitry. Although the normal developmental processes that are controlled by the arrival of corticospinal input are becoming clear, little is known about how perinatal cortical damage impacts specific aspects of spinal circuit development, particularly the inhibitory microcircuitry that regulates spinal reflex circuits. In this study, we sought to determine how ischemic cortical damage impacts the synaptic attributes of a well-characterized population of inhibitory, GABAergic interneurons, called GABApre neurons, which modulates the efficiency of proprioceptive sensory terminals in the sensorimotor reflex circuit. We found that putative GABApre interneurons receive CST input and, using an established mouse model of perinatal stroke, that cortical ischemic injury results in a reduction of CST density within the intermediate region of the spinal cord, where these interneurons reside. Importantly, CST alterations were restricted to the side contralateral to the injury. Within the synaptic terminals of the GABApre interneurons, we observed a dramatic upregulation of the 65-isoform of the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. In accordance with the CST density reduction, GAD65 was elevated on the side of the spinal cord contralateral to cortical injury. This effect was not seen for other GABApre synaptic markers or in animals that received sham surgery. Our data reveal a novel effect of perinatal stroke that involves severe deficits in the architecture of descending spinal pathways, which in turn appear to promote molecular alterations in a specific spinal GABAergic circuit.

  18. Spinal Arteriovenous Fistula with Progressive Paraplegia after Spinal Anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Argyrakis, Nikolaos; Georgios K Matis; Mpata-Tshibemba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    A case of an iatrogenic spinal arteriovenous fistula with progressive paraplegia in a young woman is reported. The fistula was eventually created after repetitive lumbar punctures performed in the process of spinal anaesthesia. Her symptoms were progressed to paraplegia over a period of 2 years. The digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a single-hole fistula, involving the anterior spinal artery and vein. The lesion was occluded by embolization with immediate improvement. The potential...

  19. Spinal arteriovenous fistula with progressive paraplegia after spinal anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Argyrakis, Nikolaos; Georgios K Matis; Mpata-Tshibemba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    A case of an iatrogenic spinal arteriovenous fistula with progressive paraplegia in a young woman is reported. The fistula was eventually created after repetitive lumbar punctures performed in the process of spinal anaesthesia. Her symptoms were progressed to paraplegia over a period of 2 years. The digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a single-hole fistula, involving the anterior spinal artery and vein. The lesion was occluded by embolization with immediate improvement. The potential...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1,517,806 $1,071,309 Data Source: Economic Impact of SCI published in the journal Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Volume 16 ... South, SRC 515, Birmingham, AL 35233-7330 For Statistics: (205) 934-3342; For Business: (205) 934-3320; TDD: (205) 934-4642; FAX: ( ...

  1. Primary spinal epidural lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutham Cugati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidural location for lymphoma is observed in 0.1-6.5% of all the lymphomas. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL is a subset of lymphomas, where there are no other recognizable sites of lymphomas at the time of diagnosis. The incidence of this subset of lymphomas is much less. It, however, is increasingly diagnosed, due to the increased use of more sensitive imaging modalities. For the electronic search, Pubmed was used to identify journals that enlisted and enumerated PSEL from 1961 to January 2011. The following combination of terms: "primary," "spinal," "epidural," and "lymphoma" were used. The most significant articles and their bibliographies were analyzed by the authors. The symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, histopathology, treatment, and outcome have been analyzed in a systematic manner

  2. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Transverse myelitis following spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal anesthesia is widely used during surgical procedures. It is generally safe and the frequency of severe, permanent neurological complications associated with it has been reported to be extremely low. We report a patient, who developed paraplegia following spinal anesthesia. A 29-year-old male was referred with acute, flaccid, sensory motor paraplegia, with bladder and bowel involvement. He developed this immediately after an operation for inguinal hernia under spinal anesthesia. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed hemorrhagic myelitis in the conus at D12. He was referred after he did not respond to intravenous methylprednisolone for 10 days. This case brings up the difficulty encountered in determination of the interspace used for spinal anesthesia and the potential for traumatic injury to the spinal cord. It also demonstrates the tragic outcome after a clinician violates some important, standard and established guidelines.

  4. Spinal accessory nerve neurilemmoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neurilemmoma of the spinal accessory nerve extending from the lower brain stem to the high cervical region, without typical jugular foramen syndome is presented. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a high cervical intradural extramedullary lesion in patients with lower cranial nerve(s) dysfunction. The value of intrathecal and intravenous contrast enhancement computed tomography (CT) myelogram is emphasized. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host

  6. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  7. Infections in spinal instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerometta, Antoine; Olaverri, Juan Carlos Rodriguez; Bitan, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Surgical-site infection (SSI ) in the spine is a serious postoperative complication. Factors such as posterior surgical approach, arthrodesis, use of spinal instrumentation, age, obesity, diabetes, tobacco use, operating-room environment and estimated blood loss are well established in the literature to affect the risk of infection. Infection after spine surgery with instrumentation is becoming a common pathology. The reported infection rates range from 0.7% to 11.9%, depending on the diagnos...

  8. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  9. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  10. Elevated PGC-1α Activity Sustains Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Muscle Function without Extending Survival in a Mouse Model of Inherited ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Da Cruz, Sandrine; Parone, Philippe A.; Lopes, Vanda S.; Lillo, Concepción; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Lee, Sandra K.; Vetto, Anne P.; Petrosyan, Susanna; Marsala, Martin; Murphy, Anne N.; Williams, David S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Don W Cleveland

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α induces multiple effects on muscle, including increased mitochondrial mass and activity. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal, adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective loss of motor neurons and skeletal muscle degeneration. An early event is thought to be denervation-induced muscle atrophy accompanied by alterations in mitochondrial activity and morphology within muscle. We now report that elevation of PGC-...

  11. Vertebral spinal osteophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Zachary; Tubbs, R Shane; Apaydin, Nihal; Hage, Robert; Jordan, Robert; Loukas, Marios

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common complication in the elderly and is often associated with osteophyte growth on vertebral bodies. The clinical presentation of vertebral osteophytes is related to anatomical structures adjacent to the spinal column. For instance, cervical osteophytes potentially involve the pharynx and esophagus, leading to dysphagic symptoms that may be accompanied by food aspiration, vocal fold paralysis and obstructive sleep apnea. In addition to anterior cervical osteophytes, posterior and uncinate process osteophytes may form, compressing the spinal cord and vertebral artery blood supply, respectively. Cervical osteophytes have also been shown to form an accessory median atlanto-occipital joint when the relationship between the atlas, dens and basiocciput is involved. In the thorax, the esophagus is often affected by osteophytes and may result in dysphagia. Traumatic and non-traumatic thoracic aorta pseudoaneurysm formation has been attributed to sharp osteophytes lacerating the aorta, a direct complication of the relationship between the aorta anterior vertebral column. Additionally, aspiration pneumonia was reported in patients with compression of a main stem bronchus, due to mechanical compression by thoracic osteophytes. In the lumbar spinal region, the two major structures in close proximity to the spine are the inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta, both of which have been reported to be affected by osteophytes. Treatment of osteophytes is initially conservative with anti-inflammatory medications, followed by surgical removal. Increasing obesity and geriatric populations will continue to result in an array of osteoarthritic degenerative changes such as osteophyte formation. PMID:20383671

  12. Complications of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dursun, Erbil; Hamamci, Nigar; Ozbey, Aydan; Cakci, Aytul

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord injury and its complications cause important physical, psychosocial and economical problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications resulting from spinal cord injury, to show their adverse effects on the rehabilitation program, and to make related clinicians to call attention especially to preventable complications. Sixty-two spinal cord injured patients were included in the study. All the patients were evaluated regarding age, gender, etiology, time since inj...

  13. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, William E.; Brent Y. Kimball; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition associated with trauma, lumbar puncture, hemorrhagic disorder, anticoagulant therapy, spinal surgery, tumor, vascular malformations, and spinal or epidural anesthesia. Traumatic SDH is even more uncommon than other forms of SDH with only 10 reported cases in the literature. Following a punch to the head and loss of consciousness, a 35-year-old man reported headaches, right-sided tinnitus, and dull ache behi...

  14. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, S.; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and henc...

  15. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  16. Spinal angiography. Anatomy, technique and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal angiography is a diagnostic modality requiring detailed knowledge of spinal vascular anatomy. The cervical spinal cord is supplied by the vertebral arteries while segmental arteries which are preserved from fetal anatomy, supply the thoracic and lumbar regions. As spinal angiography carries the risk of paraplegia the indications have to be considered very carefully. Nevertheless, spinal angiography should be performed if there is reason to suspect a spinal vascular malformation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (orig.)

  17. A comprehensive assessment of the SOD1G93A low-copy transgenic mouse, which models human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Acevedo-Arozena

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The disorder generally strikes in mid-life, relentlessly leading to paralysis and death, typically 3–5 years after diagnosis. No effective treatments are available. Up to 10% of ALS is familial, usually autosomal dominant. Several causative genes are known and, of these, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 is by far the most frequently found, accounting for up to 20% of familial ALS. A range of human mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse strains has been produced, and these largely successfully model the human disease. Of these, the most widely used is the SOD1 mouse, which expresses a human SOD1 transgene with a causative G93A mutation. This mouse model is excellent for many purposes but carries up to 25 copies of the transgene and produces a great excess of SOD1 protein, which might affect our interpretation of disease processes. A variant of this strain carries a deletion of the transgene array such that the copy number is dropped to eight to ten mutant SOD1 genes. This ‘deleted’ ‘low-copy’ mouse undergoes a slower course of disease, over many months. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of phenotype, including nerve and muscle physiology and histology, to add to our knowledge of this ‘deleted’ strain and give baseline data for future studies. We find differences in phenotype that arise from genetic background and sex, and we quantify the loss of nerve and muscle function over time. The slowly progressive pathology observed in this mouse strain could provide us with a more appropriate model for studying early-stage pathological processes in ALS and aid the development of therapies for early-stage treatments.

  18. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, José M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Estefanía; Sanz-Rivas, David; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and lumbar hypo/hyper lordosis in these postures. Forty adolescent tennis players (24 male and 16 female) aged 13-18 years, participated voluntarily in this study. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt. The mean values in the relaxed standing posture were 43.83° ± 7.87° (thoracic kyphosis), - 27.58° ± 7.01° (lumbar lordosis), and 13.38° ± 5.57° (pelvic tilt) for male tennis players, respectively; and 36.13° ± 6.69° (thoracic kyphosis), - 32.69° ± 5.06° (lumbar lordosis), 20.94° ± 5.36° (pelvic tilt) for female tennis players (p tennis players showed a frequency of 62.5% and 93.8% (p = 0.032) for neutral thoracic kyphosis, and 83.3% and 93.8% (p = 0.062) in neutral lumbar lordosis, respectively. In conclusion, due to the high percentage of neutral spinal curvatures in both male and female tennis players, to practice tennis in these levels does not alter sagittal spinal morphology in the relaxed standing posture in adolescent highly trained tennis players. Key Points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt during several postures in young highly trained tennis players. Female tennis players showed statistically significant greater anterior pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and lower thoracic kyphosis than male tennis players. The high percentage of neutral thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis posture in both groups of young tennis players in relaxed standing

  19. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W;

    1997-01-01

    analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin was...... specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation in...

  20. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.)

  1. Erythropoietin attenuates the sequels of ischaemic spinal cord injury with enhanced recruitment of CD34+ cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Koji; Wagner, Klaus; Mark, Peter; Pittermann, Erik; Gäbel, Ralf; Furlani, Dario; Li, Wenzhong; Vollmar, Brigitte; Yamada, Tomomi; Steinhoff, Gustav; Ma, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Erythropoietin has been shown to promote tissue regeneration after ischaemic injury in various organs. Here, we investigated whether Erythropoietin could ameliorate ischaemic spinal cord injury in the mouse and sought an underlying mechanism. Spinal cord ischaemia was developed by cross-clamping the descending thoracic aorta for 7 or 9 min. in mice. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg) or saline was administrated 30 min. before aortic cross-clamping. Neurological function was assessed using t...

  2. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back. Generally speaking, SCI is damage to the spinal nerves, the body's central and most important nerve bundle, ... This, in turn, damages the axons—the long nerve cell "wires" that pass through ... point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement ...

  3. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.)

  4. Paediatric Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhee Goyal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric spinal anesthesia is not only a safe alternative to general anaesthesia but often the anaesthesia technique of choice in many lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries in children. The misconception regarding its safety and feasibility is broken and is now found to be even more cost-effective. It is a much preferred technique especially for the common daycase surgeries generally performed in the paediatric age group. There is no require-ment of any additional expensive equipment either and this procedure can be easily performed in peripheral centers. However, greater acceptance and experience is yet desired for this technique to become popular.

  5. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Daniel Comer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system, providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord.

  6. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  7. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  8. An ultrastructural study of the development of leptomeningeal macrophages in the mouse and rabbit.

    OpenAIRE

    Sturrock, R R

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages can be identified in the leptomeninges of the mouse and rabbit spinal cord at E11 and E12 respectively. Initially macrophages contained few cytoplasmic organelles and had long, narrow convoluted processes. By E14 in the mouse and E16 in the rabbit the macrophages were well differentiated with short processes; the cytoplasm contained vacuoles of varying sizes, dense bodies, mitochondria, free ribosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum. In the young postnatal mouse leptomeningeal mac...

  9. In Vivo Reprogramming for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Wernig, Marius; Berninger, Benedikt; Nakafuku, Masato; Parmar, Malin; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming technologies have enabled the generation of various specific cell types including neurons from readily accessible patient cells, such as skin fibroblasts, providing an intriguing novel cell source for autologous cell transplantation. However, cell transplantation faces several difficult hurdles such as cell production and purification, long-term survival, and functional integration after transplantation. Recently, in vivo reprogramming, which makes use of endogenous cells for regeneration purpose, emerged as a new approach to circumvent cell transplantation. There has been evidence for in vivo reprogramming in the mouse pancreas, heart, and brain and spinal cord with various degrees of success. This mini review summarizes the latest developments presented in the first symposium on in vivo reprogramming glial cells into functional neurons in the brain and spinal cord, held at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, DC. PMID:26730402

  10. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202–211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202–211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  11. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  12. Cross-disease comparison of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy reveals conservation of selective vulnerability but differential neuromuscular junction pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comley, Laura H; Nijssen, Jik; Frost-Nylen, Johanna; Hedlund, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Neuromuscular junctions are primary pathological targets in the lethal motor neuron diseases spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Synaptic pathology and denervation of target muscle fibers has been reported prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms in mouse models of both diseases, suggesting that neuromuscular junctions are highly vulnerable from the very early stages, and are a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here we examined neuromuscular pathology longitudinally in three clinically relevant muscle groups in mouse models of ALS and SMA in order to assess their relative vulnerabilities. We show for the first time that neuromuscular junctions of the extraocular muscles (responsible for the control of eye movement) were resistant to degeneration in endstage SMA mice, as well as in late symptomatic ALS mice. Tongue muscle neuromuscular junctions were also spared in both animal models. Conversely, neuromuscular junctions of the lumbrical muscles of the hind-paw were vulnerable in both SMA and ALS, with a loss of neuronal innervation and shrinkage of motor endplates in both diseases. Thus, the pattern of selective vulnerability was conserved across these two models of motor neuron disease. However, the first evidence of neuromuscular pathology occurred at different timepoints of disease progression, with much earlier evidence of presynaptic involvement in ALS, progressing to changes on the postsynaptic side. Conversely, in SMA changes appeared concomitantly at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that mechanisms of neuromuscular disruption are distinct in these diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1424-1442, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26502195

  13. Spinal muscular atrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darras, Basil T

    2015-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are hereditary degenerative disorders of lower motor neurons associated with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Proximal 5q SMA is caused by decreased levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. Its inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive, resulting from mutations involving the SMN1 gene on chromosome 5q13. Unlike other autosomal recessive diseases, the SMN gene has a unique structure (an inverted duplication) that presents potential therapeutic targets. Although there is currently no effective treatment of SMA, the field of translational research in this disorder is active and clinical trials are ongoing. Advances in the multidisciplinary supportive care of children with SMA also offer hope for improved life expectancy and quality of life. PMID:26022173

  14. The spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spinal cord develops initially as an invagination of the thickened ectodermal neural plate to form the neural groove. This is then closed over by the neural folds, which fuse first in the thoracic region, then progressively rostrad and caudad to form the neural tube. The neural tube is completely formed by the fourth fetal week and is separated from the overlying ectoderm by intervening mesoderm, part of which has simultaneously segmented into somites to become the vertebral column. The cartilaginous and ossifying neural arches of the vertebral column are completely developed and fused by the third month of fetal life. The fetal spine can be detected by US by 12 weeks of gestational age

  15. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Feng; Brown, Arthur; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Omana, Vanessa; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which inflammatory cells from the circulation invade organs such as the liver, lung and kidney, leading to damage of these organs. Our previous study (Gris, et al, Exp. Neurol, 2008) demonstrated that spinal cord injury (SCI) activates circulating neutrophils that then invade the lung and kidney from 2 to 24 h after injury, increasing myeloperoxidase activity, cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metallop...

  16. Retinoic Acid Signaling during Early Spinal Cord Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Diez del Corral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid signaling is required at several steps during the development of the spinal cord, from the specification of generic properties to the final acquisition of neuronal subtype identities, including its role in trunk neural crest development. These functions are associated with the production of retinoic acid in specific tissues and are highly dependent on context. Here, we review the defects associated with retinoic acid signaling manipulations, mostly in chick and mouse models, trying to separate the different processes where retinoic acid signaling is involved and to highlight common features, such as its ability to promote transitions along the neuronal differentiation cascade.

  17. Inhibitory zinc-enriched terminals in mouse spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, G; Jo, S M; Varea, E;

    2001-01-01

    zinc selenium autometallographic silver grains, and zinc transporter-3 and glutamate decarboxylase immunohistochemical puncta in both ventral and dorsal horns as seen in the light microscope corresponded to their presence in the synaptic vesicles of zinc-enriched terminals at ultrastructural levels...

  18. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 325 9th Ave., Seattle WA 98104 Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington ...

  19. Transcutaneous Spinal Direct Current Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Vergari, Maurizio; Ferrucci, Roberta; Ciocca, Matteo; Scelzo, Emma; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In the past 10 years renewed interest has centered on non-invasive transcutaneous weak direct currents applied over the scalp to modulate cortical excitability (“brain polarization” or transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS). Extensive literature shows that tDCS induces marked changes in cortical excitability that outlast stimulation. Aiming at developing a new, non-invasive, approach to spinal cord neuromodulation we assessed the after-effects of thoracic transcutaneous spinal DC stim...

  20. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Our case illustrates rapid resolution of a posttraumatic spinal SDH after treatment with oral corticosteroids. Recognition of blood products on MRI is vital to diagnosis and expedient treatment. There is agreement that prompt laminectomy with evacuation of SDH should be performed before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Including our patient, 4 of 11 reported cases of thoracic or lumbar SDH resolved with conservative treatment.

  1. Estudio anatómico de la transferencia de los nervios accesorio y toracodorsal al nervio cubital en el gato Anatomic study of spinal accesory and thoracodorsal nerves transfer to ulnar nerve in cats

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Martínez-Méndez; A. Isla Guerrero; C. Pérez Conde; Morales, C.; C. Casado Pérez

    2008-01-01

    Las lesiones del plexo braquial son una de las patologías más graves y con mayor número de secuelas del miembro superior. En el momento actual las transferencias nerviosas se encuentran en primera línea del armamento terapéutico para reconstruir funciones proximales del miembro superior. En el estudio que presentamos se realizaron 20 transferencias nerviosas al nervio cubital del gato común, tomando bien el nervio accesorio del espinal (10 casos) o bien el nervio toracodorsal (10 casos). Como...

