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Sample records for alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

  1. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H

    2009-01-01

    in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment induced by PCP......, and administration of the NMDA-antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents is a well validated model of such cognitive deficits. Here we show that repeated PCP treatment (10 mg/kg/day for 10 days) decreased the expression of parvalbumin and synaptophysin mRNA in the mouse PFC, which corresponds to changes seen....... Importantly, repeated co-administration of SSR180711 (3 mg/kg) with PCP prevented both the changes in parvalbumin, synaptophysin, and Arc mRNA expression in the PFC, and the behavioral impairment induced by PCP. These results are the first to demonstrate prevention of the deleterious effects induced...

  2. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions......, as measured by c-Fos immunoreactivity, a marker of neuronal activation. Selective depletion of these cholinergic neurons abolishes the SSR180711-induced activation of the mPFC but not the ACCshell, demonstrating their critical importance for alpha(7) nAChR-dependent activation of the mPFC. Contrarily......, selective depletion of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area abolishes the SSR180711-induced activation of the ACCshell but not the mPFC or HDB. These results demonstrate 2 distinct neural pathways activated by SSR180711. The BF and mPFC are important for attentional function and may subserve...

  3. Pharmacological characterisation of strychnine and brucine analogues at glycine and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Gharagozloo, Parviz; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2006-01-01

    Strychnine and brucine from the plant Strychnos nux vomica have been shown to have interesting pharmacological effects on several neurotransmitter receptors, including some members of the superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels. In this study, we have characterised the pharmacological properties...... of tertiary and quaternary analogues as well as bisquaternary dimers of strychnine and brucine at human alpha1 and alpha1beta glycine receptors and at a chimera consisting of the amino-terminal domain of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor (containing the orthosteric ligand binding site) and the ion channel domain...... of the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor. Although the majority of the analogues displayed significantly increased Ki values at the glycine receptors compared to strychnine and brucine, a few retained the high antagonist potencies of the parent compounds. However, mirroring the pharmacological profiles...

  4. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  5. Selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists worsen disease in experimental colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, Susanne A.; Verstege, Marleen I.; van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Deeks, Nigel; Bulmer, David C.; Skynner, Michael; Lee, Kevin; te Velde, Anje A.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In various models vagus nerve activation has been shown to ameliorate intestinal inflammation, via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on immune cells. As the alpha7 nAChR has been put forward to mediate this effect, we studied the effect of nicotine and two

  6. Virtual screening studies of Chinese medicine Coptidis Rhizoma as alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Xu, Youdong; Zhang, Yan; Meng, Xianli; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Extensive in vitro and in vivo experiments have proved that the decreased activity of the cholinergic neuron is responsible for the memory and cognition deterioration. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is proposed to a drug target of AD, and compounds which acting as α7-nAChR agonists are considered as candidates in AD treatment. Chinese medicine CoptidisRhizoma and its compounds are reported in various anti-AD effects. In this study, virtual screening, docking approaches and hydrogen bond analyses were applied to screen potential α7-nAChR agonists from CoptidisRhizome. The 3D structure of the protein was obtained from PDB database. 87 reported compounds were included in this research and their structures were accessed by NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the compounds was performed using AutoDock 4.2 and AutoDock Vina. The images of the binding modes hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interaction were rendered with PyMOL1.5.0.4. and LigPlot+ respectively. Finally, N-tran-feruloyltyramine, isolariciresinol, flavanone, secoisolariciresinol, (+)-lariciresinol and dihydrochalcone, exhibited the lowest docking energy of protein-ligand complex. The results indicate these 6 compounds are potential α7 nAChR agonists, and expected to be effective in AD treatment.

  7. Neuroprotection of rat retinal ganglion cells mediated through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, K; Mata, D; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is thought to play an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was analyzed using acetylcholine (ACh), nicotine and the α7 specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist, N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987), in cultured adult rat retinal neurons. Adult Long Evans rat retinas were dissociated and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were isolated from all other retinal tissue using a two-step panning technique. Once isolated, RGCs were cultured under various pharmacological conditions to demonstrate excitotoxicity and neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. After 3 days, RGCs were immunostained with antibodies against the glycoprotein, Thy 1.1, counted and cell survival was assessed relative to control untreated conditions. 500 μM glutamate induced excitotoxicity in large and small RGCs in an adult rat dissociated culture. After 3 days in culture with glutamate, the cell survival of large RGCs decreased by an average of 48.16% while the cell survival of small RGCs decreased by an average of 42.03%. Using specific glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists, we provide evidence that the excitotoxic response was mediated through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid (KA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors through an apoptotic mechanism. However, the excitotoxic effect of glutamate on all RGCs was eliminated if cells were cultured for an hour with 10 μM ACh, 100 μM nicotine or 100 nM of the α7 nAChR agonist, PNU-282987, before the glutamate insult. Inhibition studies using 10nM methyllycaconitine (MLA) or α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt) supported the hypothesis that neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on rat RGCs was mediated through α7 nAChRs. In immunocytochemical studies, double

  8. An allosteric modulator of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor possessing cognition-enhancing properties in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Daniel B; Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Dam, Eva; Jørgensen, Tino D; Ahring, Philip K; Peters, Dan; Holst, Dorte; Christensen, Jeppe K; Chrsitensen, Jeppe K; Malysz, John; Briggs, Clark A; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Olsen, Gunnar M

    2007-10-01

    Augmentation of nicotinic alpha7 receptor function is considered to be a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at ameliorating cognitive and mnemonic dysfunction in relation to debilitating pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In the present report, a novel positive allosteric modulator of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), 1-(5-chloro-2-hydroxy-phenyl)-3-(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-urea (NS1738), is described. NS1738 was unable to displace or affect radioligand binding to the agonist binding site of nicotinic receptors, and it was devoid of effect when applied alone in electrophysiological paradigms. However, when applied in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), NS1738 produced a marked increase in the current flowing through alpha7 nAChRs, as determined in both oocyte electrophysiology and patch-clamp recordings from mammalian cells. NS1738 acted by increasing the peak amplitude of ACh-evoked currents at all concentrations; thus, it increased the maximal efficacy of ACh. Oocyte experiments indicated an increase in ACh potency as well. NS1738 had only marginal effects on the desensitization kinetics of alpha7 nAChRs, as determined from patch-clamp studies of both transfected cells and cultured hippocampal neurons. NS1738 was modestly brain-penetrant, and it was demonstrated to counteract a (-)-scopolamine-induced deficit in acquisition of a water-maze learning task in rats. Moreover, NS1738 improved performance in the rat social recognition test to the same extent as (-)-nicotine, demonstrating that NS1738 is capable of producing cognitive enhancement in vivo. These data support the notion that alpha7 nAChR allosteric modulation may constitute a novel pharmacological principle for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction.

  9. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  10. Protective effect of an alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist against enterovirus 71 infection in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feng Xia; Zhao, Lin Qing; Zhu, Ru Nan; Song, Qin Wei; Deng, Jie; Tian, Run; Wang, Fang; Qian, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Enterovirus 71, as one of the dominant pathogens associated with severe hand, foot, and mouth disease, has been well reported to trigger severe neurological symptoms among young children over the last decade, particularly among children in the Asia-Pacific region. To date, no effective antiviral agent has been developed for the treatment of severe enterovirus 71 infection. PNU-282987, a selective alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) agonist, has been reported to have a neuroprotective effect by participating in inflammatory regulation in previous studies. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to assess the cell-protective effect of PNU-282987 against enterovirus 71 infection in neuronal cells, and to discuss potential mechanisms underlying this cell-protective effect in order to elucidate the potential impact of such agonists in the treatment of neurotropic viral infection. We observed that treatment with PNU-282987 improved cell viability and inhibited viral replication in enterovirus 71-infected SH-SY5Y cells. Further investigation revealed that inhibition of enterovirus 71 production by PNU-282987 is likely associated with events of RNA replication, and that increased levels of INF mRNA and its downstream antiviral proteins stimulated by the JAK-STAT2 pathway may contribute to the antiviral effect of PNU-282987. Moreover, our findings suggest that both the antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects of PNU-282987 may contribute to the neural protective effect of the drug in enterovirus 71-infected cells. Taken together, the results suggest that selective α7nAChR agonists may represent viable candidates for future therapeutic treatment of severe enterovirus 71 infection, and for other cases of neurotropic viral infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in juvenile pig brain with [{sup 18}F]NS10743

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    Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Funke, Uta; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy, Leipzig (Germany); Becker, Georg; Sabri, Osama [Univ. of Leipzig, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Peters, Dan [NeuroSearch A/S, Ballerup (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    To conduct a quantitative PET assessment of the specific binding sites in the brain of juvenile pigs for [{sup 18}F]NS10743, a novel diazabicyclononane derivative targeting {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChRs). Dynamic PET recordings were made in isoflurane-anaesthetized juvenile pigs during 120 min after administration of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 under baseline conditions (n = 3) and after blocking of the {alpha}7 nAChR with NS6740 (3 mg.kg{sup -1} bolus + 1 mg.kg{sup -1}.h{sup -1} continuous infusion; n = 3). Arterial plasma samples were collected for determining the input function of the unmetabolized tracer. Kinetic analysis of regional brain time-radioactivity curves was performed, and parametric maps were calculated relative to arterial input. Plasma [{sup 18}F]NS10743 passed readily into the brain, with peak uptake occurring in {alpha}7 nAChR-expressing brain regions such as the colliculi, thalamus, temporal lobe and hippocampus. The highest SUV{sub max} was approximately 2.3, whereas the lowest uptake was in the olfactory bulb (SUV{sub max} 1.53 {+-} 0.32). Administration of NS6740 significantly decreased [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding late in the emission recording throughout the brain, except in the olfactory bulb, which was therefore chosen as reference region for calculation of BP{sub ND}. The baseline BP{sub ND} ranged from 0.39 {+-} 0.08 in the cerebellum to 0.76 {+-} 0.07 in the temporal lobe. Pretreatment and constant infusion with NS6740 significantly reduced the BP{sub ND} in regions with high [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding (temporal lobe -29%, p = 0.01; midbrain: -35%, p = 0.02), without significantly altering the BP{sub ND} in low binding regions (cerebellum: -16%, p = 0.2). This study confirms the potential of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 as a target-specific radiotracer for the molecular imaging of central {alpha}7 nAChRs by PET. (orig.)

  12. In vivo evaluation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists [11C]A-582941 and [11C]A-844606 in mice and conscious monkeys.

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    Jun Toyohara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate the two carbon-11-labeled alpha7 nAChR agonists [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 for their potential as novel positron emission tomography (PET tracers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The two tracers were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors using [(11C]methyl triflate. Effects of receptor blockade in mice were determined by coinjection of either tracer along with a carrier or an excess amount of a selective alpha7 nAChR agonist (SSR180711. Metabolic stability was investigated using radio-HPLC. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys with/without SSR180711-treatment. [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 showed high uptake in the mouse brain. Most radioactive compounds in the brain were detected as an unchanged form. However, regional selectivity and selective receptor blockade were not clearly observed for either compound in the mouse brain. On the other hand, the total distribution volume of [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 was high in the hippocampus and thalamus but low in the cerebellum in the conscious monkey brain, and reduced by pretreatment with SSR180711. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A nonhuman primate study suggests that [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 would be potential PET ligands for imaging alpha7 nAChRs in the human brain.

  13. Arecoline inhibits interleukin-2 secretion in Jurkat cells by decreasing the expression of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G S; Hu, S; Lin, Y H; Chen, S T; Tang, T K; Wang, P S; Wang, S W

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of arecoline on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, the expression of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), prostaglandin E2(PGE2) protein, and IL-2 mRNA in human lymphocyte cells (Jurkat cell line). The IL-2 and PGE2 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expressions of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and α7-nAChRs were determined by Western blotting. The level of IL-2 mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Arecoline, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly decreased IL-2 and PGE2 secretion by Jurkat cells incubated with 0 or 5 μg/ml 5 μg/ml PHA. PGE2 also significantly inhibited IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, reduced expression of PHA-induced ERK phosphorylation was observed in Jurkat cells treated with arecoline. PHA-enhanced IL-2 mRNA expression was also inhibited by arecoline. These results imply that arecoline inhibits the release of PGE2 and PHA-induced IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells and that these effects seem to occur, at least in part, either through the attenuation of ERK in conjunction with a decrease of PHA-induced IL-2 mRNA expression. These results imply that arecoline inhibits the protein expression of α7-nAChRs , the release of PGE2 and PHA-induced IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells.

  14. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine, partially protects against beta-amyloid1-42 toxicity in primary neuron-enriched cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelley E; de Fiebre, Nancy Ellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2004-10-01

    Studies have suggested that the neuroprotective actions of alpha7 nicotinic agonists arise from activation of receptors and not from the extensive desensitization which rapidly follows activation. Here, we report that the alpha7-selective nicotinic antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA), protects against beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity; whereas the alpha4beta2-selective antagonist, dihydro-beta-erythroidine, does not. These findings suggest that neuroprotective actions of alpha7-acting agents arise from receptor inhibition/desensitization and that alpha7 antagonists may be useful neuroprotective agents.

  15. Molecular imaging of {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: design and evaluation of the potent radioligand [{sup 18}F]NS10743

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    Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Oestergaard Nielsen, Elsebet; Brunicardi Timmermann, Daniel; Peters, Dan [NeuroSearch A/S, Ballerup (Denmark); Steinbach, Joerg [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy, Dresden (Germany); Sabri, Osama [Universitaet Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The outstanding diversity of cellular properties mediated by neuronal and nonneuronal {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChR) points to the diagnostic potential of quantitative nuclear molecular imaging of {alpha}7 nAChR in neurology and oncology. It was our goal to radiolabel the {alpha}7 nAChR agonist 4-[5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-yl]-1,4-diaza-bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane (NS10743) and to assess the selectivity of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding site occupancy in animal experiments. [{sup 18}F]NS10743 was synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the nitro precursor. In vitro receptor affinity and selectivity were assessed by radioligand competition and autoradiography. The radiotracer properties were evaluated in female CD-1 mice by brain autoradiography and organ distribution. Target specificity was validated after treatment with SSR180711 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and metabolic stability was investigated using radio-HPLC. The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 exceeded 150 GBq/{mu}mol at a radiochemical purity >99%. In vitro, NS10743 and [{sup 18}F]NS10743 showed high affinity and specificity towards {alpha}7 nAChR. The brain permeation of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 was fast and sufficient with values of 4.83 and 1.60% injected dose per gram and brain to plasma ratios of 3.83 and 2.05 at 5 and 60 min after radiotracer administration. Brain autoradiography and organ distribution showed target-specific accumulation of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 in brain substructures and various {alpha}7 nAChR-expressing organs. The radiotracer showed a high metabolic stability in vivo with a single polar radiometabolite, which did not cross the blood-brain barrier. The good in vitro and in vivo features of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 make this radioligand a promising candidate for quantitative in vivo imaging of {alpha}7 nAChR expression and encourage further investigations. (orig.)

  16. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target....... Here we investigate the effects of repeated agonism on alpha7 nAChR receptor levels and responsiveness in vivo in rats. Using [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) autoradiography we show that acute or repeated administration with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist A-582941 increases the number of alpha7 n......-120596 and NS1738 do not increase [(125)I]-BTX binding. Furthermore, A-582941-induced increase in Arc and c-fos mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex is enhanced and unaltered, respectively, after repeated administration, demonstrating that the alpha7 nAChRs remain responsive. Contrarily, A-582941...

  17. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim

    2013-01-01

    whether behavioural and GABAergic functional deficits induced by the NMDA receptor channel blocker, phencyclidine (PCP), could be reversed by repeated administration of two drugs known to enhance GABAergic transmission: the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (m......GluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment...... with ADX47273 and SSR180711 decreased the induction of spontaneous inhibitory current caused by acute and direct agonism of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs in slices. These results show that repeated administration of ADX47273 or SSR180711 reverses certain behavioural and functional deficits induced by PCP, likely...

  18. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated interleukin-8 production in Cystic Fibrosis airway epithelial cells via the alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder characterised by chronic inflammation of the airways. The lung manifestations of CF include colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus leading to neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation and tissue damage. Inflammation in the CF lung is initiated by microbial components which activate the innate immune response via Toll-like receptors (TLRs), increasing airway epithelial cell production of proinflammatory mediators such as the neutrophil chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Thus modulation of TLR function represents a therapeutic approach for CF. Nicotine is a naturally occurring plant alkaloid. Although it is negatively associated with cigarette smoking and cardiovascular damage, nicotine also has anti-inflammatory properties. Here we investigate the inhibitory capacity of nicotine against TLR2- and TLR4-induced IL-8 production by CFTE29o- airway epithelial cells, determine the role of alpha7-nAChR (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor) in these events, and provide data to support the potential use of safe nicotine analogues as anti-inflammatories for CF.

  19. Radiosynthesis and in vitro validation of 3H-NS14492 as a novel high affinity alpha7 nicotinic receptor radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Janus H.; Ettrup, Anders; Donat, Cornelius K.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a homo-pentameric ligand-gated ion channel that is a promising drug target for cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We have previously described 11C-NS14492 as a suitable agonist radioligand for in vivo positron......, these findings show that 3H-NS14492 is a useful new in vitro radioligand for the pig alpha 7 nicotinic receptor. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  20. Alpha7 nicotinic receptor mediated protection against ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; King, M A; Grimes, J; Smith, N; de Fiebre, C M; Meyer, E M

    1999-01-16

    Ethanol caused a concentration-dependent loss of PC12 cells over a 24 h interval, accompanied by an increase in intracellular calcium. The specific alpha7 nicotinic receptor partial agonist DMXB attenuated both of these ethanol-induced actions at a concentration (3 microM) found previously to protect against apoptotic and necrotic cell loss. The alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methylylaconitine blocked the neuroprotective action of DMXB when applied with but not 30 min after the agonist. These results indicate that activation of alpha7 nicotinic receptors may be therapeutically useful in preventing ethanol-neurotoxicity. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    AChR binding sites in several brain regions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. The alpha7 nAChR agonists SSR180711 and PNU-282987 also increase [(125)I]-BTX binding, suggesting that this is a general consequence of alpha7 nAChR agonism. Interestingly, the alpha7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators PNU......The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target....... Here we investigate the effects of repeated agonism on alpha7 nAChR receptor levels and responsiveness in vivo in rats. Using [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) autoradiography we show that acute or repeated administration with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist A-582941 increases the number of alpha7 n...

  2. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-Delta2 -isoxazoline derivatives as potent and selective agonists of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallanoce, Clelia; Magrone, Pietro; Matera, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    A set of racemic spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-¿(2) -isoxazoline derivatives was synthesized using a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition-based approach. Target compounds were assayed for binding affinity toward rat neuronal homomeric (a7) and heteromeric (a4ß2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. ¿(2...... in electrophysiological experiments against human a7 and a4ß2 receptors stably expressed in cell lines, behaved as partial a7 agonists with varying levels of potency. The two enantiomers of (±)-3-methoxy-1-oxa-2,7-diaza-7,10-ethanospiro[4.5]dec-2-ene sesquifumarate 6¿a were prepared using (+)-dibenzoyl......-L- or (-)-dibenzoyl-D-tartaric acid as resolving agents. Enantiomer (R)-(-)-6¿a was found to be the eutomer, with K(i) values of 4.6 and 48.7 nM against rat and human a7 receptors, respectively....

  3. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)nACh......R binding in humans and to measure α(7)nAChR occupancy of α(7)nAChR drug candidates. Here, we present the radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of (11)C-NS14492 as a selective α(7)nAChR PET radioligand....

  4. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule a(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled a(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of a(7)nACh......R binding in humans and to measure a(7)nAChR occupancy of a(7)nAChR drug candidates. Here, we present the radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of (11)C-NS14492 as a selective a(7)nAChR PET radioligand....

  5. Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha 7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0144 TITLE: Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha 7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha 7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0144 5c...ABSTRACT Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a polygenic signaling disorder that may result, in part, from an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory

  6. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Play a Predominant Role in the Cholinergic Potentiation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Evoked Firing Responses of Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Cells

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    Zsolt K. Bali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify in vivo electrophysiological correlates of the interaction between cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission underlying memory. Extracellular spike recordings were performed in the hippocampal CA1 region of anesthetized rats in combination with local microiontophoretic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and acetylcholine (ACh. Both NMDA and ACh increased the firing rate of the neurons. Furthermore, the simultaneous delivery of NMDA and ACh resulted in a more pronounced excitatory effect that was superadditive over the sum of the two mono-treatment effects and that was explained by cholinergic potentiation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Next, animals were systemically treated with scopolamine or methyllycaconitine (MLA to assess the contribution of muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR or α7 nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR receptor-mediated mechanisms to the observed effects. Scopolamine totally inhibited ACh-evoked firing, and attenuated the firing rate increase evoked by simultaneous application of NMDA and ACh. However, the superadditive nature of the combined effect was preserved. The α7 nAChR antagonist MLA robustly decreased the firing response to simultaneous application of NMDA and ACh, suspending their superadditive effect, without modifying the tonic firing rate increasing effect of ACh. These results provide the first in vivo electrophysiological evidence that, in the hippocampal CA1 region, α7 nAChRs contribute to pyramidal cell activity mainly through potentiation of glutamatergic signaling, while the direct cholinergic modulation of tonic firing is notably mediated by mAChRs. Furthermore, the present findings also reveal cellular physiological correlates of the interplay between cholinergic and glutamatergic agents in behavioral pharmacological models of cognitive decline.

  7. Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] is a potent ligand for selectively labeling alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Arik J; Whiteaker, Paul; Mohn, Jesse L; Jacob, Michele H; McIntosh, J Michael

    2010-08-01

    The alpha7* (*denotes the possible presence of additional subunits) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype is widely expressed in the vertebrate nervous system and implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders that compromise thought and cognition. In this report, we demonstrate that the recently developed fluorescent ligand Cy3-ArIB[V11L;V16A] labels alpha7 nAChRs in cultured hippocampal neurons. However, photobleaching of this ligand during long image acquisition times prompted us to develop a new derivative. In photostability studies, this new ligand, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A], was significantly more resistant to bleaching than the Cy3 derivative. The classic alpha7 ligand alpha-bungarotoxin binds to alpha1* and alpha9* nAChRs. In contrast, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] potently (IC(50) 1.8 nM) and selectively blocked alpha7 nAChRs but not alpha1* or alpha9* nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Selectivity was further confirmed by competition binding studies of native nAChRs in rat brain membranes. The fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] were assessed using human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably transfected with nAChRs; labeling was observed on cells expressing alpha7 but not cells expressing alpha3beta2, alpha3beta4, or alpha4beta2 nAChRs. Further imaging studies demonstrate that Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] labels hippocampal neurons from wild-type mice but not from nAChR alpha7 subunit-null mice. Thus, Alexa Fluor 546-ArIB[V11L;V16A] represents a potent and selective ligand for imaging alpha7 nAChRs.

  8. Stimulation of Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Attenuates Nicotine-Induced Upregulation of MMP, MCP-1, and RANTES through Modulating ERK1/2/AP-1 Signaling Pathway in RAW264.7 and MOVAS Cells

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    Liping Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation through alpha7 nicotine acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChR signaling had been demonstrated attenuation of inflammation. This study aimed to determine whether PNU-282987, a selective α7-nAChR agonist, affected activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP and inflammatory cytokines in nicotine-treatment RAW264.7 and MOVAS cells and to assess the underlying molecular mechanisms. RAW264.7 and MOVAS cells were treated with nicotine at different concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml for 0–120 min. Nicotine markedly stimulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 and c-Jun in RAW264.7 cells. Pretreatment with U0126 significantly suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and further attenuated nicotine-induced activation of c-Jun and upregulation of MMP-2, MMP-9, monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP- 1, and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES. Similarly, nicotine treatment also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun and expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, MCP-1, and RANTES in MOVAS cells. When cells were pretreated with PNU-282987, nicotine-induced activations of ERK1/2 and c-Jun in RAW264.7 cells and c-Jun in MOVAS cells were effectively inhibited. Furthermore, nicotine-induced secretions of MMP-2, MMP-9, MCP-1, and RANTES were remarkably downregulated. Treatment with α7-nAChR agonist inhibits nicotine-induced upregulation of MMP and inflammatory cytokines through modulating ERK1/2/AP-1 signaling in RAW264.7 cells and AP-1 in MOVAS cells, providing a new therapeutic for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist PNU-282987 [N-[(3R)-1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride] enhances GABAergic synaptic activity in brain slices and restores auditory gating deficits in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajós, M; Hurst, R S; Hoffmann, W E; Krause, M; Wall, T M; Higdon, N R; Groppi, V E

    2005-03-01

    Schizophrenic patients are thought to have an impaired ability to process sensory information. This deficit leads to disrupted auditory gating measured electrophysiologically as a reduced suppression of the second of paired auditoryevoked responses (P50) and is proposed to be associated with decreased function and/or expression of the homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Here, we provide evidence that N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987), a novel selective agonist of the alpha7 nAChR, evoked whole-cell currents from cultured rat hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and enhanced GABAergic synaptic activity when applied to hippocampal slices. Amphetamine-induced sensory gating deficit, determined by auditory-evoked potentials in hippocampal CA3 region, was restored by systemic administration of PNU-282987 in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. Auditory gating of rat reticular thalamic neurons was also disrupted by amphetamine; however, PNU-282987 normalized gating deficit only in a subset of tested neurons (6 of 11). Furthermore, PNU-282987 improved the inherent hippocampal gating deficit occurring in a subpopulation of anesthetized rats, and enhanced amphetamine-induced hippocampal oscillation. We propose that the alpha7 nAChR agonist PNU-282987, via modulating/enhancing hippocampal GABAergic neurotransmission, improves auditory gating and enhances hippocampal oscillatory activity. These results provide further support for the concept that drugs that selectively activate alpha7 nAChRs may offer a novel, potential pharmacotherapy in treatment of schizophrenia.

  10. The alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in a direct inhibitory effect of nicotine on GnRH release: In vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messi, Elio; Pimpinelli, Federica; Andrè, Valentina; Rigobello, Chiara; Gotti, Cecilia; Maggi, Roberto

    2018-01-15

    The activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR) inhibits the reproductive axis; however, it is not clear whether nicotine may directly modulate the release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Experiments carried out in GT1-1 immortalized GnRH neurons reveal the presence of a single class of high affinity α4β2 and α7 nAchR subtypes. The exposure of GT1-1 cells to nicotine does not modify the basal accumulation of GnRH. However, nicotine was found to modify GnRH pulsatility in perifusion experiments and inhibits, the release of GnRH induced by prostaglandin E 1 or by K + -induced cell depolarization; these effects were reversed by D-tubocurarine and α-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, the results reported here indicate that: functional nAChRs are present on GT1-1 cells, the activation of the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive subclass (α7) produces an inhibitory effect on the release of GnRH and that the direct action of nicotine on GnRH neurons may be involved in reducing fertility of smokers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nootropic alpha7 nicotinic receptor allosteric modulator derived from GABAA receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Herman J; Whittemore, Edward R; Tran, Minhtam B; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Broide, Ron S; Johnstone, Timothy B; Zheng, Lijun; Stevens, Karen E; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-05-08

    Activation of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChRs) has broad therapeutic potential in CNS diseases related to cognitive dysfunction, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In contrast to direct agonist activation, positive allosteric modulation of alpha7 nAChRs would deliver the clinically validated benefits of allosterism to these indications. We have generated a selective alpha7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) from a library of GABAA receptor PAMs. Compound 6 (N-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-[[(4-chloro-phenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide) evokes robust positive modulation of agonist-induced currents at alpha7 nAChRs, while preserving the rapid native characteristics of desensitization, and has little to no efficacy at other ligand-gated ion channels. In rodent models, it corrects sensory-gating deficits and improves working memory, effects consistent with cognitive enhancement. Compound 6 represents a chemotype for allosteric activation of alpha7 nAChRs, with therapeutic potential in CNS diseases with cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus rL-RVG enhances the apoptosis and inhibits the migration of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells via regulating alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yulan; Su, Chunxiang; Hang, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhao, Yinghai; Shao, Xiaomei; Bu, Xuefeng

    2017-10-03

    The aim of this study were to investigate the possible pro-apoptotic mechanisms of the recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain rL-RVG, which expresses the rabies virus glycoprotein, in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells via the regulation of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs) and to analyze the relationships between α7 nAChR expression in lung cancer and the clinical pathological features. α7 nAChR expression in A549, LΑ795, and small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells, among others, was detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The optimal α7 nAChR antagonist and agonist concentrations for affecting A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells were detected using MTT assays. The α7 nAChR expression in A549 cells after various treatments was assessed by Western blot, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR analyses. Apoptosis in the various groups was also monitored by Western blot and TUNEL assays, followed by the detection of cell migration via transwell and scratch tests. Furthermore, α7 nAChR expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in lung cancer tissue samples from 130 patients and 40 pericancerous tissue samples, and the apoptotis in lung adenocarcinoma tissue was detected by Tunel assay, Then, the expression levels and clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. Of the A549, LΑ795, SCLC and U251 cell lines, the A549 cells exhibited the highest α7 nAChR expression. The cells infected with rL-RVG exhibited high RVG gene and protein expression. The rL-RVG group exhibited weaker α7 nAChR expression compared with the methyllycaconitine citrate hydrate (MLA, an α7 nAChR antagonist) and NDV groups. At the same time, the MLA and rL-RVG treatments significantly inhibited proliferation and migration and promoted apoptosis in the lung cancer cells (P A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells by regulating α7 nAChR signaling pathways.

  13. The role of alpha-7 nicotinic receptors in food intake behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina L. McFadden

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine alters appetite and energy expenditure, leading to changes in body weight. While the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully established, both central and peripheral involvement of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR has been suggested. Centrally, the α7nAChR modulates activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in food intake regulation, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and neuropeptide Y (NPY. α7nAChRs also modulate glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems controlling reward processes that affect food intake. Additionally, α7nAChRs are important peripheral mediators of chronic inflammation, a key contributor to health problems in obesity. This review focuses on nicotinic cholinergic effects on eating behaviors, specifically those involving the α7nAChR, with the hypothesis that α7nAChR agonism leads to appetite suppression. Recent studies are highlighted that identify links between α7nAChR expression and obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes and describe early findings showing an α7nAChR agonist to be associated with reduced weight gain in a mouse model of diabetes. Given these effects, the α7nAChR may be a useful therapeutic target for strategies to treat and manage obesity.

  14. Septal innervation regulates the function of alpha7 nicotinic receptors in CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Frazier, Charles J; King, Michael A; Meyer, Edwin M; Papke, Roger L

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus receives substantial input from the medial septum/diagonal band of broca (MS/DB) via the fibria-fornix (FF). Projections from the MS/DB innervate hippocampal interneurons that express alpha7 nicotinic receptors and regulate excitation in principal cell populations. In the present report we used stereotaxic surgery, whole-cell patch clamping, and immunohistochemical techniques to evaluate the effects of FF and MS/DB lesions on alpha7 nicotinic receptors in stratum radiatum interneurons. Focal somatic application of ACh (1 mM) evoked methyllycaconitine (MLA)-sensitive currents that were markedly reduced following aspirative lesions of the FF. Reductions in current amplitudes were prevented or restored to levels not significantly different from controls following in vivo treatment with the alpha7-selective agonist GTS-21, and GTS-21 treatment did not change current amplitudes measured in tissue from unlesioned animals. MS/DB injections of the selective cholinergic neurotoxin 192 IgG-saporin did not affect alpha7 receptor currents, although MS/DB ChAT and hippocampal AChE immunolabeling were significantly reduced. In contrast, kainic acid lesions of the MS/DB, potentially more selective for GABAergic projection neurons, produced significant reductions in current amplitudes. These findings are the first to show functional changes in alpha7 receptors following hippocampal denervation and suggest that MS/DB hippocampal innervation regulates functional aspects of hippocampal alpha7 receptors. The results confirm hippocampal alpha7 nicotinic receptors as viable therapeutic targets in diseases that involve degradation of the septohippocampal pathway and may indicate that GABAergic MS/DB hippocampal input plays a more substantial role in the regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor function than MS/DB hippocampal cholinergic input.

  15. Methyllycaconitine prevents methamphetamine-induced effects in mouse striatum: involvement of alpha7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escubedo, Elena; Chipana, Carlos; Pérez-Sánchez, Mónica; Camarasa, Jordi; Pubill, David

    2005-11-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that in rat striatal synaptosomes, methamphetamine (METH)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was prevented by methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific antagonist of alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR). The aim of this study was to test the influence of MLA on acute METH effects and neurotoxicity in mice, using both in vivo and in vitro models. MLA inhibited METH-induced climbing behavior by 50%. Acute effects after 30-min preincubation with 1 microM METH also included a decrease in striatal synaptosome dopamine (DA) uptake, which was prevented by MLA. METH-induced neurotoxicity was assessed in vivo in terms of loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals (73%) and of tyrosine hydroxylase levels (by 90%) at 72 h post-treatment, which was significantly attenuated by MLA. Microglial activation [measured as 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide binding] was also present at 24 h post-treatment and was fully prevented by MLA, tending to confirm its neuroprotective activity. MLA had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. Additionally, flow cytometry assays showed that METH-induced ROS generation occurs inside synaptosomes from mouse striatum. This effect implied release of vesicular DA and was calcium-, neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-, and protein kinase C-dependent. MLA and alpha-bungarotoxin, but not dihydro-beta-erythroidine (an antagonist that blocks nAChR-containing beta2 subunits), fully prevented METH-induced ROS production without affecting vesicular DA uptake. The importance of this study lies not only in the neuroprotective effect elicited by the blockade of the alpha7 nicotinic receptors by MLA but also in that it proposes a new mechanism with which to study METH-induced acute and long-term effects.

  16. Positive allosteric modulator of alpha 7 nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors, PNU-120596 augments the effects of donepezil on learning and memory in aged rodents and non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick M.; Hutchings, Elizabeth J.; Kille, Nancy J.; Chapman, James M.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of novel therapeutic agents for disorders of cognition such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is of paramount importance given the ever-increasing elderly population, however; there is also considerable interest in any strategy that might enhance the clinical efficacy of currently available treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an adjunctive treatment strategy to memory enhancement, namely combining the commonly prescribed acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) donepezil, with a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of α7 nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), PNU-120596. The treatment strategy was evaluated in a (non-spatial) spontaneous novel object recognition (NOR) task in young rats; a water maze spatial learning and recall procedure in aged, cognitively-impaired rats, and a delayed match to sample (working/short term memory) task in aged rhesus monkeys. In all three experiments a similar drug response was observed, namely that donepezil administered alone improved task performance in a dose-dependent manner; that PNU-120596 administered alone was without significant effect, but that the combination of PNU-120596 with a subthreshold dose of donepezil was effective. The positive effect of the drug combination appeared to be α7-nAChR mediated given that it was blocked in the NOR task by the selective α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). Collectively, these data indicate that PNU-120596 increases the effective dose range of donepezil in learning/memory-related tasks in young and age-impaired animal models. The results suggest that α7-nAChR-selective PAMs like PNU-120596 have potential as adjunctive treatments with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., donepezil) for age-related illnesses such as AD as well memory disorders not necessarily associated with advanced age. PMID:23168113

  17. alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene promoter polymorphisms in inbred mice affect expression in a cell type-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, Sharon; Jenkins, Paul M; Lautner, Meeghan A; Iacob, Eli; Crouch, Eric L; Stitzel, Jerry A

    2007-05-04

    Inbred mouse strains display significant differences in their levels of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) expression, as measured by binding of the alpha7-selective antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. Variations in alpha-bungarotoxin binding have been shown to correlate with an animal's sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures and sensory gating. In two inbred mouse strains, C3H/2Ibg (C3H) and DBA/2Ibg (DBA/2), the inter-strain binding differences are linked to a restriction length polymorphism in the alpha7 nAChR gene, Chrna7. Despite this finding, the molecular mechanism(s) through which genetic variability in Chrna7 may contribute to alpha7 nAChR expression differences remains unknown. However, studies of the human alpha7 nAChR gene (CHRNA7) previously have demonstrated that CHRNA7 promoter polymorphisms are associated with differences in promoter activity as well as differences in sensory processing. In the present study, a 947-base pair region of the Chrna7 promoter was cloned from both the C3H and DBA/2 inbred mouse strains in an attempt to identify polymorphisms that may underlie alpha7 nAChR differential expression. Sequence analysis of these fragments identified 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A combination of two of these SNPs affects promoter activity in an in vitro luciferase reporter assay. These results suggest a mechanism through which the Chrna7 promoter genotype may influence interstrain variations in alpha7 nAChR expression.

  18. Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 penetration and neutrophil transmigration across the blood-brain barrier are modulated by alpha7 nicotinic receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chi

    Full Text Available Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, an essential regulator of inflammation, is abundantly expressed in hippocampal neurons, which are vulnerable to bacterial meningitis. However, it is unknown whether α7 nAChR contributes to the regulation of these events. In this report, an aggravating role of α7 nAChR in host defense against meningitic E. coli infection was demonstrated by using α7-deficient (α7(-/- mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC and animal model systems. As shown in our in vitro and in vivo studies, E. coli K1 invasion and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN transmigration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB were significantly reduced in α7(-/- BMEC and α7(-/- mice. Stimulation by nicotine was abolished in the α7(-/- cells and animals. The same blocking effect was achieved by methyllycaconitine (α7 antagonist. The tight junction molecules occludin and ZO-1 were significantly reduced in the brain cortex of wildtype mice infected with E. coli and treated with nicotine, compared to α7(-/- cells and animals. Decreased neuronal injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was observed in α7(-/- mice with meningitis. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and RANTES and adhesion molecules (CD44 and ICAM-1 were significantly reduced in the cerebrospinal fluids of the α7(-/- mice with E. coli meningitis. Furthermore, α7 nAChR is the major calcium channel for nicotine- and E. coli K1-increased intracellular calcium concentrations of mouse BMEC. Taken together, our data suggest that α7 nAChR plays a detrimental role in the host defense against meningitic infection by modulation of pathogen invasion, PMN recruitment, calcium signaling and neuronal inflammation.

  19. Differential immediate and sustained memory enhancing effects of alpha7 nicotinic receptor agonists and allosteric modulators in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; El-Sayed, Mona; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    of repeated administration of α7 nAChR agonists. We further compare the effect of agonists to that of α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), which do not induce upregulation of the α7 nAChR. Using the social discrimination test as a measure of short-term memory, we show that the α7 nAChR agonist A......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a potential target for the treatment of cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia, ADHD and Alzheimer's disease. Here we test the hypothesis that upregulation of α7 nAChR levels underlies the enhanced and sustained procognitive effect......-582941 improves short-term memory immediately after repeated (7× daily), but not a single administration. The α7 nAChR PAMs PNU-120596 and AVL-3288 do not affect short-term memory immediately after a single or repeated administration. This demonstrates a fundamental difference in the behavioral effects...

  20. Differential immediate and sustained memory enhancing effects of alpha7 nicotinic receptor agonists and allosteric modulators in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten S Thomsen

    Full Text Available The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR is a potential target for the treatment of cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia, ADHD and Alzheimer's disease. Here we test the hypothesis that upregulation of α7 nAChR levels underlies the enhanced and sustained procognitive effect of repeated administration of α7 nAChR agonists. We further compare the effect of agonists to that of α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs, which do not induce upregulation of the α7 nAChR. Using the social discrimination test as a measure of short-term memory, we show that the α7 nAChR agonist A-582941 improves short-term memory immediately after repeated (7× daily, but not a single administration. The α7 nAChR PAMs PNU-120596 and AVL-3288 do not affect short-term memory immediately after a single or repeated administration. This demonstrates a fundamental difference in the behavioral effects of agonists and PAMs that may be relevant for clinical development. Importantly, A-582941 and AVL-3288 increase short-term memory 24 hrs after repeated, but not a single, administration, suggesting that repeated administration of both agonists and PAMs may produce sustained effects on cognitive performance. Subsequent [(125I]-bungarotoxin autoradiography revealed no direct correlation between α7 nAChR levels in frontal cortical or hippocampal brain regions and short-term memory with either compound. Additionally, repeated treatment with A-582941 did not affect mRNA expression of RIC-3 or the lynx-like gene products lynx1, lynx2, PSCA, or Ly6H, which are known to affect nAChR function. In conclusion, both α7 nAChR agonists and PAMs exhibit sustained pro-cognitive effects after repeated administration, and altered levels of the α7 nAChR per se, or that of endogenous regulators of nAChR function, are likely not the major cause of this effect.

  1. HUMAN ALPHA-7 NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES ARE INHIBITED BY TRICHLOROETHYLENE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a volatile organic solvent (VOC) that is used as a metal degreasing agent and in paints and glue. In addition to being a commonly abused inhalant, run-off from hazardous waste sites contain enough TCE and other VOCs to contaminate ground water and near...

  2. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    concern in the development of alpha(7) nAChR agonists as putative drugs. Our review of the existing literature shows that development of tolerance to the behavioral effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists does not occur in animal models or humans. However, the long-term memory-enhancing effects seen in animal......AChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major...... preclinical evaluation of alpha(7) nAChR activation. It is therefore important to consider the translational power of the animal models used before entering into a clinical evaluation of the pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation....

  3. Alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2003-11-01

    The alpha(7)-selective nicotinic partial agonist 3-[2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene]anabaseine (DMXB) was examined for its ability to modulate ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat neurons. Primary cultures of hippocampal neurons were established from Long-Evans, embryonic day (E)-18 rat fetuses and maintained for 7 days. Ethanol (0-150 mM), DMXB (0-56 microM), or both were subsequently co-applied to cultures. Ethanol was added two additional times to the cultures to compensate for evaporation. After 5 days, neuronal viability was assessed with the MTT cell proliferation assay. Results demonstrated that ethanol reduces neuronal viability in a concentration-dependent fashion and that DMXB protects against this ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, also in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results support the suggestion that nicotinic partial agonists may be useful in treating binge drinking-induced neurotoxicity and may provide clues as to why heavy drinkers are usually smokers.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin against ischemia is partially mediated by alpha-7 nicotinic receptor modulation and HO-1 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Esther; Buendia, Izaskun; León, Rafael; Negredo, Pilar; Romero, Alejandro; Cuadrado, Antonio; López, Manuela G; Egea, Javier

    2014-03-01

    Melatonin has been widely studied as a protective agent against oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuroprotection in neurodegeneration and ischemic stroke are not yet well understood. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective/antioxidant mechanism of action of melatonin in organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) as well as in photothrombotic stroke model in vivo. Melatonin (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) incubated postoxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) showed a concentration-dependent protection; maximum protection was achieved at 10 μM (90% protection). Next, OHCs were exposed to 10 μM melatonin at different post-OGD times; the protective effect of melatonin was maintained at 0, 1, and 2 hr post-OGD treatment, but it was lost at 6 hr post-OGD. The protective effect of melatonin and the reduction in OGD-induced ROS were prevented by luzindole (melatonin antagonist) and α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt, a selective α7 nAChR antagonist). In Nrf2 knockout mice, the protective effect of melatonin was reduced by 40% compared with controls. Melatonin, incubated 0, 1, and 2 hr post-OGD, increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and this overexpression was prevented by luzindole and α-bungarotoxin. Finally, administration of 15 mg/kg melatonin following the induction of photothrombotic stroke in vivo, reduced infarct size (50%), and improved motor skills; this effect was partially lost in 0.1 mg/kg methyllycaconitine (MLA, selective α7 nAChR antagonist)-treated mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that postincubation of melatonin provides a protective effect that, at least in part, depends on nicotinic receptor activation and overexpression of HO-1. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nicotine enhances expression of the alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 7 nicotinic receptors modulating calcium metabolism and regulating adhesion and motility of respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, S; Ndoye, A; Nguyen, V T; Grando, S A

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of direct toxic effects of nicotine (Nic) on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) suggested by our previous findings of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the epithelial cells lining mucocutaneous membranes. We now demonstrate for the first time that human and murine BEC both in vivo and in vitro express functional nAChRs, and that classic alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 7 subunits can contribute to formation of these acetylcholine-gated ion channels. In human bronchial and mouse lung tissues, and in cultures of human BEC, the nAChRs were visualized by subunit-specific antibodies on the cell membranes, particularly at the sites of cell-to-cell contacts. The epithelial cells of submucosal glands abundantly expressed alpha 7 nAChRs. Smoking significantly (p epithelial nAChRs apparently involve regulation of cell-to-cell communications, adhesion and motility, because Mec caused rapid and profound changes in these cell functions which were reversible by Nic. An over exposure of BEC to Nic, however, produced an antagonist-like effect, suggesting that the pathobiological effects of Nic toxicity might result from both activation of nAChR channels and nAChR desensitization. We conclude that medical consequences of smoking can be mediated by direct toxic effects of inhaled Nic on the respiratory tissues wherein Nic specifically binds to and activates the nicotinic ion channels present on the cell surfaces of BEC. We believe that outside the neural system Nic interferes with functioning of non-neuronal cholinergic networks by displacing from nAChR its natural ligand acetylcholine which acts as a local hormone or cytokine in a variety of non-neuronal locations.

