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Sample records for alphaproteobacteria

  1. Global Regulatory Pathways in the Alphaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    2007-04-27

    A major goal for microbiologists in the twenty-first century is to develop an understanding of the microbial cell in all its complexity. In addition to understanding the function of individual gene products we need to focus on how the cell regulates gene expression at a global level to respond to different environmental parameters. Development of genomic technologies such as complete genome sequencing, proteomics, and global comparisons of mRNA expression patterns allows us to begin to address this issue. This proposal focuses on a number of phylogenetically related bacteria that are involved in environmentally important processes such as carbon sequestration and bioremediation. Genome sequencing projects of a number of these bacteria have revealed the presence of a small family of regulatory genes found thus far only in the alpha-proteobacteria. These genes encode proteins that are related to the global regulatory protein RosR in Rhizobium etli, which is involved in determining nodulation competitiveness in this bacterium. Our goal is to examine the function of the proteins encoded by this gene family in several of the bacteria containing homologs to RosR. We will construct gene disruption mutations in a number of these bacteria and characterize the resulting mutant strains using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genetic and biochemical techniques. We will thus determine if the other proteins also function as global regulators of gene expression. Using proteomics methods we will identify the specific proteins whose expression varies depending on the presence or absence of the RosR homolog. Over fifty loci regulated by RosR have been identified in R. etli using transposon mutagenesis; this will serve as out benchmark to which we will compare the other regulons. We expect to identify genes regulated by RosR homologs in several bacterial species, including, but not limited to Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Sphingomonas aromaticivorans. In this way we will

  2. DIY series of genetic cassettes useful in construction of versatile vectors specific for Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Adamczuk, Marcin; Szuplewska, Magdalena; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2011-08-01

    We have developed a DIY (Do It Yourself) series of genetic cassettes, which facilitate construction of novel versatile vectors for Alphaproteobacteria. All the cassettes are based on defined genetic modules derived from three natural plasmids of Paracoccus aminophilus JCM 7686. We have constructed over 50 DIY cassettes, which differ in structure and specific features. All of them are functional in eight strains representing three orders of Alphaproteobacteria: Rhodobacterales, Rhizobiales and Caulobacterales. Besides various replication and stabilization systems, many of the cassettes also contain selective markers appropriate for Alphaproteobacteria (40 cassettes) and genetic modules responsible for mobilization for conjugal transfer (24 cassettes). All the DIY cassettes are bordered by different types of polylinkers, which facilitate vector construction. Using these DIY cassettes, we have created a set of compatible Escherichia coli-Alphaproteobacteria mobilizable shuttle vectors (high or low copy number in E. coli), which will greatly assist the genetic manipulation of Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:21569803

  3. Insights into the Transposable Mobilome of Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Baj, Jadwiga; Szuplewska, Magdalena; Maj, Anna; Tabin, Mateusz; Czyzkowska, Anna; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Sitarek, Tomasz; Stawinski, Piotr; Tudek, Agnieszka; Wanasz, Katarzyna; Wardal, Ewa; Piechucka, Ewa; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Several trap plasmids (enabling positive selection of transposition events) were used to identify a pool of functional transposable elements (TEs) residing in bacteria of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria). Complex analysis of 25 strains representing 20 species of this genus led to the capture and characterization of (i) 37 insertion sequences (ISs) representing 9 IS families (IS3, IS5, IS6, IS21, IS66, IS256, IS1182, IS1380 and IS1634), (ii) a composite transposon Tn6097 generated by two copies of the ISPfe2 (IS1634 family) containing two predicted genetic modules, involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and daunorubicin/doxorubicin resistance, (iii) 3 non-composite transposons of the Tn3 family, including Tn5393 carrying streptomycin resistance and (iv) a transposable genomic island TnPpa1 (45 kb). Some of the elements (e.g. Tn5393, Tn6097 and ISs of the IS903 group of the IS5 family) were shown to contain strong promoters able to drive transcription of genes placed downstream of the target site of transposition. Through the application of trap plasmid pCM132TC, containing a promoterless tetracycline resistance reporter gene, we identified five ways in which transposition can supply promoters to transcriptionally silent genes. Besides highlighting the diversity and specific features of several TEs, the analyses performed in this study have provided novel and interesting information on (i) the dynamics of the process of transposition (e.g. the unusually high frequency of transposition of TnPpa1) and (ii) structural changes in DNA mediated by transposition (e.g. the generation of large deletions in the recipient molecule upon transposition of ISPve1 of the IS21 family). We also demonstrated the great potential of TEs and transposition in the generation of diverse phenotypes as well as in the natural amplification and dissemination of genetic information (of adaptative value) by horizontal gene transfer, which is considered the driving force of bacterial

  4. Insights into the transposable mobilome of Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Dziewit

    Full Text Available Several trap plasmids (enabling positive selection of transposition events were used to identify a pool of functional transposable elements (TEs residing in bacteria of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria. Complex analysis of 25 strains representing 20 species of this genus led to the capture and characterization of (i 37 insertion sequences (ISs representing 9 IS families (IS3, IS5, IS6, IS21, IS66, IS256, IS1182, IS1380 and IS1634, (ii a composite transposon Tn6097 generated by two copies of the ISPfe2 (IS1634 family containing two predicted genetic modules, involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and daunorubicin/doxorubicin resistance, (iii 3 non-composite transposons of the Tn3 family, including Tn5393 carrying streptomycin resistance and (iv a transposable genomic island TnPpa1 (45 kb. Some of the elements (e.g. Tn5393, Tn6097 and ISs of the IS903 group of the IS5 family were shown to contain strong promoters able to drive transcription of genes placed downstream of the target site of transposition. Through the application of trap plasmid pCM132TC, containing a promoterless tetracycline resistance reporter gene, we identified five ways in which transposition can supply promoters to transcriptionally silent genes. Besides highlighting the diversity and specific features of several TEs, the analyses performed in this study have provided novel and interesting information on (i the dynamics of the process of transposition (e.g. the unusually high frequency of transposition of TnPpa1 and (ii structural changes in DNA mediated by transposition (e.g. the generation of large deletions in the recipient molecule upon transposition of ISPve1 of the IS21 family. We also demonstrated the great potential of TEs and transposition in the generation of diverse phenotypes as well as in the natural amplification and dissemination of genetic information (of adaptative value by horizontal gene transfer, which is considered the driving force of

  5. Multiphyletic origins of methylotrophy in Alphaproteobacteria, exemplified by comparative genomics of Lake Washington isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David A C; McTaggart, Tami L; Setboonsarng, Usanisa; Vorobev, Alexey; Goodwin, Lynne; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2015-03-01

    We sequenced the genomes of 19 methylotrophic isolates from Lake Washington, which belong to nine genera within eight families of the Alphaproteobacteria, two of the families being the newly proposed families. Comparative genomic analysis with a focus on methylotrophy metabolism classifies these strains into heterotrophic and obligately or facultatively autotrophic methylotrophs. The most persistent metabolic modules enabling methylotrophy within this group are the N-methylglutamate pathway, the two types of methanol dehydrogenase (MxaFI and XoxF), the tetrahydromethanopterin pathway for formaldehyde oxidation, the serine cycle and the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway. At the same time, a great potential for metabolic flexibility within this group is uncovered, with different combinations of these modules present. Phylogenetic analysis of key methylotrophy functions reveals that the serine cycle must have evolved independently in at least four lineages of Alphaproteobacteria and that all methylotrophy modules seem to be prone to lateral transfers as well as deletions. PMID:25683159

  6. First report of human infection by Rhodoplanes sp., Alphaproteobacteria in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangLJ; WangGQ; YuHL; WangJ; WangSW; JiaY; YuYY; XuJG

    2011-01-01

    We isolated a novel strain of Alphaproteobacteria from a patient, who had medical history of chronic rhinitis for more than twenty years and recently experienced local skin abscess and ulcer. He eventually died of multiple organ failure due to multi-antibiotics resistance. We identified the microorganism by 16SrRNA sequencing and found that it belonged to the genus Rhodoplanes. It was named as Rhodoplanes sp. strain ZLJ-0. It is resumed that Rhodoplanes sp. strain ZLJ-0 might be an emerging human pathogen involving in unknown febrile conditions and could cause local infection of any tissues or organs. Differential diagnosis of febrile patients should be conducted in clinical practice and research on emerging pathogens of Alphaproteobacteria should be performed to determine the epidemiology, clinical symptoms and pathogenic features of these pathogens.

  7. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

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    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  8. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria. PMID:24260361

  9. Similar diversity of Alphaproteobacteria and nitrogenase gene amplicons on two related Sphagnum mosses

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    Anastasia eBragina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum mosses represent a main component in ombrotrophic wetlands. They harbor a specific and diverse microbial community with essential functions for the host. To understand extend and degree of host specificity, Sphagnum fallax and S. angustifolium, two phylogenetically closely related species, which show distinct habitat preference with respect to the nutrient level, were analyzed by a multifaceted approach. Microbial fingerprints obtained by PCR-SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism using universal, group-specific and functional primers were highly similar. Similarity was confirmed for colonization patterns obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM: Alphaproteobacteria were the main colonizers inside the hyaline cells of Sphagnum leaves. A deeper survey of Alphaproteobacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reveals a high diversity with Acidocella, Acidisphaera, Rhodopila and Phenylobacterium as major genera for both mosses. Pathogen defense and nitrogen fixation are important functions of Sphagnum-associated bacteria, which are fulfilled by microbial communities of both Sphagna in a similar way. NifH libraries of Sphagnum-associated microbial communities were characterized by high diversity and abundance of Alphaproteobacteria but contained also diverse amplicons of other taxa, e.g. Cyanobacteria, Geobacter and Spirochaeta. Statistically significant differences between the microbial communities of both Sphagnum species could not be discovered in any of the experimental approach. Our results show that the same close relationship, which exists between the physical, morphological and chemical characteristics of Sphagnum mosses and the ecology and function of bog ecosystems, also connects moss plantlets with their associated bacterial communities.

  10. Introduction to the alpha-proteobacteria: Wolbachia and Bartonella, Rickettsia, Brucella, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Dwight D

    2011-11-01

    Wolbachia is an obligate intracellular endosymbiont and likely mutualist living within the heartworm Dirofilaria immitis and a number of other filarial nematodes in the family Onchocercidae. The bacterial infection is passed from worm to worm transovarially; the organisms are in ovarian cells, the developing microfilariae, and multiply and persist in all later developmental stages through the mosquito and into the next host. Besides being present in the ovaries of the adult worms, they also are present in large numbers within the hypodermal tissues of the nematode. It is now know that these bacteria that were first observed in heartworms more than 30 years ago are actually related to similar Wolbachia bacteria that are found in arthropods. Wolbachia is an alpha-proteobacteria, and this group includes a number of important arthropod-transmitted bacterial agents of dogs and cats: Rickettsia rickettsii, R. felis, Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, and E. ewingii. Alpha-proteobacteria are also important as obligate intracellular mutualists in plants in which they are responsible for nitrogen fixation. Recent work on the treatment of heartworms in dogs with doxycycline stems from related work with the human filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus that causes river blindness in people. PMID:22152604

  11. Whole-Proteome Analysis of Twelve Species of Alphaproteobacteria Links Four Pathogens

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    Yunyun Zhou

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of whole-genome and whole-proteome sequences have been made available through advances in sequencing technology, and sequences of millions more organisms will become available in the coming years. This wealth of genetic information will provide numerous opportunities to enhance our understanding of these organisms including a greater understanding of relationships among species. Researchers have used 16S rRNA and other gene sequences to study the evolutionary origins of bacteria, but these strategies do not provide insight into the sharing of genes among bacteria via horizontal transfer. In this work we use an open source software program called pClust to cluster proteins from the complete proteomes of twelve species of Alphaproteobacteria and generate a dendrogram from the resulting orthologous protein clusters. We compare the results with dendrograms constructed using the 16S rRNA gene and multiple sequence alignment of seven housekeeping genes. Analysis of the whole proteomes of these pathogens grouped Rickettsia typhi with three other animal pathogens whereas conventional sequence analysis failed to group these pathogens together. We conclude that whole-proteome analysis can give insight into relationships among species beyond their phylogeny, perhaps reflecting the effects of horizontal gene transfer and potentially providing insight into the functions of shared genes by means of shared phenotypes.

  12. Occurrence and Potential Diagnostic Applications of Serological Cross-Reactivities between Brucella and Other Alpha-Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2004-01-01

    Agrobacterium, Sinorhizobium, and Ochrobactrum are genera closely related to Brucella but, in contrast to the latter, are not pathogenic for humans and animals. We studied by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) the reactivities of brucellosis sera against cytosolic (CYT) and membrane (MA) antigens from these nonpathogenic bacteria, and we evaluated the potential usefulness of these cross-reactions for the diagnosis of brucellosis in humans, sheep, cows, and dogs. Canine infection by Brucella canis was detected with high specificity by CYT antigen-based ELISAs (96% for Agrobacterium, 96% for Sinorhizobium, and 91% for Ochrobactrum), while sensitivity was variable (58% for Agrobacterium, 88% for Sinorhizobium, and 84% for Ochrobactrum). In addition, it was possible to diagnose canine disease shortly after exposure to the pathogen (15 days). Similar results for canine brucellosis were obtained with MA antigens. In contrast, normal sera from humans, sheep, and cattle reacted strongly with all the antigens (CYT and MA antigens from the three bacteria), producing high cutoff values and, consequently, low sensitivities. While for some host species the reactivity patterns of normal sera by Western blotting were similar to those produced with sera from infected individuals, the reactivity pattern of bovine sera against Sinorhizobium meliloti antigens exhibited some differential bands for the two groups of sera. These results show that crude fractions from nonpathogenic alpha-proteobacteria can be used to diagnose canine brucellosis but may need to be further separated into simpler fractions to have diagnostic usefulness in ovine, bovine, or human infection. By reducing the biosafety requirements, the use of antigens derived from these nonpathogenic bacteria would simplify the production of diagnostic kits for brucellosis, especially in settings where biosafety level-3 facilities are scarce or absent. PMID:15358645

  13. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  14. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Fioravanti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation, biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  15. Isolation, cultivation and genomic analysis of magnetosome biomineralization genes of a new genus of South-seeking magnetotactic cocci within the Alphaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morillo, Viviana [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Abreu, Fernanda [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Araujo, Ana C [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; de Almeida, Luiz G [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica; Enrich-Prast, Alex [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Farina, Marcos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; de Vasconcelos, Ana T [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica; Bazylinski, Dennis A [Ames Laboratory; Lins, Ulysses [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

    2014-01-01

    Although magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats, they are still considered fastidious microorganisms with regard to growth and cultivation with only a relatively low number of axenic cultures available to date. Here, we report the first axenic culture of an MTB isolated in the Southern Hemisphere (Itaipu Lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Cells of this new isolate are coccoid to ovoid in morphology and grow microaerophilically in semi-solid medium containing an oxygen concentration ([O2]) gradient either under chemoorganoheterotrophic or chemolithoautotrophic conditions. Each cell contains a single chain of approximately 10 elongated cuboctahedral magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetosomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that the coccoid MTB isolated in this study represents a new genus in the Alphaproteobacteria; the name Magnetofaba australis strain IT-1 is proposed. Preliminary genomic data obtained by pyrosequencing shows that M. australis strain IT-1 contains a genomic region with genes involved in biomineralization similar to those found in the most closely related magnetotactic cocci Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1. However, organization of the magnetosome genes differs from M. marinus.

  16. Bartonella apis sp. nov., a honey bee gut symbiont of the class Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kešnerová, Lucie; Moritz, Roxane; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the culture and characterization of an alphaproteobacterium of the order Rhizobiales, isolated from the gut of the honey bee Apis mellifera. Strain PEB0122T shares >95 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species of the genus Bartonella, a group of mammalian pathogens transmitted by bloodsucking arthropods. Phylogenetic analyses showed that PEB0122T and related strains from the honey bee gut form a sister clade of the genus Bartonella. Optimal growth of strain PEB0122T was obtained on solid media supplemented with defibrinated sheep blood under microaerophilic conditions at 35-37 °C, which is consistent with the cultural characteristics of other species of the genus Bartonella. Reduced growth of strain PEB0122T also occurred under aerobic conditions. The rod-shaped cells of strain PEB0122T had a mean length of 1.2-1.8 μm and revealed hairy surface structures. Strain PEB0122T was positive for catalase, cytochrome c oxidase, urease and nitrate reductase. The fatty acid composition was comparable to those of other species of the genus Bartonella, with palmitic acid (C16 : 0) and isomers of 18- and 19-carbon chains being the most abundant. The genomic DNA G+C content of PEB0122T was determined to be about 45.5 mol%. The high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species of Bartonella and its close phylogenetic position suggest that strain PEB0122T represents a novel species within the genus Bartonella, for which we propose the name Bartonella apis sp. nov. The type strain is PEB0122T ( = NCIMB 14961T = DSM 29779T). PMID:26537852

  17. Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-Proteobacteria.

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    Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Yamada, Yuzo

    2004-03-01

    Three bacterial strains were isolated from flowers collected in Bangkok, Thailand, by an enrichment-culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located in the lineage of the genus Asaia but constituted a cluster separate from the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis. The DNA base composition of the isolates was 60.2-60.5 mol% G+C, with a range of 0.3 mol%. The isolates constituted a taxon separate from Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. The isolates had morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics similar to those of the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis, but the isolates grew on maltose. The major ubiquinone was Q(10). On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov. is proposed for the isolates. The type strain is isolate AA08(T) (=BCC 12978(T)=TISTR 1524(T)=NBRC 100057(T)=NRIC 0535(T)), which had a DNA G+C content of 60.3 mol% and was isolated from a heliconia flower ('paksaasawan' in Thai; Heliconia sp.) collected in Bangkok, Thailand.

  18. Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Yamada, Yuzo

    2004-03-01

    Three bacterial strains were isolated from flowers collected in Bangkok, Thailand, by an enrichment-culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located in the lineage of the genus Asaia but constituted a cluster separate from the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis. The DNA base composition of the isolates was 60.2-60.5 mol% G+C, with a range of 0.3 mol%. The isolates constituted a taxon separate from Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. The isolates had morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics similar to those of the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis, but the isolates grew on maltose. The major ubiquinone was Q(10). On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov. is proposed for the isolates. The type strain is isolate AA08(T) (=BCC 12978(T)=TISTR 1524(T)=NBRC 100057(T)=NRIC 0535(T)), which had a DNA G+C content of 60.3 mol% and was isolated from a heliconia flower ('paksaasawan' in Thai; Heliconia sp.) collected in Bangkok, Thailand. PMID:15023938

  19. A genome phylogeny for mitochondria among alpha-proteobacteria and a predominantly eubacterial ancestry of yeast nuclear genes

    OpenAIRE

    Esser, C.; Ahmadinejad, N.; C. Wiegand; Rotte, C.; Sebastiani, F.; Gelius-Dietrich, G; Henze, K; Kretschmann, E.; Richly, E.; Leister, D.; Bryant, D; Steel, M; Lockhart, P; Penny, D; Martin, W

    2004-01-01

    Analyses of 55 individual and 31 concatenated protein data sets encoded in Reclinomonas americana and Marchantia polymorpha mitochondrial genomes revealed that current methods for constructing phylogenetic trees are insufficiently sensitive (or artifact-insensitive) to ascertain the sister of mitochondria among the current sample of eight alpha-proteobacterial genomes using mitochondrially-encoded proteins. However, Rhodospirillum rubrum came as close to mitochondria as any alpha-proteobacter...

  20. Culturable bacterial phylogeny from a shallow water hydrothermal vent of Espalamaca (Faial, Azores) reveals a variety of novel taxa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C.; Colaco, A.; Dastager, S.G.; Santos, R.S.; Meena, R.M.

    implemented on bacte-rial census indicated the occupancy of Gamma-Proteobacteria by 55.78%, Alpha-Proteobacteria by 21.05% and 12.63% of Bacteroidetes in the total population. Occurrence of novel species maximized with Alpha-Proteobacteria (11/20) followed...

  1. Characterization of an ATP/ADP translocase in the citrus huanglongbing bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a disease currently threatening the citrus industry worldwide, has been associated with three different species of Alphaproteobacteria known as Candidatus Liberibacter. A complete genome sequence was recently obtained via metagenomics for Ca. L. asiaticus (Las), the prom...

  2. Comparison of 26 sphingomonad genomes reveals diverse environmental adaptations and biodegradative capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aylward, Frank O.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Adams, Sandra M.;

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group within the Alphaproteobacteria that includes strains of interest for biotechnology, human health, and environmental nutrient cycling. In this study, we compared 26 sphingomonad genome sequences to gain insight into their ecology, metabolic ...

  3. Composition and Functional Characterization of Microbiome Associated with Mucus of the Coral Fungia echinata Collected from Andaman Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Ghosh, Tarini S.; Das, Subrata K.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the community composition and functions of the microbiome associated with the mucus of the coral Fungia echinata based on metagenomic approach. Metagenome sequence data showed a dominance of the class Gammaproteobacteria followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, Bacilli, and Clostridia. At the order level, the most abundant groups were Pseudomonadales, Oceanospirillales, Alteromonadales, and Rhodobacterales. The genus Psychr...

  4. Characterization and transcriptional analysis of two gene clusters for type IV secretion machinery in Wolbachia of Armadillidium vulgare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Félix, Christine; Pichon, Samuel; Braquart-Varnier, Christine;

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited alpha-proteobacteria that induce feminization of genetic males in most terrestrial crustacean isopods. Two clusters of vir genes for a type IV secretion machinery have been identified at two separate loci and characterized for the first time in a feminizing Wolb...

  5. Phylogenomic analysis of Odyssella thessalonicensis fortifies the common origin of Rickettsiales, Pelagibacter ubique and Reclimonas americana mitochondrion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Georgiades

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The evolution of the Alphaproteobacteria and origin of the mitochondria are topics of considerable debate. Most studies have placed the mitochondria ancestor within the Rickettsiales order. Ten years ago, the bacterium Odyssella thessalonicensis was isolated from Acanthamoeba spp., and the 16S rDNA phylogeny placed it within the Rickettsiales. Recently, the whole genome of O. thessalonicensis has been sequenced, and 16S rDNA phylogeny and more robust and accurate phylogenomic analyses have been performed with 65 highly conserved proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results suggested that the O. thessalonicensis emerged between the Rickettsiales and other Alphaproteobacteria. The mitochondrial proteins of the Reclinomonas americana have been used to locate the phylogenetic position of the mitochondrion ancestor within the Alphaproteobacteria tree. Using the K tree score method, nine mitochondrion-encoded proteins, whose phylogenies were congruent with the Alphaproteobacteria phylogenomic tree, have been selected and concatenated for Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood phylogenies. The Reclinomonas americana mitochondrion is a sister taxon to the free-living bacteria Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, and together, they form a clade that is deeply rooted in the Rickettsiales clade. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Reclinomonas americana mitochondrion phylogenomic study confirmed that mitochondria emerged deeply in the Rickettsiales clade and that they are closely related to Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique.

  6. Molecular Characterization and Evolution of Arthropod-Pathogenic Rickettsiella Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaux, Richard; Paces-Fessy, Mélanie; Raimond, Maryline; Michel-Salzat, Alice; Zimmer, Martin; Bouchon, Didier

    2007-01-01

    We determined the 16S rRNA gene sequences of three crustacean “Rickettsiella armadillidii” strains. Rickettsiella bacteria overall appear to form a monophyletic group that diverged from Coxiella bacteria ∼350 million years ago. Therefore, the genus Rickettsiella as a whole (not just Rickettsiella grylli) should be classified among the Gammaproteobacteria instead of the Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:17557851

  7. Effects of prokaryotic diversity changes on hydrocarbon degradation rates and metal partitioning during bioremediation of contaminated anoxic marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated changes of prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on anoxic marine sediments characterized by high hydrocarbon and metal content. Microcosms containing contaminated sediments were amended with lactose and acetate and incubated in anaerobic conditions up to 60 d at 20 or 35 °C. Microcosms displaying higher degradation efficiency of hydrocarbons were characterized by the dominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Methanosarcinales and the lack of gene sequences belonging to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Multivariate analyses support the hypothesis that Alphaproteobacteria are important for hydrocarbon degradation and highlight a potential synergistic effect of archaea and bacteria in changes of metal partitioning. Overall, these results point out that the identification of changes in the prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation of contaminated marine sediments is not only important for the improvement of bio-treatment performance towards hydrocarbons, but also for a better comprehension of changes occurring in metal partitioning which affect their mobility and toxicity.

  8. In-Situ Incubation of Iron-Sulfide Mineral in Seawater Reveals Colonization by Iron-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Zetaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, R. A.; Ramírez, G. A.; Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide mineral precipitation occurs at mid-ocean ridge (MOR) spreading centers, both in the form of plume particles and massive sulfide structures. A common constituent of MOR sulfide mineral is pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS). This mineral was chosen as a substrate for in-situ incubation studies in the shallow waters of Catalina Islands, CA to investigate the colonization of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria largely dominated the bacterial community on pyrrhotite samples incubated in the water column. Pyrrhotite samples incubated at the sediment/water column interface showed more even dominance by Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Cultivations that originated from these pyrrhotite samples resulted in the enrichment of Zetaproteobacteria with either twisted-stalks (Mariprofundus) or sheath structures. Additionally, a candidate novel Gammaproteobacterium was isolated and shown to grow autotrophically via the oxidation of iron.

  9. Global Molecular Analyses of Methane Metabolism in Methanotrophic Alphaproteobacterium, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Part II. Metabolomics and 13C-Labeling Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Song; Matsen, Janet B.; Konopka, Michael; Green-Saxena, Abigail; Clubb, Justin; Sadilek, Martin; Orphan, Victoria J; Beck, David; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we use metabolomics and ^(13)C-labeling data to refine central metabolic pathways for methane utilization in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a model alphaproteobacterial methanotrophic bacterium. We demonstrate here that similar to non-methane utilizing methylotrophic alphaproteobacteria the core metabolism of the microbe is represented by several tightly connected metabolic cycles, such as the serine pathway, the ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC) pathway, and the citric acid (TCA) cycle. ...

  10. Bartonellae in animals and vectors in New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Davoust, B.; Cabre, O; Rolain, J. M.; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Bartonellae are gram-negative facultative intracellular alpha-proteobacteria from the family Bartonellaceae. The natural history of bartonellae consists of a reservoir/host, which is a vertebrate with chronic intravascular infection with sustained bacteremia, and a vector (usually an arthropod) that transfers the bacteria from the reservoir to a susceptible yet uninfected host. In order to reveal the sources and reservoirs of Bartonella infection in animals and vectors in New Caledonia, we co...

  11. Genomic analysis of the nitrate-respiring Sphingopyxis granuli (formerly Sphingomonas macrogoltabida) strain TFA

    OpenAIRE

    García-Romero, Inmaculada; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.; González-Flores, Yolanda Elisabet; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2016-01-01

    Background Sphingomonads are Alphaproteobacteria that belong to the Sphingomonas, Novosphingobium, Sphingopyxis or Sphingobium genera, They are physiologically diverse and broadly distributed in nature, playing important roles in oligotrophic environments and in the degradation of recalcitrant polyaromatic compounds, Sphingopyxis is a poorly studied genus of which only one representative (S. alaskensis RB2256) has been deeply characterized. In this paper we analyze the genomic features of S. ...

  12. Evaluating bacterial community structures in oil collected from the sea surface and sediment in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Jiqing

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial community structures were evaluated in oil samples using culture-independent pyrosequencing, including oil mousses collected on sea surface and salt marshes during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead 1 year after the spill. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Erythrobacter, Rhodovulum, Stappia, and Thalassospira of Alphaproteobacteria were the prevailing groups in the oil mousses, which may relate to high temperatures and strong ...

  13. Phylogeny and Functions of Bacterial Communities Associated with Field-Grown Rice Shoots

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Takashi; Ikeda, Seishi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Sato, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic analysis was applied to bacterial communities associated with the shoots of two field-grown rice cultivars, Nipponbare and Kasalath. In both cultivars, shoot microbiomes were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (51–52%), Actinobacteria (11–15%), Gammaproteobacteria (9–10%), and Betaproteobacteria (4–10%). Compared with other rice microbiomes (root, rhizosphere, and phyllosphere) in public databases, the shoot microbiomes harbored abundant genes for C1 compound metabolism and 1-aminoc...

  14. Generation of the Brucella melitensis ORFeome Version 1.1

    OpenAIRE

    Dricot, A. (Amélie); Rual, J. J. (Jean François); Lamesch, P; BERTIN, N.; Dupuy, D. (Denis); Hao, T.; Lambert, C; Hallez, R.; Delroisse, J.M. (Jean Marc); Vandenhaute, J; Lopez-Goñi, I. (Ignacio); Moriyon, I. (Ignacio); Garcia-Lobo, J M; Sangari, F.J. (Félix Javier); MacMillan, A.P.

    2004-01-01

    The bacteria of the Brucella genus are responsible for a worldwide zoonosis called brucellosis. They belong to the alpha-proteobacteria group, as many other bacteria that live in close association with a eukaryotic host. Importantly, the Brucellae are mainly intracellular pathogens, and the molecular mechanisms of their virulence are still poorly understood. Using the complete genome sequence of Brucella melitensis, we generated a database of protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs) and cons...

  15. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. PMID:25640843

  16. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gang [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Xu, Zhenjiang [Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tian, Xiangli, E-mail: xianglitian@ouc.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Dong, Shuanglin [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Peng, Mo [School of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University (China)

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  17. Prokaryotic Community in Lacustrine Sediments of Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Lentini, Valeria; Rochera, Carlos; Camacho, Antonio; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana

    2016-02-01

    Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica), the largest seasonally ice-free region of the Maritime Antarctica, holds a large number of lakes, ponds, and streams. The prokaryotic structure and bacterial diversity in sediment samples collected during the 2008-2009 austral summer from five inland lakes, two coastal lakes, and an estuarine site were analyzed by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) and 16S rRNA 454 tag pyrosequencing techniques, respectively. Differently from inland lakes, which range around the oligotrophic status, coastal lakes are eutrophic environments, enriched by nutrient inputs from marine animals. Although the prokaryotic abundances (estimated as DAPI stained cells) in sediment samples were quite similar among inland and coastal lakes, Bacteria always far dominated over Archaea. Despite the phylogenetic analysis indicated that most of sequences were affiliated to a few taxonomic groups, mainly referred to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, their relative abundances greatly differed from each site. Differences in bacterial composition showed that lacustrine sediments were more phyla rich than the estuarine sediment. Proteobacterial classes in lacustrine samples were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria), while in the estuarine sample, they were mainly related to Gammaproteobacteria (followed by Deltaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria). Higher number of sequences of Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes were observed in sediments of inland lakes compared to those of coastal lakes, whereas Chloroflexi were relatively more abundant in the sediments of coastal eutrophic lakes. As demonstrated by the great number of dominant bacterial genera, bacterial diversity was higher in the sediments of inland lakes than that in coastal lakes

  18. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber

  19. Complete genome sequence of Hirschia baltica type strain (IFAM 1418T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, Pamela J.B. [Indiana University; Kysela, David T. [Indiana University; De Pedro, Miguel A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Brun, Yves V. [Indiana University

    2011-01-01

    The family Hyphomonadaceae within the Alphaproteobacteria is largely comprised of bacte- ria isolated from marine environments with striking morphologies and an unusual mode of cell growth. Here, we report the complete genome sequence Hirschia baltica, which is only the second a member of the Hyphomonadaceae with a published genome sequence. H. bal- tica is of special interest because it has a dimorphic life cycle and is a stalked, budding bacte- rium. The 3,455,622 bp long chromosome and 84,492 bp plasmid with a total of 3,222 pro- tein-coding and 44 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2008.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Hirschia baltica type strain (IFAM 1418(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, Olga; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; de Pedro, Miguel A; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Tindall, Brian J; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brun, Yves V

    2011-12-31

    The family Hyphomonadaceae within the Alphaproteobacteria is largely comprised of bacteria isolated from marine environments with striking morphologies and an unusual mode of cell growth. Here, we report the complete genome sequence Hirschia baltica, which is only the second a member of the Hyphomonadaceae with a published genome sequence. H. baltica is of special interest because it has a dimorphic life cycle and is a stalked, budding bacterium. The 3,455,622 bp long chromosome and 84,492 bp plasmid with a total of 3,222 protein-coding and 44 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2008. PMID:22675580

  1. Microbial Community Strucure of a Tropical Wastewater Stabilization Pond (Cajati, Brazil)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishio, Sandra; Schramm, Andreas; Pellizari, V.

    deposition (CARD-FISH) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of spatial and seasonal variations of microbial diversity and community structure. Samples were collected both in winter and summer from three depth of the bulk water and from the bottom sludge of a shallow stabilization pond treating...... seasons. CARD-FISH successfully detected 55-85% and 40-50% of all cells in the water and sludge samples, respectively, and generally confirmed the DGGE results. The bacterial community was dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria, followed by either Beta- or Alphaproteobacteria, depending on the season...

  2. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  3. Diversity of the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophy genepufM in Arctic and Antarctic coastal seawaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yinxin; DONG Peiyan; QIAO Zongyun; ZHENG Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria serve important functions in marine carbon and energy cycling because of their capability to utilize dissolved organic substrates and harvest light energy. AAP bacteria are widely distributed in marine environments, and their diversity has been examined in marine habitats. However, information about AAP bacteria at high latitudes remains insufficient to date. Therefore, this study determined the summer AAP bacterial diversity in Arctic Kongsfjorden and in the Antarctic coastal seawater of King George Island on the basis ofpufM, a gene that encodes a pigment-binding protein subunit of the reaction center complex. FourpufM clone libraries were constructed, and 674 positive clones were obtained from four investigated stations (two in Kongsfjorden and two in the Antarctic Maxwell Bay). Arctic clones were clustered within theAlphaproteobacteria, whereas Antarctic clones were classified into theAlphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria classes.Rhodobacteraceae-likepufM genes dominated in all samples. In addition, sequences closely related topufM encoded on a plasmid inSulfitobacter guttiformis were predominant in both Arctic and Antarctic samples. This result indicates the transpolar or even global distribution ofpufM genes in marine environments. Meanwhile, differences between the Arctic and Antarctic sequences may prove polar endemism. These results indicate the important role ofRhodobacteraceae as AAP bacteria in bipolar coastal waters.

  4. The functions of DNA methylation by CcrM in Caulobacter crescentus: a global approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Kozdon, Jennifer B; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy; Collier, Justine

    2014-04-01

    DNA methylation is involved in a diversity of processes in bacteria, including maintenance of genome integrity and regulation of gene expression. Here, using Caulobacter crescentus as a model, we exploit genome-wide experimental methods to uncover the functions of CcrM, a DNA methyltransferase conserved in most Alphaproteobacteria. Using single molecule sequencing, we provide evidence that most CcrM target motifs (GANTC) switch from a fully methylated to a hemi-methylated state when they are replicated, and back to a fully methylated state at the onset of cell division. We show that DNA methylation by CcrM is not required for the control of the initiation of chromosome replication or for DNA mismatch repair. By contrast, our transcriptome analysis shows that >10% of the genes are misexpressed in cells lacking or constitutively over-expressing CcrM. Strikingly, GANTC methylation is needed for the efficient transcription of dozens of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression, in particular for DNA metabolism and cell division. Many of them are controlled by promoters methylated by CcrM and co-regulated by other global cell cycle regulators, demonstrating an extensive cross talk between DNA methylation and the complex regulatory network that controls the cell cycle of C. crescentus and, presumably, of many other Alphaproteobacteria.

  5. DNA methylation by CcrM activates the transcription of two genes required for the division of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation regulates many processes, including gene expression, by superimposing secondary information on DNA sequences. The conserved CcrM enzyme, which methylates adenines in GANTC sequences, is essential to the viability of several Alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we find that Caulobacter crescentus cells lacking the CcrM enzyme accumulate low levels of the two conserved FtsZ and MipZ proteins, leading to a severe defect in cell division. This defect can be compensated by the expression of the ftsZ gene from an inducible promoter or by spontaneous suppressor mutations that promote FtsZ accumulation. We show that CcrM promotes the transcription of the ftsZ and mipZ genes and that the ftsZ and mipZ promoter regions contain a conserved CGACTC motif that is critical to their activities and to their regulation by CcrM. In addition, our results suggest that the ftsZ promoter has the lowest activity when the CGACTC motif is non-methylated, an intermediate activity when it is hemi-methylated and the highest activity when it is fully methylated. The regulation of ftsZ expression by DNA methylation may explain why CcrM is essential in a subset of Alphaproteobacteria.

  6. Bacterial diversity in surface water of the Yellow Sea duringand after a green alga tide in 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Cong; LI Fuchao; JIANG Peng; LIU Zhaopu; QIN Song

    2011-01-01

    From May to August 2008,a large "green tide",consisting of the alga Ulva (Enteromorpha) prolifera,occurred in the Yellow Sea,China,affecting the local marine ecosystem and human activities.We investigated the influence of the green tide on the microbial community in the surface seawater,at four sites from July to August 2008,using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.We sequenced 228clones of unique patterns identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques.The results show that 228 sequenced clones fell into six bacterial phyla:Proteobacteria,Bacteroidetes,Cyanobacteria,Verrucomicrobia,Actinobacteria,and Planctomycetes.Alphaproteobacteria (33%),Gammaproteobacteria (25%),Bacteroidetes (23%) and Cyanobacteria (9%) dominated the assemblage.Comparison between samples collected in July (during the tide) and those collected in August (after the tide) showed that,in the microbial community,diversities of Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria increased after the tide,while those of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased.These results indicate that the green tide influenced the growth of some bacteria,and provide information for further studies on the interactions and relationships between U.prolifera and the bacterial community.This study suggests that microbial community analysis is a good approach to monitoring green tides.

  7. Bacterial community structure in Apis florea larvae analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraithong, Prakaimuk; Li, Yihong; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chen, Zhou; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-10-01

    This study characterizes the colonization and composition of bacterial flora in dwarf Asian honeybee (Apis florea) larvae and compares bacterial diversity and distribution among different sampling locations. A. florea larvae were collected from 3 locations in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Bacterial DNA was extracted from each larva using the phenol-chloroform method. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was performed, and the dominant bands were excised from the gels, cloned, and sequenced for bacterial species identification. The result revealed similarities of bacterial community profiles in each individual colony, but differences between colonies from the same and different locations. A. florea larvae harbor bacteria belonging to 2 phyla (Firmicutes and Proteobacteria), 5 classes (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Clostridia), 6 genera (Clostridium, Gilliamella, Melissococcus, Lactobacillus, Saccharibacter, and Snodgrassella), and an unknown genus from uncultured bacterial species. The classes with the highest abundance of bacteria were Alphaproteobacteria (34%), Bacilli (25%), Betaproteobacteria (11%), Gammaproteobacteria (10%), and Clostridia (8%), respectively. Similarly, uncultured bacterial species were identified (12%). Environmental bacterial species, such as Saccharibacter floricola, were also found. This is the first study in which sequences closely related to Melissococcus plutonius, the causal pathogen responsible for European foulbrood, have been identified in Thai A. florea larvae. PMID:25393530

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of a microbialite-forming microbial mat from a hypersaline lake of the Kiritimati atoll, Central Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Schneider

    Full Text Available On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰. Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster, which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales, anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae, Nitrospirae (OPB95, Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B with increasing depth.

  9. Diversity and antibacterial activity of the bacterial communities associated with two Mediterranean sea pens, Pennatula phosphorea and Pteroeides spinosum (Anthozoa: Octocorallia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, E M D; Lo Giudice, A; Michaud, L; De Domenico, E; Spanò, N

    2013-10-01

    A description of the bacterial communities associated with the Mediterranean pennatulids (sea pens) Pennatula phosphorea and Pteroeides spinosum from the Straits of Messina (Italy) is reported. The automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis showed a marked difference between coral (tissues and mucus) and non-coral (underlying sediment and surrounding water) habitats. The diversity of the coral-associated communities was more deeply analysed by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of bacterial clones. P. phosphorea and P. spinosum harbour distinct bacterial communities, indicating the occurrence of species-specific coral-associated bacteria. In addition, only few phylotypes were shared between mucus and tissues of the same pennatulid species, suggesting that there might be a sort of microhabitat partitioning between the associated microbial communities. The predominance of Alphaproteobacteria was observed for the communities associated with both tissues and mucus of P. phosphorea (84 and 58.2 % of total sequences, respectively). Conversely, the bacterial community in the mucus layer of P. spinosum was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (74.2 %) as opposed to the tissue library that was dominated by the Gammaproteobacteria and Mollicutes (40.6 and 35.4 %, respectively). The antibacterial activity of 78 bacterial isolates against indicator organisms was assayed. Active isolates (15.4 %), which predominantly affiliated to Vibrio spp., were mainly obtained from coral mucus. Results from the present study enlarge our knowledge on the composition and antibacterial activity of coral-associated bacterial communities. PMID:23817604

  10. Clone-based comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes retrieved from biodeteriorating brick buildings of the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the bacterial communities in four samples of historical materials (plaster, brick, and wood) derived from buildings located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka, Poland. For this purpose a molecular strategy based on the construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries was used. In total, 138 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (∼600bp) were obtained and compared. The clones belonged to phyla Proteobacteria (classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The plaster samples predominantly contained clones closely related to Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, brick samples contained Gammaproteobacteria, while wood samples had Actinobacteria clones. Interestingly, the historic plaster and brick samples contained the following bacteria with known and described biodeterioration potential: chemoorganotrophic Streptomyces sp. and Pseudonocardia sp., halotolerant or halophilic Rubrobacter sp., Salinisphaera sp. and Halomonas sp. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that amongst the bacterial species detected and identified none occurred on all the tested historical materials. The 16S rRNA clone library construction method was successfully used for the detection and diversity determination of bacterial communities inhabiting brick barracks located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Brzezinka.

  11. Niche differentiation of bacterial communities at a millimeter scale in Shark Bay microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hon Lun; Smith, Daniela-Lee; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern microbial mats can provide key insights into early Earth ecosystems, and Shark Bay, Australia, holds one of the best examples of these systems. Identifying the spatial distribution of microorganisms with mat depth facilitates a greater understanding of specific niches and potentially novel microbial interactions. High throughput sequencing coupled with elemental analyses and biogeochemical measurements of two distinct mat types (smooth and pustular) at a millimeter scale were undertaken in the present study. A total of 8,263,982 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, which were affiliated to 58 bacterial and candidate phyla. The surface of both mats were dominated by Cyanobacteria, accompanied with known or putative members of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The deeper anoxic layers of smooth mats were dominated by Chloroflexi, while Alphaproteobacteria dominated the lower layers of pustular mats. In situ microelectrode measurements revealed smooth mats have a steeper profile of O2 and H2S concentrations, as well as higher oxygen production, consumption, and sulfate reduction rates. Specific elements (Mo, Mg, Mn, Fe, V, P) could be correlated with specific mat types and putative phylogenetic groups. Models are proposed for these systems suggesting putative surface anoxic niches, differential nitrogen fixing niches, and those coupled with methane metabolism.

  12. The microbiome of North Sea copepods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, G.; Brandt, P.; Kreisel, K.; Boersma, M.; Schoo, K. L.; Wichels, A.

    2013-12-01

    Copepods can be associated with different kinds and different numbers of bacteria. This was already shown in the past with culture-dependent microbial methods or microscopy and more recently by using molecular tools. In our present study, we investigated the bacterial community of four frequently occurring copepod species, Acartia sp., Temora longicornis, Centropages sp. and Calanus helgolandicus from Helgoland Roads (North Sea) over a period of 2 years using DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and subsequent sequencing of 16S-rDNA fragments. To complement the PCR-DGGE analyses, clone libraries of copepod samples from June 2007 to 208 were generated. Based on the DGGE banding patterns of the two years survey, we found no significant differences between the communities of distinct copepod species, nor did we find any seasonality. Overall, we identified 67 phylotypes (>97 % similarity) falling into the bacterial phyla of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The most abundant phylotypes were affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. In comparison with PCR-DGGE and clone libraries, phylotypes of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated the clone libraries, whereas Alphaproteobacteria were most abundant in the PCR-DGGE analyses.

  13. Community structure of microbial biofilms associated with membrane-based water purification processes as revealed using a polyphasic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.L.; Chong, M.L.; Wong, M.T.; Ong, S.L.; Ng, W.J. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, W.T. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Seah, H. [Public Utilities Board (Singapore)

    2004-07-01

    The microbial communities of membrane biofilms occurring in two full-scale water purification processes employing microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were characterized using a polyphasic approach that employed bacterial cultivation, 16S rDNA clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. All methods showed that the {alpha}-proteobacteria was the largest microbial fraction in the samples, followed by the {gamma}-proteobacteria. This suggested that members of these two groups could be responsible for the biofouling on the membranes studied. Furthermore, the microbial community structures between the MF and RO samples were considerably different in composition of the most predominant 16S rDNA clones and bacterial isolates from the {alpha}-proteobacteria and only shared two common groups (Bradyrhizobium, Bosea) out of more than 17 different bacterial groups observed. The MF and RO samples further contained Planctomycetes and Fibroacter/Acidobacteria as the second predominant bacterial clones, respectively, and differed in minor bacterial clones and isolates. The community structure differences were mainly attributed to differences in feed water, process configurations and operating environments, such as the pressure and hydrodynamic conditions present in the water purification systems. (orig.)

  14. Complete genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' obtained through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yongping; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G; Li, Wenbin; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Li; Vahling, Cheryl M; Gabriel, Dean W; Williams, Kelly P; Dickerman, Allan; Sun, Yijun; Gottwald, Tim

    2009-08-01

    Citrus huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with a low-titer, phloem-limited infection by any of three uncultured species of alpha-Proteobacteria, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. A complete circular 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome has been obtained by metagenomics, using the DNA extracted from a single 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllid. The 1.23-Mb genome has an average 36.5% GC content. Annotation revealed a high percentage of genes involved in both cell motility (4.5%) and active transport in general (8.0%), which may contribute to its virulence. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have a limited ability for aerobic respiration and is likely auxotrophic for at least five amino acids. Consistent with its intracellular nature, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' lacks type III and type IV secretion systems as well as typical free-living or plant-colonizing extracellular degradative enzymes. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have all type I secretion system genes needed for both multidrug efflux and toxin effector secretion. Multi-protein phylogenetic analysis confirmed 'Ca. L. asiaticus' as an early-branching and highly divergent member of the family Rhizobiaceae. This is the first genome sequence of an uncultured alpha-proteobacteria that is both an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont.

  15. Methane assimilation and trophic interactions with marine Methylomicrobium in deep-water coral reef sediment off the coast of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Neufeld, Josh D; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin; Murrell, John Colin

    2008-11-01

    Deep-water coral reefs are seafloor environments with diverse biological communities surrounded by cold permanent darkness. Sources of energy and carbon for the nourishment of these reefs are presently unclear. We investigated one aspect of the food web using DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Sediment from beneath a Lophelia pertusa reef off the coast of Norway was incubated until assimilation of 5 micromol 13CH4 g(-1) wet weight occurred. Extracted DNA was separated into 'light' and 'heavy' fractions for analysis of labelling. Bacterial community fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed two predominant 13C-specific bands. Sequencing of these bands indicated that carbon from 13CH4 had been assimilated by a Methylomicrobium and an uncultivated member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from the heavy DNA, in addition to genes encoding particulate methane monooxygenase and methanol dehydrogenase, all linked Methylomicrobium with methane metabolism. Putative cross-feeders were affiliated with Methylophaga (Gammaproteobacteria), Hyphomicrobium (Alphaproteobacteria) and previously unrecognized methylotrophs of the Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deferribacteres and Bacteroidetes. This first marine methane SIP study provides evidence for the presence of methylotrophs that participate in sediment food webs associated with deep-water coral reefs. PMID:18811651

  16. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  17. Variation in the diets of hydrothermal vent gastropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govenar, Breea; Fisher, Charles R.; Shank, Timothy M.

    2015-11-01

    A prevailing paradigm of hydrothermal vent ecology is that primary consumers feed on chemoautotrophic bacteria. However, for the purposes of reconstructing vent food webs and for tracking energy flow from the generation of rock and fluid chemistry through primary/ secondary productivity and consumption to the overlying water column, it remains unclear which consumers feed on which bacteria. In paired analyses of carbon and nitrogen tissue stable isotope values with unique 16S rRNA sequences from the stomach contents, we determined that two species of gastropod grazers appear to feed on epsilon-proteobacteria, while two other species have more diverse diets, including one species that consumes alpha-proteobacteria, planctomycetes, and non-green sulfur bacteria. Different carbon fixation pathways used by epsilon- and alpha-proteobacteria may account for the variation in the carbon stable isotope values among the consumers. Furthermore, our results indicate that trophic specialization and niche partitioning may contribute to the distribution and abundance of vent-endemic gastropods and support the hypothesis that consumers in the warmer habitats commonly feed on epsilon-proteobacteria that use the rTCA cycle, while in the cooler habitats they feed on additional bacteria that use the CBB cycle. These results suggest that the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of free-living bacteria may play an important and previously overlooked role in facilitating species coexistence among primary consumers at hydrothermal vents and other chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  18. Bacterial diversity in the breadcrumb sponge Halichondria panicea (Pallas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichels, Antje; Würtz, Sven; Döpke, Hilke; Schütt, Christian; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and variability of bacterial communities associated with the marine sponge Halichondria panicea with respect to tissue compartmentalization as well as seasonal and small-scale geographic variation. Diversity of microorganisms in sponges was investigated recently, but work on the variability and succession of associated bacterial communities is rare. Despite some information on Pacific and Mediterranean sponges, it is still uncertain whether bacteria and sponges are specifically associated. In this study, H. panicea specimens were sampled throughout the year at different stations around the island of Helgoland (North Sea) and investigated using molecular tools. The bacterial community associated with H. panicea was diverse, consisting of one denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band occurring in most 'tissue' samples and additional variable bands. Variability was observed between different sponge fractions (i.e. the aquiferous system and the 'tissue'), sampling locations, and sampling dates. A PCR-DGGE specific for the Roseobacter group of marine Alphaproteobacteria displayed low diversity and a marked similarity between all samples. Phylogenetic analysis also pointed to specific Alphaproteobacteria of the Roseobacter group, which was predominant in most sponge 'tissue' samples. We conclude that H. panicea harbour a specific Roseobacter population with varying bacterial co-populations occurring seasonally or on a small-scale geographically, sometimes even dominating the bacterial community.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of magnetotactic bacteria from the Deltaproteobacteria provides new insights into magnetite and greigite magnetosome genes required for magnetotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Trubitsyn, Denis; Abreu, Fernanda; Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Lins, Ulysses; Pignol, David; Schüler, Dirk; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Ginet, Nicolas

    2013-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a group of diverse motile prokaryotes that biomineralize magnetosomes, the organelles responsible for magnetotaxis. Magnetosomes consist of intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometre-sized crystals of the magnetic minerals magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and are usually organized as a chain within the cell acting like a compass needle. Most information regarding the biomineralization processes involved in magnetosome formation comes from studies involving Alphaproteobacteria species which biomineralize cuboctahedral and elongated prismatic crystals of magnetite. Many magnetosome genes, the mam genes, identified in these organisms are conserved in all known MTB. Here we present a comparative genomic analysis of magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria that synthesize bullet-shaped crystals of magnetite and/or greigite. We show that in addition to mam genes, there is a conserved set of genes, designated mad genes, specific to the magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria, some also being present in Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum of the Nitrospirae phylum, but absent in the magnetotactic Alphaproteobacteria. Our results suggest that the number of genes associated with magnetotaxis in magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria is larger than previously thought. We also demonstrate that the minimum set of mam genes necessary for magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum is also conserved in magnetite-producing, magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria. Some putative novel functions of mad genes are discussed. PMID:23607663

  20. Uncultivated Magnetotactic Cocci from Yuandadu Park in Beijing, China▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated a group of uncultivated magnetotactic cocci, which was magnetically isolated from a freshwater pond in Beijing, China. Light and transmission electron microscopy showed that these cocci ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 μm and contained two to four chains of magnetite magnetosomes, which sometimes were partially disorganized. Overall, the size of the disorganized magnetosomes was significantly smaller than that arranged in chains. All characterized magnetosome crystals were elongated (shape factor = 0.64) and fall into the single-domain size range (30 to 115 nm). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the enriched bacteria were a virtually homogeneous population and represented a novel lineage in the Alphaproteobacteria. The closest cultivated relative was magnetotactic coccoid strain MC-1 (88% sequence identity). First-order reversal curve diagrams revealed that these cocci had relatively strong magnetic interactions compared to the single-chain magnetotactic bacteria. Low-temperature magnetic measurements showed that the Verwey transition of them was ∼108 K, confirming magnetite magnetosomes, and the delta ratio δFC/δZFC was >2. Based on the structure, phylogenetic position and magnetic properties, the enriched magnetotactic cocci of Alphaproteobacteria are provisionally named as “Candidatus Magnetococcus yuandaducum.” PMID:19376904

  1. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities and bacterioplankton in Indonesian Marine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Daniel F R; Becking, Leontine E; Polónia, Ana R M; Freitas, Rossana M; Gomes, Newton C M

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we compared communities of bacteria in two jellyfish species (the 'golden' jellyfish Mastigias cf.papua and the box jellyfish Tripedalia cf.cystophora) and water in three marine lakes located in the Berau region of northeastern Borneo, Indonesia. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities were compositionally distinct and less diverse than bacterioplankton communities. Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Synechococcophycidae and Flavobacteriia were the most abundant classes in water. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities were dominated by OTUs assigned to the Gammaproteobacteria (family Endozoicimonaceae), Mollicutes, Spirochaetes and Alphaproteobacteria (orders Kiloniellales and Rhodobacterales). Mollicutes were mainly restricted to Mastigias whereas Spirochaetes and the order Kiloniellales were most abundant in Tripedalia hosts. The most abundant OTU overall in jellyfish hosts was assigned to the family Endozoicimonaceae and was highly similar to organisms in Genbank obtained from various hosts including an octocoral, bivalve and fish species. Other abundant OTUs included an OTU assigned to the order Entomoplasmatales and mainly found in Mastigias hosts and OTUs assigned to the Spirochaetes and order Kiloniellales and mainly found in Tripedalia hosts. The low sequence similarity of the Entomoplasmatales OTU to sequences in Genbank suggests that it may be a novel lineage inhabiting Mastigias and possibly restricted to marine lakes. PMID:27004797

  2. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  3. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone. The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp., marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria, and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp.,

  4. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  5. Temporal controls of the asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric cell division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is orchestrated by an elaborate gene-protein regulatory network, centered on three major control proteins, DnaA, GcrA and CtrA. The regulatory network is cast into a quantitative computational model to investigate in a systematic fashion how these three proteins control the relevant genetic, biochemical and physiological properties of proliferating bacteria. Different controls for both swarmer and stalked cell cycles are represented in the mathematical scheme. The model is validated against observed phenotypes of wild-type cells and relevant mutants, and it predicts the phenotypes of novel mutants and of known mutants under novel experimental conditions. Because the cell cycle control proteins of Caulobacter are conserved across many species of alpha-proteobacteria, the model we are proposing here may be applicable to other genera of importance to agriculture and medicine (e.g., Rhizobium, Brucella.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Biological Approaches to Interpreting Ancient Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dianne K.; Neubauer, Cajetan; Ricci, Jessica N.; Wu, Chia-Hung; Pearson, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to read the molecular fossil record has advanced significantly in the past decade. Improvements in biomarker sampling and quantification methods, expansion of molecular sequence databases, and the application of genetic and cellular biological tools to problems in biomarker research have enabled much of this progress. By way of example, we review how attempts to understand the biological function of 2-methylhopanoids in modern bacteria have changed our interpretation of what their molecular fossils tell us about the early history of life. They were once thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria and hence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but we now believe that 2-methylhopanoid biosynthetic capacity originated in the Alphaproteobacteria, that 2-methylhopanoids are regulated in response to stress, and that hopanoid 2-methylation enhances membrane rigidity. We present a new interpretation of 2-methylhopanes that bridges the gap between studies of the functions of 2-methylhopanoids and their patterns of occurrence in the rock record.

  7. New criteria for selecting the origin of DNA replication in Wolbachia and closely related bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Sapountzis, Panagiotis;

    2007-01-01

    as their patterns of sequence evolution will aid studies of cell replication and cell density, as well as the potential genetic manipulation of these widespread intracellular bacteria. RESULTS: Using features that have been previously experimentally verified in the alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus......BACKGROUND: The annotated genomes of two closely related strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis have been reported without the identifications of the putative origin of replication (ori). Identifying the ori of these bacteria and related alpha-Proteobacteria as well......, the origin of DNA replication (ori) regions were identified in silico for Wolbachia strains and eleven other related bacteria belonging to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and Rickettsia genera. These features include DnaA-, CtrA- and IHF-binding sites as well as the flanking genes in C. crescentus. The Wolbachia ori...

  8. BrucellaBase: Genome information resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Khader, L K M Abdul; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-09-01

    Brucella sp. causes a major zoonotic disease, brucellosis. Brucella belongs to the family Brucellaceae under the order Rhizobiales of Alphaproteobacteria. We present BrucellaBase, a web-based platform, providing features of a genome database together with unique analysis tools. We have developed a web version of the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (Whatmore et al., 2007) and phylogenetic analysis of Brucella spp. BrucellaBase currently contains genome data of 510 Brucella strains along with the user interfaces for BLAST, VFDB, CARD, pairwise genome alignment and MLST typing. Availability of these tools will enable the researchers interested in Brucella to get meaningful information from Brucella genome sequences. BrucellaBase will regularly be updated with new genome sequences, new features along with improvements in genome annotations. BrucellaBase is available online at http://www.dbtbrucellosis.in/brucellabase.html or http://59.99.226.203/brucellabase/homepage.html. PMID:27164438

  9. Dynamics of seawater bacterial communities in a shellfish hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S M; Chapman, C C; Bermudes, M; Tamplin, M L

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial disease is a significant issue for larviculture of several species of shellfish, including oysters. One source of bacteria is the seawater used throughout the hatchery. In this study carried out at a commercial oyster hatchery in Tasmania, Australia, the diversity of the bacterial community and its relationship with larval production outcomes were studied over a 2-year period using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and tag-encoded pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were very diverse, dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The communities were highly variable on scales of days, weeks and seasons. The difference between the intake seawater and treated clean seawater used in the hatchery was smaller than the observed temporal differences in the seawater throughout the year. No clear correlation was observed between production outcomes and the overall bacterial community structure. However, one group of Cyanobacterial sequences was more abundant when mass mortality events occurred than when healthy spat were produced although they were always present.

  10. Comparative analysis of the bacterial diversity in a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) applied to treat urban wastewater under different operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Kadiya; Martín-Pascual, Jaime; Poyatos, José Manuel; Rodelas, Belén; González-Martínez, Alejandro; González-López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Different types of carriers were tested as support material in a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) used to treat urban wastewater under three different conditions of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and carrier filling ratios (FR). The bacterial diversity developed on the biofilms responsible of the treatment was studied using a cultivation-independent approach based on the polymerase chain reaction-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis technique (PCR-TGGE). Cluster analysis of TGGE fingerprints showed significant differences of community structure dependent upon the different operational conditions applied. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to determine the relationship between the operational conditions (type of carrier, HRT, FR) and bacterial biofilm diversity, demonstrating a significant effect of FR=50%. Phylogenetic analysis of PCR-reamplified and sequenced TGGE bands revealed that the prevalent Bacteria populations in the biofilm were related to Betaproteobacteria (46%), Firmicutes (34%),Alphaproteobacteria (14%) and Gammaproteobacteria (9%).