  2. The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Once two mice (老鼠) were good friends. One lived in the city, the other lived in the country (乡村). After many years, the city mouse came to see the country mouse. The country mouse took him to his house in a field. He gave him the nicest food that he could find. The city mouse said,

  3. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99mTc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [18F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  4. Mouse lymphotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivers, G; Braungart, D; Leonard, E J

    1976-07-01

    The addition of PHA to C3H mouse spleen cells in tissue culture led to the production of lymphotoxin (LT). Cytotoxicity was assayed by addition of the culture fluids to syngeneic target cells labeled with tritiated thymidine; after an incubation period of 72 hr the amount of radioactivity released into the supernatant was measured. The LT activity in unfractionated culture fluids survived lyophilization, remained unchanged for many weeks at 4 degrees C, and progressively decreased on heating at 56 degrees C for periods from 1 to 9 hr. Based on the G-200 Sephadex distribution coefficients for several preparations, the m.w. of mouse lymphotoxin was about 41,000 daltons. Lymphotoxin from three different spleen cell production runs was recovered from isoelectric focusing columns in sharply focused peaks, the pH of which ranged from 4.4 to 4.8. PMID:1084362

  5. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas; Spinale durale arteriovenoese Fisteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thron, A. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is an important cause of a slowly progressive sensorimotor transverse lesion in mostly elderly patients. The disease affects men in 80% of the cases. Per year and per 1 Million inhabitants only 5-10 new cases of the disease have to be expected. Although rare, the serious disease should not be missed. Diagnosis can be made by MRI and spinal angiography. The result of treatment depends on early diagnosis. The arteriovenous shunt is located within the dural layer of the spinal canal. It connects branches of a radiculomeningeal artery with the veins of the spinal cord. Spinal cord supplying vessels are not primarily involved. Arterialisation of the venous part of the spinal cord circulation results in a chronic congestive myelopathy, which can well be demonstrated by MR imaging. The role of selective spinal angiography is to detect and exactly localize the site of the avshunt, which is rather difficult in some cases. Therapeutic alternatives are effective embolization of the fistula with liquid agents or surgical dysconnection. (orig.) [German] Die spinale durale arteriovenoese Fistel (SDAVF) ist eine wichtige Ursache fuer eine sich langsam, aber progredient entwickelnde Querschnittslaehmung des meist aelteren Patienten. 80% der Betroffenen sind Maenner. Die Erkrankungshaeufigkeit ist mit 5-10 Neuerkrankungen/1 Mio. Einwohner/Jahr zwar selten. Die unbehandelt ernste Prognose sowie die Tatsache, dass diese Erkrankung diagnostizierbar ist und der Erfolg der Behandlung von einer moeglichst fruehzeitigen Diagnosestellung abhaengt, machen sie jedoch zu einer wichtigen Erkrankung. Die der Erkrankung zugrundeliegende arteriovenoese Gefaessfehlverbindung ist in der Dura mater des Rueckenmarks gelegen. Ihre Ursache ist ungeklaert, sie ist vermutlich erworben wie die ihr aehnlichen arteriovenoesen Fisteln in der harten Hirnhaut des Schaedels. Im Gegensatz zu den angeborenen arteriovenoesen Gefaessmissbildungen zwischen

  6. Clinical picture of spinal tumors; Klinik spinaler Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, F. [Helios-Kliniken, Neurologische Klinik, Schwerin (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Spinal tumors may present with symptoms such as pain and motor and sensory deficits. Sphincter dysfunction may also occur. The clinical picture depends upon the size and localization of the tumor in relation to the cross section and the height along the longitudinal axis of the spinal cord. Typical symptoms due to transverse damage of the spinal cord are complete lesion, Brown-Sequard syndrome, a lesion of the central spinal cord, and posterior cord syndrome. Tetraparesis, spastic, or flaccid paraparesis result from lesions at the cervical spine, thoracic spine, or below the first lumbar vertebral body, respectively. (orig.) Schmerzen, Paresen und Sensibilitaetsstoerungen stellen die wesentlichen und haeufigen Symptome spinaler Raumforderungen dar. Blasen- und Mastdarmstoerungen sind weitere moegliche Symptome. Ausdehnungen der Raumforderungen im Querschnitt und im Hinblick auf die Laengsachse des Rueckenmarks bestimmen das klinische Bild. Kompletter Querschnitt, Brown-Sequard-Syndrom, zentrale Rueckenmarkschaedigung und Hinterstrangsyndrom sind haeufige Auspraegungen entsprechend der Querschnittslaesion. Tetraparese, spastische oder schlaffe Paraparese resultieren aus Laesionen in Hoehe HWS, BWS bzw. unterhalb von LWK1. (orig.)

  7. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M;

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  8. Exciting innovations for the spinally injured

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, K.J.; McLean, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Spinal injury can be devastating, resulting, as it often does, in some paralysis and loss of sensation. Engineering plays an important role in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Here, the authors survey current research into the uses of functional electrical stimulation to improve the quality of life of spinally injured people. Touching on the area of spinal cord repair and nerve regeneration, they also consider the question of whether technology can help paraplegics to take steps again.

  9. Syringomyelia Associated with a Spinal Arachnoid Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2009-01-01

    While syringomyelia is not a rare spinal disorder, syringomyelia associated with a spinal arachnoid cyst is very unusual. Here, we report a 62-year-old man who suffered from gait disturbance and numbness of bilateral lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the presence of a spinal arachnoid cyst between the 7th cervical and 3rd thoracic vertebral segment and syringomyelia extending between the 6th cervical and 1st thoracic vertebral segment. The cyst had compressed t...

  10. Recurrent Spinal Meningioma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hoi Jung; Paeng, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Yong Tae

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common intradural spinal tumors accounting for 25% of all spinal tumors. Being a slow growing and invariably benign tumor, it responds favorably to surgical excision. In addition, spinal meningioma has low recurrence rates. However, we experienced a case of intradural extramedullary spinal meningioma which recurred 16 years after the initial surgery on a 64-year-old woman. She presented with progressive neurological symptoms and had a surgical history of remova...

  11. Radiosurgery of Spinal Meningiomas and Schwannomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kufeld, M; Wowra, B.; Muacevic, A.; Zausinger, Stefan; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze local control, clinical symptoms and toxicity after image-guided radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas. Standard treatment of benign spinal lesions is microsurgical resection. While a few publications have reported about radiosurgery for benign spinal lesions, this is the first study analyzing the outcome of robotic radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors, treated exclusively with a non-invasive, fiducial free, single-fraction setup. Thirty-six p...

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multiple spinal involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xiao Guang; Zhong, Wo Quan; Ma, Qing Jun; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting; Liu, Zhong Jun

    2010-01-01

    To stress the clinical and radiologic presentation and treatment outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple spinal involvements. A total of 42 cases with spinal LCH were reviewed in our hospital and 5 had multifocal spinal lesions. Multiple spinal LCH has been reported in 50 cases in the literature. All cases including ours were analyzed concerning age, sex, clinical and radiologic presentation, therapy and outcome. Of our five cases, three had neurological symptom, four sof...

  13. Spatial Elucidation of Spinal Cord Lipid- and Metabolite- Regulations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2014-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, rapidly progressing disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the brain stem and the spinal cord. We employed time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to profile spatial lipid- and metabolite- regulations in post mortem human spinal cord tissue from ALS patients to investigate chemical markers of ALS pathogenesis. ToF-SIMS scans and multivariate analysis of image and spectral data were performed on thoracic human spinal cord sections. Multivariate statistics of the image data allowed delineation of anatomical regions of interest based on their chemical identity. Spectral data extracted from these regions were compared using two different approaches for multivariate statistics, for investigating ALS related lipid and metabolite changes. The results show a significant decrease for cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E in the ventral horn of ALS samples, which is presumably a consequence of motor neuron degeneration. Conversely, the biogenic mediator lipid lysophosphatidylcholine and its fragments were increased in ALS ventral spinal cord, pointing towards neuroinflammatory mechanisms associated with neuronal cell death. ToF-SIMS imaging is a promising approach for chemical histology and pathology for investigating the subcellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  14. Wnt Signaling is Altered by Spinal Cord Neuronal Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Li; Guan, Yingjun; Wu, Xin; Chen, Yanchun; Liu, Zhijun; Du, Hongmei; wang, xin

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in the cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. The etiology and mechanisms of selective motor neuron loss in ALS remain unknown. Wnt signaling is involved in neurodegenerative processes but little is known about the kinetic changes in Wnt signaling during ALS progression. In this study we used transcriptional microarray analysis to examine the expression of Wnt...

  15. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord; Magnetresonanztomographie fuer MTRA. Spinalkanal und Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-07-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  16. Primary Dural Spinal Lymphoma Presentation of a Rare Spinal Tumor Case

    OpenAIRE

    Dilber Ayçiçek Çeçen; Necati Tatarlı; Hikmet Turan Süslü; Selçuk Özdoğan; Nagehan Özdemir Barışık

    2015-01-01

    Background. Primary spinal dural lymphomas (PSDL) are tumors with characteristic histopathology of a lymphoma, which are completely in the spinal epidural space without any other systemic involvement. Extranodal primary lymphoma involving nervous system prefers thalamus/basal ganglia, periventricular region, cerebellum, eyes, meninges/dura, and cranial nerves or spinal cord. Rare spinal localization with acute spinal cord compression is worth attention. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old male p...

  17. Unusual presentation of spinal lipomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson W

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available William Stephenson,1 Matthew J Kauflin2,3 1Primary Care, Huntington Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Huntington, WV, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, Grandview Medical Center, Dayton, Ohio, OH, USA; 3Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio, OH, USA Abstract: Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL is a rare condition characterized by overgrowth of normal adipose tissue in the extradural space within the spinal canal that can lead to significant spinal cord compression. It is most commonly reported in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Other causes can include obesity and hypercortisolism. Occasionally, idiopathic SEL will occur in patients with no known risk factors, but cases are more generally reported in obesity and males. We present the case of a 35 year-old non-obese woman found to have rapidly progressive SEL that was not associated with any of the common causes of the disorder. Keywords: lipomatosis, laminectomy, hypercortisolism

  18. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  19. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) If you or a loved one is ... spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is the ... on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90SI5005). NIDILRR is a ...

  20. Motorcycle-related spinal injury: crash characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkipli, Zarir Hafiz; Abdul Rahmat, Abdul Manap; Mohd Faudzi, Siti Atiqah; Paiman, Noor Faradila; Wong, Shaw Voon; Hassan, Ahamedali

    2012-11-01

    This study presents an analysis of crash characteristics of motorcyclists who sustained spinal injuries in motorcycle crashes. The aim of the study is to identify the salient crash characteristics that would help explain spinal injury risks for motorcyclists. Data were retrospectively collected from police case reports that were archived at MIROS from year 2005 to 2007. The data were categorized into two subcategories; the first group was motorcycle crashes with spinal injury (case) and the second group was motorcycle crashes without spinal injury (control). A total of 363 motorcyclists with spinal injury and 873 motorcyclists without spinal injury were identified and analyzed. Descriptive analysis and multivariate analysis were performed in order to determine the odds of each characteristic in contributing to spinal injury. Single vehicle crash, collision with fixed objects and crash configuration were found to have significant influence on motorcyclists in sustaining spinal injury (p<0.05). Although relatively few than other impact configurations, the rear-end impacted motorcyclist shows the highest risk of spinal injury. Helmets have helped to reduce head injury but they did not seem to offer corresponding protection for the spine in the study. With a growing number of young motorcyclists, further efforts are needed to find effective measures to help reduce the crash incidents and severity of spinal injury. In sum, the study provides some insights on some vital crash characteristics associated with spinal injury that can be further investigated to determine the appropriate counter-measures and prevention strategies to reduce spinal injury. PMID:23036400

  1. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Marong Fang; Haohao Chen; Fangming Gou; Mingxing Ding

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... accumulate and impair the normal function of motor neurons. Other types of spinal muscular atrophy that primarily affect the lower legs and feet and the lower arms and hands are caused by the dysfunction of neurons in the spinal cord. When spinal muscular atrophy ...

  3. Effects of novel subtype selective M-current activators on spinal reflexes in vitro: Comparison with retigabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Baz, Jorge; Lopez-Garcia, Jose A; Rivera-Arconada, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    The activation of Kv7 channels and the resulting M-current is a powerful mechanism to control neuronal excitability with profound effects in pain pathways. Despite the lack of specific data on the expression and role of these channels in nociceptive processing, much attention has been paid at exploring their potential value as targets for analgesia. Here we have characterized the spinal actions of two novel subunit selective Kv7 activators, ICA-069673 and ML213, and compared their effects to those of retigabine that acts with similar affinity on all neuronal Kv7 channels. Spinal reflexes were recorded in a mouse spinal cord in vitro preparation to allow the testing of the compounds on native spinal pathways at known concentrations. As retigabine, novel compounds depressed spinal segmental transmission with particularly strong effects on wind up, showing an adequate pro-analgesic profile. ML213 presented the highest potency. In contrast to retigabine, the effects of ICA-069673 and ML213 were blocked by XE-991 even at the highest concentrations used, suggesting specific effect on Kv7 channels. In addition, the effects of ICA-069673 on repetitive stimulation are consistent with a mode of action involving state or activity dependent interaction with the channels. Compared to retigabine, novel Kv7 openers maintain strong depressant effects on spinal nociceptive transmission showing an improved specificity on Kv7 channels. The differential effects obtained with these Kv7 openers may indicate the existence of several Kv7 conformations in spinal circuits. PMID:27263036

  4. ECG in neonate mice with spinal muscular atrophy allows assessment of drug efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Heier, Christopher R.; DiDonato, Christine J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular technologies have produced diverse arrays of animal models for studying genetic diseases and potential therapeutics. Many have neonatal phenotypes. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder primarily affecting children, and is of great interest in translational medicine. The most widely used SMA mouse models require all phenotyping to be performed in neonates since they do not survive much past weaning. Pre-clinical studies in neonate mice can be hindered by toxicity...

  5. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author)

  6. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...

  7. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  8. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  9. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Improves Myelination and Attenuates Tissue Damage of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Ju, Peijun; Tjandra, Editha; Yeap, Yeeshan; Owlanj, Hamed; Feng, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    Preventing demyelination and promoting remyelination of denuded axons are promising therapeutic strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition was reported to benefit the neural functional recovery and the axon regeneration after SCI. However, its role in de- and remyelination of axons in injured spinal cord is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EGFR inhibitor, PD168393 (PD), on the myelination in mouse contusive SCI model. We found that expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the injured spinal cords of PD treated mice was remarkably elevated. The density of glial precursor cells and oligodendrocytes (OLs) was increased and the cell apoptosis in lesions was attenuated after PD168393 treatment. Moreover, PD168393 treatment reduced both the numbers of OX42 + microglial cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein + astrocytes in damaged area of spinal cords. We thus conclude that the therapeutic effects of EGFR inhibition after SCI involves facilitating remyelination of the injured spinal cord, increasing of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and OLs, as well as suppressing the activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages. PMID:26883518

  10. Comparative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histopathological Correlates in Two SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Caron

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive and fatal disease due to motoneuron degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is becoming a promising non-invasive approach to monitor the disease course but a direct correlation with neuropathology is not feasible in human. Therefore in this study we aimed to examine MRI changes in relation to histopathology in two mouse models of ALS (C57BL6/J and 129S2/SvHsd SOD1G93A mice with different disease onset and progression. A longitudinal in vivo analysis of T2 maps, compared to ex vivo histological changes, was performed on cranial motor nuclei. An increased T2 value was associated with a significant tissue vacuolization that occurred prior to motoneuron loss in the cranial nuclei of C57 SOD1G93A mice. Conversely, in 129Sv SOD1G93A mice, which exhibit a more severe phenotype, MRI detected a milder increase of T2 value, associated with a milder vacuolization. This suggests that alteration within brainstem nuclei is not predictive of a more severe phenotype in the SOD1G93A mouse model. Using an ex vivo paradigm, Diffusion Tensor Imaging was also applied to study white matter spinal cord degeneration. In contrast to degeneration of cranial nuclei, alterations in white matter and axons loss reflected the different disease phenotype of SOD1G93A mice. The correspondence between MRI and histology further highlights the potential of MRI to monitor progressive motoneuron and axonal degeneration non-invasively in vivo. The identification of prognostic markers of the disease nevertheless requires validation in multiple models of ALS to ensure that these are not merely model-specific. Eventually this approach has the potential to lead to the development of robust and validated non-invasive imaging biomarkers in ALS patients, which may help to monitor the efficacy of therapies.

  11. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  12. Changes of BB Isoenzyme of Creatine Kinase, CaATPase and Calpain in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mouse Brain and Spinal Cord%实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎小鼠脑组织和脊髓中脑型肌酸激酶、钙泵和钙中性蛋白酶的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沛; 郑荣远; 林福虹; 王赵伟; 厉芳; 张正学

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the changes ofBB isoenzyme of creatine kinase(CK-BB), CaATPase and calpain in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE) mouse brain and spinal cord. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were induced into the models of EAE with multiple sclerosis by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) peptides. Behavioral changes of the EAE mice were observed and recorded. With HE staining, LFB myelin staining, the changes of the central nervous tissues, CK-BB, CaATPase and calpain activity were assayed in the peak incidence by using microplate reader and spectrophotometer (19 days after immunization). Results: Compared with the control group, the results of the EAE group were as follows :① Mean daily clinical scores and cumulative scores were mcreased(P<0.01).② HE staining: Central inflammatory cell infiltration became obvious(P<0.05).③ LFB Clinical Analysis of 15 Cases with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension HeadacheKEY WORDS spontaneous intracranial hypotension; headache; secondary headacheABSTRACT Aim: To explore the clinical features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension(SIH) headache.Methods: Clinical data of 15 cases of SIH headache were retrospectively analyzed. Results: 12 0f 15 caseswere acute onset, 9 were female. The ages of onset were from 28 t0 56 years. 93.33% cases had posturalheadache, with the common concomitant symptoms of nausea and vomit. The average cerebrospinal fluidpressure was (41.2 + 30.85)mmH20, which was higher in male than in female (P<0.05). Radionuclidecisternography and imaging were normal. All cases were cured after conservative treatment. Conclusion:Typical postural headache and cerebrospinal fluid pressure less than 60 mmH.O were the main features in SIHheadache, which were with favorable prognosis.%目的:观察实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎(EAE)小鼠模型脑组织和脊髓中脑型肌酸激酶(CK-BB)、钙泵(CaATPase) 和钙中性蛋白酶(calpain)的变化.方法:C57BL/6

  13. Ultrastructural studies of ALS mitochondria connect altered function and permeability with defects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Frati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The key role of mitochondria in patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is well documented by electron microscopy studies of motor neurons within spinal cord and brainstem. Nonetheless, recent studies challenged the role of mitochondria placed within the cell body of motor neuron. In fact, it was demonstrated that, despite preservation of mitochondria placed within this compartment, there is no increase in the lifespan of transgenic mouse models of ALS. Thus, the present mini-review comments on morphological findings of mitochondrial alterations in ALS patients in connection with novel findings about mitochondrial dynamics within various compartments of motor neurons. The latter issue was recently investigated in relationship with altered calcium homeostasis and autophagy, which affect mitochondria in ALS. In fact, it was recently indicated that a pathological mitophagy, mitochondriogenesis and calcium homeostasis produce different ultrastructural effects within specific regions of motor neurons. This might explain why specific compartments of motor neurons possess different thresholds to mitochondrial damage. In particular, it appears that motor axons represent the most sensitive compartment which undergoes the earliest and most severe alterations in the course of ALS. It is now evident that altered calcium buffering is compartment-dependent, as well as mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis. On the other hand, mitochondrial homeostasis strongly relies on calcium handling, the removal of altered mitochondria through the autophagy flux (mitophagy and the biogenesis of novel mitochondria (mitochondriogenesis. Thus, recent findings related to altered calcium storage and impaired autophagy flux in ALS may help to understand the occurrence of mitochondrial alterations as a hallmark in ALS patients. At the same time, the compartmentalization of such dysfunctions may be explained considering the compartments of calcium dynamics and

  14. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  15. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  16. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  17. Spinal Plasticity following Intermittent Hypoxia: Implications for Spinal Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dale-Nagle, Erica A.; Hoffman, Michael S.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Vinit, Stéphane; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2010-01-01

    Plasticity is a fundamental property of the neural system controlling breathing. One frequently studied model of respiratory plasticity is long-term facilitation of phrenic motor output (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF arises from spinal plasticity, increasing respiratory motor output through a mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular...

  18. Reduction of cytosolic phospholipase A2α upregulation delays the onset of symptoms in SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Solomonov, Yulia; Hadad, Nurit; Levy, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal multifactorial neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective death of motor neurons in the cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha (cPLA2α) upregulation and activation in the spinal cord of patients with sporadic ALS and in the spinal cord of human mutant SOD1G93A (hmSOD1) transgenic mice were recently reported. Methods cPLA2α upregulation in the brainstem and spinal cord was reduced by brain infusio...

  19. Acquired spondylolysis after spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J A; Wiley, J J

    1984-11-01

    Spondylolysis occurring after a spinal fusion is considered to result from operative damage to the pars interarticularis on both sides. Fourteen cases are reported, and compared with the 23 cases which have previously been published. The defects are usually recognised within five years of fusion, and usually occur immediately above the fusion mass. Other contributory causes may be: fatigue fracture from concentration of stress; damage and altered function of the posterior ligament complex; and degenerative disc disease immediately above or below the fusion. Fusion technique is critical, since virtually all cases occurred after posterior interlaminar fusions. This complication is easily overlooked in patients with recurrent back pain after an originally successful posterior spinal fusion. PMID:6501368

  20. Plastic Changes in the Spinal Cord in Motor Neuron Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fornai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we analyze the cell number within lamina X at the end stage of disease in a G93A mouse model of ALS; the effects induced by lithium; the stem-cell like phenotype of lamina X cells during ALS; the differentiation of these cells towards either a glial or neuronal phenotype. In summary we found that G93A mouse model of ALS produces an increase in lamina X cells which is further augmented by lithium administration. In the absence of lithium these nestin positive stem-like cells preferentially differentiate into glia (GFAP positive, while in the presence of lithium these cells differentiate towards a neuron-like phenotype (βIII-tubulin, NeuN, and calbindin-D28K positive. These effects of lithium are observed concomitantly with attenuation in disease progression and are reminiscent of neurogenetic effects induced by lithium in the subependymal ventricular zone of the hippocampus.

  1. Plastic changes in the spinal cord in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornai, Francesco; Ferrucci, Michela; Lenzi, Paola; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Flaibani, Marina; Siciliano, Gabriele; Giannessi, Francesco; Paparelli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we analyze the cell number within lamina X at the end stage of disease in a G93A mouse model of ALS; the effects induced by lithium; the stem-cell like phenotype of lamina X cells during ALS; the differentiation of these cells towards either a glial or neuronal phenotype. In summary we found that G93A mouse model of ALS produces an increase in lamina X cells which is further augmented by lithium administration. In the absence of lithium these nestin positive stem-like cells preferentially differentiate into glia (GFAP positive), while in the presence of lithium these cells differentiate towards a neuron-like phenotype ( β III-tubulin, NeuN, and calbindin-D28K positive). These effects of lithium are observed concomitantly with attenuation in disease progression and are reminiscent of neurogenetic effects induced by lithium in the subependymal ventricular zone of the hippocampus. PMID:24829911

  2. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  3. Non-Contiguous Spinal Injury in Cervical Spinal Trauma: Evaluation with Cervical Spine MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang-Jin

    2004-01-01

    Objective We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Materials and Methods Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyp...