  6. The alpha7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 increases activity regulated cytoskeleton protein (Arc) gene expression in the prefrontal cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Hansen, Henrik H

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR) have been shown to enhance attentional function and aspects of memory function in experimental models and in man. The protein Arc encoded by the effector immediate early gene arc or arg3.1 has been shown to be strongly implicated in long......-term memory function. We have sought to determine if alpha7 nAChR mediate the stimulation of arc gene expression, and if so, where in the brain such activation may occur using semi-quantitative in situ hybridisation. Administration of the novel and selective alpha7 nAChR agonist, SSR180711 (1, 3 and 10 mg...

  7. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist A-582941 activates immediate early genes in limbic regions of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M S; Mikkelsen, J D; Timmermann, D B

    2008-01-01

    and adult rat forebrain using two markers, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and c-Fos, to map neuronal activity. Acute administration of A-582941 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent increase in Arc mRNA expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventral....../lateral orbitofrontal (VO/LO) cortex of juvenile, but not adult rats. This effect was mitigated by the alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine. A-582941 also increased c-Fos mRNA expression in the mPFC of juvenile, but not adult rats. Furthermore, A-582941 increased the number of Arc and c-Fos immunopositive cells...... in the mPFC, VO/LO, and shell of the nucleus accumbens, in both juvenile and adult rats. The A-582941-induced c-Fos protein expression was significantly greater in the mPFC and VO/LO of juvenile compared with adult rats. These data indicate that A-582941-induced alpha7 nAChR stimulation activates brain...

  8. Endogenous acetylcholine modulates impulsive action via alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Ohmura, Yu; Izumi, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Taku; Yoshida, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2010-09-01

    Nicotine has been well established as an impulsive action-inducing agent, but it remains unknown whether endogenous acetylcholine affects impulsive action via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In the present study, the 3-choice serial reaction time task (3-CSRTT), a simple and valid assessment of impulsive action, was employed. Male Wistar/ST rats were trained to detect and respond to 1-s flashes of light presented in one of three holes until stable performance was achieved. Following training on the 3-CSRTT, rats received intracerebroventricular injections of the preferential alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE; 0, 3, 10, and 30 microg) or the selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 0, 3, 10, and 30 microg) 5 min before test sessions. Injection of 10 microg of DHbetaE significantly suppressed premature responses, an index of impulsive-like action, without changing other behavioral parameters. On the other hand, MLA infusions failed to affect impulsive-like action at any dose. These results suggest that the central alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that enable a provoking effect of endogenous acetylcholine play a critical role in impulsive action. Substances that modulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, especially the alpha4beta2 subtype, may be beneficial for the treatment of psychiatric disorders characterized by lack of inhibitory control. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Allosteric modulation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by HEPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, Maegan M; Huang, Yanzhou; Schulte, Marvin K

    2014-06-05

    A number of new positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been reported that enhance responses of neuronal alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes to orthosteric ligands. PAMs represent promising new leads for the development of therapeutic agents for disorders involving alterations in nicotinic neurotransmission including Autism, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. During our recent studies of alpha4beta2 PAMs, we identified a novel effect of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES). The effects of HEPES were evaluated in a phosphate buffered recording solution using two-electrode voltage clamp techniques and alpha4beta2 and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine induced responses of high-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors were potentiated 190% by co-exposure to HEPES. Responses were inhibited at higher concentrations (bell-shaped concentration/response curve). Coincidentally, at concentrations of HEPES typically used in oocyte recording (5-10mM), the potentiating effects of HEPES are matched by its inhibitory effects, thus producing no net effect. Mutagenesis results suggest HEPES potentiates the high-sensitivity stoichiometry of the alpha4beta2 receptors through action at the beta2+/beta2- interface and is dependent on residue beta2D218. HEPES did not potentiate low-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors and did not produce any observable effect on acetylcholine induced responses on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Allosteric modulation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by HEPES✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, Maegan M; Huang, Yanzhou; Schulte, Marvin K

    2013-01-01

    A number of new positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been reported that enhance responses of neuronal alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes to orthosteric ligands. PAMs represent promising new leads for the development of therapeutic agents for disorders involving alterations in nicotinic neurotransmission including Autism, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. During our recent studies of alpha4beta2 PAMs, we identified a novel effect of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES). The effects of HEPES were evaluated in a phosphate buffered recording solution using two-electrode voltage clamp techniques and alpha4beta2 and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine induced responses of high-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors were potentiated 190% by co-exposure to HEPES. Responses were inhibited at higher concentrations (bell-shaped concentration/response curve). Coincidentally, at concentrations of HEPES typically used in oocyte recording (5–10 mM), the potentiating effects of HEPES are matched by its inhibitory effects, thus producing no net effect. Mutagenesis results suggest HEPES potentiates the high-sensitivity stoichiometry of the alpha4beta2 receptors through action at the beta2+/beta2− interface and is dependent on residue beta2D218. HEPES did not potentiate low-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors and did not produce any observable effect on acetylcholine induced responses on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:22732654

  11. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  12. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Temporal Memory: Synergistic Effects of Combining Prenatal Choline and Nicotine on Reinforcement-Induced Resetting of an Interval Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that prenatal choline supplementation could increase the precision of timing and temporal memory and facilitate simultaneous temporal processing in mature and aged rats. In the present study, we investigated the ability of adult rats to selectively control the reinforcement-induced resetting of an internal clock as a function…

  13. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11-labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)]. E-mail: swkim@bnl.gov; Ding Yushin [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Alexoff, David [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Patel, Vinal [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Logan, Jean [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lin, K.-S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Carter, Pauline [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); King, Payton [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Constanzo, Jasmine R. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Ciaccio, James A. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Introduction: (3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3'-bipyridine (GTS-21), a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. Methods: We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with positron emission tomography (PET). Results: Both [2-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1 to 3.5 min (0.027-0.038%ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t {sub 1/2}<15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21), which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole-body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. Conclusions: The major findings are as follows: (a) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 from the brain, which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (b) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21

  14. Differential Modulation of GABAA and NMDA Receptors by an α7-nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist in Chronic Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujiao Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA release by an alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR agonist promotes retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival and function, as suggested by a previous study on a chronic glaucomatous model from our laboratory. However, the role of excitatory and inhibitory amino acid receptors and their interaction with α7-nAChR in physiological and glaucomatous events remains unknown. In this study, we investigated GABAA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor activity in control and glaucomatous retinal slices and the regulation of amino acid receptor expression and function by α7-nAChR. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from RGCs revealed that the α7-nAChR specific agonist PNU-282987 enhanced the amplitude of currents elicited by GABA and reduced the amplitude of currents elicited by NMDA. The positive modulation of GABAA receptor and the negative modulation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR by PNU-282987-evoked were prevented by pre-administration of the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. The frequency and the amplitude of glutamate receptor-mediated miniature glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs were not significantly different between the control and glaucomatous RGCs. Additionally, PNU-282987-treated slices showed no alteration in the frequency or amplitude of mEPSCs relative to control RGCs. Moreover, we showed that expression of the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor was downregulated and the expression of the NMDAR NR2B subunit was upregulated by intraocular pressure (IOP elevation, and the changes of high IOP were blocked by PNU-282987. In conclusion, retina GABAA and NMDARs are modulated positively and negatively, respectively, by activation of α7-nAChR in in vivo chronic glaucomatous models.

  15. Kinetic properties and open probability of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesti, Krisztina; Szabo, Anett K; Mike, Arpad; Vizi, E Sylvester

    2014-06-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has some peculiar kinetic properties. From the literature of α7 nAChR-mediated currents we concluded that experimentally measured kinetic properties reflected properties of the solution exchange system, rather than genuine kinetic properties of the receptors. We also concluded that all experimentally measured EC50 values for agonists must inherently be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the undistorted kinetic properties of α7 nAChRs, and to construct an improved kinetic model, which can also serve as a basis of modeling the effect of the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596, as it is described in the accompanying paper. Agonist-evoked currents were recorded from GH4C1 cells stably transfected with pCEP4/rat α7 nAChR using patch-clamp and fast solution exchange. We used two approaches to circumvent the problem of insufficient solution exchange rate: extrapolation and kinetic modeling. First, using different solution exchange rates we recorded evoked currents, and extrapolated their amplitude and kinetics to instantaneous solution exchange. Second, we constructed a kinetic model that reproduced concentration-dependence and solution exchange rate-dependence of receptors, and then we simulated receptor behavior at experimentally unattainably fast solution exchange. We also determined open probabilities during choline-evoked unmodulated and modulated currents using nonstationary fluctuation analysis. The peak open probability of 10 mM choline-evoked currents was 0.033 ± 0.006, while in the presence of choline (10 mM) and PNU-120596 (10 μM), it was increased to 0.599 ± 0.058. Our kinetic model could adequately reproduce low open probability, fast kinetics, fast recovery and solution exchange rate-dependent kinetics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Docking to flexible nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Bruun, Anne T; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and other members of the Cys-loop receptor family is complicated by the flexibility of the so-called C-loop. As observed in the large number of published crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a structural...

  17. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  18. Cholinergic receptor alterations in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chinthu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many areas of the cerebral cortex process sensory information or coordinate motor output necessary for control of movement. Disturbances in cortical cholinergic system can affect locomotor coordination. Spinal cord injury causes severe motor impairment and disturbances in cholinergic signalling can aggravate the situation. Considering the impact of cortical cholinergic firing in locomotion, we focussed the study in understanding the cholinergic alterations in cerebral cortex during spinal cord injury. The gene expression of key enzymes in cholinergic pathway - acetylcholine esterase and choline acetyl transferase showed significant upregulation in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured group compared to control with the fold increase in expression of acetylcholine esterase prominently higher than cholineacetyl transferase. The decreased muscarinic receptor density and reduced immunostaining of muscarinic receptor subtypes along with down regulated gene expression of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor subtypes accounts for dysfunction of metabotropic acetylcholine receptors in spinal cord injury group. Ionotropic acetylcholine receptor alterations were evident from the decreased gene expression of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors and reduced immunostaining of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in confocal imaging. Our data pin points the disturbances in cortical cholinergic function due to spinal cord injury; which can augment the locomotor deficits. This can be taken into account while devising a proper therapeutic approach to manage spinal cord injury.

  19. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs...

  20. Strychnine, but not PMBA, inhibits neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed by rabbit retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, J M; Strang, C E; Amthor, F R; Keyser, K T

    2007-01-01

    Strychnine is considered a selective competitive antagonist of glycine gated Cl- channels (Saitoh et al., 1994) and studies have used strychnine at low micromolar concentrations to study the role of glycine in rabbit retina (Linn, 1998; Protti et al., 2005). However, other studies have shown that strychnine, in the concentrations commonly used, is also a potent competitive antagonist of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; Matsubayashi et al., 1998). We tested the effects of low micromolar concentrations of strychnine and 3-[2'-phosphonomethyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl] alanine (PMBA), a specific glycine receptor blocker (Saitoh et al., 1994; Hosie et al., 1999) on the activation of both alpha7 nAChRs on retinal ganglion cells and on ganglion cell responses to a light flash. Extracellular recordings were obtained from ganglion cells in an isolated retina/choroid preparation and 500 microM choline was used as an alpha7 agonist (Alkondon et al., 1997). We recorded from brisk sustained and brisk transient OFF cells, many of which have been previously shown to have alpha7 receptors (Strang et al., 2005). Further, we tested the effect of strychnine, PMBA and alpha-bungarotoxin on the binding of tetramethylrhodamine alpha-bungarotoxin in the inner plexiform layer. Our data indicates that strychnine, at doses as low as 1.0 microM, can inhibit the alpha7 nAChR-mediated response to choline, but PMBA at concentrations as high as 0.4 microM does not. Binding studies show strychnine and alpha-bungarotoxin inhibit binding of labeled alpha-bungarotoxin in the IPL. Thus, the effects of strychnine application may be to inhibit glycine receptors expressed by ganglion cell or to inhibit amacrine cell alpha7 nAChRs, both of which would result in an increase in the ganglion cell responses. Further research will be required to disentangle the effects of strychnine previously believed to be caused by a single mechanism of glycine receptor inhibition.

  1. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  2. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860 ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. External Imaging of Cerebral Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, William C.; Reba, Richard C.; Rzeszotarski, Waclaw J.; Gibson, Raymond E.; Hill, Thomas; Holman, B. Leonard; Budinger, Thomas; Conklin, James J.; Eng, Robert; Grissom, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  4. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-06

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  6. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote...... as an increasing pipeline of specific drug candidates, enabling a more subtle manipulation of α7 nAChR function, may facilitate α7 nAChR drug development efforts....

  7. Acetylcholine α7 nicotinic and dopamine D2 receptors are targeted to many of the same postsynaptic dendrites and astrocytes in the rodent prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Aine M; Fitzgerald, Megan L; Chan, June; Robinson, Danielle C; Milner, Teresa A; Mackie, Kenneth; Pickel, Virginia M

    2011-12-01

    The alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and the dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2) R) are both implicated in attentional processes and cognition, mediated in part through the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We examined the dual electron microscopic immunolabeling of α7nAChR and either D(2) R or the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in rodent PFC to assess convergent functional activation sites. Immunoreactivity (ir) for α7nAChR and/or D(2) R was seen in the same as well as separate neuronal and glial profiles. At least half of the dually labeled profiles were somata and dendrites, while most labeled axon terminals expressed only D(2) R-ir. The D(2) R-labeled terminals were without synaptic specializations or formed inhibitory or excitatory-type synapses with somatodendritic profiles, some of which expressed the α7nAChR and/or D(2) R. Astrocytic glial processes comprised the majority of nonsomatodendritic α7nAChR or α7nAChR and D(2) R-labeled profiles. Glial processes containing α7nAChR-ir were frequently located near VAChT-labeled terminals and also showed perisynaptic and perivascular associations. We conclude that in rodent PFC α7nACh and D(2) R activation can dually modulate (1) postsynaptic dendritic responses within the same or separate but synaptically linked neurons in which the D(2) R has the predominately presynaptic distribution, and (2) astrocytic signaling that may be crucial for synaptic transmission and functional hyperemia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. In vitro pharmacological characterization of a novel selective alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist ABT-107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malysz, John; Anderson, David J; Grønlien, Jens H; Ji, Jianguo; Bunnelle, William H; Håkerud, Monika; Thorin-Hagene, Kirten; Ween, Hilde; Helfrich, Rosalind; Hu, Min; Gubbins, Earl; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Briggs, Clark A; Li, Jinhe; Meyer, Michael D; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Timmermann, Daniel B; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2010-09-01

    Enhancement of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity is considered a therapeutic approach for ameliorating cognitive deficits present in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In this study, we describe the in vitro profile of a novel selective alpha7 nAChR agonist, 5-(6-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2,2,2]oct-3-yloxy]pyridazin-3-yl)-1H-indole (ABT-107). ABT-107 displayed high affinity binding to alpha7 nAChRs [rat or human cortex, [(3)H](1S,4S)-2,2-dimethyl-5-(6-phenylpyridazin-3-yl)-5-aza-2-azoniabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane (A-585539), K(i) = 0.2-0.6 nM or [(3)H]methyllycaconitine (MLA), 7 nM] that was at least 100-fold selective versus non-alpha7 nAChRs and other receptors. Functionally, ABT-107 did not evoke detectible currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing human or nonhuman alpha3beta4, chimeric (alpha6/alpha3)beta4, or 5-HT(3A) receptors, and weak or negligible Ca(2+) responses in human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells (alpha3* function) and human alpha4beta2 and alpha4beta4 nAChRs expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. ABT-107 potently evoked human and rat alpha7 nAChR current responses in oocytes (EC(50), 50-90 nM total charge, approximately 80% normalized to acetylcholine) that were enhanced by the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) 4-[5-(4-chloro-phenyl)-2-methyl-3-propionyl-pyrrol-1-yl]-benzenesulfonamide (A-867744). In rat hippocampus, ABT-107 alone evoked alpha7-like currents, which were inhibited by the alpha7 antagonist MLA. In dentate gyrus granule cells, ABT-107 enhanced spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current activity when coapplied with A-867744. In the presence of an alpha7 PAM [A-867744 or N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-120596)], the addition of ABT-107 elicited MLA-sensitive alpha7 nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signals in IMR-32 cells and rat cortical cultures and enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in differentiated PC-12 cells. ABT-107 was also effective in protecting rat

  9. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  10. THE NATURE OF ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. TASHAYOD

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work with consideratlon to the autoradiographic pictures, suggests that cholinergic receptors are located at the gate of a channel originating from synaptic cleft coming to lie within the muscle fibre. AChE molecules stand at the gate of this channel,controlling the entrance of different cholinergic agents. It was report- ••• ed previously that dtc molecules s t.abD ;:.2e the AChE rnolecules and will obstruct the gate. This blocks the acess of ionic flux within the channel thus producing a non-depolarizing neuromuscular paralysis.The presented experiments imply that depolarizing agent will bring a considerable change in conformation of AChE mole cule and this causes the opening of the gate allowing ioni flux and depolarization .In case of ACh this process is repeated in a fraction of milli second, due to rapid regeneration of AChE while in case of suxamethonium and neostigmine(given in high dose, the regeneration of AChE takes much longer time thus will produce a depolarizing blockade. In this hypothepis the main responsa~ility of AChE"nis confined to identification of cholinergic agents and Cooperation in their function so,it can be accepted as Cholinergic receptor. In regard to clinic, this work suggests that only the use of minimum effective dose of neostigmine is advisable, in reversing curarisation. In contrast to general belief , the dose of neostigmine should be s elec t ed in relation to r eceptor dtc occupation and not depending on pati ent 's weight . As it was demonstrated , the early use"nof high dose o f neostigmine may a lso potent i a te curar i s a tion

  11. In vivo pharmacological characterization of a novel selective alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist ABT-107: preclinical considerations in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, R Scott; Bunnelle, William H; Decker, Michael W; Drescher, Karla U; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Markosyan, Stella; Marsh, Kennan C; Nikkel, Arthur L; Browman, Kaitlin; Radek, Rich; Anderson, David J; Buccafusco, Jerry; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2010-09-01

    We previously reported that alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonism produces efficacy in preclinical cognition models correlating with activation of cognitive and neuroprotective signaling pathways associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In the present studies, the selective and potent alpha7 nAChR agonist 5-(6-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yloxy] pyridazin-3-yl)-1H-indole (ABT-107) was evaluated in behavioral assays representing distinct cognitive domains. Studies were also conducted to address potential issues that may be associated with the clinical development of an alpha7 nAChR agonist. Specifically, ABT-107 improved cognition in monkey delayed matching to sample, rat social recognition, and mouse two-trial inhibitory avoidance, and continued to improve cognitive performance at injection times when exposure levels continued to decline. Rats concurrently infused with ABT-107 and donepezil at steady-state levels consistent with clinical exposure showed improved short-term recognition memory. Compared with nicotine, ABT-107 did not produce behavioral sensitization in rats or exhibit psychomotor stimulant activity in mice. Repeated (3 days) daily dosing of ABT-107 increased extracellular cortical acetylcholine in rats, whereas acute administration increased cortical extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in mice, neurochemical and biochemical events germane to cognitive function. ABT-107 increased cortical phosphorylation of the inhibitory residue (Ser9) of glycogen synthase kinase-3, a primary tau kinase associated with AD pathology. In addition, continuous infusion of ABT-107 in tau/amyloid precursor protein transgenic AD mice reduced spinal tau hyperphosphorylation. These findings show that targeting alpha7 nAChRs may have potential utility for symptomatic alleviation and slowing of disease progression in the treatment AD, and expand the understanding of the potential

  12. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. Modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by strychnine

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Colunga, Jesús; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Strychnine, a potent and selective antagonist at glycine receptors, was found to inhibit muscle (α1β1γδ, α1β1γ, and α1β1δ) and neuronal (α2β2 and α2β4) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AcChoRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Strychnine alone (up to 500 μM) did not elicit membrane currents in oocytes expressing AcChoRs, but, when applied before, concomitantly, or during superfusion of acetylcholine (AcCho), it rapidly and reversibly inhibited the current elicited by AcCho (AcCho-current). Although in the three cases the AcCho-current was reduced to the same level, its recovery was slower when the oocytes were preincubated with strychnine. The amount of AcCho-current inhibition depended on the receptor subtype, and the order of blocking potency by strychnine was α1β1γδ > α2β4 > α2β2. With the three forms of drug application, the Hill coefficient was close to one, suggesting a single site for the receptor interaction with strychnine, and this interaction appears to be noncompetitive. The inhibitory effects on muscle AcChoRs were voltage-independent, and the apparent dissociation constant for AcCho was not appreciably changed by strychnine. In contrast, the inhibitory effects on neuronal AcChoRs were voltage-dependent, with an electrical distance of ≈0.35. We conclude that strychnine regulates reversibly and noncompetitively the embryonic type of muscle AcChoR and some forms of neuronal AcChoRs. In the former case, strychnine presumably inhibits allosterically the receptor by binding at an external domain whereas, in the latter case, it blocks the open receptor-channel complex. PMID:10097172

  14. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  15. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  16. Therapeutic potential of α7 nicotinic receptor agonists to regulate neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Laura Foucault-Fruchard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, are all characterized by a component of innate immunity called neuroinflammation. Neuronal loss and neuroinflammation are two phenomena closely linked. Hence, the neuroinflammation is a relevant target for the management of the neurodegenerative diseases given that, to date, there is no treatment to stop neuronal loss. Several studies have investigated the potential effects of activators of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system. After activation, they seem to mediate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the brain. This anti-inflammatory pathway, first described in periphery, regulates activation of microglial cells considered as the resident macrophage population of the central nervous system. In this article, we shortly review the agonists of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that have been evaluated in vivo and we focused on the selective positive allosteric modulators of these receptors. These compounds represent a key element to enhance receptor activity only in the presence of the endogenous agonist.

  17. Molecular recognition of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by an acetylcholine binding protein reveals determinants of binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette S

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and homologues, details of acetylcholine binding are not completely resolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of acetylcholine bound to the receptor homologue acetylcholine binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis. This is the first structure of acetylcholine in a binding pocket containing all five aromatic residues conserved in all mammalian nAChRs. The ligand-protein interactions are characterized by contacts to the aromatic box formed primarily by residues on the principal side of the intersubunit binding interface (residues Tyr89, Trp143 and Tyr185). Besides these interactions on the principal side, we observe a cation-π interaction between acetylcholine and Trp53 on the complementary side and a water-mediated hydrogen bond from acetylcholine to backbone atoms of Leu102 and Met114, both of importance for anchoring acetylcholine to the complementary side. To further study the role of Trp53, we mutated the corresponding tryptophan in the two different acetylcholine-binding interfaces of the widespread α4β2 nAChR, i.e. the interfaces α4(+)β2(-) and α4(+)α4(-). Mutation to alanine (W82A on the β2 subunit or W88A on the α4 subunit) significantly altered the response to acetylcholine measured by oocyte voltage-clamp electrophysiology in both interfaces. This shows that the conserved tryptophan residue is important for the effects of ACh at α4β2 nAChRs, as also indicated by the crystal structure. The results add important details to the understanding of how this neurotransmitter exerts its action and improves the foundation for rational drug design targeting these receptors.

  18. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, α7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol (β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE 2 and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE 2 induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not α-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis

  19. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

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    Eline K. M. Lebbe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV, potassium- (KV, and calcium- (CaV channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action of several conotoxins has been the subject of investigation, while for many others this remains unknown. This review aims to give an overview of the knowledge we have today on the molecular pharmacology of conotoxins specifically interacting with nAChRs along with the structure–function relationship data.

  20. Activation of muscarinic receptors by non-neuronal acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz Karl; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-01-01

    The biological role of acetylcholine and the cholinergic system is revisited based particularly on scientific research early and late in the last century. On the one hand, acetylcholine represents the classical neurotransmitter, whereas on the other hand, acetylcholine and the pivotal components of the cholinergic system (high-affinity choline uptake, choline acetyltransferase and its end product acetylcholine, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and esterase) are expressed by more or less all mammalian cells, i.e. by the majority of cells not innervated by neurons at all. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that acetylcholine and "cholinergic receptors" are expressed in non-neuronal organisms such as plants and protists. Acetylcholine is even synthesized by bacteria and algae representing an extremely old signalling molecule on the evolutionary timescale. The following article summarizes examples, in which non-neuronal acetylcholine is released from primitive organisms as well as from mammalian non-neuronal cells and binds to muscarinic receptors to modulate/regulate phenotypic cell functions via auto-/paracrine pathways. The examples demonstrate that non-neuronal acetylcholine and the non-neuronal cholinergic system are vital for various types of cells such as epithelial, endothelial and immune cells.

  1. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    of such compounds in vivo is highly dependent on α7 nAChR-interacting proteins, such as RIC-3 and lynx1, which modulate expression and function of the receptor. These regulatory proteins are often not expressed in in vitro models used to study α7 nAChR function, and it is not known to what extent they are involved......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...... and proteins regulate expression and function of the α7 nAChR. Drug development efforts have hitherto focused on direct manipulation of the α7 nAChR, but it is still not clear, whether agonism/antagonism or allosteric modulation is preferable as a potential drug therapy. In addition, the action...

  2. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modal gating of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Ridhima

    Many ion channels exhibit multiple patterns of kinetic activity in single-channel currents. This behavior is rare in WT mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), where A2C↔A2O gating events are well-described by single exponentials. Also, single-channel open probability (PO) is essentially homogeneous at a given agonist concentration in the WT receptors. Here I report that perturbations of almost all the residues in loop C (alpha188-alpha199, at the agonist binding site) generate heterogeneity in PO ('modes'). Such unsettled activity was apparent with an alanine substitution at all positions in loop C (except alphaY190 and alphaY198) and with different side chain substitutions at alphaP197 for both adult- and fetal-type AChRs. I used single channel electrophysiology along with site-directed mutagenesis to study modal gating in AChRs consequent to mutations/deletions in loop C. The multiple patterns of kinetic activity arose from the difference in agonist affinity rather than in intrinsic AChR gating. Out of the four different agonists used to study the modal behavior, acetylcholine (ACh) showed a higher degree of kinetic heterogeneity compared to others. The time constant for switching between modes was long (~mins), suggesting that they arise from alternative, stable protein conformations. By studying AChRs having only 1 functional binding site, I attempted to find the source of the affinity difference, which was traced mainly to the alphadelta agonist site. Affinity at the neurotransmitter binding site is mainly determined by a core of five aromatic residues (alphaY93, alphaW149, alphaY190, alphaY198 and deltaW57). Phenylalanine substitutions at all aromatic residues except alphaY93 resulted in elimination of modes. Modes were also eliminated by alanine mutation at deltaW57 on the complementary side but not at other aromatics. Also, by substituting four gamma subunit residues into the delta subunit on the complementary beta sheet, I found that

  4. Cholinergic modulation of dopamine pathways through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, S.F.; Mansvelder, H.D.; de Vries, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine addiction is highly prevalent in current society and is often comorbid with other diseases. In the central nervous system, nicotine acts as an agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and its effects depend on location and receptor composition. Although nicotinic receptors are

  5. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment.

  6. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...... and proteins regulate expression and function of the α7 nAChR. Drug development efforts have hitherto focused on direct manipulation of the α7 nAChR, but it is still not clear, whether agonism/antagonism or allosteric modulation is preferable as a potential drug therapy. In addition, the action...... with these different types of compounds. Finally, we describe the special case of Aβ1-42 binding to the α7 nAChR, which may pose a unique challenge to drug development of α7 nAChR-specific ligands for Alzheimer's disease. Hopefully, a greater knowledge of the many factors influencing α7 nAChR function as well...

  7. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  8. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  9. Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs): Important amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels which mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in insect and vertebrate nervous systems. The great abundance of nAChRs within the insect central nervous system has led to the development of insecticides targeting these receptors, such as ...

  10. Neuroprotective and memory-related actions of novel alpha-7 nicotinic agents with different mixed agonist/antagonist properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E M; Tay, E T; Zoltewicz, J A; Meyers, C; King, M A; Papke, R L; De Fiebre, C M

    1998-03-01

    The goals of this study were to develop compounds that were selective and highly efficacious agonists at alpha-7 receptors, while varying in antagonist activity; and to test the hypothesis that these compounds had memory-related and neuroprotective actions associated with both agonist and antagonist alpha-7 receptor activities. Three compounds were identified; E,E-3-(cinnamylidene)anabaseine (3-CA), E,E-3-(2-methoxycinnamylidene) anabaseine (2-MeOCA) and E,E-3-(4-methoxycinnamylidene) anabaseine (4-MeOCA) each displaced [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin binding from rat brain membranes and activated rat alpha-7 receptors in a Xenopus oocyte expression system fully efficaciously. The potency series for binding and receptor activation was 2-MeOCA > 4-MeOCA = 3-CA and 2-MeOCA = 3-CA > 4-MeOCA, respectively. No compound significantly activated oocyte-expressed alpha-4beta-2 receptors. Although each cinnamylidene-anabaseine caused a long-term inhibition of alpha-7 receptors, as measured by ACh-application 5 min later, this inhibition ranged considerably, from less than 20% (3-CA) to 90% (2-MeOCA) at an identical concentration (10 microM). These compounds improved passive avoidance behavior in nucleus basalis lesioned rats, with 2-MeOCA most potent in this respect. In contrast, only 3-CA was neuroprotective against neurite loss during nerve growth factor deprivation in differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Choline, an efficacious alpha-7 agonist without antagonist activity, was also protective in this model. These results suggest that the neurite-protective action of alpha-7 receptor agonists may be more sensitive to potential long-term antagonist properties than acute behavioral actions are.

  11. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen T., Jesper; Arvaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus...

  12. Measurement of anti- acetylcholine receptor auto-antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two different acetylcholine receptor (AChR) preparations derived from amputated human muscle (AChRAMP) and from the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line TE671 (AChRTE67,) were compared in radio-immunoprecipitation assays for the detection of AChR auto-antibodies in serum specimens from 20 patients with ...

  13. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  14. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    We have previously defined the concept of functional partial agonism as the partial agonist responses recorded in brain slices after administration of full ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists and competitive antagonists at fixed ratios. Functional partial agonism can be established at any level...... of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...

  15. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  16. Properties of acetylcholine receptors translated by cat muscle mRNA in Xenopus oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Miledi, R; Parker, I; Sumikawa, K

    1982-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA, extracted from denervated skeletal muscles of the cat, directs the synthesis of acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The receptors are inserted in the oocyte membrane where they form acetylcholine receptor-channel complexes which have properties like those of the native receptors in the muscle membrane.

  17. END-PLATE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: STRUCTURE, MECHANISM, PHARMACOLOGY, AND DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction. PMID:22811427

  18. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2011), e27732 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine muscarinic receptors * G proteins * subtype differences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  19. Phospholipase C activity affinity purifies with the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriola, Jonathan M; daCosta, Corrie J B; Wang, Shuzhi; Figeys, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey C; Sturgeon, R Michel; Baenziger, John E

    2010-04-02

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate fast synaptic transmission by fluxing ions across the membrane in response to neurotransmitter binding. We show here that during affinity purification of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo, phosphatidic acid, but not other anionic or zwitterionic phospholipids, is hydrolyzed to diacylglycerol. The phospholipase C activity elutes with the acetylcholine receptor and is inhibited by a lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase inhibitor, sodium vanadate, but not a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide. Further, the hydrolysis product of phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, enhances the functional capabilities of the acetylcholine receptor in the presence of anionic lipids. We conclude that a phospholipase C activity, which appears to be specific for phosphatidic acid, is associated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The acetylcholine receptor may directly or indirectly influence lipid metabolism in a manner that enhances its own function.

  20. Acetylcholine promotes binding of α-conotoxin MII at α3 β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasivarao, Somisetti V; Roberts, Jessica; Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Slingsby, Jason G; Rohleder, Conrad; Mallory, Chris; Groome, James R; McDougal, Owen M; Maupin, C Mark

    2014-02-10

    α-Conotoxin MII (α-CTxMII) is a 16-residue peptide with the sequence GCCSNPVCHLEHSNLC, containing Cys2-Cys8 and Cys3-Cys16 disulfide bonds. This peptide, isolated from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus magus, is a potent and selective antagonist of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To evaluate the impact of channel-ligand interactions on ligand-binding affinity, homology models of the heteropentameric α3β2-nAChR were constructed. The models were created in MODELLER with the aid of experimentally characterized structures of the Torpedo marmorata-nAChR (Tm-nAChR, PDB ID: 2BG9) and the Aplysia californica-acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP, PDB ID: 2BR8) as templates for the α3- and β2-subunit isoforms derived from rat neuronal nAChR primary amino acid sequences. Molecular docking calculations were performed with AutoDock to evaluate interactions of the heteropentameric nAChR homology models with the ligands acetylcholine (ACh) and α-CTxMII. The nAChR homology models described here bind ACh with binding energies commensurate with those of previously reported systems, and identify critical interactions that facilitate both ACh and α-CTxMII ligand binding. The docking calculations revealed an increased binding affinity of the α3β2-nAChR for α-CTxMII with ACh bound to the receptor, and this was confirmed through two-electrode voltage clamp experiments on oocytes from Xenopus laevis. These findings provide insights into the inhibition and mechanism of electrostatically driven antagonist properties of the α-CTxMIIs on nAChRs. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  2. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of

  3. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...... for the true partial muscarinic agonist, 4-[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyloxy]-2-butynyltrimethylammonium chloride (McN A-343). Thus, functional as well as true partial agonist responses became more efficacious and potent with increasing receptor and G-protein levels. The level of maximal functional partial......We have previously defined the concept of functional partial agonism as the partial agonist responses recorded in brain slices after administration of full ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists and competitive antagonists at fixed ratios. Functional partial agonism can be established at any level...

  4. A model of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöhren, Kirstin; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2002-11-01

    The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor belongs to the family of rhodopsin like G-Protein Coupled Receptors. This subtype of muscarinic receptors is of special interest because it bears, aside from an orthosteric binding site, also an allosteric binding site. Based on the X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin a complete homology model of the human M2 receptor was developed. For the orthosteric binding site point mutations and binding studies with different agonists and antagonists are available. This knowledge was utilized for an initial verification of the M2 model. Allosteric modulation of activity is mediated by structurally different ligands such as gallamine, caracurine V salts or W84 (a hexamethonium-derivative). Caracurine V derivatives with different affinities to M2 were docked using GRID-fields. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulations yielded different binding energies based on diverse electrostatic and lipophilic interactions. The calculated affinities are in good agreement to experimentally determined affinities.

  5. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  6. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  7. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-05

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate donepezil-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Ogata, Toru; Uchida, Ryuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Takishima, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Failure of myelin development and oligodendrocyte loss results in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that donepezil, an acetlycholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells without affecting proliferation or cell viability. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase, and MOG, in addition to transcription factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil. Furthermore, luciferase assays confirmed that both MAG and MBP promoters display increased activity upon donepezil-induced oligodendrocytes differentiation, suggesting that donepezil increases myelin gene expression mainly through enhanced transcription. We also found that the increase in the number of oligodendrocytes observed following donepezil treatment was significantly inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine, but not by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. Moreover, donepezil-induced myelin-related gene expression was suppressed by mecamylamine at both the mRNA and protein level. These results suggest that donepezil stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin-related gene expression via nAChRs in neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We show that donepezil, a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase and MOG in addition to transcripton factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil

  9. Alternative splicing in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from Locusta migratoria and its influence on acetylcholine potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Yang; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Liu, Zewen

    2017-01-18

    Due to the great abundance within insect central nervous system (CNS), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play key roles in insect CNS, which makes it to be the targets of several classes of insecticides, such as neonicotinoids. Insect nAChRs are pentameric complexes consisting of five subunits, and a dozen subunits in one insect species can theoretically comprise diverse nAChRs. The alternative splicing in insect nAChR subunits may increase the diversity of insect nAChRs. In the oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis Meyen), a model insect species with agricultural importance, the alternative splicing was found in six α subunits among nine α and two β subunits, such as missing conserved residues in Loop D from Locα1, Locα6 and Locα9, a 34-residue insertion in Locα8 cytoplasmic loop, and truncated transcripts for Locα4, Locα7 and Locα9. Hybrid nAChRs were successfully constructed in Xenopus oocytes through co-expression with rat β2 and one α subunit from L. migratoria, which included Locα1, Locα2, Locα3, Locα4, Locα5, Locα8 and Locα9. Influences of alternative splicing in Locα1, Locα8 and Locα9 on acetylcholine potency were tested on hybrid nAChRs. The alternative splicing in Locα1 and Locα9 could increase acetylcholine sensitivities on recombinant receptors, while the splicing in Locα8 showed significant influences on the current amplitudes of oocytes. The results revealed that the alternative splicing at or close to the ligand-binding sites, as well as at cytoplasmic regions away from the ligand-binding sites, in insect nAChR subunits would change the agonist potencies on the receptors, which consequently increased nAChR diversity in functional and pharmacological properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  11. Characterization of an acetylcholine receptor gene of Haemonchus contortus in relation to levamisole resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Visser, A.; Wiley, L. J.; Weiss, A. S.; Sangster, N. C.; Roos, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    The anthelminitic drug levamisole is thought to bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of nematodes. It is possible that resistance to this drug is associated with either a change in binding characteristics or a reduction in the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, the

  12. Characterisation of an acetylcholine receptor gene of Haemonchus contortus in relation to levamisole resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Visser, A.; Wiley, L.; Weiss, A.S.; Sangster, N.C.; Roos, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The anthelmintic drug levamisole is thought to bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of nematodes. It is possible that resistance to this drug is associated with either a change in binding characteristics or a reduction in the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, the molecular

  13. Change in desensitization of cat muscle acetylcholine receptor caused by coexpression of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor subunits in Xenopus oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Sumikawa, K; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Cat muscle acetylcholine receptors (AcChoR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes desensitized more slowly than Torpedo electric organ AcChoRs, also expressed in oocytes. To examine the bases for the different degrees of desensitization, cat-Torpedo AcChoR hybrids were formed by injecting oocytes with cat denervated muscle mRNA mixed with a large excess of cloned Torpedo AcChoR subunit mRNAs. Hybrid AcChoRs formed by coinjection of cat muscle mRNA with the Torpedo beta or delta subunit mRNAs desensiti...

  14. Potentiation of the actions of acetylcholine, epibatidine, and nicotine by methyllycaconitine at fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Gardner, Dale R

    2011-07-15

    Methyllycaconitine (MLA) is a norditerpenoid alkaloid found in high abundance in toxic Delphinium (larkspur) species. It is a potent and selective antagonist of α(7)-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but has not been well investigated for activity aside from receptor antagonism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MLA alone and in combination with acetylcholine, epibatidine, nicotine, and neostigmine for actions other than receptor antagonism in TE-671 cells expressing (α(1))(2)β(1)γδ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Ligand activity was assessed through measurements of membrane potential changes in TE-671 cells using a fluorescent membrane potential-sensitive dye and normalized to the maximum response to epibatidine (10μM). MLA was ineffective in changing cell membrane potential in the absence of other receptor agonists. However at nanomolar concentrations, it acted as a co-agonist to potentiate TE-671 cell responses to acetylcholine, epibatidine, nicotine, and neostigmine. These results suggest that the poisoning of cattle by norditerpenoid alkaloids found in larkspur may be more complex than previously determined. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Acetylcholine elongates neuronal growth cone filopodia via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    In addition to acting as a classical neurotransmitter in synaptic transmission, acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to play a role in axonal growth and growth cone guidance. What is not well understood is how ACh acts on growth cones to affect growth cone filopodia, structures known to be important for neuronal pathfinding. We addressed this question using an identified neuron (B5) from the buccal ganglion of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis in cell culture. ACh treatment caused pronounced filopodial elongation within minutes, an effect that required calcium influx and resulted in the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i ). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed that ACh caused a reduction in input resistance, a depolarization of the membrane potential, and an increase in firing frequency in B5 neurons. These effects were mediated via the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as the nAChR agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) mimicked the effects of ACh on filopodial elongation, [Ca]i elevation, and changes in electrical activity. Moreover, the nAChR antagonist tubucurarine blocked all DMPP-induced effects. Lastly, ACh acted locally at the growth cone, because growth cones that were physically isolated from their parent neuron responded to ACh by filopodial elongation with a similar time course as growth cones that remained connected to their parent neuron. Our data revealed a critical role for ACh as a modulator of growth cone filopodial dynamics. ACh signaling was mediated via nAChRs and resulted in Ca influx, which, in turn, caused filopodial elongation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The challenges of modulating the 'rest and digest' system: acetylcholine receptors as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanPatten, Sonya; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Acetylcholine, a major neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was discovered in the early 1900s. Over the years, researchers have revealed much about its regulation, properties of its receptors and features of the downstream signaling that influence its terminal effects. The acetylcholine system, traditionally associated with neuromuscular communication, is now known to play a crucial part in modulation of the immune system and other 'rest and digest' effects. Recent research seeks to elucidate the system's role in brain functions including cognition, sleep, arousal, motivation, reward and pain. We highlight clinically approved and experimental drugs that modulate the acetylcholine receptors. The complexities in targeting the acetylcholine receptors are vast and finding future indications for drug development associated with specific acetylcholine receptors remains a challenge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acetylcholine excites neocortical pyramidal neurons via nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2015-04-01

    The neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) shapes neocortical function during sensory perception, motor control, arousal, attention, learning, and memory. Here we investigate the mechanisms by which ACh affects neocortical pyramidal neurons in adult mice. Stimulation of cholinergic axons activated muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors on pyramidal neurons in all cortical layers and in multiple cortical areas. Nicotinic receptor activation evoked short-latency, depolarizing postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in many pyramidal neurons. Nicotinic receptor-mediated PSPs promoted spiking of pyramidal neurons. The duration of the increase in spiking was membrane potential dependent, with nicotinic receptor activation triggering persistent spiking lasting many seconds in neurons close to threshold. Persistent spiking was blocked by intracellular BAPTA, indicating that nicotinic ACh receptor activation evoked persistent spiking via a long-lasting calcium-activated depolarizing current. We compared nicotinic PSPs in primary motor cortex (M1), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and visual cortex. The laminar pattern of nicotinic excitation was not uniform but was broadly similar across areas, with stronger modulation in deep than superficial layers. Superimposed on this broad pattern were local differences, with nicotinic PSPs being particularly large and common in layer 5 of M1 but not layer 5 of PFC or primary visual cortex (V1). Hence, in addition to modulating the excitability of pyramidal neurons in all layers via muscarinic receptors, synaptically released ACh preferentially increases the activity of deep-layer neocortical pyramidal neurons via nicotinic receptors, thereby adding laminar selectivity to the widespread enhancement of excitability mediated by muscarinic ACh receptors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Mechanics of channel gating of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR is a key molecule involved in the propagation of signals in the central nervous system and peripheral synapses. Although numerous computational and experimental studies have been performed on this receptor, the structural dynamics of the receptor underlying the gating mechanism is still unclear. To address the mechanical fundamentals of nAChR gating, both conventional molecular dynamics (CMD and steered rotation molecular dynamics (SRMD simulations have been conducted on the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of nAChR embedded in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC bilayer and water molecules. A 30-ns CMD simulation revealed a collective motion amongst C-loops, M1, and M2 helices. The inward movement of C-loops accompanying the shrinking of acetylcholine (ACh binding pockets induced an inward and upward motion of the outer beta-sheet composed of beta9 and beta10 strands, which in turn causes M1 and M2 to undergo anticlockwise motions around the pore axis. Rotational motion of the entire receptor around the pore axis and twisting motions among extracellular (EC, transmembrane (TM, and intracellular MA domains were also detected by the CMD simulation. Moreover, M2 helices undergo a local twisting motion synthesized by their bending vibration and rotation. The hinge of either twisting motion or bending vibration is located at the middle of M2, possibly the gate of the receptor. A complementary twisting-to-open motion throughout the receptor was detected by a normal mode analysis (NMA. To mimic the pulsive action of ACh binding, nonequilibrium MD simulations were performed by using the SRMD method developed in one of our laboratories. The result confirmed all the motions derived from the CMD simulation and NMA. In addition, the SRMD simulation indicated that the channel may undergo an open-close (O C motion. The present MD simulations explore the structural dynamics of the receptor under its

  19. Fluorescent agonists for the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Florian; Mourot, Alexandre; Araoz, Romulo; Kotzyba-Hibert, Florence; Molgó, Jordi; Bamberg, Ernst; Goeldner, Maurice

    2008-05-05

    We have synthesized a series of fluorescent acylcholine derivatives carrying different linkers that vary in length and structure and connect the acylcholine unit to the environment-sensitive fluorophores 7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carbonyl (DEAC) or N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-yl) (NBD). The pharmacological properties of the fluorescent analogues were investigated on heterologously expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo californica and on oocytes transplanted with nAChR-rich Torpedo marmorata membranes. Agonist action strongly depends on the length and the structure of the linker. One particular analogue, DEAC-Gly-C6-choline, showed partial agonist behavior with about half of the maximum response of acetylcholine, which is at least 20 times higher than those observed with previously described fluorescent dansyl- and NBD-acylcholine analogues. Binding of DEAC-Gly-C6-choline to Torpedo nAChR induces a strong enhancement of fluorescence intensity. Association and displacement kinetic experiments revealed dissociation constants of 0.5 nM for the alphadelta-binding site and 15.0 nM for the alphagamma-binding site. Both the pharmacological and the spectroscopic properties of this agonist show great promise for characterizing the allosteric mechanism behind the function of the Torpedo nAChR, as well as for drug-screening studies.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emiliano; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Husson, Steven J; Steuer-Costa, Wagner; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R; Treinin, Millet

    2014-03-01

    Polymodal nociceptors sense and integrate information on injurious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Chemical signals either activate nociceptors or modulate their responses to other stimuli. One chemical known to activate or modulate responses of nociceptors is acetylcholine (ACh). Across evolution nociceptors express subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family, a family of ACh-gated ion channels. The roles of ACh and nAChRs in nociceptor function are, however, poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans polymodal nociceptors, PVD, express nAChR subunits on their sensory arbor. Here we show that mutations reducing ACh synthesis and mutations in nAChR subunits lead to defects in PVD function and morphology. A likely cause for these defects is a reduction in cytosolic calcium measured in ACh and nAChR mutants. Indeed, overexpression of a calcium pump in PVD mimics defects in PVD function and morphology found in nAChR mutants. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a central role for nAChRs and ACh in nociceptor function and suggest that calcium permeating via nAChRs facilitates activity of several signaling pathways within this neuron. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emiliano; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Husson, Steven J.; Steuer-Costa, Wagner; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R.; Treinin, Millet

    2014-01-01

    Polymodal nociceptors sense and integrate information on injurious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Chemical signals either activate nociceptors or modulate their responses to other stimuli. One chemical known to activate or modulate responses of nociceptors is acetylcholine (ACh). Across evolution nociceptors express subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family, a family of ACh-gated ion channels. The roles of ACh and nAChRs in nociceptor function are, however, poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans polymodal nociceptors, PVD, express nAChR subunits on their sensory arbor. Here we show that mutations reducing ACh synthesis and mutations in nAChR subunits lead to defects in PVD function and morphology. A likely cause for these defects is a reduction in cytosolic calcium measured in ACh and nAChR mutants. Indeed, overexpression of a calcium pump in PVD mimics defects in PVD function and morphology found in nAChR mutants. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a central role for nAChRs and ACh in nociceptor function and suggest that calcium permeating via nAChRs facilitates activity of several signaling pathways within this neuron. PMID:24518198

  2. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+). Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125)I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+) transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  3. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  4. Rapid synthesis of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Pestronk, A

    1988-10-11

    The rate of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) degradation in mature, innervated mammalian neuromuscular junctions has recently been shown to be biphasic; up to 20% are rapidly turned over (RTOs; half life less than 1 day) whereas the remainder are lost more slowly ('stable' AChRs; half life 10-12 days). In order to maintain normal junctional receptor density, synthesis and insertion of AChRs should presumably be sufficiently rapid to replace both the RTOs and the stable receptors. We have tested this prediction by blocking pre-existing AChRs in the mouse sternomastoid muscle with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), and monitoring the subsequent appearance of 'new' junctional AChRs at intervals of 3 h to 20 days by labeling them with 125I-alpha-BuTx. The results show that new receptors were initially inserted rapidly (16% at 24 h and 28% at 48 h). The rate of increase of 'new' 125I-alpha-BuTx binding sites gradually slowed down during the remainder of the time period studied. Control observations excluded possible artifacts of the experimental procedure including incomplete blockade of AChRs, dissociation of toxin-receptor complexes, or experimentally induced alteration of receptor synthesis. The present demonstration of rapid synthesis and incorporation of AChRs at innervated neuromuscular junctions provides support for the concept of a subpopulation of rapidly turned over AChRs. The RTOs may serve as precursors for the larger population of stable receptors and have an important role in the metabolism of the neuromuscular synapse.