  11. Removal performance and microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor treating hypersaline phenol-laden wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Wei, Li; Zhang, Huining; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-10-01

    Hypersaline phenol-rich wastewater is hard to be treated by traditional biological systems. In this work, a sequencing batch reactor was used to remove phenol from hypersaline wastewater. The removal performance was evaluated in response to the variations of operating parameters and the microbial diversity was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. The results showed that the bioreactor had high removal efficiency of phenol and was able to keep stable with the increase of initial phenol concentration. DO, pH, and salinity also affected the phenol removal rate. The most abundant bacterial group was phylum Proteobacteria in the two working conditions, and class Gammaproteobacteria as well as Alphaproteobacteria was predominant subgroup. The abundance of bacterial clusters was notably different along with the variation of operation conditions, resulting in changes of phenol degradation rates. The high removal efficiency of phenol suggested that the reactor might be promising in treating phenol-laden industrial wastewater in high-salt condition. PMID:27359064

  12. GLOBAL MOLECULAR ANALYSES OF METHANE METABOLISM IN METHANOTROPHIC ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIUM, METHYLOSINUS TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B.PART II. METABOLOMICS AND 13C-LABELING STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Kalyuzhanaya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use metabolomics and 13C-labeling data to refine central metabolic pathways for methane utilization in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a model alphaproteobacterial methanotrophic bacterium. We demonstrate here that similar to non-methane utilizing methylotrophic alphaproteobacteria the core metabolism of the microbe is represented by several tightly connected metabolic cycles, such as the serine pathway, the ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC pathway, and the citric acid (TCA cycle. Both in silico estimations and stable isotope labeling experiments combined with single cell (NanoSIMS and bulk biomass analyses indicate that a significantly larger portion of the cell carbon (over 60% is derived from CO2 in this methanotroph. Our 13C-labeling studies revealed an unusual topology of the assimilatory network in which phosph(enolpyruvate/pyruvate interconversions are key metabolic switches. A set of additional pathways for carbon fixation are identified and discussed.

  13. Molecular characterization of an endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in the central Alps (Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, Thomas; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2009-08-01

    Endolithic microorganisms colonize the pores in exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Swiss Alps. They appear as distinct grayish-green bands about 1-8 mm below the rock surface. Based on environmental small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, a diverse community driven by photosynthesis has been found. Cyanobacteria (57 clones), especially the genus Leptolyngbya, form the functional basis for an endolithic community which contains a wide spectrum of so far not characterized species of chemotrophic Bacteria (64 clones) with mainly Actinobacteria, Alpha-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria, as well as a cluster within the Chloroflexaceae. Furthermore, a cluster within the Crenarchaeotes (40 clones) has been detected. Although the eukaryotic diversity was outside the scope of the study, an amoeba (39 clones), and several green algae (51 clones) have been observed. We conclude that the bacterial diversity in this endolithic habitat, especially of chemotrophic, nonpigmented organisms, is considerable and that Archaea are present as well. PMID:19172216

  14. The functional potential of microbial communities in hydraulic fracturing source water and produced water from natural gas extraction characterized by metagenomic sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Murali Mohan

    Full Text Available Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible for carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection.

  15. Study of the diversity of microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor oxic-settling-anaerobic process and its modified process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianpeng; Chen, Jianfan; Wei, Xiange; Guo, Wuzhen; Lin, Meishan; Yu, Xiaoyu

    2016-05-01

    To further reveal the mechanism of sludge reduction in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process, the polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis protocol was used to study the possible difference in the microbial communities between a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-OSA process and its modified process, by analyzing the change in the diversity of the microbial communities in each reactor of both systems. The results indicated that the structure of the microbial communities in aerobic reactors of the 2 processes was very different, but the predominant microbial populations in anaerobic reactors were similar. The predominant microbial population in the aerobic reactor of the SBR-OSA belonged to Burkholderia cepacia, class Betaproteobacteria, while those of the modified process belonged to the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. These 3 types of microbes had a cryptic growth characteristic, which was the main cause of a greater sludge reduction efficiency achieved by the modified process. PMID:27021584

  16. Diversity of bacteria in ships ballast water as revealed by next generation DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeyer, Robin

    2016-06-15

    The bacterial diversity in ballast water from five general cargo ships calling at the Port of Houston was determined with ion semiconductor DNA sequencing (Ion Torrent PGM) of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the composition of bacteria in ballast water did not resemble that of typical marine habitats or even open ocean waters where BWEs occur. The predominant group of bacteria in ships conducting BWEs was the Roseobacter clade within the Alphaproteobacteria. In contrast, Gammaproteobacteria were predominant in the ship that did not conduct a BWE. All the ships contained human, fish, and terrestrial plant pathogens as well as bacteria indicative of fecal or activated sludge contamination. Most of the 60 pathogens had not been detected in ballast water previously. Among these were the human pathogens Corynebacterium diptheriae and several Legionella species and the fish pathogens Francisella piscicida and Piscirickettsia salmonis. PMID:27076378

  17. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inceoglu, Özgül; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Salles, Joana Falcão;

    2011-01-01

    the structure of bacterial communities in a field cropped with potato. The rhizospheres of six cultivars denoted Aveka, Aventra, Karnico, Modena, Premiere and Desiree, at three growth stages (young, flowering and senescence) were examined, in addition to corresponding bulk soils. Around 350,000 sequences were......, Alphaproteobacteria, next to as-yet-unclassified bacteria, dominated. Other groups that were consistently found, albeit at lower abundance, were Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Principal components analyses revealed that rhizosphere samples were significantly different from corresponding bulk...... soil in each growth stage. Furthermore, cultivar effects were found in the young plant stage, whereas these became insignificant in the flowering and senescence stages. Besides, an effect of time of season was observed for both rhizosphere and bulk soils. The analyzed rhizosphere samples of the potato...

  18. Molecular characterization of methanotrophic communities in forest soils that consume atmospheric methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Evan; Ahmad, Azeem; Steudler, Paul A; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2007-06-01

    Methanotroph abundance was analyzed in control and long-term nitrogen-amended pine and hardwood soils using rRNA-targeted quantitative hybridization. Family-specific 16S rRNA and pmoA/amoA genes were analyzed via PCR-directed assays to elucidate methanotrophic bacteria inhabiting soils undergoing atmospheric methane consumption. Quantitative hybridizations suggested methanotrophs related to the family Methylocystaceae were one order of magnitude more abundant than Methyloccocaceae and more sensitive to nitrogen-addition in pine soils. 16S rRNA gene phylotypes related to known Methylocystaceae and acidophilic methanotrophs and pmoA/amoA gene sequences, including three related to the upland soil cluster Alphaproteobacteria (USCalpha) group, were detected across different treatments and soil depths. Our results suggest that methanotrophic members of the Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae may be the candidates for soil atmospheric methane consumption. PMID:17391332

  19. Aurantimonas altamirensis sp. nov., a member of the order Rhizobiales isolated from Altamira Cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Valme; Gonzalez, Juan M; Laiz, Leonila; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-11-01

    A bacterial strain, S21BT, was isolated from Altamira Cave (Cantabria, Spain). The cells were Gram-negative, short rods growing aerobically. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain S21BT represented a separate subline of descent within the family 'Aurantimonadaceae' (showing 96% sequence similarity to Aurantimonas coralicida) in the order Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria). The major fatty acids detected were C16:0 and C18:1omega7c. The G+C content of the DNA from strain S21BT was 71.8 mol%. Oxidase and catalase activities were present. Strain S21BT utilized a wide range of substrates for growth. On the basis of the results of this polyphasic study, isolate S21BT represents a novel species of the genus Aurantimonas, for which the name Aurantimonas altamirensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S21BT (=CECT 7138T=LMG 23375T). PMID:17082395

  20. Phylogeny and functions of bacterial communities associated with field-grown rice shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Ikeda, Seishi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Sato, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-09-17

    Metagenomic analysis was applied to bacterial communities associated with the shoots of two field-grown rice cultivars, Nipponbare and Kasalath. In both cultivars, shoot microbiomes were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (51-52%), Actinobacteria (11-15%), Gammaproteobacteria (9-10%), and Betaproteobacteria (4-10%). Compared with other rice microbiomes (root, rhizosphere, and phyllosphere) in public databases, the shoot microbiomes harbored abundant genes for C1 compound metabolism and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate catabolism, but fewer genes for indole-3-acetic acid production and nitrogen fixation. Salicylate hydroxylase was detected in all microbiomes, except the rhizosphere. These genomic features facilitate understanding of plant-microbe interactions and biogeochemical metabolism in rice shoots. PMID:25130883

  1. An abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria revealed in the gut microbiome of the laboratory cultured sea urchin, Lytechinus variegatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Antoine Hakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have examined the bacterial community composition in the laboratory cultured sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus gut microbiome and its culture environment using NextGen amplicon sequencing of the V4 segment of the 16S rRNA gene, and downstream bioinformatics tools. Overall, the gut and tank water was dominated by Proteobacteria, whereas the feed consisted of a co-occurrence of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes at a high abundance. The gut tissue represented Epsilonproteobacteria as dominant, with order Campylobacterales at the highest relative abundance (>95%. However, the pharynx tissue was dominated by class Alphaproteobacteria. The gut digesta and egested fecal pellets had a high abundance of class Gammaproteobacteria, from which Vibrio was found to be the primary genus, and Epsilonproteobacteria, with genus Arcobacter occurring at a moderate level. At the class level, the tank water was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the feed by Alphaproteobacteria. Multi-Dimensional Scaling analysis showed that the microbial community of the gut tissue clustered together, as did the pharynx tissue to the feed. The gut digesta and egested fecal pellets showed a similar relationship to the tank water. Further analysis of Campylobacterales at a lower taxonomic level using the oligotyping method revealed 37 unique types across the ten samples, where Oligotype 1 was primarily represented in the gut tissue. BLAST analysis identified Oligotype 1 to be Arcobacter sp., Sulfuricurvum sp., and Arcobacter bivalviorum at an identity level >90%. This study showed that although distinct microbial communities were evident across multiple components of the sea urchin gut ecosystem, there is a noticeable correlation between the overall microbial communities of the gut with the sea urchin L. variegatus culture environment.

  2. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara C Boutte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1 confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2 defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3 identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo

  3. Profile of the culturable microbiome capable of producing acyl-homoserine lactone in the tobacco phyllosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Lv; Anzhou Ma; Xuanming Tang; Zhihui Bai; Hongyan Qi; Guoqiang Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations coexisting in the phyllosphere niche have important effects on plant health.Quorum sensing (QS) allows bacteria to communicate via diffusible signal molecules,but QS-dependent behaviors in phyllosphere bacterial populations are poorly understood.We investigate the dense and diverse N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing phyllosphere bacteria living on tobacco leaf surfaces via a culture-dependent method and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.Our results indicated that approximately 7.9%-11.7%of the culturable leaf-associated bacteria have the ability to produce AHL based on the assays using whole-cell biosensors.Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene assigned the AHL-producing strains to two phylogenetic groups,with Gammaproteobacteria (93%) as the predominant group,followed by Alphaproteobacteria.All of the AHL-producing Alphaproteobacteria were affiliated with the genus Rhizobium,whereas the AHL-producing bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria mainly fell within the genera Pseudomonas,Acinetobacter,Citrobacter,Enterobacter,Pantoea and Serratia.The bioassays of supernatant extracts revealed that a portion of the strains have a remarkable AHL profile for AHL induction activity using the two different biosensors,and one compound in the active extract of a representative isolate,NTL223,corresponded to 3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone.A large population size and diversity of bacteria capable of AHL-driven QS were found to cohabit on leaves,implying that cross-communication based AHL-type QS may be common in the phyllosphere.Furthermore,this study provides a general snapshot of a potential valuable application of AHL-producing bacteria inhabiting leaves for their presumable ecological roles in the phyllosphere.

  4. Rhizobiales as functional and endosymbiontic members in the lichen symbiosis of Lobaria pulmonaria L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Armin; Cernava, Tomislav; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Soh, Jung; Sensen, Christoph W; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria) are well-known beneficial partners in plant-microbe interactions. Less is known about the occurrence and function of Rhizobiales in the lichen symbiosis, although it has previously been shown that Alphaproteobacteria are the dominating group in growing lichen thalli. We have analyzed the taxonomic structure and assigned functions to Rhizobiales within a metagenomic dataset of the lung lichen Lobaria pulmonaria L. One third (32.2%) of the overall bacteria belong to the Rhizobiales, in particular to the families Methylobacteriaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae, and Rhizobiaceae. About 20% of our metagenomic assignments could not be placed in any of the Rhizobiales lineages, which indicates a yet undescribed bacterial diversity. SEED-based functional analysis focused on Rhizobiales and revealed functions supporting the symbiosis, including auxin and vitamin production, nitrogen fixation and stress protection. We also have used a specifically developed probe to localize Rhizobiales by confocal laser scanning microscopy after fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-CLSM). Bacteria preferentially colonized fungal surfaces, but there is clear evidence that members of the Rhizobiales are able to intrude at varying depths into the interhyphal gelatinous matrix of the upper lichen cortical layer and that at least occasionally some bacteria also are capable to colonize the interior of the fungal hyphae. Interestingly, the gradual development of an endosymbiotic bacterial life was found for lichen- as well as for fungal- and plant-associated bacteria. The new tools to study Rhizobiales, FISH microscopy and comparative metagenomics, suggest a similar beneficial role for lichens than for plants and will help to better understand the Rhizobiales-host interaction and their biotechnological potential. PMID:25713563

  5. Rhizobiales as functional and endosymbiontic members in the lichen symbiosis of Lobaria pulmonaria L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin eErlacher

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria are well-known beneficial partners in plant-microbe interactions. Less is known about the occurrence and function of Rhizobiales in the lichen symbiosis, although it has previously been shown that Alphaproteobacteria are the dominating group in growing lichen thalli. We have analyzed the taxonomic structure and assigned functions to Rhizobiales within a metagenomic dataset of the lung lichen Lobaria pulmonaria L. One third (32.2% of the overall bacteria belong to the Rhizobiales, in particular to the families Methylobacteriaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Rhizobiaceae. About 20% of our metagenomic assignments could not be placed in any of the Rhizobiales lineages, which indicates a yet undescribed bacterial diversity. SEED-based functional analysis focused on Rhizobiales and revealed functions supporting the symbiosis, including auxin and vitamin production, nitrogen fixation and stress protection. We also have used a specifically developed probe to localize Rhizobiales by confocal laser scanning microscopy after fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-CLSM. Bacteria preferentially colonized fungal surfaces, but there is clear evidence that members of the Rhizobiales are able to intrude at varying depths into the interhyphal gelatinous matrix of the upper lichen cortical layer and that at least occasionally some bacteria also are capable to colonize the interior of the fungal hyphae. Interestingly, the gradual development of an endosymbiotic bacterial life was found for lichen- as well as for plant-associated bacteria. The new tools to study Rhizobiales applied in this study, FISH microscopy and comparative metagenomics will help to better understand the beneficial roles for their hosts and their biotechnological potential.

  6. Ubiquitous dissolved inorganic carbon assimilation by marine bacteria in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean as determined by stable isotope probing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne DeLorenzo

    Full Text Available In order to identify bacteria that assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the northeast Pacific Ocean, stable isotope probing (SIP experiments were conducted on water collected from 3 different sites off the Oregon and Washington coasts in May 2010, and one site off the Oregon Coast in September 2008 and March 2009. Samples were incubated in the dark with 2 mM (13C-NaHCO(3, doubling the average concentration of DIC typically found in the ocean. Our results revealed a surprising diversity of marine bacteria actively assimilating DIC in the dark within the Pacific Northwest coastal waters, indicating that DIC fixation is relevant for the metabolism of different marine bacterial lineages, including putatively heterotrophic taxa. Furthermore, dark DIC-assimilating assemblages were widespread among diverse bacterial classes. Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated the active DIC-assimilating communities across the samples. Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia were also implicated in DIC assimilation. Alteromonadales and Oceanospirillales contributed significantly to the DIC-assimilating Gammaproteobacteria within May 2010 clone libraries. 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the sulfur-oxidizing symbionts Arctic96BD-19 were observed in all active DIC assimilating clone libraries. Among the Alphaproteobacteria, clones related to the ubiquitous SAR11 clade were found actively assimilating DIC in all samples. Although not a dominant contributor to our active clone libraries, Betaproteobacteria, when identified, were predominantly comprised of Burkholderia. DIC-assimilating bacteria among Deltaproteobacteria included members of the SAR324 cluster. Our research suggests that DIC assimilation is ubiquitous among many bacterial groups in the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest marine environment and may represent a significant metabolic process.

  7. Pyrosequencing-Based Assessment of Bacterial Community Structure Along Different Management Types in German Forest and Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Heiko; Thürmer, Andrea; Wollherr, Antje; Will, Christiane; Hodac, Ladislav; Herold, Nadine; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Background Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. Methodology/Principal Findings We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure in nine forest and nine grassland soils from the Schwäbische Alb that covered six different management types. The dataset comprised 598,962 sequences that were affiliated to the domain Bacteria. The number of classified sequences per sample ranged from 23,515 to 39,259. Bacterial diversity was more phylum rich in grassland soils than in forest soils. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences) were Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Significant variations in relative abundances of bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes, including Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Alphaproteobacteria, between the land use types forest and grassland were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Phenylobacter, Bacillus, Kribbella, Streptomyces, Agromyces, and Defluviicoccus. In addition, soil bacterial community structure showed significant differences between beech and spruce forest soils. The relative abundances of bacterial groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with soil pH, but little or no relationships to management type and other soil properties were found. Conclusions/Significance Soil bacterial community composition and diversity of the six analyzed management types showed significant differences between the land use types grassland

  8. Horizon-Specific Bacterial Community Composition of German Grassland Soils, as Revealed by Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Christiane; Thürmer, Andrea; Wollherr, Antje; Nacke, Heiko; Herold, Nadine; Schrumpf, Marion; Gutknecht, Jessica; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of bacteria in soil is enormous, and soil bacterial communities can vary greatly in structure. Here, we employed a pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to characterize the overall and horizon-specific (A and B horizons) bacterial community compositions in nine grassland soils, which covered three different land use types. The entire data set comprised 752,838 sequences, 600,544 of which could be classified below the domain level. The average number of sequences per horizon was 41,824. The dominant taxonomic groups present in all samples and horizons were the Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Despite these overarching dominant taxa, the abundance, diversity, and composition of bacterial communities were horizon specific. In almost all cases, the estimated bacterial diversity (H′) was higher in the A horizons than in the corresponding B horizons. In addition, the H′ was positively correlated with the organic carbon content, the total nitrogen content, and the C-to-N ratio, which decreased with soil depth. It appeared that lower land use intensity results in higher bacterial diversity. The majority of sequences affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Fibrobacteres, Firmicutes, Spirochaetes, Verrucomicrobia, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were derived from A horizons, whereas the majority of the sequences related to Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira, TM7, and WS3 originated from B horizons. The distribution of some bacterial phylogenetic groups and subgroups in the different horizons correlated with soil properties such as organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, or microbial biomass. PMID:20729324

  9. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure along different management types in German forest and grassland soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Nacke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil bacteria are important drivers for nearly all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and participate in most nutrient transformations in soil. In contrast to the importance of soil bacteria for ecosystem functioning, we understand little how different management types affect the soil bacterial community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V2-V3 16S rRNA gene region to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure in nine forest and nine grassland soils from the Schwäbische Alb that covered six different management types. The dataset comprised 598,962 sequences that were affiliated to the domain Bacteria. The number of classified sequences per sample ranged from 23,515 to 39,259. Bacterial diversity was more phylum rich in grassland soils than in forest soils. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences were Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Significant variations in relative abundances of bacterial phyla and proteobacterial classes, including Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Alphaproteobacteria, between the land use types forest and grassland were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Phenylobacter, Bacillus, Kribbella, Streptomyces, Agromyces, and Defluviicoccus. In addition, soil bacterial community structure showed significant differences between beech and spruce forest soils. The relative abundances of bacterial groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with soil pH, but little or no relationships to management type and other soil properties were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Soil bacterial community composition and diversity of the six analyzed management types showed significant differences between the land

  10. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas, in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone. The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  11. The Bartonella quintana Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor RpoE Has a Role in Bacterial Adaptation to the Arthropod Vector Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abromaitis, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a vector-borne bacterial pathogen that causes fatal disease in humans. During the infectious cycle, B. quintana transitions from the hemin-restricted human bloodstream to the hemin-rich body louse vector. Because extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors often regulate adaptation to environmental changes, we hypothesized that a previously unstudied B. quintana ECF sigma factor, RpoE, is involved in the transition from the human host to the body louse vector. The genomic context of B. quintana rpoE identified it as a member of the ECF15 family of sigma factors found only in alphaproteobacteria. ECF15 sigma factors are believed to be the master regulators of the general stress response in alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we examined the B. quintana RpoE response to two stressors that are encountered in the body louse vector environment, a decreased temperature and an increased hemin concentration. We determined that the expression of rpoE is significantly upregulated at the body louse (28°C) versus the human host (37°C) temperature. rpoE expression also was upregulated when B. quintana was exposed to high hemin concentrations. In vitro and in vivo analyses demonstrated that RpoE function is regulated by a mechanism involving the anti-sigma factor NepR and the response regulator PhyR. The ΔrpoE ΔnepR mutant strain of B. quintana established that RpoE-mediated transcription is important in mediating the tolerance of B. quintana to high hemin concentrations. We present the first analysis of an ECF15 sigma factor in a vector-borne human pathogen and conclude that RpoE has a role in the adaptation of B. quintana to the hemin-rich arthropod vector environment. PMID:23564167

  12. Distinct Microbial Communities within the Endosphere and Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides Roots across Contrasting Soil Types.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottel, Neil R [ORNL; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F [ORNL; Kerley, Marilyn K [ORNL; Yang, Zamin [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Vilgalys, Rytas [Duke University; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The root-rhizosphere interface of Populus is the nexus of a variety of associations between bacteria, fungi, and the host plant and an ideal model for studying interactions between plants and microorganisms. However, such studies have generally been confined to greenhouse and plantation systems. Here we analyze microbial communities from the root endophytic and rhizospheric habitats of Populus deltoides in mature natural trees from both upland and bottomland sites in central Tennessee. Community profiling utilized 454 pyrosequencing with separate primers targeting the V4 region for bacterial 16S rRNA and the D1/D2 region for fungal 28S rRNA genes. Rhizosphere bacteria were dominated by Acidobacteria (31%) and Alphaproteobacteria (30%), whereas most endophytes were from the Gammaproteobacteria (54%) as well as Alphaproteobacteria (23%). A single Pseudomonas-like operational taxonomic unit (OTU) accounted for 34% of endophytic bacterial sequences. Endophytic bacterial richness was also highly variable and 10-fold lower than in rhizosphere samples originating from the same roots. Fungal rhizosphere and endophyte samples had approximately equal amounts of the Pezizomycotina (40%), while the Agaricomycotina were more abundant in the rhizosphere (34%) than endosphere (17%). Both fungal and bacterial rhizosphere samples were highly clustered compared to the more variable endophyte samples in a UniFrac principal coordinates analysis, regardless of upland or bottomland site origin. Hierarchical clustering of OTU relative abundance patterns also showed that the most abundant bacterial and fungal OTUs tended to be dominant in either the endophyte or rhizosphere samples but not both. Together, these findings demonstrate that root endophytic communities are distinct assemblages rather than opportunistic subsets of the rhizosphere.

  13. Phototrophic biofilm assembly in microbial-mat-derived unicyanobacterial consortia: model systems for the study of autotroph-heterotroph interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Cole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, but the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ manipulation make it challenging to elucidate the principles governing these interactions. The study of assembling phototrophic biofilm communities provides a robust means to identify such interactions and evaluate their contributions to the recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity over time. To examine primary succession in phototrophic communities, we isolated two unicyanobacterial consortia from the microbial mat in Hot Lake, Washington, characterizing the membership and metabolic function of each consortium. We then analyzed the spatial structures and quantified the community compositions of their assembling biofilms. The consortia retained the same suite of heterotrophic species, identified as abundant members of the mat and assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Autotroph growth rates dominated early in assembly, yielding to increasing heterotroph growth rates late in succession. The two consortia exhibited similar assembly patterns, with increasing relative abundances of members from Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria concurrent with decreasing relative abundances of those from Gammaproteobacteria. Despite these similarities at higher taxonomic levels, the relative abundances of individual heterotrophic species were substantially different in the developing consortial biofilms. This suggests that, although similar niches are created by the cyanobacterial metabolisms, the resulting webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions are specific to each primary producer. The relative simplicity and tractability of the Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia make them useful model systems for deciphering interspecies interactions and assembly principles relevant to natural

  14. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Melcher, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant's growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species.

  15. Effects of seawater ozonation on biofilm development in aquaculture tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietz, Matthias; Hall, Michael R; Høj, Lone

    2009-07-01

    Microbial biofilms developing in aquaculture tanks represent a reservoir for opportunistic bacterial pathogens, and procedures to control formation and bacterial composition of biofilms are important for the development of commercially viable aquaculture industries. This study investigated the effects of seawater ozonation on biofilm development on microscope glass slides placed in small-scale aquaculture tanks containing the live feed organism Artemia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated that ozonation accelerated the biofilm formation cycle, while it delayed the establishment of filamentous bacteria. Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial groups in the biofilm for both water types, but ozonation influenced their dynamics. With ozonation, the bacterial community structure was relatively stable and dominated by Gammaproteobacteria throughout the experiment (21-66% of total bacteria). Without ozonation, the community showed larger fluctuations, and Alphaproteobacteria emerged as dominant after 18 days (up to 54% of total bacteria). Ozonation of seawater also affected the dynamics of less abundant populations in the biofilm such as Betaproteobacteria, Planctomycetales and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium branch of phylum Bacteroidetes. The abundance of Thiothrix, a bacterial genus capable of filamentous growth and fouling of larvae, increased with time for both water types, while no temporal trend could be detected for the genus Vibrio. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) demonstrated temporal changes in the dominant bacterial populations for both water types. Sequencing of DGGE bands confirmed the FISH data, and sequences were related to bacterial groups commonly found in biofilms of aquaculture systems. Several populations were closely related to organisms involved in sulfur cycling. Improved Artemia survival rates in tanks receiving ozonated water suggested a positive effect of ozonation on animal

  16. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  17. Microbial Communities and a Novel Symbiotic Interaction in Extremely Acidic Mine Drainage at Iron Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Culture-independent studies of microbial communities in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system associated with the Richmond ore body at Iron Mountain, CA, demonstrated that the total number of prokaryote lineages is small compared to other environments. Phylogenetic analyses of 232 small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from six clone libraries revealed some novel lines of descent. Many of the novel clones were from libraries constructed from subaerial biofilms associated with fine grained pyrite. The clones form several distinct groups within the order Thermoplasmatales and are most closely related to Ferroplasma spp. and Thermoplasma spp. Another novel group detected in a pH 1.4 pool and a pH 0.8 biofilm falls within the Rickettsiales (alpha-proteobacteria and related to mitochondria) and is most closely related to a-proteobacterial endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba spp. An oligonucleotide rRNA probe designed to target alpha-proteobacteria revealed that these are protist endosymbionts, and that they are associated with a small percentage (2%) of the total eukaryotes in samples from the Richmond mine. Measurements of the internal pH of these protists show that their cytosol is close to neutral. Thus, protists provide a habitat within the AMD system that is at least 5 pH units less acidic than the surroundings. The uncultured AMD endosymbionts have a conserved 273 nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in the variable V1 region of their 16S rRNA gene. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but predicted secondary structure form well defined stem loops. The discovery of inserts within a highly conserved gene is extremely rare. At present we have not identified the protist host. However, it is interesting to note that protists previously shown to have a-proteobacterial endosymbionts possess 18S rRNA genes that contain both IVSs and group I introns. The possibility that the IVS in the AMD bacteria is a result of extensive genetic exchange between a

  18. Analysis of bacterial community during the fermentation of pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic beverage, using a polyphasic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Adelfo; Giles-Gómez, Martha; Hernández, Georgina; Córdova-Aguilar, María Soledad; López-Munguía, Agustín; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2008-05-31

    In this study, the characterization of the bacterial community present during the fermentation of pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic beverage from maguey (Agave), was determined for the first time by a polyphasic approach in which both culture and non-culture dependent methods were utilized. The work included the isolation of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), aerobic mesophiles, and 16S rDNA clone libraries from total DNA extracted from the maguey sap (aguamiel) used as substrate, after inoculation with a sample of previously produced pulque and followed by 6-h fermentation. Microbiological diversity results were correlated with fermentation process parameters such as sucrose, glucose, fructose and fermentation product concentrations. In addition, medium rheological behavior analysis and scanning electron microscopy in aguamiel and during pulque fermentation were also performed. Our results showed that both culture and non-culture dependent approaches allowed the detection of several new and previously reported species within the alpha-, gamma-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Bacteria diversity in aguamiel was composed by the heterofermentative Leuconostoc citreum, L. mesenteroides, L. kimchi, the gamma-Proteobacteria Erwinia rhapontici, Enterobacter spp. and Acinetobacter radioresistens. Inoculation with previously fermented pulque incorporated to the system microbiota, homofermentative lactobacilli related to Lactobacillus acidophilus, several alpha-Proteobacteria such as Zymomonas mobilis and Acetobacter malorum, other gamma-Proteobacteria and an important amount of yeasts, creating a starting metabolic diversity composed by homofermentative and heterofermentative LAB, acetic and ethanol producing microorganisms. At the end of the fermentation process, the bacterial diversity was mainly composed by the homofermentative Lactobacillus acidophilus, the heterofermentative L. mesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and the alpha-Proteobacteria A. malorum. After

  19. Performance of a new suspended filler biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides under thermophilic conditions and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Shaobin, Huang; Zhendong, Wei; Pengfei, Chen; Yongqing, Zhang

    2016-08-15

    A suspended biofilter, as a new bioreactor, was constructed for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOX) from simulated flue gas under thermophilic conditions. The suspended biofilter could be quickly started up by inoculating the thermophilic denitrifying bacterium Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1. The NO concentration in the inlet stream ranged from 200mg/m(3) to 2000mg/m(3) during the operation, and inlet loading ranged from 8.2-164g/(m(3)·h). The whole operation period was divided into four phases according to the EBRT. The EBRT of phases I, II, III and IV were 88s (9-43d), 44s (44-61d), 66s (62-79d) and 132s (80-97d), respectively. An average NO removal efficiency of 90% was achieved during the whole operation period, and the elimination capacity increased linearly with the increase in NO inlet loading and the maximum elimination capacity reached 146.9g/(m(3)·h). No clogging was observed, although there was a high biomass concentration in the biofilter bed. The remarkable performance in terms of NO removal could be attributed to the rich bacterial communities. The microbial community structure in the biofilm was investigated by high throughput sequencing analysis (16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing). The experimental results showed that the microbial community structure of the biofilm was very rich in diversity, with the most abundant bacterial class of the Alphaproteobacteria, which accounted for 36.5% of the total bacteria, followed by Gammaproteobacteria (30.7%) and Clostridia (27.5%). It was worthwhile to mention that the dominant species in the suspended biofilter biofilm were all common denitrifying bacteria including Rhizobiales (inoculated microbe), Rhodospirillales, Enterobacteriales and Pseudomonadales, which accounted for 19.4%, 17%, 21.6% and 7%, respectively. The inoculated strain TAD1 belonged to Alphaproteobacteria class. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, 16S rRNA gene

  20. Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Stefanie; Wedin, Mats; Fernandez-Brime, Samantha; Cronholm, Bodil; Westberg, Martin; Weber, Bettina; Grube, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) seal the soil surface from erosive forces in many habitats where plants cannot compete. Lichens symbioses of fungi and algae often form significant fraction of these microbial assemblages. In addition to the fungal symbiont, many species of other fungi can inhabit the lichenic structures and interact with their hosts in different ways, ranging from commensalism to parasitism. More than 1800 species of lichenicolous (lichen-inhabiting) fungi are known to science. One example is Diploschistes muscorum, a common species in lichen-dominated BSC that infects lichens of the genus Cladonia. D. muscorum starts as a lichenicolous fungus, invading the lichen Cladonia symphycarpa and gradually develops an independent Diploschistes lichen thallus. Furthermore, bacterial groups, such as Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria, have been consistently recovered from lichen thalli and evidence is rapidly accumulating that these microbes may generally play integral roles in the lichen symbiosis. Here we describe lichen microbiome dynamics as the parasitic lichen D. muscorum takes over C. symphycarpa. We used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene and photobiont-specific ITS rDNA sequencing to track bacterial and algal transitions during the infection process, and employed fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize bacteria in the Cladonia and Diploschistes lichen thalli. We sampled four transitional stages, at sites in Sweden and Germany: A) Cladonia with no visible infection, B) early infection stage defined by the first visible Diploschistes thallus, C) late-stage infection with parts of the Cladonia thallus still identifiable, and D) final stage with a fully developed Diploschistes thallus, A gradual microbiome shift occurred during the transition, but fractions of Cladonia-associated bacteria were retained during the process of symbiotic reorganization. Consistent changes observed across sites included a notable decrease in the relative abundance of

  1. Bacterial diversity analysis of two hot springs in Chengde, Hebei%河北承德地区两个温泉中细菌的多样性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽娜; 郝春博; 李思远; 周训; 冯传平

    2011-01-01

    通过构建16S rDNA克隆文库,对承德地区两温泉中的细菌多样性水平及系统发育关系进行了初步研究.研究表明:68℃的A11文库中阳性克隆的16S rDNA序列分属5个细菌类群,分别为 Firmicutes (6.25%)、Deinococcus-Thermus (25.0%)、Gammaproteobacteria (12.5%)、Betaproteobacteria (50.0%)、Alphaproteobacteria(6.25%);而74.5℃的A12文库仅属于一个细菌类群:厚壁菌门(Firmicutes).两温泉中细菌多样性的差异表明,温度是影响温泉中细菌多样性水平的重要因素.此外,A11文库中克隆的16S rDNA序列与许多已知的可产色素的好氧菌相似性很高,而A12文库中的细菌多数为专性厌氧或兼性厌氧型,其中厌氧芽孢杆菌属(Anoxybacillus)中的Anoxybacillus flavithermus可以作为研究泉华形成的理想材料.%The bacterial diversity and phylogenetic analysis of two hot springs in Chengde were investigated and analyzed by construction of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. The results showed that bacteria in sample All (68℃) could be divided into 5 groups, which were as follows: Firmicutes (6.25%), Deinococcus-Thermus (25.0%), Gammaproteobacteria (12.5%), Betaproteo-bacteria (50.0%), Al-phaproteobacteria (6.25%). But sample A12 (74.5℃) contains only one group, Firmicutes. The difference between the two samples revealed that the temperature was an important factor to affect the level of bacterial diversity in hot springs. Furthermore, a lot of 16S rDNA sequences in Al 1 clone library had high similarity to the aerobic bacteria that can produce pigment, while most bacteria in A12 clone library belonged to obligate or facultative anaerobe, in which, Anoxybacillus flavithermus can be used as ideal material to research the formation of sinter.

  2. Dynamic changes in the structure of microbial communities in Baltic Sea coastal seawater microcosms modified by crude oil, shale oil or diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggor, Signe; Juhanson, Jaanis; Jõesaar, Merike; Mitt, Mario; Truu, Jaak; Vedler, Eve; Heinaru, Ain

    2013-08-25

    The coastal waters of the Baltic Sea are constantly threatened by oil spills, due to the extensive transportation of oil products across the sea. To characterise the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community of this marine area, microcosm experiments on diesel fuel, crude oil and shale oil were performed. Analysis of these microcosms, using alkane monooxygenase (alkB) and 16S rRNA marker genes in PCR-DGGE experiments, demonstrated that substrate type and concentration strongly influence species composition and the occurrence of alkB genes in respective oil degrading bacterial communities. Gammaproteobacteria (particularly the genus Pseudomonas) and Alphaproteobacteria were dominant in all microcosms treated with oils. All alkB genes carried by bacterial isolates (40 strains), and 8 of the 11 major DGGE bands from the microcosms, had more than 95% sequence identity with the alkB genes of Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, the closest relatives of the majority of sequences (54 sequences from 79) of the alkB gene library from initially collected seawater DNA were Actinobacteria. alkB gene expression, induced by hexadecane, was recorded in isolated bacterial strains. Thus, complementary culture dependent and independent methods provided a more accurate picture about the complex seawater microbial communities of the Baltic Sea.

  3. Resilience of SAR11 bacteria to rapid acidification in the high-latitude open ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Manuela; Hill, Polly G; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P; Leakey, Raymond J G; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitous SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria numerically dominate marine planktonic communities. Because they are excruciatingly difficult to cultivate, there is comparatively little known about their physiology and metabolic responses to long- and short-term environmental changes. As surface oceans take up anthropogenic, atmospheric CO2, the consequential process of ocean acidification could affect the global biogeochemical significance of SAR11. Shipping accidents or inadvertent release of chemicals from industrial plants can have strong short-term local effects on oceanic SAR11. This study investigated the effect of 2.5-fold acidification of seawater on the metabolism of SAR11 and other heterotrophic bacterioplankton along a natural temperature gradient crossing the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Uptake rates of the amino acid leucine by SAR11 cells as well as other bacterioplankton remained similar to controls despite an instant ∼50% increase in leucine bioavailability upon acidification. This high physiological resilience to acidification even without acclimation, suggests that open ocean dominant bacterioplankton are able to cope even with sudden and therefore more likely with long-term acidification effects. PMID:26691595

  4. Comparison of two radio-frequency plasma sterilization processes using microspot evaluation of microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Klaus S; Johansen, Jens E; Grün, Reinar

    2006-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated gas plasma surface sterilization methods in a specific sterilizer. We have introduced a new monitoring method using 0.4 microm pore size membranes, which in this study gave the information corresponding to 3000 exposed biological indicators per treatment cycle. This enabled us to compare the fraction of inoculates that showed no growth after exposure for 30 different locations in the chamber, and hereby identify weak and strong spots in the chamber with regard to sporicidal effect. Membranes were also used to expose a broad spectrum of soil bacteria for plasma treatment at four different conditions. The organisms were identified using PCR and sequencing. The test showed that Bacillus stearothermophilus spores were inactivated at the slowest rate among the tested microorganisms. Further alpha-proteobacteria (Gram negative) seemed more sensitive than the rest of the tested organisms. The microspot evaluation approach has been a most useful tool in the assessment of sterilization performance in sterilizers that do not have clear measurable parameters related to the sterilization.

  5. Multilevel correlations in the biological phosphorus removal process: From bacterial enrichment to conductivity-based metabolic batch tests and polyphosphatase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbrodt, David G; Maillard, Julien; Brovelli, Alessandro; Chabrelie, Alexandre; May, Jonathan; Holliger, Christof

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater relies on the preferential selection of active polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in the underlying bacterial community continuum. Efficient management of the bacterial resource requires understanding of population dynamics as well as availability of bioanalytical methods for rapid and regular assessment of relative abundances of active PAOs and their glycogen-accumulating competitors (GAO). A systems approach was adopted here toward the investigation of multilevel correlations from the EBPR bioprocess to the bacterial community, metabolic, and enzymatic levels. Two anaerobic-aerobic sequencing-batch reactors were operated to enrich activated sludge in PAOs and GAOs affiliating with "Candidati Accumulibacter and Competibacter phosphates", respectively. Bacterial selection was optimized by dynamic control of the organic loading rate and the anaerobic contact time. The distinct core bacteriomes mainly comprised populations related to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, and Chloroflexi in the PAO enrichment and of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Sphingobacteria in the GAO enrichment. An anaerobic metabolic batch test based on electrical conductivity evolution and a polyphosphatase enzymatic assay were developed for rapid and low-cost assessment of the active PAO fraction and dephosphatation potential of activated sludge. Linear correlations were obtained between the PAO fraction, biomass specific rate of conductivity increase under anaerobic conditions, and polyphosphate-hydrolyzing activity of PAO/GAO mixtures. The correlations between PAO/GAO ratios, metabolic activities, and conductivity profiles were confirmed by simulations with a mathematical model developed in the aqueous geochemistry software PHREEQC. PMID:24975745

  6. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs. PMID:25189844

  7. Genome-engineered Sinorhizobium meliloti for the production of poly(lactic-co-3-hydroxybutyric) acid copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tam T; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-02-01

    Economically competitive commercial production of biodegradable bioplastics with desirable properties is an important goal. In this study, we demonstrate the use of chromosome engineering of an alternative bacterial host, Sinorhizobium meliloti, for production of the copolymer, poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate). Codon-optimized genes for 2 previously engineered enzymes, Clostridium propionicum propionate CoA transferase (Pct532Cp) and Pseudomonas sp. strain MBEL 6-19 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1400Ps6-19), were introduced into S. meliloti Rm1021 by chromosome integration, replacing the native phbC gene. On the basis of phenotypic analysis and detection of polymer product by gas chromatography analysis, synthesis and accumulation of the copolymer was confirmed. The chromosome integrant strain, with the introduced genes under the control of the native phbC promoter, is able to produce over 15% cell dry mass of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate), containing 30 mol% lactate, from growth on mannitol. We were also able to purify the polymer from the culture and confirm the structure by NMR and GC-MS. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of production of this copolymer in the Alphaproteobacteria. Further optimization of this system may eventually yield strains that are able to produce economically viable commercial product. PMID:26639519

  8. mdRNA-Seq analysis of marine microbial communities from the northern Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shengwei; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Miller, Dan; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Metatranscriptomic differential RNA-Seq (mdRNA-Seq) identifies the suite of active transcriptional start sites at single-nucleotide resolution through enrichment of primary transcript 5′ ends. Here we analyzed the microbial community at 45 m depth at Station A in the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, during 500 m deep mixing in February 2012 using mdRNA-Seq and a parallel classical RNA-Seq approach. We identified promoters active in situ for five different pico-planktonic genera (the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria, Synechococcus of Cyanobacteria, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Micromonas as an example for picoeukaryotic algae), showing the applicability of this approach to highly diverse microbial communities. 16S rDNA quantification revealed that 24% of the analyzed community were group II marine Euryarchaeota in which we identified a highly abundant non-coding RNA, Tan1, and detected very high expression of genes encoding intrinsically disordered proteins, as well as enzymes for the synthesis of specific B vitamins, extracellular peptidases, carbohydrate-active enzymes, and transport systems. These results highlight previously unknown functions of Euryarchaeota with community-wide relevance. The complementation of metatranscriptomic studies with mdRNA-Seq provides substantial additional information regarding transcriptional start sites, promoter activities, and the identification of non-coding RNAs. PMID:27759035

  9. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0-30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0-20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30-60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0-20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings. PMID:27126064

  10. Phylogenetically Diverse Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria Isolated from Epilithic Biofilms in Tama River, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Setsuko; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria in freshwater environments, particularly in rivers, has not been examined in as much detail as in ocean environments. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic and physiological diversities of AAP bacteria in biofilms that developed on submerged stones in a freshwater river using culture methods. The biofilms collected were homogenized and inoculated on solid media and incubated aerobically in the dark. Sixty-eight red-, pink-, yellow-, orange-, or brown-colored colonies were isolated, and, of these, 28 isolates contained the photosynthetic pigment, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were classified into 14 groups in 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and distributed in the orders Rhodospirillales, Rhodobacterales, and Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria and in Betaproteobacteria. Physiological analyses confirmed that none of the representative isolates from any of the groups grew under anaerobic phototrophic conditions. Seven isolates in 4 OTUs showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 98.0% or less with any established species, suggesting the presence of previously undescribed species of AAP bacteria. Six isolates in 2 other OTUs had the closest relatives, which have not been reported to be AAP bacteria. Physiological comparisons among the isolates revealed differences in preferences for nutrient concentrations, BChl contents, and light-harvesting proteins. These results suggest that diverse and previously unknown AAP bacteria inhabit river biofilms. PMID:27453124

  11. [Genome Rearrangements in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 with the Involvement of the Plasmid pRhico and the Prophage phiAb-Cd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsy, E I; Petrova, L P

    2015-12-01

    Alphaproteobacteria of the species Azospirillum brasilense have a multicomponent genome that undergoes frequent spontaneous rearrangements, yielding changes in the plasmid profiles of strains. Specifically, variants (Cd, Sp7.K2, Sp7.1, Sp7.4, Sp7.8, etc.) of the type strainA. brasilense Sp7 that had lost a 115-MDa plasmid were previously selected. In many of them, the molecular weight of a 90-MDa plasmid (p90 or pRhico), which is a kind of "depot" for glycopolymer biosynthesis genes, increased. In this study, a collection of primers was designed to the plasmid pRhico and to the DNA of prophage phiAb-Cd integrated in it. The use ofthese primers in polymerase chain reactions allowed the detection of the probable excision of phiAb-Cd phage from the DNA of A. brasilense variants Sp7.4 and Sp7.8 and other alterations of the pRhico structure in A. brasilense strains Cd, Sp7.K2, and Sp7.8. The developed primers and PCR conditions may be recoin mended for primary analysis of spontaneous plasmid rearrangements in A. brasilense Sp7 and related strains.

  12. RpoH2 sigma factor controls the photooxidative stress response in a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rai, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Shukla, Mansi; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria normally harbour multiple copies of the heat shock sigma factor (known as σ(32), σ(H) or RpoH). Azospirillum brasilense, a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, harbours five copies of rpoH genes, one of which is an rpoH2 homologue. The genes around the rpoH2 locus in A. brasilense show synteny with that found in rhizobia. The rpoH2 of A. brasilense was able to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. Inactivation of rpoH2 in A. brasilense results in increased sensitivity to methylene blue and to triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC). Exposure of A. brasilense to TTC and the singlet oxygen-generating agent methylene blue induced several-fold higher expression of rpoH2. Comparison of the proteome of A. brasilense with its rpoH2 deletion mutant and with an A. brasilense strain overexpressing rpoH2 revealed chaperone GroEL, elongation factors (Ef-Tu and EF-G), peptidyl prolyl isomerase, and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase as the major proteins whose expression was controlled by RpoH2. Here, we show that the RpoH2 sigma factor-controlled photooxidative stress response in A. brasilense is similar to that in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but that RpoH2 is not involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal in A. brasilense.

  13. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. PMID:26528534

  14. Simultaneous selection of soil electroactive bacterial communities associated to anode and cathode in a two-chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Bacci, Giovanni; Fani, Renato; Mocali, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Different bacteria have evolved strategies to transfer electrons over their cell surface to (or from) their extracellular environment. This electron transfer enables the use of these bacteria in bioelectrochemical systems (BES) such as Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). In MFC research the biological reactions at the cathode have long been a secondary point of interest. However, bacterial biocathodes in MFCs represent a potential advantage compared to traditional cathodes, for both their low costs and their low impact on the environment. The main challenge in biocathode set-up is represented by the selection of a bacterial community able to efficiently accept electrons from the electrode, starting from an environmental matrix. In this work, a constant voltage was supplied on a two-chamber MFC filled up with soil over three weeks in order to simultaneously select an electron donor bacterial biomass on the anode and an electron acceptor biomass on the cathode, starting from the same soil. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis was performed to characterize the bacterial community of the initial soil, in the anode, in the cathode and in the control chamber not supplied with any voltage. Results highlighted that both the MFC conditions and the voltage supply affected the soil bacterial communities, providing a selection of different bacterial groups preferentially associated to the anode (Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Clostridia) and to the cathode (Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria). These results confirmed that several electroactive bacteria are naturally present within a top soil and, moreover, different soil bacterial genera could provide different electrical properties.

  15. Distribution and metabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and phylogenetic affiliation of DMSP-assimilating bacteria in northern Baffin Bay/Lancaster Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motard-CôTé, J.; Levasseur, M.; Scarratt, M. G.; Michaud, S.; Gratton, Y.; Rivkin, R. B.; Keats, K.; Gosselin, M.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Kiene, R. P.; Lovejoy, C.

    2012-02-01

    We determined the distribution and bacterial metabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the two dominant surface water masses in northern Baffin Bay/Lancaster Sound during September 2008. Concentrations of particulate DMSP (DMSPp; 5-70 nmol L-1) and the DMSPp:Chl a ratios (15-229 nmol μg-1) were relatively high, suggesting the presence of DMSP-rich phytoplankton taxa. Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes and total prokaryotes were tenfold and threefold more abundant in Baffin Bay surface water (BBS) than in Arctic surface water (AS), respectively. Heterotrophic bacterial production (0.07-2.5 μC L-1 d-1) and bacterial turnover rate constants for dissolved DMSP (DMSPd) were low (0.03-0.11 h-1) compared with the values previously reported in warmer and more productive environments. Nonetheless, a relatively large proportion (12%-31%) of the DMSP metabolized by the bacteria was converted into DMS. Additionally, between 40% and 65% of the total bacterial cells incorporated sulfur from DMSPd, with Gammaproteobacteria and non-Roseobacter Alphaproteobacteria (AlfR-) contributing proportionally more to total DMSP-incorporating cells. The contribution of AlfR- to the total prokaryotic community was 50% higher in BBS than in AS, while the bacterial rate constants for DMSPd turnover were 78% higher in BBS than in AS. These results show that the two different Arctic water masses host specific microbial assemblages that result in distinct affinity for DMSP.

  16. Plants Rather than Mineral Fertilization Shape Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Legacy Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridl, Jakub; Kolar, Michal; Strejcek, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Stursa, Petr; Paces, Jan; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions are of particular importance in polluted soils. This study sought to determine how selected plants (horseradish, black nightshade and tobacco) and NPK mineral fertilization shape the structure of soil microbial communities in legacy contaminated soil and the resultant impact of treatment on the soil microbial community functional potential. To explore these objectives, we combined shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA gene amplicon high throughput sequencing with data analysis approaches developed for RNA-seq. We observed that the presence of any of the selected plants rather than fertilization shaped the microbial community structure, and the microbial populations of the root zone of each plant significantly differed from one another and/or from the bulk soil, whereas the effect of the fertilizer proved to be insignificant. When we compared microbial diversity in root zones versus bulk soil, we observed an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria or Bacteroidetes, taxa which are commonly considered copiotrophic. Our results thus align with the theory that fast-growing, copiotrophic, microorganisms which are adapted to ephemeral carbon inputs are enriched in the vegetated soil. Microbial functional potential indicated that some genetic determinants associated with signal transduction mechanisms, defense mechanisms or amino acid transport and metabolism differed significantly among treatments. Genetic determinants of these categories tend to be overrepresented in copiotrophic organisms. The results of our study further elucidate plant-microbe relationships in a contaminated environment with possible implications for the phyto/rhizoremediation of contaminated areas. PMID:27446035

  17. A prevalent alpha-proteobacterium Paracoccus sp. in a population of the Cayenne ticks (Amblyomma cajennense from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Machado-Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is the most common tick-borne disease in South America, the presence of Rickettsia sp. in Amblyomma ticks is a possible indication of its endemicity in certain geographic regions. In the present work, bacterial DNA sequences related to Rickettsia amblyommii genes in A. dubitatum ticks, collected in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, were discovered. Simultaneously, Paracoccus sp. was detected in aproximately 77% of A. cajennense specimens collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first report of Paracoccus sp. infection in a specific tick population, and raises the possibility of these bacteria being maintained and/or transmitted by ticks. Whether Paracoccus sp. represents another group of pathogenic Rhodobacteraceae or simply plays a role in A. cajennense physiology, is unknown. The data also demonstrate that the rickettsial 16S rRNA specific primers used forRickettsia spp. screening can also detect Paracoccus alpha-proteobacteria infection in biological samples. Hence, a PCRRFLP strategy is presented to distinguish between these two groups of bacteria.

  18. Microbial diversity in an Armenian geothermal spring assessed by molecular and culture-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosyan, Hovik; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2014-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the prokaryotic community thriving in the Arzakan hot spring in Armenia was studied using molecular and culture-based methods. A sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated the presence of a diversity of microorganisms belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes phyla, and Cyanobacteria. Proteobacteria was the dominant group, representing 52% of the bacterial clones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments also indicated the abundance of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria populations. Most of the sequences were most closely related to uncultivated microorganisms and shared less than 96% similarity with their closest matches in GenBank, indicating that this spring harbors a unique community of novel microbial species or genera. The majority of the sequences of an archaeal 16S rRNA gene library, generated from a methanogenic enrichment, were close relatives of members of the genus Methanoculleus. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria mainly belonging to Bacillus and Geobacillus were detected only by culture-dependent methods. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 99, 96, and 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Arcobacter sp., Methylocaldum sp., and Methanoculleus sp., respectively. PMID:24740751

  19. Identification of Associations between Bacterioplankton and Photosynthetic Picoeukaryotes in Coastal Waters

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    Hanna Maria Farnelid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes are significant contributors to marine primary productivity. Associations between marine bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes frequently occur and can have large biogeochemical impacts. We used flow cytometry to sort cells from seawater to identify non-eukaryotic phylotypes that are associated with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Samples were collected at the Santa Cruz wharf on Monterey Bay, California during summer and fall, 2014. The phylogeny of associated microbes was assessed through 16S rRNA gene amplicon clone and Illumina MiSeq libraries. The most frequently detected bacterioplankton phyla within the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts were Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Intriguingly, the presence of free-living bacterial genera in the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts could suggest that some of the photosynthetic picoeukaryotes were mixotrophs. However, the occurrence of bacterial sequences, which were not prevalent in the corresponding bulk seawater samples, indicates that there was also a selection for specific OTUs in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes suggesting specific functional associations. The results show that diverse bacterial phylotypes are found in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Taxonomic identification of these associations is a prerequisite for further characterizing and to elucidate their metabolic pathways and ecological functions.

  20. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik, Cody S; Stevenson, Emily I; Den Uyl, Paul A; Arendt, Carli A; Aciego, Sarah M; Dick, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical, and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG) in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream, and the glacier's terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  1. Biodegradation of low-ethoxylated nonylphenols in a bioreactor packed with a new ceramic support (Vukopor ® S10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Luigi; Bertin, Lorenzo; Todaro, Daniela; Bettini, Cristina; Fava, Fabio; Di Gioia, Diana

    2014-03-01

    This work was aimed at studying the possibility of biodegrading 4-nonylphenol and low ethoxylated nonylphenol mixtures, which are particularly recalcitrant to microbial degradation, by employing a biofilm reactor packed with a ceramic support (Vukopor® S10). A selected microbial consortium (Consortium A) was used to colonize the support. 4-Nonylphenol and ethoxylated nonylphenol degradation and mineralization capabilities were studied both in batch and continuous mode. The results showed that Vukopor® S10 was able to be colonized by an active biofilm for the degradation of the target pollutants with the reactor operating both in batch and continuous mode. On the other hand, pollutant adsorption on the support was negligible. FISH showed equal proportion of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the Igepal CO-520 degrading reactor. A shift towards high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria was observed by supplying Igepal CO-210. PCR-density gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses also evidenced that the biofilm evolved with time by changing the mixture applied and that Proteobacteria were the most represented phylum in the biofilm. Taken together, the data obtained provide a strong indication that the biofilm reactor packed with Vukopor® S10 and inoculated with Consortium A could potentially be used to develop a technology for the decontamination of 4-nonylphenol and low ethoxylated nonylphenol polluted effluents.

  2. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  3. A quantitative study of the division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progression of a cell through the division cycle is tightly controlled at different steps to ensure the integrity of genome replication and partitioning to daughter cells. From published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism for control of the cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus. The mechanism, which is based on the synthesis and degradation of three "master regulator" proteins (CtrA, GcrA, and DnaA, is converted into a quantitative model, in order to study the temporal dynamics of these and other cell cycle proteins. The model accounts for important details of the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of cell cycle control in stalked C. crescentus cell. It reproduces protein time courses in wild-type cells, mimics correctly the phenotypes of many mutant strains, and predicts the phenotypes of currently uncharacterized mutants. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C. crescentus are conserved among many genera of alpha-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to other species of importance in agriculture and medicine.

  4. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

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    Seán M Murray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  5. Alpha- and Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Codominate the Active Methane-Oxidizing Communities in an Acidic Boreal Peat Bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Kaitlin C; Lin, Xueju; Kumaresan, Deepak; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Murrell, J Colin; Kostka, Joel E

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize metabolically active, aerobic methanotrophs in an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest, in Minnesota. Methanotrophs were investigated in the field and in laboratory incubations using DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP), expression studies on particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes, and amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Potential rates of oxidation ranged from 14 to 17 μmol of CH4g dry weight soil(-1)day(-1) Within DNA-SIP incubations, the relative abundance of methanotrophs increased from 4%in situto 25 to 36% after 8 to 14 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the(13)C-enriched DNA fractions revealed that the active methanotrophs were dominated by the generaMethylocystis(type II;Alphaproteobacteria),Methylomonas, andMethylovulum(both, type I;Gammaproteobacteria). In field samples, a transcript-to-gene ratio of 1 to 2 was observed forpmoAin surface peat layers, which attenuated rapidly with depth, indicating that the highest methane consumption was associated with a depth of 0 to 10 cm. Metagenomes and sequencing of cDNApmoAamplicons from field samples confirmed that the dominant active methanotrophs wereMethylocystisandMethylomonas Although type II methanotrophs have long been shown to mediate methane consumption in peatlands, our results indicate that members of the generaMethylomonasandMethylovulum(type I) can significantly contribute to aerobic methane oxidation in these ecosystems. PMID:26873322

  6. Assessing the effect of litter species on the dynamic of bacterial and fungal communities during leaf decomposition in microcosm by molecular techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xu

    Full Text Available Although bacteria and fungi are well-known to be decomposers of leaf litter, few studies have examined their compositions and diversities during the decomposition process in tropical stream water. Xishuangbanna is a tropical region preserving one of the highest floristic diversity areas in China. In this study, leaf litter of four dominant plant species in Xishuangbanna was incubated in stream water for 42 days during which samples were taken regularly. Following DNA extraction, PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone-sequencing analyses were performed using bacterial and fungal specific primers. Leaf species have slightly influences on bacterial community rather than fungal community. The richness and diversity of bacteria was higher than that of fungi, which increased towards the end of the 42-day-incubation. The bacterial community was initially more specific upon the type of leaves and gradually became similar at the later stage of decomposition with alpha-proteobacteria as major component. Sequences affiliated to methanotrophs were obtained that indicates potentially occurrence of methane oxidation and methanogenesis. For the fungal community, sequences affiliated to Aspergillus were predominant at the beginning and then shifted to Pleosporales. Our results suggest that the microorganisms colonizing leaf biofilm in tropical stream water were mostly generalists that could exploit the resources of leaves of various species equally well.