  4. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  5. Nonlinear optical techniques for imaging and manipulating the mouse central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Matthew John

    The spinal cord of vertebrates serves as the conduit for somatosensory information and motor control, as well as being the locus of neural circuits that govern fast reflexes and patterned behaviors, such as walking in mammals or swimming in fish. Consequently, pathologies of the spinal cord -such as spinal cord injury (SCI)- lead to loss of motor control and sensory perception, with accompanying decline in life expectancy and quality of life. Despite the devastating effects of these diseases, few therapies exist to substantially ameliorate patient outcome. In part, studies of spinal cord pathology have been limited by the inability to perform in vivo imaging at the level of cellular processes. The focus of this thesis is to present the underlying theory for and demonstration of novel multi-photon microscopy (MPM) and optical manipulation techniques as they apply to studies the mouse central nervous system (CNS), with an emphasis on the spinal cord. The scientific findings which have resulted from the implementation of these techniques are also presented. In particular, we have demonstrated that third harmonic generation is a dye-free method of imaging CNS myelin, a fundamental constituent of the spinal cord that is difficult to label using exogenous dyes and/or transgenic constructs. Since gaining optical access to the spinal cord is a prerequisite for spinal cord imaging, we review our development of a novel spinal cord imaging chamber and surgical procedure which allowed us to image for multiple weeks following implantation without the need for repeated surgeries. We also have used MPM to characterize spinal venous blood flow before and after point occlusions. We review a novel nonlinear microscopy technique that may serve to show optical interfaces in three dimensions inside scattering tissue. Finally, we discuss a model and show results of optoporation, a means of transfecting cells with genetic constructs. Brief reviews of MPM and SCI are also presented.

  6. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K.; Huang, Russel C.

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the or...

  7. Characterization of A11 neurons projecting to the spinal cord of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblinger, Kathrin; Füzesi, Tamás; Ejdrygiewicz, Jillian; Krajacic, Aleksandra; Bains, Jaideep S; Whelan, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic A11 region has been identified in several species including rats, mice, cats, monkeys, zebrafish, and humans as the primary source of descending dopamine (DA) to the spinal cord. It has been implicated in the control of pain, modulation of the spinal locomotor network, restless leg syndrome, and cataplexy, yet the A11 cell group remains an understudied dopaminergic (DAergic) nucleus within the brain. It is unclear whether A11 neurons in the mouse contain the full complement of enzymes consistent with traditional DA neuronal phenotypes. Given the abundance of mouse genetic models and tools available to interrogate specific neural circuits and behavior, it is critical first to fully understand the phenotype of A11 cells. We provide evidence that, in addition to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) that synthesizes L-DOPA, neurons within the A11 region of the mouse contain aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), the enzyme that converts L-DOPA to dopamine. Furthermore, we show that the A11 neurons contain vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), which is necessary for packaging DA into vesicles. On the contrary, A11 neurons in the mouse lack the dopamine transporter (DAT). In conclusion, our data suggest that A11 neurons are DAergic. The lack of DAT, and therefore the lack of a DA reuptake mechanism, points to a longer time of action compared to typical DA neurons. PMID:25343491

  8. Acute Hydrocephalus Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang Gu; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of acute hydrocephalus secondary to cervical spinal cord injury in a patient with diffuse ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A 75-year-old male patient visited the emergency department with tetraparesis and spinal shock. Imaging studies showed cervical spinal cord injury with hemorrhage and diffuse OPLL from C1 to C4. We performed decompressive laminectomy and occipitocervical fusion. Two days after surgery, his mental status had deteriorated to drow...

  9. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  10. Nanomedicine for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent use...

  11. Mobile myelographic filling defects: Spinal cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Cimino, C.; Passerini, A.; La Mantia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Cysticercosis usually affects the brain and is easily demonstrated by CT. Spinal cysticercosis is much rarer and is usually diagnosed only at surgery. Myelographic demonstration of multiple rounded filling defects, some of which were mobile, allowed diagnosis of spinal extramedullary cysticercosis in an unsuspected case. The literature on spinal cysticercosis is briefly reviewed. Diagnosis is important in view of the recent development of medical treatment.

  12. Mobile myelographic filling defects: Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysticercosis usually affects the brain and is easily demonstrated by CT. Spinal cysticercosis is much rarer and is usually diagnosed only at surgery. Myelographic demonstration of multiple rounded filling defects, some of which were mobile, allowed diagnosis of spinal extramedullary cysticercosis in an unsuspected case. The literature on spinal cysticercosis is briefly reviewed. Diagnosis is important in view of the recent development of medical treatment. (orig.)

  13. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  14. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins and uncovertebral joint hypertrophy in the neck. The central canal and the neurorecess may be compromised by tumor infiltration, such as metastatic disease, or by infectious spondylitis."nAP diameter of the normal adult cervical canal has a mean value of 17-18 mm at vertebral levels C3-5. The lower cervical canal measures 12-14 mm. Cervical stenosis is associated with an AP diameter of less than 10 mm. The thoracic spinal canal varies from 12 to 14 mm in diameter in the adult. The diameter of the normal lumbar spinal canal varies from 15 to 27 mm. Lumbar stenosis results from a spinal canal diameter of less than 12 mm in some patients; a diameter of 10 mm is definitely stenotic."nSpinal MRI is the most suitable technique for the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The examination should be performed using thin sections (3 mm and high resolution, including the axial and sagittal planes using T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted techniques. The bony and osteophytic components are seen best using a T2-weighted gradient-echo technique."nOn MRI, findings of spinal stenosis have a variable presentation depending on the specific disease. The goal of spinal imaging is to localize the site and level of disease and to help differentiate between conditions in which patients require surgery or conservative treatment."nIn this presentation, different kinds of spinal canal stenosis and their MRI findings would be discussed.

  15. Neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis the spinal cord of 27 post mortem patients of the years 1997 to 2000 was investigated in comparison to 29 controls matched for sex, age and year of death. In addition to immunohistochemical examinations and demonstration of pathological cell changes, we also quantified the neurons of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. In comparison to controls, MS-patients show a significant loss of 43% of the cervical neurons and a signif...

  16. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, J. (Joaquín) del; Beguiristain, J. (José); Duart, J.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentat...

  17. Intracranial metastasis of spinal intramedullary anaplastic astrocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kataria, Rashim; Bhasme, Vishal; Chopra, Sanjeev; V D Sinha; Singhvi, Shashi

    2011-01-01

    Meningeal spread of spinal intramedullary astrocytoma into the cranium is rare. Only few case reports are available so far in the literature. We report a case of intramedullary high grade astrocytoma of the conus, developing intracranial metastasis after three months of partial excision of the spinal mass. The need for radical surgery, entire neuroaxis radiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy is suggested in the management of malignant spinal cord astrocytoma to prevent dissemination.

  18. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  19. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation transcriptome alterations in human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy C; Keeney, Paula M; Govind, Maria M; Bennett, James P

    2014-12-01

    Origins of onset and progression of motor neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not clearly known, but may include impairment of mitochondrial bioenergetics. We used quantitative PCR approaches to analyze the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) transcriptomes of spinal cord tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from persons with sporadic ALS compared with those without neurological disease. Expression measurements of 88 different nuclear (n) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA-encoded OXPHOS genes showed mtDNA-encoded respiratory gene expression was significantly decreased in ALS spinal cord by 78-84% (ANOVA p < 0.002). We observed the same phenomenon in freshly isolated PBMC from ALS patients (reduced 24-35%, ANOVA p < 0.001) and reproduced it in a human neural stem cell model treated with 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) (reduced 52-78%, ANOVA p < 0.001). nDNA-encoded OXPHOS genes showed heterogeneously and mostly decreased expression in ALS spinal cord tissue. In contrast, ALS PBMC and ddC-treated stem cells showed no significant change in expression of nDNA OXPHOS genes compared with controls. Genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, TFAM, ERRα, NRF1, NRF2 and POLG) were queried with inconclusive results. Here, we demonstrate there is a systemic decrease in mtDNA gene expression in ALS central and peripheral tissues that support pursuit of bioenergetic-enhancing therapies. We also identified a combined nDNA and mtDNA gene set (n = 26), downregulated in spinal cord tissue that may be useful as a biomarker in the development of cell-based ALS models. PMID:25081190

  20. Human neural stem cell replacement therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by spinal transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Hefferan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1 causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension of lifespan. The aim of the present study was to analyze the degree of therapeutical effect of hNSCs once grafted into the lumbar spinal ventral horn in presymptomatic immunosuppressed SOD1(G93A rats and to assess the presence and functional integrity of the descending motor system in symptomatic SOD1(G93A animals. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Presymptomatic SOD1(G93A rats (60-65 days old received spinal lumbar injections of hNSCs. After cell grafting, disease onset, disease progression and lifespan were analyzed. In separate symptomatic SOD1(G93A rats, the presence and functional conductivity of descending motor tracts (corticospinal and rubrospinal was analyzed by spinal surface recording electrodes after electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. Silver impregnation of lumbar spinal cord sections and descending motor axon counting in plastic spinal cord sections were used to validate morphologically the integrity of descending motor tracts. Grafting of hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A rats protected α-motoneurons in the vicinity of grafted cells, provided transient functional improvement, but offered no protection to α-motoneuron pools distant from grafted lumbar segments. Analysis of motor-evoked potentials recorded from the thoracic spinal cord of symptomatic SOD1(G93A rats showed a near complete loss of descending motor tract conduction, corresponding to a significant (50-65% loss of large caliber descending motor axons. CONCLUSIONS

  1. MR imaging of spinal epidural sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal epidural abscess is uncommonly found in adults and children. Early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis and prevents serious neurologic sequelae. Four patients with spinal epidural infections were recently evaluated with MR and CT of the spine. In all cases, MR and CT localized the site of infection accurately and showed adjacent bony osteomyelitis. MR proved superior in characterizing infection (abscess vs. inflammatory edema) and demonstrating epidural involvement and spinal cord compression. In all cases, MR obviated the need for myelography. Early recognition by MR of spinal epidural sepsis led to expeditious treatment and better clinical outcome

  2. Spinal arteriovenous malformation: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is abnormal connections between arteries and veins, without intervening capillaries, located in the spinal cord and/or its leptomeninges. There are two main types spinal of AVM; d ural AV fistulas, in which the nidus of the AV fistula is imbeded in the dural covering of the nerve root, and intradural AVMs, in which the nidus of the AVM is within the cord tissue or the pia. The intradural AVMs are further subclassified into juvenile AVMs, glomus AVMs, and direct AV fistulas. The authors report a case of spinal AVM, intradural and glomus type, confirmed by operation in 17 years old male patient

  3. Spontaneous Ventral Spinal Epidural Hematoma in an Infant: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad ABBAS

    2013-06-01

    disorders of the spinal cord, in Davidoff RA (ed: Handbook of the Spinal Cord.Infections and Cancer, Vol 5. New York: Marcel Dekker, 1986, pp 271-273.8. Blount J, Doughty K, Tubbs RS, Wellons JC, Reddy A, Law C, et al. In utero spontaneous cervical thoracicepidural hematoma imitating spinal cord birth injury. Pediatr Neurosurg 2004;40:23-7.9. Iguchi T, Ito Y, Asai M, Ito J, Okada N, Murakami M. [A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma]. No ToHattatsu 1993;25:267-70. Review. Japanese.10. Nagel MA, Taff IP, Cantos EL, Patel MP, Maytal J, Berman D. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a7-year-old girl. Diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging. Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1989;91:157-60.11. Metzger G, Singbartl G. Spinal epidural hematoma following epidural anesthesia versus spontaneous spinalsubdural hematoma. Two case reports. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 1991;35:105-7.12. Patel H, Garg BP. Increasing irritability with sudden onset of flaccid weakness. Semin Pediatr Neurol 1996;3:192-7.13. Tewari MK, Tripathi LN, Mathuriya SN, Khandelwal N, Kak VK. Spontaneous spinal extradural hematomain children. Report of three cases and a review of the literature. Childs Nerv Syst 1992;8:53-5. Review.14. Pecha MD, Able AC, Barber DB, Willingham AC. Outcome after spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in children: case report and review of the literature. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1998;79:460-3. Review.

  4. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  5. Changes in spinal range of motion after a flexibility training program in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battaglia G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Battaglia,1,2 Marianna Bellafiore,1,2 Giovanni Caramazza,2 Antonio Paoli,3 Antonino Bianco,1,2 Antonio Palma1,2 1Department of Law, Society, and Sport Sciences, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 2Sicilian Regional Sports School of Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI, Sicily, Italy; 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Background: Aging-related reduced spinal mobility can interfere with the execution of important functional skills and activities in elderly women. Although several studies have shown positive outcomes in response to spinal flexibility training programs, little is known about the management of sets and repetitions in training protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week specific and standardized flexibility training program on the range of spinal motion in elderly women. Methods: Participants were recruited in a senior center of Palermo and randomly assigned in two groups: trained group (TG and control group (CG, which included 19 and 18 women, respectively. TG was trained for 8 weeks at two sessions/week. In particular, every session included three phases: warm up (~10 minutes, central period (~50 minutes, and cool down (~10 minutes. CG did not perform any physical activity during the experimental period. Spinal ranges of motion (ROM were measured from neutral standing position to maximum bending position and from neutral standing position to maximum extension position before and after the experimental period, using a SpinalMouse® device (Idiag, Volkerswill, Switzerland. Results: After the training period, TG showed an increase in spinal inclination by 16.4% (P<0.05, in sacral/hip ROM by 29.2% (P<0.05, and in thoracic ROM by 22.5% (P>0.05 compared with CG from maximum extension position to maximum bending position. We did not observe any significant difference in TG's lumbar ROM compared with CG after the training period (P>0.05. Conclusion

  6. Involvement of spinal glutamate in nociceptive behavior induced by intrathecal administration of hemokinin-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Chizuko; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2016-03-23

    The most recently identified tachykinin, hemokinin-1, was cloned from mouse bone marrow. While several studies indicated that hemokinin-1 is involved in pain and inflammation, the physiological functions of hemokinin-1 are not fully understood. Our previous research demonstrated that the intrathecal (i.t.) administration of hemokinin-1 (0.00625-1.6 nmol) dose-dependently induced nociceptive behaviors, consisting of scratching, biting and licking in mice, which are very similar with the nociceptive behaviors induced by the i.t. administration of substance P. Low-dose (0.0125 nmol) hemokinin-1-induced nociceptive behavior was inhibited by a specific NK1 receptor antagonist; however, high-dose (0.1 nmol) hemokinin-1-induced nociceptive behavior was not affected. In the present study, we found that the nociceptive behaviors induced by hemokinin-1 (0.1 nmol) were inhibited by the i.t. co-administration of MK-801 or D-APV, which are NMDA receptor antagonists. Moreover, we measured glutamate in the extracellular fluid of the mouse spinal cord using microdialysis. The i.t. administration of hemokinin-1 produced a significant increase in glutamate in the spinal cord, which was significantly reduced by co-administration with NMDA receptor antagonists. These results suggest that hemokinin-1-induced nociceptive behaviors may be mediated by the NMDA receptor in the spinal cord. PMID:26899156

  7. Adenosine-mediated modulation of ventral horn interneurons and spinal motoneurons in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witts, Emily C; Nascimento, Filipe; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-10-01

    Neuromodulation allows neural networks to adapt to varying environmental and biomechanical demands. Purinergic signaling is known to be an important modulatory system in many parts of the CNS, including motor control circuitry. We have recently shown that adenosine modulates the output of mammalian spinal locomotor control circuitry (Witts EC, Panetta KM, Miles GB. J Neurophysiol 107: 1925-1934, 2012). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this adenosine-mediated modulation. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on ventral horn interneurons and motoneurons within in vitro mouse spinal cord slice preparations. We found that adenosine hyperpolarized interneurons and reduced the frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to interneurons. Both effects were blocked by the A1-type adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. Analysis of miniature postsynaptic currents recorded from interneurons revealed that adenosine reduced their frequency but not amplitude, suggesting that adenosine acts on presynaptic receptors to modulate synaptic transmission. In contrast to interneurons, recordings from motoneurons revealed an adenosine-mediated depolarization. The frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to motoneurons were again reduced by adenosine, but we saw no effect on miniature postsynaptic currents. Again these effects on motoneurons were blocked by DPCPX. Taken together, these results demonstrate differential effects of adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, in the mouse spinal cord. Adenosine has a general inhibitory action on ventral horn interneurons while potentially maintaining motoneuron excitability. This may allow for adaptation of the locomotor pattern generated by interneuronal networks while helping to ensure the maintenance of overall motor output. PMID:26311185

  8. Extensive molecular differences between anterior- and posterior-half-sclerotomes underlie somite polarity and spinal nerve segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keynes Roger J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polarization of somite-derived sclerotomes into anterior and posterior halves underlies vertebral morphogenesis and spinal nerve segmentation. To characterize the full extent of molecular differences that underlie this polarity, we have undertaken a systematic comparison of gene expression between the two sclerotome halves in the mouse embryo. Results Several hundred genes are differentially-expressed between the two sclerotome halves, showing that a marked degree of molecular heterogeneity underpins the development of somite polarity. Conclusion We have identified a set of genes that warrant further investigation as regulators of somite polarity and vertebral morphogenesis, as well as repellents of spinal axon growth. Moreover the results indicate that, unlike the posterior half-sclerotome, the central region of the anterior-half-sclerotome does not contribute bone and cartilage to the vertebral column, being associated instead with the development of the segmented spinal nerves.

  9. ALS Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  10. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  11. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  12. Spinal Cord Involvement in Brachial Plexus Injury

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    The role of spinal cord plasticity after birth injury and recovery from obstetric brachial plexus lesions was investigated in newborn rats with selective crush injury to spinal roots C5 and C6, in a study at University Clinics of Vienna School of Medicine, Austria.

  13. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  14. Subarachnoid disseminative hemangiopericytoma of the spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Guo-zhong; WANG Zhen-yu; LI Zhen-dong; ZHONG Yan-feng; WANG Lei-ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) originating from central nervous system were increasingly reported recently.1 Intravertebral HPCs are predominantly epidural. Primary intradural HPCs of spinal cord are rare.2-5 Little subarachnoid dissemination has been reported. We reported a HPC of the cervical spinal cord with subarachnoid dissemination.

  15. Moderate modulation of disease in the G93A model of ALS by the compound 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole (HBX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Teresa M; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Shi, Yun; Qi, Wenbo; Block, Travis J; Chaudhuri, Asish; Chaudhuri, Alakananda Ray; Hawker, Kara; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-06-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurological disease characterized by degeneration and death of motor neurons. Aberrant protein aggregation and oxidative stress are implicated in the etiology of ALS; thus preventing propagation of early aggregation events and oxidative damage could be an effective therapy. We tested the effect of dietary supplementation (initiated 40 days of age) with 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole (HBX), a compound with metal chelator and anti-aggregation properties, on disease onset, progression and lifespan in the G93A mouse model of ALS. Tests were not sufficiently powerful to detect any change to survival distribution of mice treated with HBX. However, the disease onset was delayed and max lifespan was increased in the treatment group. Additionally, disease progression was moderated as shown by reduced neuromuscular denervation measured by repetitive nerve stimulation. F2-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative damage, are elevated in skeletal muscle from G93A mice at onset and this increase is prevented in HBX fed G93A mice. Furthermore, HBX treatment reduced mutant SOD1 protein aggregation in whole spinal cord of G93A mice at disease onset. Overall, our data suggests that HBX may be able to improve the degenerative symptoms of ALS through the prevention of oxidative damage and protein aggregation. Further studies are needed to uncover the mechanistic effects of HBX in ameliorating ALS pathology. PMID:27138280

  16. A role for bombesin in sensory processing in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, T L; Massari, V J; Pazoles, C J; Chronwall, B M; Shults, C W; Quirion, R; Chase, T N; Moody, T W

    1984-12-01

    Bombesin (BN)-containing neuronal processes were demonstrated in laminae I and II of the dorsal horn of the cat, rat, and mouse spinal cord by immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Dorsal rhizotomy in the cat resulted in a marked decrease in BN immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn indicating that BN is contained in primary sensory afferents. BN-binding sites were also localized in superficial laminae of the dorsal horn. The presence of both BN and BN-binding sites in the dorsal horn suggested that BN may be involved in sensory processing in the spinal cord. Consistent with this hypothesis, it was demonstrated that an injection of BN into the spinal cord caused a biting and scratching response indicative of sensory stimulation. The effect was similar to that observed after injection of substance P into the cord with the exception that the BN effect lasted about 100 times longer than that induced by substance P. Taken together, these data indicate that BN may be a neurotransmitter of primary sensory afferents to the spinal cord. PMID:6094746

  17. New products tissue-engineering in the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, I. N.; Sergienko, V. I.; Kiselev, S. L.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Remigaylo, A. A.; Mihaylov, A. A.; Prokopenko, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In the treatment of patients with complicated spinal cord injury the Russian Health spends about one million rubles for each patient in the acute and the interim period after the injury. The number of complicated spinal cord injury is different in geographical areas Russian Federation from 30 to 50 people per 1 million that is affected by the year 5600. Applied to the present surgical and pharmacological techniques provide unsatisfactory results or minimally effective treatment. Transplantation of 100 thousand neuronal mouse predecessors (24 rats) or human neuronal predecessors (18 rats) in the anatomical gap rat spinal cord, followed by analysis of neurological deficit. The neuro-matrix implantation in the rat spinal cord containing 100 thousand neuronal precursors hESC, repeatable control neuro-matrix transplantation, non-cell mass, eliminating neurological deficit for 14 weeks after transplantation about 5-9 points on the scale of the BBB. The cultivation under conditions in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cells on collagen-chitosan matrix (hIPSC) showed that neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells grown on scaffolds as compact groups and has no neurites. Cells do not penetrate into the matrix during long-term cultivation and formed near the surface of the spherical structures resembling neurospheres. At least 90% of the cells were positive for the neuronal marker tubulin b3. Further studies should be performed to examine the compatibility of neuronal cultures and matrices.