  5. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    that inhibited (threo-beta-benzyl-oxy-aspartate (TβOA), 100.0μM) or facilitated (ceftriaxalone, 200mg/kg, i.p.) excitatory amino acid transporters. TβOA slowed both the clearance (s) and rate of clearance (μM/s) by 10-fold, particularly at the mid-late stages of the return to baseline. Ceftriaxone reduced...

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors control acetylcholine and noradrenaline release in the rodent habenulo-interpeduncular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, F; Zlabinger, C; Orr-Urtreger, A; Ristl, R; Huck, S; Scholze, P

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh receptors) play a central role in the habenulo-interpeduncular system. We studied nicotine-induced release of NA and ACh in the habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The habenula and IPN were loaded with [(3) H]-choline or [(3) H]-NA and placed in superfusion chambers. [(3) H]-ACh release was also stimulated using nicotinic agonists, electrical pulses and elevated [KCl]o in hippocampal and cortical slices from rats, wild-type mice and mice lacking α5, α7, β2, or β4 nACh receptor subunits. Finally, we analysed nACh receptor subtypes in the IPN using immunoprecipitation. Nicotine induced release of [(3) H]-ACh in the IPN of rats and mice. This release was calcium-dependent but not blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX); moreover, [(3) H]-ACh release was abolished in β4-knockout mice but was unaffected in β2- and α5-knockout mice. In contrast, nicotine-induced release of [(3) H]-NA in the IPN and habenula was blocked by TTX and reduced in both β2-knockout and β4-knockout mice, and dose-response curves were right-shifted in α5-knockout mice. Although electrical stimuli triggered the release of both transmitters, [(3) H]-ACh release required more pulses delivered at a higher frequency. Our results confirm previous findings that β4-containing nACh receptors are critical for [(3) H]-ACh release in the mouse IPN. Experiments using α5-knockout mice also revealed that unlike in the hippocampus, nicotine-induced [(3) H]-NA release in the habenulo-interpeduncular system is altered in this knockout model. As α5-containing nACh receptors play a key role in nicotine intake, our results add NA to the list of transmitters involved in this mechanism. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with nACh......Rs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human...... brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit nACh...

  8. The formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters visualized with quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motor innervation of skeletal muscle leads to the assembly of acetylcholine receptor (AChR clusters in the postsynaptic membrane at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Synaptic AChR aggregation, according to the diffusion-mediated trapping hypothesis, involves the establishment of a postsynaptic scaffold that "traps" freely diffusing receptors into forming high-density clusters. Although this hypothesis is widely cited to explain the formation of postsynaptic AChR clusters, direct evidence at molecular level is lacking. Results Using quantum dots (QDs and live cell imaging, we provide new measurements supporting the diffusion-trap hypothesis as applied to AChR cluster formation. Consistent with published works, experiments on cultured Xenopus myotomal muscle cells revealed that AChRs at clusters that formed spontaneously (pre-patterned clusters, also called hot spots and at those induced by nerve-innervation or by growth factor-coated latex beads were very stable whereas diffuse receptors outside these regions were mobile. Moreover, despite the restriction of AChR movement at sites of synaptogenic stimulation, individual receptors away from these domains continued to exhibit free diffusion, indicating that AChR clustering at NMJ does not involve an active attraction of receptors but is passive and diffusion-driven. Conclusion Single-molecular tracking using QDs has provided direct evidence that the clustering of AChRs in muscle cells in response to synaptogenic stimuli is achieved by two distinct cellular processes: the Brownian motion of receptors in the membrane and their trapping and immobilization at the synaptic specialization. This study also provides a clearer picture of the "trap" that it is not a uniformly sticky area but consists of discrete foci at which AChRs are immobilized.

  9. Conformationally restrained carbamoylcholine homologues. Synthesis, pharmacology at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and biostructural considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Fuente Revenga, M; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of small selective ligands for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) based on acetylcholine (ACh) has led to the development of potent agonists with clear preference for the α4β2 nAChR, the most prevalent nAChR subtype in the central nervous system. In this work we present th...

  10. Functional characterization of acetylcholine receptors and calcium signaling in rat testicular capsule contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Júnior, Edilson Dantas; de Souza, Bruno Palmieri; Rodrigues, Juliano Quintela Dantas; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Jurkiewicz, Neide Hyppolito

    2013-08-15

    The motor activity of mammalian testicular capsule (TC) contributes to male fertility and infertility, but the acetylcholine receptors related to the contractions induced by cholinergic drugs are poorly known. Indeed to characterize the acetylcholine receptors and cellular signaling by Ca(2+) involved in TC motor activity of rats, the potency of agonists (pD₂) and antagonists (pA₂) of acetylcholine receptors, and effects of Ca(2+) cellular transport blockers on the cholinergic contractions were evaluated. pD₂ values of acetylcholine (5.98) were ten-fold higher than that of carbachol (4.99). Efficacy (Emax) of acetylcholine and carbachol to induce contractions corresponded to 95% and 97% of Emax for KCl, but Emax for nicotine was very low (8% of Emax for KCl). Further, physostigmine did not affect the acetylcholine potency. Contractions induced by acetylcholine or carbachol were antagonized by muscarinic but not nicotinic antagonist. The order of pA₂ values obtained for muscarinic antagonists, namely atropine>4-DAMP>AF-DX116>pirenzepine, corresponded to a typical profile of M3 receptors. Contractions induced by acetylcholine or carbachol were inhibited by blockers of Ca(2+) influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (nifedipine and Ni(2+)), Ca(2+) reuptake by sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (cyclopiazonic acid) and mitochondria (FCCP). The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine only affected the acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that TC motor activity of rats are mediated mainly by M₃ receptors followed by the increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration regulated by voltage-dependent calcium channels, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Furthermore, the differential effects of chelerythrine in the acetylcholine or carbachol-induced contractions are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. TC299423, a Novel Agonist for Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teagan R. Wall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available (E-5-(Pyrimidin-5-yl-1,2,3,4,7,8-hexahydroazocine (TC299423 is a novel agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. We examined its efficacy, affinity, and potency for α6β2∗ (α6β2-containing, α4β2∗, and α3β4∗ nAChRs, using [125I]-epibatidine binding, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, synaptosomal 86Rb+ efflux, [3H]-dopamine release, and [3H]-acetylcholine release. TC299423 displayed an EC50 of 30–60 nM for α6β2∗ nAChRs in patch-clamp recordings and [3H]-dopamine release assays. Its potency for α6β2∗ in these assays was 2.5-fold greater than that for α4β2∗, and much greater than that for α3β4∗-mediated [3H]-acetylcholine release. We observed no major off-target binding on 70 diverse molecular targets. TC299423 was bioavailable after intraperitoneal or oral administration. Locomotor assays, measured with gain-of-function, mutant α6 (α6L9′S nAChR mice, show that TC299423 elicits α6β2∗ nAChR-mediated responses at low doses. Conditioned place preference assays show that low-dose TC299423 also produces significant reward in α6L9′S mice, and modest reward in WT mice, through a mechanism that probably involves α6(non-α4β2∗ nAChRs. However, TC299423 did not suppress nicotine self-administration in rats, indicating that it did not block nicotine reinforcement in the dosage range that was tested. In a hot-plate test, TC299423 evoked antinociceptive responses in mice similar to those of nicotine. TC299423 and nicotine similarly inhibited mouse marble burying as a measure of anxiolytic effects. Taken together, our data suggest that TC299423 will be a useful small-molecule agonist for future in vitro and in vivo studies of nAChR function and physiology.

  12. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poli, E.; Coruzzi, G.; Bertaccini, G.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with ( 3 H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-α-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-α-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-α-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors

  13. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors derived from snake and snail venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Sébastien; Nicke, Annette; Tsetlin, Victor I

    2017-12-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) represents the prototype of ligand-gated ion channels. It is vital for neuromuscular transmission and an important regulator of neurotransmission. A variety of toxic compounds derived from diverse species target this receptor and have been of elemental importance in basic and applied research. They enabled milestone discoveries in pharmacology and biochemistry ranging from the original formulation of the receptor concept, the first isolation and structural analysis of a receptor protein (the nAChR) to the identification, localization, and differentiation of its diverse subtypes and their validation as a target for therapeutic intervention. Among the venom-derived compounds, α-neurotoxins and α-conotoxins provide the largest families and still represent indispensable pharmacological tools. Application of modified α-neurotoxins provided substantial structural and functional details of the nAChR long before high resolution structures were available. α-bungarotoxin represents not only a standard pharmacological tool and label in nAChR research but also for unrelated proteins tagged with a minimal α-bungarotoxin binding motif. A major advantage of α-conotoxins is their smaller size, as well as superior selectivity for diverse nAChR subtypes that allows their development into ligands with optimized pharmacological and chemical properties and potentially novel drugs. In the following, these two groups of nAChR antagonists will be described focusing on their respective roles in the structural and functional characterization of nAChRs and their development into research tools. In addition, we provide a comparative overview of the diverse α-conotoxin selectivities that can serve as a practical guide for both structure activity studies and subtype classification. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Venom-derived Peptides as Pharmacological Tools.' Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of PET Radioligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbaechler, R.; Westera, G.; Nan-Horng Lin

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A-186253.1, a compound made by Abbott laboratories, was labelled with carbon-11 and evaluated as a PET ligand for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The compound was labelled with C-11 by methylation with 11C-MeI of the desmethyl precursor A-183828.1. The affinity of A-186253.1 for the α4β2 and the α7 subtype of the nAChR was determined in displacement studies. PET-studies were performed in rats and pigs Inhibitory constants (K i ) versus cytsine were 461 ± 99 pM for A-186253.1 and versus α-Bungarotoxin >100 μM. which means a very high selectivity for the α4β2-receptor (>227,000). Highest uptake of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 was observed in the thalamus where an increase in radiotracer uptake was seen until 45 min p.i.. Thereafter, the radiotracer concentration remained constant until the end of the scan indicating slow washout of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Application of cold A-186253.1 (0.5 mg/kg) 40 min p.i. resulted in a decrease in radiotracer concentration in the thalamus and the cortex indicating displacement of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Blockade studies with cytisine (0.5 mg/kg), a selective ligand for the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, showed just a slight reduction of the radioligand uptake in the thalamus and in the cortex whereas the blockade with cold A-186253.1 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a 50 % reduction. These results suggest, that 50 % of the [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 in the brain corresponds to specifically bound radioligand, but not to the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor. (author)

  15. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-01-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, 3 H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion ( 3 H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that 3 H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin

  16. Non-Neuronal Functions of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter whose effects are mediated by two classes of receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ion channels, whereas the muscarinic receptors belong to the large family of G protein coupled seven transmembrane helix receptors. Beyond its function in neuronal systems, it has become evident that acetylcholine also plays an important role in non-neuronal cells such as epithelial and immune cells. Furthermore, many cell types in the periphery are capable of synthesizing acetylcholine and express at least some of the receptors. In this review, we summarize the non-neuronal functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, especially those of the M2 muscarinic receptor in epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of signaling by the M2 receptor but also the cellular trafficking and ARF6 mediated endocytosis of this receptor, which play an important role in the regulation of signaling events. In addition, we provide an overview of the M2 receptor in human pathological conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  17. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are sensors for ethanol in lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roser-Page, Susanne; Guidot, David M; Roman, Jesse

    2013-06-01

    Chronic ethanol (EtOH) abuse in humans is known to independently increase the incidence of and mortality due to acute lung injury in at-risk individuals. However, the mechanisms by which EtOH affects lung cells remain incompletely elucidated. In earlier work, we reported that EtOH increased the expression in lung fibroblasts of fibronectin, a matrix glycoprotein implicated in lung injury and repair. This effect was blocked by α-bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin that binds certain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) thereby implicating nAChRs in this process. Here, we examine the identity of these receptors. Mouse lung fibroblasts were stimulated with EtOH (60 mM) or acetylcholine (100 to 500 μM) and evaluated for the expression of fibronectin and nAChRs. Inhibitors to nAChRs or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) were used to assess changes in fibronectin expression. Animals exposed to EtOH for up to 6 weeks were used to evaluate the expression of nAChRs in vivo. First, in EtOH-treated fibroblasts, we observed increased expression of α4 and α9 nAChR subunits. Second, we found that acetylcholine, a natural ligand for nAChRs, mimicked the effects of EtOH. Dihydro-β-erythroidin hydrobromide, a competitive inhibitor of α4 nAChR, blocked the increase in fibronectin expression and cell proliferation. Furthermore, EtOH-induced fibronectin expression was inhibited in cells silenced for α4 nAChR. However, EtOH-treated cells showed increased α-bungarotoxin binding suggesting that α4 nAChR mediates the effects of EtOH via a ligand-independent pathway. Knowing there are several important cysteine residues near the ligand-binding site of α4 nAChRs, we tested the antioxidant NAC and found that it too blocked the induction of fibronectin expression by EtOH. Also, fibroblasts exposed to oxidant stress showed increased fibronectin expression that was blocked with α-bungarotoxin. Finally, we showed increased expression of α4 nAChRs in the lung tissue of mice and

  18. Functional role of acetylcholine and the expression of cholinergic receptors and components in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takahiro; Chida, Dai; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Hori, Naoko; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Iwata, Takanori; Usui, Michihiko; Aiko, Katsuya; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2010-02-19

    Recent studies have indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) plays a vital role in various tissues, while the role of ACh in bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that ACh induced cell proliferation and reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity via nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in osteoblasts. We detected mRNA expression of several nAChRs and mAChRs. Furthermore, we showed that cholinergic components were up-regulated and subunits/subtypes of acetylcholine receptors altered during osteoblast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that osteoblasts express specific acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic components and that ACh plays a possible role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Perhydrohistrionicotoxin: a potential ligand for the ion conductance modulator of the acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldefrawi, A T; Eldefrawi, M E; Albuquerque, E X; Oliveira, A C; Mansour, N; Adler, M; Daly, J W; Brown, G B; Burgermeister, W; Witkop, B

    1977-05-01

    Histrionicotoxin from the Colombian frog Dendrobates histrionicus and its perhydro derivative reversibly block the acetylcholine-sensitive ion conductance system in frog neuromuscular preparations. The perhydro derivative and [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin, like histrionicotoxin, caused a significant decrease in the peak amplitude of the end-plate current and shortened its rise time and half-decay time. In membrane preparations from Torpedo electroplax, [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin bound reversibly to a limited number of high-affinity sites [dissociation constant, (KD) = 0.4 micronM]. The ratio of perhydrohistrionicotoxin to acetylcholine binding sites in these membrane preparations approached 2. Histrionicotoxins, local anesthetics, and certain cholinergic agonists inhibited binding of perhydrohistrionicotoxin. Binding of perhydrohistrionicotoxin to membranes was decreased by heat or treatment with proteases. Treatment of membranes with Triton X-100 solubilized acetylcholine binding proteins and apparently also perhydrohistrionicotoxin-binding proteins. However, the detergent Triton X-100 also bound [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin. This nonspecific binding was not saturable and complicated studies on the antagonism by drugs of binding of [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin. In solubilized preparations the binding protein for acetylcholine could be removed by affinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation without affecting binding of perhydrohistrionicotoxin. Sephadex chromatography also separated acetylcholine- from perhydrohistrionicotoxin-binding proteins. Perhydrohistrionicotoxin did not bind significantly to purified acetylcholine-receptor protein but presumably bound to an ion conductance modulator protein that was associated with the acetylcholine-receptor in intact membrane and readily separable from the receptor protein after solubilization.

  20. Plant toxins that affect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Welch, Kevin D; Panter, Kip E; Lee, Stephen T

    2013-08-19

    Plants produce a wide variety of chemical compounds termed secondary metabolites that are not involved in basic metabolism, photosynthesis, or reproduction. These compounds are used as flavors, fragrances, insecticides, dyes, hallucinogens, nutritional supplements, poisons, and pharmaceutical agents. However, in some cases these secondary metabolites found in poisonous plants perturb biological systems. Ingestion of toxins from poisonous plants by grazing livestock often results in large economic losses to the livestock industry. The chemical structures of these compounds are diverse and range from simple, low molecular weight toxins such as oxalate in halogeton to the highly complex norditerpene alkaloids in larkspurs. While the negative effects of plant toxins on people and the impact of plant toxins on livestock producers have been widely publicized, the diversity of these toxins and their potential as new pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of diseases in people and animals has also received widespread interest. Scientists are actively screening plants from all regions of the world for bioactivity and potential pharmaceuticals for the treatment or prevention of many diseases. In this review, we focus the discussion to those plant toxins extensively studied at the USDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory that affect the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors including species of Delphinium (Larkspurs), Lupinus (Lupines), Conium (poison hemlock), and Nicotiana (tobaccos).

  1. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  2. Sodium nitrate decreases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Jess; White, Cullen; Grow, Wade A

    2016-05-01

    Humans are exposed to nitrate predominantly through diet with peak plasma concentrations within an hour after ingestion, but additional exposure is obtained from the environment, and minimally through de novo synthesis. Higher nitrate consumption has been associated with methemoglobinemia, spontaneous abortions, atherosclerosis, myocardial ischemia, septic and distressed lung, inflammatory bowel disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and neural tube defects. However, skeletal muscle development has not been examined. C2C12 skeletal muscle cell cultures were maintained, myoblasts were fused into myotubes, and then cultures were exposed to motor neuron derived agrin to enhance acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Untreated cultures were compared with cultures exposed to sodium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 10 ng/mL-100 μg/mL. The results reported here demonstrate that 1 μg/mL sodium nitrate was sufficient to decrease the frequency of agrin-induced AChR clustering without affecting myotube formation. In addition, concentrations of sodium nitrate of 1 μg/mL or 100 μg/mL decreased gene expression of the myogenic transcription factor myogenin and AChR in correlation with the agrin-induced AChR clustering data. These results reveal that sodium nitrate decreases the frequency of agrin-induced AChR clustering by a mechanism that includes myogenin and AChR gene expression. As a consequence sodium nitrate may pose a risk for skeletal muscle development and subsequent neuromuscular synapse formation in humans.

  3. Transmembrane topology of the acetylcholine receptor examined in reconstituted vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Each of the five acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits, α 2 β-γδ, is believed to have the same number of transmembrane crossing and to share the same general folding pattern. AChR isolated from the electric organ of electric fish is predominantly dimeric. We have used this bridge as a marker for the C-terminus of the δ subunit, and presumably that of the other subunits in addition. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants, principally glutathione (GSH), was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. The reduction of the δ-δ desulfide, as evidenced by the transition of AChrR dimers to monomers, was quantitatively monitored on velocity sedimentation sucrose gradients. Alternatively, the reduction of δ 2 to δ was followed by employing non-reducing SDS-PAGE. Reductants such as GSH were able to access the bridge in intact right-side-out vesicles. No acceleration of this process was evident when the vesicles were disrupted by freeze-thaw or by detergents. Control experiments which determined the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin, or that of 3 H-GSH efflux, demonstrated that intact reconstituted vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier to GSH access of their intravesicular space

  4. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M.; DeSimone, John A.; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. PMID:26039516

  5. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Jun Ren

    Full Text Available Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR, inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  6. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  7. Ikarisoside A inhibits acetylcholine-induced catecholamine secretion and synthesis by suppressing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-ion channels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojia; Toyohira, Yumiko; Horisita, Takafumi; Satoh, Noriaki; Takahashi, Keita; Zhang, Han; Iinuma, Munekazu; Yoshinaga, Yukari; Ueno, Susumu; Tsutsui, Masato; Sata, Takeyoshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Ikarisoside A is a natural flavonol glycoside derived from plants of the genus Epimedium, which have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as tonics, antirheumatics, and aphrodisiacs. Here, we report the effects of ikarisoside A and three other flavonol glycosides on catecholamine secretion and synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. We found that ikarisoside A (1-100 μM), but not icariin, epimedin C, or epimedoside A, concentration-dependently inhibited the secretion of catecholamines induced by acetylcholine, a physiological secretagogue and agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Ikarisoside A had little effect on catecholamine secretion induced by veratridine and 56 mM K(+). Ikarisoside A (1-100 μM) also inhibited (22)Na(+) influx and (45)Ca(2+) influx induced by acetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner similar to that of catecholamine secretion. In Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, ikarisoside A (0.1-100 μM) directly inhibited the current evoked by acetylcholine. It also suppressed (14)C-catecholamine synthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by acetylcholine at 1-100 μM and 10-100 μM, respectively. The present findings suggest that ikarisoside A inhibits acetylcholine-induced catecholamine secretion and synthesis by suppression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-ion channels in bovine adrenal medullary cells.

  8. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  9. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, Osama; Kendziorra, Kai [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[{sup 18}]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, we developed the new {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[{sup 18}F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in rhesus monkey retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; McGlinn, Alice M; Fernandes, Alcides; Milam, Ann H; Strang, Christianne E; Andison, Margot E; Lindstrom, Jon M; Keyser, Kent T; Stone, Richard A

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect and establish the cellular localizations of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in Rhesus monkey retina. Retinas were dissected from the eyes of monkeys killed after unrelated experiments. RNA was extracted and analyzed by RT-PCR, using primers designed against human sequences of alpha3-alpha7, alpha9, and beta2-beta4 nAChR subunits. The RT-PCR products were separated by gel electrophoresis and sequenced. Frozen sections of postmortem fixed monkey eyes were immunolabeled with well-characterized and specific monoclonal antibodies against the alpha3, alpha4, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, or beta4 nAChR subunits and visualized with fluorescence labeling. Products of the predicted size for the alpha3-alpha7, alpha9, and beta2-beta4 nAChR subunits were detected by RT-PCR in Rhesus monkey retina. Homology between transcripts from monkey retina and human nucleotide sequences ranged from 93 to 99%. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that neurons in various cell layers of monkey retina expressed alpha3, alpha4, alpha7, or beta2 nAChR subunits and cells with the morphology of microglia were immunoreactive for the alpha6 or beta4 nAChR subunits. nAChR subunits are expressed in the monkey retina and localize to diverse retinal neurons as well as putative microglia. Besides mediating visual processing, retinal nAChRs may influence refractive development and ocular pathologies such as neovascularization.

  11. Subunit profiling and functional characteristics of acetylcholine receptors in GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuki; Ishii, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    GnRH neurons form a final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Although the involvement of acetylcholine in GnRH secretion has been reported, direct effects of acetylcholine and expression profiles of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) still remain to be studied. Using immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1-7 cells), we analyzed molecular expression and functionality of AChRs. Expression of the mRNAs were identified in the order α7 > β2 = β1 ≧ α4 ≧ α5 = β4 = δ > α3 for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits and m4 > m2 for muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Furthermore, this study revealed that α7 nAChRs contributed to Ca 2+ influx and GnRH release and that m2 and m4 mAChRs inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP production and isobutylmethylxanthine-induced GnRH secretion. These findings demonstrate the molecular profiles of AChRs, which directly contribute to GnRH secretion in GT1-7 cells, and provide one possible regulatory action of acetylcholine in GnRH neurons.

  12. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F.S. Sampaio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of melatonin on the developmental pattern of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated in embryonic 8-day-old chick retinal cells in culture. The functional response to acetylcholine was measured in cultured retina cells by microphysiometry. The maximal functional response to acetylcholine increased 2.7 times between the 4th and 5th day in vitro (DIV4, DIV5, while the Bmax value for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin was reduced. Despite the presence of alpha8-like immunoreactivity at DIV4, functional responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were observed only at DIV5. Mecamylamine (100 µM was essentially without effect at DIV4 and DIV5, while dihydro-ß-erythroidine (10-100 µM blocked the response to acetylcholine (3.0 nM-2.0 µM only at DIV4, with no effect at DIV5. Inhibition of melatonin receptors with the antagonist luzindole, or melatonin synthesis by stimulation of D4 dopamine receptors blocked the appearance of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response at DIV5. Therefore, alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors were expressed in retinal cells as early as at DIV4, but they reacted to acetylcholine only after DIV5. The development of an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response is dependent on the production of melatonin by the retinal culture. Melatonin, which is produced in a tonic manner by this culture, and is a key hormone in the temporal organization of vertebrates, also potentiates responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors in rat vas deferens and cerebellum. This common pattern of action on different cell models that express alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors probably reflects a more general mechanism of regulation of these receptors.

  13. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent [ 3 H]acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with [ 3 H]choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine ≤ SKF(R)82526 3 H]acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) 3 H]acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by [ 3 H]SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. [ 3 H]SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of [ 3 H]SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate [ 3 H]acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at [ 3 H]SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8)

  14. Dopamine D(1) receptor-mediated control of striatal acetylcholine release by endogenous dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquas, E; Di Chiara, G

    1999-10-27

    The role of dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors in the control of acetylcholine release in the dorsal striatum by endogenous dopamine was investigated by monitoring with microdialysis the effect of the separate or combined administration of the dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist, SCH 39166 ¿(-)-trans-6,7,7a,8,9, 13b-exahydro-3-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-methyl-5H-benzo-[d]-nap hto-[2, 1b]-azepine hydrochloride¿ (50 microg/kg subcutaneous (s.c.)), of the dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor agonist, quinpirole (trans-(-)-4aR, 4a,5,6,7,8,8a,9-octahydro-5-propyl-1H-pyrazolo-(3,4-g)-quinoline hydrochloride) (5 and 10 microg/kg s.c.), and of the D(3) receptor selective agonist, PD 128,907 [S(+)-(4aR,10bR)-3,4,4a, 10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano-[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin -9-ol hydrochloride] (50 microg/kg s.c.), on in vivo dopamine and acetylcholine release. Microdialysis was performed with a Ringer containing low concentrations (0.01 microM) of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, neostigmine. Quinpirole (10 microg/kg s.c.) decreased striatal dopamine and acetylcholine release. Administration of PD 128,907 (50 microg/kg) decreased dopamine but failed to affect acetylcholine release. SCH 39166 (50 microg/kg s.c.) stimulated dopamine release and reduced acetylcholine release. Pretreatment with quinpirole reduced (5 microg/kg s.c.) or completely prevented (10 microg/kg s.c.) the stimulation of dopamine release elicited by SCH 39166 (50 microg/kg s.c.); on the other hand, pretreatment with quinpirole (5 and 10 microg/kg) potentiated the reduction of striatal acetylcholine release induced by SCH 39166 (50 microg/kg s.c.). Similarly, pretreatment with PD 128,907 (50 microg/kg) which prevented the increase of dopamine release induced by SCH 39166 (50 microg/kg), potentiated the reduction of striatal acetylcholine transmission elicited by SCH 39166. Thus, pretreatment with low doses of quinpirole or PD 128,907 influences in opposite manner the effect of SCH 39166 on striatal dopamine and

  15. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  16. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5......). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M......) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked...

  17. Involvement of spinal serotonin receptors in the regulation of intraspinal acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalage, Mahinda; Höglund, A Urban

    2005-02-21

    Stimulation of spinal serotonin (5-HT) receptors results in analgesia and release of acetylcholine. We investigated the involvement of 5-HT1, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes in the regulation of spinal acetylcholine release. A spinal microdialysis probe was placed dorsally at about the C5 level in anaesthetized rats. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram was found to increase acetylcholine release when infused via the microdialysis probe. Several doses of the 5-HT receptor agonists 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT, 5-HT1A), 1,4-dihydro-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-5H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-5-one dihydrochloride (CP93129, 5-HT1B), alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (m5-HT, 5-HT2), 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI, 5-HT2C), and 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (5-HT3) were subsequently infused via the microdialysis probe. Only 8-OH-DPAT, CP93129, and m5-HT increased acetylcholine release dose dependently. The 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide hydrochloride and the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist ketanserin tartrate inhibited the 8-OH-DPAT and the m5-HT induced acetylcholine release. The results suggest that 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of acetylcholine release in the spinal cord.

  18. Recent Duplication and Functional Divergence in Parasitic Nematode Levamisole-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Duguet

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites rely on fast-synaptic transmission in their neuromusculature to experience the outside world and respond to it. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in this and its receptors are targeted by a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds used in human health and for the control of parasitic disease. The model, Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by a large number of acetylcholine receptor subunit genes, a feature shared across the nematodes. This dynamic family is characterized by both gene duplication and loss between species. The pentameric levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor has been characterized from C. elegans, comprised of five different subunits. More recently, cognate receptors have been reconstituted from multiple parasitic nematodes that are found to vary in subunit composition. In order to understand the implications of receptor composition change and the origins of potentially novel drug targets, we investigated a specific example of subunit duplication based on analysis of genome data for 25 species from the 50 helminth genome initiative. We found multiple independent duplications of the unc-29, acetylcholine receptor subunit, where codon substitution rate analysis identified positive, directional selection acting on amino acid positions associated with subunit assembly. Characterization of four gene copies from a model parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, demonstrated that each copy has acquired unique functional characteristics based on phenotype rescue of transgenic C. elegans and electrophysiology of receptors reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. We found evidence that a specific incompatibility has evolved for two subunits co-expressed in muscle. We demonstrated that functional divergence of acetylcholine receptors, driven by directional selection, can occur more rapidly than previously thought and may be mediated by alteration of receptor assembly. This phenomenon is common among the

  19. Covalent attachment of antagonists to the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: synthesis and reactivity of substituted maleimides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Joseph I; Halliday, Jill I; Kanizaj, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).......The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)....

  20. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  1. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  2. Adenosine receptors and muscarinic receptors cooperate in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafe, M M; Priego, M; Obis, T; Garcia, N; Tomàs, M; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are present in the motor terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction. ARs and the presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) share the functional control of the neuromuscular junction. We analysed their mutual interaction in transmitter release modulation. In electrophysiological experiments with unaltered synaptic transmission (muscles paralysed by blocking the voltage-dependent sodium channel of the muscle cells with μ-conotoxin GIIIB), we found that: (i) a collaborative action between different AR subtypes reduced synaptic depression at a moderate activity level (40 Hz); (ii) at high activity levels (100 Hz), endogenous adenosine production in the synaptic cleft was sufficient to reduce depression through A1 -type receptors (A1 Rs) and A2 A-type receptors (A2 A Rs); (iii) when the non-metabolizable 2-chloroadenosine (CADO) agonist was used, both the quantal content and depression were reduced; (iv) the protective effect of CADO on depression was mediated by A1 Rs, whereas A2 A Rs seemed to modulate A1 Rs; (v) ARs and mAChRs absolutely depended upon each other for the modulation of evoked and spontaneous acetylcholine release in basal conditions and in experimental conditions with CADO stimulation; (vi) the purinergic and muscarinic mechanisms cooperated in the control of depression by sharing a common pathway although the purinergic control was more powerful than the muscarinic control; and (vii) the imbalance of the ARs created by using subtype-selective and non-selective inhibitory and stimulatory agents uncoupled protein kinase C from evoked transmitter release. In summary, ARs (A1 Rs, A2 A Rs) and mAChRs (M1 , M2 ) cooperated in the control of activity-dependent synaptic depression and may share a common protein kinase C pathway. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A constitutively active G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor regulates motility of larval Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kevin; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A; Ribeiro, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The neuromuscular system of helminths controls a variety of essential biological processes and therefore represents a good source of novel drug targets. The neuroactive substance, acetylcholine controls movement of Schistosoma mansoni but the mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we present first evidence of a functional G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor in S. mansoni, which we have named SmGAR. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that SmGAR belongs to a clade of invertebrate GAR-like receptors and is related to vertebrate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional expression studies in yeast showed that SmGAR is constitutively active but can be further activated by acetylcholine and, to a lesser extent, the cholinergic agonist, carbachol. Anti-cholinergic drugs, atropine and promethazine, were found to have inverse agonist activity towards SmGAR, causing a significant decrease in the receptor's basal activity. An RNAi phenotypic assay revealed that suppression of SmGAR activity in early-stage larval schistosomulae leads to a drastic reduction in larval motility. In sum, our results provide the first molecular evidence that cholinergic GAR-like receptors are present in schistosomes and are required for proper motor control in the larvae. The results further identify SmGAR as a possible candidate for antiparasitic drug targeting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in chloride secretion by cultured rat epididymal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian-Yang; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chen, Min-Hui; Xiang, Hui; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our present study was to investigate the short-circuit current response to carbachol in cultured rat cauda epididymal epithelia and the signal transduction mechanisms involved. Carbachol added basolaterally induced a concentration-dependent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across the epididymal epithelium consisting of a rapidly rising phase and a long term sustained response. The response was almost abolished by removing Cl(-) from the extracellular medium and blockable by pretreating the tissues with DPC, indicating a substantial contribution of Cl(-) secretion to the carbachol-induced response. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine inhibited the response, but the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors antagonist curarine had no effect, suggesting that only the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors mediated the secretory response of the basolateral side of rat cauda epididymal epithelium to carbachol. Addition of carbachol to the apical side of the tissue was found not to elicit an Isc response. These results suggested that muscarinic receptors are present in the basolateral side of rat cauda epididymal epithelium. Activation of these receptors by acetylcholine released from the nerve endings regulates epididymal transepithelial Cl(-) secretion. Cholinergic stimulation therefore contributes to the formation of luminal fluid microenvironment.

  5. Nerve terminal contributes to acetylcholine receptor organization at the dystrophic neuromuscular junction of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Julia; Taniguti, Ana Paula Tiemi; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-02-01

    Changes in the distribution of acetylcholine receptors have been reported to occur at the neuromuscular junction of mdx mice and may be a consequence of muscle fiber regeneration rather than the absence of dystrophin. In the present study, we examined whether the nerve terminal determines the fate of acetylcholine receptor distribution in the dystrophic muscle fibers of mdx mice. The left sternomastoid muscle of young (1-month-old) and adult (6-month-old) mdx mice was injected with 60 microl lidocaine hydrochloride to induce muscle degeneration-regeneration. Some mice had their sternomastoid muscle denervated at the time of lidocaine injection. After 10 days of muscle denervation, nerve terminals and acetylcholine receptors were labeled with 4-Di-2-ASP and rhodamine-alpha-bungarotoxin, respectively, for confocal microscopy. In young mdx mice, 75% (n = 137 endplates) of the receptors were distributed in islands. The same was observed in 100% (n = 114 endplates) of the adult junctions. In denervated-regenerated fibers of young mice, the receptors were distributed as branches in 89% of the endplates (n = 90). In denervated-regenerated fibers of adult mice, the receptors were distributed in islands in 100% of the endplates (n = 100). These findings show that nerve-dependent mechanisms are also involved in the changes in receptor distribution in young dystrophic muscles. In older dystrophic muscles, other factors may play a role in receptor distribution.

  6. Deletion of muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors alters splenic lymphocyte functions and splenic noradrenaline concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainke, Susanne; Wildmann, Johannes; Del Rey, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The existence of interactions between the immune and the sympathetic nervous systems is well established. Noradrenaline can promote or inhibit the immune response, and conversely, the immune response itself can affect noradrenaline concentration in lymphoid organs, such as the spleen. It is also well known that acetylcholine released by pre-ganglionic neurons can modulate noradrenaline release by the postsynaptic neuron. The spleen does not receive cholinergic innervation, but it has been reported that lymphocytes themselves can produce acetylcholine, and express acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholinesterase. We found that the spleen of not overtly immunized mice in which muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors have been knocked out (M1KO) has higher noradrenaline concentrations than that of the wildtype mice, without comparable alterations in the heart, in parallel to a decreased number of IgG-producing B cells. Splenic lymphocytes from M1KO mice displayed increased in vitro-induced cytotoxicity, and this was observed only when CD4(+) T cells were present. In contrast, heterozygous acetylcholinesterase (AChE+/-) mice, had no alterations in splenic noradrenaline concentration, but the in vitro proliferation of AChE+/- CD4(+) T cells was increased. It is theoretically conceivable that reciprocal effects between neuronally and non-neuronally derived acetylcholine and noradrenaline might contribute to the results reported. Our results emphasize the need to consider the balance between the effects of these mediators for the final immunoregulatory outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Expression and Susceptibility to Cholinergic Immunomodulation in Human Monocytes of Smoking Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Hilbers, Francisca W.; Verseijden, Caroline; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; Skynner, Mike; Lee, Kevin; Ulloa, Luis; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Smoking is generally accepted as a factor that affects the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease patients. Whether these effects can be contributed to the immunomodulatory effects of nicotine via nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation is unclear. As previous data

  8. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  9. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  10. Cloning and structural analysis of partial acetylcholine receptor subunit genes from the parasitic nematode Teladorsagia circumcincta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, J.; Hoekstra, R.; Roos, M. H.; Wiley, L. J.; Weiss, A. S.; Sangster, N. C.; Tait, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nematode nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the sites of action for the anthelmintic drug levamisole. Recent findings indicate that the molecular mechanism of levamisole resistance may involve changes in the number and/or functions of target nAChRs. Accordingly, we have used an RT-PCR

  11. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  12. a2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Influence Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Memory in Adolescent Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Mojica, Celina; Nakauchi, Sakura; Lipovsek, Marcela; Silverstein, Sarah; Cushman, Jesse; Tirtorahardjo, James; Poulos, Andrew; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Sumikawa, Katumi; Fanselow, Michael S.; Boulter, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The absence of a2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in oriens lacunosum moleculare (OLM) GABAergic interneurons ablate the facilitation of nicotine-induced hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation and impair memory. The current study delineated whether genetic mutations of a2* nAChRs ("Chrna2"[superscript L9'S/L9'S] and…

  13. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS. A.S. Bale*; P.J. Bushnell; C.A. Meacham; T.J. Shafer Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Toluene (TOL...