  7. So close, so different: geothermal flux shapes divergent soil microbial communities at neighbouring sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A L; Tagliavia, M; D'Alessandro, W; Franzetti, A; Parello, F; Quatrini, P

    2016-03-01

    This study is focused on the (micro)biogeochemical features of two close geothermal sites (FAV1 and FAV2), both selected at the main exhalative area of Pantelleria Island, Italy. A previous biogeochemical survey revealed high CH4 consumption and the presence of a diverse community of methanotrophs at FAV2 site, whereas the close site FAV1 was apparently devoid of methanotrophs and recorded no CH4 consumption. Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to describe the bacterial and archaeal communities which have been linked to the physicochemical conditions and the geothermal sources of energy available at the two sites. Both sites are dominated by Bacteria and host a negligible component of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (phylum Thaumarchaeota). The FAV2 bacterial community is characterized by an extraordinary diversity of methanotrophs, with 40% of the sequences assigned to Methylocaldum, Methylobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Bejerickia (Alphaproteobacteria); conversely, a community of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs (Acidithiobacillus, Nitrosococcus) or putative chemolithotrophs (Ktedonobacter) dominates the FAV1 community, in the absence of methanotrophs. Since physical andchemical factors of FAV1, such as temperature and pH, cannot be considered limiting for methanotrophy, it is hypothesized that the main limiting factor for methanotrophs could be high NH4 (+) concentration. At the same time, abundant availability of NH4 (+) and other high energy electron donors and acceptors determined by the hydrothermal flux in this site create more energetically favourable conditions for chemolithotrophs that outcompete methanotrophs in non-nitrogen-limited soils. PMID:26560641

  8. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel Family of Cyclophilins, the AquaCyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Roman P; Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Koch, Johanna R; Schmid, Franz X; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitous cis-trans-prolyl isomerases (PPIases) found in all kingdoms of life. Here, we identify a novel family of cyclophilins, termed AquaCyps, which specifically occurs in marine Alphaproteobacteria, but not in related terrestric species. In addition to a canonical PPIase domain, AquaCyps contain large extensions and insertions. The crystal structures of two representatives from Hirschia baltica, AquaCyp293 and AquaCyp300, reveal the formation of a compact domain, the NIC domain, by the N- and C-terminal extensions together with a central insertion. The NIC domain adopts a novel mixed alpha-helical, beta-sheet fold that is linked to the cyclophilin domain via a conserved disulfide bond. In its overall fold, AquaCyp293 resembles AquaCyp300, but the two proteins utilize distinct sets of active site residues, consistent with differences in their PPIase catalytic properties. While AquaCyp293 is a highly active general PPIase, AquaCyp300 is specific for hydrophobic substrate peptides and exhibits lower overall activity. PMID:27276069

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel Family of Cyclophilins, the AquaCyps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman P Jakob

    Full Text Available Cyclophilins are ubiquitous cis-trans-prolyl isomerases (PPIases found in all kingdoms of life. Here, we identify a novel family of cyclophilins, termed AquaCyps, which specifically occurs in marine Alphaproteobacteria, but not in related terrestric species. In addition to a canonical PPIase domain, AquaCyps contain large extensions and insertions. The crystal structures of two representatives from Hirschia baltica, AquaCyp293 and AquaCyp300, reveal the formation of a compact domain, the NIC domain, by the N- and C-terminal extensions together with a central insertion. The NIC domain adopts a novel mixed alpha-helical, beta-sheet fold that is linked to the cyclophilin domain via a conserved disulfide bond. In its overall fold, AquaCyp293 resembles AquaCyp300, but the two proteins utilize distinct sets of active site residues, consistent with differences in their PPIase catalytic properties. While AquaCyp293 is a highly active general PPIase, AquaCyp300 is specific for hydrophobic substrate peptides and exhibits lower overall activity.

  11. Tuning fresh: radiation through rewiring of central metabolism in streamlined bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, Alexander; Mondav, Rhiannon; Sinclair, Lucas; Fernandez-Vidal, Leyden; Scofield, Douglas G; Schwientek, Patrick; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Torrents, David; McMahon, Katherine D; Andersson, Siv GE; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Most free-living planktonic cells are streamlined and in spite of their limitations in functional flexibility, their vast populations have radiated into a wide range of aquatic habitats. Here we compared the metabolic potential of subgroups in the Alphaproteobacteria lineage SAR11 adapted to marine and freshwater habitats. Our results suggest that the successful leap from marine to freshwaters in SAR11 was accompanied by a loss of several carbon degradation pathways and a rewiring of the central metabolism. Examples for these are C1 and methylated compounds degradation pathways, the Entner–Doudouroff pathway, the glyoxylate shunt and anapleuretic carbon fixation being absent from the freshwater genomes. Evolutionary reconstructions further suggest that the metabolic modules making up these important freshwater metabolic traits were already present in the gene pool of ancestral marine SAR11 populations. The loss of the glyoxylate shunt had already occurred in the common ancestor of the freshwater subgroup and its closest marine relatives, suggesting that the adaptation to freshwater was a gradual process. Furthermore, our results indicate rapid evolution of TRAP transporters in the freshwater clade involved in the uptake of low molecular weight carboxylic acids. We propose that such gradual tuning of metabolic pathways and transporters toward locally available organic substrates is linked to the formation of subgroups within the SAR11 clade and that this process was critical for the freshwater clade to find and fix an adaptive phenotype. PMID:26784354

  12. Resilience of SAR11 bacteria to rapid acidification in the high-latitude open ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Manuela; Hill, Polly G; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P; Leakey, Raymond J G; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitous SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria numerically dominate marine planktonic communities. Because they are excruciatingly difficult to cultivate, there is comparatively little known about their physiology and metabolic responses to long- and short-term environmental changes. As surface oceans take up anthropogenic, atmospheric CO2, the consequential process of ocean acidification could affect the global biogeochemical significance of SAR11. Shipping accidents or inadvertent release of chemicals from industrial plants can have strong short-term local effects on oceanic SAR11. This study investigated the effect of 2.5-fold acidification of seawater on the metabolism of SAR11 and other heterotrophic bacterioplankton along a natural temperature gradient crossing the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Uptake rates of the amino acid leucine by SAR11 cells as well as other bacterioplankton remained similar to controls despite an instant ∼50% increase in leucine bioavailability upon acidification. This high physiological resilience to acidification even without acclimation, suggests that open ocean dominant bacterioplankton are able to cope even with sudden and therefore more likely with long-term acidification effects.

  13. Effects of Transgenic DREB Toybean Dongnong50 on Diversity of Soil Nitrogen-ifxing Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chun-miao; Dong Lei; Jin Yu; Qu Juan-juan

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a bottleneck for worldwide soybean production which is getting more serious as the climate continues to worsen. Dehydration responsive element binding (DREB) is a kind of transcription factor that regulates the expression of stress tolerance-related genes in response to drought, high salinity and cold stress in plant. Soybean withDREB gene possesses the drought resisting capability which is helpful to increase the yield. However, the potential risk of genetically modified plants (GMPs) on soil microbial community is still in debate. In order to understand the effects of transgenic DREB soybean on the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, the diversity ofnifH gene in pot experiments planted transgenic soybean and near-isogenic nontransgenic soybean under normal water condition and drought stress condition was analyzed by PCR-DGGE and sequence analysis. The results showed that transgenic soybean under normal water condition decrease the diversity of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the seeding stage and flowering stage, but had no notable effect in other stages. Under drought stress, transgenic soybean reduced the diversity of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the flowering stage, but had no notable effects on other stages. Phylogenic analysis revealed that g7, g13, g15 and g19 had a close relationship withAlphaproteobacteria, g12 had a close relationship withAzonexus, others were related toBetaproteobacteria and Burkholderia.

  14. Highly heterogeneous bacterial communities associated with the South China Sea reef corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Coral harbor diverse and specific bacteria play significant roles in coral holobiont function. Bacteria associated with three of the common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the South China Sea, Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora, were investigated using 454 barcoded-pyrosequencing. Three colonies of each species were sampled, and 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed individually. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities associated with the three coral species were more diverse than previous estimates based on corals from the Caribbean Sea, Indo-Pacific reefs and the Red Sea. Three candidate phyla, including BRC1, OD1 and SR1, were found for the first time in corals. Bacterial communities were separated into three groups: P. lutea and G. fascicular, A. millepora and seawater. P. lutea and G. fascicular displayed more similar bacterial communities, and bacterial communities associated with A. millepora differed from the other two coral species. The three coral species shared only 22 OTUs, which were distributed in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria and an unclassified bacterial group. The composition of bacterial communities within each colony of each coral species also showed variation. The relatively small common and large specific bacterial communities in these corals implies that bacterial associations may be structured by multiple factors at different scales and that corals may associate with microbes in terms of similar function, rather than identical species.

  15. Molecular analyses of the diversity in marine bacterioplankton assemblages along the coastline of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade, Ola A

    2010-10-01

    Bacterial community diversity in marine bacterioplankton assemblages were examined in 3 coastal locations along the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) using 16S rRNA gene libraries and fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches. The majority of the sequences (30%-60%) were similar to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of unknown bacteria; however, the operational taxonomic units from members of the Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were also present at the 3 GOM sites. Overall, sequence diversity was more similar between the Gulf sites of Carrabelle and Ochlockonee than between either of the Gulf sites and Apalachicola Bay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed the quantitative predominance of members of the Alphaproteobacteria subclass and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster within the bacterioplankton assemblages. In general, the study further reveals the presence of many bacterial taxa that have been previously found to be dominant in coastal marine environments. Differences observed in the representation of the various bacterial phylogenetic groups among the GOM coastal sites could be partly attributed to dynamic variations in several site-specific conditions, including intermittent tidal events, nutrient availability, and anthropogenic influences.

  16. PHA production by mixed cultures: a way to valorize wastes from pulp industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Diogo; Rossetti, Simona; Serafim, Luísa S

    2014-04-01

    In this work, hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HSSL), a complex feedstock originating from the pulp industry, was tested for the first time as a substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by a mixed microbial culture (MMC) under aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) conditions. A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with HSSL was operated for 67days and the selected MMC reached a maximum PHA content of 67.6%. The MMC demonstrated a differential utilization of the carbon sources present in HSSL. Acetic acid was fully consumed, while xylose and lignosulphonates were partially consumed (30% and 14%, respectively). The selected culture was characterized by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). Bacteria belonging to the three main classes were identified: Alpha- (72.7±4.0%), Beta- (11.1±0.37%) and Gammaproteobacteria (10.3±0.3%). Within Alphaproteobacteria, a small amount of Paracoccus (4.2±0.51%) and Defluvicoccus related to Tetrad Forming Organisms (9.0±0.28%) were detected.

  17. Diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with arctic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sathish; Pratibha, Mambatta Shankaranarayanan; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Begum, Zareena; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2013-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of chemotactic heterotrophic bacteria associated with Arctic cyanobacteria was determined. The viable numbers ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) cell g(-1) cyanobacterial biomass. A total of 112 morphotypes, representing 22 phylotypes based on their 16S rRNA sequence similarity were isolated from the samples. All the phylotypes were Gram-negative with affiliation to the proteobacterial and bacteroidetes divisions. Among the 22 phylotypes, 14 were chemotactic to glucose. Majority of the phylotypes were psychrotolerant showing growth up to 30 °C. Representatives of Alphaproteobacteria, the genus Flavobacterium and the gammaproteobacterial Alcanivorax sp, were psychrophilic with growth at or below 18 °C. A significant percentage of phylotypes were pigmented (~68 %), rich in unsaturated membrane fatty acids and tolerated pH values and NaCl concentrations between 5.0-8.0 and 0.15-1.0 M, respectively. The percentages of phylotypes producing extracellular cold-active enzymes at 4 °C were amylase (18.18 %), lipase and urease (45.45 %), caseinase (59.09 %) and gelatinase (31.8 %). PMID:23053490

  18. Plants Rather than Mineral Fertilization Shape Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Legacy Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridl, Jakub; Kolar, Michal; Strejcek, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Stursa, Petr; Paces, Jan; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions are of particular importance in polluted soils. This study sought to determine how selected plants (horseradish, black nightshade and tobacco) and NPK mineral fertilization shape the structure of soil microbial communities in legacy contaminated soil and the resultant impact of treatment on the soil microbial community functional potential. To explore these objectives, we combined shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA gene amplicon high throughput sequencing with data analysis approaches developed for RNA-seq. We observed that the presence of any of the selected plants rather than fertilization shaped the microbial community structure, and the microbial populations of the root zone of each plant significantly differed from one another and/or from the bulk soil, whereas the effect of the fertilizer proved to be insignificant. When we compared microbial diversity in root zones versus bulk soil, we observed an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria or Bacteroidetes, taxa which are commonly considered copiotrophic. Our results thus align with the theory that fast-growing, copiotrophic, microorganisms which are adapted to ephemeral carbon inputs are enriched in the vegetated soil. Microbial functional potential indicated that some genetic determinants associated with signal transduction mechanisms, defense mechanisms or amino acid transport and metabolism differed significantly among treatments. Genetic determinants of these categories tend to be overrepresented in copiotrophic organisms. The results of our study further elucidate plant-microbe relationships in a contaminated environment with possible implications for the phyto/rhizoremediation of contaminated areas.

  19. Soil-foraging animals alter the composition and co-occurrence of microbial communities in a desert shrubland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, David J; Woodhouse, Jason N; Curlevski, Nathalie J A; Hayward, Matthew; Brown, Mark V; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-12-01

    Animals that modify their physical environment by foraging in the soil can have dramatic effects on ecosystem functions and processes. We compared bacterial and fungal communities in the foraging pits created by bilbies and burrowing bettongs with undisturbed surface soils dominated by biocrusts. Bacterial communities were characterized by Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, and fungal communities by Lecanoromycetes and Archaeosporomycetes. The composition of bacterial or fungal communities was not observed to vary between loamy or sandy soils. There were no differences in richness of either bacterial or fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the soil of young or old foraging pits, or undisturbed soils. Although the bacterial assemblage did not vary among the three microsites, the composition of fungi in undisturbed soils was significantly different from that in old or young foraging pits. Network analysis indicated that a greater number of correlations between bacterial OTUs occurred in undisturbed soils and old pits, whereas a greater number of correlations between fungal OTUs occurred in undisturbed soils. Our study suggests that digging by soil-disturbing animals is likely to create successional shifts in soil microbial and fungal communities, leading to functional shifts associated with the decomposition of organic matter and the fixation of nitrogen. Given the primacy of organic matter decomposition in arid and semi-arid environments, the loss of native soil-foraging animals is likely to impair the ability of these systems to maintain key ecosystem processes such as the mineralization of nitrogen and the breakdown of organic matter, and to recover from disturbance.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research. PMID:27147438

  1. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C.; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, EMily K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H.; Johnston, Andrew W.; Davie-Martin, Cleo L.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ~109 tons of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year1,2, an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS)3,4. SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell’s unusual requirement for reduced sulfur5,6. Here we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol (MeSH) and that simultaneously a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a DMSP lyase, shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to DMS production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of DMS as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. These findings suggest that DMSP supply and demand relationships in Pelagibacter metabolism are important to determining rates of oceanic DMS production.

  2. "Candidatus Mesochlamydia elodeae" (Chlamydiae: Parachlamydiaceae), a novel chlamydia parasite of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Daniele; Müller, Karl-Dieter; Wingender, Jost; Michel, Rolf

    2013-02-01

    Vannella sp. isolated from waterweed Elodea sp. was found infected by a chlamydia-like organism. This organism behaves like a parasite, causing the death through burst of its host. Once the vannellae degenerated, the parasite was successfully kept in laboratory within a Saccamoeba sp. isolated from the same waterweed sample, which revealed in fine through electron microscopy to harbor two bacterial endosymbionts: the chlamydial parasite we introduce and another endosymbiont initially and naturally present in the host. Herein, we provide molecular-based identification of both the amoeba host and its two endosymbionts, with special focus on the chlamydia parasite. High sequence similarity values of the 18S rDNA permitted to assign the amoeba to the species Saccamoeba lacustris (Amoebozoa, Tubulinea). The bacterial endosymbiont naturally harbored by the host belonged to Sphingomonas koreensis (Alpha-Proteobacteria). The chlamydial parasite showed a strict specificity for Saccamoeba spp., being unable to infect a variety of other amoebae, including Acanthamoeba, and it was itself infected by a bacteriophage. Sequence similarity values of the 16S rDNA and phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain is a new member of the family Parachlamydiaceae, for which we propose the name "Candidatus Mesochlamydia elodeae."

  3. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain) through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Blanco, Silvia; García-López, Marina; García-Salamanca, Adela; Bursakov, Sergey A; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F; Ramos, Juan L; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit. PMID:26741495

  4. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pascual

    Full Text Available Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  5. Live Probiotic Cultures and the Gastrointestinal Tract: Symbiotic Preservation of Tolerance Whilst Attenuating Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eVitetta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria comprise the earliest form of independent life on this planet. Bacterial development has included co–operative symbiosis with plants (e.g., Leguminosae family and nitrogen fixing bacteria in soil and animals (e.g., the gut microbiome. A fusion event of two prokaryotes evolutionarily gave rise to the eukaryote cell in which mitochondria may be envisaged as a genetically functional mosaic, a relic from one of the prokaryote cells. The discovery of bacterial inhibitors such chloramphenicol and others has been exploited to highlight mitochondria as arising from a bacterial progenitor. As such the evolution of human life has been complexly connected to bacterial activity. This is embodied, by the appearance of mitochondria in eukaryotes (alphaproteobacteria contribution, a significant endosymbiotic evolutionary event. During the twentieth century there was an increasing dependency on anti–microbials as mainline therapy against bacterial infections. It is only comparatively recently that the essential roles played by the gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbiome in animal health and development has been recognized as opposed to the GIT microbiome being a toxic collection of micro–organisms. It is now well documented that t

  6. Thermal and sedimentation stress are unlikely causes of brown spot syndrome in the coral reef sponge, Ianthella basta.

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    Heidi M Luter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine diseases are being increasingly linked to anthropogenic factors including global and local stressors. On the Great Barrier Reef, up to 66% of the Ianthella basta population was recently found to be afflicted by a syndrome characterized by brown spot lesions and necrotic tissue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Manipulative experiments were undertaken to ascertain the role of environmental stressors in this syndrome. Specifically, the effects of elevated temperature and sedimentation on sponge health and symbiont stability in I. basta were examined. Neither elevated temperature nor increased sedimentation were responsible for the brown spot lesions, but sponges exposed to 32°C developed substantial discoloration and deterioration of their tissues, resulting in death after eight days and a higher microbial diversity in those samples. No shifts in the microbial community of I. basta were observed across a latitudinal gradient or with increased sedimentation, with three previously described symbionts dominating the community of all sponges (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results from this study highlight the stable microbial community of I. basta and indicate that thermal and sedimentation stress are not responsible for the brown spot lesions currently affecting this abundant and ecologically important sponge species.

  7. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Martirosyan

    Full Text Available Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies.

  8. Predominance of Roseobacter, Sulfitobacter, Glaciecola and Psychrobacter in seawater collected off Ushuaia, Argentina, Sub-Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane; Manorama, Ruth; Delille, Daniel; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2007-02-01

    Bacterial diversity in sub-Antarctic seawater, collected off Ushuaia, Argentina, was examined using a culture independent approach. The composition of the 16S rRNA gene libraries from seawater and seawater contaminated with the water soluble fraction of crude oil was statistically different (P value 0.001). In both libraries, clones representing the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroidetes group and unculturable bacteria were dominant. Clones associated with the genera Roseobacter, Sulfitobacter, Staleya, Glaciecola, Colwellia, Marinomonas, Cytophaga and Cellulophaga were common to both the libraries. However, clones associated with Psychrobacter, Arcobacter, Formosa algae, Polaribacter, Ulvibacter and Tenacibaculum were found only in seawater contaminated with hydrocarbons (Table 1). Further, the percentage of clones of Roseobacter, Sulfitobacter and Glaceicola was high in seawater (43%, 90% and 12% respectively) compared to seawater contaminated with hydrocarbons (35%, 4% and 9% respectively). One of the clones F2C63 showed 100% similarity with Marinomonas ushuaiensis a bacterium identified by us from the same site. PMID:17026513

  9. Microbial diversity in deep-sea sediments from the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent system of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Teresa; Pinho, Diogo; Egas, Conceição; Froufe, Hugo; Altermark, Bjørn; Candeias, Carla; Santos, Ricardo S; Bettencourt, Raul

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal sediments are known to support remarkably diverse microbial consortia. Cultureindependent sequence-based technologies have extensively been used to disclose the associated microbial diversity as most of the microorganisms inhabiting these ecosystems remain uncultured. Here we provide the first description of the microbial community diversity found on sediments from Menez Gwen vent system. We compared hydrothermally influenced sediments, retrieved from an active vent chimney at 812 m depth, with non-hydrothermally influenced sediments, from a 1400 m depth bathyal plain. Considering the enriched methane and sulfur composition of Menez Gwen vent fluids, and the sediment physicochemical properties in each sampled area, we hypothesized that the site-associated microbes would be different. To address this question, taxonomic profiles of bacterial, archaeal and micro-eukaryotic representatives were studied by rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Communities were shown to be significantly different and segregated by sediment geographical area. Specific mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaeal (e.g., Archaeoglobus, ANME-1) and bacterial (e.g., Caldithrix, Thermodesulfobacteria) taxa were highly abundant near the vent chimney. In contrast, bathyal-associated members affiliated to more ubiquitous phylogroups from deep-ocean sediments (e.g., Thaumarchaeota MGI, Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria). This study provides a broader picture of the biological diversity and microbial biogeography, and represents a preliminary approach to the microbial ecology associated with the deep-sea sediments from the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent field.

  10. Coral-the world's most diverse symbiotic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, Linda L; Wilson, Bryan; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2015-11-01

    Zooxanthellate corals (i.e. those harbouring Symbiodinium) are the main builders of the world's shallow-water marine coral reefs. They represent intimate diverse symbioses between coral animals, single-celled photosynthetic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.), other microscopic eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses. Crabs and other crustaceans, worms, sponges, bivalves and hydrozoans, fishes, sea urchins, octopuses and sea stars are itinerant members of these 'rainforests of the sea'. This review focuses on the biodiversity of scleractinian coral animals and their best studied microscopic epi- and endosymbionts. In relation to coral-associated species diversity, Symbiodinium internal transcribed spacer region sequence types tally 10(2) -10(3) or up to ~15 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs, or putative species at the 97% sequence identity level; this cut-off was chosen based on intragenomic sequence diversity observed in monoclonal cultures) and prokaryotes (mostly bacterial) total 10(2) -10(4) OTUs. We analysed all publically accessible 16S rRNA gene sequence data and found Gammaproteobacteria were extremely abundant, followed by Alphaproteobacteria. Notably, Archaea were poorly represented and 'unassigned OTUs' were abundant in data generated by high-throughput DNA sequencing studies of corals. We outline and compare model systems that could be used in future studies of the coral holobiont. In our future directions, we recommend a global coral sampling effort including substantial attention being paid to method of coral tissue acquisition, which compartments (mucus, tissue, skeleton) to explore, broadening the holobiont members considered and linking biodiversity with functional investigations. PMID:26414414

  11. Regulation of bacterial communities through antimicrobial activity by the coral holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Sampayo, Eugenia; Kerr, Caroline; Vieira, Genyess; Roff, George; Barnes, Andrew C

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between corals and associated bacteria and amongst these bacterial groups are likely to play a key role in coral health. However, the complexity of these interactions is poorly understood. We investigated the functional role of specific coral-associated bacteria in maintaining microbial communities on the coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg 1834) and the ability of coral mucus to support or inhibit bacterial growth. Culture-independent techniques were used to assess bacterial community structures whilst bacterial culture was employed to assess intra- and inter-specific antimicrobial activities of bacteria. Members of Pseudoalteromonas and ribotypes closely related to Vibrio coralliilyticus displayed potent antimicrobial activity against a range of other cultured isolates and grew readily on detached coral mucus. Although such bacterial ribotypes would be expected to have a competitive advantage, they were rare or absent on intact and healthy coral colonies growing in situ (analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing). The most abundant bacterial ribotypes found on healthy corals were Gammaproteobacteria, previously defined as type A coral associates. Our results indicate that this group of bacteria and specific members of the Alphaproteobacteria described here as 'type B associates' may be important functional groups for coral health. We suggest that bacterial communities on coral are kept in check by a combination of host-derived and microbial interactions and that the type A associates in particular may play a key role in maintaining stability of microbial communities on healthy coral colonies. PMID:21984347

  12. Spatial Homogeneity of Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus Layer of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora palmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Dustin W; Rivers, Adam R; Kemp, Keri M; Lipp, Erin K; Porter, James W; Wares, John P

    2015-01-01

    Coral surface mucus layer (SML) microbiota are critical components of the coral holobiont and play important roles in nutrient cycling and defense against pathogens. We sequenced 16S rRNA amplicons to examine the structure of the SML microbiome within and between colonies of the threatened Caribbean reef-building coral Acropora palmata in the Florida Keys. Samples were taken from three spatially distinct colony regions--uppermost (high irradiance), underside (low irradiance), and the colony base--representing microhabitats that vary in irradiance and water flow. Phylogenetic diversity (PD) values of coral SML bacteria communities were greater than surrounding seawater and lower than adjacent sediment. Bacterial diversity and community composition was consistent among the three microhabitats. Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Alphaproteobacteria, and Proteobacteria, respectively were the most abundant phyla represented in the samples. This is the first time spatial variability of the surface mucus layer of A. palmata has been studied. Homogeneity in the microbiome of A. palmata contrasts with SML heterogeneity found in other Caribbean corals. These findings suggest that, during non-stressful conditions, host regulation of SML microbiota may override diverse physiochemical influences induced by the topographical complexity of A. palmata. Documenting the spatial distribution of SML microbes is essential to understanding the functional roles these microorganisms play in coral health and adaptability to environmental perturbations. PMID:26659364

  13. Characterization of geographically distinct bacterial communities associated with coral mucus produced by Acropora spp. and Porites spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, B A; Dumbrell, A J; Daud, S D; Hepburn, L; Thorpe, E; Mogensen, L; Whitby, C

    2012-08-01

    Acropora and Porites corals are important reef builders in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Bacteria associated with mucus produced by Porites spp. and Acropora spp. from Caribbean (Punta Maroma, Mexico) and Indo-Pacific (Hoga and Sampela, Indonesia) reefs were determined. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities from Caribbean corals were significantly more diverse (H', 3.18 to 4.25) than their Indonesian counterparts (H', 2.54 to 3.25). Dominant taxa were Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria, which varied in relative abundance between coral genera and region. Distinct coral host-specific communities were also found; for example, Clostridiales were dominant on Acropora spp. (at Hoga and the Mexican Caribbean) compared to Porites spp. and seawater. Within the Gammproteobacteria, Halomonas spp. dominated sequence libraries from Porites spp. (49%) and Acropora spp. (5.6%) from the Mexican Caribbean, compared to the corresponding Indonesian coral libraries (coral mucus. In addition, the predominance of Clostridiales associated with Acropora spp. provided additional evidence for coral host-specific microorganisms. PMID:22636010

  14. Culture independent characterization of bacteria associated with the mucus of the coral Acropora digitifera from the Gulf of Mannar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyanand, Paramasivam; Indhumathi, Thiruvalluvan; Ravi, Arumugam Veera; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2011-06-01

    Corals are sessile eukaryotic hosts which provide a unique surface for microbial colonization. Culture independent studies show that the coral mucus and tissue harbour diverse and abundant prokaryotic communities. However, little is known about the diversity of bacteria associated with the corals of Gulf of Mannar. The present study characterised the bacterial diversity associated with the mucus of the coral Acropora digitifera from the Gulf of Mannar by 16S rRNA gene clone library construction. The bacterial communities of the mucus of A. digitifera were diverse, with representatives within the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and several unclassified bacteria. The culture independent bacterial population was totally different from our previous culture dependent study of the mucus and tissue of the same coral. 36% of the bacteria in the clone library of A. digitifera were found to be novel after full length sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene wherein several clones were found to be novel at the Genus and species level. The current study further supports the findings that Actinobacteria amount to a certain proportion among bacterial communities associated with corals. PMID:25187139

  15. Structuring of bacterioplankton diversity in a large tropical bay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo B Gregoracci

    Full Text Available Structuring of bacterioplanktonic populations and factors that determine the structuring of specific niche partitions have been demonstrated only for a limited number of colder water environments. In order to better understand the physical chemical and biological parameters that may influence bacterioplankton diversity and abundance, we examined their productivity, abundance and diversity in the second largest Brazilian tropical bay (Guanabara Bay, GB, as well as seawater physical chemical and biological parameters of GB. The inner bay location with higher nutrient input favored higher microbial (including vibrio growth. Metagenomic analysis revealed a predominance of Gammaproteobacteria in this location, while GB locations with lower nutrient concentration favored Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. According to the subsystems (SEED functional analysis, GB has a distinctive metabolic signature, comprising a higher number of sequences in the metabolism of phosphorus and aromatic compounds and a lower number of sequences in the photosynthesis subsystem. The apparent phosphorus limitation appears to influence the GB metagenomic signature of the three locations. Phosphorus is also one of the main factors determining changes in the abundance of planktonic vibrios, suggesting that nutrient limitation can be observed at community (metagenomic and population levels (total prokaryote and vibrio counts.

  16. Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-11-19

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  17. Rhamnolipid-enhanced aerobic biodegradation of triclosan (TCS) by indigenous microorganisms in water-sediment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Wen, Junjie; Hu, Yongyou; Chen, Yuanbo; Wu, Wenjin

    2016-11-15

    Bioremediation of triclosan (TCS) is a challenge because of its low bioavailability, persistence in the environment and recalcitrance to remediation efforts. Rhamnolipid (RL) was used to enhance TCS biodegradation by indigenous microbes in an aerobic water-sediment system. However, knowledge of the effects of TCS on the bacterial community and environmental factors in an RL-enhanced, TCS-degrading system are lacking. Therefore, in this study, the influence of environmental factors on RL-enhanced biodegradation of TCS was investigated by single factor experiments, and shifts in aerobic TCS-degrading bacterial populations, with and without RL, were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that aerobic biodegradation of TCS was significantly promoted by the addition of RL. Environmental conditions, which included RL addition (0.125-0.5g/L), medium concentrations of TCS (environments (pH8-9), were monitored. High concentrations of TCS had a remarkable influence on the bacterial community structure, and this influence on the distribution proportion of the main microorganisms was strengthened by RL addition. Alpha-proteobacteria (e.g., Sphingomonadaceae and Caulobacteraceae) might be resistant to TCS or even capable of TCS biodegradation, while Sphingobacteria, Beta- and Delta-proteobacteria were sensitive to TCS toxicity. This research provides ecological information on the degradation efficiency and bacterial community stability in RL-enhanced bioremediation of TCS-polluted aquatic environments. PMID:27476727

  18. Bioaugmentation of a 4-chloronitrobenzene contaminated soil with Pseudomonas putida ZWL73

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Guilan [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhao Shuo [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu Hong [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Boon, Nico [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Zhou Ningyi [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)], E-mail: n.zhou@pentium.whiov.ac.cn

    2009-03-15

    The strain Pseudomonas putida ZWL73, which metabolizes 4-chloronitrobenzene (4CNB) by a partial-reductive pathway, was inoculated into lab-scale 4CNB-contaminated soil for bioaugmentation purposes in this study. The degradation of 4CNB was clearly stimulated, as indicated with the gradual accumulation of ammonium and chloride. Simultaneously, the diversity and quantity of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria decreased due to 4CNB contamination, while the quantity of 4CNB-resistant bacteria increased. During the bioaugmentation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed the changes of diversity in dominant populations of intrinsic soil microbiota. The results showed that Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were not distinctly affected, but Actinobacteria were apparently stimulated. In addition, an interesting dynamic within Acidobacteria was observed, as well as an influence on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria population. These combined findings demonstrate that the removal of 4CNB in soils by inoculating strain ZWL73 is feasible, and that specific populations in soils rapidly changed in response to 4CNB contamination and subsequent bioaugmentation. - Pseudomonas putida ZWL73 can accelerate 4CNB removal in lab-scale soils, causing dynamic changes within intrinsic Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria.

  19. Geographically conserved microbiomes of four temperate water tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick L; Fidler, Andrew E; Hopkins, Grant A; Wood, Susanna A

    2016-08-01

    Tunicates are useful models for exploring microbiomes because they have an innate immune system resembling that of chordates. Automated ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer analysis and High-Throughput Sequencing were used to compare the tunic microbiomes of Ciona robusta (formerly Ciona intestinalis type A), Ciona savignyi, Botrylloides leachi and Botryllus schlosseri sampled from three distinct locations with limited genetic connectivity. Bacterial phylotype profiles were conserved within each species, and there were no detectable differences between tunic and tunic + cuticle subsamples from an individual. Bacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) diversity was lowest for C. savignyi (320 ± 190 OTUs) and highest for B. schlosseri (1260 ± 190 OTUs). Each species had a distinct set of bacterial OTUs (pseudo-F = 3.0, p > 0.001), with the exception of B. leachi and B. schlosseri from one sampling location (t = 1.2, p = 0.09). Of note were OTUs assigned to Alphaproteobacteria from C. robusta plus Phyllobacteriaceae and Endozoicomonas from C. savignyi. These OTUs contributed 51, 22 and 10% of sequence reads, respectively, and are related to known bacterial symbionts. The within-species conservation of core OTUs across three distinct and co-occurring populations of tunicates provides compelling evidence that these tunicates foster defined microbiomes. PMID:26929150

  20. Spatial Distribution of Bacterial Communities Driven by Multiple Environmental Factors in a Beach Wetland of the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eDing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction and vertical (sediment depth gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH4+ concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland.

  1. So close, so different: geothermal flux shapes divergent soil microbial communities at neighbouring sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A L; Tagliavia, M; D'Alessandro, W; Franzetti, A; Parello, F; Quatrini, P

    2016-03-01

    This study is focused on the (micro)biogeochemical features of two close geothermal sites (FAV1 and FAV2), both selected at the main exhalative area of Pantelleria Island, Italy. A previous biogeochemical survey revealed high CH4 consumption and the presence of a diverse community of methanotrophs at FAV2 site, whereas the close site FAV1 was apparently devoid of methanotrophs and recorded no CH4 consumption. Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to describe the bacterial and archaeal communities which have been linked to the physicochemical conditions and the geothermal sources of energy available at the two sites. Both sites are dominated by Bacteria and host a negligible component of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (phylum Thaumarchaeota). The FAV2 bacterial community is characterized by an extraordinary diversity of methanotrophs, with 40% of the sequences assigned to Methylocaldum, Methylobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Bejerickia (Alphaproteobacteria); conversely, a community of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs (Acidithiobacillus, Nitrosococcus) or putative chemolithotrophs (Ktedonobacter) dominates the FAV1 community, in the absence of methanotrophs. Since physical andchemical factors of FAV1, such as temperature and pH, cannot be considered limiting for methanotrophy, it is hypothesized that the main limiting factor for methanotrophs could be high NH4(+) concentration. At the same time, abundant availability of NH4(+) and other high energy electron donors and acceptors determined by the hydrothermal flux in this site create more energetically favourable conditions for chemolithotrophs that outcompete methanotrophs in non-nitrogen-limited soils.

  2. Plants Rather than Mineral Fertilization Shape Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Legacy Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridl, Jakub; Kolar, Michal; Strejcek, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Stursa, Petr; Paces, Jan; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions are of particular importance in polluted soils. This study sought to determine how selected plants (horseradish, black nightshade and tobacco) and NPK mineral fertilization shape the structure of soil microbial communities in legacy contaminated soil and the resultant impact of treatment on the soil microbial community functional potential. To explore these objectives, we combined shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA gene amplicon high throughput sequencing with data analysis approaches developed for RNA-seq. We observed that the presence of any of the selected plants rather than fertilization shaped the microbial community structure, and the microbial populations of the root zone of each plant significantly differed from one another and/or from the bulk soil, whereas the effect of the fertilizer proved to be insignificant. When we compared microbial diversity in root zones versus bulk soil, we observed an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria or Bacteroidetes, taxa which are commonly considered copiotrophic. Our results thus align with the theory that fast-growing, copiotrophic, microorganisms which are adapted to ephemeral carbon inputs are enriched in the vegetated soil. Microbial functional potential indicated that some genetic determinants associated with signal transduction mechanisms, defense mechanisms or amino acid transport and metabolism differed significantly among treatments. Genetic determinants of these categories tend to be overrepresented in copiotrophic organisms. The results of our study further elucidate plant-microbe relationships in a contaminated environment with possible implications for the phyto/rhizoremediation of contaminated areas. PMID:27446035

  3. Age, sun and substrate: triggers of bacterial communities in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Steinová, Jana; Rabensteiner, Johannes; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial communities colonize the surfaces of lichens in a biofilm-like manner. The overall structure of the bacterial communities harboured by the lichens shows similarities, in particular the dominance of not yet cultured Alphaproteobacteria. Parameters causing variation in abundance, composition and spatial organization of the lichen-associated bacterial communities are so far poorly understood. As a first step, we used a microscopic approach to test the significance of both lichen-intrinsic and extrinsic environmental factors on the bacterial communities associated with 11 lichen samples, belonging to six species. Some of these species have thalli with a distinct age gradient. A statistically significant effect can be attributed to the age of the thallus parts, which is an intrinsic factor: growing parts of the lichens host bacterial communities that significantly differ from those of the ageing portions of the thalli. The substrate type (rock, tree, understory) and (at a lower extent) the exposition to the sun also affected the bacterial communities. Interestingly, the abundance of bacterial cells in the lichens was also influenced by the same structure-triggering factors. No effect on the composition with main bacterial groups was attributed to different lichen species, differentiated thallus parts or thallus growth type. Our results are important for the experimental designs in lichen-bacterial ecology. PMID:23757225

  4. Analyzing the antagonistic potential of the lichen microbiome against pathogens by bridging metagenomic with culture studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav eCernava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antagonists towards pathogens play an important role to avoid pathogen outbreaks in ecosystems, and they can be applied as biocontrol agents for crops. Lichens present long-living symbiotic systems continuously exposed to pathogens. To analyze the antagonistic potential in lichens, we studied the bacterial community active against model bacteria and fungi by an integrative approach combining isolate screening, omics techniques and high resolution mass spectrometry. The highly diverse microbiome of the lung lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria (L. Hoffm. included an abundant antagonistic community dominated by Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas and Burkholderia. While antagonists represent 24.5% of the isolates, they were identified with only 7% in the metagenome; which means that they were overrepresented in the culturable fraction. Isolates of the dominant antagonistic genus Stenotrophomonas produced spermidine as main bioactive component. Moreover, spermidine-related genes, especially for the transport, were identified in the metagenome. The majority of hits identified belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, while Stenotrophomonas-specific spermidine synthases were not present in the dataset. Evidence for plant growth promoting effects was found for lichen-associated strains of Stenotrophomonas. Linking of metagenomic and culture data was possible but showed partly contradictory results, which required a comparative assessment. However, we have shown that lichens are important reservoirs for antagonistic bacteria, which open broad possibilities for biotechnological applications.

  5. Analyzing the antagonistic potential of the lichen microbiome against pathogens by bridging metagenomic with culture studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernava, Tomislav; Müller, Henry; Aschenbrenner, Ines A; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring antagonists toward pathogens play an important role to avoid pathogen outbreaks in ecosystems, and they can be applied as biocontrol agents for crops. Lichens present long-living symbiotic systems continuously exposed to pathogens. To analyze the antagonistic potential in lichens, we studied the bacterial community active against model bacteria and fungi by an integrative approach combining isolate screening, omics techniques, and high resolution mass spectrometry. The highly diverse microbiome of the lung lichen [Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm.] included an abundant antagonistic community dominated by Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Burkholderia. While antagonists represent 24.5% of the isolates, they were identified with only 7% in the metagenome; which means that they were overrepresented in the culturable fraction. Isolates of the dominant antagonistic genus Stenotrophomonas produced spermidine as main bioactive component. Moreover, spermidine-related genes, especially for the transport, were identified in the metagenome. The majority of hits identified belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, while Stenotrophomonas-specific spermidine synthases were not present in the dataset. Evidence for plant growth promoting effects was found for lichen-associated strains of Stenotrophomonas. Linking of metagenomic and culture data was possible but showed partly contradictory results, which required a comparative assessment. However, we have shown that lichens are important reservoirs for antagonistic bacteria, which open broad possibilities for biotechnological applications. PMID:26157431

  6. Quantitative role of shrimp fecal bacteria in organic matter fluxes in a recirculating shrimp aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Christine; Moss, Shaun; Malfatti, Francesca; Azam, Farooq

    2011-07-01

    Microorganisms play integral roles in the cycling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) for fish and shellfish production. We quantified the pathways of shrimp fecal bacterial activities and their role in C- and N-flux partitioning relevant to culturing Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei, in RAS. Freshly produced feces from P. vannamei contained 0.6-7 × 10(10) bacteria g(-1) dry wt belonging to Bacteroidetes (7%), Alphaproteobacteria (4%), and, within the Gammaproteobacteria, almost exclusively to the genus Vibrio (61%). Because of partial disintegration of the feces (up to 27% within 12 h), the experimental seawater became inoculated with fecal bacteria. Bacteria grew rapidly in the feces and in the seawater, and exhibited high levels of aminopeptidase, chitinase, chitobiase, alkaline phosphatase, α- and β-glucosidase, and lipase activities. Moreover, fecal bacteria enriched the protein content of the feces within 12 h, potentially enriching the feces for the coprophagous shrimp. The bacterial turnover time was much faster in feces (1-10 h) than in mature RAS water (350 h). Thus, shrimp fecal bacteria not only inoculate RAS water but also contribute to bacterial abundance and productivity, and regulate system processes important for shrimp health. PMID:21426366

  7. 浙江镇海潮间带沉积物中可培养微生物初步研究%A preliminary study of the culturable microorganisms in tidal flat sediment from Zhenhai, Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑莹; 霍颖异

    2012-01-01

    Marine microorganisms in the tidal flat sediment from Zhenhai were isolated with pure culture method and bacterial community and diversity were analyzed. The tidal flat sediment sample was collected from Zhenhai, Zhejiang Province of China in June, 2008. The diluted sediment was plated on modified ZoBell medium agar plates. After incubation aerobically at 25 °C and 37 °C, strains were selected and purified. The 16S rRNA genes were amplified with primers 27F (5 '-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG 3') and 1492R (5'-GGTTACCTTGTTACGACTT-3') and sequenced. The sequences obtained were compared with closely related sequences of described bacteria from the EzTaxon-c online service. Sequence data were aligned with Clustal W and phylogenetic tree were constructed by the neighbor-joining method with the MEGA 5 program package. Totally, 39 bacterial strains were isolated. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences show that the isolates were closely related to described bacteria and fell into four lineages: Firmicutes (20 strains, 51. 3%) ,Proteobacteria (12 strains, 30.8%), Bacteroidetes (6 strains, 15.4%) and Actinobacteria (1 strain, 2.6%). Firmicutes strains belong to genera Bacillus, Ornithinibacillus and Thalassobacillus; Proteobacteria strains belong to genera Roseicyclus, Rhodobacter, Erythrobacter, Jannaschia and Ruegeria of Alphaproteobacteria and genera Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas of Gammaproteobacteria; Bacteroidetes strains belong to genus Algoriphagus and family Flavobacteriaceae; and Actinobacteria strains belong to genus Gordonia. Bacilli and Alphaproteobacteria were the largest group in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, respectively. They might play an important role in biogeochemical cycles in the coastal sediment ecosystem. Bacilli strains are heterotrophic bacteria, and their occurrence indicates that the tidal flat environment is rich in organic nutrition. 15 out of 20 (75%) of the isolated Bacilli strains showed closer phylogenetic relationship with the bacteria of land

  8. Genomic makeup of the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and identification of a novel class of rhodopsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488-494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle.

  9. Quorum sensing in marine snow and its possible influence on production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in marine snow bacterium Pantoea ananatis B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatt, Abdul Nabi; Tang, Kaihao; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Zenghu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Marine snow is a continuous shower of organic and inorganic detritus, and plays a crucial role in transporting materials from the sea surface to the deep ocean. The aims of the current study were to identify N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules directly from marine snow particles and to investigate the possible regulatory link between QS signals and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by marine snow bacteria. The marine snow samples were collected from the surface water of China marginal seas. Two AHLs, i.e. 3OC6-HSL and C8-HSL, were identified directly from marine snow particles, while six different AHL signals, i.e. C4-HSL, 3OC6-HSL, C6-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL and C14-HSL were produced by Pantoea ananatis B9 inhabiting natural marine snow particles. Of the extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by P. ananatis B9, alkaline phosphatase activity was highly enhanced in growth medium supplemented with exogenous AHL (C10-HSL), while quorum quenching enzyme (AiiA) drastically reduced the enzyme activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing six different AHL signals produced by P. ananatis B9 and AHL-based QS system enhanced the extracellular hydrolytic enzyme in P. ananatis B9. Furthermore, this study first time revealing 3OC6-HSL production by Paracoccus carotinifaciens affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria.

  10. Bioremediation using Novosphingobium strain DY4 for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-contaminated soil and impact on microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Li, Ningning; Zhao, Qun; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-04-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is commonly used for weed control. The ubiquity of 2,4-D has gained increasing environmental concerns. Biodegradation is an attractive way to clean up 2,4-D in contaminated soil. However, information on the bioaugmentation trial for remediating contaminated soil is still very limited. The impact of bioaugmentation using 2,4-D-degraders on soil microbial community remains unknown. The present study investigated the bioremediation potential of a novel degrader (strain DY4) for heavily 2,4-D-polluted soil and its bioaugmentation impact on microbial community structure. The strain DY4 was classified as a Novosphingobium species within class Alphaproteobacteria and harbored 2,4-D-degrading TfdAα gene. More than 50 and 95 % of the herbicide could be dissipated in bioaugmented soil (amended with 200 mg/kg 2,4-D) respectively in 3-4 and 5-7 days after inoculation of Novosphingobium strain DY4. A significant growth of the strain DY4 was observed in bioaugmented soil with the biodegradation of 2,4-D. Moreover, herbicide application significantly altered soil bacterial community structure but bioaumentation using the strain DY4 showed a relatively weak impact.

  11. Defensive bacteriome symbiont with a drastically reduced genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabachi, Atsushi; Ueoka, Reiko; Oshima, Kenshiro; Teta, Roberta; Mangoni, Alfonso; Gurgui, Mihaela; Oldham, Neil J; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Okamura, Keiko; Yamamoto, Kohei; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hattori, Masahira; Piel, Jörn; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-08-01

    Diverse insect species harbor symbiotic bacteria, which play important roles such as provisioning nutrients and providing defense against natural enemies [1-6]. Whereas nutritional symbioses are often indispensable for both partners, defensive symbioses tend to be of a facultative nature [1-12]. The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is a notorious agricultural pest that transmits Liberibacter spp. (Alphaproteobacteria), causing the devastating citrus greening disease or Huanglongbing [13, 14]. In a symbiotic organ called the bacteriome, D. citri harbors two distinct intracellular symbionts: a putative nutrition provider, Carsonella_DC (Gammaproteobacteria), and an unnamed betaproteobacterium with unknown function [15], for which we propose the name "Candidatus Profftella armatura." Here we report that Profftella is a defensive symbiont presumably of an obligate nature with an extremely streamlined genome. The genomes of Profftella and Carsonella_DC were drastically reduced to 464,857 bp and 174,014 bp, respectively, suggesting their ancient and mutually indispensible association with the host. Strikingly, 15% of the small Profftella genome encoded horizontally acquired genes for synthesizing a novel polyketide toxin. The toxin was extracted, pharmacologically and structurally characterized, and designated diaphorin. The presence of Profftella and its diaphorin-biosynthetic genes was perfectly conserved in the world's D. citri populations. PMID:23850282

  12. Differential utilization patterns of dissolved organic phosphorus compounds by heterotrophic bacteria in two mountain lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofner, Carina; Sommaruga, Ruben; Pérez, María Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Although phosphorus limitation is common in freshwaters and bacteria are known to use dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), little is known about how efficiently DOP compounds are taken up by individual bacterial taxa. Here, we assessed bacterial uptake of three model DOP substrates in two mountain lakes and examined whether DOP uptake followed concentration-dependent patterns. We determined bulk uptake rates by the bacterioplankton and examined bacterial taxon-specific substrate uptake patterns using microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results show that in the oligotrophic alpine lake, bacteria took up ATP, glucose-6-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate to similar extents (mean 29.7 ± 4.3% Bacteria), whereas in the subalpine mesotrophic lake, ca. 40% of bacteria took up glucose-6-phosphate, but only ∼20% took up ATP or glycerol-3-phosphate. In both lakes, the R-BT cluster of Betaproteobacteria (lineage of genus Limnohabitans) was over-represented in glucose-6-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake, whereas AcI Actinobacteria were under-represented in the uptake of those substrates. Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes contributed to DOP uptake proportionally to their in situ abundance. Our results demonstrate that R-BT Betaproteobacteria are the most active bacteria in DOP acquisition, whereas the abundant AcI Actinobacteria may either lack high affinity DOP uptake systems or have reduced phosphorus requirements. PMID:27312963

  13. Factors Influencing Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in Municipal Drinking Waters in the Ohio River Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanish, Lee F; Hull, Natalie M; Robertson, Charles E; Harris, J Kirk; Stevens, Mark J; Spear, John R; Pace, Norman R

    2016-01-01

    The composition and metabolic activities of microbes in drinking water distribution systems can affect water quality and distribution system integrity. In order to understand regional variations in drinking water microbiology in the upper Ohio River watershed, the chemical and microbiological constituents of 17 municipal distribution systems were assessed. While sporadic variations were observed, the microbial diversity was generally dominated by fewer than 10 taxa, and was driven by the amount of disinfectant residual in the water. Overall, Mycobacterium spp. (Actinobacteria), MLE1-12 (phylum Cyanobacteria), Methylobacterium spp., and sphingomonads were the dominant taxa. Shifts in community composition from Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria to Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria were associated with higher residual chlorine. Alpha- and beta-diversity were higher in systems with higher chlorine loads, which may reflect changes in the ecological processes structuring the communities under different levels of oxidative stress. These results expand the assessment of microbial diversity in municipal distribution systems and demonstrate the value of considering ecological theory to understand the processes controlling microbial makeup. Such understanding may inform the management of municipal drinking water resources. PMID:27362708

  14. Factors Influencing Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in Municipal Drinking Waters in the Ohio River Basin, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F Stanish

    Full Text Available The composition and metabolic activities of microbes in drinking water distribution systems can affect water quality and distribution system integrity. In order to understand regional variations in drinking water microbiology in the upper Ohio River watershed, the chemical and microbiological constituents of 17 municipal distribution systems were assessed. While sporadic variations were observed, the microbial diversity was generally dominated by fewer than 10 taxa, and was driven by the amount of disinfectant residual in the water. Overall, Mycobacterium spp. (Actinobacteria, MLE1-12 (phylum Cyanobacteria, Methylobacterium spp., and sphingomonads were the dominant taxa. Shifts in community composition from Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria to Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria were associated with higher residual chlorine. Alpha- and beta-diversity were higher in systems with higher chlorine loads, which may reflect changes in the ecological processes structuring the communities under different levels of oxidative stress. These results expand the assessment of microbial diversity in municipal distribution systems and demonstrate the value of considering ecological theory to understand the processes controlling microbial makeup. Such understanding may inform the management of municipal drinking water resources.

  15. Picoplankton Community Composition by CARD-FISH and Flow Cytometric Techniques: A Preliminary Study in Central Adriatic Sea Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Manti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Data concerning picoplanktonic community composition and abundance in the Central Adriatic Sea are presented in an effort to improve the knowledge of bacterioplankton and autotrophic picoplankton and their seasonal changes. Flow cytometry analyses revealed the presence of two distinct bacteria populations: HNA and LNA cells. HNA cells showed an explicit correlation with viable and actively respiring cells. The study of viability and activity may increase our knowledge of the part that contributes really to the remineralization and bacterial biomass production. Authotrophic picoplankton abundance, especially picocyanobacteria, was strongly influenced by seasonality, indicating that light availability and water temperature are very important regulating factors. In terms of total carbon biomass, the main contribution came from heterotrophic bacteria with a lower contribution from autotrophic picoplankton. CARD-FISH evidenced, within the Eubacteria domain, the dominance of members of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, with a strong contribution from SAR11clade, followed by Cytophaga-Flavobacterium and Gammaproteobacteria. The bacterial groups detected contributed differently depending when the sample was taken, suggesting possible seasonal patterns. This study documents for the first time picoplankton community composition in the Central Adriatic Sea using two different approaches, FCM and CARD-FISH, and could provide preliminary data for future studies.

  16. Structural and Functional Insights from the Metagenome of an Acidic Hot Spring Microbial Planktonic Community in the Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Chaves, Diego; Montaña, José Salvador; Osorio-Forero, Cesar; Junca, Howard; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level) acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC). A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation), and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ), associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA) indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment. PMID:23251687

  17. Ultrastructural and molecular characterization of a bacterial symbiosis in the ecologically important scale insect family Coelostomidiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhami, Manpreet K; Turner, Adrian P; Deines, Peter; Beggs, Jacqueline R; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-09-01

    Scale insects are important ecologically and as agricultural pests. The majority of scale insect taxa feed exclusively on plant phloem sap, which is carbon rich but deficient in essential amino acids. This suggests that, as seen in the related aphids and psyllids, scale insect nutrition might also depend upon bacterial symbionts, yet very little is known about scale insect-bacteria symbioses. We report here the first identification and molecular characterization of symbiotic bacteria associated with the New Zealand giant scale Coelostomidia wairoensis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. Dissection and FISH confirmed the location of the bacteria in large, paired, multilobate organs in the abdominal region of the insect. TEM indicated that the dominant pleomorphic bacteria were confined to bacteriocytes in the sheath-enclosed bacteriome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of three distinct bacterial types, the bacteriome-associated B-symbiont (Bacteroidetes), an Erwinia-related symbiont (Gammaproteobacteria) and Wolbachia sp. (Alphaproteobacteria). This study extends the current knowledge of scale insect symbionts and is the first microbiological investigation of the ecologically important coelostomidiid scales.

  18. Soil-foraging animals alter the composition and co-occurrence of microbial communities in a desert shrubland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, David J; Woodhouse, Jason N; Curlevski, Nathalie J A; Hayward, Matthew; Brown, Mark V; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-12-01

    Animals that modify their physical environment by foraging in the soil can have dramatic effects on ecosystem functions and processes. We compared bacterial and fungal communities in the foraging pits created by bilbies and burrowing bettongs with undisturbed surface soils dominated by biocrusts. Bacterial communities were characterized by Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, and fungal communities by Lecanoromycetes and Archaeosporomycetes. The composition of bacterial or fungal communities was not observed to vary between loamy or sandy soils. There were no differences in richness of either bacterial or fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the soil of young or old foraging pits, or undisturbed soils. Although the bacterial assemblage did not vary among the three microsites, the composition of fungi in undisturbed soils was significantly different from that in old or young foraging pits. Network analysis indicated that a greater number of correlations between bacterial OTUs occurred in undisturbed soils and old pits, whereas a greater number of correlations between fungal OTUs occurred in undisturbed soils. Our study suggests that digging by soil-disturbing animals is likely to create successional shifts in soil microbial and fungal communities, leading to functional shifts associated with the decomposition of organic matter and the fixation of nitrogen. Given the primacy of organic matter decomposition in arid and semi-arid environments, the loss of native soil-foraging animals is likely to impair the ability of these systems to maintain key ecosystem processes such as the mineralization of nitrogen and the breakdown of organic matter, and to recover from disturbance. PMID:25932616

  19. The amphibian skin-associated microbiome across species, space and life history stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueneman, Jordan G; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Woodhams, Douglas C; Archer, Holly M; Knight, Rob; McKenzie, Valerie J

    2014-03-01

    Skin-associated bacteria of amphibians are increasingly recognized for their role in defence against pathogens, yet we have little understanding of their basic ecology. Here, we use high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to examine the host and environmental influences on the skin microbiota of the cohabiting amphibian species Anaxyrus boreas, Pseudacris regilla, Taricha torosa and Lithobates catesbeianus from the Central Valley in California. We also studied populations of Rana cascadae over a large geographic range in the Klamath Mountain range of Northern California, and across developmental stages within a single site. Dominant bacterial phylotypes on amphibian skin included taxa from Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Sphingobacteria and Actinobacteria. Amphibian species identity was the strongest predictor of microbial community composition. Secondarily, within a given amphibian species, wetland site explained significant variation. Amphibian-associated microbiota differed systematically from microbial assemblages in their environments. Rana cascadae tadpoles have skin bacterial communities distinct from postmetamorphic conspecifics, indicating a strong developmental shift in the skin microbes following metamorphosis. Establishing patterns observed in the skin microbiota of wild amphibians and environmental factors that underlie them is necessary to understand skin symbiont community assembly, and ultimately, the role skin microbiota play in the extended host phenotype including disease resistance. PMID:24171949

  20. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  1. Reproducing stone monument photosynthetic-based colonization under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ana Zélia; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Dionísio, Amélia; Macedo, Maria Filomena; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2008-11-01

    In order to understand the biodeterioration process occurring on stone monuments, we analyzed the microbial communities involved in these processes and studied their ability to colonize stones under controlled laboratory experiments. In this study, a natural green biofilm from a limestone monument was cultivated, inoculated on stone probes of the same lithotype and incubated in a laboratory chamber. This incubation system, which exposes stone samples to intermittently sprinkling water, allowed the development of photosynthetic biofilms similar to those occurring on stone monuments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to evaluate the major microbial components of the laboratory biofilms. Cyanobacteria, green microalgae, bacteria and fungi were identified by DNA-based molecular analysis targeting the 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The natural green biofilm was mainly composed by the Chlorophyta Chlorella, Stichococcus, and Trebouxia, and by Cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Leptolyngbya and Pleurocapsa. A number of bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were identified, as well as fungi from the Ascomycota. The laboratory colonization experiment on stone probes showed a colonization pattern similar to that occurring on stone monuments. The methodology described in this paper allowed to reproduce a colonization equivalent to the natural biodeteriorating process.

  2. Nitrogen fertilization has a stronger effect on soil nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities than elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthrong, Sean T; Yeager, Chris M; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Steven, Blaire; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Jackson, Robert B; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is the primary supply of N to most ecosystems, yet there is considerable uncertainty about how N-fixing bacteria will respond to global change factors such as increasing atmospheric CO2 and N deposition. Using the nifH gene as a molecular marker, we studied how the community structure of N-fixing soil bacteria from temperate pine, aspen, and sweet gum stands and a brackish tidal marsh responded to multiyear elevated CO2 conditions. We also examined how N availability, specifically, N fertilization, interacted with elevated CO2 to affect these communities in the temperate pine forest. Based on data from Sanger sequencing and quantitative PCR, the soil nifH composition in the three forest systems was dominated by species in the Geobacteraceae and, to a lesser extent, Alphaproteobacteria. The N-fixing-bacterial-community structure was subtly altered after 10 or more years of elevated atmospheric CO2, and the observed shifts differed in each biome. In the pine forest, N fertilization had a stronger effect on nifH community structure than elevated CO2 and suppressed the diversity and abundance of N-fixing bacteria under elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions. These results indicate that N-fixing bacteria have complex, interacting responses that will be important for understanding ecosystem productivity in a changing climate.

  3. Dust Rains Deliver Diverse Assemblages of Microorganisms to the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Ghida Nouhad; Smith, Colin Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Dust rains may be particularly effective at delivering microorganisms, yet their biodiversities have been seldom examined. During 2011 and 2012 in Beirut, Lebanon, 16 of 21 collected rainfalls appeared dusty. Trajectory modelling of air mass origins was consistent with North African sources and at least one Southwest Asian source. As much as ~4 g particulate matter, ~20 μg DNA, and 50 million colony forming units were found deposited per square meter during rainfalls each lasting less than one day. Sequencing of 93 bacteria and 25 fungi cultured from rain samples revealed diverse bacterial phyla, both Gram positive and negative, and Ascomycota fungi. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA of 13 rains revealed distinct and diverse assemblages of bacteria. Dust rain 16S libraries yielded 131 sequences matching, in decreasing order of abundance, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria. Clean rain 16S libraries yielded 33 sequences matching only Betaproteobacteria family Oxalobacteraceae. Microbial composition varied between dust rains, and more diverse and different microbes were found in dust rains than clean rains. These results show that dust rains deliver diverse communities of microorganisms that may be complex products of revived desert soil species and fertilized cloud species.