  18. Light distribution properties in spinal cord for optogenetic stimulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÄ secka, Alicja; Bahdine, Mohamed; Lapointe, Nicolas; Rioux, Veronique; Perez-Sanchez, Jimena; Bonin, Robert P.; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Optogenetics is currently one of the most popular technique in neuroscience. It enables cell-selective and temporally-precise control of neuronal activity. Good spatial control of the stimulated area and minimized tissue damage requires a specific knowledge about light scattering properties. Light propagation in cell cultures and brain tissue is relatively well documented and allows for a precise and reliable delivery of light to the neurons. In spinal cord, light must pass through highly organized white matter before reaching cell bodies present in grey matter, this heterogenous structure makes it difficult to predict the propagation pattern. In this work we investigate the light distribution properties through mouse and monkey spinal cord. The light propagation depends on a fibers orientation, leading to less deep penetration profile in the direction perpendicular to the fibers and lower attenuation in the direction parallel to the fibers. Additionally, the use of different illumination wavelengths results in variations of the attenuation coefficient. Next, we use Monte-Carlo simulation to study light transport. The model gives a full 3-D simulation of light distribution in spinal cord and takes into account different scattering properties related to the fibers orientation. These studies are important to estimate the minimum optical irradiance required at the fiber tip to effectively excite the optogenetic proteins in a desired region of spinal cord.

  19. Isolated intramedullary spinal cord cysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Qazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of epilepsy in developing countries. Cysticercal involvement of the spinal cord is rare even in endemic areas and accounts for 0.7 to 5.85% of all cases. We present a 19-year-old man who presented with weakness of both lower limbs and urinary complaints in the form of straining of micturition with increased frequency, in whom preoperative MRI revealed a well-defined cystic lesion in dorso-lumber cord extending from D11 to L1 level, which on pathological examination was found to be intramedullary cysticercosis.

  20. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  1. Spinal hyperostosis in comparative pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal hyperostosis, an anatomical and radiological concept primarily described in man, is characterized by enthesopathic bony overgrowth on vertebral bodies in the form of spurs or intervertebral bridges. It can also be part of a more diffuse enthesopathic condition, including the appendicular skeleton. These changes are distinct from those of osteoarthrosis. Similar changes can be observed in all kinds of mammals, independent of their type of locomotion (bipodic, quadrumanous, quadrupedic, or aquatic). An anatomical and radiological study is presented of six cases (with histological examination of two dogs and one horse, and observation of macerated specimens of one horse, one equida, and one whale). (orig./GDG)

  2. Multidetector-row CT for spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-detector-row CT is called second stage helical CT because it produces multi-volume slices in a short time. We have observed sagittal, coronal images for spinal diseases by this CT. Thirty-three sagittal images out of 39 post-myelography for spinal diseases were good images of compression of the dural sac, and 8 coronal images post myelography were good images of compression of the dural sac and spinal nerve roots. We obtained 11 sagittal images for OPLL, and all images were nearly equal to that of tomography. However, spinal tumors and inflammatory diseases are more easily obtained using MRI. Multi-detector-row CT is useful for spinal degenerative diseases. (author)

  3. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  4. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  5. Proteomic assessment of a cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kelvin H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion or mutation(s of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a neuromuscular disease characterized by spinal motor neuron death and muscle paralysis. Complete loss of the SMN protein is embryonically lethal, yet reduced levels of this protein result in selective death of motor neurons. Why motor neurons are specifically targeted by SMN deficiency remains to be determined. In this study, embryonic stem (ES cells derived from a severe SMA mouse model were differentiated into motor neurons in vitro by addition of retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog agonist. Proteomic and western blot analyses were used to probe protein expression alterations in this cell-culture model of SMA that could be relevant to the disease. Results When ES cells were primed with Noggin/fibroblast growth factors (bFGF and FGF-8 in a more robust neural differentiation medium for 2 days before differentiation induction, the efficiency of in vitro motor neuron differentiation was improved from ~25% to ~50%. The differentiated ES cells expressed a pan-neuronal marker (neurofilament and motor neuron markers (Hb9, Islet-1, and ChAT. Even though SMN-deficient ES cells had marked reduced levels of SMN (~20% of that in control ES cells, the morphology and differentiation efficiency for these cells are comparable to those for control samples. However, proteomics in conjunction with western blot analyses revealed 6 down-regulated and 14 up-regulated proteins with most of them involved in energy metabolism, cell stress-response, protein degradation, and cytoskeleton stability. Some of these activated cellular pathways showed specificity for either undifferentiated or differentiated cells. Increased p21 protein expression indicated that SMA ES cells were responding to cellular stress. Up-regulation of p21 was confirmed in spinal cord tissues from the same SMA mouse model from which the ES cells were derived. Conclusion SMN

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals differentially regulated protein acetylation in human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have neuroprotective effects potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including ALS; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying their potential efficacy is not well understood. Here we report that protein acetylation in urea-soluble proteins is differently regulated in post-mortem ALS spinal cord. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE analysis reveals several protein clusters with similar molecular weight but different charge status. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS identifies glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP as the dominant component in the protein clusters. Further analysis indicates six heavily acetylated lysine residues at positions 89, 153, 189, 218, 259 and 331 of GFAP. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting confirms that the larger form of GFAP fragments are acetylated and upregulated in ALS spinal cord. Further studies demonstrate that acetylation of the proteins additional to GFAP is differently regulated, suggesting that acetylation and/or deacetylation play an important role in pathogenesis of ALS.

  7. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  8. Reproducibility of the MRI-defined spinal cord position in stereotactic radiotherapy for spinal oligometastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish the reproducibility of the MRI-defined spinal cord position within the spinal canal. Materials and methods: We acquired T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans of 15 volunteers on spine levels C7, T8 or L2. The scan protocol was repeated several times for different postures and time intervals. We determined the spinal cord shift (LR, AP, CC) using a rigid, grey value, vertebral body registration, followed by a spinal cord registration. We tested the sensitivity of our method, introducing artificial spinal cord shifts by varying the size and direction of the water-fat-shift (WFS) of the MR sequences. Results: The spinal cord position on MRI is reproducible within approximately 0.2 mm SD (LR, AP) and 0.7 mm SD (CC) when reproducing the posture on the same day, as well as several weeks later. However, when comparing different postures, shifts of ∼1.5 mm were found. Varying the WFS difference between scans (0.6–3.0 mm) induced equivalent virtual spinal cord shifts (0.5–2.5 mm). Conclusions: Displacement of the spinal cord inside the spinal canal may occur as a result of posture change. Considering the total geometric accuracy of spine SBRT, MRI-defined spinal cord position is sufficiently reproducible and requires no addition to the typical setup-and-intrafraction motion PRV margin if posture is identical throughout the RT process

  9. Analgesic interventions for spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a rule vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty can prevent further collapse of a previously broken vertebra. Pain is probably caused by collapse of the porous bone resulting in instability of the vertebra. Stabilization of the vertebra by injecting cement results in a clear improvement in the complaint and a clear reduction in pain resulting in better mobilization. Recent results have, however, cast doubt on the effectiveness of this therapy. Diagnostic nerve blocks on the spinal column are important because the pain is mostly clinically uncharacteristic, the innervation is complex and the pain is subjective. An exact classification can be made using special nerve blocks. Prerequisites for the use of diagnostic nerve blocks are an extensive clinical history and examination of the patient before nerve blocks are carried out. In approximately 15-45% of patients the zygapophyseal joint is the cause of the back pain. Anesthesia of the zygapophyseal joint can be carried out by direct intra-articular application of a local anesthetic or by a block of the medial branch of the posterior branch of each of two spinal nerves. The simplest method is by computed tomography-guided zygapophyseal block. (orig.)

  10. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Sanghvi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  11. Leptomeningeal metastasis of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten patients with leptomeningeal metastases of spinal cord were studied with a 1.5-T MR imager. Six patients had primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors, and the other four had their primary tumor outside of the CNS. All patients had positive CSF cytologic findings, and cervical cords were generally examined. MR findings on T1-weighted images before and after gadolinium-DTPA administration were divided into three types. Type 1, the diffuse form (four cases), was characterized by (1) increased CSF intensity, (2) poor cord-CSF interface, and (3) perimedullary enhancement; type 2, the nodular form (one case) by discrete nodules adherent to the cord surface; and type 3, predominance of intramedullary metastases (three cases), by localized cord swelling with central enhancement. In two cases, no significant findings were found. In conclusion, T1-weighted images with Gd-DTPA enhancement were valuable in the MR imaging of spinal meningeal metastasis. The main route of intramedullary tumor spread is believed to be via arterial seeding, but the authors study suggests that intramedullary metastases resulting from direct extension from the CSF were not infrequent

  12. CT of metastatic spinal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT findings of metastatic spinal tumor were classified into 6 types, i.e., consolidation, dissolution, mottle, doughnut, and ring types, and mixed type of these, and that of no findings. Some statistically significant relationship was found between prostatic cancer and consolidation type, and unknown primary cancer and dissolution type. Abnormal findings of bone scintigraphy was suspected to have metastatic spinal tumor by plain radiography and CT scan in 64/128 (50.0%) and 113/145 (78.6%), respectively. There was some relationship between plain radiographic findings and CT findings; between consolidation type of the former and consolidation type of the latter, dissolution type and dissolution type, compression fracture type and mixed type, the type of no findings and consolidation or mixed type. The most of lesions detected by CT as consolidation or mixed type were revealed by plain radiography. Changes in Ca ammount was not detected by plain radiography and CT scan if it was approximately less than 30% and 18% of the initial Ca respectively. (Ueda, J.)

  13. Nrf2 activation in astrocytes contributes to spinal cord ischemic tolerance induced by hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Guoyang; Zhang, Kun; Sun, Jinchuan; Xu, Tao; Li, Runping; Tao, Hengyi; Xu, Weigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation in astrocytes contributes to the neuroprotection induced by a single hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (SCIR) injury. In vivo: At 24 h after a single HBO-PC at 2.5 atmospheres absolute for 90 min, the male ICR mice underwent SCIR injury by aortic cross-clamping surgery and observed for 48 h. HBO-PC significantly improved hindlimb motor function, reduced secondary spinal cord edema, ameliorated the reactivity of spinal motor-evoked potentials, and slowed down the process of apoptosis to exert neuroprotective effects against SCIR injury. At 12 h or 24 h after HBO-PC without aortic cross-clamping surgery, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, realtime-polymerase chain reaction and double-immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the Nrf2 activity of spinal cord tissue, such as mRNA level, protein content, DNA binding activity, and the expression of downstream gene, such as glutamate-cysteine ligase, γ-glutamyltransferase, multidrug resistance protein 1, which are key proteins for intracellular glutathione synthesis and transit. The Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression were all enhanced in normal spinal cord with HBO-PC. Glutathione content of spinal cord tissue with HBO-PC significantly increased at all time points after SCIR injury. Moreover, Nrf2 overexpression mainly occurs in astrocytes. In vitro: At 24 h after HBO-PC, the primary spinal astrocyte-neuron co-cultures from ICR mouse pups were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 90 min to simulate the ischemia-reperfusion injury. HBO-PC significantly increased the survival rate of neurons and the glutathione content in culture medium, which was mainly released from asctrocytes. Moreover, the Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression induced by HBO-PC were mainly enhanced in astrocytes, but not in neurons. In

  14. [Spinal and spinal cord injuries. Therapeutic approach in Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loembe, P M; Bouger, D; Dukuly, L; Ndong-Launay, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors present their experience with 81 cases (66.4%) of acute cervical spine injuries (C.S.I.) and 41 cases (33.6%) of acute thoracolumbar spine injuries (T.L.S.I.) treated by a multidisciplinary approach, at Jeanne Ebori Hospital (Libreville, Gabon) between the years 1981 and 1987. Traffic accidents were the leading cause of injury. The largest group consisted of patients in their third decade. The anatomic localizations were: upper cervical spine: 22 cases (27%); lower cervical spine: 56 (69%); upper thoracic spine: 11 (26.8%); lower thoracic spine or thoracolumbar area: 19 (46.3%); lumbar spine: 7 (17%). There were osteoligamental lesions in 3 cases (3.7%) of C.S.I. and 4 (9.7%) of T.L.S.I. Clinically, 44 patients (54.3%) with C.S.I. and 37 (90.2%) with T.L.S.I. had neurological deficits. Surgical indications depended upon the osseous as well as neurologic lesions. There were five important steps in the treatment of spinal injuries associated with neurological deficit: (1) immobilization, (2) medical stabilization, (3) spinal alignment (skeletal traction), (4) operative decompression if there was proven cord compression, and (5) spinal stabilization. Twenty patients (24.6%) with cervical injuries were treated conservatively (traction, collar, kinesitherapy); 53 (65.4%) underwent a surgical intervention (anterior approach - 21, posterior fusion - 30, combined approach - 2); and in 8 patients (9.8%) refraining from surgery seemed the best alternative. After lengthy multidisciplinary discussion, the authors elected not to operate on tetraplegic patients with respiratory problems that necessitated assisted ventilation, because of its fatal outcome. Of injuries to the thoracolumbar spine, 13 (31.7%) were treated conservatively (bedrest, orthopedic treatment). Twenty-eight patients (68.2%) with unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures associated with neurologic deficit required acute surgical intervention (stabilization with or without decompression of the neural

  15. Asymptomatic spinal arachnoiditis in patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, T. [Department of Neurology, CN Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Department of Medicine, S.P. Medical College, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India); Kochar, D.K. [Department of Medicine, S.P. Medical College, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2003-10-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is one of the common and disabling complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). We focused on early diagnosis of spinal arachnoiditis by spinal MRI in asymptomatic patients in whom neurological examination was normal. We studied 16 patients with a diagnosis of probable or highly probable TBM with symptoms for less than 1 month; three had radiological evidence of spinal arachnoiditis. High cerebrospinal fluid protein appeared to be a risk factor for development of spinal arachnoiditis. MRI is sensitive to detect early spinal arachnoiditis. Earlier diagnosis may be helpful in management of spinal arachnoiditis in TBM. (orig.)

  16. Neurogenic differentiation from adipose-derived stem cells and application for autologous transplantation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Xin-wei; Chen, Jian-Ting; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue have the capacity to differentiate into endodermal, mesoderm and ectodermal cell lineages in vitro, which are an ideal engraft in tissue-engineered repair. In this study, mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated from subcutaneous fat. The markers of ADSCs, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were detected by immunofluorescence assays. The ADSCs were cultured in cocktail factors (including ATRA, GGF-2, bFGF, PDGF and forskolin) for neurogenic differentiation. The neurogenic cells markers, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were analyzed using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR after dramatic changes in morphology. Neurogenic cells from ADSCs were autologous transplanted into the mouse of spinal cord injury for observation neurogenic cells colonization in spinal cord. The result demonstrated that the mouse ADSCs were positive for the CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD166 but negative for neurogenic cell markers, MAP-2, GFAP and Nestin. After neurogenic differentiation, the neurogenic cells were positive for neurogenic cell special markers, gene expression level showed a time-lapse increase, and the cells were successful colonized into spinal cord. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of neuronal cells can be specifically generated from ADSCs and that induced cells may allow for participation in tissue-repair. PMID:25330756

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  18. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhua Zhang; Hao Wei; Meimei Lin; Chunmei Chen; Chunhua Wang; Maobai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cellinjury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneal y injected with curcumin. Reverse transcrip-tion-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective ef-fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression.

  19. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. PMID:26553817

  20. What is different about spinal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Howard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms subserving deep spinal pain have not been studied as well as those related to the skin and to deep pain in peripheral limb structures. The clinical phenomenology of deep spinal pain presents unique features which call for investigations which can explain these at a mechanistic level. Methods Targeted searches of the literature were conducted and the relevant materials reviewed for applicability to the thesis that deep spinal pain is distinctive from deep pain in the peripheral limb structures. Topics related to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of deep spinal pain were organized in a hierarchical format for content review. Results Since the 1980’s the innervation characteristics of the spinal joints and deep muscles have been elucidated. Afferent connections subserving pain have been identified in a distinctive somatotopic organization within the spinal cord whereby afferents from deep spinal tissues terminate primarily in the lateral dorsal horn while those from deep peripheral tissues terminate primarily in the medial dorsal horn. Mechanisms underlying the clinical phenomena of referred pain from the spine, poor localization of spinal pain and chronicity of spine pain have emerged from the literature and are reviewed here, especially emphasizing the somatotopic organization and hyperconvergence of dorsal horn “low back (spinal neurons”. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures. Conclusions This thesis addressed the question “what is different about spine pain?” Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic findings from studies in the last twenty years provide preliminary support for the thesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures.

  1. Spinal fractures resulting from traumatic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heidari Pedram; Zarei Mohammad Reza; Rasouli Mohammad Reza; Alexander R Vaccaro; Rahimi-Movaghar Vafa

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To illustrate mechanisms of spine fractures and the pattern of spinal injuries characterized by the major mechanisms in urban population of Iran.Methods:Data regarding spinal injuries including demographics,mechanism and level of spinal injury,abbreviated injury score,associated injuries and final fate of the patients were extracted from the Iranian national trauma registry database from 1999 to 2004.Results:A total of 619 patients with traumatic spine fractures were identified,of whom 68.5% were males.The peak frequency of these injuries occurred in the 21-40 year age-group.Accidental falls and road traffic crashes(RTCs)were the most common mechanisms of spinal fractures(47.2% and 44.1%,respectively).RTCs tended to occur in younger patients compared with accidental falls.The most common spinal region for spinal fracture was the lumbar spine(53.63%).Cervical spine fractures were significantly more common in RTCs,while lumbar spine fractures were more common in accidental falls(P<0.001).A total of 171(27.6%)patients had associated non-spinal injuries,of whom 127 had associated extremity injuries,and 55 had head injuries.Thirty-six(5.6%)patients had spinal cord injury(SCI).The injury severity score of the RTC group was significantly higher than that of accidental falls(P=0.002).Fifteen(4%)patients died of traumatic injuries.The rate of death was significantly higher in RTCs compared with accidental falls(5.1% vs 2.1%,P=0.039).Conclusions:The patterns of spinal fractures are similar to those reported from developed countries.RTCs tend to affect the younger age population and are associated with a higher degree of associated injuries and mortality than accidental falls.Therefore preventive strategies should be based on reduction of the number and severity of RTCs.

  2. Advance in spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury: Blood-spinal cord barrier and remote ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qijing; Huang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ji; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-06-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is the physiological and metabolic substance diffusion barrier between blood circulation and spinal cord tissues. This barrier plays a vital role in maintaining the microenvironment stability of the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the structure and function of the BSCB is disrupted, further destroying the spinal cord homeostasis and ultimately leading to neurological deficit. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia is followed by reperfusion to tissues/organs to protect the distant target tissues/organs against subsequent lethal ischemic injuries. RIPC is an innovation of the treatment strategies that protect the organ from I/R injury. In this study, we review the morphological structure and function of the BSCB, the injury mechanism of BSCB resulting from spinal cord I/R, and the effect of RIPC on it. PMID:27060223

  3. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Kraan, G.A.; Hoogland, P. V. J. M.; Wuisman, P. I. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    An anatomical study of the extraforaminal attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves was performed using human spinal columns. The objectives of the study are to identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each thoracic level that attach spinal nerves to structures at the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms have been described to protect the spinal nerve against traction. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal pro...

  4. MR imaging findings of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of massive spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by repeated lumbar punctures during spinal anesthesia in a 36-year-old man. The signal intensities of spinal SAH were similar to those of the conus medullaris on both T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Although spinal SAH is hardly recognized on MR, spinal SAH of sufficient amount may cause alteration of the cerebrospinal fluid signal

  5. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The classical clinical presentation, neuroradiographic features, and conservative vs. surgical management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord (CSS injury remain controversial. Methods: CSS injuries, occurring in approximately 9.2% of all cord injuries, are usually attributed to significant hyperextension trauma combined with congenital/acquired cervical stenosis/spondylosis. Patients typically present with greater motor deficits in the upper vs. lower extremities accompanied by patchy sensory loss. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR scans usually show hyperintense T2 intramedullary signals reflecting acute edema along with ligamentous injury, while noncontrast computed tomography (CT studies typically show no attendant bony pathology (e.g. no fracture, dislocation. Results: CSS constitute only a small percentage of all traumatic spinal cord injuries. Aarabi et al. found CSS patients averaged 58.3 years of age, 83% were male and 52.4% involved accidents/falls in patients with narrowed spinal canals (average 5.6 mm; their average American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA motor score was 63.8, and most pathology was at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (71%. Surgery was performed within 24 h (9 patients, 24-48 h (10 patients, or after 48 h (23 patients. In the Brodell et al. study of 16,134 patients with CSS, 39.7% had surgery. In the Gu et al. series, those with CSS and stenosis/ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL exhibited better outcomes following laminoplasty. Conclusions: Recognizing the unique features of CSS is critical, as the clinical, neuroradiological, and management strategies (e.g. conservative vs. surgical management: early vs. late differ from those utilized for other spinal cord trauma. Increased T2-weighted MR images best document CSS, while CT studies confirm the absence of fracture/dislocation.