  14. Functional aspects of dexamethasone upregulated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in C2C12 myotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maestrone, E; Lagostena, L; Henning, RH; DenHertog, A; Nobile, M

    1995-01-01

    Three days of treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (1 nM-mu M) induced a concentration-dependent up-regulation of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in C2C12 mouse myotubes (EC(50)=10+/-7.3 nM), as assessed by [H-3]alpha-BuTx binding. The maximum increase in binding amounted

  15. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  16. Coexistence of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Somatostatin in Nonpyramidal Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Benoit, R.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    This study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus. SOM and mAChRs were identified by immunocytochemistry employing antibody S309 and M35, respectively. Half of the

  17. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  18. Non-selectivity of the monoclonal antibody M35 for subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CarsiGabrenas, JM; VanDerZee, EA; Luiten, PGM; Potter, LT; Carsi-Gabrenas, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody M35, one of the first monoclonal antibodies successfully raised against muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, has been widely used to study the distribution of this protein in a variety of tissues and cell types of different species. It is not fully known, however, to which

  19. GABA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites modulate hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; de Boer, P; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the regulation of acetylcholine release from the ventral hippocampus by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was investigated in vivo. GABA receptor agonists and antagonists were administered locally in the medial septum and the adjacent vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca,

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat endocrine pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Buwalda, B.; Strubbe, J.H.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    Immunocytochemical application of the antimuscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibody M35 to pancreas tissue revealed the target areas for the parasympathetic nervous system. Immunoreactivity in the endocrine pancreas was much higher than that in the exocrine part. Moreover, the endocrine cells at

  1. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jan 16 (2017), č. článku 40381. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * N-methylscopolamine * ligand binding * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  2. Layer-specific modulation of the prefrontal cortex by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, R.B.; Bloem, B.; Schak, B.; Wester, J.; de Kock, C.P.J.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine signaling through nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is crucial for attention. Nicotinic AChRs are expressed on glutamatergic inputs to layer V (LV) cells and on LV interneurons and LVI pyramidal neurons. Whether PFC layers are activated by nAChRs to a similar

  3. Weak toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia cobra venom interacts with both nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mordvintsev, D.Y.; Polyak, Y.L.; Rodionov, D.I.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; Karlsson, E.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Utkin, Y.N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 18 (2009), s. 5065-5075 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine receptors * allosteric interaction * toxins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.042, year: 2009

  4. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Act in Synergy to Facilitate Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Chen, Helen J.; Corcoran, Kevin A.; Guedea, Anita L.; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Wess, Jurgen; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how episodic memories are formed and retrieved is necessary if we are to treat disorders in which they malfunction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the hippocampus and cortex underlie memory formation, but there is conflicting evidence regarding their role in memory retrieval. Additionally, there is no consensus on…

  5. GABAergic Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Express Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells in the different strata of CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus is examined by way of quantitative immunofluorescent double labeling employing M35, the

  6. Multiple inhibitory actions of lidocaine on Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors transplanted to Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Martinez-Pinna, Juan; González-Ros, José Manuel; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2011-06-01

    Lidocaine is a local anaesthetic that blocks sodium channels, but also inhibits several ligand-gated ion-channels. The aim of this work was to unravel the mechanisms by which lidocaine blocks Torpedo nicotinic receptors transplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Acetylcholine-elicited currents were reversibly blocked by lidocaine, in a concentration dependent manner. At doses lower than the IC(50) , lidocaine blocked nicotinic receptors only at negative potentials, indicating an open-channel blockade; the binding site within the channel was at about 30% of the way through the electrical field across the membrane. In the presence of higher lidocaine doses, nicotinic receptors were blocked both at positive and negative potentials, acetylcholine dose-response curve shifted to the right and lidocaine pre-application, before its co-application with acetylcholine, enhanced the current inhibition, indicating all together that lidocaine also blocked resting receptors; besides, it increased the current decay rate. When lidocaine, at low doses, was co-applied with 2-(triethylammonio)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamide bromide, edrophonium or 1,5-bis(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl)pentan-3-one dibromide, which are quaternary-ammonium molecules that also blocked nicotinic receptors, there was an additive inhibitory effect, indicating that these molecules bound to different sites within the channel pore. These results prove that lidocaine blocks nicotinic receptors by several independent mechanisms and evidence the diverse and complex modulation of this receptor by structurally related molecules. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Molecular Determinants of α3β4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Inhibition by Triterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sanung; Kim, Yoon Suh; Lee, Sung Bae; Noh, Shinhwa; Yeom, Hye Duck; Bae, Hyunsu; Lee, Jun-Ho

    2018-01-01

    In a previous work, we reported the regulatory role of the triterpenoids on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 3 A receptors activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes (Eur. J. Pharmacol., 615, 2009, Lee et al.). In the present report, we studied the modulation of triterpenoids on the activity of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor type α3β4. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments were used to test acetylcholine mediated inward current (I ACh ). Treatment with triterpenoids (dehydroeburicoic acid, 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C and pachymic acid) inhibited I ACh in a concentration dependent and reversible manner. The IC 50 values for pachymic acid, dehydroeburicoic acid, and 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C were 14.9, 37.7, and 20.9 µM, respectively. The inhibitory regulation of I ACh by each triterpenoid showed in a non-competitive manner on the activity of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results show that triterpenoids (pachymic acid, dehydroeburicoic acid, 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C) can be used as agents to modulate the activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor type α3β4. Furthermore, molecular docking studies of 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C on α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in silico showed that this molecule interacted predominantly with residues at cavities in the α3 subunit and β4 subunit. This docking assays indicated four potential binding sites for this ligand in the extracellular region at sensor domain of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In point mutagenesis of those whose alanine substitution, 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C potency decreased on W25A of α3 subunit or N109A of β4 subunit in both mutants. The double mutation of W25A of α3 subunit and N109A of β4 subunit was significantly attenuated inhibitory effects by 6α-hydroxypolyporenic acid C. All taken together, this study revealed that molecular basis of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by triterpenoids and provides a novel potent interaction

  8. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  9. Sub-anesthetic concentrations of (R,S)-ketamine metabolites inhibit acetylcholine-evoked currents in α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddel, Ruin; Abdrakhmanova, Galia; Kozak, Joanna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Toll, Lawrence; Jimenez, Lucita; Rosenberg, Avraham; Tran, Thao; Xiao, Yingxian; Zarate, Carlos A; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-01-05

    The effect of the (R,S)-ketamine metabolites (R,S)-norketamine, (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine on the activity of α7 and α3β4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated using patch-clamp techniques. The data indicated that (R,S)-dehydronorketamine inhibited acetylcholine-evoked currents in α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, IC(50) = 55 ± 6 nM, and that (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine, (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine and (R,S)-norketamine also inhibited α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function at concentrations ≤ 1 μM, while (R,S)-ketamine was inactive at these concentrations. The inhibitory effect of (R,S)-dehydronorketamine was voltage-independent and the compound did not competitively displace selective α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands [(125)I]-α-bungarotoxin and [(3)H]-epibatidine indicating that (R,S)-dehydronorketamine is a negative allosteric modulator of the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. (R,S)-Ketamine and (R,S)-norketamine inhibited (S)-nicotine-induced whole-cell currents in cells expressing α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, IC(50) 3.1 and 9.1 μM, respectively, while (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine were weak inhibitors, IC(50) >100 μM. The binding affinities of (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine at the NMDA receptor were also determined using rat brain membranes and the selective NMDA receptor antagonist [(3)H]-MK-801. The calculated K(i) values were 38.95 μM for (S)-dehydronorketamine, 21.19 μM for (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and>100 μM for (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine. The results suggest that the inhibitory activity of ketamine metabolites at the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor may contribute to the clinical effect of the drug. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.A.; Dunn, S.M.J.; Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Middlemas, D.S.; Crawford, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  11. On homology modeling of the M-2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 525-538 ISSN 0920-654X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * G-protein coupled receptor * homology energy estimation * MM-GBSA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2013

  12. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor-lipid interactions: from model membranes to human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenziger, John E; daCosta, Corrie J B

    2013-03-01

    Lipids are potent modulators of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Lipids influence nicotinic receptor function by allosteric mechanisms, stabilizing varying proportions of pre-existing resting, open, desensitized, and uncoupled conformations. Recent structures reveal that lipids could alter function by modulating transmembrane α-helix/α-helix packing, which in turn could alter the conformation of the allosteric interface that links the agonist-binding and transmembrane pore domains-this interface is essential in the coupling of agonist binding to channel gating. We discuss potential mechanisms by which lipids stabilize different conformational states in the context of the hypothesis that lipid-nicotinic receptor interactions modulate receptor function at biological synapses.

  14. Regional distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the telencephalon of the pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waechtler, K.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was studied autoradiographically in croystat sections of the pigeon telencephalon using 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzylate as a ligand. Highest receptor density was observed in the hyperstriatum ventrale, palaeostriatum augmentatum, septum, and parts of the archistriatum. In sites of known sensory input of neostriatum (field L) and ectostriatum low receptor binding was observed. Acetylcholinesterase distribution is in good agreement with the receptor picture only in the basal telencephalon. In the pallium differences in the pattern of these two components can be seen. (author)

  15. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one...... conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade...

  16. Kinetics of agonist-induced intrinsic fluorescence changes in the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hideki; Raftery, Michael A

    2010-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo electric organs is a ligand-gated ion channel that undergoes conformational transitions for activation and/or desensitization. Earlier work suggested that intrinsic fluorescence changes of the receptor monitors kinetic transitions toward the high-affinity, desensitized state. Here, using highly purified membrane preparations to minimize contaminating fluorescence, we examined kinetic mechanisms of the receptor as monitored by its intrinsic fluorescence. Fluorescence changes were specific to the receptor as they were blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin and were induced by agonists, but not by the antagonist hexamethonium. Acetylcholine, carbamylcholine and suberyldicholine showed only one kinetic phase with relatively fast rates (t(1/2) = 0.2-1.2 s). Effective dissociation constants were at least an order of magnitude higher than the high affinity, equilibrium binding constants for these agonists. A semirigid agonist isoarecolone-methiodide, whose activation constant was approximately 3-fold lower than acetylcholine, induced an additional slow phase (t(1/2) = 4.5-9 s) with apparent rates that increased and then decreased in a concentration dependent manner, revealing a branched mechanism for conformational transitions. We propose that the intrinsic fluorescence changes of the receptor describe a process(es) toward a fast desensitization state prior to the formation of the high affinity state.

  17. Acetylcholine modulates gamma frequency oscillations in the hippocampus by activation of muscarinic M1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterton, Ruth T; Broad, Lisa M; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R

    2017-06-01

    Modulation of gamma oscillations is important for the processing of information and the disruption of gamma oscillations is a prominent feature of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Gamma oscillations are generated by the interaction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons where their precise frequency and amplitude are controlled by the balance of excitation and inhibition. Acetylcholine enhances the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons and suppresses both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, but the net modulatory effect on gamma oscillations is not known. Here, we find that the power, but not frequency, of optogenetically induced gamma oscillations in the CA3 region of mouse hippocampal slices is enhanced by low concentrations of the broad-spectrum cholinergic agonist carbachol but reduced at higher concentrations. This bidirectional modulation of gamma oscillations is replicated within a mathematical model by neuronal depolarisation, but not by reducing synaptic conductances, mimicking the effects of muscarinic M1 receptor activation. The predicted role for M1 receptors was supported experimentally; bidirectional modulation of gamma oscillations by acetylcholine was replicated by a selective M1 receptor agonist and prevented by genetic deletion of M1 receptors. These results reveal that acetylcholine release in CA3 of the hippocampus modulates gamma oscillation power but not frequency in a bidirectional and dose-dependent manner by acting primarily through muscarinic M1 receptors. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Novel insights into M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function by the use of gene targeting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahisa; Basile, Anthony S; Fedorova, Irina; Zhang, Weilie; Duttaroy, Alokesh; Cui, Yinghong; Lamping, Kathryn G; Faraci, Frank M; Deng, Chu Xia; Wess, Jürgen

    2003-12-05

    Until recently, little was known about the possible physiological functions of the M(5) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype, the last member of the muscarinic receptor family (M(1)-M(5)) to be cloned. To learn more about the potential physiological roles of this receptor subtype, we generated and analyzed M(5) receptor-deficient mice (M5 -/- mice). Strikingly, acetylcholine, a potent dilator of most vascular beds, virtually lost the ability to dilate cerebral arteries and arterioles in M5 -/- mice, suggesting that endothelial M(5) receptors mediate this activity in wild-type mice. This effect was specific for cerebral blood vessels, since acetylcholine-mediated dilation of extra-cerebral arteries remained fully intact in M5 -/- mice. In addition, in vitro neurotransmitter release experiments indicated that M(5) receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals play a role in facilitating muscarinic agonist-induced dopamine release in the striatum, consistent with the observation that the dopaminergic neurons innervating the striatum almost exclusively express the M(5) receptor subtype. We also found that the rewarding effects of morphine, the prototypical opiate analgesic, were substantially reduced in M5 -/- mice, as measured in the conditioned place preference paradigm. Furthermore, both the somatic and affective components of naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly attenuated in M5 -/- mice. It is likely that these behavioral deficits are caused by the lack of mesolimbic M(5) receptors, activation of which is known to stimulate dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. These results convincingly demonstrate that the M(5) muscarinic receptor is involved in modulating several important pharmacological and behavioral functions. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of drug addiction and certain cerebrovascular disorders.

  19. Cyclic imine toxins from dinoflagellates: a growing family of potent antagonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molgó, Jordi; Marchot, Pascale; Aráoz, Rómulo; Benoit, Evelyne; Iorga, Bogdan I; Zakarian, Armen; Taylor, Palmer; Bourne, Yves; Servent, Denis

    2017-08-01

    We present an overview of the toxicological profile of the fast-acting, lipophilic macrocyclic imine toxins, an emerging family of organic compounds associated with algal blooms, shellfish contamination and neurotoxicity. Worldwide, shellfish contamination incidents are expanding; therefore, the significance of these toxins for the shellfish food industry deserves further study. Emphasis is directed to the dinoflagellate species involved in their production, their chemical structures, and their specific mode of interaction with their principal natural molecular targets, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, or with the soluble acetylcholine-binding protein, used as a surrogate receptor model. The dinoflagellates Karenia selliformis and Alexandrium ostenfeldii / A. peruvianum have been implicated in the biosynthesis of gymnodimines and spirolides, while Vulcanodinium rugosum is the producer of pinnatoxins and portimine. The cyclic imine toxins are characterized by a macrocyclic skeleton comprising 14-27 carbon atoms, flanked by two conserved moieties, the cyclic imine and the spiroketal ring system. These phycotoxins generally display high affinity and broad specificity for the muscle type and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a feature consistent with their binding site at the receptor subunit interfaces, composed of residues highly conserved among all nAChRs, and explaining the diverse toxicity among animal species. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. The anthelmintic levamisole is an allosteric modulator of human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandoski, Mark M; Piket, Barbara; Chang, Jane

    2003-06-13

    L-[-]-2,3,5,6-Tetrahydro-6-phenylimidazo[2,1b]-thiazole hydrochloride (levamisole) is an anthelmintic that targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of parasitic nematodes. We report here the effects of levamisole on human neuronal alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 nicotinic receptors, heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied with the voltage clamp method. Applied alone, levamisole was a very weak partial agonist for the two subunit combinations. When co-applied with acetylcholine, micromolar concentrations of levamisole potentiated responses, while millimolar concentrations inhibited them; these effects were complex functions of both acetylcholine and levamisole concentrations. The differences in the levamisole effects on the two receptor combinations suggest that the effects are mediated by the beta subunit. Several combinations of agonist and anthelmintic gave the dual potentiation/inhibition behavior, suggesting that the modulatory effects are general. Levamisole inhibition showed macroscopic characteristics of open channel block. Several results led us to conclude that levamisole potentiation occurs through noncompetitive binding to the receptor. We propose pseudo-site binding for noncompetitive potentiation by levamisole.

  1. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains.

  2. Agonist activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, JasKiran K.; Savolainen, Mari; Young, Gareth T.; Zwart, Ruud; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, such as acetylcholine, act at an extracellular “orthosteric” binding site located at the interface between two adjacent subunits. Here, we present evidence of potent activation of α7 nAChRs via an allosteric transmembrane site. Previous studies have identified a series of nAChR-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that lack agonist activity but are able to potentiate responses to orthosteric agonists, such as acetylcholine. It has been shown, for example, that TQS acts as a conventional α7 nAChR PAM. In contrast, we have found that a compound with close chemical similarity to TQS (4BP-TQS) is a potent allosteric agonist of α7 nAChRs. Whereas the α7 nAChR antagonist metyllycaconitine acts competitively with conventional nicotinic agonists, metyllycaconitine is a noncompetitive antagonist of 4BP-TQS. Mutation of an amino acid (M253L), located in a transmembrane cavity that has been proposed as being the binding site for PAMs, completely blocks agonist activation by 4BP-TQS. In contrast, this mutation had no significant effect on agonist activation by acetylcholine. Conversely, mutation of an amino acid located within the known orthosteric binding site (W148F) has a profound effect on agonist potency of acetylcholine (resulting in a shift of ∼200-fold in the acetylcholine dose-response curve), but had little effect on the agonist dose-response curve for 4BP-TQS. Computer docking studies with an α7 homology model provides evidence that both TQS and 4BP-TQS bind within an intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that agonist activation of nAChRs can occur via an allosteric transmembrane site. PMID:21436053

  3. Differential Contribution of Subunit Interfaces to α9α10 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffi, Juan Carlos; Marcovich, Irina; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Corradi, Jeremías; Collins, Toby; Lipovsek, María Marcela; Moglie, Marcelo; Plazas, Paola V.; Craig, Patricio O.; Millar, Neil S.; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can be assembled from either homomeric or heteromeric pentameric subunit combinations. At the interface of the extracellular domains of adjacent subunits lies the acetylcholine binding site, composed of a principal component provided by one subunit and a complementary component of the adjacent subunit. Compared with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) assembled from α and β subunits, the α9α10 receptor is an atypical member of the family. It is a heteromeric receptor composed only of α subunits. Whereas mammalian α9 subunits can form functional homomeric α9 receptors, α10 subunits do not generate functional channels when expressed heterologously. Hence, it has been proposed that α10 might serve as a structural subunit, much like a β subunit of heteromeric nAChRs, providing only complementary components to the agonist binding site. Here, we have made use of site-directed mutagenesis to examine the contribution of subunit interface domains to α9α10 receptors by a combination of electrophysiological and radioligand binding studies. Characterization of receptors containing Y190T mutations revealed unexpectedly that both α9 and α10 subunits equally contribute to the principal components of the α9α10 nAChR. In addition, we have shown that the introduction of a W55T mutation impairs receptor binding and function in the rat α9 subunit but not in the α10 subunit, indicating that the contribution of α9 and α10 subunits to complementary components of the ligand-binding site is nonequivalent. We conclude that this asymmetry, which is supported by molecular docking studies, results from adaptive amino acid changes acquired only during the evolution of mammalian α10 subunits. PMID:28069778

  4. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  5. Intersubunit bridge formation governs agonist efficacy at nicotinic acetylcholine alpha4beta2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Line Aagot Hede; Ahring, Philip Kiær; Jensen, Marianne Lerbech

    2012-01-01

    The a4ß2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been pursued as a drug target for treatment of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids for decades. Still, a thorough understanding of structure-function relationships of a4ß2 agonists is lacking....... Using binding experiments, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography we have investigated a consecutive series of five prototypical pyridine-containing agonists derived from 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane. A correlation between binding affinities at a4ß2 and the acetylcholine binding protein from...... Lymnaea stagnalis (Ls-AChBP) confirms Ls-AChBP as structural surrogate for a4ß2 receptors. Crystal structures of five agonists with efficacies at a4ß2 from 21-76% were determined in complex with Ls-AChBP. No variation in closure of loop C is observed despite large efficacy variations. Instead...

  6. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  7. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39 ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.816, year: 2015

  8. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Parastoo; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1 regions), the medial prefrontal cortex or the basolateral amygdala in the effect of acute or sub-chronic stress on nicotine-induced conditioned place preference. Our results indicated that subcutaneous administration of nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) induced significant conditioned place preference. Exposure to acute or sub-chronic elevated platform stress potentiated the response of an ineffective dose of nicotine. Pre-conditioning intra-CA1 (0.5-4 µg/rat) or intra-medial prefrontal cortex (0.2-0.3 µg/rat) microinjection of mecamylamine (a non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) reversed acute stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward as measured in the conditioned place preference paradigm. By contrast, pre-conditioning intra-basolateral amygdala microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) potentiated the effects of acute stress on nicotine reward. Our findings also showed that intra-CA1 or intra-medial prefrontal cortex, but not intra-basolateral amygdala, microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) prevented the effect of sub-chronic stress on nicotine reward. These findings suggest that exposure to elevated platform stress potentiates the rewarding effect of nicotine which may be associated with the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. It seems that there is a different contribution of the basolateral amygdala, the medial prefrontal cortex or the CA1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine-induced conditioned place preference.

  9. Myasthenogenicity of the main immunogenic region and endogenous muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, JIE; LINDSTROM, JON

    2011-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) many pathologically significant autoantibodies are directed at the main immunogenic region (MIR), a conformation-dependent region at the extracellular tip of α1 subunits of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Human muscle AChR α1 MIR sequences were integrated into Aplysia ACh binding protein (AChBP). The chimera was potent at inducing both acute and chronic EAMG, though less potent than Torpedo electric organ AChR. ...

  10. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Andrew K.; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H.; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldw...

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall......, these studies have shown that amino acids within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptors define their selectivities for different G-proteins and that multiple discontinuous epitopes contribute to their selectivities for different ligands. The residues that contribute to ligand binding and G-protein coupling...

  12. Epibatidine-derivatives: ligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westera, G.; Patt, J.T.; Jankowski, K.; Bertrand, D.; Spang, J.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Epibatidine, isolated from the Ecuadorian frog Epipedobates tricolar, has been synthesized. 11 C-N-methyl derivate is investigated as useful nicotinergic receptor ligand by electrophysiological methods and in vivo mice experiments. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  13. Interaction of alpha-conotoxin ImII and its analogs with nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins: additional binding sites on Torpedo receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasheverov, I.E.; Zhmak, M.N.; Fish, A.; Rucktooa, P.; Khruschov, A.Y.; Osipov, A.V.; Ziganshin, R.H.; D'Hoedt, D.; Bertrand, D.; Sixma, T.K.; Smit, A.B.; Tsetlin, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    α-Conotoxins interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) at the sites for agonists/competitive antagonists. α-Conotoxins blocking muscle-type or α7 nAChRs compete with α-bungarotoxin. However, α-conotoxin ImII, a close homolog of the α7

  14. Characterization of a series of anabaseine-derived compounds reveals that the 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine derivative is a selective agonist at neuronal nicotinic alpha 7/125I-alpha-bungarotoxin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Meyer, E M; Henry, J C; Muraskin, S I; Kem, W R; Papke, R L

    1995-01-01

    Investigation of the naturally occurring, nicotinic agonist anabaseine and novel derivatives has shown that these compounds have cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects. The hypothesis that these arise at least in part through actions on brain nicotinic receptors was evaluated by examining the ability of these compounds to displace the binding of nicotinic ligands and to affect the function of the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The derivative 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine anabaseine (DMAC) was found to be a selective alpha 7 receptor agonist; it was more potent than nicotine, acetylcholine, anabaseine, and other derivatives at activating the alpha 7 receptor subtype, while displaying little agonist activity at alpha 4 beta 2 and other receptor subtypes. Compared with anabaseine and the other derivatives, DMAC was the most potent at displacing 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin binding (putative alpha 7) and the least potent at displacing [3H]cytisine binding (putative alpha 4 beta 2) to brain membranes. Independently of agonist activities, all of the novel compounds displayed secondary inhibitory activity at both receptor subtypes. At the alpha 4 beta 2 receptor subtype, inhibition by the 3-(2,4)-dimethoxybenzylidene derivative was enhanced by coapplication of acetylcholine, suggesting a noncompetitive form of inhibition. Anabaseine and nicotine prolonged the time course of activation of alpha 4 beta 2 receptors, compared with acetylcholine, suggesting sequential channel-blocking activity. As selective agonists, anabaseine derivatives such as DMAC may be useful for elucidating the function of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors, including their potential role(s) in the cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects of nicotinic agents.

  15. Biophysical and pharmacological characterization of α6-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Andreas H; Strøbæk, Dorte; Dyhring, Tino; Jensen, Marianne L; Peters, Dan; Grunnet, Morten; Timmermann, Daniel B; Ahring, Philip K

    2014-01-13

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR's) containing the α6 subunit (α6) are putative drug targets of relevance to Parkinson's disease and nicotine addiction. However, heterologous expression of α6 receptors has proven challenging which has stifled drug discovery efforts. Here, we investigate potential new avenues for achieving functional α6 receptor expression. Combinations of chimeric and mutated α6, β2 and β3 subunits were co-expressed in the human HEK293 cell line and receptor expression was assessed using Ca(2+)-imaging (FLIPR™) and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Transient transfections of a chimeric α6/α3 subunit construct in combination with β2 and β3(V9'S) gave rise to significant acetylcholine-evoked whole-cell currents. Increasing the β3(V9'S):β2:α6/α3 cDNA ratio, resulted in a significantly higher fraction of cells with robust current levels. Using an excess of wild-type β3, significant functional expression of α6/α3β2β3 was also demonstrated. Comparing the acetylcholine concentration-response relationship of α6/α3β2β3(V9'S) to that of α6/α3β2β3 revealed the β3 point mutation to result in decreased current decay rate and increased ACh agonist potency. Ca(2+)-imaging experiments showed preservation of basic α6 receptor pharmacology. Our results establish that α6/α3β2β3(V9'S) replicate several basic features of native α6 receptors but also highlight several caveats associated with using this construct and may therefore provide guidance for future drug hunting efforts. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Metabotropic GABAB receptors mediate GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release in the rat neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malomouzh, Artem I; Petrov, Konstantin A; Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E

    2015-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Here, we studied the effects of GABA on non-quantal, spontaneous, and evoked quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release from motor nerve endings. We found that while the application of 10 μM of GABA had no effect on spontaneous quantal ACh release, as detected by the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, GABA reduced the non-quantal ACh release by 57%, as determined by the H-effect value. Finally, the evoked quantal ACh release, estimated by calculating the quantal content of full-sized endplate potentials (EPPs), was reduced by 34%. GABA's inhibitory effect remained unchanged after pre-incubation with picrotoxin, an ionotropic GABAA receptor blocker, but was attenuated following application of the GABAB receptor blocker CGP 55845, which itself had no effect on ACh release. An inhibitor of phospholipase C, U73122, completely prevented the GABA-induced decrease in ACh release. Immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of both subunits of the GABAB receptor (GABAB R1 and GABAB R2) in the neuromuscular junction. These findings suggest that metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse and their activation results in a phospholipase C-mediated reduction in the intensity of non-quantal and evoked quantal ACh release. We investigated the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on neuromuscular transmission. GABA reduced the non-quantal and evoked quantal release of acetylcholine. These effects are mediated by GABAB receptors and are implemented via phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Our findings suggest that in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse, metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed and their activation results in a reduction in the intensity of acetylcholine release. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto; de Valdivia, Ernesto Gonzalez; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M M; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels O; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin R; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2013-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked by the antagonists. A- and B-type mAChRs were also cloned and functionally characterized from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Recently, Haga et al. (Nature 2012, 482: 547-551) published the crystal structure of the human m2 mAChR, revealing 14 amino acid residues forming the binding pocket for QNB. These residues are identical between the human m2 and the D. melanogaster and T. castaneum A-type mAChRs, while many of them are different between the human m2 and the B-type receptors. Using bioinformatics, one orthologue of the A-type and one of the B-type mAChRs could also be found in all other arthropods with a sequenced genome. Protostomes, such as arthropods, and deuterostomes, such as mammals and other vertebrates, belong to two evolutionarily distinct lineages of animal evolution that split about 700 million years ago. We found that animals that originated before this split, such as cnidarians (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs.

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues. The...

  19. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S; Kanui, Titus I; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1-5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies with [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in the formalin test. Administration of 50 mg/kg VU0152100 resulted in a non-significant tendency towards antinociception. The antinociceptive effects were reversed by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. Binding studies indicated presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with a radioligand affinity comparable to that reported in mice. In conclusion, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are present in the naked mole-rat and contribute to antinociception in the naked mole-rat.

  20. Probing for and Quantifying Agonist Hydrogen Bonds in α6β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Michael R; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2017-04-04

    Designing subtype-selective agonists for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is a challenging and significant goal aided by intricate knowledge of each subtype's binding patterns. We previously reported that in α6β2 receptors, acetylcholine makes a functional cation-π interaction with Trp149, but nicotine and TC299423 do not, suggesting a distinctive binding site. This work explores hydrogen binding at the backbone carbonyl associated with α6β2 Trp149. Substituting residue i + 1, Thr150, with its α-hydroxy analogue (Tah) attenuates the carbonyl's hydrogen bond accepting ability. At α6(T150Tah)β2, nicotine shows a 24-fold loss of function, TC299423 shows a modest loss, and acetylcholine shows no effect. Nicotine was further analyzed via a double-mutant cycle analysis utilizing N'-methylnicotinium, which indicated a hydrogen bond in α6β2 with a ΔΔG of 2.6 kcal/mol. Thus, even though nicotine does not make the conserved cation-π interaction with Trp149, it still makes a functional hydrogen bond to its associated backbone carbonyl.

  1. Monkey adrenal chromaffin cells express α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Hernández-Vivanco

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs that contain α6 and β4 subunits have been demonstrated functionally in human adrenal chromaffin cells, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, and on noradrenergic terminals in the hippocampus of adolescent mice. In human adrenal chromaffin cells, α6β4* nAChRs (the asterisk denotes the possible presence of additional subunits are the predominant subtype whereas in rodents, the predominant nAChR is the α3β4* subtype. Here we present molecular and pharmacological evidence that chromaffin cells from monkey (Macaca mulatta also express α6β4* receptors. PCR was used to show the presence of transcripts for α6 and β4 subunits and pharmacological characterization was performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology in combination with α-conotoxins that target the α6β4* subtype. Acetylcholine-evoked currents were sensitive to inhibition by BuIA[T5A,P6O] and MII[H9A,L15A]; α-conotoxins that inhibit α6-containing nAChRs. Two additional agonists were used to probe for the expression of α7 and β2-containing nAChRs. Cells with currents evoked by acetylcholine were relatively unresponsive to the α7-selctive agonist choline but responded to the agonist 5-I-A-85380. These studies provide further insights into the properties of natively expressed α6β4* nAChRs.

  2. Unraveling the high- and low-sensitivity agonist responses of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Ahring, Philip K; Christensen, Jeppe K

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal a4ß2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors exist as two distinct subtypes, (a4)(2)(ß2)(3) and (a4)(3)(ß2)(2), and biphasic responses to acetylcholine and other agonists have been ascribed previously to coexistence of these two receptor subtypes. We offer a novel and radical explanation...... for the observation of two distinct agonist sensitivities. Using different expression ratios of mammalian a4 and ß2 subunits and concatenated constructs, we demonstrate that a biphasic response is an intrinsic functional property of the (a4)(3)(ß2)(2) receptor. In addition to two high-sensitivity sites at a4ß2...... interfaces, the (a4)(3)(ß2)(2) receptor contains a third low-sensitivity agonist binding site in the a4a4 interface. Occupation of this site is required for full activation and is responsible for the widened dynamic response range of this receptor subtype. By site-directed mutagenesis, we show that three...

  3. Synaptic connections of starburst amacrine cells and localization of acetylcholine receptors in primate retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Elizabeth S; Dmitrieva, Nina; Keyser, Kent T; Lindstrom, Jon M; Hersh, Louis B; Marshak, David W

    2003-06-16

    Starburst amacrine cells in the macaque retina were studied by electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. We found that these amacrine cells make a type of synapse not described previously; they are presynaptic to axon terminals of bipolar cells. We also confirmed that starburst amacrine cells are presynaptic to ganglion cell dendrites and amacrine cell processes. In order to determine the functions of these synapses, we localized acetylcholine receptors using a monoclonal antibody (mAb210) that recognizes human alpha3- and alpha5-containing nicotinic receptors and also antisera against the five known subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The majority of the mAb210-immunoreactive perikarya were amacrine cells and ganglion cells, but a subpopulation of bipolar cells was also labeled. A subset of bipolar cells and a subset of horizontal cells were labeled with antibodies to M3 muscarinic receptors. A subset of amacrine cells, including those that contain cholecystokinin, were labeled with antibodies to M2 receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that acetylcholine can modulate the activity of retinal ganglion cells by multiple pathways. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Activation of nicotinic receptors can contribute to endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in the rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qian; Leung, Susan W S; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine causes endothelium-dependent relaxations in the rat aorta. Both muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in endothelial cells. It is generally accepted that mAChRs are responsible for the endothelium-dependent relaxations evoked by acetylcholine. The present study was designed to investigate whether nAChRs can also be involved in such responses evoked by the cholinergic transmitter. Rings with or without endothelium of aortae of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) normotensive rats were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of isometric tension. In WKY aortae the muscarinic antagonist atropine abolished the relaxations to increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, confirming that mAChRs are responsible mainly for the response under control conditions. In SHR aortae, atropine caused only partial inhibition of the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine; the remaining decreases in tension were inhibited by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine, which did not significantly affect the response in the absence of atropine in either SHR or WKY preparations. Thus, when mAChRs are inhibited, nAChRs mediate relaxation to the cholinergic transmitter in the SHR but not the WKY aorta. Nicotine, a direct agonist of the nicotinic receptor, induced endothelium-dependent relaxations in both SHR and WKY rats via the activation of α7-nAChRs, but not by mecamylamine-sensitive nicotinic receptors (α3 subtype). The acetylcholine-induced, atropine-insensitive relaxations and those to nicotine both involve the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway. The present study demonstrates that the activation of nAChRs can contribute to acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of hypertensive animals and suggests that these receptors may contribute to the endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone.

  5. Allosteric modulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by physostigmine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Lucie; Krůšek, Jan; Hendrych, Tomáš; Vyskočil, František

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1048, - (2005), s. 355-358 ISSN 0077-8923 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/02/1213; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/02/1333; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/03/H148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : nicotinic ACh receptor * serine * desensitization Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.971, year: 2005

  6. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S; Maksimov, Georgy V

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the "axon-SC" interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+-influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization.

  7. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatranska, M.; Budai, D.; Gulya, K; Kvetnansky, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [ 3 H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  8. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  9. Fast kinetic studies on the allosteric interactions between acetylcholine receptor and local anesthetic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, T; Changeux, J P

    1979-02-15

    Preincubation of receptor-rich membrane fragments from Torpedo marmorata with tertiary amine local anesthetics and several toxins such as histrionicotoxin, crotoxin and cerulotoxin, modifies the amplitude and time course of the relaxation processes monitored upon rapid mixing of the membrane fragments with the fluorescent agonist, Dns-C6-Cho. In particular, the amplitude of the rapid relaxation process, which is proportional to the fraction of acetylcholine receptor sites in a high-affinity state, increases; accordingly, the rate constant of the 'slow' and 'intermediate' relaxation processes also increases up to ten times (except with histrionicotoxin) whereas in a higher range of local anesthetic concentrations the rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process decreases. The data are accounted for by a two-state model of the acetylcholine regulator, assuming distinct binding sites for cholinergic agonists and local anesthetics and allosteric interactions between these two classes of sites; local anesthetics stabilize the regulator in a high-affinity state for agonists even in the absence of agonist, and modify the rate constants for th interconversions between the low-affinity and high-affinity states. The model accounts for the 'slow' fluorescence increase monitored upon addition of local anesthetics to a suspension of receptor-rich membranes supplemented with trace amounts of Dns-C6-Cho. The effect of local anesthetics on the apparent rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process can be accounted for on the basis of an additional low-affinity binding of local anesthetics to the acetylcholine receptor site. Finally the increase of the apparent rate constant of the 'intermediate' relaxation process can be simply accounted for by assuming the existence of a third state, corresponding to the 'active' state, to which local anesthetics bind and block ionic transport.

  10. Degradation rate of acetylcholine receptors inserted into denervated vertebrate neuromuscular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyng, S.L.; Salpeter, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Many studies exist on the effect of denervation on the degradation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (nmj). These studies have described the behavior of either the total population of junctional receptors at different times after denervation, or of the receptors present at the time of denervation. No experimental studies yet exist on the degradation rate of the receptors newly inserted into denervated junctions. In the previous studies, the original receptors of mouse sternomastoid muscles were found to retain the slow degradation (t 1/2) of approximately 8-10 d of innervated junctional receptors for up to 10 d after denervation before accelerating to a t 1/2 of approximately 3 d. The total junctional receptors, on the other hand, showed a progressive increase in degradation rate from a t 1/2 of 8-10 d to a t 1/2 of 1 d. To reconcile these earlier observations, the present study examines the degradation of new receptors inserted into the nmj after denervation. To avoid possible contamination of the data with postdenervation extrajunctional receptors, we used transmission electron microscope autoradiography to study only receptors located at the postjunctional fold of the nmj. We established that the new receptors inserted into denervated junctions have a t 1/2 of approximately 1 d, considerably faster than that of the original receptors and equivalent to that of postdenervation extrajunctional receptors. Both original and new receptors are interspersed at the top of the junctional folds. Thus, until all the original receptors are degraded, the postjunctional membrane contains two populations of AChRs that maintain a total steady-state site density but degrade at different rates

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Laura A; Levey, Allan I

    2004-01-01

    The M1, M2 and M4 subtypes of mAChRs are the predominant receptors in the CNS. These receptors activate a multitude of signaling pathways important for modulating neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and feedback regulation of ACh release. In addition, novel functions mediated by mAChRs are currently being discovered. These studies are greatly facilitated by the recent development of subtype selective toxins and mice lacking individual mAChR genes. Studies in cell culture and the rodent brain demonstrate that mAChR internalization and intracellular trafficking is an important component of mAChR regulation. Characterizing mAChR intracellular trafficking could help facilitate the development of selective mAChR ligands. For example, a selective M1 agonist would cause a shift in the distribution of M1 from the cell surface to an intracellular distribution, while M2 and M4 would remain on the cell surface. Characterizing mAChR intracellular trafficking is also important for understanding the cellular mechanisms that regulate mAChR cell surface expression and signaling. Furthermore, intracellular trafficking has recently been demonstrated to play a role in the development of tolerance to drugs (Whistler et al., 1999; He et al., 2002). Because individual mAChR subtypes are novel targets for treatments of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, understanding the mechanisms that regulate mAChR signaling and intracellular trafficking following acute and chronic stimulation might lead to the development of rational strategies.

  12. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elevates intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in accessory lobe neurons of the chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keita; Kitamura, Naoki; Suzuki, Yuki; Yamanaka, Yuko; Shinohara, Hikaru; Shibuya, Izumi

    2015-04-01

    Accessory lobes are protrusions located at the lateral sides of the spinal cord of chicks and it has been proposed that they play a role as a sensory organ for equilibrium during walking. We have reported that functional neurons exist in the accessory lobe. As there is histological evidence that synaptic terminals of cholinergic nerves exist near the somata of accessory lobe neurons, we examined the effects of acetylcholine on changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i), as an index of cellular activities. Acetylcholine (0.1-100 µM) caused a transient rise in the [Ca2+]i. Acetylcholine-evoked [Ca2+]i rises were observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, and they were abolished in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase of intracellular Ca2+ stores or atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. mRNAs coding M3 and M5 isoforms of the muscarinic receptors were detected in accessory lobes by the RT-PCR. These results indicate that chick accessory lobe neurons express functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and that acetylcholine stimulates Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores, which elevates the [Ca2+]i in the somata of accessory lobe neurons, through activation of these receptors. Cholinergic synaptic transmission to the accessory lobe neurons may regulate some cellular functions through muscarinic receptors.

  13. Subtype-specific mechanisms for functional interaction between α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limapichat, Walrati; Dougherty, Dennis A; Lester, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    P2X receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) display functional and physical interactions in many cell types and heterologous expression systems, but interactions between α6β4-containing (α6β4*) nAChRs and P2X2 receptors and/or P2X3 receptors have not been fully characterized. We measured several types of crosstalk in oocytes coexpressing α6β4 nAChRs and P2X2, P2X3, or P2X2/3 receptors. A novel form of crosstalk occurs between α6β4 nAChRs and P2X2 receptors. P2X2 receptors were forced into a prolonged desensitized state upon activation by ATP through a mechanism that does not depend on the intracellular C terminus of the P2X2 receptors. Coexpression of α6β4 nAChRs with P2X3 receptors shifts the ATP dose-response relation to the right, even in the absence of acetylcholine (ACh). Moreover, currents become nonadditive when ACh and ATP are coapplied, as previously reported for other Cys-loop receptors interacting with P2X receptors, and this crosstalk is dependent on the presence of the P2X3 C-terminal domain. P2X2 receptors also functionally interact with α6β4β3 but through a different mechanism from α6β4. The interaction with P2X3 receptors is less pronounced for the α6β4β3 nAChR than the α6β4 nAChR. We also measured a functional interaction between the α6β4 nAChRs and the heteromeric P2X2/3 receptor. Experiments with the nAChR channel blocker mecamylamine on P2X2-α6β4 oocytes point to the loss of P2X2 channel activity during the crosstalk, whereas the ion channel pores of the P2X receptors were fully functional and unaltered by the receptor interaction for P2X2-α6β4β3, P2X2/3-α6β4, and P2X2/3-α6β4β3. These results may be relevant to dorsal root ganglion cells and to other neurons that coexpress these receptor subunits. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  15. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...... be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine....

  16. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three...... specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor interfaces....... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3...

  17. Choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of human gingival and esophageal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V T; Hall, L L; Gallacher, G; Ndoye, A; Jolkovsky, D L; Webber, R J; Buchli, R; Grando, S A

    2000-04-01

    A non-neuronal cholinergic system that includes neuronal-like nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has recently been described in epithelial cells that line the skin and the upper respiratory tract. Since the use of nicotine-containing products is associated with morbidity in the upper digestive tract, and since nicotine may alter cellular functions directly via nAChRs, we sought to identify and characterize a non-neuronal cholinergic system in the gingival and esophageal epithelia. mRNA transcripts for alpha3, alpha5, alpha7, and beta2 nAChR subunits, choline acetyltransferase, and the asymmetric and globular forms of acetylcholinesterase were amplified from gingival keratinocytes (KC) by means of polymerase chain-reactions. These proteins were visualized in the gingival and esophageal epithelia by means of specific antibodies. Variations in distribution and intensity of immunostaining were found, indicating that the repertoire of cholinergic enzymes and receptors expressed by the cells changes during epithelial maturation, and that an upward concentration gradient of free acetylcholine exists. Blocking of the nAChRs with mecamylamine resulted in reversible loss of cell-to-cell adhesion, and shrinking and rounding of cultured gingival KC. Activation of the receptors with acetylcholine or carbachol caused stretching and peripheral ruffling of the cytoplasmic aprons, and formation of new intercellular contacts. These results demonstrate that both the keratinizing epithelium of attached gingiva and the non-keratinizing epithelium lining the upper two-thirds of the esophageal mucosa possess a non-neuronal cholinergic system. The nAChRs expressed by these epithelia are coupled to regulation of cell adhesion and motility, and may provide a target for the deleterious effects of nicotine.

  18. Peptides from puff adder Bitis arietans venom, novel inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Serebryakova, Marina V; Shelukhina, Irina V; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Kryukova, Elena V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Kopylova, Nina V; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ivanov, Igor A; Kudryashova, Ksenia S; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2016-10-01

    Phospholipase A 2 (named bitanarin) possessing capability to block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was isolated earlier (Vulfius et al., 2011) from puff adder Bitis arietans venom. Further studies indicated that low molecular weight fractions of puff adder venom inhibit nAChRs as well. In this paper, we report on isolation from this venom and characterization of three novel peptides called baptides 1, 2 and 3 that reversibly block nAChRs. To isolate the peptides, the venom of B. arietans was fractionated by gel-filtration and reversed phase chromatography. The amino acid sequences of peptides were established by de novo sequencing using MALDI mass spectrometry. Baptide 1 comprised 7, baptides 2 and 3-10 amino acid residues, the latter being acetylated at the N-terminus. This is the first indication for the presence of such post-translational modification in snake venom proteins. None of the peptides contain cysteine residues. For biological activity studies the peptides were prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Baptide 3 and 2 blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents in isolated Lymnaea stagnalis neurons with IC 50 of about 50 μM and 250 μM, respectively. In addition baptide 2 blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in muscle nAChR heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC 50 of about 3 μM. The peptides did not compete with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and α7 nAChRs at concentration up to 200 μM that suggests non-competitive mode of inhibition. Calcium imaging studies on α7 and muscle nAChRs heterologously expressed in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells showed that on α7 receptor baptide 2 inhibited acetylcholine-induced increasing intracellular calcium concentration with IC 50 of 20.6 ± 3.93 μM. On both α7 and muscle nAChRs the suppression of maximal response to acetylcholine by about 50% was observed at baptide 2 concentration of 25 μM, the value being close to IC 50 on α7 nAChR. These data are

  19. Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate the modulation of acetylcholine release at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsentsevitsky, Andrei; Nurullin, Leniz; Nikolsky, Evgeny; Malomouzh, Artem

    2017-07-01

    There is some evidence that glutamate (Glu) acts as a signaling molecule at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions where acetylcholine (ACh) serves as a neurotransmitter. In this study, performed on the cutaneous pectoris muscle of the frog Rana ridibunda, Glu receptor mechanisms that modulate ACh release processes were analyzed. Electrophysiological experiments showed that Glu reduces both spontaneous and evoked quantal secretion of ACh and synchronizes its release in response to electrical stimulation. Quisqualate, an agonist of ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptors and metabotropic Group I mGlu receptors, also exerted Glu-like inhibitory effects on the secretion of ACh but had no effect on the kinetics of quantal release. Quisqualate's inhibitory effect did not occur when a blocker of Group I mGlu receptors (LY 367385) or an inhibitor of phospholipase C (U73122) was present. An increase in the degree of synchrony of ACh quantal release, such as that produced by Glu, was obtained after application of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). The presence of Group I mGlu and NMDA receptors in the neuromuscular synapse was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, the data suggest that both metabotropic Group I mGlu receptors and ionotropic NMDA receptors are present at the neuromuscular synapse of amphibians, and that the activation of these receptors initiates different mechanisms for the regulation of ACh release from motor nerve terminals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Drugs interfering with Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Their effects on Place Navigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jan; Popelíková, Anna; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Nov 9 (2017), č. článku 215. ISSN 1664-0640 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04047S; GA ČR NV17-30833A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) PAN-17-07 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : scopolamine * biperiden * acetylcholine * receptor * behavior * learning Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.532, year: 2016

  1. Molecular characterization of off-target activities of telithromycin: a potential role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Daniel; Bertrand, Sonia; Neveu, Estelle; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2010-12-01

    Adverse effects have limited the clinical use of telithromycin. Preferential inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) at the neuromuscular junction (α3β2 and NMJ), the ciliary ganglion of the eye (α3β4 and α7), and the vagus nerve innervating the liver (α7) could account for the exacerbation of myasthenia gravis, the visual disturbance, and the liver failure seen with telithromycin use. The studies presented here enable the prediction of expected side effects of macrolides in development, such as solithromycin (CEM-101).