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel Family of Cyclophilins, the AquaCyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Roman P.; Schmidpeter, Philipp A. M.; Koch, Johanna R.; Schmid, Franz X.; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitous cis-trans-prolyl isomerases (PPIases) found in all kingdoms of life. Here, we identify a novel family of cyclophilins, termed AquaCyps, which specifically occurs in marine Alphaproteobacteria, but not in related terrestric species. In addition to a canonical PPIase domain, AquaCyps contain large extensions and insertions. The crystal structures of two representatives from Hirschia baltica, AquaCyp293 and AquaCyp300, reveal the formation of a compact domain, the NIC domain, by the N- and C-terminal extensions together with a central insertion. The NIC domain adopts a novel mixed alpha-helical, beta-sheet fold that is linked to the cyclophilin domain via a conserved disulfide bond. In its overall fold, AquaCyp293 resembles AquaCyp300, but the two proteins utilize distinct sets of active site residues, consistent with differences in their PPIase catalytic properties. While AquaCyp293 is a highly active general PPIase, AquaCyp300 is specific for hydrophobic substrate peptides and exhibits lower overall activity. PMID:27276069

  5. Pilot-scale study on nitrogen and aromatic compounds removal in printing and dyeing wastewater by reinforced hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process and its microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Hongqiang; Yin, Erqin; Tang, Siyuan; Li, Yi; Cao, Jiashun

    2015-06-01

    Aiming to efficiently dispose printing and dyeing wastewater with "high organic nitrogen and aromatic compounds, but low carbon source quality", the reinforced anaerobic hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process, based on improved UASB reactors and segregated collection-disposition strategy, was designed and applied at the pilot scale. Results showed that the coupling process displayed efficient removal for these two kinds of pollutants (nitrogen and aromatics), since the concentration of NH3-N (shortened as ρ (NH3-N)) aromatics reduced greatly by UASBs according to GC-MS. Microbial community analysis by PCR-DGGE showed that Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant communities in the bioreactors and some kinds of VFAs-producing, denitrifying and aromatic ring opening microorganisms were discovered. Further, the nirK and bcrA genes quantification also indicated the coupling process owned outstanding denitrification and aromatic compound-degrading potential, which demonstrates that the coupling process owns admirable applicability for this kind of wastewater treatment.

  6. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Mou

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  7. Bartonellae in animals and vectors in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Davoust, Bernard; Cabre, Olivier; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2011-12-01

    Bartonellae are gram-negative facultative intracellular alpha-proteobacteria from the family Bartonellaceae. The natural history of bartonellae consists of a reservoir/host, which is a vertebrate with chronic intravascular infection with sustained bacteremia, and a vector (usually an arthropod) that transfers the bacteria from the reservoir to a susceptible yet uninfected host. In order to reveal the sources and reservoirs of Bartonella infection in animals and vectors in New Caledonia, we collected the blood samples of 64 dogs, 8 cats, 30 bovines, 25 horses and 29 wild deer Cervus timorensis russa and 308 associated blood-sucking parasites (14 keds Hippobosca equina, 258 ticks (22 Rhipicephalus microplus, 235 Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and 1 Haemaphysalis longicornis), 12 fleas Ctenocephalides felis and 24 dog lice Trichodectes canis). We isolated ten strains of Bartonella: four Bartonella henselae from cats and six Bartonella chomelii from cattle. The strains were characterized by sequencing of five genes (16S, ITS, rpoB, gltA and ftsZ). The six strains isolated from cattle were close to the reference strain of B. chomelii and were, probably, imported from France with cattle of Limousin race. PCR showed that 35% of keds collected from deer and 31% of deer were infected by B. aff. schoenbuchensis; all other samples were negative. Our data confirmed that in New Caledonia, as in other regions of the world, cats are the major reservoirs of B. henselae. We also confirmed that Hippoboscidae flies may serve as the vectors of ruminant-associated bartonellae. PMID:22018646

  8. Persistent Infection by Wolbachia wAlbB Has No Effect on Composition of the Gut Microbiota in Adult Female Anopheles stephensi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shicheng; Zhao, Jiangchao; Joshi, Deepak; Xi, Zhiyong; Norman, Beth; Walker, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteria in the midgut of Anopheles stephensi adult females from laboratory colonies were studied by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA genes, with respect to three experimental factors: stable or cured Wolbachia infection; sugar or blood diet; and age. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated the community [>90% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs)]; most taxa were in the classes Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, and were assigned to Elizabethkingia (46.9%), Asaia (6.4%) and Pseudomonas (6.0%), or unclassified Enterobacteriaceae (37.2%). Bacterial communities were similar between Wolbachia-cured and Wolbachia-infected mosquito lines, indicating that the gut microbiota were not dysregulated in the presence of Wolbachia. The proportion of Enterobacteriaceae was higher in mosquitoes fed a blood meal compared to those provided a sugar meal. Collectively, the bacterial community had a similar structure in older Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes 8 days after the blood meal, as in younger Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes before a blood meal, except that older mosquitoes had a higher proportion of Enterobacteriaceae and lower proportion of Elizabethkingia. Consistent presence of certain predominant bacteria (Elizabethkingia, Asaia, Pseudomonas, and Enterobacteriaceae) suggests they would be useful for paratransgenesis to control malaria infection, particularly when coupled to a Wolbachia-based intervention strategy. PMID:27708633

  9. Phylogeny of 16S rRNA, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase genes from gamma- and alphaproteobacterial symbionts in gutless marine worms (oligochaeta) from Bermuda and the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejak, Anna; Kuever, Jan; Erséus, Christer; Amann, Rudolf; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-08-01

    Gutless oligochaetes are small marine worms that live in obligate associations with bacterial endosymbionts. While symbionts from several host species belonging to the genus Olavius have been described, little is known of the symbionts from the host genus Inanidrilus. In this study, the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in Inanidrilus leukodermatus from Bermuda and Inanidrilus makropetalos from the Bahamas was investigated using comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and fluorescence in situ hybridization. As in all other gutless oligochaetes examined to date, I. leukodermatus and I. makropetalos harbor large, oval bacteria identified as Gamma 1 symbionts. The presence of genes coding for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form I (cbbL) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (aprA) supports earlier studies indicating that these symbionts are chemoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers. Alphaproteobacteria, previously identified only in the gutless oligochaete Olavius loisae from the southwest Pacific Ocean, coexist with the Gamma 1 symbionts in both I. leukodermatus and I. makropetalos, with the former harboring four and the latter two alphaproteobacterial phylotypes. The presence of these symbionts in hosts from such geographically distant oceans as the Atlantic and Pacific suggests that symbioses with alphaproteobacterial symbionts may be widespread in gutless oligochaetes. The high phylogenetic diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in two species of the genus Inanidrilus, previously known only from members of the genus Olavius, shows that the stable coexistence of multiple symbionts is a common feature in gutless oligochaetes.

  10. Phylogeny of 16S rRNA, Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, and Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase Genes from Gamma- and Alphaproteobacterial Symbionts in Gutless Marine Worms (Oligochaeta) from Bermuda and the Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejak, Anna; Kuever, Jan; Erséus, Christer; Amann, Rudolf; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Gutless oligochaetes are small marine worms that live in obligate associations with bacterial endosymbionts. While symbionts from several host species belonging to the genus Olavius have been described, little is known of the symbionts from the host genus Inanidrilus. In this study, the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in Inanidrilus leukodermatus from Bermuda and Inanidrilus makropetalos from the Bahamas was investigated using comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and fluorescence in situ hybridization. As in all other gutless oligochaetes examined to date, I. leukodermatus and I. makropetalos harbor large, oval bacteria identified as Gamma 1 symbionts. The presence of genes coding for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form I (cbbL) and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (aprA) supports earlier studies indicating that these symbionts are chemoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers. Alphaproteobacteria, previously identified only in the gutless oligochaete Olavius loisae from the southwest Pacific Ocean, coexist with the Gamma 1 symbionts in both I. leukodermatus and I. makropetalos, with the former harboring four and the latter two alphaproteobacterial phylotypes. The presence of these symbionts in hosts from such geographically distant oceans as the Atlantic and Pacific suggests that symbioses with alphaproteobacterial symbionts may be widespread in gutless oligochaetes. The high phylogenetic diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in two species of the genus Inanidrilus, previously known only from members of the genus Olavius, shows that the stable coexistence of multiple symbionts is a common feature in gutless oligochaetes. PMID:16885306

  11. Role of bacteria in the production and degradation of Microcystis cyanopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Enora; Humbert, Jean-François; Tambosco, Kevin; Bormans, Myriam; Gerwick, William H

    2016-06-01

    The freshwater cyanobacteria, Microcystis sp., commonly form large colonies with bacteria embedded in their mucilage. Positive and negative interactions between Microcystis species and their associated bacteria have been reported. However, the potential role of bacteria in the production and degradation of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites has not been investigated. In this study, a Microcystis-associated bacterial community was isolated and added to the axenic M. aeruginosaPCC7806 liquid culture. After 3 years of cocultivation, we studied the bacterial genetic diversity adapted to the PCC7806 strain and compared the intra- and extracellular concentration of major cyanopeptides produced by the cyanobacterial strain under xenic and axenic conditions. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that the intracellular concentration of peptides was not affected by the presence of bacteria. Interestingly, the produced peptides were detected in the axenic media but could not be found in the xenic media. This investigation revealed that a natural bacterial community, dominated by Alpha-proteobacteria, was able to degrade a wide panel of structurally varying cyclic cyanopeptides. PMID:26918405

  12. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Allen White III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase. The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 0.900. These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  13. Composition and Functional Characterization of Microbiome Associated with Mucus of the Coral Fungia echinata Collected from Andaman Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Ghosh, Tarini S; Das, Subrata K

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the community composition and functions of the microbiome associated with the mucus of the coral Fungia echinata based on metagenomic approach. Metagenome sequence data showed a dominance of the class Gammaproteobacteria followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, Bacilli, and Clostridia. At the order level, the most abundant groups were Pseudomonadales, Oceanospirillales, Alteromonadales, and Rhodobacterales. The genus Psychrobacter was the most predominant followed by Thalassolituus and Cobetia, although other genera were also present, such as Sulfitobacter, Pseudoalteromonas, Oleispira, Halomonas, Oceanobacter, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Marinobacter. The metabolic profile of the bacterial community displayed high prevalence of genes associated with core-housekeeping processes, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acid metabolism. Further, high abundance of genes coding for DNA replication and repair, stress response, and virulence factors in the metagenome suggested acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the microbiota. Comparative analysis with other coral metagenome exhibits marked differences at the taxonomical and functional level. This study suggests the bacterial community compositions are influenced by the specific coral micro-niche and the oligotrophic marine environment. PMID:27379066

  14. Characteristics of microbial communities in crustal fluids in a deep-sea hydrothermal field of the Suiyo Seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo eKato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To directly access the sub-seafloor microbial communities, seafloor drilling has been done in a deep-sea hydrothermal field of the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific. In the present study, crustal fluids were collected from the boreholes, and the bacterial and archaeal communities in the fluids were investigated by culture-independent molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Bottom seawater, sands, rocks, sulfide mound and chimneys were also collected around the boreholes and analyzed for comparisons. Comprehensive analysis revealed the characteristics of the microbial community composition in the crustal fluids. Phylotypes closely related to cultured species, e.g., Alteromonas, Halomonas, Marinobacter, were relatively abundant in some crustal-fluid samples, whereas the phylotypes related to Pelagibacter and the SUP05-group were relatively abundant in the seawater samples. Phylotypes related to other uncultured environmental clones in Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were relatively abundant in the sand, rock, sulfide mound and chimney samples. Furthermore, comparative analysis with previous studies of the Suiyo Seamount crustal fluids indicates the change in the microbial community composition for three years. Our results provide novel insights into the characteristics of the microbial communities in crustal fluids beneath a deep-sea hydrothermal field.

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Endophytic Bacterial Diversity and Dynamics in Roots of the Halophyte Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuai; Zhou, Na; Zhao, Zheng-Yong; Zhang, Ke; Tian, Chang-Yan

    2016-05-01

    Endophytic bacterial communities of halophyte Salicornia europaea roots were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. A total of 20,151 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained. These sequences revealed huge amounts of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), that is, 747-1405 OTUs in a root sample, at 3 % cut-off level. Root endophytes mainly comprised four phyla, among which Proteobacteria was the most represented, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant class of Proteobacteria, followed by Betaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. Genera Pantoea, Halomonas, Azomonas, Serpens, and Pseudomonas were shared by all growth periods. A marked difference in endophytic bacterial communities was evident in roots from different host life-history stages. Gammaproteobacteria increased during the five periods, while Betaproteobacteria decreased. The richest endophytic bacteria diversity was detected in the seedling stage. Endophytic bacteria diversity was reduced during the flowering stage and fruiting stage. The five libraries contained 2321 different OTUs with 41 OTUs in common. As a whole, this study first surveys communities of endophytic bacteria by tracing crucial stages in the process of halophyte growth using high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26787546

  16. Diversity rankings among bacterial lineages in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2009-03-01

    We used rarefaction curve analysis and diversity ordering-based approaches to rank the 11 most frequently encountered bacterial lineages in soil according to diversity in 5 previously reported 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from agricultural, undisturbed tall grass prairie and forest soils (n=26,140, 28 328, 31 818, 13 001 and 53 533). The Planctomycetes, Firmicutes and the delta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the most diverse lineages in all data sets, whereas the Verrucomicrobia, Gemmatimonadetes and beta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the least diverse. On the other hand, the rankings of alpha-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi varied widely in different soil clone libraries. In general, lineages exhibiting largest differences in diversity rankings also exhibited the largest difference in relative abundance in the data sets examined. Within these lineages, a positive correlation between relative abundance and diversity was observed within the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi, and a negative diversity-abundance correlation was observed within the Bacteroidetes. The ecological and evolutionary implications of these results are discussed. PMID:18987677

  17. Bioremediation of polychlorinated-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans contaminated soil using simulated compost-amended landfill reactors under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Juu-En

    2016-07-15

    Compost-amended landfill reactors were developed to reduce polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in contaminated soils. By periodically recirculating leachate and suppling oxygen, the online monitoring of the oxidation reduction potential confirmed that the reactors were maintained under hypoxic conditions, with redox levels constantly fluctuating between -400 and +80mV. The subsequent reactor operation demonstrated that PCDD/F degradation in soil could be facilitated by amending compost originating from the cow manure and waste sludge and that the degradation might be affected by the availability of easily degradable substrates in the soil and compost. The pyrosequencing analysis of V4/V5 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes suggested that species richness of the soil microbial community was increased by a factor of 1.37-1.61. Although the bacterial community varied with the compost origin and changed markedly during reactor operation, it was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The aerotolerant anaerobic Sedimentibacter and Propionibacterium spp., and the uncultured Chloroflexi group could be temporarily induced to a high abundance by amending the cow manure compost; the bacterial growths were associated with the rapid degradation of PCDD/Fs. Overall, the novel bioremediation method for PCDD/F-contaminated soils using hypoxic conditions was effective, simple, energy saving, and thus easily practicable. PMID:27037469

  18. Bioaugmentation of a 4-chloronitrobenzene contaminated soil with Pseudomonas putida ZWL73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strain Pseudomonas putida ZWL73, which metabolizes 4-chloronitrobenzene (4CNB) by a partial-reductive pathway, was inoculated into lab-scale 4CNB-contaminated soil for bioaugmentation purposes in this study. The degradation of 4CNB was clearly stimulated, as indicated with the gradual accumulation of ammonium and chloride. Simultaneously, the diversity and quantity of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria decreased due to 4CNB contamination, while the quantity of 4CNB-resistant bacteria increased. During the bioaugmentation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed the changes of diversity in dominant populations of intrinsic soil microbiota. The results showed that Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were not distinctly affected, but Actinobacteria were apparently stimulated. In addition, an interesting dynamic within Acidobacteria was observed, as well as an influence on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria population. These combined findings demonstrate that the removal of 4CNB in soils by inoculating strain ZWL73 is feasible, and that specific populations in soils rapidly changed in response to 4CNB contamination and subsequent bioaugmentation. - Pseudomonas putida ZWL73 can accelerate 4CNB removal in lab-scale soils, causing dynamic changes within intrinsic Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria

  19. Genomic differentiation among two strains of the PS1 clade isolated from geographically separated marine habitats

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez-Infante, Francy

    2014-05-22

    Using dilution-to-extinction cultivation, we isolated a strain affiliated with the PS1 clade from surface waters of the Red Sea. Strain RS24 represents the second isolate of this group of marine Alphaproteobacteria after IMCC14465 that was isolated from the East (Japan) Sea. The PS1 clade is a sister group to the OCS116 clade, together forming a putatively novel order closely related to Rhizobiales. While most genomic features and most of the genetic content are conserved between RS24 and IMCC14465, their average nucleotide identity (ANI) is < 81%, suggesting two distinct species of the PS1 clade. Next to encoding two different variants of proteorhodopsin genes, they also harbor several unique genomic islands that contain genes related to degradation of aromatic compounds in IMCC14465 and in polymer degradation in RS24, possibly reflecting the physicochemical differences in the environment they were isolated from. No clear differences in abundance of the genomic content of either strain could be found in fragment recruitment analyses using different metagenomic datasets, in which both genomes were detectable albeit as minor part of the communities. The comparative genomic analysis of both isolates of the PS1 clade and the fragment recruitment analysis provide first insights into the ecology of this group. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  20. Intrinsic rates of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in Gulf of Mexico intertidal sandy sediments and its enhancement by organic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rates of crude oil degradation by the extant microorganisms in intertidal sediments from a northern Gulf of Mexico beach were determined. The enhancement in crude oil degradation by amending the microbial communities with marine organic matter was also examined. Replicate mesocosm treatments consisted of: (i) controls (intertidal sand), (ii) sand contaminated with crude oil, (iii) sand plus organic matter, and (iv) sand plus crude oil and organic matter. Carbon dioxide (CO2) production was measured daily for 42 days and the carbon isotopic ratio of CO2 (δ13CO2) was used to determine the fraction of CO2 derived from microbial respiration of crude oil. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone library analyses indicated members of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi occurred exclusively in control sediments whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes occurred in both control and oil contaminated sediments. Members of the hydrocarbon-degrading genera Hydrocarboniphaga, Pseudomonas, and Pseudoxanthomonas were found primarily in oil contaminated treatments. Hydrocarbon mineralization was 76% higher in the crude oil amended with organic matter treatment compared to the rate in the crude oil only treatment indicating that biodegradation of crude oil in the intertidal zone by an extant microbial community is enhanced by input of organic matter

  1. Comparison of two radio-frequency plasma sterilization processes using microspot evaluation of microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Klaus S; Johansen, Jens E; Grün, Reinar

    2006-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated gas plasma surface sterilization methods in a specific sterilizer. We have introduced a new monitoring method using 0.4 microm pore size membranes, which in this study gave the information corresponding to 3000 exposed biological indicators per treatment cycle. This enabled us to compare the fraction of inoculates that showed no growth after exposure for 30 different locations in the chamber, and hereby identify weak and strong spots in the chamber with regard to sporicidal effect. Membranes were also used to expose a broad spectrum of soil bacteria for plasma treatment at four different conditions. The organisms were identified using PCR and sequencing. The test showed that Bacillus stearothermophilus spores were inactivated at the slowest rate among the tested microorganisms. Further alpha-proteobacteria (Gram negative) seemed more sensitive than the rest of the tested organisms. The microspot evaluation approach has been a most useful tool in the assessment of sterilization performance in sterilizers that do not have clear measurable parameters related to the sterilization. PMID:16362959

  2. Determinants of bacterial communities in Canadian agroforestry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samiran; Baah-Acheamfour, Mark; Carlyle, Cameron N; Bissett, Andrew; Richardson, Alan E; Siddique, Tariq; Bork, Edward W; Chang, Scott X

    2016-06-01

    Land-use change is one of the most important factors influencing soil microbial communities, which play a pivotal role in most biogeochemical and ecological processes. Using agroforestry systems as a model, this study examined the effects of land uses and edaphic properties on bacterial communities in three agroforestry types covering a 270 km soil-climate gradient in Alberta, Canada. Our results demonstrate that land-use patterns exert stronger effects on soil bacterial communities than soil zones in these agroforestry systems. Plots with trees in agroforestry systems promoted greater bacterial abundance and to some extent species richness, which was associated with more nutrient-rich soil resources. While Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial phyla and subphyla across land uses, Arthrobacter, Acidobacteria_Gp16, Burkholderia, Rhodanobacter and Rhizobium were the keystone taxa in these agroforestry systems. Soil pH and carbon contents emerged as the major determinants of bacterial community characteristics. We found non-random co-occurrence and modular patterns of soil bacterial communities, and these patterns were controlled by edaphic factors and not their taxonomy. Overall, this study highlights the drivers and co-occurrence patterns of soil microbial communities in agroforestry systems.

  3. Microbiote shift in the Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khalloufi, Fatima; Oufdou, Khalid; Bertrand, Marie; Lahrouni, Majida; Oudra, Brahim; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2016-01-01

    The bloom-containing water bodies may have an impact due to cyanotoxins production on other microorganisms and aquatic plants. Where such water is being used for crops irrigation, the presence of cyanotoxins may also have a toxic impact on terrestrial plants and their rhizosphere microbiota. For that purpose, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was applied to phylogenetically characterize the bacterial community of Medicago sativa rhizosphere in response to cyanotoxins extract. This analysis revealed a wide diversity at species level, which decreased from unplanted soil to root tissues indicating that only some populations were able to compete for nutrients and niches in this selective habitat. Gemmatimonas, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Opitutae mainly inhabited the bulk soil, whereas, the root-adhering soil and the root tissues were inhabited by Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. The proportion of these populations fluctuated in response to cyanotoxins extract exposure. Betaproteobacteria proportion increased in the three studied compartments, whereas Gammaproteobacteria proportion decreased except in the bulk soil. This study revealed the potential toxicity of cyanotoxins extract towards Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonas, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria, however Clostridia, Opitutae and bacteria related with Betaproteobacteria, were stimulated denoting their tolerance. Altogether, these data indicate that crop irrigation using cyanotoxins containing water might alter the rhizosphere functioning. PMID:26356186

  4. Bacterial community composition of a wastewater treatment system reliant on N{sub 2} fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, N.M.; Bowers, T.H.; Lloyd-Jones, G. [Scion, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    2008-05-15

    The temporal stability and change of the dominant phylogenetic groups of the domain bacteria were studied in a model plant-based industrial wastewater treatment system showing high levels of organic carbon removal supported by high levels of N{sub 2} fixation. Community profiles were obtained through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning of 16S rRNA amplicons followed by sequencing. Bacterial community profiles showed that ten common terminal restriction fragments made up approximately 50% of the measured bacterial community. As much as 42% of the measured bacterial community could be monitored by using quantitative PCR and primers that targeted three dominant operational taxonomic units. Despite changes in wastewater composition and dissolved oxygen levels, the bacterial community composition appeared stable and was dominated by {alpha}-Proteobacteria and {beta}-Proteobacteria, with a lesser amount of the highly diverse bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes. A short period of considerable change in the bacterial community composition did not appear to affect treatment performance indicating functional redundancy in this treatment system. (orig.)

  5. Biodiversity patterns of plankton assemblages at the extremes of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2016-01-07

    © FEMS 2016. The diversity of microbial plankton has received limited attention in the main basin of the Red Sea. This study investigates changes in the community composition and structure of prokaryotes and eukaryotes at the extremes of the Red Sea along cross-shelf gradients and between the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum. Using molecular methods to target both the 16S and 18S rRNA genes, it was observed that the dominant prokaryotic classes were Acidimicrobiia, Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, regardless of the region and depth. The eukaryotes Syndiniophyceae and Dinophyceae between them dominated in the north, with Bacillariophyceae and Mamiellophyceae more prominent in the southern region. Significant differences were observed for prokaryotes and eukaryotes for region, depth and distance from shore. Similarly, it was noticed that communities became less similar with increasing distance from the shore. Canonical correspondence analysis at the class level showed that Mamiellophyceae and Bacillariophyceae correlated with increased nutrients and chlorophyll a found in the southern region, which is influenced by the input of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water.

  6. Plant powder teabags: a novel and practical approach to resolve culturability and diversity of rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Mohamed S; Mourad, Elhussein F; Hamza, Mervat A; Youssef, Hanan H; Scherwinski, Ann-Christin; El-Tahan, Mahmoud; Fayez, Mohamed; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2016-08-01

    We have developed teabags packed with dehydrated plant powders, without any supplements, for preparation of plant infusions necessary to develop media for culturing rhizobacteria. These bacteria are efficiently cultivated on such plant teabag culture media, with better progressive in situ recoverability compared to standard chemically synthetic culture media. Combining various plant-based culture media and incubation conditions enabled us to resolve unique denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands that were not resolved by tested standard culture media. Based on polymerase chain reaction PCR-DGGE of 16S rDNA fingerprints and sequencing, the plant teabag culture media supported higher diversity and significant increases in the richness of endo-rhizobacteria, namely Gammaproteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) and predominantly Alphaproteobacteria (Rhizobiaceae). This culminated in greater retrieval of the rhizobacteria taxa associated with the plant roots. We conclude that the plant teabag culture medium by itself, without any nutritional supplements, is sufficient and efficient for recovering and mirroring the complex and diverse communities of rhizobacteria. Our message to fellow microbial ecologists is: simply dehydrate your plant canopy, teabag it and soak it to prepare your culture media, with no need for any additional supplementary nutrients. PMID:27178359

  7. Bacterial diversity and tetrodotoxin analysis in the viscera of the gastropods from Portuguese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheepa, Vijayakumari; Alex, Anoop; Silva, Marisa; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2016-09-01

    To trace the pathway of tetrodotoxin (TTX) producing microorganism in the Atlantic coast of Portugal, culture-dependent evaluation of the bacterial isolates from the viscera of the gastropods Monodonta lineata, Gibbula umbilicalis, Nucella lapillus and Patella intermedia, and from the environmental samples (biofilm and surrounding sea water) was carried out. Samples were collected from eight different coastal locations of Northern Portugal. A total of 311 isolates were identified. The observed bacterial diversity was distributed over five different classes (Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria) with the greatest number of 16S rRNA gene sequence derived from the Gammaproteobacteria (75%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that bacterial isolates were highly diverse and most of which were found in other marine environment. Among the different species isolated, Vibrio was found abundant. Eventhough TTX was not detected (UPLC-MS/MS) in the isolates from this study, PCR screening identified some natural product biosynthesis genes (PKS and NRPS) involved in its assembly. Further PCR screening of the TTX producing two ATCC Vibrio sp. reveals that NRPS might be involved in the biosynthesis of TTX through the incorporation of arginine. PMID:27312988

  8. A Genomic Encyclopedia of the Root Nodule Bacteria: assessing genetic diversity through a systematic biogeographic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Eshragi, Leila; Yoon, Je Won; Ngamwisetkun, Pinyaruk; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria are free-living soil bacteria, belonging to diverse genera within the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, that have the capacity to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. The symbiosis is specific and is governed by signaling molecules produced from both host and bacteria. Sequencing of several model RNB genomes has provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of symbiosis. However, the small number of sequenced RNB genomes available does not currently reflect the phylogenetic diversity of RNB, or the variety of mechanisms that lead to symbiosis in different legume hosts. This prevents a broad understanding of symbiotic interactions and the factors that govern the biogeography of host-microbe symbioses. Here, we outline a proposal to expand the number of sequenced RNB strains, which aims to capture this phylogenetic and biogeographic diversity. Through the Vavilov centers of diversity (Proposal ID: 231) and GEBA-RNB (Proposal ID: 882) projects we will sequence 107 RNB strains, isolated from diverse legume hosts in various geographic locations around the world. The nominated strains belong to nine of the 16 currently validly described RNB genera. They include 13 type strains, as well as elite inoculant strains of high commercial importance. These projects will strongly support systematic sequence-based studies of RNB and contribute to our understanding of the effects of biogeography on the evolution of different species of RNB, as well as the mechanisms that determine the specificity and effectiveness of nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by RNB with diverse legume hosts.

  9. Endo- and exoglucanase activities in bacteria from mangrove sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Júnior, Fábio Lino; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; de Souza Lima, André Oliveira; Melo, Itamar Soares; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2013-01-01

    The mangrove ecosystem is an unexplored source for biotechnological applications. In this unique environment, endemic bacteria have the ability to thrive in the harsh environmental conditions (salinity and anaerobiosis), and act in the degradation of organic matter, promoting nutrient cycles. Thus, this study aimed to assess the cellulolytic activities of bacterial groups present in the sediment from a mangrove located in Ilha do Cardoso (SP, Brazil). To optimize the isolation of cellulolytic bacteria, enrichments in two types of culture media (tryptone broth and minimum salt medium), both supplemented with 5% NaCl and 1% of cellulose, were performed. Tests conducted with the obtained colonies showed a higher occurrence of endoglycolytic activity (33 isolates) than exoglycolytic (19 isolates), and the degradation activity was shown to be modulated by the presence of NaCl. The isolated bacteria were clustered by BOX-PCR and further classified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences as Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of studies focusing on the endemic species found in mangroves to exploit them as novel biotechnological tools for the degradation of cellulose. PMID:24516466

  10. Endo-and exoglucanase activities in bacteria from mangrove sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lino Soares Júnior

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove ecosystem is an unexplored source for biotechnological applications. In this unique environment, endemic bacteria have the ability to thrive in the harsh environmental conditions (salinity and anaerobiosis, and act in the degradation of organic matter, promoting nutrient cycles. Thus, this study aimed to assess the cellulolytic activities of bacterial groups present in the sediment from a mangrove located in Ilha do Cardoso (SP, Brazil. To optimize the isolation of cellulolytic bacteria, enrichments in two types of culture media (tryptone broth and minimum salt medium, both supplemented with 5% NaCl and 1% of cellulose, were performed. Tests conducted with the obtained colonies showed a higher occurrence of endoglycolytic activity (33 isolates than exoglycolytic (19 isolates, and the degradation activity was shown to be modulated by the presence of NaCl. The isolated bacteria were clustered by BOX-PCR and further classified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences as Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of studies focusing on the endemic species found in mangroves to exploit them as novel biotechnological tools for the degradation of cellulose.

  11. Spatial Homogeneity of Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus Layer of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora palmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin W Kemp

    Full Text Available Coral surface mucus layer (SML microbiota are critical components of the coral holobiont and play important roles in nutrient cycling and defense against pathogens. We sequenced 16S rRNA amplicons to examine the structure of the SML microbiome within and between colonies of the threatened Caribbean reef-building coral Acropora palmata in the Florida Keys. Samples were taken from three spatially distinct colony regions--uppermost (high irradiance, underside (low irradiance, and the colony base--representing microhabitats that vary in irradiance and water flow. Phylogenetic diversity (PD values of coral SML bacteria communities were greater than surrounding seawater and lower than adjacent sediment. Bacterial diversity and community composition was consistent among the three microhabitats. Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Alphaproteobacteria, and Proteobacteria, respectively were the most abundant phyla represented in the samples. This is the first time spatial variability of the surface mucus layer of A. palmata has been studied. Homogeneity in the microbiome of A. palmata contrasts with SML heterogeneity found in other Caribbean corals. These findings suggest that, during non-stressful conditions, host regulation of SML microbiota may override diverse physiochemical influences induced by the topographical complexity of A. palmata. Documenting the spatial distribution of SML microbes is essential to understanding the functional roles these microorganisms play in coral health and adaptability to environmental perturbations.

  12. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species. PMID:21108068

  13. Composition and variability of biofouling organisms in seawater reverse osmosis desalination plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M V; Cai, Baoli

    2011-07-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Cellulophaga based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The 16S rRNA gene clone library of the SWRO membrane biofilm showed that a filamentous bacterium, Leucothrix mucor, which belongs to the gammaproteobacteria, accounted for nearly 30% of the clone library, while the rest of the microorganisms (61.2% of the total clones) were related to the alphaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that bacteria colonizing the SWRO membrane represented a subportion of microbes in the source seawater; however, they were quite different from those colonizing the cartridge filter. The examination of five SWRO membranes from desalination plants located in different parts of the world showed that although the bacterial communities from the membranes were not identical to each other, some dominant bacteria were commonly observed. In contrast, bacterial communities in source seawater were significantly different based on location and season. Microbial profiles from 14 cartridge filters collected from different plants also revealed spatial trends. PMID:21551282

  14. Culturable bacterial diversity from a feed water of a reverse osmosis system, evaluation of biofilm formation and biocontrol using phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgini, D R B; Dias, R S; Siqueira, V M; Valadares, L A B; Albanese, J M; Souza, R S; Torres, A P R; Sousa, M P; Silva, C C; De Paula, S O; Oliveira, V M

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm formation on reverse osmosis (RO) systems represents a drawback in the application of this technology by different industries, including oil refineries. In RO systems the feed water maybe a source of microbial contamination and thus contributes for the formation of biofilm and consequent biofouling. In this study the planktonic culturable bacterial community was characterized from a feed water of a RO system and their capacities were evaluated to form biofilm in vitro. Bacterial motility and biofilm control were also analysed using phages. As results, diverse Protobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were identified. Alphaproteobacteria was the predominant group and Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium the most abundant genera. Among the 30 isolates, 11 showed at least one type of motility and 11 were classified as good biofilm formers. Additionally, the influence of non-specific bacteriophage in the bacterial biofilms formed in vitro was investigated by action of phages enzymes or phage infection. The vB_AspP-UFV1 (Podoviridae) interfered in biofilm formation of most tested bacteria and may represent a good alternative in biofilm control. These findings provide important information about the bacterial community from the feed water of a RO system that may be used for the development of strategies for biofilm prevention and control in such systems.

  15. Endemic Mimosa species from Mexico prefer alphaproteobacterial rhizobial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontemps, Cyril; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Wiechmann, Anja; Mussabekova, Assel; Moody, Sarah; Simon, Marcelo F; Moulin, Lionel; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Lacercat-Didier, Laurence; Dasilva, Cindy; Grether, Rosaura; Camargo-Ricalde, Sara L; Chen, Weimin; Sprent, Janet I; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2016-01-01

    The legume genus Mimosa has > 500 species, with two major centres of diversity, Brazil (c. 350 spp.) and Mexico (c. 100 spp.). In Brazil most species are nodulated by Burkholderia. Here we asked whether this is also true of native and endemic Mexican species. We have tested this apparent affinity for betaproteobacteria by examining the symbionts of native and endemic species of Mimosa in Mexico, especially from the central highlands where Mimosa spp. have diversified. Nodules were tested for betaproteobacteria using in situ immunolocalization. Rhizobia isolated from the nodules were genetically characterized and tested for their ability to nodulate Mimosa spp. Immunological analysis of 25 host taxa suggested that most (including all the highland endemics) were not nodulated by betaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, nodA, nodC and nifH genes from 87 strains isolated from 20 taxa confirmed that the endemic Mexican Mimosa species favoured alphaproteobacteria in the genera Rhizobium and Ensifer: this was confirmed by nodulation tests. Host phylogeny, geographic isolation and coevolution with symbionts derived from very different soils have potentially contributed to the striking difference in the choice of symbiotic partners by Mexican and Brazilian Mimosa species. PMID:26214613

  16. Rhizobacterial Community Structures Associated with Native Plants Grown in Chilean Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Milko A; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogram, Andrew V; Navarrete, Oscar U; Lagos, Lorena M; Inostroza, Nitza G; Acuña, Jacquelinne J; Rilling, Joaquín I; de La Luz Mora, María

    2016-10-01

    Chile is topographically and climatically diverse, with a wide array of diverse undisturbed ecosystems that include native plants that are highly adapted to local conditions. However, our understanding of the diversity, activity, and role of rhizobacteria associated with natural vegetation in undisturbed Chilean extreme ecosystems is very poor. In the present study, the combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing approaches was used to describe the rhizobacterial community structures of native plants grown in three representative Chilean extreme environments: Atacama Desert (ATA), Andes Mountains (AND), and Antarctic (ANT). Both molecular approaches revealed the presence of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria as the dominant phyla in the rhizospheres of native plants. Lower numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed in rhizosphere soils from ATA compared with AND and ANT. Both approaches also showed differences in rhizobacterial community structures between extreme environments and between plant species. The differences among plant species grown in the same environment were attributed to the higher relative abundance of classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. However, further studies are needed to determine which environmental factors regulate the structures of rhizobacterial communities, and how (or if) specific bacterial groups may contribute to the growth and survival of native plants in each Chilean extreme environments. PMID:27406732

  17. Hydrocarbon biodegradation by Arctic sea-ice and sub-ice microbial communities during microcosm experiments, Northwest Passage (Nunavut, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Marie-Ève; Michel, Christine; Meisterhans, Guillaume; Fortin, Nathalie; King, Thomas L; Greer, Charles W; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    The increasing accessibility to navigation and offshore oil exploration brings risks of hydrocarbon releases in Arctic waters. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons is a promising mitigation strategy but challenges remain, particularly due to low microbial metabolic rates in cold, ice-covered seas. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of ice-associated microbes collected from the Northwest Passage was investigated. Microcosm incubations were run for 15 days at -1.7°C with and without oil to determine the effects of hydrocarbon exposure on microbial abundance, diversity and activity, and to estimate component-specific hydrocarbon loss. Diversity was assessed with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial activity was measured by (3)H-leucine uptake rates. After incubation, sub-ice and sea-ice communities degraded 94% and 48% of the initial hydrocarbons, respectively. Hydrocarbon exposure changed the composition of sea-ice and sub-ice communities; in sea-ice microcosms, Bacteroidetes (mainly Polaribacter) dominated whereas in sub-ice microcosms, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria increased, and that of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Sequencing data revealed a decline in diversity and increases in Colwellia and Moritella in oil-treated microcosms. Low concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sub-ice seawater may explain higher hydrocarbon degradation when compared to sea ice, where DOM was abundant and composed of labile exopolysaccharides. PMID:27387912

  18. Microbial communities in acid water environments of two mines, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Shengmu; Xie Xuehui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Liu Jianshe [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha (China)], E-mail: xiaoshengmu@gmail.com

    2009-03-15

    To understand the compositions and structures of microbial communities in different acid-aqueous environments, a PCR-based cloning approach was used. A total of five samples were collected from two mines in China. Two samples, named as G1 and G2, were acid mine drainage (AMD) samples and from Yunfu sulfide mine in Guangdong province, China. The rest of the three samples named as D1, DY and D3, were from three sites undertaking bioleaching in Yinshan lead-zinc mine in Jiangxi province, China. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that bacteria in the five samples fell into six putative divisions, which were {alpha}-Proteobacteria, {beta}-Proteobacteria, {gamma}-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Nitrospira. Archaea was only detected in the three samples from Yinshan lead-zinc mine, which fell into two phylogenentic divisions, Thermoplsma and Ferroplasma. In addition, the results of principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that more similar the geochemical properties in samples were, more similar microbial community structures in samples were. - Microbial community compositions in acid-aqueous environments from Chinese mines were studied, and the relationship with geochemical properties was obtained.

  19. Exploring links between pH and bacterial community composition in soils from the Craibstone Experimental Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Andrea K; Jiang, Xingpeng; Lynch, Michael D J; Masella, Andre P; Nicol, Graeme W; Dushoff, Jonathan; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-02-01

    Soil pH is an important determinant of microbial community composition and diversity, yet few studies have characterized the specific effects of pH on individual bacterial taxa within bacterial communities, both abundant and rare. We collected composite soil samples over 2 years from an experimentally maintained pH gradient ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 from the Craibstone Experimental Farm (Craibstone, Scotland). Extracted nucleic acids were characterized by bacterial and group-specific denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Both methods demonstrated comparable and reproducible shifts within higher taxonomic bacterial groups (e.g. Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Gammaproteobacteria) across the pH gradient. In addition, we used non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the first time on 16S rRNA gene data to identify positively interacting (i.e. co-occurring) operational taxonomic unit (OTU) clusters (i.e. 'components'), with abundances that correlated strongly with pH, and sample year to a lesser extent. All OTUs identified by NMF were visualized within principle coordinate analyses of UNIFRAC distances and subjected to taxonomic network analysis (SSUnique), which plotted OTU abundance and similarity against established taxonomies. Most pH-dependent OTUs identified here would not have been identified by previous methodologies for microbial community profiling and were unrelated to known lineages. PMID:24117982

  20. Deciphering bartonella diversity, recombination, and host specificity in a rodent community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Buffet

    Full Text Available Host-specificity is an intrinsic feature of many bacterial pathogens, resulting from a long history of co-adaptation between bacteria and their hosts. Alpha-proteobacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella infect the erythrocytes of a wide range of mammal orders, including rodents. In this study, we performed genetic analysis of Bartonella colonizing a rodent community dominated by bank voles (Myodes glareolus and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus in a French suburban forest to evaluate their diversity, their capacity to recombine and their level of host specificity. Following the analysis of 550 rodents, we detected 63 distinct genotypes related to B. taylorii, B. grahamii, B. doshiae and a new B. rochalimae-like species. Investigating the most highly represented species, we showed that B. taylorii strain diversity was markedly higher than that of B. grahamii, suggesting a possible severe bottleneck for the latter species. The majority of recovered genotypes presented a strong association with either bank voles or wood mice, with the exception of three B. taylorii genotypes which had a broader host range. Despite the physical barriers created by host specificity, we observed lateral gene transfer between Bartonella genotypes associated with wood mice and Bartonella adapted to bank voles, suggesting that those genotypes might co-habit during their life cycle.

  1. Characterization of Bacterial Community Structure and Diversity in Rhizosphere Soils of Three Plants in Rapidly Changing Salt Marshes Using 16S rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure and diversity of the bacterial communities in rhizosphere soils of native Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter and alien Spartina alterniflora in the Yangtze River Estuary were investigated by constructing 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone libraries. The bacterial diversity was quantified by placing the clones into operational taxonomic unit (OTU) groups at the level of sequence similarity of > 97%. Phylogenetic analysis of the resulting 398 clone sequences indicated a high diversity of bacteria in the rhizosphere soils of these plants. The members of Alphaproteobacteria,Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria were the most abundant in rhizobacteria. Chao 1 nonparametric diversity estimator coupled with the reciprocal of Simpson's index (1/D) was applied to sequence data obtained from each library to evaluate total sequence diversity and quantitatively compare the level of dominance. The results showed that Phragmites, Scirpus, and Spartina rhizosphere soils contained 200, 668, and 382 OTUs, respectively. The bacterial communities in the Spartina and Phragmites rhizosphere soils displayed species dominance revealed by 1/D, whereas the bacterial community in Scirpus rhizosphere soil had uniform distributions of species abundance. Overall, analysis of 16S rDNA clone libraries from the rhizosphere soils indicates that the changes in bacterial composition may occur concomitantly with the shift of species composition in plant communities.

  2. Snow surface microbiome on the High Antarctic Plateau (DOME C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Michaud

    Full Text Available The cryosphere is an integral part of the global climate system and one of the major habitable ecosystems of Earth's biosphere. These permanently frozen environments harbor diverse, viable and metabolically active microbial populations that represent almost all the major phylogenetic groups. In this study, we investigated the microbial diversity in the surface snow surrounding the Concordia Research Station on the High Antarctic Plateau through a polyphasic approach, including direct prokaryotic quantification by flow cytometry and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH, and phylogenetic identification by 16S RNA gene clone library sequencing and 454 16S amplicon pyrosequencing. Although the microbial abundance was low (<10(3 cells/ml of snowmelt, concordant results were obtained with the different techniques. The microbial community was mainly composed of members of the Alpha-proteobacteria class (e.g. Kiloniellaceae and Rhodobacteraceae, which is one of the most well-represented bacterial groups in marine habitats, Bacteroidetes (e.g. Cryomorphaceae and Flavobacteriaceae and Cyanobacteria. Based on our results, polar microorganisms could not only be considered as deposited airborne particles, but as an active component of the snowpack ecology of the High Antarctic Plateau.

  3. Metaproteomics provides functional insight into activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wilmes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis". When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming alpha-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid beta oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of "Accumulibacter" to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models.

  4. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. PMID:25485864

  5. Evaluating bacterial community structures in oil collected from the sea surface and sediment in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanfei; Liu, Jiqing

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial community structures were evaluated in oil samples using culture-independent pyrosequencing, including oil mousses collected on sea surface and salt marshes during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead 1 year after the spill. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Erythrobacter, Rhodovulum, Stappia, and Thalassospira of Alphaproteobacteria were the prevailing groups in the oil mousses, which may relate to high temperatures and strong irradiance in surface Gulf waters. In the mousse collected from the leaves of Spartina alterniflora, Vibrio of Gammaproteobacteria represented 57% of the total operational taxonomic units, suggesting that this indigenous genus is particularly responsive to the oil contamination in salt marshes. The bacterial communities in oil-contaminated sediments were highly diversified. The relatively high abundance of the Methylococcus, Methylobacter, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chlorofexi bacteria resembles those found in certain cold-seep sediments with gas hydrates. Bacterial communities in the overlying water of the oil-contaminated sediment were dominated by Ralstonia of Betaproteobacteria, which can degrade small aromatics, and Saccharophagus degradans of Gammaproteobacteria, a cellulose degrader, suggesting that overlying water was affected by the oil-contaminated sediments, possibly due to the dissolution of small aromatics and biosurfactants produced during biodegradation. Overall, these results provided key information needed to evaluate oil degradation in the region and develop future bioremediation strategies. PMID:23568850

  6. Hydrogeology, water quality, and microbial assessment of a coastal alluvial aquifer in western Saudi Arabia: potential use of coastal wadi aquifers for desalination water supplies [Hydrogéologie, qualité de l’eau et évaluation microbienne d’un aquifère côtier alluvial dans l’Ouest de l’Arabie Saoudite: utilisation potentielle des aquifères côtiers des oueds pour l’alimentation en eau après désalinisation] [Hidrogeologia, qualidade da água e avaliação microbiológica de um aquífero costeiro no oeste da Arábia Saudita: uso potencial de aquíferos de wadi costeiros para dessalinização de águas destinadas a abastecimento] [Hidrogeología, calidad de agua y evaluación microbiana de un acuífero costero aluvial en Arabia Saudita occidental: uso potencial de acuíferos costeros uadis para la desalinización de los abastecimientos de agua

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2014-07-20

    Wadi alluvial aquifers located along coastal areas of the Middle East have been assumed to be suitable sources of feed water for seawater reverse osmosis facilities based on high productivity, connectedness to the sea for recharge, and the occurrence of seawater with chemistry similar to that in the adjacent Red Sea. An investigation of the intersection of Wadi Wasimi with the Red Sea in western Saudi Arabia has revealed that the associated predominantly unconfined alluvial aquifer divides into two sand-and-gravel aquifers at the coast, each with high productivity (transmissivity = 42,000 m2/day). This aquifer system becomes confined near the coast and contains hypersaline water. The hydrogeology of Wadi Wasimi shows that two of the assumptions are incorrect in that the aquifer is not well connected to the sea because of confinement by very low hydraulic conductivity terrigenous and marine muds and the aquifer contains hypersaline water as a result of a hydraulic connection to a coastal sabkha. A supplemental study shows that the aquifer system contains a diverse microbial community composed of predominantly of Proteobacteria with accompanying high percentages of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria.

  7. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  8. Dynamic bacterial communities on reverse-osmosis membranes in a full-scale desalination plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; West, N; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-01-01

    To better understand biofouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, bacterial diversity was characterized in the intake water, in subsequently pretreated water and on SWRO membranes from a full-scale desalination plant (FSDP) during a 9 month period. 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting and sequencing revealed that bacterial communities in the water samples and on the SWRO membranes were very different. For the different sampling dates, the bacterial diversity of the active and the total bacterial fractions of the water samples remained relatively stable over the sampling period whereas the bacterial community structure on the four SWRO membrane samples was significantly different. The richness and evenness of the SWRO membrane bacterial communities increased with usage time with an increase in the Shannon diversity index of 2.2 to 3.7. In the oldest SWRO membrane (330 days), no single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dominated and the majority of the OTUs fell into the Alphaproteobacteria or the Planctomycetes. In striking contrast, a Betaproteobacteria OTU affiliated to the genus Ideonella was dominant and exclusively found in the membrane used for the shortest time (10 days). This suggests that bacteria belonging to this genus could be one of the primary colonizers of the SWRO membrane. Knowledge of the dominant bacterial species on SWRO membranes and their dynamics should help guide culture studies for physiological characterization of biofilm forming species.

  9. Composition and variability of biofouling organisms in seawater reverse osmosis desalination plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M V; Cai, Baoli

    2011-07-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Cellulophaga based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The 16S rRNA gene clone library of the SWRO membrane biofilm showed that a filamentous bacterium, Leucothrix mucor, which belongs to the gammaproteobacteria, accounted for nearly 30% of the clone library, while the rest of the microorganisms (61.2% of the total clones) were related to the alphaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that bacteria colonizing the SWRO membrane represented a subportion of microbes in the source seawater; however, they were quite different from those colonizing the cartridge filter. The examination of five SWRO membranes from desalination plants located in different parts of the world showed that although the bacterial communities from the membranes were not identical to each other, some dominant bacteria were commonly observed. In contrast, bacterial communities in source seawater were significantly different based on location and season. Microbial profiles from 14 cartridge filters collected from different plants also revealed spatial trends.

  10. Composition and Variability of Biofouling Organisms in Seawater Reverse Osmosis Desalination Plants ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglu; Jiang, Sunny; Tanuwidjaja, Dian; Voutchkov, Nikolay; Hoek, Eric M. V.; Cai, Baoli

    2011-01-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane biofouling remains a common challenge in the desalination industry, but the marine bacterial community that causes membrane fouling is poorly understood. Microbial communities at different stages of treatment processes (intake, cartridge filtration, and SWRO) of a desalination pilot plant were examined by both culture-based and culture-independent approaches. Bacterial isolates were identified to match the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Vibrio, and Cellulophaga based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The 16S rRNA gene clone library of the SWRO membrane biofilm showed that a filamentous bacterium, Leucothrix mucor, which belongs to the gammaproteobacteria, accounted for nearly 30% of the clone library, while the rest of the microorganisms (61.2% of the total clones) were related to the alphaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that bacteria colonizing the SWRO membrane represented a subportion of microbes in the source seawater; however, they were quite different from those colonizing the cartridge filter. The examination of five SWRO membranes from desalination plants located in different parts of the world showed that although the bacterial communities from the membranes were not identical to each other, some dominant bacteria were commonly observed. In contrast, bacterial communities in source seawater were significantly different based on location and season. Microbial profiles from 14 cartridge filters collected from different plants also revealed spatial trends. PMID:21551282

  11. [Analysis on Diversity of Denitrifying Microorganisms in Sequential Batch Bioreactor Landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Hua; Sun, Ying-Jie; Liu, Zi-Liang; Ma, Qiang; Yang, Qiang

    2016-01-15

    A denitrification functional microorganism gene clone library (amoA, nosZ) and the PCR-RFLP technology was constructed to investigate the microbial diversity of denitrifying microorganisms in the late period of stabilization of sequential batch bioreactor landfill. The results indicated that: the bacterial diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the aged refuse reactor was very high, and most of them were unknown groups, also, all bacteria were unculturable or had not been isolated. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria were presumably Nitrosomonas of 6-Proteobacteria. The diversity of denitrifying bacteria in fresh refuse reactor was abundant, which mainly included Thauera and Thiobacillus of 6-Proteobacteria. As Thauera sp. has the denitrification characteristics under the condition of aerobic while Thiobacillus denitrificans has the autotrophic denitrification characteristics, it was speculated that aerobic denitrification and autotrophic denitrification might be the main pathways for nitrogen removal in the fresh refuse reactor at the late period of stabilization. Additionally, another group in the gene clone library of denitrifying bacteria may be classified as Bradyrhizobiaceae of alpha-Proteobacteria. PMID:27078976

  12. Responses of Bacterial Communities to Simulated Climate Changes in Alpine Meadow Soil of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Junpeng; Li, Jiabao; Wang, Shiping; An, Jiaxing; Liu, Wen-tso; Lin, Qiaoyan; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Li, Xiangzhen

    2015-09-01

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling. However, microbial responses to climate warming or cooling remain poorly understood, limiting our ability to predict the consequences of future climate changes. To address this issue, it is critical to identify microbes sensitive to climate change and key driving factors shifting microbial communities. In this study, alpine soil transplant experiments were conducted downward or upward along an elevation gradient between 3,200 and 3,800 m in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau to simulate climate warming or cooling. After a 2-year soil transplant experiment, soil bacterial communities were analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that the transplanted soil bacterial communities became more similar to those in their destination sites and more different from those in their "home" sites. Warming led to increases in the relative abundances in Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, while cooling had opposite effects on bacterial communities (symmetric response). Soil temperature and plant biomass contributed significantly to shaping the bacterial community structure. Overall, climate warming or cooling shifted the soil bacterial community structure mainly through species sorting, and such a shift might correlate to important biogeochemical processes such as greenhouse gas emissions. This study provides new insights into our understanding of soil bacterial community responses to climate warming and cooling. PMID:26116682

  13. A snapshot on spatial and vertical distribution of bacterial communities in the eastern Indian Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; KAN Jinjun; BORECKI Laura; ZHANG Xiaodong; WANG Dongxiao; SUN Jun

    2016-01-01

    Besides being critical components of marine food web, microorganisms play vital roles in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and elements in the ocean. Currently little is known about microbial population structure and their distributions in the eastern Indian Ocean. In this study, we applied molecular approaches including polymerase chain reaction-denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and High-Throughput next generation sequencing to investigate bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the equatorial regions and the adjacent Bay of Bengal in the eastern Indian Ocean. In general,Bacteroidetes,Proteobacteria (mainlyAlpha, andGamma),Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria andPlanctomycetes dominated the microbial communities. Horizontally distinct spatial distribution of major microbial groups was observed from PCR-DGGE gel image analyses. However, further detailed characterization of community structures by pyrosequencing suggested a more pronounced stratified distribution pattern:Cyanobacteria andActinobacteria were more predominant at surface water (25 m);Bacteroidetes dominated at 25 m and 150 m whileProteobacteria (mainlyAlphaproteobacteria) occurred more frequently at 75 m water depth. With increasing water depth, the bacterial communities from different locations tended to share high similarity, indicating a niche partitioning for minor groups of bacteria recovered with high throughput sequencing approaches. This study provided the first “snapshot” on biodiversity and spatial distribution ofBacteria in water columns in the eastern Indian Ocean, and the findings further emphasized the potential functional roles of these microbes in energy and resource cycling in the eastern Indian Ocean.

  14. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Bougouffa, Salim

    2013-03-29

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.

  15. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  16. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities of serpentine soil and of rhizosphere of the nickel-hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum bertolonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, A; Grassi, E; Barzanti, R; Biondi, E G; Gonnelli, C; Kim, C K; Bazzicalupo, M

    2004-08-01

    Serpentine soils are characterized by high levels of heavy metals (Ni, Co, Cr), and low levels of important plant nutrients (P, Ca, N). Because of these inhospitable edaphic conditions, serpentine soils are typically home to a very specialized flora including endemic species as the nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum bertolonii. Although much is known about the serpentine flora, few researches have investigated the bacterial communities of serpentine areas. In the present study bacterial communities were sampled at various distances from A. bertolonii roots in three different serpentine areas and their genetic diversity was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. The obtained results indicated the occurrence of a high genetic diversity and heterogeneity of the bacterial communities present in the different serpentine areas. Moreover, TRFs (terminal restriction fragments) common to all the investigated A. bertolonii rhizosphere samples were found. A new cloning strategy was applied to 27 TRFs that were sequenced and taxonomically interpreted as mainly belonging to Gram-positive and alpha-Proteobacteria representatives. In particular, cloned TRFs which discriminated between rhizosphere and soil samples were mainly interpreted as belonging to Proteobacteria representatives. PMID:15546041

  17. Genetic and functional diversities of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shyamalina; Choudhury, Susanta Roy; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2011-06-01

    Bioinoculants are environmentally friendly, energy efficient and economically viable resources in sustainable agriculture. Knowledge of the structure and activities of microbial population in the rhizosphere of a plant is essential to formulate an effective bioinoculant. In this study, the bacterial community present in the rhizosphere of an important oilseed legume, Arachis hypogaea (L.) was described with respect to adjoining bulk soil as a baseline control using a 16S rDNA based metagenomic approach. Significantly higher abundance of Gamma-proteobacteria, a prevalence of Bacillus and the Cytophaga-Flavobacteria group of Bacteroidetes and absence of the Rhizobiaceae family of Alpha-proteobacteria were the major features observed in the matured Arachis-rhizosphere. The functional characterization of the rhizosphere-competent bacteria was performed using culture-dependent determination of phenotypes. Most bacterial isolates from the groundnut-rhizosphere exhibited multiple biochemical activities associated with plant growth and disease control. Validation of the beneficial traits in candidate bioinoculants in pot-cultures and field trials is necessary before their targeted application in the groundnut production system. PMID:21380504

  18. Dynamics of bacterial communities in two unpolluted soils after spiking with phenanthrene: soil type specific and common responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Chun eDing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Considering their key role for ecosystem processes, it is important to understand the response of microbial communities in unpolluted soils to pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. Phenanthrene, a model compound for PAH, was spiked to a Cambisol and a Luvisol soil. Total community DNA from phenanthrene-spiked and control soils collected on days 0, 21 and 63 were analyzed based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genefragments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints of bacterial communities increasingly deviated with time between spiked and control soils. In taxon specific DGGE, significant responses of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria became only detectable after 63 days, while significant effects on Betaproteobacteria were detectable in both soils after 21 days. Comparison of the taxonomic distribution of bacteria in spiked and control soils on day 63 as revealed by pyrosequencing indicated soil type specific negative effects of phenanthrene on several taxa, many of them belonging to the Gamma-, Beta- or Deltaproteobacteria. Bacterial richness and evenness decreased in spiked soils. Despite the significant differences in the bacterial community structure between both soils on day 0, similar genera increased in relative abundance after PAH spiking, especially Sphingomonas and Polaromonas. However, this did not result in an increased overall similarity of the bacterial communities in both soils.