  6. Kalsiyum Kanal Blokeri Verapamilin Spinal Reflekslere Etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    TAŞÇI, N.; GENÇ, O.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of calcium channel blocker verapamil on spinal reflexes were studied. Verapamil 5, 50, (iM locally. 10,20 mg/kg was administradet intraperitoneally and 10, 50, 100 (iM localyy. Experiments on adult spinal cats (n=10) were conducted. Animals weighing 1,5-3 kg were anesthetized with ketamine (45 mg/kg intramuscular) and artiflcally ventilated. Animals were spinalized at Cj level and a laminectomy was performed in the lumbosacral region. The ventral and dorsal roots of segment Lg were...

  7. Post-traumatic recto-spinal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquired recto-spinal fistula has been described elsewhere as a rare complication of colorectal malignancy and Crohn's enterocolitis. We treated a young man who developed a recto-spinal fistula as a result of a high fall injury. The patient presented with meningeal signs, sepsis and perianal laceration. Computerized axial tomography revealed air in the supersellar cistern. Gastrografin enema showed that contrast material was leaking from the rectum into the spinal canal. Surgical management included a diverting sigmoid colostomy, sacral bone curettage and wide presacral drainage. To the best of our knowledge, rectospinal fistula of traumatic origin has not been previously reported in the English literature. (orig.)

  8. Post-traumatic recto-spinal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantsberg, L; Laufer, L; Greenberg, G; Hertzanu, Y

    2000-01-01

    Acquired recto-spinal fistula has been described elsewhere as a rare complication of colorectal malignancy and Crohn's enterocolitis. We treated a young man who developed a recto-spinal fistula as a result of a high fall injury. The patient presented with meningeal signs, sepsis and perianal laceration. Computerized axial tomography revealed air in the supersellar cistern. Gastrografin enema showed that contrast material was leaking from the rectum into the spinal canal. Surgical management included a diverting sigmoid colostomy, sacral bone curettage and wide presacral drainage. To the best of our knowledge, rectospinal fistula of traumatic origin has not been previously reported in the English literature. PMID:10663732

  9. MR findings of the spinal epidural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Shin, Myung Jin; Rhim, Seung Chul [Ulsan Univ. College of Midicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Tae [Dongguk Univ. College of Midicine, Kyungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    The spinal canal takes the form of a series of cylinders designated by their relationship to the meninges and is divided by the dura mater into the epidural or extradural space and intradural space. The epidural space is composed of spinal ligaments, connective and areolar tissue, the epidural venous plexus, lymphatic channels and supporting elements, and various pathologic entities are found there. MR imaging can accurately depict the extent and characteristics of lesions, and in some cases specific diagnosis is possible. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a variety of spinal epidural lesions and their MR findings.

  10. Cellular Scaling Rules for Primate Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Burish, Mark J.; Peebles, J. Klint; Baldwin, Mary K.; Tavares, Luciano; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    The spinal cord can be considered a major sensorimotor interface between the body and the brain. How does the spinal cord scale with body and brain mass, and how are its numbers of neurons related to the number of neurons in the brain across species of different body and brain sizes? Here we determine the cellular composition of the spinal cord in eight primate species and find that its number of neurons varies as a linear function of cord length, and accompanies body mass raised to an expone...

  11. Post-traumatic recto-spinal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantsberg, L.; Greenberg, G. [Department of Surgery A, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Laufer, L.; Hertzanu, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2000-01-01

    Acquired recto-spinal fistula has been described elsewhere as a rare complication of colorectal malignancy and Crohn's enterocolitis. We treated a young man who developed a recto-spinal fistula as a result of a high fall injury. The patient presented with meningeal signs, sepsis and perianal laceration. Computerized axial tomography revealed air in the supersellar cistern. Gastrografin enema showed that contrast material was leaking from the rectum into the spinal canal. Surgical management included a diverting sigmoid colostomy, sacral bone curettage and wide presacral drainage. To the best of our knowledge, rectospinal fistula of traumatic origin has not been previously reported in the English literature. (orig.)

  12. A novel SOD1-ALS mutation separates central and peripheral effects of mutant SOD1 toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Peter I.; McGoldrick, Philip; Saccon, Rachele A.; Weber, William, L.; Fratta, Pietro; West, Steven J.; Zhu, Ning; Carter, Sarah; Phatak, Vinaya; Stewart, Michelle; Simon, Michelle; Kumar, Saumya; Heise, Ines; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Dick, James

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been critical in furthering our understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, such models generally overexpress the mutant protein, which may give rise to phenotypes not directly relevant to the disorder. Here, we have analysed a novel mouse model that has a point mutation in the endogenous mouse Sod1 gene; this mutation is identical to a pathological change in human familial ALS (fALS) which results...

  13. Spinal cord decompression reduces rat neural cell apoptosis secondary to spinal cord injury*

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Kan; Chen, Qi-xin; Li, Fang-cai; Chen, Wei-Shan; Lin, Min; Wu, Qiong-hua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether spinal cord decompression plays a role in neural cell apoptosis after spinal cord injury. Study design: We used an animal model of compressive spinal cord injury with incomplete paraparesis to evaluate neural cell apoptosis after decompression. Apoptosis and cellular damage were assessed by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labelling (TUNEL) and immunostaining for caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. Meth...

  14. Neurological deficit following spinal anaesthesia: MRI and CT evidence of spinal cord gas embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences]|[Parco Comola-Ricci, Naples (Italy); Marano, I.; Savarese, F.; Brunetti, A.; Sodano, A. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences; Olibet, G. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Intensive Care Unit; Di Salvo, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of General and Transplant Surgery

    1999-04-01

    A 62-year-old diabetic woman developed permanent neurological deficits in the legs following spinal anaesthesia. MRI showed oedema in the spinal cord and a small intramedullary focus of signal void at the T10 level, with negative density at CT. Intramedullary gas bubbles have not been reported previously among the possible neurological complications of spinal anaesthesia; a combined ischaemic/embolic mechanism is hypothesised. (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  15. Neurological deficit following spinal anaesthesia: MRI and CT evidence of spinal cord gas embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 62-year-old diabetic woman developed permanent neurological deficits in the legs following spinal anaesthesia. MRI showed oedema in the spinal cord and a small intramedullary focus of signal void at the T10 level, with negative density at CT. Intramedullary gas bubbles have not been reported previously among the possible neurological complications of spinal anaesthesia; a combined ischaemic/embolic mechanism is hypothesised. (orig.)

  16. Retraction: "Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf Leads to Deregulated Expression of miRNAs in K-Ras Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer" by Ali et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on June 21, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. Literature Cited Ali S, Banerjee S, Logna F, Bao B, Philip PA, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2012. Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf leads to deregulated expression of miRNAs in K-Ras transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. J Cell Physiol 227:3373-3380; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24036. PMID:27315161

  17. Combining Adult Learning Theory with Occupational Therapy Intervention for Bladder and Bowel Management after Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Gina; Bell, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bladder and bowel management is an important goal of rehabilitation for clients with spinal cord injury. Dependence is these areas have been linked to a variety of secondary complications, including decreased quality of life, urinary tract infections and pressure ulcers (Hammell, 2010; Hicken et al, 2001). Occupational therapists have been identified as important members of the health care team in spinal cord injury rehabilitation; however, specific roles and interventions have not been clearly described. This case report will describe occupational therapy interventions embedded with principles of adult learning theory to address bladder and bowel management with an adult client who sustained an incomplete thoracic level spinal cord injury. PMID:26694910

  18. Clinical application and diagnostic value of non-invasive spinal angiography in spinal vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the value of CT spinal angiography with 256 MSCT and fast dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography (CE-MRA) at 3.0 T in the diagnosis of spinal vascular malformations by comparing with results of DSA and operation. Methods: Seventeen patients suspected of spinal vascular diseases by initial MR and clinical manifestations all underwent CT spinal angiography. Of them, 10 patients underwent MRA, 15 patients underwent DSA within 3-5 days,and 8 patients finally underwent surgical treatment. Results: CTA examination clearly showed the abnormal vascular lesions in 16 of 17 cases, including 7 cases with the diagnosis of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula, 7 cases of perimedullary arteriovenous fistula, and 2 cases of spinal arteriovenous malformations. The results were consistent with the diagnosis of DSA or surgery. One case was poorly diagnosed. The feeding vessels were correctly determined in 12 cases, and the level of fistulas were correctly displayed in 12 cases. The level of fistulas and feeding vessels were accurately showed in 7 of 10 cases with MRA, while the other 3 cases exhibited normal with DSA. Conclusions: Spinal angiography with 256 MSCT and CE-MRA at 3.0 T can clearly show the extent of spinal vascular malformations, feeding arteries and fistula location. They are safe, noninvasive, convenient and can shorten the time of DSA diagnosis and treatment. They play an important role in diagnosis and treatment of spinal vascular malformations and postoperative follow-up. (authors)

  19. Spinal antinflammatory action of Diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal antinflammatory drug (NSAID) that finds indication in the treatment of debilitating pathologies characterized by chronic pain sustained by inflammation, such as in rheumatic disease (rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis) or periarthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, myositis and sciatica. Its properties differentiate it from other NSAIDs. In fact, diclofenac's increased effect on spinal nociception and chronic neuro-inflammatory pain may be referred to: 1) its synergistic effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR- γ) activation and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition (COX-2 inhibition); 2) its capacity of suppressing neuronal hyperexcitability through the blockage of neuronal K+ channels in a concentration-dependant manner; and 3) its facility to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27014880

  20. Ependymomas of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many patients with spinal cord ependymomas (SCE) undoubtedly benefit from post-operative radiation therapy; however, because of the wide variability in the total doses given, the optimal post-operative dose for SCE remains unclear. Several recent papers recommend total doses of 4000 rad to 5000 rad in 4-1/2 to 6 weeks. Unfortunately, only a small number of patients reported in the literature have been consistently treated to these high dose recommendations. Nine consecutive adult patients with SCE have been treated in a consistent way at Yale-New Haven Hospital with total doses of approximately 4500 rad to 5000 rad at 180 rad to 200 rad per day. The acute and chronic morbidity from such treatment has been minimal and no patient has had a local recurrence at 8 months to 8 years following treatment

  1. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  2. Pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY An important and detrimental effect of spinal cord injury (SCI) is pain, which develops in approximately two-thirds of all SCI patients, while approximately half of SCI patients develop chronic neuropathic pain (NP). Thus far, there is no cure for SCI NP, and oral pharmacological intervention is often inadequate, commonly resulting in a pain reduction of only 20-30%. In this short review, we will present an overview of the important features of SCI pain including taxonomy, epidemiology and classification, as well as a suggested oral pharmacological treatment strategy for SCI NP and the current evidence available from randomized placebo-controlled trials. Considerations and evidence for the nonpharmacological treatment of SCI will be discussed briefly. PMID:24654622

  3. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field in...

  4. A Case of Extensive Spinal Cysticercosis Involving the Whole Spinal Canal in a Patient with a History of Cerebral Cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong Ah; Shin, Hyun Chul

    2009-01-01

    Although cysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease affecting the central nervous system, spinal cysticercosis is rare. A rare form of spinal cysticercosis involving the whole spinal canal is presented. A 45-year-old Korean male had a history of intracranial cysticercosis and showed progressive paraparesis. Spinal magnetic resonance scan showed multiple cysts compressing the spinal cord from C1 to L1. Three different levels (C1-2, T1-3, and T11-L1) required operation. Histopathologica...

  5. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs in 3D Collagen Scaffolds: developing pharmacologically monitored neuroimplants for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kourgiantaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury, a traumatic disease characterised by a massive degeneration of neural tissue, was recently targeted for neuroregenerative interventions. Our approach is the development of pharmacologically pulsed neuroimplants using 3D collagen scaffolds hosting NSCs. We aim to monitor the properties of NSCs ex vivo and in vivo, using synthetic small molecules with neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Synthetic, highly lipophilic CNS bioavailable small molecules, synthesized by our group (microneurotrophins, bind to neurotrophins receptors (Gravanis et al, Science Signaling, 2012, Calogeropoulou et al., J Med Chem., 2009. BNN27 can specifically interact with TrkA and p75NTR receptors activating specific signalling pathways controlling neuronal cell survival and neurogenesis (Charalampopoulos et al, PNAS, 2004, Lazaridis et al., PLoS Biol., 2011. We are seeding embryonic and adult mouse NSC on collagen 3D scaffolds of different composition (collagen, chondroitin-6-sulphate and gelatin and construction (size of pores and stiffness, testing cell behaviour (survival, proliferation or differentiation in basal conditions or pulsed with neurotrophins and/or microneurotrophins. Using the knock in sox2-egfp mice strain and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, we obtain NSCs cultures with a sox2-positive population more than 90% pure. We evaluate specific markers of proliferation (ki67 and/or differentiation (GFAP for glial cells, Tuj1 for mature neurons and O4 for oligodendrocytes: we are currently testing the possible effect of BNN27 on proliferation of cortical NSCs in 2D cultures (increased numbers of ki67 positive cells up to 12%. The composition and the structure of 3D scaffolds seem to play a significant functional role: scaffolds with a combined composition such as 50% collagen/50% gelatin and 92% collagen/8% chondroitin-6-sulphate support NSC survival since they sustain sox2 expression and propagate neurosphere formation

  6. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  7. Extramedullary haematopoeisis causing spinal cord compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ismail

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary haematopoeisis (EMH is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. However, in a patient with a haematological disorder and in particular thalassaemia, EMH with paraspinal masses should be considered and imaging planned appropriately.

  8. Spinal ossovenography of the lumbosacral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of 231 spinal ossovenographies performed within 5 years it was shown, that the diagnostics of the lumbosacral region could be improved by a method little strenuous to the patient and with relevant results

  9. Factors associated with myelopathy in spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identity factors associated with Pott's disease, 49 spinal tuberculosis patients were classified into a group of 22 patients with a neurological deficit and a group of 27 patients with no neurological deficits, and their clinical findings (gender, age, pulmonary tuberculosis, antituberculous chemotherapy, C reactive protein (CRP), nutritional status, and duration of disease) and radiographic findings (degree of canal encroachment, pathology and level of dural compression, number of affected vertebral bodies, range of paravertebral abscesses, signals in the spinal cord on MRI, kyphotic angle, and spinal instability) were compared. The results showed that malnutrition, severe canal encroachment, and abnormal signal within the spinal cord on MRI were associated with neurological complications. Factors associated with the degree of neurological deficit were unclear because the study population was too small. (author)

  10. Investigation of spinal pathology in notalgia paresthetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savk, Oner; Savk, Ekin

    2005-06-01

    A possible association of spinal pathology with notalgia paresthetica (NP) was investigated through clinical and radiographic evaluation. Forty-three NP patients underwent dermatologic and orthopedic examination accompanied by radiography of the spine. Sixty-one lesions in 43 patients were evaluated. In 34 patients, various vertebral pathologies were observed radiographically by a blinded investigator, and in 28 of these cases these changes were most prominent in the vertebrae which corresponded to a lesional dermatome. Thirty-seven lesions were accompanied by spinal changes decided to be relevant (60.7%). The striking correlation of NP localization with spinal pathology suggests that spinal nerve impingement may contribute to the pathogenesis of this entity. PMID:15928634

  11. An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ajmal, Muhammad

    2009-12-01

    Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.

  12. Effects of asymmetric sitting on spinal balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hee Soon; Oh, Jong Chi; Won, Sung Yoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of two common asymmetric sitting positions on spinal balance. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven healthy subjects in their twenties were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Asymmetric positions of resting the chin on a hand and crossing the legs were performed by each group for 1 hour. After 1 hour, the subjects lay in the supine position again and spinal imbalance was measured using a device. [Results] After 1 hour of resting with the chin on a hand, sagittal imbalance, coronal imbalance, pelvic obliquity and lordosis angle presented spinal imbalance worsening of 1 hour of crossing legs, sagittal imbalance, pelvic torsion showed in mainly learned spinal imbalance living. [Conclusion] Good posture could be an innate ability, however it through habits. So this study is meaningful from the perspective of the importance of good posture. PMID:27065291

  13. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE)

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Guig?? Serra, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Adams, Leslie B.

    2012-01-01

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  14. The possible meaning of fractional anisotropy measurement of the cervical spinal cord in correct diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrewicz, Slawomir; Szewczyk, Pawel; Bladowska, Joanna; Podemski, Ryszard; Koziorowska-Gawron, Ewa; Ejma, Maria; Słotwiński, Krzysztof; Koszewicz, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is based on clinical criteria and electrophysiological tests (electromyography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation). In the search for ALS biomarkers, the role of imaging procedures is currently emphasized, especially modern MR techniques. MR procedures were performed on 15 ALS patients and a sex- and age-matched control group. The MR examinations were performed with a 1.5-T MR unit, and the protocol consisted of sagittal T1-weighed images, sagittal and axial T2-weighed images, and sagittal T2-weighed FAT SAT images followed by an axial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence of the cervical spinal cord. FA values in individual segments of the cervical spinal cord were decreased in the ALS group in comparison with the control group. After comparing FA values for anterior, posterior, and lateral corticospinal columns, the greatest difference was observed between the C2 and C5 segments. Spinal cord assessment with the use of FA measurements allows for confirmation of the motor pathways lesion in ALS patients. The method, together with clinical criteria, could be helpful in ALS diagnosis, assessment of clinical course, or even the effects of new drugs. The results also confirmed the theory of the generalized character of ALS. PMID:26590991

  15. Imaging Techniques in Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingson, BM; Salamon, N.; Holly, LT

    2012-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Background Spinal imaging plays a critical role in the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). In recent years there has been increasing interest in the development of advanced imaging techniques to provide pertinent microstructural and metabolic information that is not provided by conventional modalities. Methods This review details the pathophysiological structural changes that accompany SCI, as well as their imaging correlate...

  16. Early treatment of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of society, the incidence of spinal cord injury (SCI) is increasing year by year, and the treatment is very difficult with a high disability rate. Correct prehospital first aid transportation can greatly reduce secondary injury of spinal cord caused by improper transportation. Early application of high dose methylprednisolone, internal fixation by using screw-rod system, as well as intramedually and extramedually decompression can protect the residual neurolog...

  17. Application of Tuina Techniques to Spinal Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Min; SHEN Guo-quan; YAN Jun-tao; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    @@ It's one of the earliest medical techniques to relieve pain, restore health and enjoy comfort with manipulations. Knowledge on spinal neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain and leg pain can be traced back to the early stage of human evolution and upright position of two legs. Therefore the history of treating spinal diseases with Tuina or manipulations probably keeps the same pace with civilization.

  18. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker E Bohm

    2015-01-01

    Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education.

  19. Male infertility in spinal cord trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Utida; Jose C. Truzzi; Homero Bruschini; Rogerio Simonetti; Cedenho, Agnaldo P.; Miguel Srougi; Valdemar Ortiz

    2005-01-01

    Every year there are 10 thousand new cases of patients victimized by spinal cord trauma (SCT) in the United States and it is estimated that there are 7 thousand new cases in Brazil. Eighty percent of patients are fertile males. Infertility in this patient group is due to 3 main factors resulting from spinal cord lesions: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory disorder and low sperm counts. Erectile dysfunction has been successfully treated with oral and injectable medications, use of vacuum device...

  20. A regeneration strategy for spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Nordblom, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    A severe traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently leads to a devastating and permanent disability. Due to glial scarring and an inhibitory local environment, regrowth of disrupted axons in the injured spinal cord beyond a lesion is obstructed, thus preventing reconnection with neurons at the other side. Many experimental strategies have been presented to limit the damage and improve outcome after SCI, but few options are available for the patient. Neurons in the central nervous sys...

  1. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; Marolt, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  2. Spinal arteriovenous malformations: Is surgery indicated?

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bikramjit; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Mehrotra, Anant; Mohan, B.Madan; Rajendra v Phadke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinico-radiological distinguishing features in various types of spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an aim to define the role of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Hero's modified Di Chiro classification differentiated four types of spinal AVMs on digital subtraction angiogram (DSA) in 74 patients: I. Dural arteriovenous fistulae (n = 35, 47.3%); II. Glomus/intramedullary (n = 13, 17.6%); III. Juvenile/metameric (n = 4, 5.4%); and, IV. Ventral perime...

  3. Serotonergic modulation of spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; Cotel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either...... and promotes the excitability of motoneurons, while stronger release inhibits rhythmic activity and motoneuron firing. This latter effect is responsible for central fatigue and secures rotation of motor units....

  4. Central Diabetes Insipidus after Staged Spinal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P.; Steinmetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is described following penetrating spinal cord trauma but rarely following instrumented spinal fusion. More commonly, hyponatremia is seen following spine surgery, which may be iatrogenic, attributed to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone release. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old woman who underwent a planned two-stage operation for scoliotic deformity correction. On the third postoperative day, the patient developed hypernatremia (sodium leve...