  2. The amygdala modulates morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval via muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayof, A; Khajehpour, L; Zarrindast, M R

    2009-05-05

    The current study was conducted to examine the involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of the amygdala in morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Male Wistar rats implanted bilaterally with cannulas in the amygdala were submitted to a step-through type passive avoidance task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Post-training s.c. administration of morphine at the doses of 5 and 7.5 mg/kg impaired the memory on the test day, which was restored when the same doses of morphine were used as a pre-test drug. This phenomenon is well known as morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Bilateral microinjection of the non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, pilocarpine (0.25 and 0.5 microg/side), into the amygdala with an ineffective dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg s.c.) significantly improved the memory retrieval and mimicked the effects of pre-test administration of a higher dose of morphine. It should be noted that in the animals that received saline after training and tested following intra-amygdala administration of pilocarpine (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 microg/side) and those which received post-training morphine (7.5 mg/kg s.c.) and pre-test intra-amygdala microinjection of the same doses of pilocarpine, no significant change was observed in the step-through latencies. On the other hand, pre-test intra-amygdala microinjection of a selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.125 and 0.25 microg/side) inhibited morphine-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, no significant changes were seen in memory retrieval of the animals trained before saline treatment and tested following intra-amygdala microinjection of the same doses of scopolamine (0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 microg/side). Bilateral microinjection of scopolamine into the amygdala reversed the pilocarpine-induced potentiation of the morphine response. In view of the known actions of the drugs used, the present

  3. Mode of action of the positive modulator PNU-120596 on α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Anett K; Pesti, Krisztina; Mike, Arpad; Vizi, E Sylvester

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the mode of action of PNU-120596, a type II positive allosteric modulator of the rat α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed by GH4C1 cells, using patch-clamp and fast solution exchange. We made two important observations: first, while PNU-120596 rapidly associated to desensitized receptors, it had at least hundredfold lower affinity to resting conformation, therefore at 10 μM concentration it dissociated from resting receptors; and second, binding of PNU-120596 slowed down dissociation of choline molecules from the receptor radically. We propose that when agonist concentration is transiently elevated in the continuous presence of the modulator (as upon the neuronal release of acetylcholine in a modulator-treated animal) these two elements together cause occurrence of a cycle of events: Binding of the modulator is limited in the absence of the agonist. When the agonist is released, it binds to the receptor, and induces desensitization, thereby enabling modulator binding. Modulator binding in turn traps the agonist within its binding site for a prolonged period of time. Once the agonist finally dissociated, the modulator can also dissociate without re-binding, and the receptor assumes its original resting conformation. In kinetic simulations this "trapped agonist cycle" mechanism did not require that the orthosteric and allosteric ligands symmetrically modify each other's affinity, only the modulator must decrease agonist accessibility, and the agonist must induce a conformation that is accessible to the modulator. This mechanism effectively prolongs and amplifies the effect of the agonist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M3 Mutation Causes Urinary Bladder Disease and a Prune-Belly-like Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Thiele, Holger; Mir, Sevgi; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sozeri, Betül; Reutter, Heiko; Draaken, Markus; Ludwig, Michael; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Stuart, Helen M; Ranjzad, Parisa; Hanley, Neil A; Jennings, Rachel; Newman, William G; Wilcox, Duncan T; Thiel, Uwe; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Beetz, Rolf; Hoyer, Peter F; Konrad, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Nürnberg, Peter; Woolf, Adrian S

    2011-11-11

    Urinary bladder malformations associated with bladder outlet obstruction are a frequent cause of progressive renal failure in children. We here describe a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) (1q41-q44) homozygous frameshift mutation in familial congenital bladder malformation associated with a prune-belly-like syndrome, defining an isolated gene defect underlying this sometimes devastating disease. CHRM3 encodes the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which we show is present in developing renal epithelia and bladder muscle. These observations may imply that M3 has a role beyond its known contribution to detrusor contractions. This Mendelian disease caused by a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mutation strikingly phenocopies Chrm3 null mutant mice. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in attention circuitry: the role of layer VI neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Eliane; Piva, Matthew; Tian, Michael K; Bailey, Craig D C; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-04-01

    Cholinergic modulation of prefrontal cortex is essential for attention. In essence, it focuses the mind on relevant, transient stimuli in support of goal-directed behavior. The excitation of prefrontal layer VI neurons through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors optimizes local and top-down control of attention. Layer VI of prefrontal cortex is the origin of a dense feedback projection to the thalamus and is one of only a handful of brain regions that express the α5 nicotinic receptor subunit, encoded by the gene chrna5. This accessory nicotinic receptor subunit alters the properties of high-affinity nicotinic receptors in layer VI pyramidal neurons in both development and adulthood. Studies investigating the consequences of genetic deletion of α5, as well as other disruptions to nicotinic receptors, find attention deficits together with altered cholinergic excitation of layer VI neurons and aberrant neuronal morphology. Nicotinic receptors in prefrontal layer VI neurons play an essential role in focusing attention under challenging circumstances. In this regard, they do not act in isolation, but rather in concert with cholinergic receptors in other parts of prefrontal circuitry. This review urges an intensification of focus on the cellular mechanisms and plasticity of prefrontal attention circuitry. Disruptions in attention are one of the greatest contributing factors to disease burden in psychiatric and neurological disorders, and enhancing attention may require different approaches in the normal and disordered prefrontal cortex.

  6. Structure-activity relationships of acetylcholine derivatives with Lucilia cuprina nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α1 and α2 subunits in chicken β2 subunit hybrid receptors in comparison with chicken nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4/β2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederer, H; Berger, M; Meyer, T; Werr, M; Ilg, T

    2013-04-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of several insecticide classes. In the present study, we report the gene identification and cloning of nAChR α1 and α2 subunits (Lcα1 and Lcα2) from the sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina. Xenopus oocytes voltage clamp experiments as hybrids with the chicken β2 nAChR (Ggβ2) subunit resulted in ACh-gated ion channels with distinct dose-response curves for Lcα1/Ggβ2 (effective concentration 50% [EC50 ] = 80 nM; nH  = 1.05), and Lcα2/Ggβ2 (EC50  = 5.37 μM, nH  = 1.46). The neonicotinoid imidacloprid was a potent agonist for the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive Lcα1/Ggβ2 (EC50 ∼ 20 nM), while the α-bungarotoxin-resistant Lcα2/Ggβ2 showed a 30-fold lower sensitivity to this insecticide (EC50  = 0.62 μM). Thirteen close derivatives of ACh were analysed in EC50 , Hill coefficient and maximum current (relative to ACh) determinations for Lcα1/Ggβ2 and Lcα2/Ggβ2 and the chicken Ggα4/Ggβ2 nAChRs, and comparisons relative to ACh allowed the definition of novel structure-activity and structure-selectivity relationships. In the case of N-ethyl-acetylcholine, the EC50 of the chicken Ggα4/Ggβ2 rose by a factor of 1000, while for both Lcα1/Ggβ2 and Lcα2/Ggβ2, potency remained unchanged. Further derivatives with insect nAChR selectivity potential were acetyl-α-methylcholine and trimethyl-(3-methoxy-3-oxopropyl)ammonium, followed by acetylhomocholine and trimethyl-(4-oxopentyl) ammonium. Our results may provide guidance for the identification or design of insect-specific nAChR agonists using structure-based or in silico methods. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  7. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  8. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population.......We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  9. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Kryukova, Elena V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Shelukhina, Irina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Faure, Grazyna; Zouridakis, Marios; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which should be proved by

  10. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Vulfius

    Full Text Available Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which

  11. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  12. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult Brugia malayi muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, A P; Buxton, S K; Martin, R J

    2013-12-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating disease caused by clade III parasites like Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. Current recommended treatment regimen for this disease relies on albendazole, ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine, none of which targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in these parasitic nematodes. Our aim therefore has been to develop adult B. malayi for electrophysiological recordings to aid in characterizing the ion channels in this parasite as anthelmintic target sites. In that regard, we recently demonstrated the amenability of adult B. malayi to patch-clamp recordings and presented results on the single-channel properties of nAChR in this nematode. We have built on this by recording whole-cell nAChR currents from adult B. malayi muscle. Acetylcholine, levamisole, pyrantel, bephenium and tribendimidine activated the receptors on B. malayi muscle, producing robust currents ranging from >200 pA to ~1.5 nA. Levamisole completely inhibited motility of the adult B. malayi within 10 min and after 60 min, motility had recovered back to control values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Intracellular Calcium Dyshomeostasis Through Both Muscarinic and Nicotinic Receptors in Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palee, Siripong; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several heart diseases. Acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to suppress reactive oxygen species generation during oxidative stress. However, there is little information regarding the effects of ACh on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in the presence of oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ACh applied before or after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in isolated cardiomyocytes. Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the male Wistar rats for the intracellular Ca2+ transient study by a fluorimetric ratio technique. H2O2 significantly decreased both of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh applied before, but not after, H2O2 treatment attenuated the reduction of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Both atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker) significantly decreased the protective effects of acetylcholine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation. Moreover, the combination of atropine and mecamylamine completely abolished the protective effects of acetylcholine on intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh pretreatment attenuates H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ dyshomeostasis through both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Differential regulation of mTOR-dependent S6 phosphorylation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Barbara E; Blusztajn, Jan K

    2008-08-01

    Muscarinic receptors subserve many functions in both peripheral and central nervous systems. Some of these processes depend on increases in protein synthesis, which may be achieved by activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a kinase that regulates protein translation capacity. Here, we examined the regulation of mTOR-dependent signaling pathways by muscarinic receptors in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines transfected with individual muscarinic receptor subtypes. In SK-N-SH cells, the acetylcholine analog carbachol stimulated phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein, a downstream target of mTOR. The sensitivity of the response to subtype-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists indicated that it was mediated by M3 receptors. Carbachol-evoked S6 phosphorylation was blocked by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, but was independent of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation. The response was significantly reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, which also inhibited carbachol-evoked S6 phosphorylation in HEK cells expressing M2 receptors, but was ineffective in M3 receptor-expressing HEK cells, although carbachol activated MAPK in both transfected lines. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase has been implicated in mTOR regulation by phorbol esters, but was not activated by carbachol in any of the cell lines tested. The protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I reduced carbachol-stimulated S6 phosphorylation in SK-N-SH cells, and in HEK cells expressing M3 receptors, but not in HEK cells expressing M2 receptors. The results demonstrate that multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes regulate mTOR, and that both MAPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms may mediate the response in a cell context-specific manner.

  15. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on human B-lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skok M. V.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find a correlation between the level of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR expression and B lymphocyte differentiation or activation state. Methods. Expression of nAChRs in the REH, Ramos and Daudi cell lines was studied by flow cytometry using nAChR subunit-specific antibodies; cell proliferation was studied by MTT test. Results. It is shown that the level of 42/4 and 7 nAChRs expression increased along with B lymphocyte differentiation (Ramos > REH and activation (Daudi > > Ramos and depended on the antigen-specific receptor expression. The nAChR stimulation/blockade did not influence the intensity of cell proliferation.

  16. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  17. Modes of Action, Resistance and Toxicity of Insecticides Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of insects play a key role in fast excitatory neurotransmission. Several classes of insecticides target insect nAChRs, which are composed of subunit members of a family of multiple subunit encoding genes. Alternative splicing and RNA A-to-I editing can add further to receptor diversity. Native and recombinant receptors have been explored as sites of insecticide action using radioligands, electrophysiology and site-directed mutagenesis. We have reviewed the properties of native and recombinant insect nAChRs, the challenges of functional recombinant insect nAChR expression, nAChR interactions with ligands acting at orthosteric and allosteric sites and in particular their interactions with insecticides. Actions on insect nAChRs of cartap, neonicotinoids, spinosyns, sulfoxamines, butenolides and mesoionic insecticides are reviewed and current knowledge of their modes of action are addressed. Mutations that add to our understanding of insecticide action and those leading to resistance are discussed. Co-crystallisation of neonicotinoids with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a surrogate for the nAChR ligand binding domain, has proved instructive. Toxicity issues relating to insecticides targeting nAChRs are also considered. An overview of insecticide classes targeting insect nAChRs has enhanced our understanding of these important receptors and their insecticide binding sites. However, the subunit composition of native nAChRs remains poorly understood and functional expression still presents difficulties. These topics together with improved understanding of the precise sites of insecticide actions on insect nAChRs will be the subject of future research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Expression and functional properties of α7 acetylcholine nicotinic receptors are modified in the presence of other receptor subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Manuel; Valor, Luis M; Mulet, José; Gerber, Susana; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    Although α7 nicotinic receptors are predominantly homopentamers, previous reports have indicated that α7 and β2 subunits are able to form heteromers. We have studied whether other nicotinic receptor subunits can also assemble with α7 subunits and the effect of this potential association. Coexpression of α7 with α2, α3, or β4 subunits reduced to about half, surface α-bungarotoxin binding sites and acetylcholine-gated currents. This is probably because of inhibition of membrane trafficking, as the total amount of α7 subunits was similar in all cases and a significant proportion of mature α7 receptors was present inside the cell. Only β4 subunits appeared to directly associate with α7 receptors at the membrane and these heteromeric receptors showed some kinetic and pharmacological differences when compared with homomeric α7 receptors. Finally, we emulated the situation of bovine chromaffin cells in Xenopus laevis oocytes by using the same proportion of α3, β4, α5, and α7 mRNAs, finding that α-bungarotoxin binding was similarly reduced in spite of increased currents, apparently mediated by α3β4(α5) receptors. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. D2 dopamine receptors enable Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced memory impairment and reduction of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, F; Carta, G; Battasi, A M; Gessa, G L

    2000-01-01

    The systemic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (2.5–7.5 mg kg−1) reduced hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration and impaired working memory in rats.Both effects were antagonized not only by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (0.5 mg kg−1, i.p.) but also unexpectedly by the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist S(−)-sulpiride (5, 10 and 25 mg kg−1, i.p.). Conversely, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced memory impairment and inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration were potentiated by the subcutaneous administration of the D2 dopamine receptor agonist (−)-quinpirole (25 and 500 μg kg−1). The inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration and working memory produced by the combination of (−)-quinpirole and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol was suppressed by either SR141716A or S(−)-sulpiride.Our findings suggest that impairment of working memory and inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration are mediated by the concomitant activation of D2 dopamine and CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and that D2 dopamine receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of the cognitive deficits induced by marijuana. PMID:10903956

  20. Frequent occurrence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in GABAergic neurons of the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Torrão

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Double-labeling immunohistochemical methods were used to investigate the occurrence of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits in presumptive GABAergic neurons of the chick nervous system. Nicotinic receptor immunoreactivity was often found in cells exhibiting GABA-like immunoreactivity, especially in the visual system. The alpha8 subunit appeared to be present in presumptive GABAergic cells of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus, nucleus of the basal optic root of the accessory optic system, and the optic tectum, among several other structures. The alpha5 subunit was also found in GABA-positive neurons, as observed in the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon and other pretectal nuclei. The numbers of alpha8- and alpha5-positive neurons that were also GABA-positive represented high percentages of the total number of neurons containing nicotinic receptor labeling in several brain areas, which indicates that most of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits are present in GABAergic cells. Taken together with data from other studies, our results indicate an important role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the functional organization of GABAergic circuits in the visual system.

  1. Integrated regulation of AMPA glutamate receptor phosphorylation in the striatum by dopamine and acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bing; Chen, Elton C; He, Nan; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) signals converge onto protein kinase A (PKA) in medium spiny neurons of the striatum to control cellular and synaptic activities of these neurons, although underlying molecular mechanisms are less clear. Here we measured phosphorylation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) at a PKA site (S845) as an indicator of AMPAR responses in adult rat brains in vivo to explore how DA and ACh interact to modulate AMPARs. We found that subtype-selective activation of DA D1 receptors (D1Rs), D2 receptors (D2Rs), or muscarinic M4 receptors (M4Rs) induced specific patterns of GluA1 S845 responses in the striatum. These defined patterns support a local multitransmitter interaction model in which D2Rs inhibited an intrinsic inhibitory element mediated by M4Rs to enhance the D1R efficacy in modulating AMPARs. Consistent with this, selective enhancement of M4R activity by a positive allosteric modulator resumed the cholinergic inhibition of D1Rs. In addition, D1R and D2R coactivation recruited GluA1 and PKA preferentially to extrasynaptic sites. In sum, our in vivo data support an existence of a dynamic DA-ACh balance in the striatum which actively modulates GluA1 AMPAR phosphorylation and trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  3. Adenosine A(1) receptors in mouse pontine reticular formation depress breathing, increase anesthesia recovery time, and decrease acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and the time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after a PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, or SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine. First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (-18%), tidal volume (-12%), and minute ventilation (-16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, a decrease in RoRR, and a decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing.

  4. Human and rodent bronchial epithelial cells express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, A D; Pereira, E F; Karachunski, P I; Horton, R M; Navaneetham, D; Macklin, K; Cortes, W S; Albuquerque, E X; Conti-Fine, B M

    1998-11-01

    We demonstrated previously that human skin keratinocytes express acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) sensitive to acetylcholine and nicotine, which regulate cell adhesion and motility. We demonstrate here that human and rodent bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) express AChRs similar to those expressed by keratinocytes and by some neurons. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that the BEC AChRs are functional, and they are activated by acetylcholine and nicotine. They are blocked by kappa-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist of the AChR isotypes expressed by neurons in ganglia. Their ion-gating properties are consistent with those of AChR isotypes expressed in ganglia, formed by alpha3, alpha5, and beta2 or beta4 subunits. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrated the presence in BECs of mRNA transcripts for all those AChR subunits, both in cell cultures and in tissue sections, whereas we could not detect transcripts for the alpha2, alpha4, alpha6, and beta3 AChR subunits. The expression of alpha3 and alpha5 proteins in BEC in vivo was verified by the binding of subunit-specific antibodies to sections of trachea. Mecamylamine and kappa-bungarotoxin, which are cholinergic antagonists able to block the ganglionic alpha3 AChRs, caused a reversible change of the cell shape of cultured, confluent human BECs. This resulted in a reduction of the area covered by the cell and in cell/cell detachment. The presence of AChRs sensitive to nicotine on the lining of the airways raises the possibility that the high concentrations of nicotine resulting from tobacco smoking will cause an abnormal activation, a desensitization, or both of the bronchial AChRs. This may mediate or facilitate some of the toxic effects of cigarette smoking in the respiratory system.

  5. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are important targets for alcohol reward and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Gao, Ming; Taylor, Devin H

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are important targets for alcohol reward and dependence. Alcoholism is a serious public health problem and has been identified as the third major cause of preventable mortality in the world. Worldwide, about 2 billion people consume alcohol, with 76.3 million having diagnosable alcohol use disorders. Alcohol is currently responsible for the death of 4% of adults worldwide (about 2.5 million deaths each year), and this number will be significantly increased by 2020 unless effective action is taken. Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance by humans. Ethanol (EtOH) is the intoxicating agent in alcoholic drinks that can lead to abuse and dependence. Although it has been extensively studied, the mechanisms of alcohol reward and dependence are still poorly understood. The major reason is that, unlike other addictive drugs (eg, morphine, cocaine or nicotine) that have specific molecular targets, EtOH affects much wider neuronal functions. These functions include phospholipid membranes, various ion channels and receptors, synaptic and network functions, and intracellular signaling molecules. The major targets in the brain that mediate EtOH's effects remain unclear. This knowledge gap results in a therapeutic barrier in the treatment of alcoholism. Interestingly, alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused, which suggests that neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular targets for nicotine, may also contribute to alcohol's abusive properties. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how EtOH modulates nAChRs in the mesolimbic pathway, which provides a perspective that nAChRs are important targets mediating alcohol abuse.

  6. Characterization of prejunctional serotonin receptors modulating [3H]acetylcholine release in the human detrusor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Gianluigi; Condino, Anna M; Gallinari, Paola; Franceschetti, Gian P; Tonini, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Bladder overactivity (OAB) is a chronic and debilitating lower urinary tract (LUT) disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. LUT symptoms associated with OAB, such as urgency and urinary incontinence, cause a hygienic and social concern to patients, but their current pharmacological treatment is largely inadequate due to the lack of uroselectivity. Although OAB etiology remains multifactorial and poorly understood, increasing evidence indicates that serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is an endogenous substance involved in the control of micturition at central and peripheral sites. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of three distinct 5-HT receptors localized at parasympathetic nerve terminals of the human bladder by measuring electrically evoked tritiated acetylcholine release in isolated detrusor strips. These prejunctional receptors, involved in both positive and negative feedback mechanisms regulating cholinergic transmission, have been characterized by means of three highly selective 5-HT antagonists for 5-HT(4), 5-HT(7), and 5-HT(1A) receptors, namely GR113808A ([1-[2-[(-methylsulphonyl) amino] ethyl]4-piperinidyl]methyl1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate succinate), SB269970 [(R)-3-(2-(2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl)pyrrolidine-1-sulfonyl)phenol hydrochloride], and WAY100635 [N-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)-cyclohexane-carboxamide trichloride]. Under these conditions, we confirmed the facilitatory role of 5-HT(4) heteroreceptors on acetylcholine release and revealed for the first time the occurrence of 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) heteroreceptors with a facilitatory and an inhibitory action, respectively. Our findings strengthen the novel concept for the use of recently patented selective 5-HT agonists and antagonists for the control of OAB dysfunctions associated with inflammatory conditions, although their therapeutic efficacy needs to be explored in the clinical setting.

  7. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Long-Term Effects of Xanomeline on the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grant, M.K.O.; Noetzel, M.J.; De Lorme, K.C.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2010), e15722-16 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Xanomeline * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  8. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n...

  9. NMR Structure and Action on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Water-soluble Domain of Human LYNX1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Shulepko, M. A.; Mineev, K. S.; D´Hoedt, D.; Kasheverov, I. E.; Filkin, S. Yu.; Krivolapova, A. P.; Janíčková, Helena; Doležal, Vladimír; Dolgikh, D. A.; Arseniev, A. S.; Bertrand, D.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 12 (2011), s. 10618-10627 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : NMR structure * nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * water-soluble domain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  10. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the acute toxicosis of methyllycaconitine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse physiological effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to its competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research demonstrated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice...

  11. Activation and desensitization of peripheral muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by selected, naturally-occurring pyridine alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscletype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiper...

  12. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus, neocortex and amygdala : A review of immunocytochemical localization in relation to learning and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A; Luiten, P.G.M.

    Immunocytochemical mapping studies employing the extensively used monoclonal antimuscarinic acetylcholine: receptor (mAChR) antibody M35 are reviewed;sd. We focus on three neuronal muscarinic cholinoceptive substrates. which are target regions of the cholinergic basal forebrain system intimately

  13. Determination of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenic patients by use of time-resolved fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Šimková, L.; Vincent, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2002), s. 549-554 ISSN 0009-9147 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF4646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * time-resolved fluorescence method * myasthenia gravis Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.788, year: 2002

  14. Allosteric modulation by persistent binding of xanomeline of the interaction of competitive ligands with the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Tuček, Stanislav; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 301, č. 3 (2002), s. 1033-1041 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP305/01/D119 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : xanomeline * M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.991, year: 2002

  15. Changes in Temperature Have Opposing Effects on Current Amplitude in alpha 7 and alpha 4 beta 2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Lansdell, S. J.; Millar, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2012), e32073 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : effect of temperature * nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * voltage- clamp recording Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  16. Contrasting actions of philanthotoxin-343 and philanthotoxin-(12) on human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Tim J; Mellor, Ian R; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2003-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings and outside-out patch recordings from TE671 cells were made to investigate antagonism of human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) by the philanthotoxins, PhTX-343 and PhTX-(12). When coapplied with acetylcholine (ACh), PhTX-343 caused activation......, 10 microM PhTX-343 significantly reduced the mean open time of channel openings evoked by 1 microM ACh from 4.42 +/- 0.44 to 1.58 +/- 0.10 ms with a minor increase (1.26-fold) in mean closed time. These data indicate that PhTX-343 predominantly blocks the open channel gated by ACh. In contrast, Ph......TX-(12) caused potent (IC50 = 0.77 microM at-100 mV), activation-dependent, noncompetitive inhibition of ACh-induced whole-cell currents that was only weakly voltage-dependent and suggestive of desensitization enhancement. It caused only a small decrease (7.5%) in the mean open time of channel openings...

  17. Activation of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The contribution of residues alphaArg55 and gammaGlu93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ankur; Davies, Martin; Dryden, William F; Dunn, Susan M J

    2006-03-01

    The Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a heteropentamer (alpha2betagammadelta) in which structurally homologous subunits assemble to form a central ion pore. Viewed from the synaptic cleft, the likely arrangement of these subunits is alpha-gamma-alpha-delta-beta lying in an anticlockwise orientation. High affinity binding sites for agonists and competitive antagonists have been localized to the alpha-gamma and alpha-delta subunit interfaces. We investigated the involvement of amino acids lying at an adjacent interface (gamma-alpha) in receptor properties. Recombinant Torpedo receptors, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, were used to investigate the consequences of mutating alphaArg55 and gammaGlu93, residues that are conserved in most species of the peripheral nicotinic receptors. Based on homology modeling, these residues are predicted to lie in close proximity to one another and it has been suggested that they may form a salt bridge in the receptor's three-dimensional structure (Sine et al. 2002 J Biol Chem277, 29 210-29 223). Although substitution of alphaR55 by phenylalanine or tryptophan resulted in approximately a six-fold increase in the EC50 value for acetylcholine activation, the charge reversal mutation (alphaR55E) had no significant effect. In contrast, the replacement of gammaE93 by an arginine conferred an eight-fold increase in the potency for acetylcholine-induced receptor activation. In the receptor carrying the double mutations, alphaR55E-gammaE93R or alphaR55F-gammaE93R, the potency for acetylcholine activation was partially restored to that of the wild-type. The results suggest that, although individually these residues influence receptor activation, direct interactions between them are unlikely to play a major role in the stabilization of different conformational states of the receptor.

  18. Direct actions of organophosphate anticholinesterases on nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakry, N.M.; el-Rashidy, A.H.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Four nerve agents and one therapeutic organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterase (anti-ChE) bind to acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, inhibit or modulate binding of radioactive ligands to these receptors, and modify events regulated by them. The affinity of nicotinic (n) ACh receptors of Torpedo electric organs and most muscarinic (m) ACh receptors of rat brain and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cultures for the OP compounds was usually two to three orders of magnitude lower than concentrations required to inhibit 50% (IC-50) of ACh-esterase activity. However, a small population of m-ACh receptors had an affinity as high as that of ACh-esterase for the OP compound. This population is identified by its high-affinity [3H]-cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]-CD) binding. Although sarin, soman, and tabun had no effect, (O-ethyl S[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl)] methyl phosphonothionate (VX) and echothiophate inhibited competitively the binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB) and [3H]-pirenzepine ([3H]-PZ) to m-ACh receptors. However, VX was more potent than echothiophate in inhibiting this binding and 50-fold more potent in inhibiting carbamylcholine (carb)-stimulated [3H]-cGMP synthesis in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells--both acting as m receptor antagonist. All five OPs inhibited [3H]-CD binding, with IC-50s of 3, 10, 40, 100, and 800 nM for VX, soman, sarin, echothiophate, and tabun, respectively. The OP anticholinesterases also bound to allosteric sites on the n-ACh receptor (identified by inhibition of [3H]-phencyclidine binding), but some bound as well to the receptor's recognition site (identified by inhibition of [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin binding). Soman and echothiophate in micromolar concentrations acted as partial agonists of the n-ACh receptor and induced receptor desensitization. On the other hand, VX acted as an open channel blocker of the activated receptor and also enhanced receptor desensitization

  19. α7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: role in early odor learning preference in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hellier

    Full Text Available Recently, we have shown that mice with decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 in the olfactory bulb were associated with a deficit in odor discrimination compared to wild-type mice. However, it is unknown if mice with decreased α7-receptor expression also show a deficit in early odor learning preference (ELP, an enhanced behavioral response to odors with attractive value observed in rats. In this study, we modified ELP methods performed in rats and implemented similar conditions in mice. From post-natal days 5-18, wild-type mice were stroked simultaneously with an odor presentation (conditioned odor for 90 s daily. Control mice were only stroked, exposed to odor, or neither. On the day of testing (P21, mice that were stroked in concert with a conditioned odor significantly investigated the conditioned odor compared to a novel odor, as observed similarly in rats. However, mice with a decrease in α7-receptor expression that were stroked during a conditioned odor did not show a behavioral response to that odorant. These results suggest that decreased α7-receptor expression has a role in associative learning, olfactory preference, and/or sensory processing deficits.

  20. Topographic Studies of Torpedo Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits as a Transmembrane Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Catherine D.; Raftery, Michael A.

    1980-10-01

    The exposure of the four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica on both the extracellular and cytoplasmic faces of the postsynaptic membranes of the electroplaque cells has been investigated. Sealed membrane vesicles containing no protein components other than the receptor were isolated and were shown to have 95% of their synaptic surfaces facing the medium. The susceptibility of the four receptor subunits in these preparations to hydrolysis by trypsin both from the external and from the internal medium was used to investigate the exposure of the subunits on the synaptic and cytoplasmic surfaces of the membrane. It was shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the tryptic products that all four subunits are exposed on the extracellular surface to a similar degree. All four subunits are also exposed on the internal surface of the membrane, but the apparent degree of exposure varies with the subunit size, the larger subunits being more exposed. The results are discussed in terms of a possible topographic model of the receptor as a transmembrane protein complex.

  1. Action of nereistoxin on recombinant neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond Delpech, Valérie; Ihara, Makoto; Coddou, Claudio; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2003-11-01

    Nereistoxin (NTX), a natural neurotoxin from the salivary glands of the marine annelid worm Lumbriconereis heteropoda, is highly toxic to insects. Its synthetic analogue, Cartap, was the first commercial insecticide based on a natural product. We have used voltage-clamp electrophysiology to compare the actions of NTX on recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nicotinic AChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following nuclear injection of cDNAs. The recombinant nicotinic AChRs investigated were chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila melanogaster/chicken hybrid receptors SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2. No agonist action of NTX (0.1-100 microM) was observed on chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila/chicken hybrid nicotinic AChRs. Currents elicited by ACh were reduced in amplitude by NTX in a dose-dependent manner. The toxin was slightly more potent on recombinant Drosophila/vertebrate hybrid receptors than on vertebrate homomeric (alpha7) or heteromeric (alpha4beta2) nicotinic AChRs. Block by NTX of the chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2 Drosophila/chicken hybrid receptors is in all cases non-competitive. Thus, the site of action on nicotinic AChRs of NTX, to which the insecticide Cartap is metabolised in insects, differs from that of the major nicotinic AChR-active insecticide, imidacloprid.

  2. R+-methanandamide inhibits tracheal response to endogenously released acetylcholine via capsazepine-sensitive receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, Paola; Martinotti, Enrica; Testai, Lara; Adinolfi, Barbara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2003-01-10

    The effects of cannabinoid drugs on the cholinergic response evoked by electrical field stimulation (0.2 ms pulse width, 20 V amplitude, 10 Hz, 7.5 s train duration) in guinea-pig tracheal preparations were investigated. The stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide, R(+)-methanandamide (10(-7)-10(-4) M), produced a dose-dependent inhibition (up to 27+/-5% of control) of electrical field stimulation-mediated atropine-sensitive response. This effect was not blocked by the selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3 carboxamide hydrochloride (SR 141716A; 10(-6) M), and was not reproduced with the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo [1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate) (WIN 55,212-2; 10(-8)-10(-5) M) or the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor selective agonist 1-propyl-2-methyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH-015; 10(-8)-10(-5) M); it was, on the contrary, antagonized by the vanilloid antagonist 2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl-amino-thiocarbonyl]-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-2 benzazepine (capsazepine; 10(-6) M). At the postjunctional level, neither R(+)-methanandamide nor WIN 55,212-2 nor JWH-015 did affect tracheal contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (10(-6) M). An inhibitory vanilloid receptor-mediated effect on the cholinergic response evoked by electrical stimulation was confirmed with the vanilloid agonist capsaicin, at doses (3-6 x 10(-8) M) which poorly influenced the basal smooth muscle tone of trachea. In conclusion, our data indicate that in guinea-pig trachea (a) neither CB(1) nor CB(2) cannabinoid receptor-mediated modulation of acetylcholine release occurs; (b) vanilloid VR1-like receptors appear involved in R(+)-methanandamide inhibitory activity on the cholinergic response to electrical field stimulation.

  3. Distinctive Modulation of Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Mediated by Dopamine and Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Adrover, Martin F; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2017-11-15

    Nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell shows unique dopamine (DA) signals in vivo and plays a unique role in DA-dependent behaviors such as reward-motivated learning and the response to drugs of abuse. A disynaptic mechanism for DA release was reported and shown to require synchronized firing of cholinergic interneurons (CINs) and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) in DA neuron (DAN) axons. The properties of this disynaptic mechanism of DA transmission are not well understood in the NAc shell. In this study, in vitro fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to examine the modulation of DA transmission evoked by CINs firing in the shell of mice and compared with other striatal regions. We found that DA signals in the shell displayed significant degree of summation in response to train stimulation of CINs, contrary to core and dorsal striatum. The summation was amplified by a D2-like receptor antagonist and experiments with mice with targeted deletion of D2 receptors to DANs or CINs revealed that D2 receptors in CINs mediate a fast inhibition observed within 100 ms of the first pulse, whereas D2 autoreceptors in DAN terminals are engaged in a slower inhibition that peaks at ∼500 ms. ACh also contributes to the use-dependent inhibition of DA release through muscarinic receptors only in the shell, where higher activity of acetylcholinesterase minimizes nAChR desensitization and promotes summation. These findings show that DA signals are modulated differentially by endogenous DA and ACh in the shell, which may underlie the unique features of shell DA signals in vivo SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present study reports that dopamine (DA) release evoked by activation of cholinergic interneurons displays a high degree of summation in the shell and shows unique modulation by endogenous DA and acetylcholine. Desensitization of nicotinic receptors, which is a prevailing mechanism for use-dependent inhibition in the nucleus accumbens core and dorsal striatum, is

  4. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1–5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus...... musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg...

  5. Sarsasapogenin reverses depressive-like behaviors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors induced by olfactory bulbectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Zhao, Xiao-Yang; Song, Yi-Zhou; Liang, Wen-Na; Liu, Ji-Liang

    2017-02-03

    Cholinergic signalling in the hippocampus may contribute to the aetiology of mood regulation. Antidepressants can reverse the increase in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity induced by olfactory bulbectomy. The activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) also alleviates the symptoms of depression. This study advances the development of sarsasapogenin, which interacts with cholinergic signalling and has a favourable antidepressant profile in olfactory bulbectomised (OB) rats. We examined OB-induced changes in cholinergic signalling, as well as AChE, α4-nAChR, and α7-nAChR expression in the hippocampus. The results indicate that abnormal cholinergic signalling in the hippocampus contributes to the development of depression in the OB rat model. This depression may be alleviated following treatment with sarsasapogenin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  7. Molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numa, S.; Fukuda, K.; Kubo, T.; Maeda, A.; Akiba, I.; Bujo, H.; Nakai, J.; Mishina, M.; Higashida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) mediates a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition of adenylate cyclase, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and modulation of potassium channels, through the action of guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). The question then arises as to whether multiple mAChR species exist that are responsible for the various biochemical and physiological effects. In fact, pharmacologically distinguishable forms of the mAChR occur in different tissues and have been provisionally classified into M 1 (I), M 2 cardiac (II), and M 2 glandular (III) subtypes on the basis of their difference in apparent affinity for antagonists. Here, the authors have made attempts to understand the molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the mAChR, using recombinant DNA technology

  8. Computational determination of the binding mode of α-conotoxin to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Nargis; Yu, Rilei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-12-01

    Conotoxins belong to the large families of disulfide-rich peptide toxins from cone snail venom, and can act on a broad spectrum of ion channels and receptors. They are classified into different subtypes based on their targets. The α-conotoxins selectively inhibit the current of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Because of their unique selectivity towards distinct nAChR subtypes, α-conotoxins become valuable tools in nAChR study. In addition to the X-ray structures of α-conotoxins in complex with acetylcholine-binding protein, a homolog of the nAChR ligand-binding domain, the high-resolution crystal structures of the extracellular domain of the α1 and α9 subunits are also obtained. Such structures not only revealed the details of the configuration of nAChR, but also provided higher sequence identity templates for modeling the binding modes of α-conotoxins to nAChR. This mini-review summarizes recent modeling studies for the determination of the binding modes of α-conotoxins to nAChR. As there are not crystal structures of the nAChR in complex with conotoxins, computational modeling in combination of mutagenesis data is expected to reveal the molecular recognition mechanisms that govern the interactions between α-conotoxins and nAChR at molecular level. An accurate determination of the binding modes of α-conotoxins on AChRs allows rational design of α-conotoxin analogues with improved potency or selectivity to nAChRs.

  9. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  10. Functional activation of G-proteins coupled with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    The functional activation of Gi/o proteins coupled to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) was investigated with the conventional guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio) triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay in rat brain membranes. The most efficacious stimulation elicited by acetylcholine or carbachol (CCh) was obtained in striatal membranes. The pharmacological properties of mAChR-mediated [(35)S]GTPγS binding determined with a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were almost identical among the three brain regions investigated, i.e., cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, except for the apparent partial agonist effects of (αR)-α-cyclopentyl-α-hydroxy-N-[1-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-4-piperidinyl]benzeneacetamide fumarate (J 104129) observed only in the hippocampus, but not in the other two regions. Among the muscarinic toxins investigated, only MT3 attenuated CCh-stimulated [(35)S] GTPγS binding. The highly selective allosteric potentiator at the M4 mAChR subtype, 3-amino-N-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-4,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (VU 10010), shifted the concentration-response curve for CCh leftwards as well as upwards. On the other hand, neither thiochrome nor brucine N-oxide was effective. The increases induced by CCh and 5-HT were essentially additive, though not completely, indicating that the mAChRs and 5-HT1A receptors were coupled independently to distinct pools of Gi/o proteins. Collectively, all of the data suggest that functional activation of Gi/o proteins coupled to mAChRs, especially the M4 subtype, is detectable by means of CCh-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay in rat discrete brain regions.

  11. Structural characterization of binding mode of smoking cessation drugs to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors through study of ligand complexes with acetylcholine-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucktooa, Prakash; Haseler, Claire A; van Elk, René; Smit, August B; Gallagher, Timothy; Sixma, Titia K

    2012-07-06

    Smoking cessation is an important aim in public health worldwide as tobacco smoking causes many preventable deaths. Addiction to tobacco smoking results from the binding of nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain, in particular the α4β2 receptor. One way to aid smoking cessation is by the use of nicotine replacement therapies or partial nAChR agonists like cytisine or varenicline. Here we present the co-crystal structures of cytisine and varenicline in complex with Aplysia californica acetylcholine-binding protein and use these as models to investigate binding of these ligands binding to nAChRs. This analysis of the binding properties of these two partial agonists provides insight into differences with nicotine binding to nAChRs. A mutational analysis reveals that the residues conveying subtype selectivity in nAChRs reside on the binding site complementary face and include features extending beyond the first shell of contacting residues.

  12. Selective down-regulation of α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of uremic rats with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesta, Juan J; del Pozo, Carlos; Castelló-Banyuls, Juan; Faura, Clara C

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. Pharmacological cholinergic enhancement is useful in patients with cognitive dysfunction. The major nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the brain are heteromeric α4β2 and homomeric α7 receptors. To study the involvement of neuronal acetylcholine receptors in cognitive impairment in uremic rats, bilateral nephrectomy was performed. 24 weeks after nephrectomy, memory was assessed using the one trial step-down inhibitory avoidance test. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain were studied by radioligand binding, immunoprecipitation, Western blot and sucrose gradient experiments. We demonstrated that rats with severe renal failure show disorders of short term memory. Long term memory was not altered in these rats. The number of functional α4β2 heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors was decreased in the brains of rats with severe renal failure. There was a significant correlation between the degree of renal impairment and the number of heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain. The down-regulation of functional α4β2 receptors in the brains of rats with severe renal failure was not due to a reduction of α4 or β2 subunit proteins. The number of α7 homomeric neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was not altered. These findings may have important clinical significance for the management of cognitive impairment in patients with chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Super agonist actions of clothianidin and related compounds on the SAD beta 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Shimomura, Masaru; Sattelle, David B; Komai, Koichiro

    2004-03-01

    To compare the actions of clothianidin, a neonicotinoid acting on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, and related compounds with that of imidacloprid, the compounds were tested on the Drosophila SAD-chicken beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. The maximum response of the SAD beta 2 nicotinic receptor to clothianidin was larger than that observed for acetylcholine. Ring breakage of the imidazolidine ring of imidacloprid resulting in the generation of a guanidine group was critical for this super agonist action.

  14. Unraveling a molecular determinant for clathrin-independent internalization of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Min; Zhang, Wenhua; Tian, Yangli; Xu, Chanjuan; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Rongying

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important for the regulation of both their cell surface density and signaling profile. Unlike the mechanisms of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), the mechanisms underlying the control of GPCR signaling by clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely unknown. Among the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), the M4 mAChR undergoes CDE and recycling, whereas the M2 mAChR is internalized through CIE and targeted to lysosomes. Here we investigated the endocytosis and postendocytic trafficking of M2 mAChR based on a comparative analysis of the third cytoplasmic domain in M2 and M4 mAChRs. For the first time, we identified that the sequence 374KKKPPPS380 servers as a sorting signal for the clathrin-independent internalization of M2 mAChR. Switching 374KKKPPPS380 to the i3 loop of the M4 mAChR shifted the receptor into lysosomes through the CIE pathway; and therefore away from CDE and recycling. We also found another previously unidentified sequence that guides CDE of the M2 mAChR, 361VARKIVKMTKQPA373, which is normally masked in the presence of the downstream sequence 374KKKPPPS380. Taken together, our data indicate that endocytosis and postendocytic sorting of GPCRs that undergo CIE could be sequence-dependent. PMID:26094760

  15. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  16. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1995-01-01

    A series of O-alkylated analogs of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-isoxazolo[4,5-c]azepin-3-ol (THAO) were synthesized and characterized as ligands for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). O-Methyl-THAO (4a), O-ethyl-THAO (4b), O-isopropyl-THAO (4c), and O-propargyl-THAO (4d) were shown to be potent...... inhibitors of the binding of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), pirenzepine (PZ), and oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) to tissue membrane preparations. In the [3H]-Oxo-M binding assay, receptor affinities in the low nanomolar range were measured for 4a (IC50 = 0.010 microM), 4b (IC50 = 0.003 microM), 4c (IC50...... = 0.011 microM), and 4d (IC50 = 0.0008 microM). Pharmacological effects (EC50 or Ki values) and intrinsic activities (per cent of maximal carbachol responses) were determined using five recombinant human mAChRs (m1-m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R...

  17. Muscarinic receptor modulation of acetylcholine release from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, M G; Pepeu, G

    1995-04-28

    An attempt to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release from cortical and hippocampal slices was made by means of several muscarinic antagonists. Cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from adult rats were superfused with Krebs solution containing physostigmine; ACh content of the superfusate at rest and after electrical stimulation (1 Hz) was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. The antagonists were added to the Krebs at the concentration of 1 microM. ACh release at rest was enhanced only in the cortex by (+/-)-5,11-dihydro-11-([(2-[2-[(dipropylamino)methyl]-1- piperidinyl)ethyl)amino]carbonyl)-6H-pyrido[2,3-b](1,4)- benzodiazepine-6-one (AFDX384), an M2/M4 selective antagonist. The evoked ACh release from the cerebral cortex was significantly increased by AFDX384, methoctramine, pirenzepine, M2/M4, M2 and M1 selective antagonists, respectively, and scopolamine. This finding suggests that M1, M2 and M4 presynaptic receptor subtypes could regulate evoked ACh release in the cortex. In hippocampal slices, the evoked ACh release was enhanced by AFDX384, pirenzepine and scopolamine but not by methoctramine. In this region ACh release seems therefore regulated only by M1 and M4 receptor subtypes. The M3 antagonist (+/-)-p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride did not affect ACh release.