  19. Major similarities in the bacterial communities associated with lesioned and healthy Fungiidae corals

    KAUST Repository

    Apprill, Amy

    2013-03-21

    Cultivation-based studies have demonstrated that yellow-band disease (YBD), a lesion-producing ailment affecting diverse species of coral, is caused by a consortium of Vibrio spp. This study takes the first cultivation-independent approach to examine the whole bacterial community associated with YBD-like lesioned corals. Two species of Fungiidae corals, Ctenactis crassa and Herpolitha limax, displaying YBD-like lesions were examined across diverse reefs throughout the Red Sea. Using a pyrosequencing approach targeting the V1-V3 regions of the SSU rRNA gene, no major differences in bacterial community composition or diversity were identified between healthy and lesioned corals of either species. Indicator species analysis did not find Vibrio significantly associated with the lesioned corals. However, operational taxonomic units belonging to the Ruegeria genus of Alphaproteobacteria and NS9 marine group of Flavobacteria were significantly associated with the lesioned corals. The most striking trend of this dataset was that reef location was found to be the most significant influence on the coral-bacterial community. It is possible that more pronounced lesion-specific bacterial signatures might have been concealed by the strong influence of environmental conditions on coral-bacteria. Overall, this study demonstrates inconsistencies between cultivation-independent and cultivation-based studies regarding the role of specific bacteria in coral diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. A biogeographic distribution of magnetotactic bacteria influenced by salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Wang, Yinzhao; Li, Bi; Pan, Yongxin

    2012-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which synthesize intracellular ferromagnetic magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes, have significant roles in global iron cycling in aquatic systems, as well as sedimentary magnetism. The occurrence of MTB has been reported in aquatic environments from freshwater to marine ecosystems; however, the distribution of MTB across heterogeneous habitats remains unclear. Here we examined the MTB communities from diverse habitats across northern and southern China, using comprehensive transmission electron microscopy and comparison of 16S rRNA gene analyses. A total of 334 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed, representing the most comprehensive analysis on the diversity and distribution of MTB to date. The majority (95%) of sequences belong to the Alphaproteobacteria, whereas a population of giant magnetotactic rod is affiliated with the Nitrospirae phylum. By a statistical comparison of these sequence data and publicly available MTB sequences, we infer for the first time that the composition of MTB communities represents a biogeographic distribution across globally heterogeneous environments, which is influenced by salinity. PMID:21866181

  1. Magnetotactic bacteria in microcosms originating from the French Mediterranean Coast subjected to oil industry activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postec, Anne; Tapia, Nicolas; Bernadac, Alain; Joseph, Manon; Davidson, Sylvain; Wu, Long-Fei; Ollivier, Bernard; Pradel, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) mineralize nanosized magnetite or greigite crystals within cells and thus play an important role in the biogeochemical process. Despite decades of research, knowledge of MTB distribution and ecology, notably in areas subjected to oil industry activities, is still limited. In the present study, we investigated the presence of MTB in the Gulf of Fos, French Mediterranean coast, which is subjected to intensive oil industry activities. Microcosms containing sediments/water (1:2, v/v) from several sampling sites were monitored over several weeks. The presence of MTB was revealed in five of eight sites. Diverse and numerous MTB were revealed particularly from one site (named CAR), whilst temporal variations of a homogenous magnetotactic cocci population was shown within the LAV site microcosm over a 4-month period. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, and a novel genus from the LAV site was evidenced. Among the physicochemical parameters measured, a correlation was shown between the variation of MTB abundance in microcosms and the redox state of sulphur compounds. PMID:21766218

  2. Diversity analysis of magnetotactic bacteria in Lake Miyun, northern China, by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Schüler, Dirk; Jogler, Christian; Pan, Yongxin

    2009-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize intracellular nano-scale crystals of magnetite or greigite within magnetosomes. MTB are ubiquitous in limnic and marine environments. In order to understand the diversity of MTB better, sediment samples were examined from Lake Miyun near Beijing by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). First, in silico analysis was used to evaluate the effectiveness of 12 sets of restriction endonucleases for distinguishing MTB sequences retrieved from the GenBank database. It was found that the tested restriction endonucleases had different power in the ability to differentiate the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of MTB. Specifically, of the 12 sets of enzymes, MspI plus RsaI was found to be the most effective for correctly differentiating the OTUs of selected MTB sequences and it could detect 16 OTUs with appropriate OTUmin and OTUmax values (96.7% and 97.7%, respectively). The MspI plus RsaI RFLP analysis was then utilized to investigate the diversity of MTB in Lake Miyun sediment and it identified 8 OTUs (74.5% of the whole library) as MTB. Among these, 5 were affiliated to Alphaproteobacteria, while the rest belonged to the Nitrospira phylum. Interestingly, OTUs C, D and I displayed 91.8-98.4% similarity to "Magnetobacterium bavaricum". Together, these results demonstrated that the MspI plus RsaI RFLP analysis was useful for studying the diversity and change in community composition of uncultivated MTB from environmental samples. PMID:19168303

  3. Isolation, characterization and phylogeny of sponge-associated bacteria with antimicrobial activities from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olinda C S; Pontes, Paula V M L; Santos, Juliana F M; Muricy, Guilherme; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Laport, Marinella S

    2010-09-01

    Bacteria associated with marine sponges represent a rich source of bioactive metabolites. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize bacteria with antimicrobial activities from Brazilian sponges. A total of 158 colony-forming units were isolated from nine sponge species. Among these, 12 isolates presented antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria. Based on comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes, the sponge-associated bacterial strains could be subdivided into three phylogenetically different clusters. Five strains were affiliated with Firmicutes (genera Bacillus and Virgibacillus), three with alpha-Proteobacteria (Pseudovibrio sp.) and four with gamma-Proteobacteria (genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas). The sponge-associated bacterial strains Pseudomonas fluorescens H40 and H41 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa H51 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including strains such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacillus pumilus Pc31 and Pc32, Pseudovibrio ascidiaceicola Pm31 and Ca31 and Pseudovibrio denitrificans Mm37 strains were more effective against Gram-positive bacteria. These findings suggest that the identified strains may contribute to the search for new sources of antimicrobial substances, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:20600863

  4. Metagenome of microorganisms associated with the toxic Cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa analyzed using the 454 sequencing platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; ZHANG Lei; LI Fuchao; WANG Yuezhu; ZHU Yongqiang; KANG Hui; WANG Shengyue; QIN Song

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the 454 pyrosequencing technology was used to analyze the DNA of the Microcystis aeruginosa symbiosis system from cyanobacterial algal blooms in Taihu Lake, China. We generated 183 228 reads with an average length of 248 bp. Running the 454 assembly algorithm over our sequences yielded 22 239 significant contigs. After excluding the M. aeruginosa sequences, we obtained 1 322 assembled contigs longer than 1 000 bp. Taxonomic analysis indicated that four kingdoms were represented in the community: Archaea (n=9; 0.01%), Bacteria (n=98 921; 99.6%), Eukaryota (n=373;3.7%), and Viruses (n=18; 0.02%). The bacterial sequences were predominantly Alphaproteobacteria(n=41 805; 83.3%), Betaproteobacteria (n=5 254; 10.5%) and Gammaproteobacteria (n= 1 180; 2.4%).Gene annotations and assignment of COG (clusters of orthologous groups) functional categories indicate that a large number of the predicted genes are involved in metabolic, genetic, and environmental information processes. Our results demonstrate the extraordinary diversity of a microbial community in an ectosymbiotic system and further establish the tremendous utility of pyrosequencing.

  5. Pyrosequencing demonstrated complex microbial communities in a membrane filtration system for a drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soondong; Moon, Eunjeong; Kim, Taek-Seung; Hong, Seungkwan; Park, Hee-Deung

    2011-01-01

    Microbial community composition in a pilot-scale microfiltration plant for drinking water treatment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing technology. Sequences of 16S rRNA gene fragments were recovered from raw water, membrane tank particulate matter, and membrane biofilm, and used for taxonomic assignments, estimations of diversity, and the identification of potential pathogens. Greater bacterial diversity was observed in each sample (1,133-1,731 operational taxonomic units) than studies using conventional methods, primarily due to the large number (8,164-22,275) of sequences available for analysis and the identification of rare species. Betaproteobacteria predominated in the raw water (61.1%), while Alphaproteobacteria were predominant in the membrane tank particulate matter (42.4%) and membrane biofilm (32.8%). The bacterial community structure clearly differed for each sample at both the genus and species levels, suggesting that different environmental and growth conditions were generated during membrane filtration. Moreover, signatures of potential pathogens including Legionella, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, and Chromobacterium were identified, and the proportions of Legionella and Chromobacterium were elevated in the membrane tank particulate matter, suggesting a potential threat to drinking water treated by membrane filtration.

  6. 454 pyrosequencing-based characterization of the bacterial consortia in a well established nitrifying reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Vargas, Rocio; Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Luna-Guido, Marco; Thalasso, Frederic; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This present study aimed to characterize the bacterial community in a well-established nitrifying reactor by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. The laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactor has been supplied with ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as sole energy source for over 5 years, while no organic carbon has been added, assembling thus a unique planktonic community with a mean NH(4)(+) removal rate of 86 ± 1.4 mg NH(4)(+)-N/(L d). Results showed a nitrifying community composed of bacteria belonging to Nitrosomonas (relative abundance 11.0%) as the sole ammonia oxidizers (AOB) and Nitrobacter (9.3%) as the sole nitrite oxidizers (NOB). The Alphaproteobacteria (42.3% including Nitrobacter) were the most abundant class within the Proteobacteria (62.8%) followed by the Gammaproteobacteria (9.4%). However, the Betaproteobacteria (excluding AOB) contributed only 0.08%, confirming that Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria thrived in low-organic-load environments while heterotrophic Betaproteobacteria are not well adapted to these conditions. Bacteroidetes, known to metabolize extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifying bacteria and secondary metabolites of the decayed biomass, was the second most abundant phylum (30.8%). It was found that Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter sustained a broad population of heterotrophs in the reactor dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, in a 1:4 ratio of total nitrifiers to all heterotrophs. PMID:26360760

  7. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0–30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0–20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30–60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0–20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings.

  8. The incidence of nirS and nirK and their genetic heterogeneity in cultivated denitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, Kim; Gevers, Dirk; Vanparys, Bram; Wittebolle, Lieven; Geets, Joke; Boon, Nico; De Vos, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Gene sequence analysis of nirS and nirK, both encoding nitrite reductases, was performed on cultivated denitrifiers to assess their incidence in different bacterial taxa and their taxonomical value. Almost half of the 227 investigated denitrifying strains did not render an nir amplicon with any of five previously described primers. NirK and nirS were found to be prevalent in Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, respectively, nirK was detected in the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes and nirS and nirK with equal frequency in the Gammaproteobacteria. These observations deviated from the hitherto reported incidence of nir genes in bacterial taxa. NirS gene phylogeny was congruent with the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny on family or genus level, although some strains did group within clusters of other bacterial classes. Phylogenetic nirK gene sequence analysis was incongruent with the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. NirK sequences were also found to be significantly more similar to nirK sequences from the same habitat than to nirK sequences retrieved from highly related taxa. This study supports the hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer events of denitrification genes have occurred and underlines that denitrification genes should not be linked with organism diversity of denitrifiers in cultivation-independent studies.

  9. The role of lipids in activated sludge floc formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Liza Kretzschmar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge is widely used to treat municipal and industrial wastewater globally and the formation of activated sludge flocculates (flocs underpins the ability to separate sludge from treated water. Despite the importance of activated sludge flocs to human civilization there have been precious few attempts to rationally design fit for purpose flocs using a bottom-up approach based on a solid scientific foundation. Recently we have been developing experimental models for activated sludge floc formation based on the colonization and consumption of particulate organic matter (chitin and cellulose. In this study we lay the foundation for investigation of activated sludge floc formation based on biofilm formation around spheres of the lipid glycerol trioleate (GT that form spontaneously when GT is introduced into activated sludge incubations. Sludge biomass was observed to associate tightly with the lipid spheres. An increase in extracellular lipase activity was associated with a decrease in size of the colonized lipid spheres over a 25 day incubation. Bacterial community composition shifted from predominantly Betaproteobacteria to Alphaproteobacteria in GT treated sludge. Four activated sludge bacteria were isolated from lipid spheres and two of them were shown to produce AHL like quorum sensing signal activity, suggesting quorum sensing may play a role in lipid spheres colonization and biodegradation in activated sludge. The development of this experimental model of activated sludge floc formation lays the foundation for rational production of flocs for wastewater treatment using lipids as floc nuclei and further development of the flocculate life-cycle concept.

  10. Marine bacterioplankton community turnover within seasonally hypoxic waters of a subtropical sound: Devil's Hole, Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Rachel J; Nelson, Craig E; Carlson, Craig A; Denman, Carmen C; Andersson, Andreas J; Kledzik, Andrew L; Vergin, Kevin L; McNally, Sean P; Treusch, Alexander H; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Understanding bacterioplankton community dynamics in coastal hypoxic environments is relevant to global biogeochemistry because coastal hypoxia is increasing worldwide. The temporal dynamics of bacterioplankton communities were analysed throughout the illuminated water column of Devil's Hole, Bermuda during the 6-week annual transition from a strongly stratified water column with suboxic and high-pCO2 bottom waters to a fully mixed and ventilated state during 2008. A suite of culture-independent methods provided a quantitative spatiotemporal characterization of bacterioplankton community changes, including both direct counts and rRNA gene sequencing. During stratification, the surface waters were dominated by the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus. In the suboxic bottom waters, cells from the order Chlorobiales prevailed, with gene sequences indicating members of the genera Chlorobium and Prosthecochloris--anoxygenic photoautotrophs that utilize sulfide as a source of electrons for photosynthesis. Transitional zones of hypoxia also exhibited elevated levels of methane- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria relative to the overlying waters. The abundance of both Thaumarcheota and Euryarcheota were elevated in the suboxic bottom waters (> 10(9) cells l(-1)). Following convective mixing, the entire water column returned to a community typical of oxygenated waters, with Euryarcheota only averaging 5% of cells, and Chlorobiales and Thaumarcheota absent. PMID:24589037

  11. Unexpected Diversity of Magnetococci in Intertidal Sediments of Xiaoshi Island in the North Yellow Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB are a group of prokaryotes that, despite their high morphological, phylogenetic, and ecological diversity, share a common capability of forming intracellular nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4, called magnetosomes, and swimming along geomagnetic field lines in a process called magnetotaxis. In this study, we investigated the MTB diversity within the intertidal sediments near Xiaoshi Island (Weihai in the North Yellow Sea using a combination of molecular ecology techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The combination of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed seven new MTB genera affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria class. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analyses suggested that one magnetotactic coccus (designated as WHI-2 is the dominant species. TEM observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed that MTB cells mainly form magnetite magnetosomes that are organized into two chains of magnetosomes composed of e-prismatic magnetite crystals. This finding suggests the adaptation of a magnetotactic bacterial population to the marine tide. This is the first report of magnetotactic bacteria near Xiaoshi Island, which should be useful for studies of biogeochemical cycling and the geohistory of this area.

  12. Factors Influencing Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in Municipal Drinking Waters in the Ohio River Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanish, Lee F.; Hull, Natalie M.; Robertson, Charles E.; Harris, J. Kirk; Stevens, Mark J.; Spear, John R.; Pace, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    The composition and metabolic activities of microbes in drinking water distribution systems can affect water quality and distribution system integrity. In order to understand regional variations in drinking water microbiology in the upper Ohio River watershed, the chemical and microbiological constituents of 17 municipal distribution systems were assessed. While sporadic variations were observed, the microbial diversity was generally dominated by fewer than 10 taxa, and was driven by the amount of disinfectant residual in the water. Overall, Mycobacterium spp. (Actinobacteria), MLE1-12 (phylum Cyanobacteria), Methylobacterium spp., and sphingomonads were the dominant taxa. Shifts in community composition from Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria to Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria were associated with higher residual chlorine. Alpha- and beta-diversity were higher in systems with higher chlorine loads, which may reflect changes in the ecological processes structuring the communities under different levels of oxidative stress. These results expand the assessment of microbial diversity in municipal distribution systems and demonstrate the value of considering ecological theory to understand the processes controlling microbial makeup. Such understanding may inform the management of municipal drinking water resources. PMID:27362708

  13. [Analysis on Diversity of Denitrifying Microorganisms in Sequential Batch Bioreactor Landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Hua; Sun, Ying-Jie; Liu, Zi-Liang; Ma, Qiang; Yang, Qiang

    2016-01-15

    A denitrification functional microorganism gene clone library (amoA, nosZ) and the PCR-RFLP technology was constructed to investigate the microbial diversity of denitrifying microorganisms in the late period of stabilization of sequential batch bioreactor landfill. The results indicated that: the bacterial diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the aged refuse reactor was very high, and most of them were unknown groups, also, all bacteria were unculturable or had not been isolated. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria were presumably Nitrosomonas of 6-Proteobacteria. The diversity of denitrifying bacteria in fresh refuse reactor was abundant, which mainly included Thauera and Thiobacillus of 6-Proteobacteria. As Thauera sp. has the denitrification characteristics under the condition of aerobic while Thiobacillus denitrificans has the autotrophic denitrification characteristics, it was speculated that aerobic denitrification and autotrophic denitrification might be the main pathways for nitrogen removal in the fresh refuse reactor at the late period of stabilization. Additionally, another group in the gene clone library of denitrifying bacteria may be classified as Bradyrhizobiaceae of alpha-Proteobacteria.

  14. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial diversity in soils contaminated long-term with PAHs and heavy metals: Implications to bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Lee, Yong Bok; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Diversity, distribution and composition of bacterial community of soils contaminated long-term with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals were explored for the first time following 454 pyrosequencing. Strikingly, the complete picture of the Gram positive (+ve) and Gram negative (-ve) bacterial profile obtained in our study illustrates novel postulates that include: (1) Metal-tolerant and PAH-degrading Gram -ves belonging to the class Alphaproteobacteria persist relatively more in the real contaminated sites compared to Gram +ves, (2) Gram +ves are not always resistant to heavy metal toxicity, (3) Stenotrophomonas followed by Burkholderia and Pseudomonas are the dominant genera of PAH degraders with high metabolic activity in long-term contaminated soils, (4) Actinobacteria is the predominant group among the Gram +ves in soils contaminated with high molecular weight PAHs that co-exist with toxic heavy metals like Pb, Cu and Zn, (5) Microbial communities are nutrient-driven in natural environments and (6) Catabolically potential Gram +/-ves with diverse applicability to remediate the real contaminated sites evolve eventually in the historically-polluted soils. Thus, the most promising indigenous Gram +/-ve strains from the long-term contaminated sites with increased catabolic potential, enzymatic activity and metal tolerance need to be harnessed for mixed contaminant cleanups.

  15. Plants rather than mineral fertilization shape microbial community structure and functional potential in legacy contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub eRidl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant-microbe interactions are of particular importance in polluted soils. This study sought to determine how selected plants (horseradish, black nightshade and tobacco and NPK mineral fertilization shape the structure of soil microbial communities in legacy contaminated soil and the resultant impact of treatment on the soil microbial community functional potential. To explore these objectives, we combined shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA gene amplicon high throughput sequencing with data analysis approaches developed for RNA-seq. We observed that the presence of any of the selected plants rather than fertilization shaped the microbial community structure, and the microbial populations of the root zone of each plant significantly differed from one another and/or from the bulk soil, whereas the effect of the fertilizer proved to be insignificant. When we compared microbial diversity in root zones versus bulk soil, we observed an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria or Bacteroidetes, taxa which are commonly considered copiotrophic. Our results thus align with the theory that fast-growing, copiotrophic, microbial guilds which are adapted to ephemeral carbon inputs are enriched in the vegetated soil.. Microbial functional potential indicated that some genetic determinants associated with signal transduction mechanisms, defense mechanisms or amino acid transport and metabolism, differed significantly among treatments. Genetic determinants of these categories tend to be overrepresented in copiotrophic organisms. The results of our study further elucidate plant-microbe relationships in a contaminated environment with possible implications for the phyto/rhizoremediation of contaminated areas.

  16. Structural and functional insights from the metagenome of an acidic hot spring microbial planktonic community in the Colombian Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Javier Jiménez

    Full Text Available A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC. A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation, and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ, associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment.

  17. Vertical distribution of airborne bacterial communities in an Asian-dust downwind area, Noto Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Hara, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Kurosaki, Yasunori; Kakikawa, Makiko; Matsuki, Atsushi; Chen, Bin; Shi, Guangyu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial populations transported from ground environments to the atmosphere get dispersed throughout downwind areas and can influence ecosystem dynamics, human health, and climate change. However, the vertical bacterial distribution in the free troposphere was rarely investigated in detail. We collected aerosols at altitudes of 3000 m, 1000 m, and 10 m over the Noto Peninsula, Japan, where the westerly winds carry aerosols from continental and marine areas. During the sampling period on March 10, 2012, the air mass at 3000 m was transported from the Chinese desert region by the westerly winds, and a boundary layer was formed below 2000 m. Pyrosequencing targeting 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that the bacterial community at 3000 m was predominantly composed of terrestrial bacteria, such as Bacillus and Actinobacterium species. In contrast, those at 1000 m and 10 m included marine bacteria belonging to the classes Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. The entire 16S rDNA sequences in the clone libraries were identical to those of the terrestrial and marine bacterial species, which originated from the Chinese desert region and the Sea of Japan, respectively. The origins of air masses and meteorological conditions contribute to vertical variations in the bacterial communities in downwind atmosphere.

  18. Succession of bacterial community along with the removal of heavy crude oil pollutants by multiple biostimulation treatments in the Yellow River Delta, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sulin Yu; Shuguang Li; Yueqin Tang; Xiaolei Wu

    2011-01-01

    Multiple biostimulation treatments were applied to enhance the removal of heavy crude oil pollutants in the saline soil of Yellow River Delta.Changes of the soil bacterial community were monitored using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analyses.The 140-day microcosm experiments showed that low C:N.:P ratio,high availability of surfactant and addition of bulking agent significantly enhanced the performance,leading to the highest total petroleum hydrocarbon removal.Meanwhile,the bacterial community was remarkably changed by the multiple biostimulation treatments,with the Deltaproteobacteria,Firmicutes,Actinobacteria,Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes being inhibited and the Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria and some unknown Gammaproteobacteria bacteria being enriched.In addition,different hydrocarbon-degraders came to power in the following turn.At the first stage,the Alcanivorax-related Gammaproteobacteria bacteria dominated in the biostimulated soil and contributed mainly to the biodegradation of easily degradable portion of the heavy crude oil.Then the bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria,followed by bacteria belonging to Candidate division ODI,became the dominant oil-degraders to degrade the remaining recalcitrant constituents of the heavy crude oil.

  19. 凡纳滨对虾土塘养殖与循环养殖系统细菌群落结构比较研究%Comparison of bacterial communities in the earthen pond and the recirculating aquaculture system for Litopenaeus vannamei cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘钱玲琳; 徐如卫; 朱建林; 杨福生; 俞奇力; 张德民

    2015-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture system ( RAS) has gradually replaced the traditional earthen pond ( Earth) for shrimp cultivation because of its less pollution and higher economical benefit. A comprehensive knowledge on bacterial community structure is necessary for disease control and process improvement. In this paper amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used to compare the bacte-rial community structure among recirculating aquaculture system (water and biofilm) and earthen pond (water). The results showed that the bacterial communities were distinct among Earth water, RAS water and biofilm, with the highest alpha-diversity in RAS water. Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria were the predominant phyla in earthen pond. In contrast, Alphaproteobacteria was the highest in the RAS water, while Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in the RAS biofilm. Similarity percentage ( SIMPER) analysis identified 11 OTUs that cumulatively contributed to 35. 14% dissimilarity of the bacterial community. These taxa were affilia-ted with Saprospiraceae, Rhodobacteraceae, ACK-M1 and Synechococcaceae, Caldilineaceae, Betaproteobacteria, Sphingomonadales, Flavobacteria. At a finer resolution, the members of family Nitrosomonadaceae and Nitrospiraceae, which contribute to denitrification and nitrification, were dramatically higher in RAS biofilm than in waters. Overall, this work provides microbial ecological evidences for the advantages of recirculating aquaculture system over earthen pond.%对虾循环水养殖因污染排放少、经济效益高而正在逐步取代土塘养殖,成为高效养殖模式发展的方向,了解养殖系统的细菌群落结构特征对于病害控制和养殖工艺改进具有重要意义. 采用细菌16S rRNA基因扩增子焦磷酸测序,比较了循环养殖水体、生物膜与土塘养殖水环境中的细菌群落结构差异. 结果表明,循环养殖水体、生物膜与土塘水体的细菌群落结构差异明显,且循环

  20. High diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal soils affected by high methane fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas 25 times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils act as source, but also as biological filter for methane release to the atmosphere. For long time, volcanic/geothermal soils has been considered inhospitable for methanotrophic microorganisms, but new extremophile methanotrophs belonging to Verrucomicrobia were identified in three different areas (Pozzuoli, Italy; Hell's Gate, New Zealand; Kamchatka, Russia), explaining anomalous behaviours in methane leakages of several geothermal/volcanic sites. Our aim was to increase the knowledge of the relationship between methane emissions from volcanic/geothermal areas and biological methane oxidation, by investigating a geothermal site of Pantelleria island (Italy). Pantelleria Island hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high temperature, high CH4 and very low H2S fluxes. Such characteristics are reflected in potentially great supply of methane for methanotrophs and scarce presence of inhibitors of their activity (H2S and NH3) in the Pantelleria soils. Potential methanotrophic activity within these soils was already evidenced by the CH4/CO2 ratio of the flux measurements which was lower than that of the respective fumarolic manifestations indicating a loss of CH4 during the gas travel towards the earth's surface. In this study laboratory incubation experiments using soils sampled at Favara Grande, the main hydrothermal area of Pantelleria, showed very high methane consumption rates (up to 9500 ng CH4 h-1 g-1). Furthermore, microbiological and culture-independent molecular analyses allowed to detect the presence of methanotrophs affiliated to Gamma- and Alpha-Proteobacteria and to the newly discovered acidothermophilic methanotrophs Verrucomicrobia. Culturable methanotrophic Alpha-proteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated by

  1. DIVERSITY AND MAGNETISM OF MAGNETOTACTIC BACTERIA IN LAKE WEIYANG NEAR XI'AN CITY%西安未央湖趋磁细菌多样性与磁学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海涛; 林巍; 王寅炤; 李金华; 陈冠军; 潘永信

    2013-01-01

    对西安郊区未央湖趋磁细菌的生物多样性和磁学性质进行了系统研究.光学和透射电子显微镜分析发现,未央湖趋磁细菌主要为杆菌,它们的磁小体多为子弹头形状并呈链状排列;磁学分析表明这些磁小体颗粒以单畴磁铁矿为主;并发现一类同时含有磁铁矿和胶黄铁矿磁小体的趋磁杆菌.基于16S rRNA基因的系统发育分析发现,未央湖趋磁细菌主要分布在变形菌门的δ-变形菌纲(75%)和α-变形菌纲(25%).本研究结果还有助于为利用趋磁细菌群落指示环境变化提供依据.%Magnetotactic bacteria are a group of morphologically and phylogenetically heterogenous prokaryotes which synthesize intracellular nano-sized magnetic crystals of magnetite ( Fe3O4) and/or greigite ( Fe3S4). Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater and marine environments. Most observed magnetotactic bacteria are affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, while bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, phylum Nitrospira, and the candidate division OP3 are also discovered. In this study,the diversity and magnetic properties of magnetotactic bacteria collected from Lake Weiyang in Xi'an city (34°24′23. 96"N, 108°58′55. 51"E) , Shaanxi Province, were analyzed and characterized. Surface sediments ( 5cm to 10cm) were collected, and magnetotactic bacteria were magnetically enriched using the capillary racetrack method. Transmission electron microscopy analyses have revealed that rod-shaped bacteria containing bullet-shaped magnetsomes were the dominant group of magnetotactic bacteria in Lake Weiyang. Other kinds of magnetotactic bacteria,such as cocci and spirilla,were also observed. Interestingly, the energy dispersive x-rayspectrometer of transmission electron microscopy showed some rod-shaped bacteria were able to simultaneously biomineralize magnetite and greigite magnetosomes in a single cell, which is unusual in magnetotactic bacteria. The

  2. 铜陵重金属富集的尾矿废弃地酸性废水中细菌及古菌的多样性%Archaeal and bacterial communities in acid mine drainage from metal-rich abandoned tailing ponds, Tongling, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 李杨; 孙庆业

    2014-01-01

    To expand knowledge on microbial communities of various metal-rich levels of mine drainage environments in Anhui province, China, the archaeal and bacterial diversities were examined using a PCR-based cloning approach. Eight acid mine water samples were collected from five areas in Tongling. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacteria mainly fell into ten divisions, which wereBetaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Nitrospira, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi.Archaea fell into three phylogenetic divisions,Thermoplasma, FerroplasmaandThermogymnomonas. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) cluster analysis based on the microbial communities’ compositions revealed that five samples shared similarity with the dominance ofMeiothermus and Thermomonas. Two samples had the preponderant existence ofAcidithiobacillus andLeptospirillum. The remaining sample owned higher microbial communities’ diversity with the Shannon-WeaverH up to 2.91. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) suggested that microbial community structures had great association with pH and the concentration of Hg2+, Pb2+, Fe3+, Cl-, SO42-in water.%为了加深对安徽省铜陵市不同重金属富集程度的尾矿附近酸性废水中微生物多样性的了解,运用PCR-16S rDNA克隆文库技术对酸性废水中细菌及古菌的群落结构进行研究。在铜陵的5个样点采集了8个水样。系统发育分析结果表明,酸性废水中的细菌主要是Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Nitrospira, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi,古菌是Thermoplasma, Ferroplasma 以及Thermogymnomonas。根据细菌和古菌的组成对样品进行聚类分析,结果表明,5个样品由于优势菌株 Thermomonas 和 Meiothermus 拥有较高的相似度。2个样品由于 Acidithiobacillus

  3. Microbiological fingerprint of African dust deposition in alpine snow pack, Mont Blanc summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Alekhina, Irina; Normand, Philippe; Petit, Jean-Robert; Bulat, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The biogeochemical effect of African dust transport has been reported mostly with respect to nutrient budget change in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and global transport of microorganisms, including pathogens. However, its potential to seed or colonize the remote environments by transported microorganisms is poorly understood. This study has focused on bacterial content and diversity of Saharan dust deposition from 2006, 2008 and 2009 in snow pack of Mont Blanc (MtBl) glacier as well as recognition of bacteria which could be involved in establishing microbiota in this icy environment. Four snow samples recorded Saharan dust events from June 2006 (SDm06/2006 - 3,5 months aged), May and June 2008 (SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008 - 1 month in between and 1 week aged each) and May 2009 (SDm05/2009 - 1 week aged) were collected at Col du Dome area (4250m a.s.l.). Bacterial community structure was assessed by ribotyping and subsequent sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. To exclude human-associated and laboratory contamination several controls were run in parallel updating our contaminant library. The obtained phylotypes were tested against this library keeping only those which successfully passed through this exam. Of 176 selected clones from four clone libraries 29.8% were met in our contaminant library. The ‘true' sequences were assigned to 57 phylotypes (>97.5% sequence similarity) originating mostly from soil. The prevalent phylotypes recovered were belonging to different bacterial divisions: Deinococcus-Thermus, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB groups for SDm06/2006; Actinobacteria, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB for SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008; Actinobacteria and chloroplasts/plastids for SDm05/2009. Phylogenetic analysis of all phylotypes showed no shared species amongst all 4 dust layers in MtBl snow pack in 2006, 2008 and 2009. However, two phylotypes (Blastococcus saxobsidens sp. - 99%, Geodermatophilus obscurus sp. - 99%) were shared between 2008 and 2009

  4. Metagenomic analysis of the bioremediation of diesel-contaminated Canadian high arctic soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Yergeau

    Full Text Available As human activity in the Arctic increases, so does the risk of hydrocarbon pollution events. On site bioremediation of contaminated soil is the only feasible clean up solution in these remote areas, but degradation rates vary widely between bioremediation treatments. Most previous studies have focused on the feasibility of on site clean-up and very little attention has been given to the microbial and functional communities involved and their ecology. Here, we ask the question: which microorganisms and functional genes are abundant and active during hydrocarbon degradation at cold temperature? To answer this question, we sequenced the soil metagenome of an ongoing bioremediation project in Alert, Canada through a time course. We also used reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-qPCR to quantify the expression of several hydrocarbon-degrading genes. Pseudomonas species appeared as the most abundant organisms in Alert soils right after contamination with diesel and excavation (t = 0 and one month after the start of the bioremediation treatment (t = 1m, when degradation rates were at their highest, but decreased after one year (t = 1y, when residual soil hydrocarbons were almost depleted. This trend was also reflected in hydrocarbon degrading genes, which were mainly affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria at t = 0 and t = 1m and with Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria at t = 1y. RT-qPCR assays confirmed that Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus species actively expressed hydrocarbon degradation genes in Arctic biopile soils. Taken together, these results indicated that biopile treatment leads to major shifts in soil microbial communities, favoring aerobic bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons.

  5. Genotyping of Brucella species using clade specific SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Jeffrey T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a worldwide disease of mammals caused by Alphaproteobacteria in the genus Brucella. The genus is genetically monomorphic, requiring extensive genotyping to differentiate isolates. We utilized two different genotyping strategies to characterize isolates. First, we developed a microarray-based assay based on 1000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were identified from whole genome comparisons of two B. abortus isolates , one B. melitensis, and one B. suis. We then genotyped a diverse collection of 85 Brucella strains at these SNP loci and generated a phylogenetic tree of relationships. Second, we developed a selective primer-extension assay system using capillary electrophoresis that targeted 17 high value SNPs across 8 major branches of the phylogeny and determined their genotypes in a large collection ( n = 340 of diverse isolates. Results Our 1000 SNP microarray readily distinguished B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis, differentiating B. melitensis and B. suis into two clades each. Brucella abortus was divided into four major clades. Our capillary-based SNP genotyping confirmed all major branches from the microarray assay and assigned all samples to defined lineages. Isolates from these lineages and closely related isolates, among the most commonly encountered lineages worldwide, can now be quickly and easily identified and genetically characterized. Conclusions We have identified clade-specific SNPs in Brucella that can be used for rapid assignment into major groups below the species level in the three main Brucella species. Our assays represent SNP genotyping approaches that can reliably determine the evolutionary relationships of bacterial isolates without the need for whole genome sequencing of all isolates.

  6. Influence of salinity on bacterioplankton communities from the Brazilian rain forest to the coastal Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia B Silveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Planktonic bacteria are recognized as important drivers of biogeochemical processes in all aquatic ecosystems, however, the taxa that make up these communities are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate bacterial communities in aquatic ecosystems at Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a preserved insular environment of the Atlantic rain forest and how they correlate with a salinity gradient going from terrestrial aquatic habitats to the coastal Atlantic Ocean. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed chemical and microbiological parameters of water samples and constructed 16S rRNA gene libraries of free living bacteria obtained at three marine (two coastal and one offshore and three freshwater (water spring, river, and mangrove environments. A total of 836 sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 269 freshwater and 219 marine operational taxonomic units (OTUs grouped at 97% stringency. Richness and diversity indexes indicated that freshwater environments were the most diverse, especially the water spring. The main bacterial group in freshwater environments was Betaproteobacteria (43.5%, whereas Cyanobacteria (30.5%, Alphaproteobacteria (25.5%, and Gammaproteobacteria (26.3% dominated the marine ones. Venn diagram showed no overlap between marine and freshwater OTUs at 97% stringency. LIBSHUFF statistics and PCA analysis revealed marked differences between the freshwater and marine libraries suggesting the importance of salinity as a driver of community composition in this habitat. The phylogenetic analysis of marine and freshwater libraries showed that the differences in community composition are consistent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data supports the notion that a divergent evolutionary scenario is driving community composition in the studied habitats. This work also improves the comprehension of microbial community dynamics in tropical waters and how they are structured in relation to physicochemical

  7. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor cotranscribed with its cognate anti-sigma factor confers tolerance to NaCl, ethanol and methylene blue in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Mukti Nath; Kumar, Santosh; Gupta, Namrata; Kaur, Simarjot; Gupta, Ankush; Tripathi, Anil K

    2011-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense, a plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium, is exposed to changes in its abiotic environment, including fluctuations in temperature, salinity, osmolarity, oxygen concentration and nutrient concentration, in the rhizosphere and in the soil. Since extra-cytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors play an important role in stress adaptation, we analysed the role of ECF sigma factor (also known as RpoE or σ(E)) in abiotic stress tolerance in A. brasilense. An in-frame rpoE deletion mutant of A. brasilense Sp7 was carotenoidless and slow-growing, and was sensitive to salt, ethanol and methylene blue stress. Expression of rpoE in the rpoE deletion mutant complemented the defects in growth, carotenoid biosynthesis and sensitivity to different stresses. Based on data from reverse transcriptase-PCR, a two-hybrid assay and a pull-down assay, we present evidence that rpoE is cotranscribed with chrR and the proteins synthesized from these two overlapping genes interact with each other. Identification of the transcription start site by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends showed that the rpoE-chrR operon was transcribed by two promoters. The proximal promoter was less active than the distal promoter, whose consensus sequence was characteristic of RpoE-dependent promoters found in alphaproteobacteria. Whereas the proximal promoter was RpoE-independent and constitutively expressed, the distal promoter was RpoE-dependent and strongly induced in response to stationary phase and elevated levels of ethanol, salt, heat and methylene blue. This study shows the involvement of RpoE in controlling carotenoid synthesis as well as in tolerance to some abiotic stresses in A. brasilense, which might be critical in the adaptation, survival and proliferation of this rhizobacterium in the soil and rhizosphere under stressful conditions.

  8. Precipitation of Phosphate Minerals by Microorganisms Isolated from a Fixed-Biofilm Reactor Used for the Treatment of Domestic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Rivadeneyra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of bacteria isolated from a fixed-film bioreactor to precipitate phosphate crystals for the treatment of domestic wastewater in both artificial and natural media was studied. When this was demonstrated in artificial solid media for crystal formation, precipitation took place rapidly, and crystal formation began 3 days after inoculation. The percentage of phosphate-forming bacteria was slightly higher than 75%. Twelve major colonies with phosphate precipitation capacity were the dominant heterotrophic platable bacteria growing aerobically in artificial media. According to their taxonomic affiliations (based on partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, the 12 strains belonged to the following genera of Gram-negative bacteria: Rhodobacter, Pseudoxanthobacter, Escherichia, Alcaligenes, Roseobacter, Ochrobactrum, Agromyce, Sphingomonas and Paracoccus. The phylogenetic tree shows that most of the identified populations were evolutionarily related to the Alphaproteobacteria (91.66% of sequences. The minerals formed were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX. All of these strains formed phosphate crystals and precipitated struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O, bobierrite [Mg3(PO42·8H2O] and baricite [(MgFe3(PO42·8H2O]. The results obtained in this study show that struvite and spherulite crystals did not show any cell marks. Moreover, phosphate precipitation was observed in the bacterial mass but also near the colonies. Our results suggest that the microbial population contributed to phosphate precipitation by changing the media as a consequence of their metabolic activity. Moreover, the results of this research suggest that bacteria play an active role in the mineral precipitation of soluble phosphate from urban wastewater in submerged fixed-film bioreactors.

  9. Comparative analysis of prokaryotic diversity in solar salterns in eastern Anatolia (Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çınar, Seval; Mutlu, Mehmet Burçin

    2016-09-01

    The prokaryotic communities of four salterns (Bingöl, Fadlum, Kemah, and Tuzlagözü) in Turkey were examined and compared using the cultivation and cultivation-independent methods [fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 454 pyrosequencing]. FISH analysis with universal probes revealed that feeding waters carried 1.6 × 10(2)-1.7 × 10(3) cells mL(-1), while crystallization ponds carried 3.8 × 10(6)-2.0 × 10(7) cells mL(-1) that were mostly haloarchaea, including square cells (except for Kemah). High-throughput 16S rRNA-based gene sequencing showed that the most frequent archaeal OTUs in Bingöl, Fadlum, Tuzlagözü, and Kemah samples were affiliated with Haloquadratum (76.8 %), Haloarcula (27.8 %), Halorubrum (49.6 %), and Halonotius (59.8 %), respectively. Bacteroidetes was the dominant bacterial phylum in Bingöl and Fadlum, representing 71.5 and 79.5 % of the bacterial OTUs (respectively), while the most abundant bacterial phylum found in the Kemah saltern was Proteobacteria (79.6 %). The majority of the bacterial OTUs recovered from Tuzlagözü belonged to the Cyanobacteria (35.7 %), Bacteroidetes (35.0 %), and Proteobacteria (25.5 %) phyla. Cultivation studies revealed that the archaeal isolates were closely related to the genera Halobacterium, Haloarcula, and Halorubrum. Bacterial isolates were confined to two phyla, Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria classes) and Bacteroidetes. Comparative analysis showed that members of the Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria phyla were major inhabitants of the solar salterns. PMID:27306996

  10. Taxonomic and functional diversity of the culturable microbiomes of epigeic earthworms and their prospects in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Sharma, Anamika; Adak, Anurup; Singh, Surender; Prasanna, Radha; Saxena, Anil K; Nain, Lata; Singh, Ran Vir

    2016-09-01

    Eisenia foetida and Perionyx excavatus are potent vermicomposting earthworms having immense importance in organic matter recycling under tropical conditions, particularly in India. Comparative assessment of the cultivable gut microbiome of these two epigeic earthworms after growth on lignocellulosic biomass, revealed populations of 3.2-8.3 × 10(9) CFU. Diversity analyses using 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the major dominating classes were Firmicutes (50-60%), followed by Actinobacteria (26.7-33%), and Alphaproteobacteria (5.6-6.7%). Despite exhibiting similar diversity indices and species richness, Betaproteobacteria (6.7%) and Gammaproteobacteria (11.1%) were solely present in E. foetida and P. excavatus, respectively. A set of 33 distinct morphotypes, including 18 from E. foetida and 15 from P. excavatus were selected. Carbohydrate utilization profiles generated using Hi-Carbo™ kits revealed that the isolates from the gut of P. excavatus - Arthrobacter pascens IARI-L13 and Bacillus subtilis IARIC were able to utilize 54 and 51.4% of the carbohydrates tested. Sorbose was not utilized, while unusual carbohydrates - adonitol and methyl-d-mannoside were utilized only by members from the gut of P. excavatus, while melizitose was utilized by those uniquely by E. foetida microbiome. Functional characterization revealed that β-glucosidase activity was most prevalent in the culturable microbial community. Alkaline and acid phosphatase activity was more widespread in the E. foetida gut microbiome. All the culturable gut bacterial isolates produced ammonia, but IAA was detected only in five cultures. The unique functional attributes of the two culturable microbiomes, grown on a similar diet, reveals the significance of proper selection of earthworm substrate combinations for effective vermicomposting. PMID:27133232

  11. Microbial Signatures in Ooids from the Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M. R.; Swart, P. K.; Devlin, Q.; Oehlert, A. M.; Saied, A.; Eberli, G. P.; Klaus, J. S.; Altabet, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbes are abundant in sedimentary systems where their metabolic capabilities can exert a profound impact on carbonate precipitation processes by altering the alkalinity of their immediate surrounding. Using a combination of clone analysis of 16SrRNA, functional gene analysis and both inorganic and organic stable isotopic analyses, we characterized the microbial community structure of ooids and their potential functional capabilities that could lead to precipitation of carbonates. Oolitic bacterial communities were highly diverse, representing 12 different prokaryotic lineages, among which Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria/Bacteroidetes and Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant. Based on functional gene analysis, a large number of genes were associated with redox dependent microbial communities with putative functional capability for mineral precipitation such as aerobic/anoxygenic photosynthesis, denitrification, ammonification, and sulfate reduction. In addition, a broad diversity of genes related to organic carbon degradation and nitrogen fixation were present, implying metabolic plasticity that enables survival under oligotrophic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses, which were conducted on both bulk and intracrystalline organic matter as well as in leachate sediments, identified geochemical signatures of microbial activity. δ13C values for organic C in the bulk (-11.94 to -16.71) and intracrystalline organic matter (-12.37 to -17.66), were similar and within the range of fractionation patterns associated with cyanobacteria, algae and photosynthesizers that employ the C4 carbon fixation pathway. Nitrogen isotopic values for both bulk (δ15N: -0.314 to - 0.706) and intracrystalline organic matter (δ15N: -0.343 -1.70) also showed fractionation patterns consistent with nitrogen fixation. In addition, positive δ15N and δ18O values of the NO3- leached from the ooids provided evidence of denitrification. These findings

  12. 小水榕茎部内生菌的分离及鉴定%Isolation and Identification of Endophytic Bacteria in Anubias barteri's Stem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继华; 罗梦晓; 马综艺; 王丽; 李思莹; 陈惠荣; 曹干

    2015-01-01

    采用稀释涂板法,对小水榕茎部的内生菌进行分离、纯化及16S rDNA鉴定,通过同源性比对构建系统发育树。结果表明:分离到的24株内生菌分别属于5个类群(Alphaproteobacteria、 Gammaproteobacteria、 Firmicutes、Bacteroidetes、 Filimonas)的11个属(Phenylobacterium、 Rhizobium、 Caulobacter、 Sphingobium、 Paenibacillus、Staphylococcus、 Bacillus、 Pseudomona、 Chitinophaga sancti、 Filimonas、 Agrobacterium),其中Alphaproteobacteria、Firmicutes为优势种群,占总数的45.8%;所有菌株与其同源菌株的相似性均在98%以上。本研究有助于揭示小水榕茎部内生菌的多样性,为发掘其应用潜力提供参考资料。%A total of 24 isolates of Endophytic bacteria from the inside of the stem of Anubias barteri was isolated by spread-plate method. These isolates were aligned by using the sequences of 16S rDNA and then the phylogenetic tree was constructed. The result showed that 24 isolates belong to 11 genus (Phenylobacterium, Rhizobium, Caulobacter, Sphingobium, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Chitinophaga sancti, Filimonas, Agrobacterium) of 5 groups (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Filimonas). The identity of all isolates were more than 98% same as the sequence of bacteria's in NCBI and 45.8% of them were Firmicutes that were dominant species. The result was beneficial for further study of the diversity of endophytic bacteria in Anubias barteri's stem.

  13. The interaction between iron nutrition, plant species and soil type shapes the rhizosphere microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pii, Youry; Borruso, Luigimaria; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Crecchio, Carmine; Cesco, Stefano; Mimmo, Tanja

    2016-02-01

    Plant-associated microorganisms can stimulate plants growth and influence both crops yield and quality by nutrient mobilization and transport. Therefore, rhizosphere microbiome appears to be one of the key determinants of plant health and productivity. The roots of plants have the ability to influence its surrounding microbiology, the rhizosphere microbiome, through the creation of specific chemical niches in the soil mediated by the release of phytochemicals (i.e. root exudates) that depends on several factors, such as plants genotype, soil properties, plant nutritional status, climatic conditions. In the present research, two different crop species, namely barley and tomato, characterized by different strategies for Fe acquisition, have been grown in the RHIZOtest system using either complete or Fe-free nutrient solution to induce Fe starvation. Afterward, plants were cultivated for 6 days on two different calcareous soils. Total DNA was extracted from rhizosphere and bulk soil and 454 pyrosequencing technology was applied to V1-V3 16S rRNA gene region. Approximately 5000 sequences were obtained for each sample. The analysis of the bacterial population confirmed that the two bulk soils showed a different microbial community. The presence of the two plant species, as well as the nutritional status (Fe-deficiency and Fe-sufficiency), could promote a differentiation of the rhizosphere microbiome, as highlighted by non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis. Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloracidobacteria, Thermoleophilia, Betaproteobacteria, Saprospirae, Gemmatimonadetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria were the most represented classes in all the samples analyzed even though their relative abundance changed as a function of the soil, plant species and nutritional status. To our knowledge, this research demonstrate for the first time that different plants species with a diverse nutritional status can promote the development of a peculiar

  14. New criteria for selecting the origin of DNA replication in Wolbachia and closely related bacteria

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    Baldo Laura

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annotated genomes of two closely related strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis have been reported without the identifications of the putative origin of replication (ori. Identifying the ori of these bacteria and related alpha-Proteobacteria as well as their patterns of sequence evolution will aid studies of cell replication and cell density, as well as the potential genetic manipulation of these widespread intracellular bacteria. Results Using features that have been previously experimentally verified in the alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the origin of DNA replication (ori regions were identified in silico for Wolbachia strains and eleven other related bacteria belonging to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and Rickettsia genera. These features include DnaA-, CtrA- and IHF-binding sites as well as the flanking genes in C. crescentus. The Wolbachia ori boundary genes were found to be hemE and COG1253 protein (CBS domain protein. Comparisons of the putative ori region among related Wolbachia strains showed higher conservation of bases within binding sites. Conclusion The sequences of the ori regions described here are only similar among closely related bacteria while fundamental characteristics like presence of DnaA and IHF binding sites as well as the boundary genes are more widely conserved. The relative paucity of CtrA binding sites in the ori regions, as well as the absence of key enzymes associated with DNA replication in the respective genomes, suggest that several of these obligate intracellular bacteria may have altered replication mechanisms. Based on these analyses, criteria are set forth for identifying the ori region in genome sequencing projects.

  15. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma] inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-05-09

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  16. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma];#963; inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-03-30

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  17. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Baelum, Jacob; Tas, Neslihan; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, Janet K.; Semenchuk, Phillip; Prieme, Anders

    2015-04-30

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78°N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy number of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below -10°C. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA and cDNA libraries) revealed a season-based clustering of the samples, and, e.g., the relative abundance of potentially active Cyanobacteria peaked in June and Alphaproteobacteria increased over the summer and then declined from October to November. The structure of the bulk (DNA-based) community was significantly correlated with pH and dissolved organic carbon, while the potentially active (RNA-based) community structure was not significantly correlated with any of the measured soil parameters. A large fraction of the 16S rRNA transcripts was assigned to nitrogen-fixing bacteria (up to 24% in June) and phototrophic organisms (up to 48% in June) illustrating the potential importance of nitrogen fixation in otherwise nitrogen poor Arctic ecosystems and of phototrophic bacterial activity on the soil surface.

  18. Microbial diversity in hummock and hollow soils of three wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing.

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    Yongcui Deng

    Full Text Available The wetlands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are believed to play an important role in global nutrient cycling, but the composition and diversity of microorganisms in this ecosystem are poorly characterized. An understanding of the effects of geography and microtopography on microbial populations will provide clues to the underlying mechanisms that structure microbial communities. In this study, we used pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences to assess and compare the composition of soil microbial communities present in hummock and hollow soils from three wetlands (Dangxiong, Hongyuan and Maduo on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the world's highest plateau. A total of 36 bacterial phyla were detected. Proteobacteria (34.5% average relative abundance, Actinobacteria (17.3% and Bacteroidetes (11% had the highest relative abundances across all sites. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes were also relatively abundant (1-10%. In addition, archaeal sequences belonging to Euryarchaea, Crenarchaea and Thaumarchaea were detected. Alphaproteobacteria sequences, especially of the order Rhodospirillales, were significantly more abundant in Maduo than Hongyuan and Dangxiong wetlands. Compared with Hongyuan soils, Dangxiong and Maduo had significantly higher relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria sequences (mainly order Xanthomonadales. Hongyuan wetland had a relatively high abundance of methanogens (mainly genera Methanobacterium, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta and methanotrophs (mainly Methylocystis compared with the other two wetlands. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA indicated that the microbial community structure differed between locations and microtopographies and canonical correspondence analysis indicated an association between microbial community structure and soil properties or geography. These insights into the microbial community structure and the main controlling factors in wetlands of

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of alkaline protease-producing psychrotrophic bacteria from glacier and cold environments of Lahaul and Spiti, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwan, Richa; Gulati, Arvind; Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2010-04-01

    The diversity of proteolytic bacteria associated with a glacier and cold environment soils from three different locations in Lahaul and Spiti, India was investigated. Two hundred seventeen bacterial strains were isolated in pure culture. Subsequently these strains were screened for protease-production and one hundred nine showed protease production. From these protease producing psychrotrophic bacteria twenty showing high enzyme production at low temperature and alkaline pH were characterized and identified. The 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis revealed that none of the strains showed 100% identity with the validly published species of various genera. Isolates belonged to three classes i.e. Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, and were affiliated with the genera Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Mycoplana, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Serratia and Stenotrophomonas. The optimal growth temperature ranged from 10 to 28 degrees C and interestingly, high levels of enzyme productions were measured at growth temperatures between 15 and 25 degrees C, for most of the isolates in plate assay. Most of the isolates were found to produce at least two other hydrolytic enzymes along with protease. The crude protease from one strain was active over broad range of temperature and pH with optima at 30 degrees C and 7.5, respectively. The protease activity was enhanced by Ca(2+), dithiothreitol and beta-mercaptoethanol. While Na(+), Hg(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid did not showed much effect on protease activity. The results enrich our knowledge on the psychrotrophic bacterial diversity and biogeographic distribution of enzyme producing bacteria in western Himalaya. PMID:20082368

  20. Multivariate and phylogenetic analyses assessing the response of bacterial mat communities from an ancient oligotrophic aquatic ecosystem to different scenarios of long-term environmental disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Souza, Valeria; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response of bacterial communities to environmental change is extremely important in predicting the effect of biogeochemical modifications in ecosystem functioning. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin is an ancient oasis in the Mexican Chihuahuan desert that hosts a wide diversity of microbial mats and stromatolites that have survived in extremely oligotrophic pools with nearly constant conditions. However, thus far, the response of these unique microbial communities to long-term environmental disturbances remains unexplored. We therefore studied the compositional stability of these bacterial mat communities by using a replicated (3x) mesocosm experiment: a) Control; b) Fluct: fluctuating temperature; c) 40C: increase to 40 ºC; d) UVplus: artificial increase in UV radiation; and f) UVmin: UV radiation protection. In order to observe the changes in biodiversity, we obtained 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from microbial mats at the end of the experiment (eight months) and analyzed them using multivariate and phylogenetic tools. Sequences were assigned to 13 major lineages, among which Cyanobacteria (38.8%) and Alphaproteobacteria (25.5%) were the most abundant. The less extreme treatments (Control and UVmin) had a more similar composition and distribution of the phylogenetic groups with the natural pools than the most extreme treatments (Fluct, 40C, and UVplus), which showed drastic changes in the community composition and structure, indicating a different community response to each environmental disturbance. An increase in bacterial diversity was found in the UVmin treatment, suggesting that protected environments promote the establishment of complex bacterial communities, while stressful environments reduce diversity and increase the dominance of a few Cyanobacterial OTUs (mainly Leptolyngbya sp) through environmental filtering. Mesocosm experiments using complex bacterial communities, along with multivariate and phylogenetic analyses of molecular data, can

  1. Multivariate and phylogenetic analyses assessing the response of bacterial mat communities from an ancient oligotrophic aquatic ecosystem to different scenarios of long-term environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pajares

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of bacterial communities to environmental change is extremely important in predicting the effect of biogeochemical modifications in ecosystem functioning. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin is an ancient oasis in the Mexican Chihuahuan desert that hosts a wide diversity of microbial mats and stromatolites that have survived in extremely oligotrophic pools with nearly constant conditions. However, thus far, the response of these unique microbial communities to long-term environmental disturbances remains unexplored. We therefore studied the compositional stability of these bacterial mat communities by using a replicated (3x mesocosm experiment: a Control; b Fluct: fluctuating temperature; c 40C: increase to 40 ºC; d UVplus: artificial increase in UV radiation; and f UVmin: UV radiation protection. In order to observe the changes in biodiversity, we obtained 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from microbial mats at the end of the experiment (eight months and analyzed them using multivariate and phylogenetic tools. Sequences were assigned to 13 major lineages, among which Cyanobacteria (38.8% and Alphaproteobacteria (25.5% were the most abundant. The less extreme treatments (Control and UVmin had a more similar composition and distribution of the phylogenetic groups with the natural pools than the most extreme treatments (Fluct, 40C, and UVplus, which showed drastic changes in the community composition and structure, indicating a different community response to each environmental disturbance. An increase in bacterial diversity was found in the UVmin treatment, suggesting that protected environments promote the establishment of complex bacterial communities, while stressful environments reduce diversity and increase the dominance of a few Cyanobacterial OTUs (mainly Leptolyngbya sp through environmental filtering. Mesocosm experiments using complex bacterial communities, along with multivariate and phylogenetic analyses of molecular

  2. A motif-based search in bacterial genomes identifies the ortholog of the small RNA Yfr1 in all lineages of cyanobacteria

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    Axmann Ilka M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are regulators of gene expression in all domains of life. They control growth and differentiation, virulence, motility and various stress responses. The identification of ncRNAs can be a tedious process due to the heterogeneous nature of this molecule class and the missing sequence similarity of orthologs, even among closely related species. The small ncRNA Yfr1 has previously been found in the Prochlorococcus/Synechococcus group of marine cyanobacteria. Results Here we show that screening available genome sequences based on an RNA motif and followed by experimental analysis works successfully in detecting this RNA in all lineages of cyanobacteria. Yfr1 is an abundant ncRNA between 54 and 69 nt in size that is ubiquitous for cyanobacteria except for two low light-adapted strains of Prochlorococcus, MIT 9211 and SS120, in which it must have been lost secondarily. Yfr1 consists of two predicted stem-loop elements separated by an unpaired sequence of 16–20 nucleotides containing the ultraconserved undecanucleotide 5'-ACUCCUCACAC-3'. Conclusion Starting with an ncRNA previously found in a narrow group of cyanobacteria only, we show here the highly specific and sensitive identification of its homologs within all lineages of cyanobacteria, whereas it was not detected within the genome sequences of E. coli and of 7 other eubacteria belonging to the alpha-proteobacteria, chlorobiaceae and spirochaete. The integration of RNA motif prediction into computational pipelines for the detection of ncRNAs in bacteria appears as a promising step to improve the quality of such predictions.

  3. Is autoinducer-2 a universal signal for interspecies communication: a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis of the synthesis and signal transduction pathways

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    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell communication involving the production and detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Recently, it has been proposed that autoinducer-2 (AI-2, a furanosyl borate diester derived from the recycling of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH to homocysteine, serves as a universal signal for interspecies communication. Results In this study, 138 completed genomes were examined for the genes involved in the synthesis and detection of AI-2. Except for some symbionts and parasites, all organisms have a pathway to recycle SAH, either using a two-step enzymatic conversion by the Pfs and LuxS enzymes or a one-step conversion using SAH-hydrolase (SahH. 51 organisms including most Gamma-, Beta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria, and Firmicutes possess the Pfs-LuxS pathway, while Archaea, Eukarya, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria prefer the SahH pathway. In all 138 organisms, only the three Vibrio strains had strong, bidirectional matches to the periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LuxP and the central signal relay protein LuxU. The initial two-component sensor kinase protein LuxQ, and the terminal response regulator luxO are found in most Proteobacteria, as well as in some Firmicutes, often in several copies. Conclusions The genomic analysis indicates that the LuxS enzyme required for AI-2 synthesis is widespread in bacteria, while the periplasmic binding protein LuxP is only present in Vibrio strains. Thus, other organisms may either use components different from the AI-2 signal transduction system of Vibrio strains to sense the signal of AI-2, or they do not have such a quorum sensing system at all.