  5. Focal dysfunction of the proteasome: a pathogenic factor in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Taylor, David M; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2004-06-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) gene are responsible for a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). The present study demonstrated impaired proteasomal function in the lumbar spinal cord of transgenic mice expressing human SOD-1 with the ALS-causing mutation G93A (SOD-1(G93A)) compared to non-transgenic littermates (LM) and SOD-1(WT) transgenic mice. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased as early as 45 days of age. By 75 days, chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspase-like activities of the proteasome were impaired, at about 50% of control activity in lumbar spinal cord, but unchanged in thoracic spinal cord and liver. Both total and specific activities of the proteasome were reduced to a similar extent, indicating that a change in proteasome function, rather than a decrease in proteasome levels, had occurred. Similar decreases of total and specific activities of the proteasome were observed in NIH 3T3 cell lines expressing fALS mutants SOD-1(G93A) and SOD-1(G41S), but not in SOD-1(WT) controls. Although overall levels of proteasome were maintained in spinal cord of SOD-1(G93A) transgenic mice, the level of 20S proteasome was substantially reduced in lumbar spinal motor neurons relative to the surrounding neuropil. It is concluded that impairment of the proteasome is an early event and contributes to ALS pathogenesis. PMID:15189335

  6. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  7. Spinal infections in children: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Spinal infections are uncommon but significant causes of morbidity and hospitalization in the paediatric population. These infections encompass a broad range of conditions, from discitis to osteomyelitis and spinal epidural and intramedullary abscesses. Paediatric spinal infections can be caused by a range of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic agents. Ultrastructural differences of the vertebrae and associated structures result in distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis of spinal infections in children compared to adults. The non-specific nature of symptoms produced by them can cause considerable diagnostic delays. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging can facilitate early identification of the disease, and distinguish it from other spinal pathologies. The association of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains from some of the cases appears worrisome; as is the increasing incidence of Kingella kingae infections causing spinal infections. Rest and immobilization are the general treatment, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is warranted to ensure optimal clinical outcome. Most patients generally have a good prognosis; however, early identification and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential to achieve the best therapeutic response. PMID:27408498

  8. Operative costs, reasons for operative waste, and vendor credit replacement in spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Rita Roberts; John Collins

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, Epstein et al. documented that educating spinal surgeons reduced the cost of operative waste (explanted devices: placed but removed prior to closure) occurring during anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion from 20% to 5.8%. [5] This prompted the development of a two-pronged spine surgeon-education program (2012-2014) aimed at decreasing operative costs for waste, and reducing the nine reasons for operative waste. Methods: The spine surgeon-education program involved post...

  9. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  10. Surgical treatment of hydrocephalus and spinal dysraphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Besnik Elshani; Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify during intrauterine congenital malformations;Surgery to dysraphism and hydrocephalus neurological benefit, the ability to live independently;Forecast possibility of lowering birth rates with congenital malformations.Methods:Epidemiological and congenital malformations of the spinal dysraphism were included in this prospective clinical study-research.Its forms were manifested by the appearance of hydrocephalus inNeurosurgicalClinic inPristina for the period2010-2012.All cases of spinal dysraphism operated in theNeurosurgery Clinic inPrishtina for the period2010-2012 were analyzed.Results:In theNeurosurgeryClinic atUCC since2010 to2012 are operated total55 cases of spinal dysraphism;The largest number of operations were recorded in2011 with20 operated cases or36.36%, while smaller in2010 with17 operated cases or30.91%,Number of patients varies by year, with some variations of the graph, where at the beginning of the graph have gradually increased over the years, following the continuous growing and finally landing back with graph;By sex and years, the largest number of cases in male gender with spinal dysraphism were registered in2012 with14 cases or37.8%, while the smallest number in2010 with11 cases or29.7%,Whereas the female gender, number of large backlog of cases was registered in2011 with8 cases or44.4%, while the smallest number in 2012 with4 cases or22.2%.Divided by types of spinal dysraphism total were identified:13 with spinal dysraphism meningocele or23.6% and42 spinal dysraphism myelomeningocele or76.4% of which were male dominance in relation to female sex ratio(M:F =40:15 occasions), by gender and spinal dysraphism species, the males are identified with many cases, the spinal dysraphism meningocele8 or20% and32 with spinal dysraphism myelomeningocele or80%,Eksterioizm Shanti where the body rejects foreign body system as the one we had at1 patient.Conclusions:Shant meningitis due to infection or eventual reduction in immune

  11. Neurobioactive peptide amphiphile nanofiber scaffolds for spinal cord repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niece, Krista Lynne

    This thesis describes a set of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) designed for spinal cord repair (SCI). These PAs self: assemble under physiological conditions into nanofibers that cause macroscopic gelation. Hydrogen bonding, hydrophobicity, and electrostatics, which control the self-assembly, are compared throughout this thesis. PA performance is explored from a materials science and a bioengineering perspective. The salt-triggered gelation of three PAs with similar charge distributions, each bearing the neurite-outgrowth-promoting laminin-1 epitope IKVAV, is studied by rheology in Chapter 2. Stiffer, more hydrophilic PAs gel more slowly, as verified by testing analogous PAs bearing the fibronectin epitope RGD. Circular dichroism (CD) and turbidity suggest a nucleated self-assembly mechanism that depends on preexisting aggregates. Slowing gelation assists PA injection into the mouse spinal cord. Mouse neural progenitor cell (mNPC) studies with the IKVAV-PAs show cell survival, neurite outgrowth and selective neuronal differentiation, which may improve SCI repair by preventing glial scarring. Two PAs containing another laminin-1 epitope, YIGSR, are described in Chapter 3. In a negatively charged YIGSR-bearing PA (YIGSR-PA), mNPCs behave as in the IKVAV-bearing PAs, but grow longer neurites possibly due to epitope signaling. A positively charged YIGSR-bearing PA (Pos-YIGSR-PA) does not support mNPC survival. P19 cell line studies and zeta-potential measurements show that cell death is due to the PA substrate's surface charge and is specific to mNPCs. Mixed IKVAV-PA/YIGSR-PA scaffolds show averaging of cell behavior, while IKVAV-PA/Pos-YIGSR-PA mixtures fail to rescue cell viability. These dual-epitope scaffolds are studied in Chapter 4 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and CD. The like-charged mixture is composed of single-component fibers forming an interpenetrating network (IPN). The oppositely charged mixture is composed of mixed fibers, as predicted from simulation

  12. MicroRNA expression in the adult mouse central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Mads; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Møller, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    distinct areas of the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS). Microarray profiling in combination with real-time RT-PCR and LNA (locked nucleic acid)-based in situ hybridization uncovered 44 miRNAs displaying more than threefold enrichment in the spinal cord, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, pons......, hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, olfactory bulb, eye, and pituitary gland. These findings suggest that a large number of mouse CNS-expressed miRNAs may be associated with specific functions within these regions. Notably, more than 50% of the identified mouse CNS-enriched miRNAs showed different expression...... patterns compared to those reported in zebrafish, although the mature miRNA sequences are nearly 100% conserved between the two vertebrate species. The inventory of miRNA profiles in the adult mouse CNS presented here provides an important step toward further elucidation of miRNA function and mi...

  13. Morphometric analysis of the cervical spinal canal on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Niki; Janevski, Petar; Nakeva, Natasha; Zhivadinovik, Julija; Dodevski, Ace

    2013-01-01

    Two useful numerical values, called the Torg ratio and the spinal canal diameter (SC diameter) are widely accepted as reliable morphometric determinants of spinal stenosis. The aims of the study were to examine morphometric determinants of the cervical spinal canal on MRI in both sexes and analyse them as reliable indicators of spinal stenosis. Measurements were made on 50 MR images (sagittal T2 weighted images from C3 to C7) of the cervical spine of patients from the Emergency Centre who had undertaken MRI of the cervical spine in addition to CT for various diagnostic indications. Torg ratio, used in evaluation of the spinal canal stenosis on plain x-ray radiographs, cannot be used as a spinal canal stenosis indicator due to the gender differences in the vertebral bodies' width. Sagittal canal diameters were more spread out in males than in females. MRI enables the value of the space available for the spinal cord, (SAC) to be determined, by subtracting the sagittal diameter of the spinal cord from the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal. Not gender, but individual and level differences in the SAC values were evident (cervical cord enlargement). SAC values relied more on the spinal canal than on the spinal cord, so that the differences in the dimensions of the spinal cord accounted for less variability in the SAC values. MR imaging of the cervical spine provides more accurate cervical canal and spinal cord measurements that could serve as morphometric determinants of the cervical canal stenosis. PMID:24280784

  14. Robust Axonal Regeneration Occurs in the Injured CAST/Ei Mouse CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Omura, T; Omura, K.; Tedeschi, A; Riva, P; Painter, MW; L. Rojas; Martin, J.; Lisi, V; Huebner, EA; Latremoliere, A; Yin, Y.; Barrett, LB; Singh, B; Lee, S.; Crisman, T

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Axon regeneration in the CNS requires reactivating injured neurons' intrinsic growth state and enabling growth in an inhibitory environment. Using an inbred mouse neuronal phenotypic screen, we find that CAST/Ei mouse adult dorsal root ganglion neurons extend axons more on CNS myelin than the other eight strains tested, especially when pre-injured. Injury-primed CAST/Ei neurons also regenerate markedly in the spinal cord and optic nerve more than those from C57BL/6 mice a...

  15. Nimodipine alleviates apoptosis-mediated impairments through the mitochondrial pathway after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei CAI; Rui FAN; Tianmiao HUA; Huiling LIU; Jing LI

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains an unsolved human health challenge. To alleviate the impairments of SCI, we studied the therapeutic effect of nimodipine (an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist) on functional recovery from SCI using Nystrom's method in a mouse model. Eighty-four mice were divided into three groups: control group in which only vertebral plates were cut off without causing any spinal injuries; SCI; and SCI with nimodipine treatment. We assessed the histopathology, apoptosis detection, cell cycle, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, bcl-2/bax and caspase-3 levels of tissue 8 h, 1 d, 3 d and 4 d after trauma to evaluate rehabilitation. Behavioral performances were also assessed before and after nimodipine treatment. Results from inclined plane tests, motor score assessment and histological observations indicated that mice in the nimodipine-treated group rehabilitated better than those in the SCI group. The ratio of apoptosis, caspase-3 and bax expression in the nimodipine-treated group were significantly lower than those in the SCI group. The mitochondrial membrane potential and bcl-2 expression were up-regulated in the nimodipine-treated group. Taken together, our results indicate that the inhibition of calcium flux by nimodipine could reduce apoptosis processes and tissue damage through a mitochondrial pathway after spinal cord trauma [Current Zoology 57 (3): 340-349, 2011].

  16. Gene for pain modulatory neuropeptide NPFF: induction in spinal cord by noxious stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, F S; Aarnisalo, A A; Nieminen, M L; Lintunen, M; Karlstedt, K; Kontinen, V K; Kalso, E; States, B; Panula, P; Ziff, E

    1999-05-01

    Neuropeptides FF (NPFF), AF (NPAF), and SF (NPSF) are homologous amidated peptides that were originally identified on the basis of similarity to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRF-amide. They have been hypothesized to have wide-ranging functions in the mammalian central nervous system, including pain modulation, opiate function, cardiovascular regulation, and neuroendocrine function. We have cloned the NPFF gene from human, bovine, rat, and mouse, and show that the precursor mRNA encodes for all three of the biochemically identified peptides (NPFF, NPAF, and NPSF). We demonstrate that NPFF precursor mRNA expression by Northern analysis and map sites of expression by in situ hybridization. We confirm the validity of the in situ hybridization by showing that its distribution in the brain and spinal cord matches the distribution of NPFF and NPSF immunoreactivity. We go on to show that the mRNA levels (as measured by in situ hybridization) in the spinal cord can be up-regulated by a model for inflammatory pain (carrageenan injection), but not by a model for neuropathic pain (lumbar nerve ligation). Our results confirm the evolutionary conservation of NPFF, NPAF, and NPSF neuropeptide expression in mammalian brain. They also provide a context for the interpretation of the pain-sensitizing effects of injections of these peptides that have been previously reported. Our results support a model for the role of these peptides in pain regulation at the level of the spinal cord. PMID:10220558

  17. Prevention against diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma: can the Notch pathway be a novel treatment target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-jun Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate whether the Notch pathway is involved in the development of diffuse spinal cord astrocytomas. BALB/c nude mice received injections of CD133 + and CD133− cell suspensions prepared using human recurrent diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma tissue through administration into the right parietal lobe. After 7-11 weeks, magnetic resonance imaging was performed weekly. Xenografts were observed on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133 + cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expression was observed in the xenografts. By contrast, no xenografts appeared in the identical position on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133− cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expression was hardly detected either. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining revealed xenografts on the convex surfaces of the brains of mice that underwent CD133 + astrocytoma transplantation. Some sporadic astroglioma cells showed pseudopodium-like structures, which extended into the cerebral white matter. However, it should be emphasized that the subcortex xenograft with Notch-immunopositive expression was found in the fourth mouse received injection of CD133− astrocytoma cells. However, these findings suggest that the Notch pathway plays an important role in the formation of astrocytomas, and can be considered a novel treatment target for diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma.

  18. Prevention against diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma:can the Notch pathway be a novel treatment target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-jun Sun; Jin-long Mao; Xiao-hui Lou; Zhen-yu Wang; Ling-song Li; Hai-yan Yu; Yong-sheng Xu; Hai-bo Wu; Yi Luo; Bin Liu; Mei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the Notch pathway is involved in the develop-ment of diffuse spinal cord astrocytomas. BALB/c nude mice received injections of CD133+and CD133− cell suspensions prepared using human recurrent diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma tissue through administration into the right parietal lobe. After 7–11 weeks, magnetic resonance imaging was performed weekly. Xenografts were observed on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133+ cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expression was observed in the xenografts. By contrast, no xenografts appeared in the identical position on the surfaces of the brains of mice receiving the CD133− cell suspension, and Notch-immunopositive expres-sion was hardly detected either. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining revealed xenografts on the convex surfaces of the brains of mice that underwent CD133+ astro-cytoma transplantation. Some sporadic astroglioma cells showed pseudopodium-like structures, which extended into the cerebral white matter. However,it should be emphasized that the sub-cortex xenograft with Notch-immunopositive expression was found in the fourth mouse received injection of CD133− astrocytoma cells. However, these ifndings suggest that the Notch pathway plays an important role in the formation of astrocytomas, and can be considered a novel treat-ment target for diffuse spinal cord astrocytoma.

  19. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  20. Fundamental experimentation of radiation damage to spinal cords in infantile mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the multi-modal therapy, normal tissue damage is the limiting factor in the radiotherapy of cancer. Intraoperative irradiation resolves this problem by shielding critical organs. In the treatment of pediatric malignancies located in the abdomen, however, the spinal cord is inevitably irradiated. We here investigated and report effects of radiation damage to spinal cord of infantile mice. Materials and methods : Four week-old C3Hf/He male mice, weighing 21 ∼ 24 g, were used throughout experiments. Lumbar cord of spine (L1 ∼ L5) was irradiated with single fraction of X ray machine (20 mA, 25 cm FSD, 322 rad/min). Changes of neurological status after irradiation were scored by observing movements of mice. The scoring method has been employed by Goffinet, et al. Results : In the first place, we investigated the relationship between radiation dose and body weight gaining. Irradiation with large doses perturbed growth of infantile mice. The latent period between radiation and onset of paralysis in infantile mice was shorter than that in adult mice. In addition severe damage of spinal cord was observed in infantile mice by 30 ∼ 50 Gy. By the same dosage, mild damage was reported in adult mice. With 22 Gy, however, radiation did not result apparent damage. It is suggested that careful attention should be paid to radiation of spinal cord in young children. (author)

  1. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Tajima, Fumihiro; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hosomi, Koichi; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-06-15

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  2. Anti-acrolein treatment improves behavioral outcome and alleviates myelin damage in EAE mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Gary; Sun, WenJing; Zheng, Lingxing; Brookes, Sarah; Tully, Melissa; Shi, Riyi

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde byproduct of lipid peroxidation, is thought to perpetuate oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of acrolein in an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune enchephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated a significant elevation of acrolein protein adduct levels in EAE mouse spinal cord. Hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger, sig...

  3. Experimental Optic Neuritis Induced by a Demyelinating Strain of Mouse Hepatitis Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Shindler, Kenneth S.; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Dutt, Mahasweta; Hingley, Susan T.; Sarma, Jayasri Das

    2008-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON), an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease, occurs in multiple sclerosis (MS). Pathological mechanisms and potential treatments for ON have been studied via experimental autoimmune MS models. However, evidence suggests that virus-induced inflammation is a likely etiology triggering MS and ON; experimental virus-induced ON models are therefore required. We demonstrate that MHV-A59, a mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain that causes brain and spinal cord inflammation a...

  4. The primary locus of motor neuron death in an ALS–PDC mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Grace; Chu, Tony; Shaw, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis–parkinsonism–dementia complex based on the consumption of cycad seed flour was used to determine whether the observed pathology of motor neuron loss begins in the distal axons or the spinal cord. Assessments of neuromuscular junction integrity and motor neurons were performed at multiple time points. Mice fed cycad pellets performed worse on the wire hang than controls. Microglial activation in cycad-fed mice was observed with motor neuron degene...

  5. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  6. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  7. Regression Segmentation for M³ Spinal Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijie; Zhen, Xiantong; Tay, KengYeow; Osman, Said; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Clinical routine often requires to analyze spinal images of multiple anatomic structures in multiple anatomic planes from multiple imaging modalities (M(3)). Unfortunately, existing methods for segmenting spinal images are still limited to one specific structure, in one specific plane or from one specific modality (S(3)). In this paper, we propose a novel approach, Regression Segmentation, that is for the first time able to segment M(3) spinal images in one single unified framework. This approach formulates the segmentation task innovatively as a boundary regression problem: modeling a highly nonlinear mapping function from substantially diverse M(3) images directly to desired object boundaries. Leveraging the advancement of sparse kernel machines, regression segmentation is fulfilled by a multi-dimensional support vector regressor (MSVR) which operates in an implicit, high dimensional feature space where M(3) diversity and specificity can be systematically categorized, extracted, and handled. The proposed regression segmentation approach was thoroughly tested on images from 113 clinical subjects including both disc and vertebral structures, in both sagittal and axial planes, and from both MRI and CT modalities. The overall result reaches a high dice similarity index (DSI) 0.912 and a low boundary distance (BD) 0.928 mm. With our unified and expendable framework, an efficient clinical tool for M(3) spinal image segmentation can be easily achieved, and will substantially benefit the diagnosis and treatment of spinal diseases. PMID:25361503

  8. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG)

  9. An interesting case of primary spinal arachnoiditis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vaughan, Denis

    2012-02-27

    Spinal arachnoiditis describes inflammation of the meninges, subarachnoid space and, in most cases, also involve the pial layer. The vast majority of cases described are secondary and are preceded by a known event, for example,. trauma, infections or irritative substances. Here, we present the case of primary spinal arachnoiditis. A 35-year-old lady was referred to the neurosurgical services in Dublin, Ireland with a 15-month history of progressive, right lower limb weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic distortion of the lumbar spinal canal extending up to the conus. Initially, an L2-L4 laminectomy was performed revealing thickened and adherent arachnoid with a large cyst in the spinal canal. Four months after initial operation, the patient represented with bilateral lower limb weakness and loss of detrusor function. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which showed the development of a syrinx in the patient\\'s thoracic spine. We then performed a T9-T10 laminectomy, midline myelotomy and insertion of a syringe-arachnoid shunt. Post-operative imaging showed resolution of the syrinx and a vast improvement in lower limb power. The patient also regained bladder control. In conclusion, spinal arachnoiditis is a clearly defined pathological and radiological entity with a highly variable clinical presentation. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as there is no recognised treatment currently, with most interventions aimed at symptomatic relief.

  10. Radiologic analysis of the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis remains high incidental disease in Korea with an estimated incidence of 2.5% in general population. Among the tuberculosis of bone, spinal tuberculous is high incidence and curable disease, but early treatment demands early diagnosis. Authors reviewed clinical aspects of 376 cases, and reviewed conventional films of 74 cases and computed tomography of 8 cases, confirmed histopathologically as spinal tuberculosis from Jan. 1976 to May 1985 at Yonsei medical center, Yonsei University. The results were as follows: 1. The frequent site of involvement were lower thoracic and lumbar vertebra, 4th lumbar vertebra was the most common lesion site among them. 2. The separated lesions were 10.2% among spinal lesion. 3. The most common type and pattern of bone density was intervertebral type and mixed pattern each other. 4. Paravertebral abscess, kyphosis and narrowing of intervertebral disc space were discovered more than 80% in reviewed conventional films. 5. In children, there is no predilection site. 6. Spinal computed tomography was more accurate diagnostic method than conventional study in the evaluation of following aspects; 1) extent of lesion 2) degree of spinal canal involvement 3) change of surrounding organ

  11. MRI in spinal cord decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal cord decompression sickness (DCS) is a rare condition that can lead to spinal cord infarction. Despite the low incidence of diving-related DCS, we have managed to collect the data and MRI findings of seven patients who have been diagnosed with and treated for DCS in our local hyperbaric facility. This study describes the clinical presentation, MRI spinal cord findings, treatment administered and outcome of these patients. The patient medical records, from 1997 to 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients with a final diagnosis of DCS and who underwent examination were included. The images were independently reviewed by two radiologists who recorded the location and number of lesions within the spinal cord. The Frankel grading was used to assess the initial and clinical outcome response. Patchy-increased T2W changes affecting several levels at the same time were found. Contrary to the popular notion that venous infarction is the leading cause of DCS, most of our patients also demonstrated affliction of grey matter, which is typically seen in an arterial pattern of infarction. Initial involvement of multiple (>6) spinal cord levels was associated with a poor outcome. Patients who continued to have multiple neurological sequelae with less than 50% resolution of symptoms despite recompression treatment were also those who had onset of symptoms within 30 min of resurfacing. DCS is probably a combination of both arterial and venous infarction. Short latency to the onset of neurological symptoms and multilevel cord involvement may be associated with a poorer outcome.