  18. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  19. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  20. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  1. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the structural basis of neuromuscular transmission: insights from Torpedo postsynaptic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2013-11-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor, at the neuromuscular junction, is a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel that has been fine-tuned through evolution to transduce a chemical signal into an electrical signal with maximum efficiency and speed. It is composed from three similar and two identical polypeptide chains, arranged in a ring around a narrow membrane pore. Central to the design of this assembly is a hydrophobic gate in the pore, more than 50 Å away from sites in the extracellular domain where ACh binds. Although the molecular properties of the receptor have been explored intensively over the last few decades, only recently have structures emerged revealing its complex architecture and illuminating how ACh entering the binding sites opens the distant gate. Postsynaptic membranes isolated from the (muscle-derived) electric organ of the Torpedo ray have underpinned most of the structural studies: the membranes form tubular vesicles having receptors arranged on a regular surface lattice, which can be imaged directly in frozen physiological solutions. Advances in electron crystallographic techniques have also been important, enabling analysis of the closed- and open-channel forms of the receptor in unreacted tubes or tubes reacted briefly with ACh. The structural differences between these two forms show that all five subunits participate in a concerted conformational change communicating the effect of ACh binding to the gate, but that three of them (αγ, β and δ) play a dominant role. Flexing of oppositely facing pore-lining α-helices is the principal motion determining the closed/open state of the gate. These results together with the findings of biochemical, biophysical and other structural studies allow an integrated description of the receptor and of its mode of action at the synapse.

  2. Effects of stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in medial septum on some immune responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-04-21

    Though the immunomodulatory role of medial septum (MS) has been indicated, but the contribution of the muscarinic acetylcholine (mAch) receptors presented in the internal network of the neurons of MS in this regard is not known. The aim of the present study is to assess the contribution of mAch receptors of MS on some immunological parameters. Different immunological parameters i.e. phagocytic activity of peripheral leukocytes, adhesibility and cytotoxicity of splenic mononuclear cells (MNC), delayed type of hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, Total Count (TC) and Differential Count (DC) of WBC with serum corticosterone (CORT) concentration have been measured after stimulation and blocking of mAch receptors of MS in rats. Ach or atropine has been micro infused into MS of separate groups of rats for stimulating or blocking of the mAch receptors respectively. In Ach or atropine microinfused rats, the TC of WBC remained unaltered in the present study. The percentage of neutrophil has increased and the percentage of lymphocyte has decreased in Ach microinfused rats, but these parameters remain unaltered in atropine microinfused rats. The observed immunological parameters have increased after microinfusion of 0.60μM and 0.12μM of Ach and serum CORT concentration has decreased in those animals. These immunological parameters have decreased and serum CORT has increased after microinfusion of atropine (2 and 4mM) in MS of rats. It appears that the Ach receptors in MS can modulate the observed immunological parameters, and serum CORT plays an important role for these immune changes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Activation and modulation of human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by the neonicotinoids clothianidin and imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Ann, Jason; Akk, Gustav

    2011-08-01

    Neonicotinoids are synthetic, nicotine-derived insecticides used for agricultural and household pest control. Though highly effective at activating insect nicotinic receptors, many neonicotinoids are also capable of directly activating and/or modulating the activation of vertebrate nicotinic receptors. In this study, we have investigated the actions of the neonicotinoids clothianidin (CTD) and imidacloprid (IMI) on human neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The data demonstrate that the compounds are weak agonists of the human receptors with relative peak currents of 1-4% of the response to 1 mM acetylcholine (ACh). Coapplication of IMI strongly inhibited currents elicited by ACh. From Schild plot analysis, we estimate that the affinity of IMI for the human α4β2 receptor is 18 μM. The application of low concentrations of CTD potentiated responses to low concentrations of ACh, suggesting that receptors occupied by one ACh and one CTD molecule have a higher gating efficacy than receptors with one ACh bound. Interestingly, subunit stoichiometry affected inhibition by CTD, with (α4)(2) (β2)(3) receptors significantly more strongly inhibited than the (α4)(3) (β2)(2) receptors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Interaction of Synthetic Human SLURP-1 with the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durek, Thomas; Shelukhina, Irina V; Tae, Han-Shen; Thongyoo, Panumart; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Kasheverov, Igor E; Faure, Grazyna; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Tsetlin, Victor I

    2017-11-30

    Human SLURP-1 is a secreted protein of the Ly6/uPAR/three-finger neurotoxin family that co-localizes with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and modulates their functions. Conflicting biological activities of SLURP-1 at various nAChR subtypes have been based on heterologously produced SLURP-1 containing N- and/or C-terminal extensions. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of the 81 amino acid residue human SLURP-1 protein, characterization of its 3D structure by NMR, and its biological activity at nAChR subtypes. Radioligand assays indicated that synthetic SLURP-1 did not compete with [ 125 I]-α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt) binding to human neuronal α7 and Torpedo californica muscle-type nAChRs, nor to mollusk acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBP). Inhibition of human α7-mediated currents only occurred in the presence of the allosteric modulator PNU120596. In contrast, we observed robust SLURP-1 mediated inhibition of human α3β4, α4β4, α3β2 nAChRs, as well as human and rat α9α10 nAChRs. SLURP-1 inhibition of α9α10 nAChRs was accentuated at higher ACh concentrations, indicating an allosteric binding mechanism. Our results are discussed in the context of recent studies on heterologously produced SLURP-1 and indicate that N-terminal extensions of SLURP-1 may affect its activity and selectivity on its targets. In this respect, synthetic SLURP-1 appears to be a better probe for structure-function studies.

  5. A model for short alpha-neurotoxin bound to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordvintsev, Dmitry Y; Polyak, Yakov L; Kuzmine, Dmitry A; Levtsova, Olga V; Tourleigh, Yegor V; Kasheverov, Igor E

    2006-01-01

    Short- and long-chain alpha-neurotoxins from snake venoms are potent blockers of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Short alpha-neurotoxins consist of 60-62 amino acid residues and include 4 disulfide bridges, whereas long alpha-neurotoxins have 66-75 residues and 5 disulfides. The spatial structure of these toxins is built by three loops, I-III "fingers," confined by four disulfide bridges; the fifth disulfide of long-chain alpha-neurotoxins is situated close to the tip of central loop II. An accurate knowledge of the mode of alpha-neurotoxin-nAChR interaction is important for rational design of new nAChR agonists and antagonists for medical purposes. Ideas on the topography of toxin-nAChR complexes were based until recently on nAChR interactions with selectively labeled alpha-neurotoxins, mutations in toxins, nAChR, or both. Recently, crystal structures have been solved for the Torpedo marmorata nAChR (4A[Unwin, 2005]) and for the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) complexed with mollusk alpha-conotoxin (2.4 A[Celie et al., 2005]) or alpha-cobratoxin, long-chain alpha-neurotoxin (4 A [Bourne et al., 2005]). However, there were no angstrom-resolution models for complexes of short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. Here, we report the model of the Torpedo californica nAChR extracellular domain complexed to a short-chain alpha-neurotoxin II (NTII) from Naja oxiana cobra venom.

  6. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Baroreflex deficiency aggravates atherosclerosis via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dian-Hua; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, En-Hui; Liu, Chong; Su, Ding-Feng; Cai, Guo-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play a key role in the initiation, propagation, and development of atherosclerosis. Arterial baroreflex (ABR) dysfunction induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD) promoted the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. The present work was designed to examine whether ABR deficiency affected inflammation and oxidative stress via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) leading to the aggravation of atherosclerosis in mice. ApoE -/- mice were fed with a high-cholesterol diet for 6weeks and half of the mice received sinoaortic denervation that destroyed ABR. We studied the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), α7nAChR and levels of inflammatory response and oxidative stress. The results showed that baroreflex dysfunction could promote atherosclerosis, meanwhile, decrease the expression of VAChT and α7nAChR and significantly increase the levels of oxidative stress and inflammation in SAD mice. After treated with PNU-282987 (a selective α7nAChR agonist, 0.53mg/kg/day) for 6weeks in SAD and Sham mice, we found that PNU-282987 could attenuate atherosclerosis and significantly decreased oxidative stress and inflammation after SAD. In addition, α7nAChR +/+ and α7nAChR -/- mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet for 8weeks were co-treated with ketanserin (0.6mg/kg/day), a drug that can enhance baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Ketanserin could alleviate atherosclerosis and markedly decrease oxidative stress and inflammation in α7nAChR +/+ mice. But there were no effects in α7nAChR knockout mice. Our results demonstrate that ABR dysfunction aggravates atherosclerosis in mice via the vagus-ACh-α7nAChR-inflammation and oxidative stress pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of cannabidiol on the function of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Mohamed; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Sydorenko, Vadym; Ashoor, Abrar; Kabbani, Nadine; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Christopher F; Isaev, Dmytro; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-15

    The effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive ingredient of cannabis plant, on the function of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine (α7 nACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were tested using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. CBD reversibly inhibited ACh (100 μM)-induced currents with an IC50 value of 11.3 µM. Other phytocannabinoids such as cannabinol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol did not affect ACh-induced currents. CBD inhibition was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. In addition, CBD did not change GTP-γ-S binding to the membranes of oocytes injected with α7 nACh receptor cRNA. The effect of CBD was not dependent on the membrane potential. CBD (10 µM) did not affect the activity of endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels, since the extent of inhibition by CBD was unaltered by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing 2mM Ba(2+). Inhibition by CBD was not reversed by increasing ACh concentrations. Furthermore, specific binding of [(125)I] α-bungarotoxin was not inhibited by CBD (10 µM) in oocytes membranes. Using whole cell patch clamp technique in CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons of rat hippocampal slices, currents induced by choline, a selective-agonist of α7-receptor induced currents were also recoded. Bath application of CBD (10 µM) for 10 min caused a significant inhibition of choline induced currents. Finally, in hippocampal slices, [(3)H] norepinephrine release evoked by nicotine (30 µM) was also inhibited by 10 µM CBD. Our results indicate that CBD inhibits the function of the α7-nACh receptor. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Antagonist pharmacology of desensitizing and non-desensitizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cockroach neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Vincent L

    2016-09-01

    Two α-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtypes in neurons of the American cockroach have been identified as desensitizing (nAChD) and selectively inhibitable with 100nM imidacloprid, and non-desensitizing (nAChN) and selectively inhibitable with 100pM methyllycaconitine. In this paper, the single-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to measure concentration-response relations for the action of ACh and five antagonists on pharmacologically separated nAChD and nAChN receptors of acutely dissociated neurons from thoracic ganglia of the American cockroach. A dual bath and U-tube perfusion system was used to achieve rapid application of ACh in the continued presence of antagonists, which was essential to accurately measure inhibition by rapidly-reversible antagonists. ACh activated both receptors with an EC 50 of 7μM and the antagonist potencies were (nAChD/nAChN in nM): dihydro-β-erythroidine: 1.0/5.6, d-tubocurarine: 1000/34, condelphine: 0.39/0.65, phencyclidine: 74/980 and mecamylamine 47/1150. While each of these antagonists displayed some subtype selectivity, none are selective enough to be used as subtype-selective tools. These results bring to a total of 16 the number of nicotinic compounds that have been measured on nAChD and nAChN currents. Characterization of these receptors is important for understanding the role of nAChRs in the insect nervous system and the mechanism of action of insecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra-subunit flexibility underlies activation and allosteric modulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman, Paul A; Podair, Julie I; Jobe, Emily M; Levandoski, Mark M

    2014-04-01

    Allosteric modulation is a general feature of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, yet the structural components and movements important for conversions among functional states are not well understood. In this study, we examine the communication between the binding sites for agonist and the modulator morantel (Mor) of neuronal α3β2 receptors, measuring evoked currents of receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes with the two-electrode voltage-clamp method. We hypothesized that movement along an interface of β sheets connecting the agonist and modulator sites is necessary for allosteric modulation. To address this, we created pairs of substituted cysteines that span the cleft formed where the outer β sheet meets the β sheet constituting the (-)-face of the α3 subunit; the three pairs were L158C-A179C, L158C-G181C and L158C-K183C. Employing a disulfide trapping approach in which bonds are formed between neighboring cysteines under oxidation conditions, we found that oxidation treatments decreased the amplitude of currents evoked by either the agonist (ACh) or co-applied agonist and modulator (ACh + Mor), by as much as 51%, consistent with the introduced bond decreasing channel efficacy. Reduction treatment increased evoked currents up to 89%. The magnitude of the oxidation effects depended on whether agonists were present during oxidation and on the cysteine pair. Additionally, the cysteine mutations themselves decreased Mor potentiation, implicating these residues in modulation. Our findings suggest that these β sheets in the α3 subunit move with respect to each other during activation and modulation, and the residues studied highlight the contribution of this intramolecular allosteric pathway to receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  12. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  13. Heteromeric α7β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is highly expressed in the brain, where it maintains various neuronal functions including (but not limited to) learning and memory. In addition, the protein expression levels of α7 nAChRs are altered in various brain disorders. The classic rule...... governing α7 nAChR assembly in the mammalian brain was that it was assembled from five α7 subunits to form a homomeric receptor pentamer. However, emerging evidence demonstrates the presence of heteromeric α7 nAChRs in heterologously expressed systems and naturally in brain neurons, where α7 subunits are co......-assembled with β2 subunits to form a novel type of α7β2 nAChR. Interestingly, the α7β2 nAChR exhibits distinctive function and pharmacology from traditional homomeric α7 nAChRs. We review recent advances in probing the distribution, function, pharmacology, pathophysiology, and stoichiometry of the heteromeric α7β2...

  14. Segregation of lipids near acetylcholine-receptor channels imaged by cryo-EM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Unwin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid communication at the chemical synapse depends on the action of ion channels residing in the postsynaptic membrane. The channels open transiently upon the binding of a neurotransmitter released from the presynaptic nerve terminal, eliciting an electrical response. Membrane lipids also play a vital but poorly understood role in this process of synaptic transmission. The present study examines the lipid distribution around nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors in tubular vesicles made from postsynaptic membranes of the Torpedo ray, taking advantage of the recent advances in cryo-EM. A segregated distribution of lipid molecules is found in the outer leaflet of the bilayer. Apparent cholesterol-rich patches are located in specific annular regions next to the transmembrane helices and also in a more extended `microdomain' between the apposed δ subunits of neighbouring receptors. The particular lipid distribution can be interpreted straightforwardly in relation to the gating movements revealed by an earlier time-resolved cryo-EM study, in which the membranes were exposed briefly to ACh. The results suggest that in addition to stabilizing the protein, cholesterol may play a mechanical role by conferring local rigidity to the membrane so that there is productive coupling between the extracellular and membrane domains, leading to opening of the channel.

  15. Mesoionic insecticides: a novel class of insecticides that modulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoke, Caleb W; Cordova, Daniel; Zhang, Wenming; Barry, James D; Leighty, Robert M; Dietrich, Robert F; Rauh, James J; Pahutski, Thomas F; Lahm, George P; Tong, My-Hanh Thi; Benner, Eric A; Andreassi, John L; Smith, Rejane M; Vincent, Daniel R; Christianson, Laurie A; Teixeira, Luis A; Singh, Vineet; Hughes, Kenneth A

    2017-04-01

    As the world population grows towards 9 billion by 2050, it is projected that food production will need to increase by 60%. A critical part of this growth includes the safe and effective use of insecticides to reduce the estimated 20-49% loss of global crop yields owing to pests. The development of new insecticides will help to sustain this protection and overcome insecticide resistance. A novel class of mesoionic compounds has been discovered, with exceptional insecticidal activity on a range of Hemiptera and Lepidoptera. These compounds bind to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and result in a highly potent inhibitory action at the receptor with minimal agonism. The synthesis, biological activity, optimization and mode of action will be discussed. Triflumezopyrim insect control will provide a powerful tool for control of hopper species in rice throughout Asia. Dicloromezotiaz can provide a useful control tool for lepidopteran pests, with an underexploited mode of action among these pests. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Drugs Interfering with Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Their Effects on Place Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Svoboda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs have been found to regulate many diverse functions, ranging from motivation and feeding to spatial navigation, an important and widely studied type of cognitive behavior. Systemic administration of non-selective antagonists of mAChRs, such as scopolamine or atropine, have been found to have adverse effects on a vast majority of place navigation tasks. However, many of these results may be potentially confounded by disruptions of functions other than spatial learning and memory. Although studies with selective antimuscarinics point to mutually opposite effects of M1 and M2 receptors, their particular contribution to spatial cognition is still poorly understood, partly due to a lack of truly selective agents. Furthermore, constitutive knock-outs do not always support results from selective antagonists. For modeling impaired spatial cognition, the scopolamine-induced amnesia model still maintains some limited validity, but there is an apparent need for more targeted approaches such as local intracerebral administration of antagonists, as well as novel techniques such as optogenetics focused on cholinergic neurons and chemogenetics aimed at cells expressing metabotropic mAChRs.

  17. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  18. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  19. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P. D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  20. Electrical stimulation enhances the acetylcholine receptors available for neuromuscular junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Gilmore, Kerry J; Thompson, Brianna C; Stewart, Elise M; Waters, Aaron M; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2016-11-01

    Neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) are specialized synapses that link motor neurons with muscle fibers. These sites are fundamental to human muscle activity, controlling swallowing and breathing amongst many other vital functions. Study of this synapse formation is an essential area in neuroscience; the understanding of how neurons interact and control their targets during development and regeneration are fundamental questions. Existing data reveals that during initial stages of development neurons target and form synapses driven by biophysical and biochemical cues, and during later stages they require electrical activity to develop their functional interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exogenous electrical stimulation (ES) electrodes directly in contact with cells, on the number and size of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters available for NMJ formation. We used a novel in vitro model that utilizes a flexible electrical stimulation system and allows the systematic testing of several stimulation parameters simultaneously as well as the use of alternative electrode materials such as conductive polymers to deliver the stimulation. Functionality of NMJs under our co-culture conditions was demonstrated by monitoring changes in the responses of primary myoblasts to chemical stimulants that specifically target neuronal signaling. Our results suggest that biphasic electrical stimulation at 250Hz, 100μs pulse width and current density of 1mA/cm 2 for 8h, applied via either gold-coated mylar or the conductive polymer PPy, significantly increased the number and size of AChRs clusters available for NMJ formation. This study supports the beneficial use of direct electrical stimulation as a strategic therapy for neuromuscular disorders. The beneficial effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on human cells in vitro and in vivo have long been known. Although the effects of stimulation are clear and the therapeutic benefits are known, no uniform

  1. Antipsychotic Drug-Like Effects of the Selective M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0152100

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now repor...

  2. The Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus in Trace Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Raybuck, J. D.; Gould, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Acute nicotine enhances multiple types of learning including trace fear conditioning but the underlying neural substrates of these effects are not well understood. Trace fear conditioning critically involves the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, which both express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Therefore, nicotine could act in either or both areas to enhance trace fear conditioning. To identify the underlying neural areas and nAChR subtypes, we examined the effects of inf...

  3. Detection of human neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by conjugates of snake α-neurotoxin with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Ya V; Shelukhina, I V; Mukherjee, A K; Kuznetsov, D V; Tsetlin, V I; Utkin, Yu N

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescent derivatives are widely used to study the structure and functions of proteins. Quantum dots (QDs), fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, have a high quantum yield and are much more resistant to bleaching compared to organic dyes. Conjugates of α-neurotoxins with QDs were used for visualization of human α7 acetylcholine receptors heterologously expressed in GH4C1 pituitary adenoma cells. Specific staining of cells by the conjugated toxins was observed.

  4. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B

    2006-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldwide, playing an important role in crop pollination, and is also a valuable model system for studies on social interaction, sensory processing, learning, and memory. We have used the A. mellifera genome information to characterize the complete honey bee nAChR gene family. Comparison with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae shows that the honey bee possesses the largest family of insect nAChR subunits to date (11 members). As with Drosophila and Anopheles, alternative splicing of conserved exons increases receptor diversity. Also, we show that in one honey bee nAChR subunit, six adenosine residues are targeted for RNA A-to-I editing, two of which are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and Heliothis virescens orthologs, and that the extent of editing increases as the honey bee lifecycle progresses, serving to maximize receptor diversity at the adult stage. These findings on Apis mellifera enhance our understanding of nAChR functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the development of improved insecticides that spare a major beneficial insect species.

  5. α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influence locomotor activity and ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, Helen M; Peck, Colette; Garrity, Caitlin; Gechlik, Alex; Jenkins, Brenita C; Rajan, Akshat

    2017-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the mesolimbic dopamine system have been implicated in ethanol behaviors. In particular, work in genetically engineered mice has demonstrated that α6-containing nAChRs are involved in ethanol consumption and sedation. A limitation of these studies is that the alteration in the receptor was present throughout development. The recently described α6β2 antagonist, N,N-decane-1,10-diyl-bis-3-picolinium diiodide (bPiDI), now makes it possible to test for the involvement of these receptors using a pharmacological approach. The aim of this study was to examine the role of α6β2 nAChRs in ethanol behaviors using a pharmacological approach. Adolescent C57BL/6J mice were treated with bPiDI 30 min prior to testing the mice for binge-like ethanol consumption in the drinking-in-the-dark (DID) test, ethanol-induced motor incoordination using the balance beam, and ethanol-induced sedation using the Loss of Righting Reflex (LORR) paradigm. Adolescent animals were chosen because they express a high amount of α6 mRNA relative to adult animals. Control studies were also performed to determine the effect of bPiDI on locomotor activity and ethanol metabolism. Female mice treated with 20 mg/kg bPiDI had reduced locomotor activity compared to saline-treated animals during the first 30 min following an acute injection. Pretreatment with the α6β2 antagonist reduced adolescent ethanol consumption but also reduced saccharin consumption. No significant effects were observed on ethanol-induced ataxia, sedation, or metabolism. This study provides evidence that α6β2 nAChRs are involved in locomotor activity as well as ethanol and saccharin consumption in adolescent animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column for Drosophila and Musca nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, M; Latli, B; Casida, J E

    1996-10-01

    Neonicotinoids such as the insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) act as agonists at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Head membranes of Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica have a single high-affinity binding site for [3H]IMI with KD values of 1-2 nM and Bmax values of 560-850 fmol/mg of protein. Locusta and Periplaneta nAChRs isolated with an alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT)-agarose affinity column are known to be alpha-subunit homooligomers. This study uses 1-[N-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-ethyl]amino-1-amino-2-nitroethene++ + (which inhibits [3H]IMI binding to Drosophila and Musca head membranes at 2-3 nM) to develop a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column. The procedure-introduction of Triton-solubilized Drosophila or Musca head membranes into this neonicotinoid-based column, elution with IMI, and analysis by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamicle gel electrophoresis-gives only three proteins (69, 66, and 61 kDa) tentatively assigned as putative subunits of the nAChR; the same three proteins are obtained with Musca using the alpha-BGT-agarose affinity column. Photoaffinity labeling of the Drosophila and Musca putative subunits from the neonicotinoid column with 125I-alpha-BGT-4-azidosalicylic acid gives a labeled derivative of 66-69 kDa. The yield is 2-5 micrograms of receptor protein from 1 g of Drosophila or Musca heads. Neonicotinoid affinity chromatography to isolate native Drosophila and Musca receptors will facilitate studies on the structure and function of insect nAChRs.

  7. Blockade of central nicotine acetylcholine receptor signaling attenuate ghrelin-induced food intake in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, S L; Hrabovszky, E; Hansson, C; Jerlhag, E; Alvarez-Crespo, M; Skibicka, K P; Molnar, C S; Liposits, Z; Engel, J A; Egecioglu, E

    2010-12-29

    Here we sought to determine whether ghrelin's central effects on food intake can be interrupted by nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blockade. Ghrelin regulates mesolimbic dopamine neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens, partly via cholinergic VTA afferents originating in the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg). Given that these cholinergic projections to the VTA have been implicated in natural as well as drug-induced reinforcement, we sought to investigate the role of cholinergic signaling in ghrelin-induced food intake as well as fasting-induced food intake, for which endogenous ghrelin has been implicated. We found that i.p. treatment with the non-selective centrally active nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine decreased fasting-induced food intake in both mice and rats. Moreover, central administration of mecamylamine decreased fasting-induced food intake in rats. I.c.v. ghrelin-induced food intake was suppressed by mecamylamine i.p. but not by hexamethonium i.p., a peripheral nAChR antagonist. Furthermore, mecamylamine i.p. blocked food intake following ghrelin injection into the VTA. Expression of the ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1A, was found to co-localize with choline acetyltransferase, a marker of cholinergic neurons, in the LDTg. Finally, mecamylamine treatment i.p. decreased the ability of palatable food to condition a place preference. These data suggest that ghrelin-induced food intake is partly mediated via nAChRs and that nicotinic blockade decreases the rewarding properties of food. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selectivity optimization of substituted 1,2,3-triazoles as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Fokin, Valery V; Vajragupta, Opa; Taylor, Palmer

    2015-08-19

    Three series of substituted anti-1,2,3-triazoles (IND, PPRD, and QND), synthesized by cycloaddition from azide and alkyne building blocks, were designed to enhance selectivity and potency profiles of a lead α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) agonist, TTIn-1. Designed compounds were synthesized and screened for affinity by a radioligand binding assay. Their functional characterization as agonists and antagonists was performed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay using cell lines expressing transfected cDNAs, α7-nAChRs, α4β2-nAChRs, and 5HT3A receptors, and a fluorescence cell reporter. In the IND series, a tropane ring of TTIn-1, substituted at N1, was replaced by mono- and bicyclic amines to vary length and conformational flexibility of a carbon linker between nitrogen atom and N1 of the triazole. Compounds with a two-carbon atom linker optimized binding with Kd's at the submicromolar level. Further modification at the hydrophobic indole of TTIn-1 was made in PPRD and QND series by fixing the amine center with the highest affinity building blocks in the IND series. Compounds from IND and PPRD series are selective as agonists for the α7-nAChRs over α4β2-nAChRs and 5HT3A receptors. Lead compounds in the three series have EC50's between 28 and 260 nM. Based on the EC50, affinity, and selectivity determined from the binding and cellular responses, two of the leads have been advanced to behavioral studies described in the companion article (DOI: 10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00059).

  9. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  10. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  11. CB1 receptor antagonism increases hippocampal acetylcholine release: site and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, Aldemar; Köfalvi, Attila; Wade, Mark R; Davis, Richard J; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Rebola, Nelson; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Nomikos, George G

    2006-10-01

    Evidence indicates that blockade of cannabinoid receptors increases acetylcholine (ACh) release in brain cortical regions. Although it is assumed that this type of effect is mediated through CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonism, several in vitro functional studies recently have suggested non-CB1R involvement. In addition, neither the precise neuroanatomical site nor the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are known. We thoroughly examined these issues using a combination of systemic and local administration of CB1R antagonists, different methods of in vivo microdialysis, CB1R knockout (KO) mice, tissue measurements of ACh, and immunochemistry. First, we showed that systemic injections of the CB1R antagonists N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR-141716A) and N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) dose-dependently increased hippocampal ACh efflux. Likewise, local hippocampal, but not septal, infusions of SR141716A or AM251 increased hippocampal ACh release. It is noteworthy that the stimulatory effects of systemically administered CB1R antagonists on hippocampal ACh release were completely abolished in CB1R KO mice. CB1R KO mice had similar basal but higher stress-enhanced hippocampal ACh levels compared with wild-type controls. It is interesting that dopamine D1 receptor antagonism counteracted the stimulatory effect of CB1R blockade on hippocampal ACh levels. Finally, immunohistochemical methods revealed that a high proportion of CB1R-positive nerve terminals were found in hippocampus and confirmed the colocalization of CB1 receptors with cholinergic and dopaminergic nerve terminals. In conclusion, hippocampal ACh release may specifically be controlled through CB1Rs located on both cholinergic and dopaminergic neuronal projections, and CB1R antagonism increases hippocampal ACh release, probably through both a direct

  12. Isotopic rubidium ion efflux assay for the functional characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on clonal cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, R.J.; Cullen, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    An isotopic rubidium ion efflux assay has been developed for the functional characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on cultured neurons. This assay first involves the intracellular sequestration of isotopic potassium ion analog by the ouabain-sensitive action of a sodium-potassium ATPase. Subsequently, the release of isotopic rubidium ion through nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-coupled monovalent cation channels is activated by application of nicotinic agonists. Specificity of receptor-mediated efflux is demonstrated by its sensitivity to blockade by nicotinic, but not muscarinic, antagonists. The time course of agonist-mediated efflux, within the temporal limitations of the assay, indicates a slow inactivation of receptor function on prolonged exposure to agonist. Dose-response profiles (i) have characteristic shapes for different nicotinic agonists, (ii) are described by three operationally defined parameters, and (iii) reflect different affinities of agonists for binding sites that control receptor activation and functional inhibition. The rubidium ion efflux assay provides fewer hazards but greater sensitivity and resolution than isotopic sodium or rubidium ion influx assays for functional nicotinic receptors

  13. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Neuroplastic Changes underlying Alcohol and Nicotine Addictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Anne Feduccia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs can activate systems involved in normal reward-related learning, creating long-lasting memories of the drug’s reinforcing effects and the environmental cues surrounding the experience. These memories significantly contribute to the maintenance of compulsive drug use as well as cue-induced relapse which can occur even after long periods of abstinence. Synaptic plasticity is thought to be a prominent molecular mechanism underlying drug-induced learning and memories. Ethanol and nicotine are both widely abused drugs that share a common molecular target in the brain, the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. The nAChRs are ligand-gated ion channels that are vastly distributed throughout the brain and play a key role in synaptic neurotransmission. In this review, we will delineate the role of nAChRs in the development of ethanol and nicotine addiction. We will characterize both ethanol and nicotine’s effects on nAChR-mediated synaptic transmission and plasticity in several key brain areas that are important for addiction. Finally, we will discuss some of the behavioral outcomes of drug-induced synaptic plasticity in animal models. An understanding of the molecular and cellular changes that occur following administration of ethanol and nicotine will lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  14. Synthesis and 125I labelling of a precursor for imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuxia; Liu Ning; Yang Yuanyou; Zan Liangbiao; Liao Jiali; Jin Jiannan; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs) are involved in various pharmacological effects or diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and tobacco addiction. It will be very appealing to image nAChRs in vivo, diagnose and treat the above diseases, and probe the mechanism of nAChRs in tobacco addiction if the suitable radioactive labeled compound can be synthesized. In this study, (s)-5-(tri-butylstannyl)-3{[1-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-azetidinyl]methoxy} pyridine, a precursor for imaging nAChRs, was synthesized with commercial 2-furfurylamine and (s)-2-azetidinecarboxylic acid as starting materials, and was further labeled with 125/123 I. The whole procedure for radiosynthesis needs 50-55 min and more than 30% of the 125 I are found in the purified 5-[ 125 I]-A-85380. Even staying for 3 days at room temperature in vitro, the purified 5-[ 125 I]-I-85380 can maintain its stability, with a radiochemical purity of more than 95%. (authors)

  15. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  16. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissinis, Diego E.; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Schilardi, Patricia L.

    2015-09-01

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ~20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology.

  17. Clinical experience of seropositive ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody in a tertiary neurology referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuebing; Jammoul, Adham; Mente, Karin; Li, Jianbo; Shields, Robert W; Vernino, Steven; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Antibody against the acetylcholine receptor of autonomic ganglia (gAChR-Ab) is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) and several other disorders. This study was a retrospective evaluation of 95 patients positive for gAChR-Ab. Twenty-one (22%) patients had AAG, with a greater median gAChR-Ab level (0.21 nmol/L) and higher percentage (57%) of antibody levels >0.20 nmol/L when compared with the remaining 74 patients without autonomic manifestations (non-AAG group, 0.10 nmol/L and 15%, respectively). Only 2 new cases of malignancy were diagnosed after gAChR-Ab detection. The non-AAG group was associated with high frequencies of neurological and non-neurological autoimmunity, but also included 23 (31%) patients with mostly degenerative disorders. Detection of gAChR-Ab, especially at a higher level, is helpful for the diagnosis of AAG in patients with corresponding autonomic symptoms. However, its value is limited for predicting cancer risk and for diagnosis and management of patients without autonomic symptoms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M

    2016-01-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification...... to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain....... Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 nACh...

  19. Metabolic stabilization of acetylcholine receptors in vertebrate neuromuscular junction by muscle activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotzler, S.; Brenner, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of muscle activity on the growth of synaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) accumulations and on the metabolic AChR stability were investigated in rat skeletal muscle. Ectopic end plates induced surgically in adult soleus muscle were denervated early during development when junctional AChR number and stability were still low and, subsequently, muscles were either left inactive or they were kept active by chronic exogenous stimulation. AChR numbers per ectopic AChR cluster and AChR stabilities were estimated from the radioactivity and its decay with time, respectively, of end plate sites whose AChRs had been labeled with 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-butx). The results show that the metabolic stability of the AChRs in ectopic clusters is reversibly increased by muscle activity even when innervation is eliminated very early in development. 1 d of stimulation is sufficient to stabilize the AChRs in ectopic AChR clusters. Muscle stimulation also produced an increase in the number of AChRs at early denervated end plates. Activity-induced cluster growth occurs mainly by an increase in area rather than in AChR density, and for at least 10 d after denervation is comparable to that in normally developing ectopic end plates. The possible involvement of AChR stabilization in end plate growth is discussed

  20. Pathogenesis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Role of Nicotine and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Zhuang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and angiogenesis have been implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, although the well-defined initiating mechanism is not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs such as MMP-2 and -9 and other proteinases degrading elastin and extracellular matrix are the critical pathogenesis of AAAs. Among the risk factors of AAAs, cigarette smoking is an irrefutable one. Cigarette smoke is practically involved in various aspects of the AAA pathogenesis. Nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco leaves and a primary component in cigarette smoke, can stimulate the MMPs expression by vascular SMCs, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells in vascular wall and induce angiogenesis in the aneurysmal tissues. However, for the inflammatory and apoptotic processes in the pathogenesis of AAAs, nicotine seems to be moving in just the opposite direction. Additionally, the effects of nicotine are probably dose dependent or associated with the exposure duration and may be partly exerted by its receptors—nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. In this paper, we will mainly discuss the pathogenesis of AAAs involving inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and angiogenesis, and the roles of nicotine and nAChRs.

  1. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-03-06

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase.

  2. Ca sensitivity and acetylcholine receptor currents of twitch and tonic snake muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, R L; Spiegel, P

    1990-12-01

    Myofibrillar Ca sensitivity and single-channel acetylcholine receptor (AChR) currents were studied in garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis) costocutaneous muscle fibers. Nomarski optics were used to identify tonic and fast- and slow-twitch fibers. Measurements of tension generation were made using chemically skinned fibers. The maximum tensions of the three types of fibers were similar, and the fast- and slow-twitch fibers had similar Ca sensitivities. Compared with twitch fibers, tonic fibers had lower threshold Ca concentrations for tension generation and a larger range of Ca concentrations between threshold and maximum tension. The AChR channels were studied by enzymatically removing the nerve terminals and performing patch-clamp recordings on the exposed postsynaptic membrane. Twitch fibers had only one class of end-plate channel with a conductance of approximately 51 pS. Tonic fibers had two types of synaptic channels. One AChR channel in the tonic fibers resembled the type seen in twitch fibers. The other channel in tonic fibers had a smaller conductance of approximately 33 pS and resembled extrajunctional AChRs on denervated twitch fibers.

  3. Role of nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine in mucous cell metaplasia, hyperplasia and airway mucus formation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Wilder, Julie A.; Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Saeed, Ali Imran; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Gott, Katherine M.; Peña-Philippides, Juan Carlos; Harrod, Kevin S.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Buch, Shilpa; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway mucus hypersecretion is a key pathophysiological feature in number of lung diseases. Cigarette smoke/nicotine and allergens are strong stimulators of airway mucus; however, the mechanism of mucus modulation is unclear. Objectives Characterize the pathway by which cigarette smoke/nicotine regulates airway mucus and identify agents that decrease airway mucus. Methods IL-13 and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are implicated in airway mucus. We examined the role of IL-13 and GABAARs in nicotine-induced mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and A549 cells, and secondhand cigarette smoke and/or ovalbumin-induced mucus formation in vivo. Results Nicotine promotes mucus formation in NHBE cells; however, the nicotine-induced mucus formation is independent of IL-13 but sensitive to the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin (PIC). Airway epithelial cells express α7/α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and specific inhibition or knockdown of α7- but not α9/α10-nAChRs abrogates mucus formation in response to nicotine and IL-13. Moreover, addition of acetylcholine or inhibition of its degradation increases mucus in NHBE cells. Nicotinic but not muscarinic receptor antagonists block allergen or nicotine/cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus formation in NHBE cells and/or in mouse airways. Conclusions Nicotine-induced airway mucus formation is independent of IL-13 and α7-nAChRs are critical in airway mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and mucus production in response to various pro-mucoid agents, including IL-13. In the absence of nicotine, acetylcholine may be the biological ligand for α7-nAChRs to trigger airway mucus formation. α7-nAChRs are downstream of IL-13 but upstream of GABAARα2 in the MUC5AC pathway. Acetylcholine and α-7-nAChRs may serve as therapeutic targets to control airway mucus. PMID:22578901

  4. Stabilization of acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular synapse: the role of the nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Drachman, R J; Stanley, E F

    1992-05-29

    The majority of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at innervated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are stable, with half-lives averaging about 11 days in rodent muscles. In addition to the stable AChRs, approximately 18% of AChRs at these innervated junctions are rapidly turned over (RTOs), with half lives of less than 24 h. We have postulated that RTOs may be precursors of stable AChRs, and that the motor nerve may influence their stabilization. This hypothesis was tested by: (i) labeling AChRs in mouse sternomastoid (SM) muscles with 125I-alpha-BuTx; (ii) denervating one SM muscle in each mouse, and (iii) following the fate of the labeled AChRs through a 5-day period when RTOs were either stabilized or degraded. The hypothesis predicts that denervation should preclude stabilization of RTOs, resulting in a deficit of stable AChRs in denervated muscles. The results showed a highly significant (P less than 0.002) deficit of stable AChRs in denervated as compared with innervated muscles. Control experiments excluded the possibility that this deficit could be attributed to independent accelerated degradation of either RTOs or pre-existing stable AChRs. The observed deficit was quantitatively consistent with the deficit predicted by a mathematical model based on interruption of stabilization following denervation. We conclude that: (i) the observed deficit after denervation of NMJs is due to failure of stabilization of pre-existing RTOs; (ii) RTOs at normally innervated NMJs are precursors of stable AChRs; (iii) stabilization occurs after the insertion of AChRs at NMJs, and (iv) motor nerves play a key role in stabilization of RTOs. The concept of receptor stabilization has important implications for understanding the biology of the neuromuscular junction and post-synaptic plasticity.

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice show distinct synaptic plasticity impairments in the visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origlia, Nicola; Kuczewski, Nicola; Aztiria, Eugenio; Gautam, Dinesh; Wess, Jürgen; Domenici, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    In the present report, we focused our attention on the role played by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in different forms of long-term synaptic plasticity. Specifically, we investigated long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) expression elicited by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) and low-frequency stimulation (LFS), respectively, in visual cortical slices obtained from different mAChR knockout (KO) mice. A normal LTP was evoked in M1/M3 double KO mice, while LTP was impaired in the M2/M4 double KO animals. On the other hand, LFS induced LTD in M2/M4 double KO mice, but failed to do so in M1/M3 KO mice. Interestingly, LFS produced LTP instead of LTD in M1/M3 KO mice. Analysis of mAChR single KO mice revealed that LTP was affected only by the simultaneous absence of both M2 and M4 receptors. A LFS-dependent shift from LTD to LTP was also observed in slices from M1 KO mice, while LTD was simply abolished in slices from M3 KO mice. Using pharmacological tools, we showed that LTP in control mice was blocked by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi/o proteins, but not by raising intracellular cAMP levels. In addition, the inhibition of phospholipase C by U73122 induced the same shift from LTD to LTP after LFS observed in M1 single KO and M1/M3 double KO mice. Our results indicate that different mAChR subtypes regulate different forms of long-term synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex, activating specific G proteins and downstream intracellular mechanisms. PMID:17023506

  6. A role for α4(non-α6)* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Lindsey G; Grady, Sharon R; Salminen, Outi; Marks, Michael J; Tapper, Andrew R

    2013-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing either the α4 and/or α6 subunit are robustly expressed in dopaminergic nerve terminals in dorsal striatum where they are hypothesized to modulate dopamine (DA) release via acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation from cholinergic interneurons. However, pharmacological blockade of nAChRs or genetic deletion of individual nAChR subunits, including α4 and α6, in mice, yields little effect on motor behavior. Based on the putative role of nAChRs containing the α4 subunit in modulation of DA in dorsal striatum, we hypothesized that mice expressing a single point mutation in the α4 nAChR subunit, Leu9'Ala, that renders nAChRs hypersensitive to agonist, would exhibit exaggerated differences in motor behavior compared to WT mice. To gain insight into these differences, we challenged WT and Leu9'Ala mice with the α4β2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE). Interestingly, in Leu9'Ala mice, DHβE elicited a robust, reversible motor impairment characterized by hypolocomotion, akinesia, catalepsy, clasping, and tremor; whereas the antagonist had little effect in WT mice at all doses tested. Pre-injection of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg) blocked DHβE-induced motor impairment in Leu9'Ala mice confirming that the phenotype was mediated by antagonism of nAChRs. In addition, SKF82958 (1 mg/kg) and amphetamine (5 mg/kg) prevented the motor phenotype. DHβE significantly activated more neurons within striatum and substantia nigra pars reticulata in Leu9'Ala mice compared to WT animals, suggesting activation of the indirect motor pathway as the circuit underlying motor dysfunction. ACh evoked DA release from Leu9'Ala striatal synaptosomes revealed agonist hypersensitivity only at α4(non-α6)* nAChRs. Similarly, α6 nAChR subunit deletion in an α4 hypersensitive nAChR (Leu9'Ala/α6 KO) background had little effect on the DHβE-induced phenotype, suggesting an α4(non-α6)* nAChR-dependent mechanism. Together, these data indicate

  7. Release of acetylcholine from murine embryonic stem cells: effect of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors and blockade of organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Dohle, Eva; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-11-27

    The non-neuronal cholinergic system is widely expressed in nature. The present experiments were performed to characterize the non-neuronal cholinergic system in murine embryonic stem cells (CGR8 cell line). CGR8 cells were cultured in gelatinized flasks with Glasgow's buffered minimal essential medium (Gibco, Germany). Acetylcholine was measured by HPLC combined with bioreactor and electrochemical detection. CGR8 cells contained 1.08±0.12 pmol acetylcholine/10(6) cells (n=7) which was reduced to 0.50±0.06 pmol/10(6) cells (n=6; pacetylcholine into the incubation medium was demonstrated, when cholinesterase activity was blocked by 10 μM physostigmine, with 97±13, 180±15 and 216±14 pmol being released from 65×10(6) cells after incubation periods of 2, 4 and 6h, respectively. The cumulative release corresponds to a fractional release rate of 2%/min. Blockade of nicotine or muscarine receptors did not significantly modulate the release of acetylcholine which was substantially reduced by 300 μM quinine (inhibitor of organic cation transporters). This inhibition showed considerable fading over the incubation period, indicating additional release mechanisms activated upon inhibition of organic cation transporters. Murine embryonic stem cells contain and release significant amounts of acetylcholine. The high fractional release rate and the compensation for blocked organic cation transporters indicate that non-neuronal acetylcholine may play a functional role in the homeostasis of murine embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms

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    Ben-Wen Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of “classical” anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12 in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of Vas deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63 were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the

  9. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  10. Monepantel is a non-competitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum

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    Melanie Abongwa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Zolvix® is a recently introduced anthelmintic drench containing monepantel as the active ingredient. Monepantel is a positive allosteric modulator of DEG-3/DES-2 type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in several nematode species. The drug has been reported to produce hypercontraction of Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus somatic muscle. We investigated the effects of monepantel on nAChRs from Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology, we studied the effects of monepantel on a nicotine preferring homomeric nAChR subtype from A. suum comprising of ACR-16; a pyrantel/tribendimidine preferring heteromeric subtype from O. dentatum comprising UNC-29, UNC-38 and UNC-63 subunits; and a levamisole preferring subtype (O. dentatum comprising UNC-29, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-8 subunits. For each subtype tested, monepantel applied in isolation produced no measurable currents thereby ruling out an agonist action. When monepantel was continuously applied, it reduced the amplitude of acetylcholine induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner. In all three subtypes, monepantel acted as a non-competitive antagonist on the expressed receptors. ACR-16 from A. suum was particularly sensitive to monepantel inhibition (IC50 values: 1.6 ± 3.1 nM and 0.2 ± 2.3 μM. We also investigated the effects of monepantel on muscle flaps isolated from adult A. suum. The drug did not significantly increase baseline tension when applied on its own. As with acetylcholine induced currents in the heterologously expressed receptors, contractions induced by acetylcholine were antagonized by monepantel. Further investigation revealed that the inhibition was a mixture of competitive and non-competitive antagonism. Our findings suggest that monepantel is active on multiple nAChR subtypes. Keywords: Monepantel, Zolvix®, Nicotinic acetylcholine

  11. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  12. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs.