  4. Impact of lowland rainforest transformation on diversity and composition of soil prokaryotic communities in Sumatra (Indonesia

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    Dominik eSchneider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes are the most abundant and diverse group of microorganisms in soil and mediate virtually all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, they influence aboveground plant productivity and diversity. In this study, the impact of rainforest transformation to intensively managed cash crop systems on soil prokaryotic communities was investigated. The studied managed land use system comprised rubber agroforests (jungle rubber, rubber plantation and oil plantations within two Indonesian landscapes Bukit Duabelas and Harapan. Soil prokaryotic community composition and diversity were assessed by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The curated dataset contained 20,494 bacterial and 1,762 archaeal Operational Taxonomic Units at species level (97% genetic identity. Analysis revealed changes in indigenous taxon-specific patterns of soil prokaryotic communities accompanying lowland rainforest transformation to jungle rubber, and intensively managed rubber and oil palm plantations. Distinct clustering of the rainforest soil communities indicated that these are different from the communities in the studied managed land use systems. The predominant bacterial taxa in all investigated soils were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Overall, the bacterial community shifted from proteobacterial groups in rainforest soils to Acidobacteria in managed soils. The archaeal soil communities were mainly represented by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Members of the Terrestrial Group and South African Gold Mine Group 1 (Thaumarchaeota dominated in the rainforest and members of Thermoplasmata in the managed land use systems. The alpha and beta diversity of the soil prokaryotic communities was higher in managed land use systems than in rainforest. In the case of bacteria, this was related to soil characteristics such as pH value, exchangeable Ca and Fe content, C to

  5. Essential Genome of the Metabolically Versatile Alphaproteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechter, Kieran B.; Gallagher, Larry; Pyles, Harley; Manoil, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is an alphaproteobacterium that has served as a model organism for studies of photophosphorylation, regulation of nitrogen fixation, production of hydrogen as a biofuel, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium is able to transition between anaerobic photoautotrophic growth, anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth, and aerobic heterotrophic growth. As a starting point to explore the genetic basis for the metabolic versatility of R. palustris, we used transposon mutagenesis and Tn-seq to identify 552 genes as essential for viability in cells growing aerobically on semirich medium. Of these, 323 have essential gene homologs in the alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and 187 have essential gene homologs in Escherichia coli. There were 24 R. palustris genes that were essential for viability under aerobic growth conditions that have low sequence identity but are likely to be functionally homologous to essential E. coli genes. As expected, certain functional categories of essential genes were highly conserved among the three organisms, including translation, ribosome structure and biogenesis, secretion, and lipid metabolism. R. palustris cells divide by budding in which a sessile cell gives rise to a motile swarmer cell. Conserved cell cycle genes required for this developmental process were essential in both C. crescentus and R. palustris. Our results suggest that despite vast differences in lifestyles, members of the alphaproteobacteria have a common set of essential genes that is specific to this group and distinct from that of gammaproteobacteria like E. coli. IMPORTANCE Essential genes in bacteria and other organisms are those absolutely required for viability. Rhodopseudomonas palustris has served as a model organism for studies of anaerobic aromatic compound degradation, hydrogen gas production, nitrogen fixation, and photosynthesis. We used the technique of Tn-seq to determine the essential genes of

  6. Molecular characterization of putative biocorroding microbiota with a novel niche detection of Epsilon- and Zetaproteobacteria in Pacific Ocean coastal seawaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongyue; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Lin; Shao, Sudong; Dai, Lingqing; Ye, Ying; Guo, Lizhong; Huang, Guiqiao; Klotz, Martin G

    2011-11-01

    Submerged metal surfaces in marine waters undergo rapid microbial colonization and biocorrosion, causing huge damage to marine engineering facilities and significant financial losses. In coastal areas, an accelerated and particularly severe form of biocorrosion termed accelerated low water corrosion (ALWC) is widespread globally. While identification of biocorroding microorganisms and the dynamics of their community structures is the key for understanding the processes and mechanisms leading to ALWC, neither one is presently understood. In this study, analysis of constructed clone libraries and qPCR assays targeting group-specific 16S rRNA or functional marker genes were used to determine the identity and abundance of putative early carbon steel surface-colonizing and biocorroding microbes in coastal seawater. Diverse microbial groups including 10 bacterial phyla, archaea and algae were found to putatively participate in the surface-colonizing process. Analysis of the community structure of carbon steel surface microbiota revealed a temporal succession leading to ALWC. By extending the current state of knowledge, our work demonstrates the global importance of Alphaproteobacteria (mainly Rhodobacterales), Gammaproteobacteria (mainly Alteromonadales and Oceanospirillales), Bacteroidetes (mainly Flavobacteriales) and microalgae as the pioneer and sustaining surface colonizers that contribute to initial formation and development of surface biofilms. We also discovered Epsilonproteobacteria and the recently described Zetaproteobacteria as putative corrosion-causing microorganisms during early steps of the ALWC process. Hence, our study reports that Zetaproteobacteria may be ubiquitous also in non-hydrothermal coastal seawaters and that ALWC of submerged carbon steel surfaces in coastal waters may involve a highly diverse, complex and dynamic microbial consortium. Our finding that Epsilon- and Zetaproteobacteria may play pivotal roles in ALWC provides a new starting

  7. Diversity of bacteria carried by pinewood nematode in USA and phylogenetic comparison with isolates from other countries.

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    Diogo Neves Proença

    Full Text Available Pine wilt disease (PWD is native to North America and has spread to Asia and Europe. Lately, mutualistic relationship has been suggested between the pinewood nematode (PWN, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus the causal nematode agent of PWD, and bacteria. In countries where PWN occurs, nematodes from diseased trees were reported to carry bacteria from several genera. However no data exists for the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diversity of the bacterial community carried by B. xylophilus, isolated from different Pinus spp. with PWD in Nebraska, United States. The bacteria carried by PWN belonged to Gammaproteobacteria (79.9%, Betaproteobacteria (11.7%, Bacilli (5.0%, Alphaproteobacteria (1.7% and Flavobacteriia (1.7%. Strains from the genera Chryseobacterium and Pigmentiphaga were found associated with the nematode for the first time. These results were compared to results from similar studies conducted from other countries of three continents in order to assess the diversity of bacteria with associated with PWN. The isolates from the United States, Portugal and China belonged to 25 different genera and only strains from the genus Pseudomonas were found in nematodes from all countries. The strains from China were closely related to P. fluorescens and the strains isolated from Portugal and USA were phylogenetically related to P. mohnii and P. lutea. Nematodes from the different countries are associated with bacteria of different species, not supporting a relationship between PWN with a particular bacterial species. Moreover, the diversity of the bacteria carried by the pinewood nematode seems to be related to the geographic area and the Pinus species. The roles these bacteria play within the pine trees or when associated with the nematodes, might be independent of the presence of the nematode in the tree and only related on the bacteria's relationship with the tree.

  8. Two distinct microbial communities revealed in the sponge Cinachyrella

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    Marie Laure Cuvelier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are vital components of benthic and coral reef ecosystems, providing shelter and nutrition for many organisms. In addition, sponges act as an essential carbon and nutrient link between the pelagic and benthic environment by filtering large quantities of seawater. Many sponge species harbor a diverse microbial community (including Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes, which can constitute up to 50% of the sponge biomass. Sponges of the genus Cinachyrella are common in Caribbean and Floridian reefs and their archaeal and bacterial microbiomes were explored here using 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing. Cinachyrella specimens and seawater samples were collected from the same South Florida reef at two different times of year. In total, 639 OTUs (12 archaeal and 627 bacterial belonging to 2 archaeal and 21 bacterial phyla were detected in the sponges. Based on their microbiomes, the six sponge samples formed two distinct groups, namely sponge group 1 (SG1 with low diversity (Shannon-Weiner index: 3.73 ± 0.22 and SG2 with higher diversity (Shannon-Weiner index: 5.95 ± 0.25. Hosts’ 28S rDNA sequences further confirmed that the sponge specimens were composed of two taxa closely related to Cinachyrella kuekenthalli. Both sponge groups were dominated by Proteobacteria, but Alphaproteobacteria were significantly more abundant in SG1. SG2 harbored many bacterial phyla (>1% of sequences present in low abundance or below detection limits (<0.07% in SG1 including: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, PAUC34f, Poribacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Furthermore, SG1 and SG2 only had 95 OTUs in common, representing 30.5% and 22.4% of SG1 and SG2’s total OTUs, respectively. These results suggest that the sponge host may exert a pivotal influence on the nature and structure of the microbial community and may only be marginally affected by external environment parameters.

  9. Aurelia aurita ephyrae reshape a coastal microbial community

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    Luca eZoccarato

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, increasing attention has been paid to the impact of jellyfish blooms on marine communities. Aurelia aurita is one of the most studied of the Scyphozoans, and several studies have been carried out to describe its role as a top-down controller within the classical food web. However, little data are available to define the effects of these jellyfish on microbial communities. The aims of this study were to describe the predation impact of A. aurita ephyrae on a natural microplanktonic assemblage, and to determine any reshaping effects on the prokaryote community composition and functioning. Surface coastal water was used to set up a 24-h grazing experiment in microcosms. Samples were collected to determine the variations in prey biomass, heterotrophic carbon production, extracellular leucine aminopeptidase activity, and grazing pressure. A next-generation sequencing technique was used to investigate biodiversity shifts within the prokaryote and protist communities through the small subunit rRNA tag approach. This study shows that A. aurita ephyrae were responsible for large decreases in the abundances of the more motile microplankton groups, such as tintinnids, Dinophyceae, and aloricate ciliates. Bacillariophyceae and Mediophyceae showed smaller reductions. No evidence of selective predation emerged in the analysis of the community diversity down to the family level. The heterotrophic prokaryote biomass increased significantly (by up to 45%, in parallel with increases in heterotrophic carbon production and leucine aminopeptidase activity (40%. Significant modifications were detected in prokaryotic community composition. Some classes of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia showed higher relative abundances when exposed to A. aurita ephyrae, while there was a net decrease for Alphaproteobacteria. Overall, this study provides new insight into the effects of A. aurita on microbial communities, underlining their selective

  10. Aurelia aurita Ephyrae Reshape a Coastal Microbial Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccarato, Luca; Celussi, Mauro; Pallavicini, Alberto; Fonda Umani, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, increasing attention has been paid to the impact of jellyfish blooms on marine communities. Aurelia aurita is one of the most studied of the Scyphozoans, and several studies have been carried out to describe its role as a top-down controller within the classical food web. However, little data are available to define the effects of these jellyfish on microbial communities. The aims of this study were to describe the predation impact of A. aurita ephyrae on a natural microplanktonic assemblage, and to determine any reshaping effects on the prokaryote community composition and functioning. Surface coastal water was used to set up a 24-h grazing experiment in microcosms. Samples were collected to determine the variations in prey biomass, heterotrophic carbon production (HCP), extracellular leucine aminopeptidase activity, and grazing pressure. A next-generation sequencing technique was used to investigate biodiversity shifts within the prokaryote and protist communities through the small subunit rRNA tag approach. This study shows that A. aurita ephyrae were responsible for large decreases in the abundances of the more motile microplankton groups, such as tintinnids, Dinophyceae, and aloricate ciliates. Bacillariophyceae and Mediophyceae showed smaller reductions. No evidence of selective predation emerged in the analysis of the community diversity down to the family level. The heterotrophic prokaryote biomass increased significantly (by up to 45%), in parallel with increases in HCP and leucine aminopeptidase activity (40%). Significant modifications were detected in prokaryotic community composition. Some classes of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia showed higher relative abundances when exposed to A. aurita ephyrae, while there was a net decrease for Alphaproteobacteria. Overall, this study provides new insight into the effects of A. aurita on microbial communities, underlining their selective predation toward the more motile groups of

  11. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  12. Longitudinal Analysis of Microbiota in Microalga Nannochloropsis salina Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Haifeng; Sale, Kenneth L; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao; Lane, Todd W; Yu, Eizadora T

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale open microalgae cultivation has tremendous potential to make a significant contribution to replacing petroleum-based fuels with biofuels. Open algal cultures are unavoidably inhabited with a diversity of microbes that live on, influence, and shape the fate of these ecosystems. However, there is little understanding of the resilience and stability of the microbial communities in engineered semicontinuous algal systems. To evaluate the dynamics and resilience of the microbial communities in microalgae biofuel cultures, we conducted a longitudinal study on open systems to compare the temporal profiles of the microbiota from two multigenerational algal cohorts, which include one seeded with the microbiota from an in-house culture and the other exogenously seeded with a natural-occurring consortia of bacterial species harvested from the Pacific Ocean. From these month-long, semicontinuous open microalga Nannochloropsis salina cultures, we sequenced a time-series of 46 samples, yielding 8804 operational taxonomic units derived from 9,160,076 high-quality partial 16S rRNA sequences. We provide quantitative evidence that clearly illustrates the development of microbial community is associated with microbiota ancestry. In addition, N. salina growth phases were linked with distinct changes in microbial phylotypes. Alteromonadeles dominated the community in the N. salina exponential phase whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia were more prevalent in the stationary phase. We also demonstrate that the N. salina-associated microbial community in open cultures is diverse, resilient, and dynamic in response to environmental perturbations. This knowledge has general implications for developing and testing design principles of cultivated algal systems. PMID:26956183

  13. Bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity in temperate streambed sediment during drying and rewetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pohlon

    Full Text Available Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany. Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes

  14. Occurrence of novel verrucomicrobial species, endosymbiotic and associated with parthenogenesis in Xiphinema americanum-group species (Nematoda, Longidoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, T T; Willems, A; Gillis, M; Coomans, A

    2000-11-01

    Numerous micro-organisms have been described as cytoplasmic symbionts of eukaryotes. Many so-called obligate endosymbionts rely exclusively on maternal (vertical or transovarial) transmission to maintain themselves, rendering them dependent on the host sex ratio, which they would tend to manipulate to their own advantage. The latter phenomenon is often associated with the presence of Wolbachia pipientis (alpha-Proteobacteria) in arthropods and nematodes. A potentially similar situation was discovered involving members of a new clade of Verrucomicrobia, another main line of descent in the Bacteria. Nematode species of the Xiphinema americanum group (Nematoda, Longidoridae), viz. Xiphinema americanum, Xiphinema rivesi and Xiphinema brevicollum, each harbour their own specific verrucomicrobial endosymbionts. They are exclusively maternally inherited and their hosts reproduce by thelytokous (mother-to-daughter) parthenogenesis, males being extremely rare. A new genus, 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter' gen. nov., along with three new candidate verrucomicrobial species, 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter americani' sp. nov., 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter rivesi' sp. nov. and 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter brevicolli' sp. nov., are described on the basis of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) epifluorescence microscopy and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. These are the first endosymbiotic species described among the Verrucomicrobia. They share a mean 16S rDNA similarity of about 93%, whereas similarity to their closest relative, clone WCHD3-88, is less than 87%. Thus, the endosymbionts form a homogeneous clade for which the new candidate genus 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter' gen. nov. is proposed. The type species is 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter brevicolli' sp. nov.

  15. Forest strata drive spatial structure of bacterial and archaeal communities and microbial methane cycling in neotropical bromeliad wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Several thousands of tank bromeliads per hectare of neotropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem that harbors diverse communities of archaea and bacteria and emit substantial amounts of methane. We studied spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial communities, microbial methane cycling and their environmental drivers in tank bromeliad wetlands. We selected tank bromeliads of different species and functional types (terrestrial and canopy bromeliads) in a neotropical montane forest of Southern Ecuador and sampled the organic tank slurry. Archaeal and bacterial communities were characterized using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing, respectively, and linked with physico-chemical tank-slurry properties. Additionally, we performed tank-slurry incubations to measure methane production potential, stable carbon isotope fractionation and pathway of methane formation. Archaeal and bacterial community composition in bromeliad wetlands was dominated by methanogens and by Alphaproteobacteria, respectively, and did not differ between species but between functional types. Hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were the dominant methanogens among all bromeliads but the relative abundance of aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae increased in terrestrial bromeliads. Complementary, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway of methane formation but the relative contribution of aceticlastic methanogenesis increased in terrestrial bromeliads and led to a concomitant increase in total methane production. Rhodospirillales were characteristic for canopy bromeliads, Planctomycetales and Actinomycetalis for terrestrial bromeliads. While nitrogen concentration and pH explained 32% of the archaeal community variability, 29% of the bacterial community variability was explained by nitrogen, acetate and propionate concentrations. Our study demonstrates that bromeliad functional types, associated with different forest strata

  16. Microbiology of Low Temperature Seafloor Deposits Along a Geochemical Gradient in Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    sylvan, J. B.; Sia, T. Y.; Haddad, A.; Briscoe, L. J.; Girguis, P. R.; Edwards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle lenses manifest themselves by gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. At the spreading center in the north, basaltic host rock extrudes while the influence of subduction in the south creates mainly basaltic andesite host rock. A contuous gradient between these two end members exists along the spreading center. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected along the ELSC and Valu Fa Ridge by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, thin section analysis and construction of bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries. Here, we discuss the geological and biological differences between the collected rocks. We found that the bacterial community composition changed as the host rock mineralogy and chemistry changed from north to south. Also, the bacterial community composition on the silicates is distinct from those on the inactive chimneys, and the interior conduit of an inactive chimney hosts a very different community from the exterior. Basalt from the northern end of the ELSC had high proportions of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. These proportions decreased on the silicates collected further south. Epsilonproteobacteria were also present on the basalt, decreased further south and were absent on the basaltic andesite. Conversely, basaltic andesite rocks from the southern end had high proportions of Chloroflexi, which decreased further north and were absent on basalt. The exterior of inactive sulfide structures were dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria and were less diverse than those on the silicates. The interior of one chimney was dominated by sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria and was the least diverse of all samples. These results support the Mantle to Microbe hypothesis in

  17. Microbial colonization of post eruptive vents on the EPR at 9N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetriani, C.

    2008-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to understand the role of microbial colonists at newly formed vents as "mediators" in the transfer of energy from the geothermal source to the higher trophic levels, and their role in altering fluid chemistry and in "conditioning" the vent environment for metazoans to settle. Following the 2005-06 volcanic eruption along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ridge crest between 9°N and 9°N, we had several opportunities to investigate the microbial colonization of the post-eruptive vents: in 2006 (about six months after the eruption), in January 2007 (one year after the eruption), and in December 2007/January 2008 (two years after the eruption). In order to investigate microbial colonization, we designed and deployed several experimental microbial colonizers on active diffuse flow vents characterized by different temperatures (approximate range 20-60°C) chemical (different redox conditions), and biological (e.g., presence or absence of metazoan colonists) regimes. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and fuctional gene transcripts from the colonizing communities indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria represented the dominant and active fraction of the chemosynthetic early microbial colonists, and that they expressed in-situ the genes involved in carbon dioxide fixation and nitrate respiration. However, data from our semi quantitative culture experiments indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria were not the only microorganisms that attached to basalts or to the experimental colonizers during the early phases of colonization. Sulfur dependent, chemosynthetic members of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were isolated from up to 10-5 dilutions of original samples along with heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria capable of growth on n-alkanes as their sole carbon source. We propose a model that links the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids to the colonization of newly formed vents and suggests a role for chemosynthetic and heterotrophic bacteria in the

  18. Rapid microbiome changes in freshly deposited cow feces under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin eWong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although development of next generation sequencing (NGS has substantially improved our understanding of the microbial ecology of animal feces, previous studies have mostly focused on freshly excreted feces. There is still limited understanding of the aging process dynamics of fecal microbiomes in intact cowpats exposed to natural environments. Fresh cowpats were sampled at multiple time points for 57 days under field conditions; half the samples were exposed to sunlight (unshaded while the other half was protected from sunlight (shaded. The 16SRNA hypervariable region 4 was amplified from each sample and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq Platform. While Clostridia, Bacteroidia and Sphingobacteria were dominant classes of bacteria in fresh cowpats, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacilli were the dominant classes by the end of the study, indicating a general shift from anaerobic to aerobic bacterial populations. This change was most likely influenced by the shift from cattle gut (anaerobic to pasture ground (aerobic. Reduced moisture in cowpats may also contribute to the community shift since air can penetrate the dryer cowpat more easily. Twelve genera consisting pathogenic bacteria were detected, with Mycobacterium, Bacillus, and Clostridium being the most abundant; their combined abundance accounts for 90% of the total pathogenic genera. Taxonomic richness and diversity increased throughout the study for most samples, which could be due to bacteria regrowth and colonization of bacteria from the environment. In contrast to the high taxonomic diversity, the changes of PICRUSt inferred function profile were minimal for all cowpats throughout the study, which suggest that core functions predicted by PICRUSt may be too conserved to distinguish differences between aerobe and anaerobe. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that cowpat exposure to air and sunlight can cause drastic microbiome

  19. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington. Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Stephen R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stegen, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Renslow, Ryan S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cole, Jessica K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dohnalkova, Alice [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tremblay, Julien [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singh, Kanwar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beyenal, Haluk [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Fredrickson, Jim K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-13

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO2-4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.

  20. Genomic diversification in strains of Rickettsia felis Isolated from different arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Joseph J; Driscoll, Timothy P; Verhoeve, Victoria I; Utsuki, Tadanobu; Husseneder, Claudia; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Azad, Abdu F; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia felis (Alphaproteobacteria: Rickettsiales) is the causative agent of an emerging flea-borne rickettsiosis with worldwide occurrence. Originally described from the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, recent reports have identified R. felis from other flea species, as well as other insects and ticks. This diverse host range for R. felis may indicate an underlying genetic variability associated with host-specific strains. Accordingly, to determine a potential genetic basis for host specialization, we sequenced the genome of R. felis str. LSU-Lb, which is an obligate mutualist of the parthenogenic booklouse Liposcelis bostrychophila (Insecta: Psocoptera). We also sequenced the genome of R. felis str. LSU, the second genome sequence for cat flea-associated strains (cf. R. felis str. URRWXCal2), which are presumably facultative parasites of fleas. Phylogenomics analysis revealed R. felis str. LSU-Lb diverged from the flea-associated strains. Unexpectedly, R. felis str. LSU was found to be divergent from R. felis str. URRWXCal2, despite sharing similar hosts. Although all three R. felis genomes contain the pRF plasmid, R. felis str. LSU-Lb carries an additional unique plasmid, pLbaR (plasmid of L. bostrychophila associated Rickettsia), nearly half of which encodes a unique 23-gene integrative conjugative element. Remarkably, pLbaR also encodes a repeats-in-toxin-like type I secretion system and associated toxin, heretofore unknown from other Rickettsiales genomes, which likely originated from lateral gene transfer with another obligate intracellular parasite of arthropods, Cardinium (Bacteroidetes). Collectively, our study reveals unexpected genomic diversity across three R. felis strains and identifies several diversifying factors that differentiate facultative parasites of fleas from obligate mutualists of booklice. PMID:25477419

  1. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2013-05-11

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability. 2013 The

  2. Effect of biostimulation using sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw on oil degradation and bacterial community composition in a contaminated desert soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiya eAl-Kindi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities more than the addition of soybean meal. GC-MS analysis revealed that the addition of addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7 to 1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥ 90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes were measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5-86.4% of total sequences of acquired sequences from the original soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units (OTUs placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R=0.66, P=0.0001. The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95-98% of the total sequences belonging to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  3. EDTA addition enhances bacterial respiration activities and hydrocarbon degradation in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kharusi, Samiha; Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The low number and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the low solubility and availability of hydrocarbons hamper bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils in arid deserts, thus bioremediation treatments that circumvent these limitations are required. We tested the effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition, at different concentrations (i.e. 0.1, 1 and 10 mM), on bacterial respiration and biodegradation of Arabian light oil in bioaugmented (i.e. with the addition of exogenous alkane-degrading consortium) and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils. Post-treatment shifts in the soils' bacterial community structure were monitored using MiSeq sequencing. Bacterial respiration, indicated by the amount of evolved CO2, was highest at 10 mM EDTA in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented soils, reaching an amount of 2.2 ± 0.08 and 1.6 ± 0.02 mg-CO2 g(-1) after 14 days of incubation, respectively. GC-MS revealed that 91.5% of the C14-C30 alkanes were degraded after 42 days when 10 mM EDTA and the bacterial consortium were added together. MiSeq sequencing showed that 78-91% of retrieved sequences in the original soil belonged to Deinococci, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteia and Bacilli. The same bacterial classes were detected in the 10 mM EDTA-treated soils, however with slight differences in their relative abundances. In the bioaugmented soils, only Alcanivorax sp. MH3 and Parvibaculum sp. MH21 from the exogenous bacterial consortium could survive until the end of the experiment. We conclude that the addition of EDTA at appropriate concentrations could facilitate biodegradation processes by increasing hydrocarbon availability to microbes. The addition of exogenous oil-degrading bacteria along with EDTA could serve as an ideal solution for the decontamination of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  4. Evident bacterial community changes but only slight degradation when polluted with pyrene in a red soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaidi eRen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the potential for PAH degradation by indigenous microbiota and the influence of PAHs on native microbial communities is of great importance for bioremediation and ecological evaluation. Various studies have focused on the bacterial communities in the environment where obvious PAH degradation was observed, little is known about the microbiota in the soil where poor degradation was observed. Soil microcosms were constructed with a red soil by supplementation with a high-molecular-weight PAH (pyrene at three dosages (5, 30, and 70 mg.kg-1. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate the changes in bacterial abundance and pyrene dioxygenase gene (nidA quantity. Illumina sequencing was used to investigate changes in diversity, structure, and composition of bacterial communities. After 42 days of incubation, no evident degradation was observed. The poor degradation ability was associated with the stability or significant decrease of abundance of the nidA gene. Although the abundance of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was not affected by pyrene, the bacterial richness and diversity were decreased with increasing dosage of pyrene and the community structure was changed. Phylotypes affected by pyrene were comprehensively surveyed: (1 at the high taxonomic level, seven of the abundant phyla/classes (relative abundance >1.0% including Chloroflexi, AD3, WPS-2, GAL5, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria and one rare phylum Crenarchaeota were significantly decreased by at least one dosage of pyrene, while 3 phyla/classes (Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were significantly increased; and (2 at the lower taxonomic level, the relative abundances of twelve orders were significantly depressed, whereas those of nine orders were significantly increased. This work enhanced our understanding of the biodegradation potential of pyrene in red soil and the effect of pyrene on soil ecosystems at the microbial community

  5. 16S rRNA gene survey of microbial communities in Winogradsky columns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan A Rundell

    Full Text Available A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities.

  6. Elevated seawater temperature causes a microbial shift on crustose coralline algae with implications for the recruitment of coral larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nicole S; Soo, Rochelle; Cobb, Rose; Negri, Andrew P

    2011-04-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are key reef-building primary producers that are known to induce the metamorphosis and recruitment of many species of coral larvae. Reef biofilms (particularly microorganisms associated with CCA) are also important as settlement cues for a variety of marine invertebrates, including corals. If rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) affect CCA and/or their associated biofilms, this may in turn affect recruitment on coral reefs. Herein, we report that the CCA Neogoniolithon fosliei, and its associated microbial communities do not tolerate SSTs of 32 °C, only 2-4 °C above the mean maximum annual SST. After 7 days at 32 °C, the CCA exhibited clear signs of stress, including bleaching, a reduction in maximum quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)) and a large shift in microbial community structure. This shift at 32 °C involved an increase in Bacteroidetes and a reduction in Alphaproteobacteria, including the loss of the primary strain (with high-sequence similarity to a described coral symbiont). A recovery in F(v)/F(m) was observed in CCA exposed to 31 °C following 7 days of recovery (at 27 °C); however, CCA exposed to 32 °C did not recover during this time as evidenced by the rapid growth of endolithic green algae. A 50% reduction in the ability of N. fosliei to induce coral larval metamorphosis at 32 °C accompanied the changes in microbiology, pigmentation and photophysiology of the CCA. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate how thermal stress influences microbial associations on CCA with subsequent downstream impacts on coral recruitment, which is critical for reef regeneration and recovery from climate-related mortality events. PMID:20944682

  7. Microbial diversity in a Venezuelan orthoquartzite cave is dominated by the Chloroflexi (Class Ktedonobacterales) and Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Hazel A; Giarrizzo, Juan G; Suarez, Paula; Robertson, Charles E; Broering, Mark J; Banks, Eric D; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Venkateswaran, Kasthisuri

    2014-01-01

    The majority of caves are formed within limestone rock and hence our understanding of cave microbiology comes from carbonate-buffered systems. In this paper, we describe the microbial diversity of Roraima Sur Cave (RSC), an orthoquartzite (SiO4) cave within Roraima Tepui, Venezuela. The cave contains a high level of microbial activity when compared with other cave systems, as determined by an ATP-based luminescence assay and cell counting. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of microbial diversity within the cave demonstrates the dominance of Actinomycetales and Alphaproteobacteria in endolithic bacterial communities close to the entrance, while communities from deeper in the cave are dominated (82-84%) by a unique clade of Ktedonobacterales within the Chloroflexi. While members of this phylum are commonly found in caves, this is the first identification of members of the Class Ktedonobacterales. An assessment of archaeal species demonstrates the dominance of phylotypes from the Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c (100%), which have previously been associated with acidic environments. While the Thaumarchaeota have been seen in numerous cave systems, the dominance of Group I.1c in RSC is unique and a departure from the traditional archaeal community structure. Geochemical analysis of the cave environment suggests that water entering the cave, rather than the nutrient-limited orthoquartzite rock, provides the carbon and energy necessary for microbial community growth and subsistence, while the poor buffering capacity of quartzite or the low pH of the environment may be selecting for this unusual community structure. Together these data suggest that pH, imparted by the geochemistry of the host rock, can play as important a role in niche-differentiation in caves as in other environmental systems. PMID:25505450

  8. Carbon, metals and grain size correlate with bacterial community composition in sediments of a high arsenic aquifer

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    Teresa eLegg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities can exert significant influence on the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic (As. This has globally important implications since As toxicity in drinking water affects the health of millions of people worldwide, including in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta region of Bangladesh where geogenic groundwater arsenic concentrations can be more than 10 times the World Health Organization’s limit. Thus, the goal of this research was to investigate patterns in bacterial community composition across environmental gradients in an aquifer with elevated groundwater As concentrations in Araihazar, Bangladesh. We characterized the bacterial community by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes from aquifer sediment samples collected at three locations along a groundwater flowpath, at a range of depths between 1.5 and 15 m. We identified significant shifts in bacterial community composition along the groundwater flowpath in the aquifer. In addition, we found that bacterial community structure was significantly related to sediment grain size, and sediment carbon (C, manganese (Mn, and iron (Fe concentrations. Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were more abundant in silty sediments with higher concentrations of C, Fe, and Mn. By contrast, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were more abundant in sediments with higher concentrations of sand and Si, and lower concentrations of C and metals. Based on the phylogenetic affiliations of these taxa, these results may indicate a shift to more Fe-, Mn-, and humic substance- reducers in the high C and metal sediments. It is well-documented that C, Mn and Fe may influence the mobility of groundwater arsenic, and it is intriguing that these constituents may also structure the bacterial community.

  9. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

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    Jing Sun

    Full Text Available The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14C-labeled compounds to (14CO(2 indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT, trimethylamine (TMA, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35% than of C1 compounds (2-6% into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2 in the upper ocean.

  10. Bacterial indicator of agricultural management for soil under no-till crop production.

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    Eva L M Figuerola

    Full Text Available The rise in the world demand for food poses a challenge to our ability to sustain soil fertility and sustainability. The increasing use of no-till agriculture, adopted in many areas of the world as an alternative to conventional farming, may contribute to reduce the erosion of soils and the increase in the soil carbon pool. However, the advantages of no-till agriculture are jeopardized when its use is linked to the expansion of crop monoculture. The aim of this study was to survey bacterial communities to find indicators of soil quality related to contrasting agriculture management in soils under no-till farming. Four sites in production agriculture, with different soil properties, situated across a west-east transect in the most productive region in the Argentinean pampas, were taken as the basis for replication. Working definitions of Good no-till Agricultural Practices (GAP and Poor no-till Agricultural Practices (PAP were adopted for two distinct scenarios in terms of crop rotation, fertilization, agrochemicals use and pest control. Non-cultivated soils nearby the agricultural sites were taken as additional control treatments. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing was used to deeply sample the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria residing in soils corresponding to the three treatments at the four locations. Although bacterial communities as a whole appeared to be structured chiefly by a marked biogeographic provincialism, the distribution of a few taxa was shaped as well by environmental conditions related to agricultural management practices. A statistically supported approach was used to define candidates for management-indicator organisms, subsequently validated using quantitative PCR. We suggest that the ratio between the normalized abundance of a selected group of bacteria within the GP1 group of the phylum Acidobacteria and the genus Rubellimicrobium of the Alphaproteobacteria may serve as a potential management-indicator to discriminate between

  11. Marine sediments microbes capable of electrode oxidation as a surrogate for lithotrophic insoluble substrate metabolism

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    Annette Ruth Rowe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the importance and/or mechanisms of biological mineral oxidation in sediments, partially due to the difficulties associated with culturing mineral-oxidizing microbes. We demonstrate that electrochemical enrichment is a feasible approach for isolation of microbes capable of gaining electrons from insoluble minerals. To this end we constructed sediment microcosms and incubated electrodes at various controlled redox potentials. Negative current production was observed in incubations and increased as redox potential decreased (tested -50 to -400 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Electrode-associated biomass responded to the addition of nitrate and ferric iron as terminal electron acceptors in secondary sediment-free enrichments. Elemental sulfur, elemental iron and amorphous iron sulfide enrichments derived from electrode biomass demonstrated products indicative of sulfur or iron oxidation. The microbes isolated from these enrichments belong to the genera Halomonas, Idiomarina, Marinobacter, and Pseudomonas of the Gammaproteobacteria, and Thalassospira and Thioclava from the Alphaproteobacteria. Chronoamperometry data demonstrates sustained electrode oxidation from these isolates in the absence of alternate electron sources. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrated the variability in dominant electron transfer modes or interactions with electrodes (i.e., biofilm, planktonic or mediator facilitated and the wide range of midpoint potentials observed for each microbe (from 8 to -295 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The diversity of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms observed in one sediment and one redox condition, illustrates the potential importance and abundance of these interactions. This approach has promise for increasing our understanding the extent and diversity of microbe mineral interactions, as well as increasing the repository of microbes available for electrochemical applications.

  12. Impact of solar radiation on bacterioplankton in Laguna Vilama, a hypersaline Andean lake (4650 m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    FaríAs, MaríA. Eugenia; FernáNdez-Zenoff, Verónica; Flores, Regina; OrdóñEz, Omar; EstéVez, Cristina

    2009-06-01

    Laguna Vilama is a hypersaline Lake located at 4660 m altitude in the northwest of Argentina high up in the Andean Puna. The impact of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on bacterioplankton was studied by collecting samples at different times of the day. Molecular analysis (DGGE) showed that the bacterioplankton community is characterized by Gamma-proteobacteria (Halomonas sp., Marinobacter sp.), Alpha-proteobacteria (Roseobacter sp.), HGC (Agrococcus jenensis and an uncultured bacterium), and CFB (uncultured Bacteroidetes). During the day, minor modifications in bacterial diversity such as intensification of Bacteroidetes' signal and an emergence of Gamma-proteobacteria (Marinobacter flavimaris) were observed after solar exposure. DNA damage, measured as an accumulation of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers (CPDs), in bacterioplankton and naked DNA increased from 100 CPDs MB-1 at 1200 local time (LT) to 300 CPDs MB-1 at 1600 LT, and from 80 CPDs MB-1 at 1200 LT to 640 CPDs MB-1 at 1600 LT, respectively. In addition, pure cultures of Pseudomonas sp. V1 and Brachybacterium sp. V5, two bacteria previously isolated from this environment, were exposed simultaneously with the community, and viability of both strains diminished after solar exposure. No CPD accumulation was observed in either of the exposed cultures, but an increase in mutagenesis was detected in V5. Of both strains only Brachybacterium sp. V5 showed CPD accumulation in naked DNA. These results suggest that the bacterioplankton community is well adapted to this highly solar irradiated environment showing little accumulation of CPDs and few changes in the community composition. They also demonstrate that these microorganisms contain efficient mechanisms against UV damage.

  13. Entner-Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-08-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a "sulfoglycolytic" pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden-Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD(+)-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)(+)-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  14. Low Diversity Bacterial Community and the Trapping Activity of Metabolites from Cultivable Bacteria Species in the Female Reproductive System of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae

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    Hongyu Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to identify the bacteria inhabiting the reproductive system of the female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, and evaluate the chemotaxis of B. dorsalis to the metabolites produced by the bacteria. Based on 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE, 18 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were assigned to the five bacterial classes Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Nine OTUs were assigned to Gammaproteobacteria, which was the most highly represented class. Enterobacteriaceae constituted the dominant family, and within this family, three genera and five species were identified, including Enterobacter sakazakii, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter amnigenus. In this set, the first two species were the dominant components, and the latter three species were the minor ones. Finally, we found that the metabolites produced by R. terrigena, K. oxytoca and K. pneumoniae were attractive to the B. dorsalis adults, and in field studies, B. dorsalis adults were most attracted to K. oxytoca. Collectively, our results suggest that the female reproductive system plays an important role in the transfer of enterobacteria from the gut to fruit. Our data may prompt the development of a female-targeted population control strategy for this fly.

  15. Biodegradation of geosmin by a novel Gram-negative bacterium; isolation, phylogenetic characterisation and degradation rate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefel, Daniel; Ho, Lionel; Monis, Paul T; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P

    2009-06-01

    Biologically active sand filters within water treatment plants (WTPs) are now recognised as an effective barrier for the removal of geosmin. However, little is known regarding the actual microbiological processes occurring or the bacteria capable of degrading geosmin. This study reports the enrichment and isolation of a Gram-negative bacterium, Geo48, from the biofilm of a WTP sand filter where the isolate was shown to effectively degrade geosmin individually. Experiments revealed that Geo48 degraded geosmin in a planktonic state by a pseudo-first-order mechanism. Initial geosmin concentrations ranging from 100 to 1000ng/l were shown to directly influence geosmin degradation in reservoir water by Geo48, with rate constants increasing from 0.010h(-1) (R(2)=0.93) to 0.029h(-1) (R(2)=0.97) respectively. Water temperature also influenced degradation of geosmin by Geo48 where temperatures of 11, 22 and 30 degrees C resulted in rate constants of 0.017h(-1) (R(2)=0.98), 0.023h(-1) (R(2)=0.91) and 0.019h(-1) (R(2)=0.85) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene of Geo48 revealed it was a member of the Alphaproteobacteria and clustered with 99% bootstrap support with an isolate designated Geo24, a Sphingopyxis sp. previously described as degrading geosmin but only as a member of a bacterial consortium. Of the previously described bacteria, Geo48 was most similar to Sphingopyxis alaskensis (97.2% sequence similarity to a 1454bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene). To date, this is the only study to report the isolation and characterisation of a Gram-negative bacterium from a biologically active sand filter capable of the sole degradation of geosmin.

  16. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington: Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

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    Stephen R Lindemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring and disassembles each fall and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO42- and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by sequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya, and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus. Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.

  17. Two different bacterial community types are linked with the low-methane emission trait in sheep.

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    Sandra Kittelmann

    Full Text Available The potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4 is produced in the rumens of ruminant animals from hydrogen produced during microbial degradation of ingested feed. The natural animal-to-animal variation in the amount of CH4 emitted and the heritability of this trait offer a means for reducing CH4 emissions by selecting low-CH4 emitting animals for breeding. We demonstrate that differences in rumen microbial community structure are linked to high and low CH4 emissions in sheep. Bacterial community structures in 236 rumen samples from 118 high- and low-CH4 emitting sheep formed gradual transitions between three ruminotypes. Two of these (Q and S were linked to significantly lower CH4 yields (14.4 and 13.6 g CH4/kg dry matter intake [DMI], respectively than the third type (H; 15.9 g CH4/kg DMI; p<0.001. Low-CH4 ruminotype Q was associated with a significantly lower ruminal acetate to propionate ratio (3.7±0.4 than S (4.4±0.7; p<0.001 and H (4.3±0.5; p<0.001, and harbored high relative abundances of the propionate-producing Quinella ovalis. Low-CH4 ruminotype S was characterized by lactate- and succinate-producing Fibrobacter spp., Kandleria vitulina, Olsenella spp., Prevotella bryantii, and Sharpea azabuensis. High-CH4 ruminotype H had higher relative abundances of species belonging to Ruminococcus, other Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Catabacteriaceae, Coprococcus, other Clostridiales, Prevotella, other Bacteroidales, and Alphaproteobacteria, many of which are known to form significant amounts of hydrogen. We hypothesize that lower CH4 yields are the result of bacterial communities that ferment ingested feed to relatively less hydrogen, which results in less CH4 being formed.

  18. Plant-Microbial Interactions Define Potential Mechanisms of Organic Matter Priming in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalnina, K.; Cho, H. J.; Hao, Z.; Mansoori, N.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Deng, K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M. K.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, metabolic processes of plants and microorganisms are closely coupled, and together with soil minerals, their interactions regulate the turnover of soil organic C (SOC). Plants provide readily assimilable metabolites for microorganisms through exudation, and it has been hypothesized that increasing concentrations of exudate C may either stimulate or suppress rates of SOC mineralization (rhizosphere priming). Both positive and negative rhizosphere priming has been widely observed, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. To begin to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying rhizosphere priming, we isolated a broad range of soil bacteria from a Mediterranean grassland dominated by annual grass. Thirty-nine heterotrophic bacteria were selected for genome sequencing and both rRNA gene analysis and metagenome coverage suggest that these isolates represent naturally abundant strain variants. We analyzed their genomes for potential metabolic traits related to life in the rhizosphere and the decomposition of polymeric SOC. While the two dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, were enriched in polymer degrading enzymes, Alphaproteobacterial isolates contained greater gene copies of transporters related to amino acid, organic acid and auxin uptake or export, suggesting an enhanced metabolic potential for life in the root zone. To verify this metabolic potential, we determined the enzymatic activities of these isolates and revealed preferences of strains to degrade certain polymers (xylan, cellulose or lignin). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy is being used to determine which polymeric components of plant roots are targeted by specific strains and how exudates may impact their degradation. To verify the potential of isolates to assimilate root exudates and export key metabolites we are using LC-MS/MS based exometabolomic profiling. The traits hypothesized and verified here (transporters, enzymes, exudate uptake

  19. Presence of Wolbachia in insect eggs containing antimicrobially active anthraquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankewitz, Florian; Zöllmer, Anja; Hilker, Monika; Gräser, Yvonne

    2007-11-01

    Wolbachia are obligatory, cytoplasmatically inherited alpha-proteobacteria, which are common endosymbionts in arthropods where they may cause reproductive abnormalities. Many insects are well known to protect themselves from deleterious microorganisms by antibiotic components. In this study, we addressed the question whether Wolbachia are able to infect insects containing antimicrobial anthraquinones and anthrones, and if so, whether these genotypes of Wolbachia comprise a monophyletic cluster within one of the known supergroups. Leaf beetles of the taxon Galerucini (Galerucinae) are known to contain 1,8-dihydroxylated anthraquinones and anthrones. Also, the scale insect Dactylopius contains an anthraquinone glycoside, carminic acid. Our analyses revealed that a representative of the Galerucini, Galeruca tanaceti and Dactylopius, are indeed infected by endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of the wsp and ftsZ genes of these bacteria revealed that strains in G. tanaceti cluster in supergroup A, whereas those present in Dactylopius are distinctive from each other and from those of G. tanaceti. They are clustering in supergroups A and B. Wolbachia strains present in close, but anthraquinone-free relatives of G. tanaceti were shown to belong also to supergroup A. From these results, we can conclude (1) a double infection in Dactylopius, (2) that the presence of antimicrobial compounds such as anthraquinones does not necessarily protect insects from infection by Wolbachia, and (3) that genotypes of Wolbachia-infecting anthraquinone-containing insects most likely do not comprise a unique genotype. These results show that Wolbachia bacteria might be adapted to cope even with conditions usually detrimental to other bacteria and that these adaptations are widespread among Wolbachia supergroups. PMID:17364245

  20. Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in a potato field as determined by pyrosequencing.

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    Özgül Inceoğlu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants selectively attract particular soil microorganisms, in particular consumers of root-excreted compounds. It is unclear to what extent cultivar type and/or growth stage affect this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA-based pyrosequencing was used to characterize the structure of bacterial communities in a field cropped with potato. The rhizospheres of six cultivars denoted Aveka, Aventra, Karnico, Modena, Premiere and Desiree, at three growth stages (young, flowering and senescence were examined, in addition to corresponding bulk soils. Around 350,000 sequences were obtained (5,700 to 38,000 per sample. Across all samples, rank abundance distributions best fitted the power law model, which indicates a community composed of a few highly dominant species next to numerous rare species. Grouping of the sequences showed that members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, next to as-yet-unclassified bacteria, dominated. Other groups that were consistently found, albeit at lower abundance, were Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Principal components analyses revealed that rhizosphere samples were significantly different from corresponding bulk soil in each growth stage. Furthermore, cultivar effects were found in the young plant stage, whereas these became insignificant in the flowering and senescence stages. Besides, an effect of time of season was observed for both rhizosphere and bulk soils. The analyzed rhizosphere samples of the potato cultivars were grouped into two groups, in accordance with the allocation of carbon to starch in their tubers, i.e. Aveka, Aventra and Karnico (high versus Premiere and Desiree (low and thus replicates per group were established. CONCLUSIONS: Across all potato cultivars, the young plant stages revealed cultivar-dependent bacterial community structures, which disappeared in the flowering and senescence stages. Furthermore, Pseudomonas, Beta-, Alpha- and

  1. Going deeper: metagenome of a hadopelagic microbial community.

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    Emiley A Eloe

    Full Text Available The paucity of sequence data from pelagic deep-ocean microbial assemblages has severely restricted molecular exploration of the largest biome on Earth. In this study, an analysis is presented of a large-scale 454-pyrosequencing metagenomic dataset from a hadopelagic environment from 6,000 m depth within the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT. A total of 145 Mbp of assembled sequence data was generated and compared to two pelagic deep ocean metagenomes and two representative surface seawater datasets from the Sargasso Sea. In a number of instances, all three deep metagenomes displayed similar trends, but were most magnified in the PRT, including enrichment in functions for two-component signal transduction mechanisms and transcriptional regulation. Overrepresented transporters in the PRT metagenome included outer membrane porins, diverse cation transporters, and di- and tri-carboxylate transporters that matched well with the prevailing catabolic processes such as butanoate, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism. A surprisingly high abundance of sulfatases for the degradation of sulfated polysaccharides were also present in the PRT. The most dramatic adaptational feature of the PRT microbes appears to be heavy metal resistance, as reflected in the large numbers of transporters present for their removal. As a complement to the metagenome approach, single-cell genomic techniques were utilized to generate partial whole-genome sequence data from four uncultivated cells from members of the dominant phyla within the PRT, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes. The single-cell sequence data provided genomic context for many of the highly abundant functional attributes identified from the PRT metagenome, as well as recruiting heavily the PRT metagenomic sequence data compared to 172 available reference marine genomes. Through these multifaceted sequence approaches, new insights have been provided into the unique functional

  2. Microbial community in alpine forest soils along an altitudinal gradient on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Hu, A.; Yuan, Y.; Han, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, 'the third pole', has been reported to be sensitive to global change, but the understanding of the relationship between altitude and composition & diversity of microorganisms in this region is poorly characterized. In this study, 18 alpine forest soils located at 704 to 3760 m a.s.l on Tibetan Plateau were selected to investigate the microbial communities by 16S rRNA ion torrent sequencing. Both microbial community richness and evenness were negatively associated with altitude. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that microbial communities were significantly correlated with many environmental variables including temperature, C/N ratio, ammonium and nitrate nitrogen besides altitude. A total of 32 bacterial phyla were detected. Proteobacteria (31.7% average relative abundance) and Acidobacteria (24.0%) had the highest relative abundances across all altitudes. Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes and Nitrospira were also relatively abundant (1-10%). Bacterial communities in relative abundance at different taxonomic levels showed distinct trends with altitude. Acidobacteria sequences, especially of the class Acidobacteria_Gp1, Gp2 and Gp3, were significantly more abundant at higher altitudes, while Gp4, Gp6 and Gp17 were more favorable to lower altitudes. Alphaproteobacteria sequences, especially of the order Rhodospirillales, were significantly more abundant at higher altitudes, while Rhodobacterales and Sphingomonadales favored lower altitudes. The order of Nitrosomonadales and Rhodocyclales within Betaproteobacteria were significantly increasing with the altitude, while Burkholderiales displayed the declining trends. The order of Desulfuromonadales and Syntrophobacterales within Deltaproteobacteria were significantly increasing with the altitude, while Bdellovibrionales and Myxococcales showed the decreasing trends. The order of Chromatiales and Xanthomonadales within Gammaproteobacteriawere

  3. Biogeographic Distribution Patterns of Bacteria in Typical Chinese Forest Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zongwei; Bai, Edith; Wang, Qingkui; Gao, Decai; Zhou, Jidong; Jiang, Ping; Wu, Jiabing

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are widely distributed in soils and play a very important role in nutrient cycling and ecosystem services. To understand the biogeographic distribution of forest soil bacteria, we collected 115 soil samples in typical forest ecosystems across eastern China to investigate their bacterial community compositions using Illumina MiSeq high throughput sequencing based on 16S rRNA. We obtained 4,667,656 sequences totally and more than 70% of these sequences were classified into five dominant groups, i.e., Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes (relative abundance >5%). The bacterial diversity showed a parabola shape along latitude and the maximum diversity appeared at latitudes between 33.50°N and 40°N, an area characterized by warm-temperate zones and moderate temperature, neutral soil pH and high substrate availability (soil C and N) from dominant deciduous broad-leaved forests. Pairwise dissimilarity matrix in bacterial community composition showed that bacterial community structure had regional similarity and the latitude of 30°N could be used as the dividing line between southern and northern forest soils. Soil properties and climate conditions (MAT and MAP) greatly accounted for the differences in the soil bacterial structure. Among all soil parameters determined, soil pH predominantly affected the diversity and composition of the bacterial community, and soil pH = 5 probably could be used as a threshold below which soil bacterial diversity might decline and soil bacterial community structure might change significantly. Moreover, soil exchangeable cations, especially Ca(2+) (ECa(2+)) and some other soil variables were also closely related to bacterial community structure. The selected environmental variables (21.11%) explained more of the bacterial community variation than geographic distance (15.88%), indicating that the edaphic properties and environmental factors played a more important role than

  4. Effect of microorganisms on the chemical behavior of radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microorganisms are affecting the fate of various radionuclides in the environment through processes such as sorption, accumulation, reduction, leaching and volatilization. We have studied on the microbial influences on the chemical behavior of iodine in the environment, and have isolated various microorganisms which can mediate volatilization, accumulation and oxidation of iodine. We found that iodine-volatilizing bacteria are distributed widely in the environment, and are very diverse group of bacteria. From gas chromatographic analyses, volatile iodine species produced by bacteria was identified as methyl iodide (CH3I). Radiotracer experiments were carried out to estimate bacterial contribution to the volatilization of iodine from soils and seawaters. In soil samples, bacteria were considered to play major roles in iodine volatilization since the addition of bacterial inhibitor almost completely inhibited the volatilization. On the other hand, in seawater samples, both bacterial and fungal (or algal) contributions were suggested. We also isolated iodine-accumulating bacteria and iodine-oxidizing bacteria from the environment. Iodine-accumulating bacteria were isolated from marine sediments, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequences showed that they are close to common marine bacteria Flexibacter sp. During the cultivation with iodide ion, they accumulated iodide intracellularly at a concentration that is more than 1,000 times higher than the culture medium. Iodide uptake by iodine-accumulating bacteria was found to occur biologically, and the uptake was specific for iodide but not for iodate. Iodine-oxidizing bacteria, which can mediate iodide (I-) oxidation to molecular iodine (I2), were phylogenetically divided into two groups within alpha-Proteobacteria, and iodide oxidation was mediated by an extracellular enzyme protein. (author)

  5. Impact of Lowland Rainforest Transformation on Diversity and Composition of Soil Prokaryotic Communities in Sumatra (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dominik; Engelhaupt, Martin; Allen, Kara; Kurniawan, Syahrul; Krashevska, Valentyna; Heinemann, Melanie; Nacke, Heiko; Wijayanti, Marini; Meryandini, Anja; Corre, Marife D.; Scheu, Stefan; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes are the most abundant and diverse group of microorganisms in soil and mediate virtually all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, they influence aboveground plant productivity and diversity. In this study, the impact of rainforest transformation to intensively managed cash crop systems on soil prokaryotic communities was investigated. The studied managed land use systems comprised rubber agroforests (jungle rubber), rubber plantations and oil palm plantations within two Indonesian landscapes Bukit Duabelas and Harapan. Soil prokaryotic community composition and diversity were assessed by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The curated dataset contained 16,413 bacterial and 1679 archaeal operational taxonomic units at species level (97% genetic identity). Analysis revealed changes in indigenous taxon-specific patterns of soil prokaryotic communities accompanying lowland rainforest transformation to jungle rubber, and intensively managed rubber and oil palm plantations. Distinct clustering of the rainforest soil communities indicated that these are different from the communities in the studied managed land use systems. The predominant bacterial taxa in all investigated soils were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Overall, the bacterial community shifted from proteobacterial groups in rainforest soils to Acidobacteria in managed soils. The archaeal soil communities were mainly represented by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Members of the Terrestrial Group and South African Gold Mine Group 1 (Thaumarchaeota) dominated in the rainforest and members of Thermoplasmata in the managed land use systems. The alpha and beta diversity of the soil prokaryotic communities was higher in managed land use systems than in rainforest. In the case of bacteria, this was related to soil characteristics such as pH value, exchangeable Ca and Fe content, C to N ratio

  6. Spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial communities in a human-perturbed estuary of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, A.; Yu, C. P.; Hou, L.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are responsible for the transport and transformation of nutrients and organic matters from the continent to the adjacent coastal zone, and therefore play critical roles in global biogeochemical cycles. They are under increasing stress from human activities, especially in China, yet we still know little about the responses of microbial communities that mediate biogeochemical processes. Here, we investigated planktonic and benthic microbial communities in the human-perturbed Jiulong River estuary (JRE), southern China by using Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing. The results of taxonomic assignments indicated that Beta- (23.32%), Alpha- (22.21%), Gammaproteobacteria (14.83%), Actinobacteria (8.67%), and Flavobacteria (7.56%) were the five most abundant classes in estuarine surface waters, while benthic microbial communities were dominated by Gamma- (20.09%), Delta- (14.68%), Beta- (9.82%), Alphaproteobacteria (7.63%), and Anaerolineae (7.25%). The results of Adnois and ANOSIM tests confirmed that the compositions of microbial communities from waters and sediments of the JRE were significantly different from each other, and then salinity may be the primary factor controlling spatial distributions of planktonic and benthic microbial communities in this estuary. At the temporal scale, planktonic communities showed a more clear variation pattern. Remarkably, the ratios of Thaumarchaeota (putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea) to Nitrosomonadales (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) either in water or sediments of the JRE increased from freshwater to marine end, suggesting that bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers occupy low-salinity and high-salinity niches, respectively. The nutrient concentrations and salinity might be the most important factors which are responsible for this niche diversification. Overall, this study shed light on our understanding of the biogeographic patterns and its ecological drivers of estuarine microbial communities.

  7. Characterization of geographically distinct bacterial communities associated with coral mucus produced by Acropora spp. and Porites spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, B A; Dumbrell, A J; Daud, S D; Hepburn, L; Thorpe, E; Mogensen, L; Whitby, C

    2012-08-01

    Acropora and Porites corals are important reef builders in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Bacteria associated with mucus produced by Porites spp. and Acropora spp. from Caribbean (Punta Maroma, Mexico) and Indo-Pacific (Hoga and Sampela, Indonesia) reefs were determined. Analysis of pyrosequencing libraries showed that bacterial communities from Caribbean corals were significantly more diverse (H', 3.18 to 4.25) than their Indonesian counterparts (H', 2.54 to 3.25). Dominant taxa were Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria, which varied in relative abundance between coral genera and region. Distinct coral host-specific communities were also found; for example, Clostridiales were dominant on Acropora spp. (at Hoga and the Mexican Caribbean) compared to Porites spp. and seawater. Within the Gammproteobacteria, Halomonas spp. dominated sequence libraries from Porites spp. (49%) and Acropora spp. (5.6%) from the Mexican Caribbean, compared to the corresponding Indonesian coral libraries (<2%). Interestingly, with the exception of Porites spp. from the Mexican Caribbean, there was also a ubiquity of Psychrobacter spp., which dominated Acropora and Porites libraries from Indonesia and Acropora libraries from the Caribbean. In conclusion, there was a dominance of Halomonas spp. (associated with Acropora and Porites [Mexican Caribbean]), Firmicutes (associated with Acropora [Mexican Caribbean] and with Acropora and Porites [Hoga]), and Cyanobacteria (associated with Acropora and Porites [Hoga] and Porites [Sampela]). This is also the first report describing geographically distinct Psychrobacter spp. associated with coral mucus. In addition, the predominance of Clostridiales associated with Acropora spp. provided additional evidence for coral host-specific microorganisms.

  8. Phylogenomics of the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis wMel: a streamlined genome overrun by mobile genetic elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wu

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The complete sequence of the 1,267,782 bp genome of Wolbachia pipientis wMel, an obligate intracellular bacteria of Drosophila melanogaster, has been determined. Wolbachia, which are found in a variety of invertebrate species, are of great interest due to their diverse interactions with different hosts, which range from many forms of reproductive parasitism to mutualistic symbioses. Analysis of the wMel genome, in particular phylogenomic comparisons with other intracellular bacteria, has revealed many insights into the biology and evolution of wMel and Wolbachia in general. For example, the wMel genome is unique among sequenced obligate intracellular species in both being highly streamlined and containing very high levels of repetitive DNA and mobile DNA elements. This observation, coupled with multiple evolutionary reconstructions, suggests that natural selection is somewhat inefficient in wMel, most likely owing to the occurrence of repeated population bottlenecks. Genome analysis predicts many metabolic differences with the closely related Rickettsia species, including the presence of intact glycolysis and purine synthesis, which may compensate for an inability to obtain ATP directly from its host, as Rickettsia can. Other discoveries include the apparent inability of wMel to synthesize lipopolysaccharide and the presence of the most genes encoding proteins with ankyrin repeat domains of any prokaryotic genome yet sequenced. Despite the ability of wMel to infect the germline of its host, we find no evidence for either recent lateral gene transfer between wMel and D. melanogaster or older transfers between Wolbachia and any host. Evolutionary analysis further supports the hypothesis that mitochondria share a common ancestor with the alpha-Proteobacteria, but shows little support for the grouping of mitochondria with species in the order Rickettsiales. With the availability of the complete genomes of both species and excellent genetic tools for

  9. Correlations between root-associated microorganisms and peach replant disease symptoms in a California soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiue-in Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Replant disease often occurs when certain crops are "replanted" in a soil that had previously supported the same or similar plant species. This disease typically leads to reductions in plant growth, crop yields, and production duration, and its etiology remains ill-defined. The objective of this study was to identify microorganisms associated with peach replant disease symptoms at a field location in California, USA. Soil samples were subjected to treatments to create various levels of replant disease symptoms. Clonal peach seedlings were grown in the treated soils in greenhouse trials. After 6 weeks, plant growth parameters were measured, and both culture and culture-independent analyses were performed to identify root-associated bacteria, fungi and stramenopiles. RESULTS: A total of 295,785 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU were identified by an Illumina-based, high throughput sequence analysis of rRNA genes. Among the 60 most abundant OTUs, 27 showed significant (P<0.05 negative correlation with peach shoot weights while 10 were positively correlated. Most of these OTUs belonged to the bacterial phylum Proteobacteria (96%, including the classes Gammaproteobacteria (44.4%, Betaproteobacteria (33.3% and Alphaproteobacteria (22.2%, and the orders Pseudomonadales, Burkholderiales, Chromatiales, Rhodocyclales, and Sphingomonadales. The most abundant fungi were Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma virens, Fusarium oxysporum, Ceratocystis fimbriata and Fusarium solani. The most abundant stramenopiles were Pythium vexans, Pythium violae and an unidentified Aplanochytrium species. Validation experiments using sequence-selective quantitative PCR analyses identified negative and positive associations between P. vexans and Trichoderma spp. and peach shoot weights, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified numerous microorganisms associated with peach replant symptoms, some of which have been previously identified while others

  10. Impact of long-term cropping of glyphosate-resistant transgenic soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] on soil microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babujia, Letícia Carlos; Silva, Adriana Pereira; Nakatani, André Shigueyoshi; Cantão, Mauricio Egidio; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-08-01

    The transgenic soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] occupies about 80 % of the global area cropped with this legume, the majority comprising the glyphosate-resistant trait (Roundup Ready(®), GR or RR). However, concerns about possible impacts of transgenic crops on soil microbial communities are often raised. We investigated soil chemical, physical and microbiological properties, and grain yields in long-term field trials involving conventional and nearly isogenic RR transgenic genotypes. The trials were performed at two locations in Brazil, with different edaphoclimatic conditions. Large differences in physical, chemical and classic microbiological parameters (microbial biomass of C and N, basal respiration), as well as in grain production were observed between the sites. Some phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria), classes (Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales, Solibacteres) and orders (Rhizobiales, Burkholderiales, Myxococcales, Pseudomonadales), as well as some functional subsystems (clustering-based subsystems, carbohydrates, amino acids and protein metabolism) were, in general, abundant in all treatments. However, bioindicators related to superior soil fertility and physical properties at Londrina were identified, among them a higher ratio of Proteobacteria:Acidobacteria. Regarding the transgene, the metagenomics showed differences in microbial taxonomic and functional abundances, but lower in magnitude than differences observed between the sites. Besides the site-specific differences, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Chlorophyta were higher in the transgenic treatment, as well as sequences related to protein metabolism, cell division and cycle. Although confirming effects of the transgenic trait on soil microbiome, no differences were recorded in grain yields, probably due to the buffering capacity associated with the high taxonomic and functional microbial diversity observed in all treatments. PMID:26873023

  11. Bacterial communities associated with biofouling materials used in bench-scale hydrocarbon bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailem, Dina; Kansour, Mayada; Radwan, Samir

    2015-03-01

    Biofouling material samples from the Arabian (Persian) Gulf, used as inocula in batch cultures, brought about crude oil and pure-hydrocarbon removal in a mineral medium. Without any added nitrogen fertilizers, the hydrocarbon-removal values were between about 10 and 50 %. Fertilization with NaNO3 alone or together with a mixture of the vitamins thiamine, pyridoxine, vitamin B12, biotin, riboflavin, and folic acid increased the hydrocarbon-removal values, to reach 90 %. Biofouling material samples harbored total bacteria in the magnitude of 10(7) cells g(-1), about 25 % of which were hydrocarbonoclastic. These numbers were enhanced by NaNO3 and vitamin amendment. The culture-independent analysis of the total bacterioflora revealed the predominance of the gammaproteobacterial genera Marinobacter, Acinetobacter, and Alcanivorax, the Flavobacteriia, Flavobacterium, Gaetbulibacter, and Owenweeksia, and the Alphaproteobacteria Tistrella, Zavarzinia, and others. Most of those bacteria are hydrocarbonoclastic. Culture-dependent analysis of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria revealed that Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Dietzia maris, and Gordonia bronchialis predominated in the fouling materials. In addition, each material had several more-specific hydrocarbonoclastic species, whose frequencies were enhanced by NaNO3 and vitamin fertilization. The same samples of fouling materials were used in four successive crude-oil-removal cycles without any dramatic loss of their hydrocarbon-removal potential nor of their associated hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. In the fifth cycle, the oil-removal value was reduced by about 50 % in only one of the studied samples. This highlights how firmly biofouling materials were immobilizing the hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria.