  12. Spinal Fusion Not Always Necessary for Back Pain, Studies Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for low-back pain patients who have pinched nerves because a spinal bone slipped forward and out of place, a ... their trial focused solely on patients whose squeezed spinal nerves were caused by slipped vertebrae (spondylolisthesis). The researchers ...

  13. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  14. Mechanisms of symptomatic spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried; Verzini, Fabio; Cao, Piergiorgio; Maritati, Gabriele; Riambau, Vicente; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Rylski, Bartosz; Funovics, Martin; Loewe, Christian; Schmidli, Jürg; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Weigang, Ernst; Kuratani, Toru; Livi, Ugolino; Esposito, Giampiero; Trimarchi, Santi; van den Berg, Jos C; Fu, Weiguo; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Bertoglio, Luca; Lönn, Lars; Schuster, Ingrid; Grimm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  15. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  16. Primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst--a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushparaj, K; Sundararajan, M; Madeswaran, K; Ambalavanan, S

    2001-06-01

    Primary spinal hydatid cysts are uncommon. Among these, intradural presentation is very rare. A case of primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst presenting as incomplete dorsal cord compression is reported here for its rarity. PMID:11447449

  17. Primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst--a short report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushparaj K

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary spinal hydatid cysts are uncommon. Among these, intradural presentation is very rare. A case of primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst presenting as incomplete dorsal cord compression is reported here for its rarity.

  18. Primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst--a short report.

    OpenAIRE

    Pushparaj K; Sundararajan M; Madeswaran K; Ambalavanan S

    2001-01-01

    Primary spinal hydatid cysts are uncommon. Among these, intradural presentation is very rare. A case of primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst presenting as incomplete dorsal cord compression is reported here for its rarity.

  19. Mouse models of congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, J

    1999-06-01

    Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. The mutant aphakia has been characterised by bilaterally aphakic eyes (Varnum and Stevens, J Hered 1968;59:147-50); the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 (Varnum and Stevens, Mouse News Lett 1975;53:35). Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage of 0.6 cM proximal to the marker D19Mit10. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Chuk1, Fgf8, Lbp1, Npm3, Pax2, Pitx3). The Cat3 mutations are characterised by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the initial secondary lens fibre cell differentiation. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and iris, but the retina remains unaffected. The mutation has been mapped to chromosome 10 close to the markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Dcn, Elk3, Ldc, Mell8, Tr2-11). The series of Cat2 mutations have been mapped close to the gamma-crystallin genes (Cryg; Löster et al., Genomics 1994;23:240-2). The Cat2nop mutation is characterised by a mutation in the third exon of Crygb leading to a truncated gamma B-crystallin and the termination of lens fibre cell differentiation. The Cat2 mutants are interesting models for human cataracts caused by mutations in the human CRYG genes at chromosome 2q32-35. PMID:10627821

  20. Value of Micro-CT for Monitoring Spinal Microvascular Changes after Chronic Spinal Cord Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Qing Long

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurological degeneration can occur after compression of the spinal cord. It is widely accepted that spinal cord compression leads to ischemic lesions and ultimately neurological dysfunction due to a narrowed spinal canal. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the pathogenesis of spinal cord compression injury is required to help develop effective clinical interventions. In the present study, we propose a new method of quantitative 3D micro-CT to observe microvascular events in a chronic spinal cord compression rat model. A total of 36 rats were divided into two groups: sham control group (n = 12 and compressive spinal cord injury group (n = 24. Rats were scarified at four weeks after surgery. In each group, CD34 micro-vessel immunohistochemical staining was performed in half of the animals, while micro-CT scanning was performed in the other half. Microvessel density (MVD was measured after immunohistochemical staining, while the vascular index (VI was measured in 3D micro-CT. In comparison with sham control, abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP can be seen in all 24 cases of the compression group, and VI shows the amount of microvessels reduced consistently and significantly (p < 0.01. A significant correlation is also found between MVD and VI (r = 0.95, p < 0.01. These data suggest that quantitative 3D micro-CT is a sensitive and promising tool for investigating microvascular changes during chronic compressive spinal cord injury.

  1. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H......]Epibatidine in concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 nM was dissolved in Ringer's solution and administered through the dialysis membrane into the dorsal region of the cervical spinal cord. First, the outflow of [(3)H]epibatidine from the probe into the spinal cord was examined with respect to different concentrations and changes....... The administered [(3)H]epibatidine was found to be distributed to the area closest to the dialysis probe and not dispersed along the spinal cord, and the distribution was equal for all concentrations. The data presented in this investigation provide information, which is important for interpretation of data from...

  2. Concentration of nitric oxide (NO in spinal fluid of chronic spinal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumite Y

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied total nitric oxide (nitrite + nitrate (NO levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of chronic spinal diseases in nonsmokers (133 patients: 76 men and 57 women; mean age, 63 years; range, 15-92 years by the Griess method to clarify the role of NO in different spinal diseases. The extent of compression in terms of numbers of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve and neurological evaluation were also assessed according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. The spinal diseases included cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy (cervical disease group, ossification of yellow ligament (thoracic disease group, and lumbar disc herniation, lumbar canal stenosis and lumbar spondylolisthesis (lumbar disease group. NO levels in the spinal disease groups (4.98+/-2.28 micromol/l: mean +/- SD were significantly higher than that in the control group (2.53+/-0.94 micromol/l. An inverse correlation was detected between the elevated levels of NO and the grade of clinical symptoms in the cervical disorders. The number of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve was positively correlated with elevated NO levels in CSF in the cervical and lumbar disorder groups. These results indicate that nerve compression may elevate NO levels in CSF, and that NO concentration in the CSF might be a useful marker of damage to nervous system in spinal disorders.

  3. Administration of Recombinant Heat Shock Protein 70 Delays Peripheral Muscle Denervation in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Gifondorwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A prominent clinical feature of ALS is muscle weakness due to dysfunction, denervation and degeneration of motoneurons (MNs. While MN degeneration is a late stage event in the ALS mouse model, muscle denervation occurs significantly earlier in the disease. Strategies to prevent this early denervation may improve quality of life by maintaining muscle control and slowing disease progression. The precise cause of MN dysfunction and denervation is not known, but several mechanisms have been proposed that involve potentially toxic intra- and extracellular changes. Many cells confront these changes by mounting a stress response that includes increased expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70. MNs do not upregulate Hsp70, and this may result in a potentially increased vulnerability. We previously reported that recombinant human hsp70 (rhHsp70 injections delayed symptom onset and increased lifespan in SOD1G93A mice. The exogenous rhHsp70 was localized to the muscle and not to spinal cord or brain suggesting it modulates peripheral pathophysiology. In the current study, we focused on earlier administration of Hsp70 and its effect on initial muscle denervation. Injections of the protein appeared to arrest denervation with preserved large myelinated peripheral axons, and reduced glial activation.

  4. Making Human Neurons from Stem Cells after Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yan; Leyan Xu; Welsh, Annie M; Glen Hatfield; Thomas Hazel; Karl Johe; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Every year, spinal cord injuries, many caused by road traffic accidents, paralyze about 11,000 people in the US. This paralysis occurs because the spinal cord is the main communication highway between the body and the brain. Information from the skin and other sensory organs is transmitted to the brain along the spinal cord by bundles of neurons, nervous system cells that transmit and receive messages. The brain then sends information back down the spinal cord to ...

  5. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; LI, XIANG; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting...

  6. Transient Spinal Cord Ischemia as Presenting Manifestation of Polycythemia Vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal arterial vascularization is supplied by a large anastomotic net, making spinal ischemic events far less common than ischemic cerebral strokes. Polycythemia vera, due to blood hyperviscosity and activated platelet aggregation, is associated with a higher risk of arterial and venous thrombotic events. We report a patient with spinal cord transient ischemic attacks, a rarely presenting manifestation, and polycythemia vera, which highlights the thrombotic potential of this disease, and the requirement of exhaustive diagnostic workout of a spinal ischemic event.

  7. Unusual presentation of a primary spinal Burkitt's lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    WILKENING, A; Brack, M.; Brandis, A; Heidenreich, F; Dengler, R.; Weibenborn, K

    2001-01-01

    Primary CNS lymphomas are detected with increasing frequency in immunocompetent and immunodeficient persons. Primary involvement of the spinal roots has only rarely been reported. The unusual history is described of a patient with a primary spinal Burkitt's lymphoma initially presenting as an S1 syndrome showing lymphocytic pleocytosis in the CSF, leading to the misdiagnosis of meningoradiculitis. Repeated spinal MRI disclosed a spinal mass lesion and histological and imm...

  8. Influence of Fatigue in Neuromuscular Control of Spinal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Granata, Kevin P.; Slota, Greg P.; Wilson, Sara E.

    2004-01-01

    Lifting-induced fatigue may influence neuromuscular control of spinal stability. Stability is primarily controlled by muscle recruitment, active muscle stiffness, and reflex response. Fatigue has been observed to affect each of these neuromuscular parameters and may therefore affect spinal stability. A biomechanical model of spinal stability was implemented to evaluate the effects of fatigue on spinal stability. The model included a 6-degree-of-freedom representation of the spine controlled b...

  9. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Bin; Wang, Yi; ZHANG Li-ying; Liu, Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, ...

  10. Non-enhancing pilocytic astrocytoma of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B. [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Department of Radiology A-030, Denver, CO (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake, Utah (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are among the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in the pediatric age group. The presence of contrast enhancement is a major factor used to distinguish these tumors from other spinal cord lesions. We present a case of histologically proved non-enhancing intramedullary spinal cord pilocytic astrocytoma in a 12-year-old girl. This case represents an exception to the conventional wisdom that pediatric spinal neoplasms enhance with administration of intravenous contrast material. (orig.)

  11. Non-enhancing pilocytic astrocytoma of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are among the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in the pediatric age group. The presence of contrast enhancement is a major factor used to distinguish these tumors from other spinal cord lesions. We present a case of histologically proved non-enhancing intramedullary spinal cord pilocytic astrocytoma in a 12-year-old girl. This case represents an exception to the conventional wisdom that pediatric spinal neoplasms enhance with administration of intravenous contrast material. (orig.)

  12. [Cloning of gene fragment of estrogen receptor-beta and its expression in mouse embryo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Fan, Shao-Hua; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin; Li, Fei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2008-03-01

    In order to study the expression and regulation effects of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) in the development of mouse embryo, the primer of ERbeta was designed, the ERbeta fragment was first obtained by RT-PCR and subcloned into plasmids pGEM- 3Z, then the recombinant plasmids were linearized with the restriction enzymes of EcoRand Hind. Using Sp6 and T7 RNA polymerase, the digoxigenin(dig) labeled sense and anti-sense probes were transcriped in vitro, respectively. Then the expression of ERbeta in mouse embryo was examined with the probes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. The results indicated that ERbeta is expressed in the brain, spinal neural tube, genital ridge, pericardium, limb bud and mandibular arch of 10.5 dpc embryo, and is also expressed in the telencephalon, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, spinal cord and limb bud of 13.5 dpc embryo. These results suggest that ERbeta maybe play a role of regulation in sexual differentiation, primal differentiation of neural tube, further differentiation of three primary cerebral vesicles and spinal cord, generation and differentiation of bone and cartilage of limb bud, development of pericardium and configuration differentiation of mandibular in mouse embryo. PMID:18332005

  13. Spinal epidural empyema in two dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive, diffuse, epidural spinal cord compression was visualized myelographically in two dogs presented for rapid development of nonambulatory tetraparesis and paraplegia, respectively. Purulent fluid containing bacterial organisms was aspirated percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance from the epidural space of each dog. One dog responded poorly to aggressive medical therapy, which included installation of an epidural lavage and drainage system. Both dogs were euthanized due to the severe nature of their disorder and the poor prognosis. Spinal epidural empyema (i.e., abscess) is a rare condition in humans and has not been reported previously in the veterinary literature. Spinal epidural empyema should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs presenting with painful myelopathies, especially when accompanied by fever

  14. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  15. Radioisotope scanning for the spinal cord tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope scanning with sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate or 67Ga-citrate for the spinal cord tumors are reported. Six patients with spinal cord tumors including 2 ependymomas, 1 neurinoma, 1 metastatic medulloblastoma, 1 metastatic astrocytoma, and 1 metastatic pinealoma as well as 6 patients with non-neoplastic lesions were examined by this method. Two out of 6 cases with tumors showed positive scans, and two showed equivocal scans. This new method is different from myeloscintigraphy or radioisotope angiography as already reported. It directly demonstrates the tumor itself like brain scanning does and is very useful as a nontraumatic method for screening spinal cord lesions, especially in poor risk patients. Both the usefulness and the limitations of this method are discussed. (auth.)

  16. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF METASTATIC SPINAL TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宏光; 王以朋; 邱贵兴; 叶启彬; 张嘉

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on metastatic spinal tumor. Methods. The results of surgical intervention for metastatic spinal tumor of 31 consecutive patients since October 1985 were reviewed. Results. The average survival time was 17.6 months (range from 3 months to 9 years), and 4 patients are still alive with an average survival time of 24.6 months (range, 14~ 84 months). No postoperative complication was noted. The preoperative symptoms were partially relieved and neurological functions were improved after surgery. Conclusions. Surgical treatment for metastatic spinal tumor could improve the life quality, but should be adopted cautiously. The surgical procedures such as decompression and internal fixation should be involved only when neurological deficits occurred. The surgery with postoperative complementary therapy may not only improve the life quality , but also extend the patients' life span.

  17. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF METASTATIC SPINAL TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宏光; 王以朋; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on metastatic spinal tumor.Methods:The results of surgical intervention for metastatic spinal tumor of 31 consecutive patients since October 1985 were reviewed.Results:The average survival time was 17.6 months (range from 3 months to 9 years),and 4 patients are still alive with an average survival time of 24.6 months(range,14-84 months).No postoperative complication was noted.The preoperative symptoms were partially relieved and neurological functions were improved after surgery.Conclusions:Surgical treatment for metastatic spinal tumor could improve the life quality,but should be adopted cautiously.The surgical procedures such as decompression and internal fixation should be involved only when neurological deficits occurred.The surgery with postoperative complementary therapy may not only improve the life quality,but also extend the patients' life span.

  18. Radiation-induced spinal cord hemorrhage (hematomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing’s sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies.

  19. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  20. Spinal hemangioblastoma combined with pilocytic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Qing; Wang, Xiang; Zhong, Nan-Zhe; Li, Yi-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The combination of vascular anomalies with gliomas is rarely seen in the CNS, and is defined as "angioglioma". However, the definition, category, and histopathogenesis of angiogliomas remain controversial. Here, we present an unusual case of spinal hemangioblastoma (HB) combined with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Spinal MRI revealed lesions extending from T9 to T12 segments, in a "sandwich-like" fashion. After resection of the tumor, histopathologic study confirmed the diagnosis of HB as well as PA. A comprehensive review of the literature was further conducted. We describe a case of spinal HB combined with PA, in addition we discuss the clinicopathological relationship between HB and PA under these conditions, which may facilitate the understanding of the histogenesis of an angioglioma and guide its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26166599

  1. Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality is rare in adults. Below we present a case report of 20 yrs old male with isolated cervical cord injury, without accompanying vertebral dislocation or fracture involving the spinal canal rim. He fell down on plain and smooth ground while carrying 40 kg weight overhead and developed quadriparesis with difficulty in respiration. Plain radiographs of the neck revealed no fractures or dislocations. MRI showed bulky spinal cord and an abnormal hyper intense signal on the T2W image from C2 vertebral body level to C3/4 intervertebral disc level predominantly in the anterior aspect of the cord The patient was managed conservatively with head halter traction and invasive ventilatory support for the initial 7 days period in the ICU. In our patient recovery was good and most of the neurological deficit improved over 4 weeks with conservative management.

  2. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  3. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  4. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pedicle screw spinal system. 888.3070 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. (a) Identification. Pedicle screw spinal systems are multiple component devices, made from a variety of...

  5. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  6. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud Uckermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes.

  7. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim-Hakan; Later, Robert; Leipnitz, Elke; Neuwirth, Ales; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes. PMID:26355949

  8. Extramedullary intradural spinal tumors; Extramedullaere intradurale spinale Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The category of extramedullary intradural tumors includes a variety of lesions ranging from meningiomas originating from meningeal cells and nerve sheath tumors (neurofibromas, schwannomas) to less common primary tumors, such as lipomas, ependymomas, hemangiopericytomas, epidermoid cysts and dermoid cysts. Extramedullary metastases can occur as transcoelomic metastases in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) or metastasization from other tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for localization and characterization of these lesions before treatment. (orig.) [German] Die Kategorie der extramedullaeren intraduralen Tumoren enthaelt Laesionen, die von den Nervenhuellen (Schwannome und Neurofibrome) oder von den meningealen Zellen ausgehen (Meningeome). Ependymome, Lipome, Haemangioperizytome, Epidermoidzysten und Dermoidzysten entsprechen selteneren primaeren Tumoren. Extramedullaere Metastasen koennen als Abtropfmetastasen bei ZNS-Tumoren oder als Metastasierung anderer Karzinomerkrankungen auftreten. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist die Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung einer intraduralen Raumforderung. (orig.)

  9. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawes Martha C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review summarizes what is known about the pathological processes (e.g. structural and functional changes, by which spinal curvatures develop and evolve into spinal deformities. Methods Comprehensive review of articles (English language only published on 'scoliosis,' whose content yielded data on the pathological changes associated with spinal curvatures. Medline, Science Citation Index and other searches yielded > 10,000 titles each of which was surveyed for content related to 'pathology' and related terms such as 'etiology,' 'inheritance,' 'pathomechanism,' 'signs and symptoms.' Additional resources included all books published on 'scoliosis' and available through the Arizona Health Sciences Library, Interlibrary Loan, or through direct contact with the authors or publishers. Results A lateral curvature of the spine–'scoliosis'–can develop in association with postural imbalance due to genetic defects and injury as well as pain and scarring from trauma or surgery. Irrespective of the factor that triggers its appearance, a sustained postural imbalance can result, over time, in establishment of a state of continuous asymmetric loading relative to the spinal axis. Recent studies support the longstanding hypothesis that spinal deformity results directly from such postural imbalance, irrespective of the primary trigger, because the dynamics of growth within vertebrae are altered by continuous asymmetric mechanical loading. These data suggest that, as long as growth potential remains, evolution of a spinal curvature into a spinal deformity can be prevented by reversing the state of continuous asymmetric loading. Conclusion Spinal curvatures can routinely be diagnosed in early stages, before pathological deformity of the vertebral elements is induced in response to asymmetric loading. Current clinical approaches involve 'watching and waiting' while mild reversible spinal curvatures develop into spinal deformities with

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of various spinal disorders was studied. Six normal volunteers and 19 patients with various spinal disorders were examined with a prototype MRI (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) operated with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The appropriate selection of both pulse sequences and detector coils were important factors in obtaining the best MRIs in spinal disorders. Short spin-echo (SE) images, a 0.3-sec repetition time (TR), and a 25-msec echo time (TE) provided the best anatomical details with a short scan time. Therefore, this pulse sequence was used at first in order to find the lesion roughly in all patients. Long SE images, 1.5-2 sec TR and 90-120 msec TE, then provided the details of the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) and the normal nucleus pulposus. This pulse sequence was used just as in a contrast myelogram in order to demonstrate the distortion of the subarachnoid space in such cases as tumors, canal stenosis, and herniated discs. The long SE image was also used to evaluate the degeneration of the intervertebral disc. Inversion recovery (IR) images did not provide more information than did SE images, because they could not differentiate the gray matter and the white matter in the spinal cord, unlike as in the brain. However, these IR images were used for delineating the tumor tissue from the normal spinal cord as well as for making the calculated T1 images. T1 images were calculated from the SE and IR images. T2 images were calculated from two SE images with different TEs. Both T1 and T2 images provided the details of the CSF and the proton-relaxation times in each tissue. It is supposed that the long SE, T1 and T2 images act as MRI myelograms, which demonstrate the CSF space well without a contrast medium. (J.P.N.)