  13. Molecular determinants of subtype-selective efficacies of cytisine and the novel compound NS3861 at heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity...... electrophysiological measurements of efficacy levels at heteromeric combinations of a3- and a4-, with ß2- and ß4-subunits, and various chimeric constructs thereof. Compared with cytisine, which selectively activates receptors containing ß4- but not ß2-subunits, NS3861 displays the opposite ß-subunit preference...... and a complete lack of activation at a4-containing receptors. The maximal efficacy of NS3861 appeared solely dependent on the nature of the ligand-binding domain, whereas efficacy of cytisine was additionally affected by the nature of the ß-subunit transmembrane domain. Molecular docking to nAChR subtype...

  14. Resistance to cycloxaprid in Laodelphax striatellus is associated with altered expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueliang; Han, Yangchun; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Lihua; He, Peng; Liu, Zewen; Li, Zhong; Guo, Huifang; Fang, Jichao

    2018-04-01

    Cycloxaprid is a new oxabridged cis-configuration neonicotinoid insecticide, the resistance development potential and underlying resistance mechanism of which were investigated in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), an important agricultural pest of rice. A cycloxaprid-resistant strain (YN-CPD) only achieved 10-fold higher resistance, in contrast to 106-fold higher resistance to buprofezin and 332-fold higher resistance to chlorpyrifos achieved after exposure to similar selection pressure, and the cycloxaprid selected line showed no cross-resistance to the buprofezin and chlorpyrifos-selected resistance strains. Moreover, we identified 10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits from the transcriptome of L. striatellus, and six segments had open reading frames (ORFs). While we did not find mutations in the nAChR genes of L. striatellus, subunits Lsα1 and Lsβ1 exhibited, respectively, 9.60-fold and 3.36-fold higher expression in the resistant strain, while Lsα8 exhibited 0.44-fold lower expression. Suppression of Lsα1 through ingestion of dsLsα1 led to an increase in susceptibility to cycloxaprid. The findings indicate that resistance to cycloxaprid develops slowly compared with resistance to other chemicals and without cross-resistance to chlorpyrifos or buprofezin; over-expressed Lsα1 is associated with low cycloxaprid resistance levels, but the importance of over-expressed Lsβ1 and reduced expression of Lsα8 could not be excluded. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Activation of a7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Prevents Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Osteoarthritis in Rats

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    Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although some evidence suggests that the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA is lower in smokers compared to nonsmokers, the mechanisms of nicotine-induced protection remain unclear. Stimulation of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7-nAChR appears to be a critical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of cholinergic agonists in immune cells. The inhibition of secreted inflammatory molecules and the subsequent inflammatory processes have been proposed as a novel strategy for the treatment of OA. The objective of the present study was to determine whether nicotine-induced protection in a monosodium iodoacetate (MIA rat model of OA occurs via a7-nAChR-mediated inhibition of chondrocytes. Methods: Both in vivo (MIA and in vitro (MIA; Interleukin-1ß, IL-1ß models of OA were used to investigate the roles and the possible mechanisms whereby a7-nAChRs protect against knee joint degradation. Multiple experimental approaches, including macroscopic, histological analysis, chondrocyte cell cultures, confocal microscopy, and western blotting, were employed to elucidate the mechanisms of a7-nAChR-mediated protection. Results: Systemic administration of nicotine alleviated MIA-induced joint degradation. The protective effects of nicotine were abolished by administration of the a7-nAChR-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. In primary cultured rat chondrocytes, pretreatment with nicotine suppressed both p38, extracellular regulated kinase (Erk 1/2 and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK phosphorylation and phosphorylated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 activation induced by MIA- or IL-1ß, and these effects were also reversed by MLA. Conclusion: Taken together, our results suggest that activation a7-nAChRs is an important mechanism underlying the protective effects of nicotine.

  16. Structural characterization of the main immunogenic region of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Stuart W; Trinh, Vu B; Gudipati, Eswari; Friend, Alexander; Page, Nelson A; Agius, Mark A; Richman, David P; Fairclough, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    To develop antigen-specific immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases, knowledge of the molecular structure of targeted immunological hotspots will guide the production of reagents to inhibit and halt production of antigen specific attack agents. To this end we have identified three noncontiguous segments of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit that contribute to the conformationally sensitive immunological hotspot on the AChR termed the main immunogenic region (MIR): α(1-12), α(65-79), and α(110-115). This region is the target of greater than 50% of the anti-AChR Abs in serum from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and animals with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised in one species against an electric organ AChR cross react with the neuromuscular AChR MIR in several species. Probing the Torpedo AChR α-subunit with mAb 132A, a disease inducing anti-MIR mAb raised against the Torpedo AChR, we have determined that two of the three MIR segments, α(1-12) and α(65-79), form a complex providing the signature components recognized by mAb 132A. These two segments straddle a third, α(110-115), that seems not to contribute specific side chains for 132A recognition, but is necessary for optimum antibody binding. This third segment appears to form a foundation upon which the three-dimensional 132A epitope is anchored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenska, Kateryna; Lykhmus, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Chernyshov, Volodymyr; Arias, Hugo R; Komisarenko, Sergiy; Skok, Maryna

    2017-08-24

    Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are expressed in mitochondria to regulate the internal pathway of apoptosis in ion channel-independent manner. However, the mechanisms of nAChR activation in mitochondria and targeting to mitochondria are still unknown. Nicotine has been shown to favor nAChR pentamer assembly, folding, and maturation on the way of biosynthesis. The idea of the present work was to determine whether nicotine affects the content, glycosylation, and function of mitochondrial nAChRs. Experiments were performed in isolated liver mitochondria from mice, that either consumed or not nicotine with the drinking water (200μL/L) for 7days. Mitochondria detergent lysates were studied by sandwich or lectin ELISA for the presence and carbohydrate composition of different nAChR subunits. Intact mitochondria were examined by flow cytometry for the binding of fluorescently labeled α-cobratoxin and were tested in functional assay of cytochrome c release under the effect of either Ca 2+ or wortmannin in the presence or absence of nAChR-selective ligands, including PNU-282987 (1nM), dihydro-β-erythroidine (DhβE, 1μM), PNU-120596 (0.3, 3, or 10μM) and desformylflustrabromine hydrochloride (dFBr, 0.001, 0.3, or 1μM). It was found that nicotine consumption increased the ratio of mitochondrial vs non-mitochondrial nAChRs in the liver, enhanced fucosylation of mitochondrial nAChRs, but prevented the binding of α-cobratoxin and the cytochrome c release-attenuating effects of nAChR-specific agonists, antagonists, or positive allosteric modulators. It is concluded that nicotine consumption in vivo favors nAChR glycosylation and trafficking to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to the effects of specific ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors for Smoking Cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim S. Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine addiction, the result of tobacco use, leads to over six million premature deaths world-wide, a number that is expected to increase by a third within the next two decades. While more than half of smokers want and attempt to quit, only a small percentage of smokers are able to quit without pharmacological interventions. Therefore, over the past decades, researchers in academia and the pharmaceutical industry have focused their attention on the development of more effective smoking cessation therapies, which is now a growing 1.9 billion dollar market. Because the role of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR in nicotine addiction is well established, nAChR based therapeutics remain the leading strategy for smoking cessation. However, the development of neuronal nAChR drugs that are selective for a nAChR subpopulation is challenging, and only few neuronal nAChR drugs are clinically available. Among the many neuronal nAChR subtypes that have been identified in the brain, the α4β2 subtype is the most abundant and plays a critical role in nicotine addiction. Here, we review the role of neuronal nAChRs, especially the α4β2 subtype, in the development and treatment of nicotine addiction. We also compare available smoking cessation medications and other nAChR orthosteric and allosteric ligands that have been developed with emphasis on the difficulties faced in the development of clinically useful compounds with high nAChR subtype selectivity.

  19. Selective expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype M3 by mouse type III taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yusuke; Eguchi, Kohgaku; Yoshii, Kiyonori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-01

    Each taste bud cell (TBC) type responds to a different taste. Previously, we showed that an unidentified cell type(s) functionally expresses a muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtype, M3, and we suggested the ACh-dependent modification of its taste responsiveness. In this study, we found that M3 is expressed by type III TBCs, which is the only cell type that possesses synaptic contacts with taste nerve fibers in taste buds. The application of ACh to the basolateral membrane of mouse fungiform TBCs in situ increased the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in 2.4 ± 1.4 cells per taste bud (mean ± SD, n = 14). After Ca 2+ imaging, we supravitally labeled type II cells (phospholipase C β2 [PLCβ2]-immunoreactive cells) with Lucifer yellow CH (LY), a fluorescent dye and investigated the positional relationship between ACh-responding cells and LY-labeled cells. After fixation, the TBCs were immunohistostained to investigate the positional relationships between immunohistochemically classified cells and LY-labeled cells. The overlay of the two positional relationships obtained by superimposing the LY-labeled cells showed that all of the ACh-responding cells were type III cells (synaptosomal-associated protein 25 [SNAP-25]-immunoreactive cells). The ACh responses required no added Ca 2+ in the bathing solution. The addition of 1 μM U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, decreased the magnitude of the ACh response, whereas that of 1 μM U73343, a negative control, had no effect. These results suggest that type III cells respond to ACh and release Ca 2+ from intracellular stores. We also discuss the underlying mechanism of the Ca 2+ response and the role of M3 in type III cells.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in cigarette smokers: effect of heavy caffeine or marijuana use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Arthur L; Hubert, Robert; Mamoun, Michael S; Enoki, Ryutaro; Garcia, Lizette Y; Abraham, Paul; Young, Paulina; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Upregulation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is one of the most well-established effects of chronic cigarette smoking on the brain. Prior research by our group gave a preliminary indication that cigarette smokers with concomitant use of caffeine or marijuana have altered nAChR availability. We sought to determine if smokers with heavy caffeine or marijuana use have different levels of α4β2* nAChRs than smokers without these drug usages. One hundred and one positron emission tomography (PET) scans, using the radiotracer 2-FA (a ligand for β2*-containing nAChRs), were obtained from four groups of males: non-smokers without heavy caffeine or marijuana use, smokers without heavy caffeine or marijuana use, smokers with heavy caffeine use (mean four coffee cups per day), and smokers with heavy marijuana use (mean 22 days of use per month). Total distribution volume (Vt/fp) was determined for the brainstem, prefrontal cortex, and thalamus, as a measure of nAChR availability. A significant between-group effect was found, resulting from the heavy caffeine and marijuana groups having the highest Vt/fp values (especially for the brainstem and prefrontal cortex), followed by smokers without such use, followed by non-smokers. Direct between-group comparisons revealed significant differences for Vt/fp values between the smoker groups with and without heavy caffeine or marijuana use. Smokers with heavy caffeine or marijuana use have higher α4β2* nAChR availability than smokers without these drug usages. These findings are likely due to increased nicotine exposure but could also be due to an interaction on a cellular/molecular level.

  1. The functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Ly-6/neurotoxin proteins in Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haibo; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Yang; Yu, Na; Liu, Zewen

    2017-09-01

    Failures in expressing insect nAChRs (nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) limit the understanding of their functional properties, although insect nAChRs have been developed as insecticide targets for decades. Some accessory proteins can modulate nAChRs, but only a few have been identified in insects, including lynx from Ly-6/neurotoxin superfamily. Until now, only one to three lynx were identified in one insect species. Here, 11 lynx were identified in Locusta migratoria with common features of Ly-6/neurotoxin members. The effects of these lynx on seven hybrid nAChRs functionally constructed in Xenopus oocytes were tested, in which each nAChR subtype contained one L. migratoria α subunit plus rat β2 subunit. One lynx could selectively modulate several nAChR subtypes to significantly increase the amplitude of epibatidine-evoked currents, while Loc-lynx10 acted on all test nAChRs. Among nine lynx with obvious modulation effects to increase inward currents, only four significantly increased the specific [ 3 H]epibatidine binding, and the binding increase existed in all modulated nAChRs by these lynx. The results indicated that the modulation mode was decided by the specific lynx and had nothing to do with nAChR subtypes. This study provides an approximate panorama for the functional interaction net between L. migratoria lynx and nAChRs, although some other nAChRs need further tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gastrointestinal hypomotility with loss of enteric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: active immunization model in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Fryer, James P.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Xiao, Yingxian; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID) is a limited form of dysautonomia. The only proven effector to date is IgG specific for ganglionic nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors containing α3 subunits (α3*-nAChR). Rabbits immunized with recombinant α3-polypeptide produce α3*-nAChR autoantibodies, and profound AGID ensues. Human and rabbit α3*-nAChR-specific-IgGs induce transient hypomotility when injected into mice. Here we describe success and problems encountered inducing gastrointestinal hypomotility in mice by active immunization. Methods We repeatedly injected young adult mice of seven different strains susceptible to autoimmunity (spontaneous diabetes or neural antigen immunization-induced myasthenia gravis or encephalomyelitis) with: i) α3-polypeptide, intradermally, or ii) live α3*-nAChR-expressing xenogeneic cells, intraperitoneally. We measured serum α3*-nAChR-IgG twice monthly, and terminally assessed blue dye gastrointestinal transit, total small intestinal α3*-nAChR content (radiochemically) and myenteric plexus neuron numbers (immunohistochemically, ileal-jejunal whole-mount preparations). Key Results Standard cutaneous inoculation with α3-polypeptide was minimally immunogenic, regardless of dose. Intraperitoneally-injected live cells were potently immunogenic. Self-reactive α3*-nAChR-IgG was induced only by rodent immunogen; small intestinal transit slowing and enteric α3*-nAChR loss required high serum levels. Ganglionic neurons were not lost. Conclusions & Inferences AGID is inducible in mice by active immunization. Accompanying enteric α3*-nAChR reduction without neuronal death is consistent with an IgG-mediated rather than T cell-mediated pathogenesis, as is improvement of symptoms in patients receiving antibody-depleting therapies. PMID:23072523

  3. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  4. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  5. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K; Sheppard, Tom D; Millar, Neil S

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have diverse effects on receptor activation and desensitisation by allosteric ligands. It has been reported previously that the L247T mutation, located toward the middle of the second transmembrane domain (at the 9' position), confers reduced levels of desensitisation. In contrast, the M260L mutation, located higher up in the TM2 domain (at the 22' position), does not show any difference in desensitisation compared to wild-type receptors. We have found that in receptors containing the L247T mutation, both type I PAMs and type II PAMs are converted into non-desensitising agonists. In contrast, in receptors containing the M260L mutation, this effect is seen only with type II PAMs. These findings, indicating that the M260L mutation has a selective effect on type II PAMs, have been confirmed both with previously described PAMs and also with a series of novel α7-selective PAMs. The novel PAMs examined in this study have close chemical similarity but diverse pharmacological properties. For example, they include compounds displaying effects on receptor desensitisation that are typical of classical type I and type II PAMs but, in addition, they include compounds with intermediate properties. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacological characterisation of α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled from three different α6/α3 subunit chimeras in tsA201 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Bjørnskov; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Jensen, Anders A.

    2014-01-01

    should be made keeping the molecular modifications in the α6 surrogate subunits in mind, this study sheds light on the pharmacological properties of α6β4⁎ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and demonstrates the applicability of the C6F223L and C16F223L chimeras for studies of these receptors....

  7. Involvement of medial septal glutamate and GABA(A) receptors in behaviour-induced acetylcholine release in the hippocampus : A dual probe microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; Schirm, E; Jacso, J; Westerink, BHC

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the role of medial septal receptors in behaviour-induced increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release in hippocampus was investigated using dual-probe microdialysis in combination with a simple behavioural procedure, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate receptor agonists and

  8. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chuan-Xi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based on their genome sequences. The silkworm Bombyx mori is a model insect of Lepidoptera, among which are many agricultural pests. Identification and characterization of B. mori nAChR genes could provide valuable basic information for this important family of receptor genes and for the study of the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid action and resistance. Results We searched the genome sequence database of B. mori with the fruit fly and honeybee nAChRs by tBlastn and cloned all putative silkworm nAChR cDNAs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE methods. B. mori appears to have the largest known insect nAChR gene family to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. The silkworm possesses three genes having low identity with others, including one α and two β subunits, α9, β2 and β3. Like the fruit fly and honeybee counterparts, silkworm nAChR gene α6 has RNA-editing sites, and α4, α6 and α8 undergo alternative splicing. In particular, alternative exon 7 of Bmα8 may have arisen from a recent duplication event. Truncated transcripts were found for Bmα4 and Bmα5. Conclusion B. mori possesses a largest known insect nAChR gene family characterized to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. RNA-editing, alternative splicing and truncated transcripts were found in several subunit genes, which might enhance the diversity of the gene family.

  9. Neonicotinoid binding, toxicity and expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliane Taillebois

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI, thiamethoxam (TMX and clothianidin (CLT. Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16 ± 0.04 nM and 41.7 ± 5.9 nM and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008 ± 0.002 nM and 1.135 ± 0.213 nM. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml. The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies.

  10. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16±0.04 nM and 41.7±5.9 nM) and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008±0.002 nM and 1.135±0.213 nM). Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml) and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml) were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml). The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies. PMID:24801634

  11. Probing the structure of the affinity-purified and lipid-reconstituted torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Chiara, David C; Blanton, Michael P; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2008-12-02

    The Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the only member of the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that is available in high abundance in a native membrane preparation. To study the structure of the other LGICs using biochemical and biophysical techniques, detergent solubilization, purification, and lipid reconstitution are usually required. To assess the effects of purification on receptor structure, we used the hydrophobic photoreactive probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[(125)I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([(125)I]TID) to compare the state-dependent photolabeling of the Torpedo nAChR before and after purification and reincorporation into lipid. For the purified nAChR, the agonist-sensitive photolabeling within the M2 ion channel domain of positions M2-6, M2-9, and M2-13, the agonist-enhanced labeling of deltaThr274 (deltaM2-18) within the delta subunit helix bundle, and the labeling at the lipid-protein interface (alphaMu4) were the same as for the nAChR in native membranes. However, addition of agonist did not enhance [(125)I]TID photolabeling of deltaIle288 within the deltaM2-M3 loop. These results indicate that after purification and reconstitution of the Torpedo nAChR, the difference in structure between the resting and desensitized states within the M2 ion channel domain was preserved, but not the agonist-dependent change of structure of the deltaM2-M3 loop. To further characterize the pharmacology of [(125)I]TID binding sites in the nAChR in the desensitized state, we examined the effect of phencyclidine (PCP) on [(125)I]TID photolabeling. PCP inhibited [(125)I]TID labeling of amino acids at the cytoplasmic end of the ion channel (M2-2 and M2-6) while potentiating labeling at M2-9 and M2-13 and allosterically modulating the labeling of amino acids within the delta subunit helix bundle.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of new imaging agent for central nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Nishiyama, Shingo; Tsukada, Hideo; Hatano, Kentaro; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Matsushima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kengo; Magata, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α7 subtype (α 7 nAChR) is one of the major nAChR subtypes in the brain. We synthesized C-11 labeled α 7 nAChR ligands, (R)-2-[ 11 C]methylamino-benzoic acid 1-aza-bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ester ([ 11 C](R)-MeQAA) and its isomer (S)-[ 11 C]MeQAA, for in vivo investigation with positron emission tomography (PET). Then, the potential of (R)- and (S)-[ 11 C]MeQAA for in vivo imaging of α 7 nAChR in the brain was evaluated in mice and monkeys. Methods: The binding affinity for α 7 nAChR was measured using rat brain. Biodistribution and in vivo receptor blocking studies were undertaken in mice. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys. Results: The affinity for α 7 nAChR was 41 and 182 nM for (R)- and (S)-MeQAA, respectively. The initial uptake in the mouse brain was high ([ 11 C](R)-MeQAA: 7.68 and [ 11 C](S)-MeQAA: 6.65 %dose/g at 5 min). The clearance of [ 11 C](R)-MeQAA was slow in the hippocampus (α 7 nAChR-rich region) but was rapid in the cerebellum (α 7 nAChR-poor region). On the other hand, the clearance was fast for [ 11 C](S)-MeQAA in all regions. The brain uptake of [ 11 C](R)-MeQAA was decreased by methyllycaconitine (α 7 nAChR antagonist) treatment. In monkeys, α 7 nAChRs were highly distributed in the thalamus and cortex but poorly distributed in the cerebellum. The high accumulation was observed in the cortex and thalamus for [ 11 C](R)-MeQAA, while the uptake was rather homogeneous for [ 11 C](S)-MeQAA. Conclusions: [ 11 C](R)-MeQAA was successfully synthesized and showed high uptake to the brain. However, since the in vivo selectivity for α 7 nAChR was not enough, further PET kinetic analysis or structure optimization is needed for specific visualization of brain α 7 nAChRs in vivo.

  13. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

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    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  14. Effect of tissue-specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 on α3β4 and αβεδ acetylcholine receptors in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindovský, Jiří; Petrov, Konstantin; Krůšek, Jan; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2012-08-05

    The C-547 is the most effective muscle and tissue-specific anticholinesterase among alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS) acting in nanomolar concentrations on locomotor muscles but not on respiratory muscles, smooth muscles and heart and brain acetylcholine esterases (AChE). When applied systematically it could influence peripheral acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C-547 on rat α3β4 (ganglionic type) and αβεδ (muscle type) nicotinic receptors expressed in COS cells. Currents evoked by rapid application of acetylcholine or nicotine were recorded in whole-cell mode by electrophysiological patch-clamp technique 2-4 days after cell transfection by plasmids coding the α3β4 or αβεδ combination of receptor subunits. In cells sensitive to acetylcholine, the application of C-547 evoked no responses. When acetylcholine was applied during an already running application of C-547, acetylcholine responses were only inhibited at concentrations higher than 10(-7)M. This inhibition is not voltage-dependent, but is accompanied by an increased rate of desensitization. Thus in both types of receptors, effective doses are approximately 100 times higher than those inhibiting AChE in leg muscles and similar to those inhibiting respiratory diaphragm muscles and external intercostal muscles. These observations show that C-547 can be considered for symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and other congenital myasthenic syndromes as an inhibitor of AChE in leg muscles at concentrations much lower than those inhibiting muscle and ganglion types of acetylcholine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. State of the art on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the insect brain and the most numerous acetylcholine receptors are the nicotinic ones (nAChRs). The genome sequencing of diverse insect species has demonstrated the existence of at least 10 nAChR genes coding for alpha and beta subunits, suggesting the existence in the insect CNS of several subtypes ofnAChRs whose molecular composition and pharmacological properties are still unknown. Insect nAChRs have given rise to an abundance of literature about their sensitivity to neonicotinoid insecticides but only limited data are available on the functional role of nAChRs in insect cognitive functions. The data we have collected on honeybees are the only data that shed light on the role of nAChRs in learning and memory processes. The behavioral response of proboscis extension (PER), which appears when the honeybee perceives sugar, was used to quantify learning and memory performances in associative and non-associative learning procedures. Habituation of the PER, which consists in ceasing to respond to sucrose upon repetitive antennal sucrose stimulation, was facilitated by the injection into the brain of one of the nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) or methyllycaconitine (MLA). Pavlovian associative protocol was used to condition the PER to olfactory or tactile stimulus after single- or multiple-trial training. Localized brain injections of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine were performed before or after one-trial olfactory learning in the mushroom bodies (MB), the integrative structures of the insect brain. The results showed that the calical input structures of the MB are necessary for the acquisition processes and the output a-lobe regions are involved in retrieval processes. Brain injection of one of the three nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine, alpha-BGT and MLA was combined with single- and multiple-trial olfactory and tactile learning and memory performances were

  16. Adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in mouse prefrontal cortex modulate acetylcholine release and behavioral arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Christa J; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2009-01-21

    During prolonged intervals of wakefulness, brain adenosine levels rise within the basal forebrain and cortex. The view that adenosine promotes sleep is supported by the corollary that N-methylated xanthines such as caffeine increase brain and behavioral arousal by blocking adenosine receptors. The four subtypes of adenosine receptors are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain, yet the neurotransmitter systems and brain regions through which adenosine receptor blockade causes arousal are incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex contribute to the regulation of behavioral and cortical arousal. Dependent measures included acetylcholine (ACh) release in the prefrontal cortex, cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power, and time to waking after anesthesia. Sleep and wakefulness were also quantified after microinjecting an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist into the prefrontal cortex. The results showed that adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex modulate cortical ACh release, behavioral arousal, EEG delta power, and sleep. Additional dual microdialysis studies revealed that ACh release in the pontine reticular formation is significantly altered by dialysis delivery of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists to the prefrontal cortex. These data, and early brain transection studies demonstrating that the forebrain is not needed for sleep cycle generation, suggest that the prefrontal cortex modulates EEG and behavioral arousal via descending input to the pontine brainstem. The results provide novel evidence that adenosine A(1) receptors within the prefrontal cortex comprise part of a descending system that inhibits wakefulness.

  17. Ion transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, and purinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured in response to agonists. Secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), acetylcholine, forskolin, ionomycin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP, and adenosine induced lumen negative Vte and Isc. These changes were consistent with anion secretion, as verified in forskolin-stimulated preparations. Extracellular nucleotides, ATP, and UTP, applied from luminal and basolateral sides, caused largest responses: Vte increased up to -5 mV, Isc increased to 20 to 30 μA/cm, and resistance decreased by up to 200 Ω·cm. Transepithelial transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, adenosine, and purinergic P2 receptors; and this human model has a good potential for studies of physiology and pathophysiology of pancreatic duct ion transport.

  18. Carbamoylcholine analogs as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists--structural modifications of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Compounds based on the 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) scaffold were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized at the alpha(4)beta(2), alpha(3)beta(4,) alpha(4)beta(4) and alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The carbamate functionality and a small...... hydrophobic substituent in the C-3 position were found to be vital for the binding affinity to the nAChRs, whereas the carbamate nitrogen substituents were important for nAChR subtype selectivity. Finally, the compounds were found to be agonists at the alpha(3)beta(4) nAChR....

  19. Unorthodox Acetylcholine Binding Sites Formed by α5 and β3 Accessory Subunits in α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akansha; Kuryatov, Alexander; Wang, Jingyi; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Lindstrom, Jon

    2016-11-04

    All nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) evolved from homomeric nAChRs in which all five subunits are involved in forming acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at their interfaces. Heteromeric α4β2* nAChRs typically have two ACh binding sites at α4/β2 interfaces and a fifth accessory subunit surrounding the central cation channel. β2 accessory subunits do not form ACh binding sites, but α4 accessory subunits do at the α4/α4 interface in (α4β2) 2 α4 nAChRs. α5 and β3 are closely related subunits that had been thought to act only as accessory subunits and not take part in forming ACh binding sites. The effect of agonists at various subunit interfaces was determined by blocking homologous sites at these interfaces using the thioreactive agent 2-((trimethylammonium)ethyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSET). We found that α5/α4 and β3/α4 interfaces formed ACh binding sites in (α4β2) 2 α5 and (α4β2) 2 β3 nAChRs. The α4/α5 interface in (β2α4) 2 α5 nAChRs also formed an ACh binding site. Blocking of these sites with MTSET reduced the maximal ACh evoked responses of these nAChRs by 30-50%. However, site-selective agonists NS9283 (for the α4/α4 site) and sazetidine-A (for the α4/β2 site) did not act on the ACh sites formed by the α5/α4 or β3/α4 interfaces. This suggests that unorthodox sites formed by α5 and β3 subunits have unique ligand selectivity. Agonists or antagonists for these unorthodox sites might be selective and effective drugs for modulating nAChR function to treat nicotine addiction and other disorders. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are expressed in Trpm5 positive taste receptor cells (TRCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qian

    Full Text Available Nicotine evokes chorda tympani (CT taste nerve responses and an aversive behavior in Trpm5 knockout (KO mice. The agonists and antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs modulate neural and behavioral responses to nicotine in wildtype (WT mice, Trpm5 KO mice and rats. This indicates that nicotine evokes bitter taste by activating a Trpm5-dependent pathway and a Trpm5-independent but nAChR-dependent pathway. Rat CT responses to ethanol are also partially inhibited by nAChR blockers, mecamylamine and dihydro-β-erythroidine. This indicates that a component of the bitter taste of ethanol is also nAChR-dependent. However, at present the expression and localization of nAChR subunits has not been investigated in detail in taste receptor cells (TRCs. To this end, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and q-RT-PCR techniques were utilized to localize nAChR subunits in fungiform and circumvallate TRCs in WT mice, Trpm5-GFP transgenic mice, nAChR KO mice, and rats. The expression of mRNAs for α7, β2 and β4 nAChR subunits was observed in a subset of rat and WT mouse circumvallate and fungiform TRCs. Specific α3, α4, α7, β2, and β4 antibodies localized to a subset of WT mouse circumvallate and fungiform TRCs. In Trpm5-GFP mice α3, α4, α7, and β4 antibody binding was observed in a subset of Trpm5-positive circumvallate TRCs. Giving nicotine (100 μg/ml in drinking water to WT mice for 3 weeks differentially increased the expression of α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2 and β4 mRNAs in circumvallate TRCs to varying degrees. Giving ethanol (5% in drinking water to WT mice induced an increase in the expression of α5 and β4 mRNAs in circumvallate TRCs with a significant decrease in the expression of α3, α6 and β2 mRNAs. We conclude that nAChR subunits are expressed in Trpm5-positive TRCs and their expression levels are differentially altered by chronic oral exposure to nicotine and ethanol.

  1. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in Trpm5 positive taste receptor cells (TRCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Grider, John R; Damaj, M Imad; Lyall, Vijay

    2018-01-01

    Nicotine evokes chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses and an aversive behavior in Trpm5 knockout (KO) mice. The agonists and antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) modulate neural and behavioral responses to nicotine in wildtype (WT) mice, Trpm5 KO mice and rats. This indicates that nicotine evokes bitter taste by activating a Trpm5-dependent pathway and a Trpm5-independent but nAChR-dependent pathway. Rat CT responses to ethanol are also partially inhibited by nAChR blockers, mecamylamine and dihydro-β-erythroidine. This indicates that a component of the bitter taste of ethanol is also nAChR-dependent. However, at present the expression and localization of nAChR subunits has not been investigated in detail in taste receptor cells (TRCs). To this end, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and q-RT-PCR techniques were utilized to localize nAChR subunits in fungiform and circumvallate TRCs in WT mice, Trpm5-GFP transgenic mice, nAChR KO mice, and rats. The expression of mRNAs for α7, β2 and β4 nAChR subunits was observed in a subset of rat and WT mouse circumvallate and fungiform TRCs. Specific α3, α4, α7, β2, and β4 antibodies localized to a subset of WT mouse circumvallate and fungiform TRCs. In Trpm5-GFP mice α3, α4, α7, and β4 antibody binding was observed in a subset of Trpm5-positive circumvallate TRCs. Giving nicotine (100 μg/ml) in drinking water to WT mice for 3 weeks differentially increased the expression of α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2 and β4 mRNAs in circumvallate TRCs to varying degrees. Giving ethanol (5%) in drinking water to WT mice induced an increase in the expression of α5 and β4 mRNAs in circumvallate TRCs with a significant decrease in the expression of α3, α6 and β2 mRNAs. We conclude that nAChR subunits are expressed in Trpm5-positive TRCs and their expression levels are differentially altered by chronic oral exposure to nicotine and ethanol.

  2. 3-[2,4-Dimethoxybenzylidene]anabaseine (DMXB) selectively activates rat alpha7 receptors and improves memory-related behaviors in a mecamylamine-sensitive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E M; Tay, E T; Papke, R L; Meyers, C; Huang, G L; de Fiebre, C M

    1997-09-12

    The alpha7 nicotinic receptor agonist 3-[2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene]anabaseine (DMXB; GTS-21) was investigated for its ability to: (1) activate a variety of nicotinic receptor subtypes in Xenopus oocytes; (2) improve passive avoidance and spatial Morris water task performances in mecamylamine-sensitive manners in bilaterally nucleus basalis lesioned rats; and (3) elevate high-affinity [3H]acetylcholine (ACh) and high-affinity alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin binding in rat neocortex following 2 weeks of daily injections. DMXB (100 microM) activated alpha7 homo-oligomeric receptors, without significant activity at alpha2-, alpha3- and alpha4-containing subtypes. Mecamylamine blocked rat alpha7 receptors weakly if co-administered with agonist, but much more potently when pre-applied. Bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the nucleus basalis interfered with passive avoidance and spatial memory-related behaviors. DMXB (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) improved passive avoidance behavior in lesioned animals in a mecamylamine-sensitive manner. DMXB (0.5 mg/kg 15 min before each session) also improved performance in the training and probe components of the Morris water task. DMXB-induced improvement in the probe component but not the training phase was mecamylamine-sensitive. [3H]ACh binding was elevated after 14 days of daily i.p. injections with 0.2 mg/kg nicotine but not after 1 mg/kg DMXB. Neither drug elevated high-affinity alpha-[125I]bungarorotoxin binding over this interval.

  3. Effect of secondhand smoke on occupancy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Arthur L; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D; Khan, Aliyah; Kozman, Daniel; Costello, Matthew R; Vellios, Evan E; Archie, Meena M; Bascom, Rebecca; Mukhin, Alexey G

    2011-09-01

    Despite progress in tobacco control, secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure remains prevalent worldwide and is implicated in the initiation and maintenance of cigarette smoking. To determine whether moderate SHS exposure results in brain α(4)β(2)* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) occupancy. Positron emission tomography scanning and the radiotracer 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)azetidinylmethoxy) pyridine (also known as 2-[(18)F]fluoro-A-85380, or 2-FA) were used to determine α(4)β(2)* nAChR occupancy from SHS exposure in 24 young adult participants (11 moderately dependent cigarette smokers and 13 nonsmokers). Participants underwent two bolus-plus-continuous-infusion 2-FA positron emission tomography scanning sessions during which they sat in the passenger's seat of a car for 1 hour and either were exposed to moderate SHS or had no SHS exposure. The study took place at an academic positron emission tomography center. Main Outcome Measure  Changes induced by SHS in 2-FA specific binding volume of distribution as a measure of α(4)β(2)* nAChR occupancy. An overall multivariate analysis of variance using specific binding volume of distribution values revealed a significant main effect of condition (SHS vs control) (F(1,22) = 42.5, P effect. Exposure to SHS led to a mean 19% occupancy of brain α(4)β(2)* nAChRs (1-sample t test, 2-tailed, P < .001). Smokers had both a mean 23% increase in craving with SHS exposure and a correlation between thalamic α(4)β(2)* nAChR occupancy and craving alleviation with subsequent cigarette smoking (Spearman ρ = -0.74, P = .01). Nicotine from SHS exposure results in substantial brain α(4)β(2)* nAChR occupancy in smokers and nonsmokers. Study findings suggest that such exposure delivers a priming dose of nicotine to the brain that contributes to continued cigarette use in smokers. This study has implications for both biological research into the link between SHS exposure and cigarette use and public policy regarding the need

  4. Clinical Utility of Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Testing in Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Crandall E; De Lott, Lindsey B; Nagia, Lina; Lemos, Joao; Eggenberger, Eric R; Cornblath, Wayne T

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody testing is thought to be lower in ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG) compared with generalized disease, although estimates in small-scale studies vary. There is little information in the literature about the implications of AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. To test the hypothesis that serum AChR antibody testing is more sensitive in OMG than previously reported and to examine the association between AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. A retrospective, observational cohort study was conducted of 223 patients (mean [SD] age, 59.2 [16.4] years; 139 [62.3%] male) diagnosed with OMG between July 1, 1986, and May 31, 2013, at 2 large, academic medical centers. Baseline characteristics, OMG symptoms, results of AChR antibody testing, and progression time to generalized myasthenia gravis (if this occurred) were recorded for each patient. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the association between all clinical variables and antibody result. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to examine time to generalization. Among the 223 participants, AChR antibody testing results were positive in 158 participants (70.9%). In an adjusted model, increased age at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P = .007) and progression to generalized myasthenia gravis (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.18-7.26; P = .02) were significantly associated with positive antibody test results. Women were less likely to have a positive antibody test result (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.68; P = .002). Patients who developed symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis had a significantly higher mean (SD) antibody level than those who did not develop symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis (12.7 [16.5] nmol/L vs 4.2 [7.9] nmol/L; P = .002). We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of AChR antibody testing than previously reported in the

  5. Potential of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PET imaging in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswijk, Ellen; Bauwens, Matthias; Mottaghy, Felix M; Wildberger, Joachim E; Bucerius, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Atherosclerotic events are usually acute and often strike otherwise asymptomatic patients. Although multiple clinical risk factors have been associated with atherosclerosis, as of yet no further individual prediction can be made as to who will suffer from its consequences based on biomarker analysis or traditional imaging methods like CT, MRI or angiography. Previously, non-invasive imaging with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET was shown to potentially fill this niche as it offers high sensitive detection of metabolic processes associated with inflammatory changes in atherosclerotic plaques. However, 18 F-FDG PET imaging of arterial vessels suffers from non-specificity and has still to be proven to reliably identify vulnerable plaques, carrying a high risk of rupture. Therefore, it may be regarded only as a secondary marker for monitoring treatment effects and it does not offer alternative treatment options or direct insight in treatment mechanisms. In this review, an overview is given of the current status and the potential of PET imaging of inflammation and angiogenesis in atherosclerosis in general and special emphasis is given to imaging of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs). Due to the gaps that still exist in our understanding of atherogenesis and the limitations of the available PET tracers, the search continues for a more specific radioligand, able to differentiate between stable atherosclerosis and plaques prone to rupture. The potential role of the α7 nAChR as imaging marker for plaque vulnerability is explored. Today, strong evidence exists that nAChRs are involved in the atherosclerotic disease process. They are suggested to mediate the deleterious effects of the major tobacco component, nicotine, a nAChR agonist. Mainly based on in vitro data, α7 nAChR stimulation might increase plaque burden via increased neovascularization. However, in animal studies, α7 nAChR manipulation appears to reduce plaque size due to its inhibitory

  6. Galantamine, an Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor and Positive Allosteric Modulator of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors, Attenuates Nicotine Taking and Seeking in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas J; Rupprecht, Laura E; Hayes, Matthew R; Blendy, Julie A; Schmidt, Heath D

    2012-01-01

    Current smoking cessation pharmacotherapies have limited efficacy in preventing relapse and maintaining abstinence during withdrawal. Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that also acts as a positive allosteric modulator of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Galantamine has recently been shown to reverse nicotine withdrawal-induced cognitive impairments in mice, which suggests that galantamine may function to prevent relapse in human smokers. However, there are no studies examining whether galantamine administration modulates nicotine self-administration and/or reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rodents. The present experiments were designed to determine the effects of galantamine administration on nicotine taking and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior, an animal model of relapse. Moreover, the effects of galantamine on sucrose-maintained responding and sucrose seeking were also examined to determine whether galantamine's effects generalized to other reinforced behaviors. An inverted U-shaped dose-response curve was obtained when animals self-administered different unit doses of nicotine with the highest responding for 0.03 mg/kg per infusion of nicotine. Acute galantamine administration (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated nicotine self-administration when animals were maintained on either a fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) or progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. Galantamine administration also attenuated the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. No significant effects of galantamine on sucrose self-administration or sucrose reinstatement were noted. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors have also been shown to produce nausea and vomiting in humans. However, at doses required to attenuate nicotine self-administration, no effects of galantamine on nausea/malaise as measured by pica were noted. These results indicate that increased extracellular acetylcholine levels and/or nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation is sufficient to attenuate

  7. Expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor immunoreactivity in septohippocampal neurons and other identified hippocampal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Levey, A I

    1996-11-18

    Muscarinic cholinergic transmission plays an important role in modulating hippocampal activity and many higher brain functions. Many of the modulatory effects of acetylcholine on hippocampal function result from direct effects in the hippocampus or from actions on the hippocampal afferent neurons. At each site, the differential expression of a family of five distinct but related receptor subtypes governs the nature of the response. The aim of the present study was to identify the subtypes expressed in the hippocampal afferent neurons by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry. The retrograde tracer, wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, was injected into the hippocampus unilaterally to label afferent neurons, and was combined with muscarinic (m) acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) with immunocytochemistry to identify the m1-m4 subtypes expressed. The retrogradely labeled cells in the basal forebrain that contribute to the septohippocampal pathway were found to express m2, m3, and, to a lesser extent, m1. Commissural/associational pathway neurons, which were identified by retrogradely labeled cells in the ipsi- and contralateral dentate gyrus, expressed m1, m3, and m4. The retrogradely labeled cells in the entorhinal cortex of the perforant pathway expressed predominantly m1 and m3, with fewer neurons expressing m2 and m4. Raphe-hippocampal cells were found to express m1. Thus, this study provides evidence for the diversity of mAChR subtypes expressed in neurons that project to the hippocampus. The complex modulation by acetylcholine of hippocampal function, therefore, is governed not only by the variety of mAChRs expressed in the hippocampus but also by their differential expression in extrinsic hippocampal afferents.

  8. Differential role of ventral tegmental area acetylcholine and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in cocaine-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Wojciech; Wickham, Robert J; Behrens, Shay; Wang, Jie; Zwerling, Blake; Mason, Graeme F; Addy, Nii A

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to drug-associated cues evokes drug-seeking behavior and is regarded as a major cause of relapse. Cues evoke burst firing of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and phasic DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Cholinergic and glutamatergic input to the VTA is suggested to gate phasic DA activity. However, the role of VTA cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors in regulating phasic dopamine release and cue-induced drug-seeking in cocaine experienced subjects is not known. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, we found that VTA inactivation strongly inhibited, while VTA stimulation promoted, cocaine-seeking behavior during early withdrawal. Blockade of phasic activated D1 receptors in the NAc core also strongly inhibited cue-induced cocaine-seeking--suggesting an important role of phasic DA activity in the VTA to NAc core circuit. Next, we examined the role of VTA acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in regulating both NAc core phasic DA release and cue-induced cocaine-seeking. In cocaine naïve subjects, VTA infusion of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist mecamylamine, the muscarinic AChR antagonist scopolamine, or the NMDAR antagonist AP-5, led to robust attenuation of phasic DA release in the NAc core. During early cocaine withdrawal, VTA infusion of AP-5 had limited effects on NAc phasic DA release and cue-induced cocaine-seeking while VTA infusion of mecamylamine or scopolamine robustly inhibited both phasic DA release and cocaine-seeking. The results demonstrate that VTA AChRs, but not NMDARs, strongly regulate cue-induced cocaine-seeking and phasic DA release during early cocaine withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbachol and acetylcholine delay the early postdenervation depolarization of muscle fibres through M1-cholinergic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urazaev, A.; Naumenko, N.; Malomough, A.; Nikolsky, E.; Vyskočil, František

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2000), s. 255-263 ISSN 0168-0102 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA7011902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : acetylcholine * M1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.807, year: 2000

  10. Mechanisms of the inhibition of endplate acetylcholine receptors by antiseptic chlorhexidine (experiments and models)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaihutdinova, A.R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František; Skorinkin, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 6 (2009), s. 551-560 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * endplate currents Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2009

  11. Heterologous expression and nonsense suppression provide insights into agonist behavior at α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Michael R; Limapichat, Walrati; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2015-10-01

    The α6-containing subtypes of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are localized to presynaptic terminals of the dopaminergic pathways of the central nervous system. Selective ligands for these nAChRs are potentially useful in both Parkinson's disease and addiction. For these and other goals, it is important to distinguish the binding behavior of agonists at the α6-β2 binding site versus other subtypes. To study this problem, we apply nonsense suppression-based non-canonical amino acid mutagenesis. We report a combination of four mutations in α6β2 that yield high-level heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. By varying mRNA injection ratios, two populations were observed with unique characteristics, likely due to differing stoichiometries. Responses to nine known nAChR agonists were analyzed at the receptor, and their corresponding EC50 values and efficacies are reported. The system is compatible with nonsense suppression, allowing structure-function studies between Trp149 - a conserved residue on loop B found to make a cation-π interaction at several nAChR subtypes - and several agonists. These studies reveal that acetylcholine forms a strong cation-π interaction with the conserved tryptophan, while nicotine and TC299423 do not, suggesting a unique pharmacology for the α6β2 nAChR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...... to classical antagonists such as atropine. Here, we find that the D. melanogaster A-type mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 and D. melanogaster B-type mAChR to Gi/0. Furthermore, by comparing the second and third intracellular loops of all animal mAChRs for which the G protein coupling has been established, we could...... identify several amino acid residues likely to be specific for either Gq/11 or Gi/0 coupling. Using these hallmarks for specific mAChR G protein interaction we found that all protostomes with a sequenced genome have one mAChR coupled to Gq/11 and one to four mAChRs coupled to Gi/0. Furthermore...