  12. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eBenzine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ i-chip enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria and six Fe(II phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8, Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5, and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31 were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  13. Halodurantibacterium flavum gen. nov., sp. nov., a non-phototrophic bacterium isolated from an oil production mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiang-Lin; Xie, Bai-Sheng; Cai, Man; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wang, Ya-Nan; Cui, Heng-Lin; Liu, Xue-Ying; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Three Gram-negative bacterial strains, DQW12E6-69-1(T), DQW12E61-22-1, and DQW12E6-22-1-1, were isolated from an oil production mixture from Daqing Oilfield, northeastern China. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the three strains formed a stable cluster different from the known genus in Rhodobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. In addition, they were most closely related to species in genera Pararhodobacter, Rhodobacter ,and Rhodobaca with the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities being 95.1-95.9 %. Cells of the three strains were aerobic; they do not require salt to grow but are resistant to high salinity. They could conduct chemoorganoheterotrophic growth on various carbon sources, with non-phototrophic growth observed. The genomic DNA G+C contents of the strains DQW12E6-69-1(T), DQW12E6-22-1-1, and DQW12E61-22-1 were 63.8, 63.7, and 63.6 mol%, respectively. The predominant respiratory ubiquinone of DQW12E6-69-1(T) was Q-10, and the major fatty acids were C18:1 ω7c, C(18:0), and C(10:0) 3-OH. Photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic reaction center gene pufM were not detected. The polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, unidentified glycolipid, and unidentified phospholipid. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strains DQW12E6-69-1(T), DQW12E61-22-1, and DQW12E6-22-1-1 represent a novel genus and a novel species of the family Rhodobacteraceae. The name Halodurantibacterium flavum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed with strain DQW12E6-69-1(T) (=LMG 27742(T) = CGMCC 1.12756(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25240291

  14. Microbial community evolution during simulated managed aquifer recharge in response to different biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) concentrations

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Dong

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the evolution of the microbial community in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating the infiltration zone of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems. Parallel systems were supplemented with either moderate (1.1 mg/L) or low (0.5 mg/L) biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) for a period of six months during which time, spatial (1 cm, 30 cm, 60 cm, 90 cm, and 120 cm) and temporal (monthly) analyses of sediment-associated microbial community structure were analyzed. Total microbial biomass associated with sediments was positively correlated with BDOC concentration where a significant decline in BDOC was observed along the column length. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated dominance by Bacteria with Archaea comprising less than 1 percent of the total community. Proteobacteria was found to be the major phylum in samples from all column depths with contributions from Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Microbial community structure at all the phylum, class and genus levels differed significantly at 1 cm between columns receiving moderate and low BDOC concentrations; in contrast strong similarities were observed both between parallel column systems and across samples from 30 to 120 cm depths. Samples from 1 cm depth of the low BDOC columns exhibited higher microbial diversity (expressed as Shannon Index) than those at 1 cm of moderate BDOC columns, and both increased from 5.4 to 5.9 at 1 cm depth to 6.7-8.3 at 30-120 cm depths. The microbial community structure reached steady state after 3-4 months since the initiation of the experiment, which also resulted in an improved DOC removal during the same time period. This study suggested that BDOC could significantly influence microbial community structure regarding both composition and diversity of artificial MAR systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The effect of surface colour on the formation of marine micro and macrofouling communities

    KAUST Repository

    Dobretsov, Sergey V.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of substratum colour on the formation of micro- and macro fouling communities was investigated. Acrylic tiles, painted either black or white were covered with transparent sheets in order to ensure similar surface properties. All substrata were exposed to biofouling at 1 m depth for 40 d in the Marina Bandar al Rowdha (Muscat, Sea of Oman). Studies were conducted in 2010 over a time course of 5, 10 and 20 d, and in 2012 samples were collected at 7, 14 and 21 d. The densities of bacteria on the black and white substrata were similar with the exception of day 10, when the black substrata had a higher abundance than white ones. Pyrosequencing via 454 of 16S rRNA genes of bacteria from white and black substrata revealed that Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant groups. SIMPER analysis demonstrated that bacterial phylotypes (uncultured Gammaproteobacteria, Actibacter, Gaetbulicola, Thalassobius and Silicibacter) and the diatoms (Navicula directa, Navicula sp. and Nitzschia sp.) contributed to the dissimilarities between communities developed on white and black substrata. At day 20, the highest amount of chlorophyll a was recorded in biofilms developed on black substrata. SIMPER analysis showed that Folliculina sp., Ulva sp. and Balanus amphitrite were the major macro fouling species that contributed to the dissimilarities between the communities formed on white and black substrata. Higher densities of these species were observed on black tiles. The results emphasise the effect of substratum colour on the formation of micro and macro fouling communities; substratum colour should to be taken into account in future studies. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Stratification and seasonal stability of diverse bacterial communities in a Pinus merkusii (pine) forest soil in central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krave, Agna S; Lin, Bin; Braster, Martin; Laverman, Anniet M; van Straalen, Nico M; Röling, Wilfred F M; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2002-06-01

    In Java, Indonesia, many nutrient-poor soils are intensively reforested with Pinus merkusii (pine). Information on nutrient cycles and microorganisms involved in these cycles will benefit the management of these important forests. Here, seasonal effects on the stratification of bacterial community structure in the soil profile of a tropical pine forest are described, and differences in bacterial communities are related to chemical and physical soil parameters. Culture-independent community profiles of litter, fragmented litter and mineral soil layers were made by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments. The community profiles of the different soil layers clustered separately, correlating with significant differences in organic matter content between the three layers. The bacterial communities appeared to be stable during the wet season of 1998. The drought in 1997, caused by the El Niño climatic effect, did not influence the bacterial communities in fragmentation and mineral soil, although moisture content and other soil parameters were markedly lower than in the wet season. However, communities in litter were influenced by drought. In the litter layer, the moisture content was significantly lower than in the fragmentation and mineral layers during the dry season. A clone library was made from a litter sample taken during the wet season. Partial sequencing of 74 clones and linking the DGGE banding positions of these clones to bands in the DGGE profile of the sample from which the clone library was derived showed considerable bacterial diversity. Alpha-proteobacteria (40.5% of the clones, of which 57% belonged to the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium group) and high-G+C content, Gram-positive bacteria (36.5%) dominated the clone library. PMID:12071981

  17. Rapid Microbiome Changes in Freshly Deposited Cow Feces under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Shaw, Timothy I; Oladeinde, Adelumola; Glenn, Travis C; Oakley, Brian; Molina, Marirosa

    2016-01-01

    Although development of next generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially improved our understanding of the microbial ecology of animal feces, previous studies have mostly focused on freshly excreted feces. There is still limited understanding of the aging process dynamics of fecal microbiomes in intact cowpats exposed to natural environments. Fresh cowpats were sampled at multiple time points for 57 days under field conditions; half the samples were exposed to sunlight (unshaded) while the other half was protected from sunlight (shaded). The 16SRNA hypervariable region 4 was amplified from each sample and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq Platform. While Clostridia, Bacteroidia, and Sphingobacteria were dominant classes of bacteria in fresh cowpats, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacilli were the dominant classes by the end of the study, indicating a general shift from anaerobic to aerobic bacterial populations. This change was most likely influenced by the shift from cattle gut (anaerobic) to pasture ground (aerobic). Reduced moisture in cowpats may also contribute to the community shift since air can penetrate the dryer cowpat more easily. Twelve genera consisting pathogenic bacteria were detected, with Mycobacterium, Bacillus, and Clostridium being the most abundant; their combined abundance accounts for 90% of the total pathogenic genera. Taxonomic richness and diversity increased throughout the study for most samples, which could be due to bacteria regrowth and colonization of bacteria from the environment. In contrast to the high taxonomic diversity, the changes of PICRUSt inferred function profile were minimal for all cowpats throughout the study, which suggest that core functions predicted by PICRUSt may be too conserved to distinguish differences between aerobe and anaerobe. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that cowpat exposure to air and sunlight can cause drastic microbiome changes soon

  18. Response of bacterial community compositions to different sources of pollutants in sediments of a tributary of Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Yi; Wang, Peifang; Niu, Lihua; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Sediment bacterial communities are sensitive to water conditions in river ecosystems. The objective of this study was to compare the influences of different pollution sources, including urban areas, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), suburban areas, and agricultural areas, on sediment bacterial communities along a typical tributary of Taihu Lake, China. The dominant composition of the sediment bacterial community was determined using a combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and a 16S rRNA clone library. The results showed that the sediment bacterial communities were distinctly affected by the four pollution sources. Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria (>50 % in total) were the predominant bacterial taxa across the sediment samples. Apart from those, the sediment bacterial community composition (BCC) affected by WWTP effluent was subsequently dominated by Nitrospira (12.4 %) and Bacteroidetes (11.5 %), agriculture was dominated by Firmicutes (13.2 %) and Deltaproteobacteria (7.2 %), while urban and suburban were dominated by Bacteroidetes (7.6 and 7.9 %, respectively) and Deltaproteobacteria (7.9 and 7.6 %, respectively). Cluster analysis indicated that the BCC affected by WWTP effluent was distinct from the BCC in urban, suburban, and agricultural areas. In addition, the bacterial community richness and evenness affected by WWTP effluent were much less than those by the other pollution sources. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that the variation in BCC across the sediment samples was significantly associated with ammonium (17 %), organic matter (12 %), and cadmium (3 %) (p < 0.01). Overall, the results indicated that the four different pollution sources (WWTP, urban, suburban, and agriculture) have dissimilar impacts on the sediment BCC in the tributary of Taihu Lake, while WWTPs exhibited the greatest potential to lead to biotic homogenization in river sediments. PMID:27040536

  19. The Prestige oil spill: bacterial community dynamics during a field biostimulation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, N.; Solanas, A.M. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology; Vinas, M. [GIRO Technological Centre, Mollet del Valles (Spain); Bayona, J.M.; Albaiges, J. [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2007-12-15

    A field bioremediation assay using the oleophilic fertilizer S200 was carried out 12 months after the Prestige heavy fuel-oil spill on a beach on the Cantabrian coast (north Spain). This assay showed that S200-enhanced oil degradation, particularly of high-molecular-weight n-alkanes and alkylated PAHs, suggesting an increase in the microbial bioavailability of these compounds. The bacterial community structure was determined by cultivation-independent analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Bacterial community was mainly composed of {alpha}-Proteobacteria (Rhodobacteriaceae and Sphingomonadaceae). Representatives of {gamma}-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales, Moraxellaceae, and Halomonadaceae), Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteriaceae), and Actinobacteria group (Nocardiaceae and Corynebacteriaceae) were also found. The addition of the fertilizer led to the appearance of the bacterium Mesonia algae in the early stages, with a narrow range of growth substrates, which has been associated with the common alga Achrosiphonia sonderi. The presence of Mesonia algae may be attributable to the response of the microbial community to the addition of N and P rather than indicating a role in the biodegradation process. The Rhodococcus group appeared in both assay plots, especially at the end of the experiment. It was also found at another site on the Galician coast that had been affected by the same spill. This genus has been associated with the degradation of n-alkanes up to C{sub 36}. Taking into account the high content of heavy alkanes in the Prestige fuel, these microorganisms could play a significant role in the degradation of such fuel. A similar bacterial community structure was observed at another site that showed a similar degree of fuel weathering. (orig.)

  20. Distinct Bacterial Communities in Surficial Seafloor Sediments Following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Speare, Kelly; McKay, Luke; MacGregor, Barbara J; Joye, Samantha B; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A major fraction of the petroleum hydrocarbons discharged during the 2010 Macondo oil spill became associated with and sank to the seafloor as marine snow flocs. This sedimentation pulse induced the development of distinct bacterial communities. Between May 2010 and July 2011, full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated bacterial community succession in oil-polluted sediment samples near the wellhead area. Libraries from early May 2010, before the sedimentation event, served as the baseline control. Freshly deposited oil-derived marine snow was collected on the surface of sediment cores in September 2010, and was characterized by abundantly detected members of the marine Roseobacter cluster within the Alphaproteobacteria. Samples collected in mid-October 2010 closest to the wellhead contained members of the sulfate-reducing, anaerobic bacterial families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria, suggesting that the oil-derived sedimentation pulse triggered bacterial oxygen consumption and created patchy anaerobic microniches that favored sulfate-reducing bacteria. Phylotypes of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genus Cycloclasticus, previously found both in surface oil slicks and the deep hydrocarbon plume, were also found in oil-derived marine snow flocs sedimenting on the seafloor in September 2010, and in surficial sediments collected in October and November 2010, but not in any of the control samples. Due to the relative recalcitrance and stability of polycyclic aromatic compounds, Cycloclasticus represents the most persistent microbial marker of seafloor hydrocarbon deposition that we could identify in this dataset. The bacterial imprint of the DWH oil spill had diminished in late November 2010, when the bacterial communities in oil-impacted sediment samples collected near the Macondo wellhead began to resemble their pre-spill counterparts and spatial controls. Samples collected in summer of 2011 did not show

  1. Pyrosequencing-derived bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of spacecraft hardware destined for Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T; Vaishampayan, Parag; Nilsson, Henrik R; Torok, Tamas; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-08-01

    Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m(2) in total) were sampled, total genomic DNA was extracted, hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria and archaea) and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (fungi) were subjected to 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing PCR amplification, and 203,852 resulting high-quality sequences were analyzed. Bioinformatic analyses revealed correlations between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and certain sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE], or spacecraft hardware), cleaning regimen applied, and location about the facility or spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a larger number of diverse bacterial communities (619 OTU; 20 m(2)) than colocated spacecraft hardware (187 OTU; 162 m(2)). In contrast to the results of bacterial pyrosequencing, where at least some sequences were generated from each of the 31 sample sets examined, only 13 and 18 of these sample sets gave rise to archaeal and fungal sequences, respectively. As was the case for bacteria, the abundance of fungal OTU in the GSE surface samples dramatically diminished (9× less) once cleaning protocols had been applied. The presence of OTU representative of actinobacteria, deinococci, acidobacteria, firmicutes, and proteobacteria on spacecraft surfaces suggests that certain bacterial lineages persist even following rigorous quality control and cleaning practices. The majority of bacterial OTU observed as being recurrent belonged to actinobacteria and alphaproteobacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the measures of cleanliness exerted in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms (SAC) inadvertently select for the organisms which are the most fit to survive long journeys in space.

  2. Abundance of Two Pelagibacter ubique Bacteriophage Genotypes along a Latitudinal Transect in the North and South Atlantic Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Erin M.; Hewson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study characterizes viral and bacterial dynamics along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean from approximately 10 N–40 S. Overall viral abundance decreased with depth, on average there were 1.64 ± 0.71 × 107 virus like particles (VLPs) in surface waters, decreasing to an average of 6.50 ± 2.26 × 105 VLPs in Antarctic Bottom Water. This decrease was highly correlated to bacterial abundance. There are six major water masses in the Southern Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and inclusion of water mass, temperature and salinity variables explained a majority of the variation in total viral abundance. Recent discovery of phages infecting bacteria of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria (i.e., pelagiphages) leads to intriguing questions about the roles they play in shaping epipelagic communities. Viral-size fraction DNA from epipelagic water was used to quantify the abundance of two pelagiphages, using pelagiphage-specific quantitative PCR primers and probes along the transect. We found that HTVC010P, a member of a podoviridae sub-family, was most abundant in surface waters. Copy numbers ranged from an average of 1.03 ± 2.38 × 105 copies ml−1 in surface waters, to 5.79 ± 2.86 × 103 in the deep chlorophyll maximum. HTVC008M, a T4-like myovirus, was present in the deep chlorophyll maximum (5.42 ± 2.8 × 103 copies ml−1 on average), although it was not as highly abundant as HTVC010P in surface waters (6.05 ± 3.01 × 103 copies ml−1 on average). Interestingly, HTVC008M was only present at a few of the most southern stations, suggesting latitudinal biogeography of SAR11 phages. PMID:27733846

  3. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-07-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 %) was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding

  4. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time

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    Cody Springer Sheik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream and the glacier’s terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  5. Loktanella spp. Gb03 as an algicidal bacterium, isolated from the culture of Dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus belizeanus

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    Anmar Hameed Bloh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bacteria associated with harmful algal blooms can play a crucial role in regulating algal blooms in the environment. This study aimed at isolating and identifying algicidal bacteria in Dinoflagellate culture and to determine the optimum growth requirement of the algicidal bacteria, Loktanella sp. Gb-03. Materials and Methods: The Dinoflagellate culture used in this study was supplied by Professor Gires Usup’s Laboratory, School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia. The culture was used for the isolation of Loktanella sp., using biochemical tests, API 20 ONE kits. The fatty acid content of the isolates and the algicidal activity were further evaluated, and the phenotype was determined through the phylogenetic tree. Results: Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria (Gb01, Gb02, Gb03, Gb04, Gb05, and Gb06 were isolated from the Dinoflagellate culture. The colonies were pink in color, convex with a smooth surface and entire edge. The optimum growth temperature for the Loktanella sp. Gb03 isolate was determined to be 30°C, in 1% of NaCl and pH7. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the bacterium belonged to the genus Loktanella of the class Alphaproteobacteria and formed a tight cluster with the type strain of Loktanella pyoseonensis (97.0% sequence similarity. Conclusion: On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic data and genetic distinctiveness, strain Gb-03, were placed in the genus Loktanella as the type strain of species. Moreover, it has algicidal activity against seven toxic Dinoflagellate. The algicidal property of the isolated Loktanella is vital, especially where biological control is needed to mitigate algal bloom or targeted Dinoflagellates.

  6. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

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    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  7. Effects of selected pharmaceuticals on riverine biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, John R; Swerhone, George D W; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Neu, Thomas R

    2005-08-01

    Although pharmaceutical and therapeutic products are widely found in the natural environment, there is limited understanding of their ecological effects. Here we used rotating annular bioreactors to assess the impact of 10 microg.L(-1) of the selected pharmaceuticals ibuprofen, carbamazepine, furosemide, and caffeine on riverine biofilms. After 8 weeks of development, community structure was assessed using in situ microscopic analyses, fluor-conjugated lectin binding, standard plate counts, fluorescent in situ hybridization, carbon utilization spectra, and stable carbon isotope analyses. The biofilm communities varied markedly in architecture although only caffeine treated biofilms were significantly thicker. Cyanobacteria were suppressed by all 4 compounds, whereas the nitrogen containing caffeine, furosemide, and carbamazepine increased algal biomass. Ibuprofen and carbamazepine reduced bacterial biomass, while caffeine and furosemide increased it. Exopolymer content and composition of the biofilms was also influenced. Significant positive and negative effects were observed in carbon utilization spectra. In situ hybridization analyses indicated all treatments significantly decreased the gamma-proteobacterial populations and increased beta-proteobacteria. Ibuprofen in particular increased the alpha-proteobacteria, beta-proteobacteria, cytophaga-flavobacteria, and SRB385 probe positive populations. Caffeine and carbamazepine additions resulted in significant increases in the high GC354c and low GC69a probe positive cells. Live-dead analyses of the biofilms indicated that all treatments influenced the ratio of live-to-dead cells with controls having a ratio of 2.4, carbamazepine and ibuprofen being 3.2 and 3.5, respectively, and furosemide and caffeine being 1.9 and 1.7, respectively. Stable isotope analyses of the biofilms indicated delta 13C values shifted to more negative values relative to control biofilms. This shift may be consistent with proportional loss of

  8. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

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    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had

  9. Microbial Diversity in a Venezuelan Orthoquartzite Cave is Dominated by the Chloroflexi (Class Ktedonobacterales and Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c.

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    Hazel A Barton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The majority of caves are formed within limestone rock and hence our understanding of cave microbiology comes from carbonate-buffered systems. In this paper, we describe the microbial diversity of Roraima Sur Cave, an orthoquartzite (SiO4 cave within Roraima Tepui, Venezuela. The cave contains a high level of microbial activity when compared with other cave systems, as determined by an ATP-based luminescence assay and cell counting. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of microbial diversity within the cave demonstrate the dominance of Actinomycetales and Alphaproteobacteria in endolithic bacterial communities close to the entrance, while communities from deeper in the cave are dominated (82-84% by a unique clade of Ktedonobacterales within the Chloroflexi. While members of this phylum are commonly found in caves, this is the first identification of members of the Class Ktedonobacterales. An assessment of archaeal species demonstrates the dominance of phylotypes from the Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c (100%, which have previously been associated with acidic environments. While the Thaumarchaeota have been seen in numerous cave systems, the dominance of Group I.1c in Roraima Sur Cave is unique and a departure from the traditional archaeal community structure. Geochemical analysis of the cave environment suggests that water entering the cave, rather than the nutrient-limited orthoquartzite rock, provides the carbon and energy necessary for microbial community growth and subsistence, while the poor buffering capacity of quartzite or the low pH of the environment may be selecting for this unusual community structure. Together these data suggest that pH, imparted by the geochemistry of the host rock, can play as important a role in niche-differentiation in caves as in other environmental systems.

  10. Hippophae leaf extract (SBL-1) countered radiation induced dysbiosis in jejunum of total body 60Cobalt gamma - irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single dose of SBL-1 administered at the rate 30 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) 30 min prior to whole body 60Co-gamma-irradiation at lethal dose (10 Gy), rendered >90% survival in comparison to zero survival in the non-SBL-1 treated 60Co-gamma-irradiated (10 Gy) mice population (J Herbs Spices Med Plants, 2009; 15(2): 203-215). Present study investigated the effect of SBL-1 on jejunal microbiota in lethally irradiated mice. Study was performed with inbred Swiss albino Strain 'A' male mice (age 9 weeks) weighing 28±2 g. The animals were maintained under controlled environment at 26±2℃; 12 h light/dark cycle and offered standard animal food (Golden feed, Delhi) as well as tap water ad libitum. Metagenomic DNA was extracted, purified and quantified from jejunum of the mice. Universal primers (27f and 1492r) were used to amplify the 16S rRNA DNA from the metagenomic DNA. Amplicons were sequenced, vector contamination and chimeras were removed. The sequences (GenBank Accession No: KF681283 to KF681351) were taxonomically classified by using Sequence Match program, Ribosomal Database Project as well as by nucleotide-BLAST (E-value: 10, database: 16S rRNA gene sequences, Bacteria and Archea). Phylogenetic Tree was prepared using MEGA 5.2 package, using maximum likelihood algorithm after sequence alignment by MUSCLE. Thermus aquaticus was used as out-group to construct rooted tree. Branch stability was assessed by bootstrap analysis. Untreated animals and the animals treated with SBL-1 had 100% Lactobacillus; 60Co gamma-irradiated animals had 55% Cohaesibacter (Alphaproteobacteria); 27% Mycoplasma (Tenericutes) and only 18% Lactobacillus; animals treated with SBL-1 prior to irradiation had 89% Lactobacillus and 11% Clostridium. This study demonstrated that treatment with SBL-1 at radioprotective doses before total body irradiation with lethal dose (10 Gy) countered the jejunal dysbiosis. (author)

  11. Denitrifying bacteria from the terrestrial subsurface exposed to mixed waste contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terrestrial subsurface environments where nitrate is a critical groundwater contaminant, few cultivated representatives are available with which to verify the metabolism of organisms that catalyze denitrification. In this study, five species of denitrifying bacteria from three phyla were isolated from subsurface sediments exposed to metal radionuclide and nitrate contamination as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (OR-IFRC). Isolates belonged to the genera Afipia and Hyphomicrobium (Alphaproteobacteria), Rhodanobacter (Gammaproteobacteria), Intrasporangium (Actinobacteria) and Bacillus (Firmicutes). Isolates from the phylum Proteobacteria were confirmed as complete denitrifiers, whereas the Gram-positive isolates reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide. Ribosomal RNA gene analyses reveal that bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter comprise a diverse population of circumneutral to moderately acidophilic denitrifiers at the ORIFRC site, with a high relative abundance in areas of the acidic source zone. Rhodanobacter species do not contain a periplasmic nitrite reductase and have not been previously detected in functional gene surveys of denitrifying bacteria at the OR-IFRC site. Sequences of nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes were recovered from the isolates and from the terrestrial subsurface by designing primer sets mined from genomic and metagenomic data and from draft genomes of two of the isolates. We demonstrate that a combination of cultivation, genomic and metagenomic data are essential to the in situ characterization of denitrifiers and that current PCR-based approaches are not suitable for deep coverage of denitrifying microorganisms. Our results indicate that the diversity of denitrifiers is significantly underestimated in the terrestrial subsurface.

  12. Exo-metabolome of Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1 analyzed by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry and the effect of phosphate limitation.

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    Stefano Romano

    Full Text Available Oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM is an assemblage of reduced carbon compounds, which results from biotic and abiotic processes. The biotic processes consist in either release or uptake of specific molecules by marine organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria have been mostly considered to influence the DOM composition by preferential uptake of certain compounds. However, they also secrete a variety of molecules depending on physiological state, environmental and growth conditions, but so far the full set of compounds secreted by these bacteria has never been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the exo-metabolome, metabolites secreted into the environment, of the heterotrophic marine bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1 via ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, comparing phosphate limited with phosphate surplus growth conditions. Bacteria belonging to the Pseudovibrio genus have been isolated worldwide, mainly from marine invertebrates and were described as metabolically versatile Alphaproteobacteria. We show that the exo-metabolome is unexpectedly large and diverse, consisting of hundreds of compounds that differ by their molecular formulae. It is characterized by a dynamic recycling of molecules, and it is drastically affected by the physiological state of the strain. Moreover, we show that phosphate limitation greatly influences both the amount and the composition of the secreted molecules. By assigning the detected masses to general chemical categories, we observed that under phosphate surplus conditions the secreted molecules were mainly peptides and highly unsaturated compounds. In contrast, under phosphate limitation the composition of the exo-metabolome changed during bacterial growth, showing an increase in highly unsaturated, phenolic, and polyphenolic compounds. Finally, we annotated the detected masses using multiple metabolite databases. These analyses suggested the presence of several masses analogue to masses of known bioactive

  13. Diversity and biogeography of present-day magnetotactic bacteria in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A number of microorganisms are able to biomineralize iron minerals. Among them, magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) mineralize intracellular membrane-enveloped magnetite and/or greigite, known as magnetosomes that help cells to swim along the Earth's magnetic field. In recent years, MTB have become an attractive model system for investigating the biogeomagnetism. The occurrence of MTB has been reported in aquatic environments from freshwater to marine ecosystems. And, fossil magnetosomes are found to be potential carriers of natural remanent magnetization and indicators of paleoenvironmental changes. However, their distribution across heterogeneous habitats remains unclear. Here we report the diversity and biogeography of MTB from more than 20 locations from freshwater to saline habitats in eastern China. Great morphological variability was observed in MTB communities through light and transmission electron microscope observation. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes has revealed that identified MTB belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and the phylum Nitrospirae. The overall composition of MTB communities was compared, and we found a restricted distribution of MTB communities across a large spatial scale with pronounced endemicity. Variation partitioning analyses indicated that the biogeography of MTB is relatively more influenced by environmental factors (e.g., salinity, sulfate, total iron, Eh, and temperature) than geographic distance. More interestingly, we found, for the first time, that the strength of the Earth's magnetic field appears to influence the biogeography of MTB, implying an impact of geophysical effects on these microorganisms. Our results infer that MTB community represents a biogeographic distribution across the studied heterogeneous environments. Knowledge of the present-day MTB biogeography may be applied towards the reconstruction of paleo-environments and assessment of contribution of bacterial

  14. Turbulence-driven shifts in holobionts and planktonic microbial assemblages in St Peter & St Paul Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil

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    Ana Paula B. Moreira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the planktonic and the holobiont Madracis decactis (Scleractinia microbial diversity along a turbulence-driven upwelling event, in the world´s most isolated tropical island, St Peter and St Paul Archipelago (SPSPA, Brazil. Twenty one metagenomes were obtained for seawater (N=12, healthy and bleached holobionts (N=9 before, during and after the episode of high seawater turbulence and upwelling. Microbial assemblages differed between low turbulence-low nutrient (LLR and high-turbulence-high nutrient (HHR regimes in seawater. During LLR there was a balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the bacterioplankton and the ratio cyanobacteria:heterotrophs ~1 (C:H. Prochlorales, unclassified Alphaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea, respectively. Basic metabolisms and cyanobacterial phages characterized the LLR. During HHR C:H << 0.05 and Gammaproteobacteria approximated 50% of the most abundant organisms in seawater. Alteromonadales, Oceanospirillales and Thaumarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea. Prevailing metabolisms were related to membrane transport, virulence, disease and defense. Phages targeting heterotrophs and virulence factor genes characterized HHR. Shifts were also observed in coral microbiomes, according to both annotation–indepent and -dependent methods. HHR bleached corals metagenomes were the most dissimilar and could be distinguished by their di- and tetranucleotides frequencies, Iron Acquision metabolism and virulence genes, such as V. cholerae-related virulence factors. The healthy coral holobiont was shown to be less sensitive to transient seawater-related perturbations than the diseased animals. A conceptual model for the turbulence-induced shifts is put forward.

  15. Metagenome-based diversity analyses suggest a significant contribution of non-cyanobacterial lineages to carbonate precipitation in modern microbialites

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    Purificacion eLopez-Garcia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are thought to play a key role in carbonate formation due to their metabolic activity, but other organisms carrying out oxygenic photosynthesis (photosynthetic eukaryotes or other metabolisms (e.g. anoxygenic photosynthesis, sulfate reduction, may also contribute to carbonate formation. To obtain more quantitative information than that provided by more classical PCR-dependent methods, we studied the microbial diversity of microbialites from the Alchichica crater lake (Mexico by mining for 16S/18S rRNA genes in metagenomes obtained by direct sequencing of environmental DNA. We studied samples collected at the Western (AL-W and Northern (AL-N shores of the lake and, at the latter site, along a depth gradient (1, 5, 10 and 15 m depth. The associated microbial communities were mainly composed of bacteria, most of which seemed heterotrophic, whereas archaea were negligible. Eukaryotes composed a relatively minor fraction dominated by photosynthetic lineages, diatoms in AL-W, influenced by Si-rich seepage waters, and green algae in AL-N samples. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria classes of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundant bacterial taxa, followed by Planctomycetes, Deltaproteobacteria (Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi. Community composition varied among sites and with depth. Although cyanobacteria were the most important bacterial group contributing to the carbonate precipitation potential, photosynthetic eukaryotes, anoxygenic photosynthesizers and sulfate reducers were also very abundant. Cyanobacteria affiliated to Pleurocapsales largely increased with depth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations showed considerable areas of aragonite-encrusted Pleurocapsa-like cyanobacteria at microscale. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a strong positive correlation of Pleurocapsales and Chroococcales with aragonite formation at

  16. The effect of D123 wheat as a companion crop on soil enzyme activities, microbial biomass and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon

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    Wei Hui Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of watermelon is often threatened by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon in successively monocultured soil, which results in economic loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of D123 wheat as a companion crop on soil enzyme activities, microbial biomass and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon and to explore the relationship between the effect and the incidence of wilt caused by Fon. The results showed that the activities of soil polyphenol oxidase, urease and invertase were increased, the microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN and microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP were significantly increased, and the ratio of MBC/MBN was decreased (P<0.05. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the Fon population declined significantly in the watermelon/wheat companion system compared with the monoculture system (P<0.05. The analysis of microbial communities showed that the relative abundance of microbial communities was changed in the rhizosphere of watermelon. Compared with the monoculture system, the relative abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Sordariomycetes were increased, and the relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Cytophagia, Pezizomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were decreased in the rhizosphere of watermelon in the watermelon/wheat companion system; importantly, the incidence of Fusarium wilt was also decreased in the watermelon/wheat companion system. In conclusion, this study indicated that D123 wheat as a companion crop increased soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass, decreased the Fon population, and changed the relative abundance of microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon, which may be related to the reduction of Fusarium wilt in the watermelon/wheat companion system.

  17. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic community structure in field and cultured microbialites from the alkaline Lake Alchichica (Mexico.

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    Estelle Couradeau

    Full Text Available The geomicrobiology of crater lake microbialites remains largely unknown despite their evolutionary interest due to their resemblance to some Archaean analogs in the dominance of in situ carbonate precipitation over accretion. Here, we studied the diversity of archaea, bacteria and protists in microbialites of the alkaline Lake Alchichica from both field samples collected along a depth gradient (0-14 m depth and long-term-maintained laboratory aquaria. Using small subunit (SSU rRNA gene libraries and fingerprinting methods, we detected a wide diversity of bacteria and protists contrasting with a minor fraction of archaea. Oxygenic photosynthesizers were dominated by cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms. Cyanobacterial diversity varied with depth, Oscillatoriales dominating shallow and intermediate microbialites and Pleurocapsales the deepest samples. The early-branching Gloeobacterales represented significant proportions in aquaria microbialites. Anoxygenic photosynthesizers were also diverse, comprising members of Alphaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi. Although photosynthetic microorganisms dominated in biomass, heterotrophic lineages were more diverse. We detected members of up to 21 bacterial phyla or candidate divisions, including lineages possibly involved in microbialite formation, such as sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria but also Firmicutes and very diverse taxa likely able to degrade complex polymeric substances, such as Planctomycetales, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia. Heterotrophic eukaryotes were dominated by Fungi (including members of the basal Rozellida or Cryptomycota, Choanoflagellida, Nucleariida, Amoebozoa, Alveolata and Stramenopiles. The diversity and relative abundance of many eukaryotic lineages suggest an unforeseen role for protists in microbialite ecology. Many lineages from lake microbialites were successfully maintained in aquaria. Interestingly, the diversity detected in aquarium microbialites was higher than

  18. Prokaryotic diversity in one of the largest hypersaline coastal lagoons in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino, M M; Vieira, R P; Cardoso, A M; Nascimento, A P A; Silveira, C B; Riva, T C; Gonzalez, A S M; Paranhos, R; Albano, R M; Ventosa, A; Martins, O B

    2008-07-01

    Araruama Lagoon is an environment characterized by high salt concentrations. The low raining and high evaporation rates in this region favored the development of many salty ponds around the lagoon. In order to reveal the microbial composition of this system, we performed a 16S rRNA gene survey. Among archaea, most clones were related to uncultured environmental Euryarchaeota. In lagoon water, we found some clones related to Methanomicrobia and Methanothermococcus groups, while in the saline pond water members related to the genus Haloarcula were detected. Bacterial community was dominated by clones related to Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Synechococcus in lagoon water, while Salinibacter ruber relatives dominated in saline pond. We also detected the presence of Alpha-proteobacteria, Pseudomonas-like bacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Only representatives of the genus Ralstonia were cosmopolitan, being observed in both systems. The detection of a substantial number of clones related to uncultured archaea and bacteria suggest that the hypersaline waters of Araruama harbor a pool of novel prokaryotic phylotypes, distinct from those observed in other similar systems. We also observed clones related to halophilic genera of cyanobacteria that are specific for each habitat studied. Additionally, two bacterioplankton molecular markers with ecological relevance were analyzed, one is linked to nitrogen fixation (nifH) and the other is linked to carbon fixation by bacterial photosynthesis, the protochlorophyllide genes, revealing a specific genetic distribution in this ecosystem. This is the first study of the biogeography and community structure of microbial assemblages in Brazilian tropical hypersaline environments. This work is directed towards a better understanding of the free-living prokaryotic diversity adapted to life in hypersaline waters.

  19. Bacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252)

    KAUST Repository

    Koo, Hyunmin

    2014-07-10

    In this study, we examined the responses by the indigenous bacterial communities in salt-marsh sediment microcosms in vitro following treatment with Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252). Microcosms were constructed of sediment and seawater collected from Bayou La Batre located in coastal Alabama on the Gulf of Mexico. We used an amplicon pyrosequencing approach on microcosm sediment metagenome targeting the V3–V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Overall, we identified a shift in the bacterial community in three distinct groups. The first group was the early responders (orders Pseudomonadales and Oceanospirillales within class Gammaproteobacteria), which increased their relative abundance within 2 weeks and were maintained 3 weeks after oil treatment. The second group was identified as early, but transient responders (order Rhodobacterales within class Alphaproteobacteria; class Epsilonproteobacteria), which increased their population by 2 weeks, but returned to the basal level 3 weeks after oil treatment. The third group was the late responders (order Clostridiales within phylum Firmicutes; order Methylococcales within class Gammaproteobacteria; and phylum Tenericutes), which only increased 3 weeks after oil treatment. Furthermore, we identified oil-sensitive bacterial taxa (order Chromatiales within class Gammaproteobacteria; order Syntrophobacterales within class Deltaproteobacteria), which decreased in their population after 2 weeks of oil treatment. Detection of alkane (alkB), catechol (C2,3DO) and biphenyl (bph) biodegradation genes by PCR, particularly in oil-treated sediment metacommunity DNA, delineates proliferation of the hydrocarbon degrading bacterial community. Overall, the indigenous bacterial communities in our salt-marsh sediment in vitro microcosm study responded rapidly and shifted towards members of the taxonomic groups that are capable of surviving in an MC252 oil-contaminated environment.

  20. Composição diferencial das comunidades bacterianas na rizosfera de variedas de cana-de-açúcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Paes da Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A cultura da cana-de-açúcar é de extrema importância no cenário agrícola nacional. No entanto, pouco se sabe sobre a estruturação das comunidades microbianas associadas aos solos e às rizosferas de tais plantas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a estrutura e diversidade das comunidades de bactérias associadas ao solo e à rizosfera de seis variedades de cana-de-açúcar cultivadas no Estado de São Paulo (Brasil. As análises foram realizadas com base em métodos independentes de cultivo, em que a técnica de PCR-DGGE revelou alterações na rizosfera para os grupos de bactérias totais e também para os grupos de Alphaproteobacteria e Betaproteobacteria. Após essa análise, quatro amostras (três de rizosfera e uma de solo foram usadas para o sequenciamento da região V6 do gene 16S DNAr na plataforma Ion Torrent TM. Essa análise gerou um total de 95.812 sequências, dentro das quais houve a predominância das afiliadas aos filos Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria e Acidobateria . Os resultados revelaram que as comunidades bacterianas na rizosfera são distintas daquelas encontradas no solo. Foi possível ainda observar efeito diferencial de plantas das variedades. Alguns grupos bacterianos apresentaram menor frequência na rizosfera (Acidobacteria , enquanto outros se mostraram fortemente estimulados pela presença das raízes, comumente para todas as variedades (Betaproteobacteria , Nitrospora e Chloroflexi , ou em respostas variedade-específicas (Bacilli e Sphingobacteria .

  1. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  2. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; Tringe, Susannah G; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands is sustained by a cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16-174 nmol cm(-3) per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (⩾0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. Most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems. PMID:27015005

  3. Effect of Biostimulation Using Sewage Sludge, Soybean Meal, and Wheat Straw on Oil Degradation and Bacterial Community Composition in a Contaminated Desert Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Abed, Raeid M M

    2016-01-01

    Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal, and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities to reach 3.2-3.4 times higher than in the untreated soil, whereas the addition of soybean meal resulted in an insignificant change in the produced CO2, given the high respiration activities of the soybean meal alone. GC-MS analysis revealed that the addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7-1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes was measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5-86.4% of total sequences) of acquired sequences from the untreated soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R = 0.66, P = 0.0001). The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95-98% of the total sequences were affiliated to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  4. Methylocapsa palsarum sp. nov., a methanotroph isolated from a subArctic discontinuous permafrost ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedysh, Svetlana N; Didriksen, Alena; Danilova, Olga V; Belova, Svetlana E; Liebner, Susanne; Svenning, Mette M

    2015-10-01

    An aerobic methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from a collapsed palsa soil in northern Norway and designated strain NE2T. Cells of this strain were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-pigmented, slightly curved thick rods that multiplied by normal cell division. The cells possessed a particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme (pMMO) and utilized methane and methanol. Strain NE2T grew in a wide pH range of 4.1–8.0 (optimum pH 5.2–6.5) at temperatures between 6 and 32 °C (optimum 18–25 °C), and was capable of atmospheric nitrogen fixation under reduced oxygen tension. The major cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c, and the DNA G+C content was 61.7 mol%. The isolate belonged to the family Beijerinckiaceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria and was most closely related to the facultative methanotroph Methylocapsa aurea KYGT (98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 84 % PmoA sequence identity). However, strain NE2T differed from Methylocapsa aurea KYGT by cell morphology, the absence of pigmentation, inability to grow on acetate, broader pH growth range, and higher tolerance to NaCl. Therefore, strain NE2T represents a novel species of the genus Methylocapsa, for which we propose the name Methylocapsa palsarum sp. nov. The type strain is NE2T ( = LMG 28715T = VKM B-2945T). PMID:26297585

  5. Correlating Microbial Diversity Patterns with Geochemistry in an Extreme and Heterogeneous Environment of Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Chen, Lin-Xing; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Li, Sheng-Jin; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular surveys have advanced our understanding of the forces shaping the large-scale ecological distribution of microbes in Earth's extreme habitats, such as hot springs and acid mine drainage. However, few investigations have attempted dense spatial analyses of specific sites to resolve the local diversity of these extraordinary organisms and how communities are shaped by the harsh environmental conditions found there. We have applied a 16S rRNA gene-targeted 454 pyrosequencing approach to explore the phylogenetic differentiation among 90 microbial communities from a massive copper tailing impoundment generating acidic drainage and coupled these variations in community composition with geochemical parameters to reveal ecological interactions in this extreme environment. Our data showed that the overall microbial diversity estimates and relative abundances of most of the dominant lineages were significantly correlated with pH, with the simplest assemblages occurring under extremely acidic conditions and more diverse assemblages associated with neutral pHs. The consistent shifts in community composition along the pH gradient indicated that different taxa were involved in the different acidification stages of the mine tailings. Moreover, the effect of pH in shaping phylogenetic structure within specific lineages was also clearly evident, although the phylogenetic differentiations within the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes were attributed to variations in ferric and ferrous iron concentrations. Application of the microbial assemblage prediction model further supported pH as the major factor driving community structure and demonstrated that several of the major lineages are readily predictable. Together, these results suggest that pH is primarily responsible for structuring whole communities in the extreme and heterogeneous mine tailings, although the diverse microbial taxa may respond differently to various environmental conditions

  6. Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson L. Brock

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the marine Roseobacter clade can degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP via competing pathways releasing either methanethiol (MeSH or dimethyl sulfide (DMS. Deuterium-labeled [2H6]DMSP and the synthetic DMSP analogue dimethyltelluriopropionate (DMTeP were used in feeding experiments with the Roseobacter clade members Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 and Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, and their volatile metabolites were analyzed by closed-loop stripping and solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC–MS. Feeding experiments with [2H6]DMSP resulted in the incorporation of a deuterium label into MeSH and DMS. Knockout of relevant genes from the known DMSP demethylation pathway to MeSH showed in both species a residual production of [2H3]MeSH, suggesting that a second demethylation pathway is active. The role of DMSP degradation pathways for MeSH and DMS formation was further investigated by using the synthetic analogue DMTeP as a probe in feeding experiments with the wild-type strain and knockout mutants. Feeding of DMTeP to the R. pomeroyi knockout mutant resulted in a diminished, but not abolished production of demethylation pathway products. These results further corroborated the proposed second demethylation activity in R. pomeroyi. Isotopically labeled [2H3]methionine and 34SO42−, synthesized from elemental 34S8, were tested to identify alternative sulfur sources besides DMSP for the MeSH production in P. gallaeciensis. Methionine proved to be a viable sulfur source for the MeSH volatiles, whereas incorporation of labeling from sulfate was not observed. Moreover, the utilization of selenite and selenate salts by marine alphaproteobacteria for the production of methylated selenium volatiles was explored and resulted in the production of numerous methaneselenol-derived volatiles via reduction and methylation. The pathway of selenate/selenite reduction, however, proved to be strictly separated from sulfate reduction.

  7. Partial Protection against Brucella Infection in Mice by Immunization with Nonpathogenic Alphaproteobacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Estein, Silvia M.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that Brucella antigens and those from nonpathogenic alphaproteobacteria (NPAP) are cross-recognized by the immune system. We hypothesized that immunization with NPAP would protect mice from Brucella infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with heat-killed Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Mesorhizobium loti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, or Brucella melitensis H38 (standard positive control) before intravenous challenge with Brucella abortus 2308. Cross-reacting serum antibodies against Brucella antigens were detected at the moment of challenge in all NPAP-immunized mice. Thirty days after B. abortus challenge, splenic CFU counts were significantly lower in mice immunized with O. anthropi, M. loti, and B. melitensis H38 than in the phosphate-buffered saline controls (protection levels were 0.80, 0.66, and 1.99 log units, respectively). In mice immunized intraperitoneally with cytosoluble extracts from NPAP or Brucella abortus, protection levels were 1.58 for the latter, 0.63 for O. anthropi, and 0.40 for M. loti. To test whether the use of live NPAP would increase protection further, mice were both immunized and challenged by the oral route. Immunization with NPAP induced a significant increase in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not serum or fecal IgA, against Brucella antigens. After challenge, anti-Brucella IgA increased significantly in the sera and feces of mice orally immunized with O. anthropi. For all NPAP, protection levels were higher than those obtained with systemic immunizations but were lower than those obtained by oral immunization with heat-killed B. abortus. These results show that immunization with NPAP, especially O. anthropi, confers partial protection against Brucella challenge. However, such protection is lower than that conferred by immunization with whole Brucella or its cytosoluble fraction. PMID:17715332

  8. Effect of Biostimulation Using Sewage Sludge, Soybean Meal, and Wheat Straw on Oil Degradation and Bacterial Community Composition in a Contaminated Desert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Abed, Raeid M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal, and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities to reach 3.2–3.4 times higher than in the untreated soil, whereas the addition of soybean meal resulted in an insignificant change in the produced CO2, given the high respiration activities of the soybean meal alone. GC–MS analysis revealed that the addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7–1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes was measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5–86.4% of total sequences) of acquired sequences from the untreated soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R = 0.66, P = 0.0001). The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95–98% of the total sequences were affiliated to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils. PMID:26973618

  9. 施肥及秸秆还田对砂姜黑土细菌群落的影响%Effects of fertilization and straw incorporation on bacterial communities in lime concretion black soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伏伟; 王晓波; 李金才; 叶爱华; 王妍; 车威; 朱林

    2015-01-01

    利用 Illumina 平台 Miseq 高通量测序技术对小麦分蘖期砂姜黑土耕层土壤细菌进行高通量测序, 结合相关生物信息学分析, 探讨了不施化肥秸秆不还田(CK)、施化肥秸秆不还田(F)以及不施化肥秸秆还田(W)3种处理土壤细菌群落组成、多样性和结构的变化.结果显示,测序共获得14 873个OTUs,计173 323条读数,平均读长439 bp.砂姜黑土细菌优势门(相对丰度>10%)为变形菌门(Proteobacteria)、酸杆菌门(Acidobacteria)、放线菌门(Actinobacteria)和拟杆菌门(Bacteroidetes); 优势纲(相对丰度>10%)为α-变形菌纲(Alphaproteobacteria)、β-变形菌纲(Betaproteobacteria)、酸杆菌纲(Acidobacteria)、鞘脂杆菌纲 (Sphingobacteriia)和γ-变形菌纲(Gammaproteobacteria);优势属(相对丰度>1%)共47个, 3个处理中均有分布的优势属21个, F处理的细菌优势属的种类最多, 为39个.相对丰度最大的门、纲和属分别是变形菌门(38.7%~43.1%)、α-变形菌纲(14.5%~18.1%)和鞘氨醇单胞菌属(Sphingomonas) (4.6%~7.7%).F处理细菌丰富度指数(Chao1指数和ACE指数)显著低于CK及W处理, W处理和CK处理土壤细菌丰富度指数无显著差异,与CK处理相比, F处理ACE指数降低22.8%.W处理土壤细菌Shannon多样性指数显著大于CK及F处理, W处理Shannon指数较CK处理提高4.1%,而F处理土壤细菌Shannon指数与CK处理无显著差异.F处理Simpson指数显著高于CK及W处理; F处理Simpson指数较CK处理提高38.1%, 而W处理细菌Simpson指数最小, 显著低于CK处理, 较CK降低23.8%.分层聚类图显示在属的水平上, W处理和CK处理土壤细菌群落结构相似性较高, F处理与CK处理及W处理细菌群落结构差异较大.施化肥对土壤细菌优势类群组成、相对丰度及群落结构的影响大于秸秆还田, 施化肥显著降低了土壤细菌丰富度, 秸秆还田显著提高了土壤细菌的多样性.%Soil bacteria are important drivers of nearly

  10. Effect of fire on soil microbial composition and activity in a Pinus canariensis forest and over time recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Fernández Lugo, Silvia; Arévalo Sierra, Jose Ramon; Pérez Fernández, María

    2016-04-01

    seedlings and improves root establishment. Community composition was significantly different among burning treatments, with the greatest differences between the two recovery times after burning. The sequencing of DNA revealed distinct distributions of bacterial divisions among the treatments. Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were highly characteristic of the A horizon in the recovered treatment. Where there were dna left in the burnt site three months after the fire, Betaproteobacteria and members of Bacillus were the only representative microorganisms. Wildfire had a very pronounced negative effects on the soil microbial community not only in terms of its resistance to fire, but in regard their recovery.

  11. Profundibacterium mesophilum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member in the family Rhodobacteraceae isolated from deep-sea sediment in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, PokYui

    2012-06-08

    A slow-growing, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, coccus bacterial strain, designated KAUST100406-0324T, was isolated from sea-floor sediment collected from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The catalase- and oxidase-positive strain was non-sporulating and only slightly halophilic. Optimum growth occurred at 20-25 °C and at pH values ranging from 7.0 to 8.0. The major cellular fatty acids of the strain were unsaturated C18: 1ω6c and/or C18:1ω7c, C18:1ω7c 11-methyl and C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and two unidentified phospholipids. Ubiquinone 10 was the predominant lipoquinone. The DNA G+C content of strain KAUST100406-0324T was 64.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the novel strain belonged to the family Rhodobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria but formed a distinct evolutionary lineage from other bacterial species with validly published names. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel strain was distantly related, but formed a monophyletic cluster with, those of bacteria from two moderately halophilic genera, Hwanghaeicola and Maribius. The similarity of the sequence between the novel strain KAUST100406-0324T and the type strains Hwanghaeicola aestuarii Y26T (accession number FJ230842), Maribius pelagius B5-6T (DQ514326) and Maribius salinus CL-SP27T (AY906863) were 94.5 %, 95.2 % and 95.3 %, respectively. Based on the physiological, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics presented in this study, we propose that this strain represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which the name of Profundibacterium mesophilum gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed, with KAUST100406-0324T (= JCM 17872T = NRRL B-59665T) as the type strain. © 2013 IUMS.

  12. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our

  13. Microbial quality and nutritional aspects of Norwegian brand waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterholt, Eli; Charnock, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The microbiological quality of the five leading brands of Norwegian bottled still waters was investigated. All brands were free for the enteric indicator organisms and named pathogens whose absence is demanded in current quality directives. The relatively nutrient-poor agar R₂A revealed large heterogeneous bacterial populations which grew slowly, or not at all, on clinical media specified for use in substrate-utilization approaches to identification. The main approach used for identification was cultivation of microbes on R₂A, followed by amplification and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA genes. The identity of the heterotrophic plate count of the brands differed significantly to that found in many other similar studies with respect to the dominating species. The bacterial flora was dominated by beta- and alphaproteobacteria most of which were psychrotolerant. Several brands contained Sphingomonas and large populations of Methylobacterium species which have been associated with a variety of opportunistic infections of immunocompromised hosts. Analysis of the isolated strains' nutritional capabilities using the Biolog GN2® system, gave in most instances low positive scores, and strain identifications using the system were generally inconclusive. Measures of assimilable organic carbon in the water revealed that some brands contained levels higher than those which have been associated with biological stability and restricted or no growth of heterotrophs in distribution systems. The relationship between assimilable organic carbon and R₂A plate counts was significant and moderately positive for bottled waters. Assimilable organic carbon correlated strongly with the survival time of Escherichia coli when introduced into bottles as a contaminant. Those brands having high values (~100 μg/L) supported protracted survival, but not growth of E. coli, whereas E. coli quickly became nonculturable in brands with low values. Thus measures of assimilable organic carbon may

  14. Sedimentological imprint on subseafloor microbial communities in Western Mediterranean Sea Quaternary sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-C. Ciobanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An interdisciplinary study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between geological and paleoenvironmental parameters and the bacterial and archaeal community structure of two contrasting subseafloor sites in the Western Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Lion. Both depositional environments in this area are well-documented from paleoclimatic and paleooceanographic point of views. Available data sets allowed us to calibrate the investigated cores with reference and dated cores previously collected in the same area, and notably correlated to Quaternary climate variations. DNA-based fingerprints showed that the archaeal diversity was composed by one group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG, within the Gulf of Lion sediments and of nine different lineages (dominated by MCG, South African Gold Mine Euryarchaeotal Group (SAGMEG and Halobacteria within the Ligurian Sea sediments. Bacterial molecular diversity at both sites revealed mostly the presence of the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria within Proteobacteria phylum, and also members of Bacteroidetes phylum. The second most abundant lineages were Actinobacteria and Firmicutes at the Gulf of Lion site and Chloroflexi at the Ligurian Sea site. Various substrates and cultivation conditions allowed us to isolate 75 strains belonging to four lineages: Alpha-, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In molecular surveys, the Betaproteobacteria group was consistently detected in the Ligurian Sea sediments, characterized by a heterolithic facies with numerous turbidites from a deep-sea levee. Analysis of relative betaproteobacterial abundances and turbidite frequency suggested that the microbial diversity was a result of main climatic changes occurring during the last 20 ka. Statistical direct multivariate canonical correspondence

  15. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  16. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Verrucomicrobia. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures, under a methane containing atmosphere at 37 °C. The isolates grow at pH 3.5-8 and temperatures of 18-45 °C, and show a methane oxidation rate of ~ 450 μmol mol-1 h-1. Soils from Favara Grande showed the largest diversity of methanotrophic bacteria until now detected in a geothermal soil. While methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia are reported to dominate highly acidic geothermal sites, our results suggest that slightly acidic soils, in high enthalpy geothermal systems, host a more diverse group of both culturable and uncultivated methanotrophs.

  17. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic geothermal soils at Pantelleria (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated at about 2.5 Mg a-1 (t a-1). Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values of up to 59.2 nmol g-1 soil d.w. h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile, the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer, and values greater than 6.23 nmol g-1 h-1 were still detected up to a depth of 13 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still detectable consumption at 80 °C (> 1.25 nmol g-1 h-1) was recorded. The soil total DNA extracted from the three samples was probed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers, targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected at sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not at FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site (FAV2) pointed to a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, distantly related to Methylocaldum-Metylococcus genera, and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures under a methane

  18. Genome analysis coupled with physiological studies reveals a diverse nitrogen metabolism in Methylocystis sp. strain SC2.