  11. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhang; Tongxi, Liu; Jie, Luo; Yujuan, Jiao; Wei, Jiang; Xia, Liu; Yumin, Zheng; Xin, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to study the clinical, laboratory, imaging pathology, and prognosis features of IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis. We worked with a 55-year-old man suffering from IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis who had the most widespread lesion in his dura mater. We also review previous related studies and discuss the clinical characteristics of this rare disease. In total, eight IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis patients have been reported in the literature since 2009. They were mostly male patients, 51.7 ± 11.9 years old on average. Cervical and thoracic vertebrae were the most common sites for lesions. The most prominent symptom was varying numbness and weakness of the limbs and/or body associated with spinal cord compression. There was one patient (1/5) with elevated serum IgG4 levels and three patients (3/3) with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG4 index. Positive histopathologic findings are the strongest basis for a diagnosis. All the patients with IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis is an orphan disease that mainly occurs in cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Older males are the most susceptible group. Serum IgG4 levels were consistently normal in these cases, so analysis of CSF for IgG4 production (IgG4 index) could become a useful tool. Pathological findings remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Most patients responded favorably to glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:26567899

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multiple spinal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xiao Guang; Zhong, Wo Quan; Ma, Qing Jun; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting; Liu, Zhong Jun

    2011-11-01

    To stress the clinical and radiologic presentation and treatment outcome of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple spinal involvements. A total of 42 cases with spinal LCH were reviewed in our hospital and 5 had multifocal spinal lesions. Multiple spinal LCH has been reported in 50 cases in the literature. All cases including ours were analyzed concerning age, sex, clinical and radiologic presentation, therapy and outcome. Of our five cases, three had neurological symptom, four soft tissue involvement and three had posterior arch extension. Compiling data from the eight largest case series of the spinal LCH reveals that 27.2% multiple vertebrae lesions. In these 55 cases, there were 26 female and 29 male with the mean age of 7.4 years (range 0.2-37). A total of 182 vertebrae were involved including 28.0% in the cervical spine, 47.8% in thoracic and 24.2% in the lumbar spine. Extraspinal LCH lesion was documented in 54.2% cases, visceral involvement in 31.1% and vertebra plana in 50% cases. Paravertebral and epidural extension were not documented in most cases. Pathological diagnosis was achieved in 47 cases including 8 open spine biopsy. The treatment strategy varied depending on different hospitals. One patient died, two had recurrence and the others had no evidence of the disease with an average of 7.2 years (range 1-21) of follow-up. Asymptomatic spinal lesions could be simply observed with or without bracing and chemotherapy is justified for multiple lesions. Surgical decompression should be reserved for the uncommon cases in which neurologic compromise does not respond to radiotherapy or progresses too rapidly for radiotherapy. PMID:20496040

  13. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  14. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  15. Apoptosis and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the irradiated rodent spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Oligodendrocytes undergo early apoptosis after irradiation. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between oligodendroglial apoptosis and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) in the irradiated central nervous system. Methods and Materials: Adult rats and p53 transgenic mice were given single doses of 2 Gy, 8 Gy, or 22 Gy to the cervical spinal cord. Apoptosis was assessed using TUNEL (Tdt-mediated dUTP terminal nick-end labeling) staining or by examining nuclear morphology. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were identified with an NG2 antibody or by in situ hybridization for platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Proliferation of OPC was assessed by in vivo bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and subsequent immunohistochemistry. Because radiation-induced apoptosis of oligodendroglial cells is p53 dependent, p53 transgenic mice were used to study the relationship between apoptosis and cell proliferation. Results: Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells underwent apoptosis within 24 h of irradiation in the rat. That did not result in a change in OPC density at 24 h. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell density was significantly reduced by 2-4 weeks, but showed recovery by 6 weeks after irradiation. An increase in BrdU-labeled cells was observed at 2 weeks after 8 Gy or 22 Gy, and proliferating cells in the rat spinal cord were immunoreactive for NG2. The mouse spinal cord showed a similar early cell proliferation after irradiation. No difference was observed in the proliferation response in the spinal cord of p53 -/- mice compared with wild type animals. Conclusions: Oligodendroglial cells undergo early apoptosis and OPC undergo early proliferation after ionizing radiation. However, apoptosis is not likely to be the trigger for early proliferation of OPC in the irradiated central nervous system

  16. SDF1 in the dorsal corticospinal tract promotes CXCR4+ cell migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hosung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1 and its major signaling receptor, CXCR4, were initially described in the immune system; however, they are also expressed in the nervous system, including the spinal cord. After spinal cord injury, the blood brain barrier is compromised, opening the way for chemokine signaling between these two systems. These experiments clarified prior contradictory findings on normal expression of SDF1 and CXCR4 as well as examined the resulting spinal cord responses resulting from this signaling. Methods These experiments examined the expression and function of SDF1 and CXCR4 in the normal and injured adult mouse spinal cord primarily using CXCR4-EGFP and SDF1-EGFP transgenic reporter mice. Results In the uninjured spinal cord, SDF1 was expressed in the dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST as well as the meninges, whereas CXCR4 was found only in ependymal cells surrounding the central canal. After spinal cord injury (SCI, the pattern of SDF1 expression did not change rostral to the lesion but it disappeared from the degenerating dCST caudally. By contrast, CXCR4 expression changed dramatically after SCI. In addition to the CXCR4+ cells in the ependymal layer, numerous CXCR4+ cells appeared in the peripheral white matter and in the dorsal white matter localized between the dorsal corticospinal tract and the gray matter rostral to the lesion site. The non-ependymal CXCR4+ cells were found to be NG2+ and CD11b+ macrophages that presumably infiltrated through the broken blood-brain barrier. One population of macrophages appeared to be migrating towards the dCST that contains SDF1 rostral to the injury but not towards the caudal dCST in which SDF1 is no longer present. A second population of the CXCR4+ macrophages was present near the SDF1-expressing meningeal cells. Conclusions These observations suggest that attraction of CXCR4+ macrophages is part of a programmed response to injury and that modulation of the

  17. Detrusor function in suprasacral spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, J K; Beric, A

    1992-08-01

    A total of 21 patients with chronic, stable suprasacral spinal cord injuries underwent a comprehensive neurological evaluation. A second lumbosacral lesion was excluded. The urodynamic findings were relatively constant as 95% of the patients showed detrusor hyperreflexia with elevated pressures, sphincteric dyssynergia and a competent bladder neck during the filling phase. The urodynamic findings of unexpected detrusor function in high spinal cord injury, for example areflexia and hypocontractility, should raise the clinician's suspicion that there is a lesion or dysfunction involving the sacral cord. PMID:1635134

  18. Guillain-Barre syndrome following spinal anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is the most common disease resulting in acute diffuse flaccid paralysis. It is an autoimmune disease that can occur at any age. The clinical course is characterized by weakness in the arms and legs, areflexia and the progression of muscle weakness from the lower limbs to the upper limbs. The most common causes of GBS include infections, vaccinations, surgery and some medicines. We present the case of a 48 years old male patient, who developed GBS after undergoing surgery for renal calculus, under spinal anaesthesia. In this case report, we presented a rather rare case of GBS occurring following spinal anaesthesia. (author)

  19. Pictorial essay: MR imaging in spinal dysraphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the advent of MR, the diagnostic armamentarium for spinal dysraphism included plain films, myelography and CT myelography. There were significant limitations to these modalities, such as high false negative rates for plain radiographs, requirement of general anesthesia for myelography (as the majority of patients are children), and high radiation exposure. MR is a single, safe investigation that can provide relevant information regarding the entire craniospinal axis. MR effectively demonstrates a wide variety of dysraphic abnormalities and effectively screens children for occult spinal dysraphism. (author)

  20. Radiotherapy of spinal cord gliomas. A retrospective mono-institutional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Stefanie; Hadi, Indrawati; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Niyazi, Maximilian [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Hankel, Vinzent [Marienhospital Stuttgart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stuttgart (Germany); Ertl, Lorenz [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen Harlaching, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Behandlungsstrategie. Ziel dieser retrospektiven Studie war es, die patienten- sowie tumorbezogenen Charakteristika auszuwerten und den Einsatz sowie die Rolle der Strahlentherapie (RT) bei der Behandlung von spinalen Gliomen zu untersuchen. Es wurden retrospektiv die Daten von allen Patienten mit spinalen Gliomen untersucht, welche von 2003 bis 2013 an der Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie der LMU Muenchen behandelt wurden. Es erfolgte die Auswertung der patienten- sowie tumor- und therapiebezogenen Charakteristika. Das Gesamtueberleben (OS) wurde nach Kaplan-Meier geschaetzt. Univariate Analysen wurden mittels Log-Rank-Test durchgefuehrt. Die Daten von 16 Patienten wurden analysiert. Darunter waren sieben primaere spinale Gliome und acht Abtropfmetastasen intrakranieller Gliome. Das mediane Follow-up betrug 42 Monate. Alle Patienten erhielten eine RT mit einer medianen Gesamtdosis von 45,0 Gy. In 62,5 % erfolgte eine simultane Radiochemotherapie mit Temozolomid. Das mediane OS fuer die gesamte Kohorte lag bei 6 Monaten (95 %-KI 0,0-27,5). Patienten mit der Diagnose eines primaeren spinalen Glioms hatten ein signifikant besseres OS als Patienten mit zerebralen Abtropfmetastasen (p < 0,001). Ebenso war eine Tumorresektion mit einem signifikanten Ueberlebensvorteil assoziiert (p = 0,001). Bezueglich der RT zeigte sich eine Dosis-Wirkungs-Beziehung ab einer Dosis von ≥ 45 Gy, welche mit einem verbesserten OS im Vergleich zu einer Bestrahlungsdosis von < 45 Gy korrelierte (p < 0,001). Die simultane Chemotherapie hatte keinen Einfluss auf das OS. Schlussfolgerung Trotz der Fortschritte im Bereich der multimodalen Therapie ist die Prognose spinaler Gliome mit einem medianen OS von nur 6 Monaten immer noch schlecht. Obwohl die Aussagekraft der Ergebnisse durch die relativ kleine Anzahl an Patienten begrenzt ist, stellt diese Studie einen wichtigen Beitrag zur spaerlichen Datenlage dar. Die vorliegenden Studienergebnisse sind ausserdem eine der groessten Fallsammlungen zur simultanen

  1. Effect of exercise on retrograde transport in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Whitney, Darryl Campbell

    2007-01-01

    The potential for exercise to improve function and delay disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been examined in some detail. Recent studies have shown that retrograde transport is diminished throughout disease progression in this mouse model. The finding that exercise plus viral delivery of IGF-1 significantly improves lifespan of the G93A transgenic mouse highlights the need to investigate the mechanisms by which exercise may alter factors associated...

  2. The neurobiology of the spinal cord in experimental parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Michela; Biagioni, Francesca; Vivacqua, Giorgio; Busceti, Carla Letizia; Bartalucci, Alessia; Soldani, Paola; D'Este, Loredana; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    The neurobiology of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals a number of unexpected areas which once were not recognized a priori as part of the neuropathology underlying PD. These areas may belong either to central nervous system or periphery. Among central areas major efforts in the last decade led to recognize a number of brain nuclei as part of the disease spreading or disease onset in PD patients. Unexpectedly recent evidence deriving from pathological studies in PD patients and corroborated by experimental models of PD provided clear evidence that the spinal cord is often recruited in PD pathology. Such an involvement is intriguing since the major degenerative disease of the spinal cord (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) features the involvement of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, while some environmental (parkinsonism, ALS, and dementia of Guam) and genetic (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome) diseases are known to be characterized by mixed degeneration of pyramidal and extrapyramidal regions. Thus, the clear-cut between degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the loss of pyramidal motor system appears now more as a continuum of   degeneration which converge in abnormal activity and cell pathology of motor neurons as a final common pathway. Among motor neurons, visceral efferent cells of the spinal cord are involved and provide a robust neurobiological findings which may justify a variety of non-motor autonomic symptoms which characterize PD. Neurodegeneration in the spinal cord extends to the dorsal horn of the grey matter posing an intriguing link between PD and sensory alterations. The present manuscript reviews the involvement of multiple regions of the spinal cord in PD and experimental parkinsonism in the attempt to provide both a neurobiological background to understand non motor symptoms and to provide the anatomical basis for disease spreading. PMID:24873929

  3. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  4. Spinal cord compression by spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma in polycythemia vera.

    OpenAIRE

    Kalina, P.; Drehobl, K. E.; Black, K; Woldenberg, R.; Sapan, M.

    1995-01-01

    A woman with an eight-year history of polycythemia vera presented with numbness and weakness of both legs. A large spinal haematoma was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging which was treated clinically and which subsequently resolved.

  5. Transcutaneous spinal stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecco LH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro H Grecco,1,3,4,* Shasha Li,1,5,* Sarah Michel,1,6,* Laura Castillo-Saavedra,1 Andoni Mourdoukoutas,7 Marom Bikson,7 Felipe Fregni1,21Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA; 3Special Laboratory of Pain and Signaling, Butantan Institute, 4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Namur, Belgium; 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI still have limited effects. Electrical stimulation might facilitate plastic changes in affected spinal circuitries that may be beneficial in improving motor function and spasticity or SCI-related neuropathic pain. Based on available animal and clinical evidence, we critically reviewed the physiological basis and therapeutic action of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in SCI. We analyzed the literature published on PubMed to date, looking for the role of three main noninvasive stimulation techniques in the recovery process of SCI and focusing mainly on transcutaneous spinal stimulation. This review discusses the main clinical applications, latest advances, and limitations of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Although most recent research in this topic has focused on transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS, we also reviewed the technique of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES as potential methods to modulate spinal cord

  6. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Li; Xiao Chen; Suchi Qiao; Xinwei Liu; Chang Liu; Degang Zhu; Jiacan Su; Zhiwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial ifbrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial ifbrillary acidic protein.

  7. Spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkol Gokhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal myoclonus is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonic movements in muscles that originate from several segments of the spinal cord and usually associated with laminectomy, spinal cord injury, post-operative, lumbosacral radiculopathy, spinal extradural block, myelopathy due to demyelination, cervical spondylosis and many other diseases. On rare occasions, it can originate from the peripheral nerve lesions and be mistaken for peripheral myoclonus. Careful history taking and electrophysiological evaluation is important in differential diagnosis. The aim of this report is to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and treatment results of a case with spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury without any structural lesion.

  8. Myelogram performed using iohexol for four spinally injured dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelogram was performed for four dogs with spinal injury because the site of spinal injury and degree of spinal compression were identified. We used iohexol (240 mg%) which is relatively new contrast medium. We injected 0.3 ml/kg of iohexol to the cisterna magna. It was able to find the site of spinal injury. There were no adverse reactions during and after general anesthesia. It was concluded that the myelogram with iohexol was a very safe technique because there were no adverse reactions to spinal injury cases

  9. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  10. Effects of hip joint angle changes on intersegmental spinal coupling in human spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Knikou, M

    2005-01-01

    Pathological expression of movement and muscle tone in human upper motor neuron disorders has been partly associated with impaired modulation of spinal inhibitory mechanisms, such as reciprocal or presynaptic inhibition. In addition, input from specific afferent systems contributes significantly to spinal reflex circuits coupled with posture or locomotion. Accordingly, the objectives of this study were to identify the involved afferents and their relative contribution to soleus H-reflex modul...

  11. Treadmill step training promotes spinal cord neural plasticity after incomplete spinal cord injury**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiansheng Sun; Chaoqun Ye; Jun Wu; Zhicheng Zhang; Yanhua Cai; Feng Yue

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence shows that spinal circuits are significantly affected by training, and that intrinsic circuits that drive locomotor tasks are located in lumbosacral spinal segments in rats with complete spinal cord transection. However, after incomplete lesions, the effect of treadmil training has been debated, which is likely because of the difficulty of separating spontaneous stepping from specific training-induced effects. In this study, rats with moderate spinal cord contusion were sub-jected to either step training on a treadmil or used in the model (control) group. The treadmil training began at day 7 post-injury and lasted 20 ± 10 minutes per day, 5 days per week for 10 weeks. The speed of the treadmil was set to 3 m/min and was increased on a daily basis according to the tolerance of each rat. After 3 weeks of step training, the step training group exhibited a sig-nificantly greater improvement in the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score than the model group. The expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the spinal cord lesion site and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive ventral neurons in the second lumbar spinal segment were greater in the step training group than in the model group at 11 weeks post-injury, while the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the spinal cord lesion site showed no difference between the two groups. These results suggest that treadmil training significantly improves functional re-covery and neural plasticity after incomplete spinal cord injury.

  12. Development and Treatments of Inflammatory Cells and Cytokines in Spinal Cord Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Zhuang; Xiao-Kang Li; Masayuki Fujino; Ping Zhu; Jia-xin Li

    2013-01-01

    During aortic surgery, interruption of spinal cord blood flow might cause spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). The incidence of spinal cord IRI after aortic surgery is up to 28%, and patients with spinal cord IRI might suffer from postoperative paraplegia or paraparesis. Spinal cord IRI includes two phases. The immediate spinal cord injury is related to acute ischemia. And the delayed spinal cord injury involves both ischemic cellular death and reperfusion injury. Inflammation is a ...

  13. Analysis of the host transcriptome from demyelinating spinal cord of murine coronavirus-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Elliott

    Full Text Available Persistent infection of the mouse central nervous system (CNS with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV induces a demyelinating disease pathologically similar to multiple sclerosis and is therefore used as a model system. There is little information regarding the host factors that correlate with and contribute to MHV-induced demyelination. Here, we detail the genes and pathways associated with MHV-induced demyelinating disease in the spinal cord. High-throughput sequencing of the host transcriptome revealed that demyelination is accompanied by numerous transcriptional changes indicative of immune infiltration as well as changes in the cytokine milieu and lipid metabolism. We found evidence that a Th1-biased cytokine/chemokine response and eicosanoid-derived inflammation accompany persistent MHV infection and that antigen presentation is ongoing. Interestingly, increased expression of genes involved in lipid transport, processing, and catabolism, including some with known roles in neurodegenerative diseases, coincided with demyelination. Lastly, expression of several genes involved in osteoclast or bone-resident macrophage function, most notably TREM2 and DAP12, was upregulated in persistently infected mouse spinal cord. This study highlights the complexity of the host antiviral response, which accompany MHV-induced demyelination, and further supports previous findings that MHV-induced demyelination is immune-mediated. Interestingly, these data suggest a parallel between bone reabsorption by osteoclasts and myelin debris clearance by microglia in the bone and the CNS, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using an RNA-seq approach to study the host CNS response to persistent viral infection.

  14. THE DIAGNOSIS OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR SPINAL CAVERNOUS ANGIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for spinal cavernous angiomas.Methods The examinations of plain scan and contrast enhanced scan of magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in three patients with spinal cavernous angiomas.Results The focus of two cases was located in thorax segment of the spinal cord and one in lower cervical segment.All focuses were single and the shape of spinal cord was normal or slightly thick. MRI characteristic of spinal cavernous angiomas was just like popcorn or mulberry with a jumbled gobbet signal. Low and short T2 signal appeared around the focus. In all cases, there were no obvious contrast enhanced signal in 2 cases and one case with moderate contrast enhanced signal. The diameter of hemorrhage was smaller than that of the spinal cord.Conclusion MRI has higher sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of spinal cavernous angioma.

  15. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  16. Reproducibility of resting state spinal cord networks in healthy volunteers at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert L; Rogers, Baxter P; Conrad, Benjamin N; Smith, Seth A; Gore, John C

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported our findings of resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord: in a cohort of healthy volunteers we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns (Barry et al., 2014). Building upon these results, we now quantify the within-subject reproducibility of bilateral motor and sensory networks (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.54-0.56) and explore the impact of including frequencies up to 0.13Hz. Our results suggest that frequencies above 0.08Hz may enhance the detectability of these resting state networks, which would be beneficial for practical studies of spinal cord functional connectivity. PMID:26924285

  17. Profound Intraoperative Metabolic Acidosis and Hypotension in a Child Undergoing Multilevel Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanad Shukry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prone position may cause cardiovascular system depression. Yet, the mechanisms involved and preemptive measures are not well understood (Edgcombe et al. (2008. During spinal surgery in the prone position, hypotension may occur. Implicated factors include prolonged abdominal compression impeding venous return resulting in increased blood loss, decreased cardiovascular reserve, and the use of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA which has been shown to blunt the sympathetic response more than inhalation anesthesia. We present a case of hypotension during spinal surgery with all its challenges. Hypotension and acidosis persisted despite all supporting measures, and only to improve with supine positioning. Differential diagnosis for such an event are discussed. Although abdominal compression may not be obvious before the start of surgery, compressing the spine during surgery may lead to abdominal compression and hypoperfusion to abdominal organs.

  18. [Magnetic resonance tomography in late sequelae of spinal and spinal cord injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, A K; Akhadov, T A; Sachkova, I Iu; Belov, S A; Chernenko, O A; Panova, M M

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance tomography (MRT) helped obtain a high-resolution image characterized by high sensitivity in respect of soft tissue contrast visualization and providing direct imaging of the spinal cord and its radicles. This method is useful in the diagnosis of injuries to the spine and cord. A total of 64 patients of both sexes aged 6 to 67 were examined. The primary diagnosis of traumatic changes in the spine and cord was confirmed by MRT in only 62% of cases. Two groups of patients were singled out: with acute and chronic injuries, subdivided into subgroups with and without spinal cord dysfunction. The detected changes were divided into extramedullary (traumatic disk hernias, compression of the cord or radicles with a dislocated bone fragment, epidural hematoma) and intramedullary (edema, hemorrhages, spinal cord disruption); MRT diagnosis of intramedullary changes is particularly important, more so in the absence of bone injuries. In remote periods after the trauma the clinical picture was determined by spinal canal stenosis, cicatricial atrophic and adhesive changes eventually blocking the liquor space. Intramedullary changes presented as spinal cord cysts or syringomyelia. A classification of the detected changes by the types of injuries and their aftereffects is presented in the paper. The authors emphasize the desirability of MRT in spinal injuries with signs of cord dysfunction. PMID:7801568

  19. Spinal cord stimulation in chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Vaarwerk, IAM; Staal, MJ

    1998-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 30 years now, and although it has shown to be effective under certain well-described conditions of chronic pain, conclusive evidence on its effectiveness is still sparse. There is a need for more prospective and methodological good studies, i

  20. Pulmonary sequelae after electron spinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured pulmonary function in 21 patients, after craniospinal irradiation with a posterior spinal electron beam. The median age at treatment was 7.5 years. Nine patients (43%) demonstrated abnormal pulmonary function tests, five with restrictive changes, one with isolated diminished diffusion capacity, and three with obstructive disease. These changes were mild and predominantly asymptomatic