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    Bomba Dam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methylocystis sp. strain SC2 can adapt to a wide range of methane concentrations. This is due to the presence of two isozymes of particulate methane monooxygenase exhibiting different methane oxidation kinetics. To gain insight into the underlying genetic information, its genome was sequenced and found to comprise a 3.77 Mb chromosome and two large plasmids. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report important features of the strain SC2 genome. Its sequence is compared with those of seven other methanotroph genomes, comprising members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. While the pan-genome of all eight methanotroph genomes totals 19,358 CDS, only 154 CDS are shared. The number of core genes increased with phylogenetic relatedness: 328 CDS for proteobacterial methanotrophs and 1,853 CDS for the three alphaproteobacterial Methylocystaceae members, Methylocystis sp. strain SC2 and strain Rockwell, and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The comparative study was coupled with physiological experiments to verify that strain SC2 has diverse nitrogen metabolism capabilities. In correspondence to a full complement of 34 genes involved in N2 fixation, strain SC2 was found to grow with atmospheric N2 as the sole nitrogen source, preferably at low oxygen concentrations. Denitrification-mediated accumulation of 0.7 nmol (30N2/hr/mg dry weight of cells under anoxic conditions was detected by tracer analysis. N2 production is related to the activities of plasmid-borne nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductases. CONCLUSIONS/PERSPECTIVES: Presence of a complete denitrification pathway in strain SC2, including the plasmid-encoded nosRZDFYX operon, is unique among known methanotrophs. However, the exact ecophysiological role of this pathway still needs to be elucidated. Detoxification of toxic nitrogen compounds and energy conservation under oxygen-limiting conditions are among the possible roles. Relevant features that may stimulate

  19. Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a phosphate-solubilizing and nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a natural salt-meadow plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Christian; Ratering, Stefan; Geissler-Plaum, Rita; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    A phosphate-mobilizing, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from rhizospheric soil of Plantago winteri from a natural salt meadow as part of an investigation of rhizospheric bacteria from salt-resistant plant species and evaluation of their plant-growth-promoting abilities. Cells were rods, motile, strictly aerobic, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain E19(T) was distinct from other taxa within the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain E19(T) showed less than 93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with members of the genera Rhizobium (≤93.5 %), Labrenzia (≤93.1 %), Stappia (≤93.1 %), Aureimonas (≤93.1 %) and Mesorhizobium (≤93.0 %) and was most closely related to Rhizobium rhizoryzae (93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain). The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10, and the polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, an aminolipid and an unidentified phospholipid. Major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c (71.4 %), summed feature 2 (C14 : 0 3-OH and/or iso-C16 : 1; 8.3 %), C20 : 0 (7.9 %) and C16 : 0 (6.1 %). The DNA G+C content of strain E19(T) was 59.9±0.7 mol%. The capacity for nitrogen fixation was confirmed by the presence of the nifH gene and the acetylene reduction assay. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic taxonomic study, the new isolate represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Hartmannibacter diazotrophicus is E19(T) ( = LMG 27460(T) = KACC 17263(T)). PMID:24961682

  20. Evidence for Vertical Transmission of Bacterial Symbionts from Adult to Embryo in the Caribbean Sponge Svenzea zeai

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2009-07-31

    The Caribbean reef sponge Svenzea zeai was previously found to contain substantial quantities of unicellular photosynthetic and autotrophic microbes in its tissues, but the identities of these symbionts and their method of transfer from adult to progeny are largely unknown. In this study, both a 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprinting technique (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) and clone library analysis were applied to compare the bacterial communities associated with adults and embryos of S. zeai to test the hypothesis of vertical transfer across generations. In addition, the same techniques were applied to the bacterial community from the seawater adjacent to adult sponges to test the hypothesis that water column bacteria could be transferred horizontally as sponge symbionts. Results of both DGGE and clone library analysis support the vertical transfer hypothesis in that the bacterial communities associated with sponge adults and embryos were highly similar to each other but completely different from those in the surrounding seawater. Sequencing of prominent DGGE bands and of clones from the libraries revealed that the bacterial communities associated with the sponge, whether adult or embryo, consisted of a large proportion of bacteria in the phyla Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria, while most of the sequences recovered from the community in the adjacent water column belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria. Altogether, 21 monophyletic sequence clusters, comprising sequences from both sponge adults and embryos but not from the seawater, were identified. More than half of the sponge-derived sequences fell into these clusters. Comparison of sequences recovered in this study with those deposited in GenBank revealed that more than 75% of S. zeai-derived sequences were closely related to sequences derived from other sponge species, but none of the sequences recovered from the seawater column overlapped with those from adults or embryos of S. zeai. In

  1. Shifts in Microbial Community Structure with Changes in Cathodic Potential in Marine Sediment Microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, B. R.; Rowe, A. R.; Nealson, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms comprise more than 90% of the biomass of the ocean. Their ability to thrive and survive in a wide range of environments from oligotrophic waters to the deep subsurface stems from the great metabolic versatility that exists among them. This metabolic versatility has further expanded with the discovery of extracellular electron transport (EET). EET is the capability of microorganisms to transfer electrons to and from insoluble substrates outside of the cell. Much of what is known about EET comes from studies of model metal reducing microorganisms in the groups Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae. However, EET is not limited to these metal reducing microorganisms, and may play a large role in the biogeochemical cycling of several elements. We have developed an electrochemical culturing technique designed to target microorganisms with EET ability and tested these methods in marine sediments. The use of electrodes allows for greater control and quantification of electrons flowing to insoluble substrates as opposed to insoluble substrates such as minerals that are often difficult to measure. We have recently shown that poising electrodes at different redox potentials will enrich for different microbial groups and thus possible metabolisms. In marine sediment microcosms, triplicate electrodes were poised at different cathodic (electron donating) potentials (-300, -400, -500 and -600 mV) and incubated for eight weeks. Community analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed that at lower negative potentials (-500 and -600 mV), more sulfate reducing bacteria in the class Deltaproteobacteria were enriched in comparison to the communities at -300 and -400 mV being dominated by microorganisms within Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Clostridia. This can be explained by sulfate (abundant in seawater) becoming a more energetically favorable electron acceptor with lower applied potentials. In addition, communities at higher potentials showed greater enrichment of the

  2. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

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    Gordon Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N(2 fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2 at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2 as sole N-source bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase, has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase. An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Representative of aerobic N(2-fixing and H(2-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2 respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2, specifically that produced by N(2 fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2 has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As

  3. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

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    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  4. [Phylogenetic diversity of culturable bacteria in the ancient salt deposits of the Yipinglang Salt Mine, P. R. China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-guang; Li, Hui-ming; Li, Qin-yuan; Chen, Wei; Cui, Xiao-long

    2007-08-01

    The microbial diversity of cultivable bacteria, isolated from the ancient salt deposits from the Yipinglang Salt Mine (YPL) in the Yunnan Province, P. R. China,was investigated by using conventional culture-dependent method and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons. 38 bacteria strains were isolated from the brine, halite and saline soil samples on MBA (marine broth agar 2216, Difco) and ISP 2 (International Streotomyces Project medium 2) media supplemented with 0.5-3.5 mol/L NaCl. The genomic DNAs of the isolates were extracted and their 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR using bacterial universal primers. The resulting 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from public databases to find the most closely related species. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the software packages MEGA after multiple alignment of sequence data by CLUSTAL X. The evolutional instances (corrected by Kimura's 2-parameter model) were calculated and clustering was performed with the neighbor-joining method. The results showed that the isolates are members of twenty-four genera (Acinetobacter, Agromyces, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Chromohalobacter, Dietzia, Erythrobacter, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Idiomarina, Kocuria, Marinobacter, Micrococcus, Paracoccus, Planomicrbium, Porphyrobacter, Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter, Roseivivax, Saccharospirillum, Salegentibactor, Salinicoccus, Streptomyces) of seventeen families (Alteromonadaceae, Bacillaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Idiomarinaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Micrococcaceae, Moraxellaceae, Planococcaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Dietziaceae, Saccharospirillaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Streptomycetaceae) in four major phylogenetic groups (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria). The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the phyla of Proteobacteria (47.3%; Gamma-Proteobacteria, 31.5%; Alpha-Proteobacteria

  5. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

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    C. Jeanthon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 52 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94% was affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the

  6. 鹿回头岸礁区4种造礁珊瑚中可培养细菌的多样性%Diversity of culturable bacteria associated with four scleractinian corals located in Luhuitou fringing reef

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴家法; 李洁; 张偲

    2015-01-01

    采用稀释涂布平板法,分离三亚鹿回头岸礁区4种造礁珊瑚及其周围海水中的细菌,并基于16SrRNA基因序列进行了系统发育分析,从而探讨造礁珊瑚中可培养细菌的物种多样性.从澄黄滨珊瑚(Porites lutea)、鹿角珊瑚(Acropora sp.)、盔形珊瑚(Galaxea sp.)、扁脑珊瑚(Platygyra sp.)样品中分别分离获得细菌60、61、54、20株,从珊瑚周边海水中分离获得细菌31株.16S rRNA基因序列分析表明,珊瑚来源的细菌分布于放线菌门(Actinobacteria)、α-变形菌纲(Alphaproteobacteria)、γ-变形菌纲(Gammaproteobacteria)、厚壁菌门(Firmicutes)和拟杆菌门(Bacteroidetes).在属级水平上对4种珊瑚及海水来源细菌群落组成分析,发现在4种珊瑚中均有分布的属有3个,为Brachybacterium、Microbacterium和Rue ge ria,珊瑚来源细菌类群有一定差异.同时发现4种珊瑚来源细菌与海水来源细菌类群差异较大.在分离的菌株中,有7株菌与已有效描述的细菌物种典型菌株的全长16S rRNA基因相似性低于97%,代表着潜在新属或新种.试验结果表明,三亚鹿回头岸礁区珊瑚中存在较为丰富的细菌多样性,并潜藏较多的新物种资源.

  7. Rates of N2 production and diversity and abundance of functional genes associated with denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the sediment of the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ayeon; Cho, Hyeyoun; Kim, Sung-Han; Thamdrup, Bo; Lee, SangHoon; Hyun, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A combination of molecular microbiological analyses and metabolic rate measurements was conducted to elucidate the diversity and abundance of denitrifying and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria and the nitrogen gas (N2) production rates in sediment underlying the highly productive polynya (Stns. 10 and 17) and the sea-ice zone on the outer shelf (Stn. 83) of the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica. Despite the high water column productivity, the N2 production rates by denitrification (0.04-0.31 nmol N cm-3sed. h-1) and anammox (0.13-0.26 nmol N cm-3 sed. h-1) were lower than those measured in other polar regions. In contrast, gene copy number (106-107 copies cm-3 of nirS and nosZ genes targeting denitirifiers and 105-107 copies cm-3 of 16S rRNA genes related to anammox bacteria) of the two bacterial groups at Stn. 17 was similar compared to those of other organic-rich environments. The majority of the nirS sequences were affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria (54% and 61% of the total nirS gene at Stns. 17 and 83, respectively), which were closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most nosZ sequences (92% and 72% of the total nosZ genes at Stns. 17 and 83, respectively) were related to the Alphaproteobacteria, which were closely related to Ruegeria pomeroyi and Roseobacter denitrificans. Most (98%) of the sequences related to anammox bacteria were affiliated with Candidatus Scalindua at Stn. 17. Consequently, despite the low metabolic activity, the abundance and composition of most denitrifying and anammox bacteria detected from the ASP were similar to those reported from a variety of marine environments. Our results further imply that increased labile organic matter production resulting from a shift of the phytoplankton community from Phaeocystis to diatoms in response to rapid melting of sea ice stimulates metabolic activities of the denitrifying and anammox bacteria, thereby enhancing the N removal process in the ASP.

  8. Insight into biogeochemical inputs and composition of Greenland Ice Sheet surface snow and glacial forefield river catchment environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Karen; Hagedorn, Birgit; Dieser, Markus; Christner, Brent; Choquette, Kyla; Sletten, Ronald; Lui, Lu; Junge, Karen

    2014-05-01

    The volume of freshwater transported from Greenland to surrounding marine waters has tended to increase annually over the past four decades as a result of warmer surface air temperatures (Bamber et al 2012, Hanna et al 2008). Ice sheet run off is estimated to make up approximately of third of this volume (Bamber et al 2012). However, the biogeochemical composition and seeding sources of the Greenland Ice Sheet supraglacial landscape is largely unknown. In this study, the structure and diversity of surface snow microbial assemblages from two regions of the western Greenland Ice Sheet ice-margin was investigated through the sequencing of small subunit rRNA genes. Furthermore, the origins of microbiota were investigated by examining correlations to molecular data obtained from marine, soil, freshwater and atmospheric environments and to geochemical analytes measured in the snow. Snow was found to contain a diverse assemblage of bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria) and eukarya (Alveolata, Fungi, Stramenopiles and Viridiplantae). Phylotypes related to archaeal Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota phyla were also identified. The structure of microbial assemblages was found to have strong similarities to communities sampled from marine and air environments, and sequences obtained from the South-West region, near Kangerlussuaq, which is bordered by an extensive periglacial expanse, had additional resemblances to soil originating communities. Strong correlations were found between bacterial beta diversity and Na+ and Cl- concentrations. These data suggest that surface snow from western regions of Greenland contain microbiota that are most likely derived from exogenous, wind transported sources. Downstream of the supraglacial environment, Greenland's rivers likely influence the ecology of localized estuary and marine systems. Here we characterize the geochemical and biotic composition of a glacial and glacial forefield fed river catchment in

  9. Effect of fire on soil microbial composition and activity in a Pinus canariensis forest and over time recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Fernández Lugo, Silvia; Arévalo Sierra, Jose Ramon; Pérez Fernández, María

    2016-04-01

    and improves root establishment. Community composition was significantly different among burning treatments, with the greatest differences between the two recovery times after burning. The sequencing of DNA revealed distinct distributions of bacterial divisions among the treatments. Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were highly characteristic of the A horizon in the recovered treatment. Where there were dna left in the burnt site three months after the fire, Betaproteobacteria and members of Bacillus were the only representative microorganisms. Wildfire had a very pronounced negative effects on the soil microbial community not only in terms of its resistance to fire, but in regard their recovery.

  10. The rhizome of Reclinomonas americana, Homo sapiens, Pediculus humanus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria

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    Raoult Didier

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are thought to have evolved from eubacteria-like endosymbionts; however, the origin of the mitochondrion remains a subject of debate. In this study, we investigated the phenomenon of chimerism in mitochondria to shed light on the origin of these organelles by determining which species played a role in their formation. We used the mitochondria of four distinct organisms, Reclinomonas americana, Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and multichromosome Pediculus humanus, and attempted to identify the origin of each mitochondrial gene. Results Our results suggest that the origin of mitochondrial genes is not limited to the Rickettsiales and that the creation of these genes did not occur in a single event, but through multiple successive events. Some of these events are very old and were followed by events that are more recent and occurred through the addition of elements originating from current species. The points in time that the elements were added and the parental species of each gene in the mitochondrial genome are different to the individual species. These data constitute strong evidence that mitochondria do not have a single common ancestor but likely have numerous ancestors, including proto-Rickettsiales, proto-Rhizobiales and proto-Alphaproteobacteria, as well as current alphaproteobacterial species. The analysis of the multichromosome P. humanus mitochondrion supports this mechanism. Conclusions The most plausible scenario of the origin of the mitochondrion is that ancestors of Rickettsiales and Rhizobiales merged in a proto-eukaryotic cell approximately one billion years ago. The fusion of the Rickettsiales and Rhizobiales cells was followed by gene loss, genomic rearrangements and the addition of alphaproteobacterial elements through ancient and more recent recombination events. Each gene of each of the four studied mitochondria has a different origin, while in some cases, multichromosomes may allow for

  11. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of the bacteria diversity in surface and subsurface peat layers of a northern wetland, with focus on poorly studied phyla and candidate divisions.

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    Yulia M Serkebaeva

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands play a key role in the global carbon and water budget, but the bacterial diversity in these ecosystems remains poorly described. Here, we compared the bacterial community composition in the surface (0-5 cm depth and subsurface (45-50 cm peat layers of an acidic (pH 4.0 Sphagnum-dominated wetland, using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The denoised sequences (37,229 reads, average length ∼430 bp were affiliated with 27 bacterial phyla and corresponded to 1,269 operational taxonomic units (OTUs determined at 97% sequence identity. Abundant OTUs were affiliated with the Acidobacteria (35.5±2.4% and 39.2±1.2% of all classified sequences in surface and subsurface peat, respectively, Alphaproteobacteria (15.9±1.7% and 25.8±1.4%, Actinobacteria (9.5±2.0% and 10.7±0.5%, Verrucomicrobia (8.5±1.4% and 0.6±0.2%, Planctomycetes (5.8±0.4% and 9.7±0.6%, Deltaproteobacteria (7.1±0.4% and 4.4%±0.3%, and Gammaproteobacteria (6.6±0.4% and 2.1±0.1%. The taxonomic patterns of the abundant OTUs were uniform across all the subsamples taken from each peat layer. In contrast, the taxonomic patterns of rare OTUs were different from those of the abundant OTUs and varied greatly among subsamples, in both surface and subsurface peat. In addition to the bacterial taxa listed above, rare OTUs represented the following groups: Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydia, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Elusimicrobia, Fibrobacteres, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Spirochaetes, AD3, WS1, WS4, WS5, WYO, OD1, OP3, BRC1, TM6, TM7, WPS-2, and FCPU426. OTU richness was notably higher in the surface layer (882 OTUs than in the anoxic subsurface peat (483 OTUs, with only 96 OTUs common to both data sets. Most members of poorly studied phyla, such as the Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes and the candidate division TM6, showed a clear preference for growth in either oxic or anoxic conditions. Apparently, the bacterial communities in surface and

  12. Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community

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    Parro Víctor

    2010-06-01

    acidophilic filaments are dynamic structures in which different mechanisms for biofilm formation/dispersion are operating. Specific transcriptomic fingerprints can be inferred for both planktonic and sessile cells, having the former a more active TCA cycle, while the mixed acid fermentation process dominate in the latter. The excretion of acetate may play a relevant ecological role as a source of electron donor for heterotrophic Fe3+ reducers like some Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacterium spp. and Sulfobacillus spp., also present in the biofilm. Additionally, acetate may have a negative effect on bioleaching by inhibiting the growth of chemolithotrophic bacteria.

  13. Rhodobacter sediminis sp. nov., isolated from lagoon sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Y; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2016-08-01

    Two Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped phototrophic bacteria (designated strains N1T and C7) were isolated from lagoon sediments. Both strains were positive for catalase and oxidase activity. Casein, starch, urea and Tween 20 were hydrolysed by both strains while chitin, gelatin and Tween 80 were not. In both strains, C16 : 0, C18 : 0,C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c and C18 : 1ω6c/ C18 : 1ω7c were the predominant fatty acids, with minor amounts of C8 : 0 3-OH, anteiso-C14 : 0, C17 : 0, C14 : 1ω5c, C17 : 1 10-methyl and C18 : 1ω5c. Strains N1T and C7 contained phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine as major polar lipids with minor amounts of phosphatidylcholine, unidentified lipids and an unidentified phospholipid. The mean genomic DNA G+C content was 70.6±1 mol% and the two strains were closely related (mean DNA-DNA hybridization >90 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the two strains clustered with species of the genus Rhodobacter belonging to the family Rhodobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain N1T has a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.2 % with Rhodobacter capsulatus ATCC 11166T, 99.1 % with Rhodobacter viridis JA737T and <96.6 % with other members of the genus Rhodobacter. Strain N1T and C7 shared 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. DNA- DNA hybridization values between strain N1T and the type strains of the nearest species were clearly below the 70 % threshold. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, it is proposed that strain N1T represents a novel species of the genus Rhodobacter, for which the name Rhodobacter sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is N1T (=KEMB 563-471T=JCM 31175T), and strain C7 is an additional strain of the species. PMID:27150292

  14. Spatial variations in microbial community composition in surface seawater from the ultra-oligotrophic center to rim of the South Pacific Gyre.

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    Qi Yin

    Full Text Available Surface seawater in the South Pacific Gyre (SPG is one of the cleanest oceanic environments on earth, and the photosynthetic primary production is extremely low. Despite the ecological significance of the largest aquatic desert on our planet, microbial community composition in the ultra-oligotrophic seawater remain largely unknown. In this study, we collected surface seawater along a southern transect of the SPG during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 329. Samples from four distinct sites (Sites U1368, U1369, U1370 and U1371 were examined, representing ~5400 kilometers of transect line from the gyre heart to the edge area. Real-time PCR analysis showed 16S rRNA gene abundance in the gyre seawater, ranging from 5.96×10(5 to 2.55×10(6 copies ml(-1 for Bacteria and 1.17×10(3 to 1.90×10(4 copies ml(-1 for Archaea. The results obtained by statistic analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed the community composition in the southern SPG area: diversity richness estimators in the gyre center (Sites U1368 & U1369 are generally lower than those at sites in the gyre edge (Sites U1370 & U1371 and their community structures are clearly distinguishable. Phylogenetic analysis showed the predominance of Proteobacteria (especially Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, whereas phylotypes of Betaproteobacteria were only detected in the central gyre. Archaeal 16S rRNA genes in the clone libraries were predominated by the sequences of Marine Group II within the Euryarchaeota, and the Crenarchaeota sequences were rarely detected, which is consistent with the real-time PCR data (only 9.9 to 22.1 copies ml(-1. We also performed cultivation of heterotrophic microbes onboard, resulting in 18.9% of phylogenetically distinct bacterial isolates at least at the species level. Our results suggest that the distribution and diversity of microbial communities in the SPG surface seawater are closely

  15. Potential for luxS related signalling in marine bacteria and production of autoinducer-2 in the genus Shewanella

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    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoinducer-2 (AI-2 group of signalling molecules are produced by both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as the by-product of a metabolic transformation carried out by the LuxS enzyme. They are the only non species-specific quorum sensing compounds presently known in bacteria. The luxS gene coding for the AI-2 synthase enzyme was found in many important pathogens. Here, we surveyed its occurrence in a collection of 165 marine isolates belonging to abundant marine phyla using conserved degenerated PCR primers and sequencing of selected positive bands to determine if the presence of the luxS gene is phylogenetically conserved or dependent on the habitat. Results The luxS gene was not present in any of the Alphaproteobacteria (n = 71 and Bacteroidetes strains (n = 29 tested; by contrast, these bacteria harboured the sahH gene, coding for an alternative enzyme for the detoxification of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH in the activated methyl cycle. Within the Gammaproteobacteria (n = 76, luxS was found in all Shewanella, Vibrio and Alteromonas isolates and some Pseudoalteromonas and Halomonas species, while sahH was detected in Psychrobacter strains. A number of Gammaproteobacteria (n = 27 appeared to have neither the luxS nor the sahH gene. We then studied the production of AI-2 in the genus Shewanella using the Vibrio harveyi bioassay. All ten species of Shewanella tested produced a pronounced peak of AI-2 towards the end of the exponential growth phase in several media investigated. The maximum of AI-2 activity was different in each Shewanella species, ranging from 4% to 46% of the positive control. Conclusion The data are consistent with those of fully sequenced bacterial genomes and show that the potential for luxS related signalling is dependent on phylogenetic affiliation rather than ecological niche and is largest in certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria in the marine environment. This is the first report on AI-2

  16. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

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    Marie Ragon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in

  17. Diversity of assimilatory nitrate reductase genes from plankton and epiphytes associated with a seagrass bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhitya, Anita; Thomas, Florence I M; Ward, Bess B

    2007-11-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase gene fragments were isolated from epiphytes and plankton associated with seagrass blades collected from Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Nitrate reductase genes from diatoms (NR) and heterotrophic bacteria (nasA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of degenerate primers. A total of 129 NR and 75 nasA clones from four clone libraries, two from each of epiphytic and planktonic components, were sequenced and aligned. In addition, genomic DNA sequences for the NR fragment were obtained from Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom cultures. Rarefaction analysis with an operational taxonomic unit cut-off of 6% indicated that diversity of the NR and nasA clone libraries were similar, and that sequencing of the clone libraries was not yet saturated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 121 of the 129 NR clones sequenced were similar to diatom sequences. Of the eight non-diatom sequences, four were most closely related to the sequence of Chlorella vulgaris. Introns were found in 8% of the Tampa Bay NR sequences; introns were also observed in S. costatum, but not T. weissflogii. Introns from within the same clone library exhibited close similarity in nucleotide sequence, position and length; the corresponding exon sequences were unique. Introns from within the same component were similar in position and length, but not in nucleotide sequence. These findings raise questions about the function of introns, and mechanisms or time evolution of intron formation. A large cluster of 14 of the 75 nasA sequences was similar to sequences from Vibrio species; other sequences were closely related to sequences from Alteromonas, alpha-proteobacteria and Marinomonas-like species. Biogeographically consistent patterns were observed for the nasA Tampa Bay sequences compared with sequences from other locations: for example, Tampa Bay sequences were similar to those from the South Atlantic Bight, but not the Barents Sea. The

  18. [Prokaryotic microbial diversity of the ancient salt deposits in the Kunming Salt Mine, P.R. China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Peng, Qian; Liu, Hong-wei; Wen, Meng-liang; Cui, Xiao-long; Yang, Ya-ling; Duan, Dong-cheng; Chen, Wei; Deng, Lan; Li, Qin-yuan; Chen, Yi-guang; Wang, Zhi-gang; Ren, Zhen; Liu, Ji-hui

    2007-04-01

    The prokaryotic microbial diversity of the ancient salt deposits in the Kunming Salt Mine, PR China was investigated using PCR-DGGE and rRNA approaches. Total community DNA was extracted and purified by a direct method, which yielded amplified DNA of high molecular weight for samples. A variable region of 16S rRNA gene was then amplified by PCR with bacterial and archaeal primers and analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Twenty-seven major bands were detected in the bacterial DGGE profile of the sample, but only one band of pure culture strains of bacteria isolated from the Kunming Salt Mine matched with one band of sample. No band of pure culture strains of archaea isolated from the Kunming Salt Mine matched with 18 major bands of sample. The results indicated that most of microbes in this environment are likely uncultivable. Clones on the plate were not the predominant species in the community. Two 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (bacteria and archaea) were also constructed, and 36 and 20 clones were selected for amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). ARDRA with enzymes Afa I, Hha I, Hae III revealed 10 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with three most abundant OTUs accounting for 38.9%, 25.0%, 16.7% of all the bacterial 16S rDNA clones, respectively. The remaining 7 OTUs presented at low levels, were represented by a single clone. Eight archaeal OTUs were obtained but no predominant OTUs. Some clones were sequenced and each sequence was compared with all nucleotide sequences in GenBank database. Examination of 16S rDNA clones showed that the ancient salt deposits in the Kunming Salt Mine contained a phylogenetically diverse population of organisms from the Bacteria domain with members of three major lineages represented: alpha-proteobacteria, gamma-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, especially Pseudomonas. Surprisingly, we recovered a variety of sequence closely related to Actinobacteria which was not found in other

  19. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

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    C. Jeanthon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 % was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies

  20. Are Longitudinal Patterns of Bacterial Community Composition and Dissolved Organic Matter Composition Linked Across a River Continuum? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, J.; Kaplan, L. A.; Kan, J.; Findlay, R. H.; Podgorski, D. C.; McKenna, A. M.; Branan, T. L.; Griffith, C.

    2013-12-01

    streams had higher abundances of Sphingomonadaceae spp. and Nordella spp. (both Alphaproteobacteria). The cyanobacteria Chamaesiphon spp. was observed in highest abundance in the first and second order streams of the rock biofilm samples and the cyanobacteria Oscillatoria spp. was in highest abundance in the third order streams. Stream water samples from all orders had high lignin/tannin content and were enriched with carboxylic-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM). There was an observable shift in in the molecular weight and relative abundance of the CRAM molecules with the CRAM molecules becoming less abundant and having lower molecular weight following the downstream gradient. Multivariate statistical analyses correlated the longitudinal patterns of changes in bacterial community structure to the DOM molecular structure and geochemical parameters across the river continuum.

  1. Endophytic bacteria associated with growing shoot tips of banana (Musa sp.) cv. Grand Naine and the affinity of endophytes to the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pious; Soly, Thyvalappil A

    2009-11-01

    A cultivation-based assessment of endophytic bacteria present in deep-seated shoot tips of banana suckers was made with a view to generate information on the associated organisms, potential endophytic contaminants in tissue-cultured bananas and to assess if the endophytes shared a beneficial relationship with the host. Plating the tissue homogenate from the central core of suckers showed colony growth on nutrient agar from just 75% and 42% of the 12 stocks during May and November, respectively (average 58%; 6 x 10(3) colony-forming units per gram), yielding diverse organisms belonging to firmicutes (Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Virgibacillus, Staphylococcus spp.), actinobacteria (Cellulomonas, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Kocuria spp.), alpha-proteobacteria (Paracoccus sp.), and gamma-proteobacteria (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter spp.). Each shoot tip showed one to three different organisms and no specific organism appeared common to different sucker tips. Tissue homogenate from shoot tips including the ones that did not yield culturable bacteria displayed abundant bacterial cells during microscopic examination suggesting that a high proportion of cells were in viable-but-nonculturable state, or their cultivation requirements were not met. Direct application of cultivation-independent approach to study endophytic bacterial community using bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA universal primers resulted in high interference from chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences. Dislodging the bacterial cells from shoot tips that did not show cultivable bacteria and incubating the tissue crush in dilute-nutrient broth led to the activation of four organisms (Klebsiella, Agrobacterium, Pseudacidovorax spp., and an unidentified isolate). The endophytic organisms in general showed better growth at 30-37 degrees C compared with 25 degrees C, and the growth of endophytes as well as pathogenic Erwinia carotovora were promoted with the supply of host tissue extract (HTE) while

  2. Changes in the microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi in response to elevated CO(2) and warming in an Australian native grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Helen L; Mele, Pauline M; Bougoure, Damian S; Allan, Claire Y; Norng, Sorn; Piceno, Yvette M; Brodie, Eoin L; Desantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Williams, Amity L; Hovenden, Mark J

    2012-12-01

    The microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi is described in an Australian native grassland soil after more than 5 years exposure to different atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) (ambient, +550 ppm) and temperatures (ambient, + 2°C) under different plant functional types (C3 and C4 grasses) and at two soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). Archaeal community diversity was influenced by elevated [CO2], while under warming archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers increased for C4 plant Themeda triandra and decreased for the C3 plant community (P < 0.05). Fungal community diversity resulted in three groups based upon elevated [CO2], elevated [CO2] plus warming and ambient [CO2]. Overall bacterial community diversity was influenced primarily by depth. Specific bacterial taxa changed in richness and relative abundance in response to climate change factors when assessed by a high-resolution 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip). Operational taxonomic unit signal intensities increased under elevated [CO2] for both Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increased under warming for Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. For the interaction of elevated [CO2] and warming there were 103 significant operational taxonomic units (P < 0.01) representing 15 phyla and 30 classes. The majority of these operational taxonomic units increased in abundance for elevated [CO2] plus warming plots, while abundance declined in warmed or elevated [CO2] plots. Bacterial abundance (16S rRNA gene copy number) was significantly different for the interaction of elevated [CO2] and depth (P < 0.05) with decreased abundance under elevated [CO2] at 5-10 cm, and for Firmicutes under elevated [CO2] (P < 0.05). Bacteria, archaea and fungi in soil responded differently to elevated [CO2], warming and their interaction. Taxa identified as significantly climate-responsive could show differing trends in the direction of response ('+' or '-') under elevated CO2 or warming, which could then not be used to

  3. Diversity of bacteria isolated from cysts Heterodera glycines in Heilongjiang%黑龙江大豆胞囊线虫胞囊可培养细菌多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱英波; 史凤玉; 王牛牛; 田建卿; 向梅春; 刘杏忠

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To understand the bacterial diversity isolated from the cysts of Heterodera glycines in the soybean field in Heilongjiang Province. [Methods] Bacteria were isolated from cysts on nutrient agar plates using dilution plate method and further identified by phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA gene sequences. [Results] Totally 90 bacteria strains with different colony morphology were selected on nutrient agar plate and their phylogenetic features were analyzed based on the partial 16S rDNA sequences. In total 7 genera and 22 species were identified, including 46 strains in Gammaproteobacteria (51.1%) , 32 in Firmicutes (35. 6%) , 10 in Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) , and 2 in Alphaproteobacteria (2.2%). The dominant bacteria species were Pseudomonas and Bacillus. [Conclusion] There was abundant species diversity of bacteria isolated from cysts Heterodera glycines in Heilongjiang, and these bacteria may play a physical and ecological roles in nematodes.%[目的]了解黑龙江省大豆田大豆胞囊线虫胞囊可培养细菌的多样性.[方法]运用稀释平板法和16S rDNA基因序列的系统发育分析对胞囊可培养细菌多样性进行研究.[结果]用NA培养基从胞囊上分离90株具有不同菌落形态的细菌.16S rDNA序列分析结果表明:90株菌株分属于7个属22个种.46株属于变形菌门γ亚群(Gammaproteobacteria),32株属于厚壁菌门(Firmicutes),10株属于变形菌门β亚群(Betaproteobacteria),2株属于变形菌门α亚群(Alphaproteobacteria).假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)和芽孢杆菌属(Bacillus)为优势菌属.[结果]黑龙江省大豆胞囊线虫胞囊中存在丰富的细菌物种多样性,这些细菌对大豆胞囊线虫可能具有一定的生理生态作用.

  4. Electricity generation and dynamics characteristics of microbial community of microbial fuel cells started up with mixture of aerobic/anaerobic sludge%好氧-厌氧混合污泥启动微生物燃料电池产电性能及微生物群落动态特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹亚琳; 高崇洋; 赵阳国; 王爱杰; 王敏; 闫凯丽

    2014-01-01

    [目的]为探讨好氧-厌氧混合污泥启动微生物燃料电池(Microbial fuel cell,MFC)产电性能以及MFC对微生物群落的选择作用,[方法]以乳酸为底物,应用不依赖于培养的微生物分子生物学技术解析单室MFC启动过程中微生物群落的组成和结构动态学特征.[结果]结果表明,MFC经过3个周期启动成功,最高输出电压230 mV.当MFC外电阻为1656 Ω时,最大功率密度11.15W/m3,电池运行稳定.混合污泥启动MFC以后,阳极生物膜微生物群落结构同种泥差异较大,且多样性降低.生物膜中微生物类群按丰度依次为β-变形菌纲(Betaproteobacteria) 24.90%、拟杆菌门(Bacteroidetes) 21.30%、厚壁菌门(Firmicutes)9.70%、γ-变形菌纲(Gammaproteobacteria) 8.50%、δ-变形菌纲(Deltaproteobacteria) 7.90%、绿弯菌门(Chloroflexi) 4.20%以及α-变形菌纲(Alphaproteobacteria)3.60%.有利于生物膜形成与稳定的动胶菌属(Zoogloea)和不动杆菌属(Acinetobacter)序列丰度分别占生物膜群落的5.00%和3.90%,与MFC产电能力直接相关的地杆菌属(Geobacter)序列由混合污泥中的0.60%上升至阳极生物膜中的2.60%.[结论]本研究表明,MFC阳极生物膜在驯化过程中对污泥中的微生物进行淘汰和选择,最终驯化形成了有利于生物膜形成与稳定、有机物厌氧发酵与产电的微生物菌群.

  5. Prokaryotic diversity in the extreme lakes of Turkey, SW Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Cansu; Gül Karagüler, Nevin; Menekşe-Kılıç, Meryem; Akçer-Ön, Sena; Haydar Gültekin, A.; Balcı, Nurgül

    2016-04-01

    The Lake District, located in the SW Anatolia region of Turkey, hosts a number of lakes with unique water chemistry. Among them, Lake Acigol, Lake Salda and Lake Yarisli display extreme biogeochemical conditions. In terms of their water chemistry and diverse prokaryotic community, each lake sets a great example for microbially mediated reactions (e.g carbonate precipitation). Lake Acigol (average pH around 8.6) is known for hypersaline and alkaline water chemistry. Lake Salda (average pH around 9.1) is known for its hydromagnesite beaches, clayey-hydromagnesite shoreline and ancient-modern stromatolite formations as well as being a model for Mars. For the first time, Lake Yarisli having alkaline conditions with an average pH value of 9.5 is investigated for its geochemistry and geobiology during this study. Algal bloom and well developed cyanobacterial mats are visible on shallow waters along the Eastern shoreline of the lake. In scope of elucidating complex bio/geochemical reactions that regulate C, S and O cycles in the extreme conditions of these lakes, water, surface sediment and shallow core samples were collected. For the first time, prokaryotic diversity of Lake Acigol, Salda and Yarisli were determined by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) during this study (Balci et al., 2013). Preliminary results revealed the total number of bacterial classes determined for Lake Acigol, Lake Salda and Lake Yarisli as 22, 19 and 19; respectively. Lake Acigol, Salda and Yarisli are mostly dominated by bacterial classes of Alphaproteobacteria (68.2%, 25.6% and 1.9%; respectively), Cyanobacteria (10.2%, 5.3% and 92.9%; respectively), Bacilli (9.6%, 23.7% and 0.45%; respectively), Gammaproteobacteria (6.1%, 39.6% and 4.3%; respectively) and Actinobacteria (2.7%, 1.8% and 0.06%; respectively). The total number of archaeal classes determined for Lake Acigol, Lake Salda and Lake Yarisli are 8, 7 and 6; respectively. Common most dominant archaeal classes of Lake Acigol, Lake Salda

  6. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Of Microbial Communities From Active Layer And Permafrost After Short-Term Thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chauhan, A.; Saarunya, G.; Murphy, J.; Williams, D.; Layton, A. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Sanders, R.; Lau, C. M.; myneni, S.; Phelps, T. J.; Fountain, A. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    decreased with depth from 7x108 to 1x108 copies /g of soil. Characterization of the metagenomic sequences derived from the samples before thawing elucidated differences between the permafrost and active-layer with Acidobacteria and Alpha-Proteobacteria are being significantly higher in active layer than in permafrost, on the contrary permafrost had higher abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes than active layer. Currently additional metagenomic DNA illumina libraries for 20 samples after 1 week thawing are in preparation and will be analyzed to determine whether variations in the metagenomic sequences are correlated to the geochemical data.

  7. The importance of methanotrophic activity in geothermal soils of Pantelleria island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    were investigated by culturing and culture-independent techniques. The diversity of proteobacterial methanotrophs was investigated by creating a clone library of the amplified methane mono-oxygenase encoding gene, pmoA. Clone sequencing indicates the presence of Gammaproteobacteria in the soils of Favara Grande. Enrichment cultures, on a mineral medium in a CH4-enriched atmosphere, led to the isolation of different strains that were identified as Methylocistis spp., which belong to the Alphaproteobacteria. The presence of Verrucomicrobia was detected by amplification of pmoA gene using newly designed primers. Soils from Favara Grande show therefore the largest spectrum of methanotrophic microorganisms until now detected in a geothermal environment. While the presence of Verrucomicrobia in geothermal soils was predictable due to their thermophilic and acidophilic character, the presence of both Alpha and Gamma proteobacteria was unexpected. Their presence is limited to the shallowest part of the soil were temperatures are lower and is probably favored by a soil pH that is not too low (pH ~5) and their contribution to biological methane oxidation at Pantelleria is significant. Understanding the ecology of methanotrophy in geothermal sites will increase our knowledge of the role of soils in methane emissions in such environments.

  8. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Gagliano

    2014-04-01

    -thermophilic methanotrophs Verrucomicrobia. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures, under a methane containing atmosphere at 37 °C. The isolates grow at pH 3.5–8 and temperatures of 18–45 °C, and show a methane oxidation rate of ~ 450 μmol mol−1 h−1. Soils from Favara Grande showed the largest diversity of methanotrophic bacteria until now detected in a geothermal soil. While methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia are reported to dominate highly acidic geothermal sites, our results suggest that slightly acidic soils, in high enthalpy geothermal systems, host a more diverse group of both culturable and uncultivated methanotrophs.

  9. Global analysis of gene expression dynamics within the marine microbial community during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the southwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Spungin, Dina; Bonnet, Sophie; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-07-01

    Microbial gene expression was followed for 23 days within a mesocosm (M1) isolating 50 m3 of seawater and in the surrounding waters in the Nouméa lagoon, New Caledonia, in the southwest Pacific as part of the VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific (VAHINE) experiment. The aim of VAHINE was to examine the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in a low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ecosystem. On day 4 of the experiment, the mesocosm was fertilized with phosphate. In the lagoon, gene expression was dominated by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, closely followed by Alphaproteobacteria. In contrast, drastic changes in the microbial community composition and transcriptional activity were triggered within the mesocosm within the first 4 days, with transcription bursts from different heterotrophic bacteria in rapid succession. The microbial composition and activity of the surrounding lagoon ecosystem appeared more stable, although following similar temporal trends as in M1. We detected significant gene expression from Chromerida in M1, as well as the Nouméa lagoon, suggesting these photoautotrophic alveolates were present in substantial numbers in the open water. Other groups contributing substantially to the metatranscriptome were affiliated with marine Euryarchaeota Candidatus Thalassoarchaea (inside and outside) and Myoviridae bacteriophages likely infecting Synechococcus, specifically inside M1. High transcript abundances for ammonium transporters and glutamine synthetase in many different taxa (e.g., Pelagibacteraceae, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and Rhodobacteraceae) was consistent with the known preference of most bacteria for this nitrogen source. In contrast, Alteromonadaceae highly expressed urease genes; Rhodobacteraceae and Prochlorococcus showed some urease expression, too. Nitrate reductase transcripts were detected on day 10 very prominently in Synechococcus and in Halomonadaceae. Alkaline

  10. 感染松萎蔫病的葡萄牙海岸松中内生细菌的分离%Endophytic bacteria isolated from pine wilt-affected Pinus pinaster trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vieira dos Santos M C; Proenca D A N; Fonseca L; Abrantes I M de O; Morais P V

    2011-01-01

    The characteristic rapid death of maritime pine, Pinus pinaster, after infection by the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, suggests the involvement of other organisms in pine wilt disease (PWD) . Endophytic bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and colonize a broad spectrum of plant species. They colonize plants internally without harming them and although they have been reported to promote plant growth and stimulate plant defence mechanisms. Although such bacteria may be involved in improving plant health, they have also been seen as a potential cause of the low regeneration capacity of mature trees. The bacteria carried out by the PWN throughout pine trees may also contribute to the rapid wilting of the maritime pine trees. This study was made to assess the endophytic microbial community structure of pine wilt affected and non-affected P. pinaster, based on culture isolates, amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophorosis (DGGE) profiling, and to relate the results to a possible association between the characteristics and bacteria associated with the PWN. The microbial community from trees and PWNs included strains from Beta and Gammaproteobacteria, but Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were only found in the endophytic community whereas Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were only found to be associated with the nematode. ARDRA and DGGE profiles showed differences in the diversity of the endophytic microbial community that may be related to the presence of the PWN. Those differences seem to be associated with the number of strains of the genera Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Luteibacter. Isolates belonging to the species Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum, P. lutea and Dyella yeojuensis were isolated from trees and were associated with the PWN. This research documents the presence of bacteria associated with the PWN by molecular methods and the impact of the nematode in the plant endophytic microbial

  11. 鄱阳湖7个河口水体中细菌多样性和组成特征%Bacterial diversities and compositions in seven different estuarine water columns of Poyang Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    圣平; 于一尊; 田晓娟; 黄江丽; 张志红; 丁建南

    2016-01-01

    本文对鄱阳湖7个河口(赣江、抚河、信江、乐安河、昌江、饶河和修河)水体的理化特性进行了分析,并采用细菌16S rRNA基因MiSeq测序的方法对其多样性和组成进行了研究。结果表明,乐安河水体总氮含量最高,信江水体总磷含量最高。乐安河、修河和饶河水体细菌丰度高于其它河口,而修河、昌江和饶河水体细菌多样性则相对较高。水体细菌群落组成分析结果表明,在7个河口水体中变形菌门细菌均占优势,其次为放线菌门和拟杆菌门细菌。而在纲水平,在7个河口水体中β-变形菌纲细菌占优势,其次为α-变形菌纲细菌和放线菌纲细菌。相关性分析结果表明,水体pH和细菌群落多样性呈显著负相关关系,而总氮和氨态氮含量和细菌群落多样性呈显著正相关性。%In this study, we analyzed environmental factors of seven different estuarine water columns of Poyang Lake (Gan, Fu, Xin, Le’an, Chang, Rao, and Xiu River), and the bacterial community compositions in these different estuarine sediments were analyzed using the 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach. Our results showed that Le’an River had the highest total nitrogen content, and Xin River had the highest total phosphorus content. For the bacterial richness and diversity in these seven different estuaries, we found that Le’an, Xiu and Rao rivers showed the higher bacterial richness than other estuarines. Xiu, Chang and Rao rivers showed higher bacterial diversities than others. Bacterial composition analysis indicated that Proteobacteria phylum was dominant in all water samples, followed by Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. At the class level, all samples were numerically dominated by members of the Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Furthermore, according to the Spearman’s correlation analysis, we found that there were signiifcant negative relationships between the

  12. Microbiological analysis of the in situ bitumen-nitrate-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microscopy, molecular biology methods, ATP-measurements, and cultivation based techniques of the initial pore water samples, proved the presence and activity of bacteria. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from the initial interval solutions, i.e. artificial pore water used to fill the intervals and which have been in contact with the surrounding clay for more than six months, indicates similar bacterial communities in all three solutions of the test intervals with the dominant population being Proteobacteria (81.5 - 94.9 %) and Firmicutes (3.4 - 11.1%). Actinobacteria (1.7 and 7.4%) have only been detected in the initial pore water of two intervals. The first results of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Amplification (RISA) analysis, using universal bacterial primers for 16S rDNA968-983 and 23S rDNA115-130, demonstrate that in both injection tests, i.e. nitrate (interval 1) or nitrate and acetate (interval 2), a strong shift in bacterial communities was induced. Just before the start of these injection tests the pore waters of the two intervals were strongly predominated by different Clostridial species most of them related to Desulfosporosinus species. In addition, smaller populations of Bacteroidetes and Beta- proteobacteria were found as well. Twenty-four hours later, a rapid and strong proliferation of Bacteroidetes, in interval 1, and of Alphaproteobacteria, in intervals 1 and 2, occurred. Specific for interval 1, a stimulation of Beta- and Deltaproteobacteria and a complete masking of the Clostridial groups had occurred. In contrast, in interval 2, Gammaproteobacteria were stimulated and some Clostridia continued to persist. This shift may be due to bacterial contamination of the exchanged interval solutions and/or the drastic change of carbon- and/or electron acceptor source

  13. Targeting Autotrophic and Lithotrophic Microorganisms from Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Kelley, M.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic volcanic oligotrophic environments can host microorganisms that obtain their energy from reduced inorganic chemicals present in volcanic rocks and soils. We sampled basaltic rock from terrestrial Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) located in two fumarole ice caves, Warren and Warren West, located near the summit of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica. For reference, we sampled a similar cave, Harry's Dream, which receives continuous light during the Austral summer. We report here culturing data for bacterial and eukaryotic microbes from rocky soils in these caves when targeting lithotrophic organisms using media containing reduced inorganic compounds (Mn2+, Fe2+, NH4+). In addition, to test for the possible presence of inorganic carbon fixation, we screened samples for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) gene. Culturing of soil samples on media targeting both autotrophs and heterotrophs yielded a diverse collection of generally slow-growing colonies of bacteria (majority), fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes. Manganese(II)-oxidizing colonies were identified in Warren and Harry's Dream, and these exhibited two colony morphotypes upon subculturing. Sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene identified a bacterium distantly related to Pseudonocardia sp., a genus with known manganese oxidizers. Other bacteria enriched included members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. There was a low diversity in cultured eukaryotes representing several potential undescribed species (Geomyces sp., Penicillium sp.) and isolates that may represent alternate, previously undescribed habitats and forms (Psilolechia leprosa, Alternaria alternata). One Warren isolate was a 99% 16S rRNA match to the N2 fixer Bradyrhizobium sp.; when inoculated into liquid medium specific for N2 fixers, growth was maintained upon subculture. Putative iron oxidizers were also enriched from the two DOVE caves, using slush agar iron

  14. A Comprehensive Assessment of Biologicals Contained Within Commercial Airliner Cabin Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Osman, Shariff; Dekas, Anne; Stuecker, Tara; Newcombe, Dave; Piceno, Yvette; Fuhrman, J.; Andersen, Gary; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Bearman, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, Fusobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deinococci, Bacterioidetes, Spirochetes, and Planctomyces in varying abundance. Neisseria meningitidis rDNA sequences were retrieved in great abundance from Airline A followed by Streptococcus oralis/mitis sequences. Pseudomonas synxantha sequences dominated Airline B clone libraries, followed by those of N. meningitidis and S. oralis/mitis. In Phase II, Airline C, sequences representative of more than 113 species, enveloping 12 classes of bacteria, were retrieved. Proteobacterial sequences were retrieved in greatest frequency (58% of all clone sequences), followed in short order by those stemming from Gram-positives bacteria (31% of all clone sequences). As for overall phylogenetic breadth, Gram-positive and alpha-proteobacteria seem to have a higher affinity for international flights, whereas beta-and gamma-proteobacteria are far more common about domestic cabin air parcels in Airline C samples. Ultimately, the majority of microbial species circulating throughout the cabin airs of commercial airliners are commensal, infrequently pathogenic normal flora of the human nasopharynx and respiratory system. Many of these microbes likely originate from the oral and nasal cavities, and lungs of passengers and flight crew and are disseminated unknowingly via routine conversation, coughing, sneezing, and stochastic passing of fomites. The data documented in this study will be useful to generate a baseline microbial population database and can be utilized to develop biosensor instrumentation for monitoring microbial quality of cabin or urban air.

  15. Comunidade bacteriana como indicadora do efeito de feijoeiro geneticamente modificado sobre organismos não alvo Bacterial community as an indicator of genetically modified common bean effect on nontarget organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Moreira Knupp

    2009-12-01

    subgroup of the Proteobacteria phylum were obtained from uncultured cells and used for amplification. Using the Jaccard coefficient and UPGMA (Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean, dendrograms comparing the conventional Olathe Pinto and the elite event Olathe M1-4 transgenic varieties were obtained. The clusters obtained from the 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE profiles indicate changes in the rhizosphere bacterial community in genetically modified plants, being more notable in the profiles obtained for alphaproteobacteria. Sample origin and plant development stages affect bacterial community profiles.

  16. 枸杞岛海藻场沉积物细菌群落组成的初步研究%A preliminary study on the composition of bacterial community in the seaweed bed sediment of Gouqi Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹冰玉; 章守宇

    2011-01-01

    提取枸杞岛海藻场沉积物样品总DNA,以细菌16S rDNA通用引物进行PCR扩增,经分子克隆、测序与序列分析,构建了沉积物细菌16S rDNA文库和系统发育树,进行沉积物中细菌多样性及系统发育分析.结果表明,沉积物中细菌分属5个类群,分别为变形细菌门(Proteobacteria,48.2%)、厚壁菌门(Firmicutes,22.2%)、放线菌门(Actinobacteria,14.8%)、绿屈挠菌门(Chlorofiexi,3.7%)和酸杆菌门(Acidobacteria,3.7%),还有一些尚未确定其分类(7.4%).在枸杞岛海藻场沉积物变形细菌门类群中,γ-变形菌占主导地位,约为46.1%,其次为α-变形菌(23.1%)、β-变形菌(15.4%)、ε-变形菌(7.7%)和δ-变形菌(7.7%).作为海洋沉积物中的优势菌群,不同生态系统中变形细菌门类群的组成略有不同,功能类群的组成与生态系统机制密切相关.厚壁菌门和放线菌门作为革兰氏阳性菌的两个分支,在枸杞岛海藻场中主要参与分解碎屑及异养营养素的循环过程.%The clone library of 16S rDNA and the phylogenetic tree were constructed with extraction of bacterial DNA from seaweed bed sediment sample of Gouqi Island , PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA by universal primers, molecular clone, sequencing of 16S rDNA fragments and sequence analysis.The biodiversity of bacteria and phylogenetic analysis showed that the bacterial community fell into five main lineages: Proteobacteria (48.2%), Firmicutes (22.2%), Actinobacteria ( 14.8% ), Chloroflexi (3.7%),Acidobacteria (3.7%), In addition, a part of unidentified bacteria (7.4%) was detected.Gammaproteobacteria played the dominant role in the Proteobacteria community of the seaweed bed sediment,it was about 46.1%, followed by the Alphaproteobacteria (23.1% ), Betaproteobacteria ( 15.4% ),Epsilonproteobacteria ( 7.7% ), Deltaproteobacteria ( 7.7% ).As the preponderant bacteria of marine sediment, the composition of Proteobacteria community was different in

  17. 生物絮团培养过程中养殖水体水质因子及原核与真核微生物的动态变化%Dynamic changes of water quality factors and composition of pro-karyotic and eukaryotic microorganisms during culturing of bio-floc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏耘; 邱立疆; 郁二蒙; 谢骏; 王广军; 余德光; 吉红

    2014-01-01

    A 30-day experiment was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of bio-floc technology for main-taining good water quality in Ctenopharyngodon idellus with average weight of (121.61±14.23) g farming ponds. The total suspended solids(TSS), total nitrogen (TN) and alkalinity (CaCO3) were determined every 3 days and microbial communities of the bio-floc were analyzed using the PCR-DGGE (PCR-denaturing gradient gel elec-trophoresis) every 5 days, respectively. The results showed that water TSS concentration reached a peak value of (419.67±11.5) mg/L on the 9th day, which was significantly (P0.05). Alkalinity in the farming system ranged from 136.68 to 239.20 mg(CaCO3)/L, which reached maximum peak value of (238.22±5.44) mg (CaCO3)/L on the 6th day, after which it decreased gradually and then remained stable. Bio-floc had a crude protein content of 30%dry weight. The acquired sequences of 20 bands in 16S rDNA DGGE gel and six bands in 18S rDNA DGGE gel were analyzed by BLAST searches against the NCBI GenBank database. The main prokaryotic microorganisms represented by the 20 main bands in 16S rDNA DGGE gel were Alphaproteo-bacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Alca-ligenaceae throughout the process of formation of the bio-floc, and was the dominant bacteria on the 5th, 10th, and 15th days. The existence of Alcaligenaceae had some influence on the increase in water alkalinity during this pe-riod. We also found that bands 7 and12 represented Cyanobacteria, which appeared on the 0th, 5th and 10th days;they disappeared in the late culture period, which indicated that the application of bio-floc technology can control algal growth to some extent. The main Eukaryotic microorganisms represented by the six main bands in 18S rDNA DGGE gel were Loxophyllum sp., Nitzschia amphibian, Goniomonas sp., and Cryptomonadaceae. Nitzschia am-phibian belongs to the diatoms, and was present from the 1stto 15th days of

  18. Microbial communities established on Mont Blanc summit with Saharan dust deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvochina, M.; Alekhina, I.; Normand, P.; Petit, J. R.; Bulat, S.

    2009-04-01

    Deinococcus-Thermus phylotypes (46.2%) along with A-Proteobacteria and CFB were dominated while for MB-SD library two Actinobacteria phylotypes (29%) with another A-Proteobacteria phylotype were copious. This testify that two dust events are principally different in species composition meaning that any other events can also be different in microbes transferred from Sahara to MtBl summit. Of three other gene libraries (SD, SS and 85) selected as ‘supporting' gene pools for MB-SD two libraries (SD and 85) were strictly different from MB-SD while SS library showed two phylotype groups shared with MB-SD. Among them, one A-Proteobacteria phylotype have been detected in unrelated dust event (Polymenakou et al., 2008). It's worth noticing that one numerous A-Proteobacteria phylotype from MB5 library was closely related (97%) to another numerous phylotype from 85 (Grenoble snow fallout) library despite the events were separated geographically and split in time. Such phylotypes could be present in atmosphere elsewhere. Amongst microbes detected in MtBl dust layers libraries four separate minor phylotypes (three cyanobacteria and Deinococcus sp1) were found in MB5 and two minor phylotypes (uncultured actinobacteria, uncultured alphaproteobacteria) - in MB-SD which could be living (keep safe) in ice and snow. All of them were early discovered in cold ecosystems. Seems to be despite the dominant phylotypes recovered in both dust event gene libraries might have a high chance to be established in a snow as populations the minor phylotypes in the dust microbial load are more important in habiting the snow with dust-providing nutrients. In order to recover the cultures of ‘icy' microbes identified by sequence the attempt was done with Deinococci but we didn't succeed. The full gene and partial gene sub-libraries of the MB5 sample showed different results with respect to observed phylotypes. For example, ‘cold-loving' Cyanobacteria phylotypes were detected only in full gene library

  19. Biodiversity of culturable bacteria associated with Crassostrea hongkongensis from the tidal flat of Naozhou Island in the South China Sea%硇洲岛潮汐带牡蛎相关可培养细菌多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖建青; 朱泓溢; 刘祝祥; 刘荷; 贺建武; 李洪军; 钟小娟; 李文均; 陈义光

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To investigate the diversity of cultivable bacteria isolated from Crassostrea hongkongensis collected from the tidal flat of Naozhou Island (20°52′-20°56′ N,110°33′-110°38′ E) in the South China Sea.[Methods] Bacteria strains were isolated from homogenates of the sample by using conventional culture-dependent method,and then the isolated strains were investigated by using a phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences.[Results] We isolated 102 bacteria strains from the sample on a number of media [MA (marine agar 2216),MH (moderate halophilic medium agar),NA (nutrient agar)] supplemented with 0-25% (W/V) NaCl.On the basis of the results of some morphological,physiological and biochemical tests,we selected 74 strains to perform a further phylogenetic analysis.Our results showed that the 74 isolates represented 38 species,belonging to 18 genera (Idiomarina,Morganella,Proteus,Halomonas,Paracoccus,Wohlfahrtiimonas,Marinobacter,Vibrio,Pseudoalteromonas,Shewanella,Oceanimonas,Nitratireductor,Myroides,Bacillus,Virgibacillus,Staphylococcus,Enterococcus,Trichococcus) of 16 families (Idiomarinaceae,Enterobacteriaceae,Halomonadaceae,Rhodobacteraceae,Xanthomonadaceae,Alteromonadaceae,Vibrionaceae,Pseudoalteromonadaceae,Shewanellaceae,Aeromonadaceae,Phyllobacteriaceae,Flavobacteriaceae,Bacillaceae,Staphylococcaceae,Enterococcaceae,Carnobacteriaceae) in 4 phylogenetic groups (Gamma-Proteobacteria,Alpha-Proteobacteria,Bacteroidetes,Firmicutes).The most of isolates were within the subphylum Gamma-Proteobacteria (45strains,60.8%),followed by Firmicutes (12 strains,16.2%),Bacteriodetes (11 strains,14.9%) and Alpha-Proteobacteria (6 strains,8.1%).The phylogenetic analysis results suggested that there were obvious genetic divergences between most isolates and their closest type strains (16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ranged from 94.3% to 99.8%).The results also showed that,out of the 74 isolates,at least 6 strains could

  20. Phylogenetic diversity characteristics of soil bacteria producing nematode-attracting volatiles and identification of their active compounds%挥发性物质诱吸线虫的土壤细菌系统多样性特征及其活性挥发物鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝玉娥; 牟贵平; 何爱桃; 奚家勤; 杨发祥; 莫明和

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] This study characterized the phylogenetic diversity of soil bacteria producing nematode-attracting volatiles and their nematode-attracting compounds. Results would enhance our understanding on the interaction between nematodes and soil microorganisms and potentially enhance the biocontrol efficiency when combined the attractants with nemacides. [ Methods] Bacteria producing volatiles with functions of nematode-attracting activities were isolated from 187 agricultural soil samples collected in 26 provinces of China with the method of double-Petri dishes. The phylogenetic diversity of these bacteria was characterized by RFLP-16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The nematode-attracting volatiles of bacteria were detected using the SPME-GC/MS, and volatile compounds with attractive activity were determined by confirming with individual commercial compounds. [Results] Among the 3800 bacteria isolated from the 187 soil samples, 196 isolates(5. 16% of the total) showed attractive activity( AN) more than 30% to Panagrellus redivivus. Of the 196 isolates, 66 (1.74%) showed AN ≥70% , 62 isolates (1.63%) showed AN between 50% and 70%, and 68 isolates (1. 79% ) showed AN less than 50%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 196 bacteria were clustered into 5 groups; Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Sphingobacteria and Actinobacteria. But, Bacillus were the dominant, which covered 13 species. And 11 volatiles with nematode-attracting activity were determined, including benzaldehyde, 2-heptanone, benzyl benzoate, ethyl palmitate, ( + )-longifolene, benzyl alcohol, p-anisaldehyde, vanatone, ethyl butyrate, isovanilin and d-alaninol. [Conclusion] Some species of bacteria in agriculture soil can produce volatiles to attract nematodes.%[目的]明确有机挥发物诱吸线虫的土壤细菌种群多样性及其活性挥发物,有助于了解线虫与土壤微生物间的互作关系,为利用诱吸性物质与杀线虫剂配合使用,提高防治