  13. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands to assess......The neurotransmitter dopamine plays important roles in modulating cognitive, affective, and motor functions. Dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson...

  14. Acetylcholine induces fibrogenic effects via M2/M3 acetylcholine receptors in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and in primary human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Maelle L; Sigala, Barbara; Soeda, Junpei; Cordero, Paul; Nguyen, Vi; McKee, Chad; Mouraliderane, Angelina; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-02-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), via neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), modulates fibrogenesis in animal models. However, the role of ACh in human hepatic fibrogenesis is unclear. We aimed to determine the fibrogenic responses of human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) to ACh and the relevance of the PNS in hepatic fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Primary hHSC were analyzed for synthesis of endogenous ACh and acetylcholinesterase and gene expression of choline acetyltransferase and muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR). Cell proliferation and fibrogenic markers were analyzed in hHSC exposed to ACh, atropine, mecamylamine, methoctramine, and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide. mAChR expression was analyzed in human NASH scored for fibrosis. We observed that hHSC synthesize ACh and acetylcholinesterase and express choline acetyltransferase and M1-M5 mAChR. We also show that M2 was increased during NASH progression, while both M2 and M3 were found upregulated in activated hHSC. Furthermore, endogenous ACh is required for hHSC basal growth. Exogenous ACh resulted in hHSC hyperproliferation via mAChR and phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) signaling pathways, as well as increased fibrogenic markers. We show that ACh regulates hHSC activation via M2 and M3 mAChR involving the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and MEK pathways in vitro. Finally, we provide evidence that the PNS may be involved in human NASH fibrosis. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Iptakalim inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated currents in dopamine neurons acutely dissociated from rat substantia nigra pars compacta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; DeChon, J; Yan, K C; Liu, Q; Hu, G; Wu, J

    2006-07-31

    Iptakalim hydrochloride, a novel cardiovascular ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel opener, has shown remarkable antihypertensive and neuroprotective effects in a variety of studies using in vivo and in vitro preparations. We recently found that iptakalim blocked human alpha4-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) heterologously expressed in the human SH-EP1 cell line. In the present study, we examined the effects of iptakalim on several neurotransmitter-induced current responses in single DA neurons freshly dissociated from rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), using perforated patch-clamp recordings combined with a U-tube rapid drug application. In identified DA neurons under voltage-clamp configuration, glutamate-, NMDA-, and GABA-induced currents were insensitive to co-application with iptakalim (100 microM), while whole-cell currents induced by ACh (1 mM+1 microM atropine) or an alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors relatively selective agonist, RJR-2403 (300 microM), were eliminated by iptakalim. Iptakalim inhibited RJR-2403-induced current in a concentration-dependent manner, and reduced maximal RJR-2403-induced currents at the highest agonist concentration, suggesting a non-competitive block. In current-clamp mode, iptakalim failed to affect resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing, but abolished RJR-2403-induced neuronal firing acceleration. Together, these results indicate that in dissociated SNc DA neurons, alpha4-containing nAChRs, rather than ionotropic glutamate receptors, GABA(A) receptors or perhaps K-ATP channels are the sensitive targets to mediate iptakalim's pharmacological roles.

  16. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  17. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A; Levey, Allan I; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas N; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-02-10

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpressed with D(1) dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M(4) mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M(4) mAChRs only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells. The newly generated mutant mice displayed several striking behavioral phenotypes, including enhanced hyperlocomotor activity and increased behavioral sensitization following treatment with psychostimulants. These behavioral changes were accompanied by a lack of muscarinic inhibition of D(1) dopamine receptor-mediated cAMP stimulation in the striatum and an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. These novel findings demonstrate that a distinct subpopulation of neuronal M(4) mAChRs plays a critical role in modulating several important dopamine-dependent behaviors. Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance.

  18. Dependence of miniature endplate current on kinetic parameters of acetylcholine receptors activation: a model study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovyazina, I. V.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Giniatullin, R. A.; Adámek, S.; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 443-448 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant - others:RFBR(RU) 02-04-48901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : acetylcholine * carbachol * glutamate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  19. Cognitive correlates of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mild Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Osama; Meyer, Philipp M; Gräf, Susanne; Hesse, Swen; Wilke, Stephan; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Rullmann, Michael; Patt, Marianne; Luthardt, Julia; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Hoepping, Alexander; Smits, Rene; Franke, Annegret; Sattler, Bernhard; Tiepolt, Solveig; Fischer, Steffen; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Hegerl, Ulrich; Barthel, Henryk; Schönknecht, Peter; Brust, Peter

    2018-04-17

    In early Alzheimer's dementia, there is a need for PET biomarkers of disease progression with close associations to cognitive dysfunction that may aid to predict further cognitive decline and neurodegeneration. Amyloid biomarkers are not suitable for that purpose. The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α4β2-nAChRs) are widely abundant in the human brain. As neuromodulators they play an important role in cognitive functions such as attention, learning and memory. Post-mortem studies reported lower expression of α4β2-nAChRs in more advanced Alzheimer's dementia. However, there is ongoing controversy whether α4β2-nAChRs are reduced in early Alzheimer's dementia. Therefore, using the recently developed α4β2-nAChR-specific radioligand (-)-18F-flubatine and PET, we aimed to quantify the α4β2-nAChR availability and its relationship to specific cognitive dysfunction in mild Alzheimer's dementia. Fourteen non-smoking patients with mild Alzheimer's dementia, drug-naïve for cholinesterase therapy, were compared with 15 non-smoking healthy controls matched for age, sex and education by applying (-)-18F-flubatine PET together with a neuropsychological test battery. The one-tissue compartment model and Logan plot method with arterial input function were used for kinetic analysis to obtain the total distribution volume (VT) as the primary, and the specific binding part of the distribution volume (VS) as the secondary quantitative outcome measure of α4β2-nAChR availability. VS was determined by using a pseudo-reference region. Correlations between VT within relevant brain regions and Z-scores of five cognitive functions (episodic memory, executive function/working memory, attention, language, visuospatial function) were calculated. VT (and VS) were applied for between-group comparisons. Volume of interest and statistical parametric mapping analyses were carried out. Analyses revealed that in patients with mild Alzheimer's dementia compared to healthy controls

  20. Natural Compounds Interacting with Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Low-Molecular Weight Ones to Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Kudryavtsev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs fulfill a variety of functions making identification and analysis of nAChR subtypes a challenging task. Traditional instruments for nAChR research are d-tubocurarine, snake venom protein α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt, and α-conotoxins, neurotoxic peptides from Conus snails. Various new compounds of different structural classes also interacting with nAChRs have been recently identified. Among the low-molecular weight compounds are alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines C and G. 6-Bromohypaphorine from the mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis does not bind to Torpedo nAChR but behaves as an agonist on human α7 nAChR. To get more selective α-conotoxins, computer modeling of their complexes with acetylcholine-binding proteins and distinct nAChRs was used. Several novel three-finger neurotoxins targeting nAChRs were described and α-Bgt inhibition of GABA-A receptors was discovered. Information on the mechanisms of nAChR interactions with the three-finger proteins of the Ly6 family was found. Snake venom phospholipases A2 were recently found to inhibit different nAChR subtypes. Blocking of nAChRs in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons was shown for venom C-type lectin-like proteins, appearing to be the largest molecules capable to interact with the receptor. A huge nAChR molecule sensible to conformational rearrangements accommodates diverse binding sites recognizable by structurally very different compounds.

  1. Natural compounds interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from low-molecular weight ones to peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis; Shelukhina, Irina; Vulfius, Catherine; Makarieva, Tatyana; Stonik, Valentin; Zhmak, Maxim; Ivanov, Igor; Kasheverov, Igor; Utkin, Yuri; Tsetlin, Victor

    2015-05-14

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) fulfill a variety of functions making identification and analysis of nAChR subtypes a challenging task. Traditional instruments for nAChR research are d-tubocurarine, snake venom protein α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt), and α-conotoxins, neurotoxic peptides from Conus snails. Various new compounds of different structural classes also interacting with nAChRs have been recently identified. Among the low-molecular weight compounds are alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines C and G. 6-Bromohypaphorine from the mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis does not bind to Torpedo nAChR but behaves as an agonist on human α7 nAChR. To get more selective α-conotoxins, computer modeling of their complexes with acetylcholine-binding proteins and distinct nAChRs was used. Several novel three-finger neurotoxins targeting nAChRs were described and α-Bgt inhibition of GABA-A receptors was discovered. Information on the mechanisms of nAChR interactions with the three-finger proteins of the Ly6 family was found. Snake venom phospholipases A2 were recently found to inhibit different nAChR subtypes. Blocking of nAChRs in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons was shown for venom C-type lectin-like proteins, appearing to be the largest molecules capable to interact with the receptor. A huge nAChR molecule sensible to conformational rearrangements accommodates diverse binding sites recognizable by structurally very different compounds.

  2. Natural Compounds Interacting with Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Low-Molecular Weight Ones to Peptides and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis; Shelukhina, Irina; Vulfius, Catherine; Makarieva, Tatyana; Stonik, Valentin; Zhmak, Maxim; Ivanov, Igor; Kasheverov, Igor; Utkin, Yuri; Tsetlin, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) fulfill a variety of functions making identification and analysis of nAChR subtypes a challenging task. Traditional instruments for nAChR research are d-tubocurarine, snake venom protein α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt), and α-conotoxins, neurotoxic peptides from Conus snails. Various new compounds of different structural classes also interacting with nAChRs have been recently identified. Among the low-molecular weight compounds are alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines C and G. 6-Bromohypaphorine from the mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis does not bind to Torpedo nAChR but behaves as an agonist on human α7 nAChR. To get more selective α-conotoxins, computer modeling of their complexes with acetylcholine-binding proteins and distinct nAChRs was used. Several novel three-finger neurotoxins targeting nAChRs were described and α-Bgt inhibition of GABA-A receptors was discovered. Information on the mechanisms of nAChR interactions with the three-finger proteins of the Ly6 family was found. Snake venom phospholipases A2 were recently found to inhibit different nAChR subtypes. Blocking of nAChRs in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons was shown for venom C-type lectin-like proteins, appearing to be the largest molecules capable to interact with the receptor. A huge nAChR molecule sensible to conformational rearrangements accommodates diverse binding sites recognizable by structurally very different compounds. PMID:26008231

  3. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound...

  4. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  5. Alpha-conotoxin analogs with additional positive charge show increased selectivity towards Torpedo californica and some neuronal subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasheverov, I.E.; Zhmak, M.N.; Vulfius, C.A.; Corbacheva, E.V.; Mordvintsev, D.Y.; Utkin, Y.N.; van Elk, R.; Smit, A.B.; Tsetlin, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    α-Conotoxins from Conus snails are indispensable tools for distinguishing various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and synthesis of α-conotoxin analogs may yield novel antagonists of higher potency and selectivity. We incorporated additional positive charges into α-conotoxins

  6. Positive allosteric modulators of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor potentiate glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex of freely-moving rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Upton, B A; Mikkelsen, J D

    2016-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) exhibit pro-cognitive effects in animal models of schizophrenia and are targets for the discovery of cognition-enhancing drugs. However, little is known about their in vivo mechanism of action because...

  7. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on motor coordination in mice treated with methyllcaconitine and anabasine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Research has indicated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice with more a7 nAChR requi...

  8. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Philip K.; Olsen, Jeppe A.; Nielsen, Elsebet O.

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 4 beta 2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (alpha 4)(2)(beta 2)(3) and (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2). While these are similar in many aspects, the (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2) stoichiometry di...

  9. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): blocking 5HT3 receptors enhances release of serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. 5HT3 receptor antagonism is one of these actions, and this leads to increased release of norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), and serotonin (5HT) within various brain circuits.

  10. ALTERATIONS IN THE IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS AND COLOCALIZED PKC-GAMMA IN MOUSE HIPPOCAMPUS INDUCED BY SPATIAL DISCRIMINATION-LEARNING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; COMPAAN, JC; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1995-01-01

    This study describes changes in the immunoreactivity for muscarinic: acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the hippocampus of mice in relation to spatial discrimination behavior, employing the monoclonal antibody M35 raised against purified bovine mAChR protein. Performance in a hole hoard in which

  11. Role of the cholinergic nervous system in rheumatoid arthritis: aggravation of arthritis in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit gene knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, Marjolein A.; Stoof, Susanne P.; Larosa, Gregory J.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alpha7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7nAChR) can negatively regulate the synthesis and release of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and fibroblast-like synoviocytes in vitro. In addition, stimulation of the alpha7nAChR can reduce the severity of arthritis

  12. Purification of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein by affinity chromatography using a regioselectively modified and reversibly immobilized alpha-toxin from Naja nigricollis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringler, P; Kessler, P; Menez, A; Brisson, A

    1997-01-01

    A new method of affinity chromatography purification of the detergent-solubilized nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein (nAChR) is presented, based on the reversible coupling of a chemically monomodified alpha-toxin from Naja nigricollis to a resin. The alpha-toxin was monothiolated on the

  13. Mice Lacking the Alpha9 Subunit of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Exhibit Deficits in Frequency Difference Limens and Sound Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Clause

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sound processing in the cochlea is modulated by cholinergic efferent axons arising from medial olivocochlear neurons in the brainstem. These axons contact outer hair cells in the mature cochlea and inner hair cells during development and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors composed of α9 and α10 subunits. The α9 subunit is necessary for mediating the effects of acetylcholine on hair cells as genetic deletion of the α9 subunit results in functional cholinergic de-efferentation of the cochlea. Cholinergic modulation of spontaneous cochlear activity before hearing onset is important for the maturation of central auditory circuits. In α9KO mice, the developmental refinement of inhibitory afferents to the lateral superior olive is disturbed, resulting in decreased tonotopic organization of this sound localization nucleus. In this study, we used behavioral tests to investigate whether the circuit anomalies in α9KO mice correlate with sound localization or sound frequency processing. Using a conditioned lick suppression task to measure sound localization, we found that three out of four α9KO mice showed impaired minimum audible angles. Using a prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response paradigm, we found that the ability of α9KO mice to detect sound frequency changes was impaired, whereas their ability to detect sound intensity changes was not. These results demonstrate that cholinergic, nicotinic α9 subunit mediated transmission in the developing cochlear plays an important role in the maturation of hearing.

  14. Functional Characterization of Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Human Neurons Differentiated from Hippocampal Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Norimasa; Sawada, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    Neurotransmission mediated by acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) plays an important role in learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. Impairment of the cholinergic system contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD), indicating the importance of AChRs as drug targets for AD. To improve the success rates for AD drug development, human cell models that mimic the target brain region are important. Therefore, we characterized the functional expression of nicotinic and muscarinic AChRs (nAChRs and mAChRs, respectively) in human hippocampal neurons differentiated from hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells (HIP-009 cells). Intracellular calcium flux in 4-week differentiated HIP-009 cells demonstrated that the cells responded to acetylcholine, nicotine, and muscarine in a concentration-dependent manner (EC 50 = 13.4 ± 0.5, 6.0 ± 0.4, and 35.0 ± 2.5 µM, respectively). In addition, assays using subtype-selective compounds revealed that major AD therapeutic target AChR subtypes-α7 and α4β2 nAChRs, as well as M 1 and M 3 mAChRs-were expressed in the cells. Furthermore, neuronal network analysis demonstrated that potentiation of M 3 mAChRs inhibits the spontaneous firing of HIP-009 neurons. These results indicate that HIP-009 cells are physiologically relevant for AD drug screening and hence are loadstars for the establishment of in vitro AD models.

  15. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane point mutation (G275E) associated with resistance to spinosad in Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puinean, Alin M; Lansdell, Stuart J; Collins, Toby; Bielza, Pablo; Millar, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    High levels of resistance to spinosad, a macrocyclic lactone insecticide, have been reported previously in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, an economically important insect pest of vegetables, fruit and ornamental crops. We have cloned the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit from F. occidentalis (Foα6) and compared the nucleotide sequence of Foα6 from susceptible and spinosad-resistant insect populations (MLFOM and R1S respectively). A single nucleotide change has been identified in Foα6, resulting in the replacement of a glycine (G) residue in susceptible insects with a glutamic acid (E) in resistant insects. The resistance-associated mutation (G275E) is predicted to lie at the top of the third α-helical transmembrane domain of Foα6. Although there is no direct evidence identifying the location of the spinosad binding site, the analogous amino acid in the C. elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel lies in close proximity (4.4 Å) to the known binding site of ivermectin, another macrocyclic lactone pesticide. The functional consequences of the resistance-associated mutation have been examined in the human nAChR α7 subunit. Introduction of an analogous (A272E) mutation in α7 abolishes the modulatory effects of spinosad whilst having no significant effect upon activation by acetylcholine, consistent with spinosad having an allosteric mechanism of action. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. An experimental study on (131I-CHIBA-1001: a radioligand for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play a vital role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. However, there is currently no suitable positron emission tomography (PET or Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT radioligands for imaging α7 nAChRs in brain. Here our aim is to radiosynthesize a novel SPECT radioligand (131I-CHIBA-1001 for whole body biodistribution study and in vivo imaging of α7 nAChRs in brain. METHOD: (131I-CHIBA-1001 was radiosynthesized by chloramine-T method. Different conditions of reaction time and temperature were tested to get a better radiolabeling yield. Radiolabeling yield and radiochemical purities of (131I-CHIBA-1001 were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system. Whole body biodistribution study was performed at different time points post injection of (131I-CHIBA-1001 in KM mice. Monkey subject was used for in vivo SPECT imaging in brain. RESULT: The radiolabeling yield of (131I-CHIBA-1001 reached 96% within 1.5∼2.0 h at 90∼95°C. The radiochemical purity reached more than 99% after HPLC purification. (131I-CHIBA-1001 was highly stable in saline and fresh human serum in room temperature and 37°C separately. The biodistribution data of brain at 15, 30, and 60 min were 11.05±1.04%ID/g, 8.8±0.04%ID/g and 6.28±1.13%ID/g, respectively. In experimental SPECT imaging, the distribution of radioactivity in the brain regions was paralleled with the distribution of α7 nAChRs in the monkey brain. Moreover, in the blocking SPECT imaging study, the selective α7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 blocked the radioactive uptake in the brain successfully. CONCLUSION: The CHIBA-1001 can be successfully radiolabeled with (131I using the chloramine-T method. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can successfully accumulate in the monkey brain and image the α7 acetylcholine receptors. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can be a

  17. Two-dimensional probability density analysis of single channel currents from reconstituted acetylcholine receptors and sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, B U; Montal, M S; Hartshorne, R P; Montal, M

    1990-01-01

    Two-dimensional probability density analysis of single channel current recordings was applied to two purified channel proteins reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers: Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and voltage-sensitive sodium channels from rat brain. The information contained in the dynamic history of the gating process, i.e., the time sequence of opening and closing events was extracted from two-dimensional distributions of transitions between identifiable states. This approach allows one to identify kinetic models consistent with the observables. Gating of acetylcholine receptors expresses "memory" of the transition history: the receptor has two channel open (O) states; the residence time in each of them strongly depends on both the preceding open time and the intervening closed interval. Correspondingly, the residence time in the closed (C) states depends on both the preceding open time and the preceding closed time. This result confirms the scheme that considers, at least, two transition pathways between the open and closed states and extends the details of the model in that it defines that the short-lived open state is primarily entered from long-lived closed states while the long-lived open state is accessed mainly through short-lived closed states. Since ligand binding to the acetylcholine-binding sites is a reaction with channel closed states, we infer that the longest closed state (approximately 19 ms) is unliganded, the intermediate closed state (approximately 2 ms) is singly liganded and makes transitions to the short open state (approximately 0.5 ms) and the shortest closed state (approximately 0.4 ms) is doubly liganded and isomerizes to long open states (approximately 5 ms). This is the simplest interpretation consistent with available data. In contrast, sodium channels modified with batrachotoxin to eliminate inactivation show no correlation in the sequence of channel opening and closing events, i.e., have no memory of the transition history. This

  18. Alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor: a pluripotent target for diseases of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencherif, Merouane; Narla, Sridhar T; Stachowiak, Michal S

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years ago the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was thought to be vestigial with little biological relevance, but in recent years it has emerged as a functional target with ubiquitous localization and biological roles. In the last decade more than two thousand manuscripts have been published unraveling the multi-dimensional complexity of this target, the heterogeneity of its genetic variants, the spectrum of transducing signals, and the critical roles it plays in pivotal biological functions in the protection and maturation of neurons and stems cells, immune and inflammatory responses, sensory gating, mnemonic and attentional processes. In addition research and development of novel drugs has also promoted an intense debate on the role of activation, desensitization, β -amyloid oligomers, glutamate, and alpha7 nAChR, in cognition, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration. The initial alpha7 nAChRs transducing enzyme, aptly named after Janus the two-faced roman deity for crossroads and gateways, reflects the dichotomy of reports on alpha7 nAChRs in promoting neuronal survival and cognitive processes, or as the target of β- amyloid oligomers to destabilize neuronal homeostasis leading to an irreversible neurochemical demise and dementia. It is therefore important to understand the functional neural bases of alpha7 nAChRs-mediated improvement of biological functions. The promise of alpha7 nAChR-directed drugs has already recently translated into proof-of-concept in controlled clinical trials but the full promise of this target(s) will be fully unraveled when its impact on neuronal health and survival is tested in controlled long-term clinical trials of disease progression.

  19. Characterization of central inhibitory muscarinic autoreceptors by the use of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilie; Basile, Anthony S; Gomeza, Jesus; Volpicelli, Laura A; Levey, Allan I; Wess, Jürgen

    2002-03-01

    Forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs; M1-M5) are predicted to play important roles in many fundamental central functions, including higher cognitive processes and modulation of extrapyramidal motor activity. Synaptic ACh levels are known to be regulated by the activity of presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors mediating inhibition of ACh release. Primarily because of the use of ligands with limited receptor subtype selectivity, classical pharmacological studies have led to conflicting results regarding the identity of the mAChR subtypes mediating this activity in different areas of the brain. To investigate the molecular identity of hippocampal, cortical, and striatal inhibitory muscarinic autoreceptors in a more direct manner, we used genetically altered mice lacking functional M2 and/or M4 mAChRs [knock-out (KO) mice]. After labeling of cellular ACh pools with [3H]choline, potassium-stimulated [3H]ACh release was measured in superfused brain slices, either in the absence or the presence of muscarinic drugs. The nonsubtype-selective muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine (0.1-10 microm), inhibited potassium-stimulated [3H]ACh release in hippocampal, cortical, and striatal slices prepared from wild-type mice by up to 80%. This activity was totally abolished in tissues prepared from M2-M4 receptor double KO mice. Strikingly, release studies with brain slices from M2 and M4 receptor single KO mice indicated that autoinhibition of ACh release is mediated primarily by the M2 receptor in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but predominantly by the M4 receptor in the striatum. These results, together with additional receptor localization studies, support the novel concept that autoinhibition of ACh release involves different mAChRs in different regions of the brain.

  20. Imaging of cerebral α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with (-)-[(18)F]Flubatine PET: Implementation of bolus plus constant infusion and sensitivity to acetylcholine in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, A T; Esterlis, I; Gallezot, J D; Bois, F; Zheng, M Q; Nabulsi, N; Lin, S F; Papke, R L; Huang, Y; Sabri, O; Carson, R E; Cosgrove, K P

    2016-11-01

    The positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand (-)-[(18)F]flubatine is specific to α4β2(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and has promise for future investigation of the acetylcholine system in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and substance use disorders. The two goals of this work were to develop a simplified method for α4β2(⁎) nAChR quantification with bolus plus constant infusion (B/I) (-)-[(18)F]flubatine administration, and to assess the radioligand's sensitivity to acetylcholine fluctuations in humans. Healthy human subjects were imaged following either bolus injection (n=8) or B/I (n=4) administration of (-)-[(18)F]flubatine. The metabolite-corrected input function in arterial blood was measured. Free-fraction corrected distribution volumes (VT/fP) were estimated with modeling and graphical analysis techniques. Next, sensitivity to acetylcholine was assessed in two ways: 1. A bolus injection paradigm with two scans (n=6), baseline (scan 1) and physostigmine challenge (scan 2; 1.5mg over 60min beginning 5min prior to radiotracer injection); 2. A single scan B/I paradigm (n=7) lasting up to 240min with 1.5mg physostigmine administered over 60min beginning at 125min of radiotracer infusion. Changes in VT/fP were measured. Baseline VT/fP values were 33.8±3.3mL/cm(3) in thalamus, 12.9±1.6mL/cm(3) in cerebellum, and ranged from 9.8 to 12.5mL/cm(3) in other gray matter regions. The B/I paradigm with equilibrium analysis at 120min yielded comparable VT/fP values with compartment modeling analysis of bolus data in extrathalamic gray matter regions (regional means acetylcholine levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging of cerebral α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with (−)-[18F]Flubatine PET: Implementation of bolus plus constant infusion and sensitivity to acetylcholine in human brain☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, A.T.; Esterlis, I.; Gallezot, J.D.; Bois, F.; Zheng, M.Q.; Nabulsi, N.; Lin, S.F.; Papke, R.L.; Huang, Y.; Sabri, O.; Carson, R.E.; Cosgrove, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    The positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand (−)-[18F]flubatine is specific to α4β2∗ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and has promise for future investigation of the acetylcholine system in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and substance use disorders. The two goals of this work were to develop a simplified method for α4β2∗ nAChR quantification with bolus plus constant infusion (B/I) (−)-[18F]flubatine administration, and to assess the radioligand's sensitivity to acetylcholine fluctuations in humans. Healthy human subjects were imaged following either bolus injection (n = 8) or B/I (n = 4) administration of (−)-[18F]flubatine. The metabolite-corrected input function in arterial blood was measured. Free-fraction corrected distribution volumes (VT/fP) were estimated with modeling and graphical analysis techniques. Next, sensitivity to acetylcholine was assessed in two ways: 1. A bolus injection paradigm with two scans (n = 6), baseline (scan 1) and physostigmine challenge (scan 2; 1.5 mg over 60 min beginning 5 min prior to radiotracer injection); 2. A single scan B/I paradigm (n = 7) lasting up to 240 min with 1.5 mg physostigmine administered over 60 min beginning at 125 min of radiotracer infusion. Changes in VT/fP were measured. Baseline VT/fP values were 33.8 ± 3.3 mL/cm3 in thalamus, 12.9 ± 1.6 mL/cm3 in cerebellum, and ranged from 9.8 to 12.5 mL/cm3 in other gray matter regions. The B/I paradigm with equilibrium analysis at 120 min yielded comparable VT/fP values with compartment modeling analysis of bolus data in extrathalamic gray matter regions (regional means acetylcholine levels. PMID:27426839

  2. Use of an α3-β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit concatamer to characterize ganglionic receptor subtypes with specific subunit composition reveals species-specific pharmacologic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug development for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) is challenged by subtype diversity arising from variations in subunit composition. On-target activity for neuronal heteromeric receptors is typically associated with CNS receptors that contain α4 and other subunits, while off-target activity could be associated with ganglionic-type receptors containing α3β4 binding sites and other subunits, including β4, β2, α5, or α3 as a structural subunit in the pentamer. Additional interest in α3 β4 α5-containing receptors arises from genome-wide association studies linking these genes, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in α5 in particular, to lung cancer and heavy smoking. While α3 and β4 readily form receptors in expression system such as the Xenopus oocyte, since α5 is not required for function, simple co-expression approaches may under-represent α5-containing receptors. We used a concatamer of human α3 and β4 subunits to form ligand-binding domains, and show that we can force the insertions of alternative structural subunits into the functional pentamers. These α3β4 variants differ in sensitivity to ACh, nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine. Our data indicated lower efficacy for varenicline and cytisine than expected for β4-containing receptors, based on previous studies of rodent receptors. We confirm that these therapeutically important α4 receptor partial agonists may present different autonomic-based side-effect profiles in humans than will be seen in rodent models, with varenicline being more potent for human than rat receptors and cytisine less potent. Our initial characterizations failed to find functional effects of the α5 SNP. However, our data validate this approach for further investigations. PMID:22580377

  3. Selective potentiation of (α4)3(β2)2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors augments amplitudes of prefrontal acetylcholine- and nicotine-evoked glutamatergic transients in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupe, Morten; Paolone, Giovanna; Jensen, Anders A; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Sarter, Martin; Grunnet, Morten

    2013-11-15

    Prefrontal glutamate release evoked through activation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) situated on thalamic glutamatergic afferents mediates cue detection processes and thus contributes to attentional performance. However, little is known about the respective contributions of the high sensitivity and low sensitivity (LS) stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, to these processes. In the present study we employed glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes and the (α4)3(β2)2-selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) NS9283 to investigate the importance of the LS α4β2 nAChR for glutamate release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Firstly, the signaling evoked by physiologically relevant ACh concentrations through the (α4)3(β2)2 nAChR in HEK293 cells was potentiated by NS9283, consistent with the classification of NS9283 as a PAM. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intra-prefrontal pressure ejections of NS9283 evoked glutamatergic transients. Importantly, this glutamate release was attenuated by removal of cholinergic projections to the recording area. This finding indicates that the effects of NS9283 depend on endogenous ACh, again consistent with effects of a PAM. We then conducted microdialysis to demonstrate the presence of extracellular ACh in urethane-anesthetized control rats. While detectable, those levels were significantly lower than in awake rats. Finally, the amplitudes of glutamatergic transients evoked by local pressure ejections of a low concentration of nicotine were significantly augmented following systemic administration of NS9283 (3.0mg/kg). In conclusion, our results indicate that a LS α4β2 nAChR PAM such as NS9283 may enhance the cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cortex, thereby perhaps alleviating the attentional impairments common to a range of brain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an ant....... VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant......-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated...

  5. Synthetic α-Conotoxin Mutants as Probes for Studying Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and in the Development of Novel Drug Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Armishaw

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Conotoxins are peptide neurotoxins isolated from venomous marine cone snails that are potent and selective antagonists for different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. As such, they are valuable probes for dissecting the role that nAChRs play in nervous system function. In recent years, extensive insight into the binding mechanisms of α-conotoxins with nAChRs at the molecular level has aided in the design of synthetic analogs with improved pharmacological properties. This review examines the structure-activity relationship studies involving α-conotoxins as research tools for studying nAChRs in the central and peripheral nervous systems and their use towards the development of novel therapeutics.

  6. 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380: an in vivo tracer for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Ursula; Horti, Andrew G.; Koren, Andrei O.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Banta, Jeffrey P.; Finley, Paige A.; London, Edythe D.; Dannals, Robert F. E-mail: robert_dannals@tracer.nm.jhu.edu

    2000-01-01

    6-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 or 6-[{sup 18}F]FA), a new tracer for positron emission tomography, was synthesized by no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F] fluorination of 6-iodo-3-((1-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2(S)-azetidinyl)methoxy)pyridine followed by acidic deprotection. 6-[{sup 18}F]FA followed the regional densities of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) reported in the literature. Evidence of binding to nAChRs and high specificity of the binding in vivo was demonstrated by inhibition with nAChR selective ligands as well as with unlabeled 6-FA. A preliminary toxicology study of the 6-FA showed a relatively low biological effect.

  7. 6-[18F]fluoro-A-85380: an in vivo tracer for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Ursula; Horti, Andrew G.; Koren, Andrei O.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Banta, Jeffrey P.; Finley, Paige A.; London, Edythe D.; Dannals, Robert F.

    2000-01-01

    6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (6-[ 18 F]fluoro-A-85380 or 6-[ 18 F]FA), a new tracer for positron emission tomography, was synthesized by no-carrier-added [ 18 F] fluorination of 6-iodo-3-((1-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2(S)-azetidinyl)methoxy)pyridine followed by acidic deprotection. 6-[ 18 F]FA followed the regional densities of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) reported in the literature. Evidence of binding to nAChRs and high specificity of the binding in vivo was demonstrated by inhibition with nAChR selective ligands as well as with unlabeled 6-FA. A preliminary toxicology study of the 6-FA showed a relatively low biological effect

  8. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibody-associated myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis induced by nivolumab in a patient with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Takushi; Sano, Tasuku; Kamijo, Fuminao; Saito, Nana; Miyake, Tomomi; Kodaira, Minori; Katoh, Nagaaki; Nishie, Kenichi; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Uhara, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We reported an 81-year-old woman with metastatic melanoma, in whom myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis developed after nivolumab monotherapy. The first symptom of myasthenia gravis was dyspnea. Ultrasonography detected hypokinesis of the bilateral diaphragm suggesting myasthenia gravis, although there was no abnormal finding of the lungs in computed tomography images. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies were low-titer positive in the preserved serum before administration of nivolumab, strongly suggesting that the myasthenia gravis was a nivolumab-related immune adverse event. Despite the remarkable clinical benefits of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced melanoma, it is important to recognize unexpected immune-related adverse events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Functional analysis of Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in multiple activation states by SSM-based electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, K V; Muschik, S; Langguth, F; Rappenglück, S; Seeger, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPC), i.e. nerve agents or pesticides, are highly toxic due to their strong inhibition potency against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Inhibited AChE results in accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft and thus the desensitisation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in the postsynaptic membrane is provoked. Direct targeting of nAChR to reduce receptor desensitisation might be an alternative therapeutic approach. For drug discovery, functional properties of potent therapeutic candidates need to be investigated in addition to affinity properties. Solid supported membrane (SSM)-based electrophysiology is useful for functional characterisation of ligand-gated ion channels like nAChRs, as charge translocations via capacitive coupling of the supporting membrane can be measured. By varying the agonist (carbamoylcholine) concentration, different functional states of the nAChR were initiated. Using plasma membrane preparations obtained from Torpedo californica electric organ, functional properties of selected nAChR ligands and non-oxime bispyridinium compounds were investigated. Depending on overall-size, the bispyridinium compounds enhanced or inhibited cholinergic signals induced by 100 μM carbamoylcholine. Applying excessive concentrations of the agonist carbamoylcholine provoked desensitisation of the nAChRs, whereas addition of bispyridinium compounds bearing short alkyl linkers exhibited functional recovery of previously desensitised nAChRs. The results suggest that these non-oxime bispyridinium compounds possibly interacted with nAChR subtypes in a manner of a positive allosteric modulator (PAM). The described newly developed functional assay is a valuable tool for the assessment of functional properties of potential compounds such as nAChR modulating ligands, which might be a promising approach in the therapeutically treatment of OPC-poisonings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  11. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC50 = 4 μm, whereas it inhibited the binding of [3H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC50 values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [3H]TDBzl-etomidate, [3H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [3H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive modulators (TDBzl

  12. Azemiopsin, a Selective Peptide Antagonist of Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: Preclinical Evaluation as a Local Muscle Relaxant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Shelukhina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Azemiopsin (Az, a linear peptide from the Azemiops feae viper venom, contains no disulfide bonds, is a high-affinity and selective inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR of muscle type and may be considered as potentially applicable nondepolarizing muscle relaxant. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regard to in vitro and in vivo efficacy, acute and chronic toxicity, pharmacokinetics, allergenic capacity, immunotoxicity and mutagenic potency. The peptide effectively inhibited (IC50 ~ 19 nM calcium response of muscle nAChR evoked by 30 μM (EC100 acetylcholine but was less potent (IC50 ~ 3 μM at α7 nAChR activated by 10 μM (EC50 acetylcholine and had a low affinity to α4β2 and α3-containing nAChR, as well as to GABAA or 5HT3 receptors. Its muscle relaxant effect was demonstrated at intramuscular injection to mice at doses of 30–300 µg/kg, 30 µg/kg being the initial effective dose and 90 µg/kg—the average effective dose. The maximal muscle relaxant effect of Az was achieved in 10 min after the administration and elimination half-life of Az in mice was calculated as 20–40 min. The longest period of Az action observed at a dose of 300 µg/kg was 55 min. The highest acute toxicity (LD50 510 μg/kg was observed at intravenous injection of Az, at intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration it was less toxic. The peptide showed practically no immunotoxic, allergenic or mutagenic capacity. Overall, the results demonstrate that Az has good drug-like properties for the application as local muscle relaxant and in its parameters, is not inferior to the relaxants currently used. However, some Az modification might be effective to extend its narrow therapeutic window, a typical characteristic and a weak point of all nondepolarizing myorelaxants.

  13. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-05

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. On the appearance of acetylcholine receptors in denervated rat diaphragm, and its dependence on nerve stump length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchitel, O.; Robbins, N.

    1978-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) sensitivity and extrajunctional receptor distribution of the rat diaphragm were closely monitored during the early period following denervation. Both contracture in response to 10 μg/ml of ACh and extrajunctional binding of [ 125 I]alpha-bungarotoxin ([ 125 I]α-BTX) were first detectable 30 h after cutting the phrenic nerve in the thorax. If the nerve were cut more proximally, leaving a 3.5 cm distal nerve stump, the same level of ACh contracture and [ 125 I]α-BTX binding did not appear until 40 h after operation. This 10-h delay was far longer than the 3-h delay in transmission failure reportedly dependent on stump length. The earliest detectable extrajunctional [ 125 I]α-BTX binding appeared throughout the entire muscle fiber, and was not localized to the endplate region as would be expected if degeneration in the nerve terminal induced new receptors. However, later significant increases in [ 125 I]α-BTX binding at the endplate region could have resulted from such degeneration. All these results are consistent with neurotrophic regulation of muscle ACh receptors, working via a mechanism involving axonal transport. (Auth.)

  15. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  16. A nicotinic receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory effect of the flavonoid rhamnetin in BV2 microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Joseph A.; Kulshrestha, Manish; Rogers, Dennis T.; Littleton, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a potential target in neuroinflammation. Screening a plant extract library identified Solidago nemoralis as containing methyl-quercetin derivatives that are relatively selective ligands for the alpha7 nAChR. Flavonoids are not known for this activity, so we screened a small library of pure flavonoids to confirm our findings. Some flavonoids, e.g. rhamnetin, displaced a selective alpha7 nAChR radioligand from rat brain membranes whereas similar structures e.g. sakuranetin, did not. To evaluate the contribution of this putative nAChR activity to the known anti-inflammatory properties of these flavonoids, we compared their effects on lipopolysaccharide induced release of inflammatory mediators from BV2 microglia. Both rhamnetin and sakuranetin reduced mediator release, but differed in potency (rhamnetin>sakuranetin) and the Hill slope of their concentration response curves. For rhamnetin the Hill coefficient was >3.0 whereas for sakuranetin the coefficient was 1.0, suggesting that effects of rhamnetin are mediated through more than one mechanism, whereas sakuranetin has a single mechanism. nACHR antagonists decreased the Hill coefficient for rhamnetin toward unity, which suggests that a nAChR-mediated mechanism contributes cooperatively to its overall anti-inflammatory effect. In contrast nAChR antagonists had no effect on the potency or Hill coefficient for sakuranetin, but a concentration of nicotine (1μM) that had no effect alone, significantly increased the Hill coefficient of this flavonoid. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory effects of rhamnetin benefit cooperatively from a nAChR-mediated mechanism. This action, together with potent free radical scavenging activity, suggests that flavonoids with alpha7 nAChR activity have therapeutic potential in neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:24972350

  17. Differential presynaptic and postsynaptic expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway/granule cell synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Gilmor, M L; Levey, A I

    1998-09-01

    A family of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor proteins mediates diverse pre- and postsynaptic functions in the hippocampus. However the roles of individual receptors are not understood. The present study identified the pre- and postsynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapses in rat brain using a combination of lesioning, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopic techniques. Entorhinal cortex lesions resulted in lamina-specific reductions of m2, m3, and m4 immunoreactivity in parallel with the degeneration of the medial and lateral perforant pathway terminals in the middle and outer thirds of the molecular layer, respectively. In contrast, granule cell lesions selectively reduced m1 and m3 receptors consistent with degeneration of postsynaptic dendrites. Direct visualization of m1-m4 by electron microscopic immunocytochemistry confirmed their differential pre- and postsynaptic localizations. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for both redundancy and spatial selectivity of presynaptic (m2, m3 and m4) and postsynaptic (m1 and m3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapse.

  18. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained......) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M(1) and M(4) receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M(1) receptor activation attenuates cocaine...

  19. Association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with central respiratory control in isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation of neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EIKI HATORI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine exposure is a risk factor in several breathing disorders Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs exist in the ventrolateral medulla, an important site for respiratory control. We examined the effects of nicotinic acetylcholine neurotransmission on central respiratory control by addition of a nAChR agonist or one of various antagonists into superfusion medium in the isolated brainstem-spinal cord from neonatal rats. Ventral C4 neuronal activity was monitored as central respiratory output, and activities of respiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla were recorded in whole-cell configuration. RJR-2403 (0.1-10mM, alpha4beta2 nAChR agonist induced dose-dependent increases in respiratory frequency. Non-selective nAChR antagonist mecamylamine (0.1-100mM, alpha4beta2 antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (0.1-100mM, alpha7 antagonist methyllycaconitine (0.1-100mM, and a-bungarotoxin (0.01-10mM all induced dose-dependent reductions in C4 respiratory rate. We next examined effects of 20mM dihydro-beta-erythroidine and 20mM methyllycaconitine on respiratory neurons. Dihydro-beta-erythroidine induces hyperpolarization and decreases intraburst firing frequency of inspiratory and preinspiratory neurons. In contrast, methyllycaconitine has no effect on the membrane potential of inspiratory neurons, but does decrease their intraburst firing frequency while inducing hyperpolarization and decreasing intraburst firing frequency in preinspiratory neurons. These findings indicate that alpha4beta2 nAChR is involved in both inspiratory and preinspiratory neurons, whereas alpha7 nAChR functions only in preinspiratory neurons to modulate C4 respiratory rate

  20. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  1. Trace eyeblink conditioning is impaired in α7 but not in β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knock-out mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Brown

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are essentially involved in learning and memory. A neurobiologically and behaviorally well-characterized measure of learning and memory, eyeblink classical conditioning, is sensitive to disruptions in acetylcholine neurotransmission. The two most common forms of eyeblink classical conditioning – the delay and trace paradigms - differentially engage forebrain areas densely-populated with nAChRs. The present study used genetically modified mice to investigate the effects of selective nAChR subunit deletion on delay and trace eyeblink classical conditioning. α7 and β2 nAChR subunit knockout (KO mice and their wild-type littermates were trained for 10 daily sessions in a 500 ms delay or 500 ms trace eyeblink conditioning task, matched for the interstimulus interval (ISI between conditioned stimulus (CS and unconditioned stimulus (US onset. Impairments in conditioned responding were found in α7 KO mice trained in trace – but not delay – eyeblink conditioning. Relative to littermate controls, β2 KO mice were unimpaired in the trace task but displayed higher levels of conditioned responding in delay eyeblink conditioning. Elevated conditioned response levels in delay-conditioned β2 KOs corresponded to elevated levels of alpha responding in this group. These findings suggest that α7 nAChRs play a role in normal acquisition of 500 ms trace eyeblink classical conditioning in mice. The prominent distribution of α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus and other forebrain regions may account for these genotype-specific acquisition effects in this hippocampus-dependent trace paradigm.

  2. Molecular basis of reactive oxygen species-induced inactivation of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjun; Zheng, Yan; Xue, Fenqin; Chang, Yongchang; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jianliang

    2016-08-01

    The α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the most widespread heteromeric nAChR subtype in the brain, mediating fast synaptic transmission. Previous studies showed that α4β2 nAChRs could be inactivated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. We found that H2O2 induced the rundown of ACh-evoked currents in human α4β2 nAChRs and the replacement of the conserved cysteine in the M1-M2 linker of either α4 Cys245 or β2 Cys237 with an alanine residue could prevent the current rundown. Structurally, α4 Cys245 and β2 Cys237 are hypothesized to be in close proximity when the receptor is activated. Western blotting results showed that α4 and β2 subunits were cross-linked when the agonist-bound receptor encountered H2O2, which could be prevented by the substitution of the conserved cysteine in the M1-M2 linker to an alanine. Thus, when agonist bound to the receptor, α4 Cys245 and β2 Cys237 came close to each other and ROS oxidized these conserved cysteines, leading subunits to be cross-linked and trapping α4β2 nAChRs into the inactivation state. In addition, we mimicked an experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) model in PC12 cells and found that ROS, generated by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), could cause the current rundown in α4β2 nAChRs, which may play a role in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancement of glycine release from human brain cortex synaptosomes by acetylcholine acting at M4 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C; Marchi, M; Andrioli, G C; Cavazzani, P; Raiteri, M

    1993-07-01

    Synaptosomes prepared from fresh specimens of human cerebral cortex were labeled with [3H]glycine ([3H]Gly) and distributed in parallel superfusion chambers. Exposure to 15 mM KCl evoked a tritium overflow which was largely prevented by 10 mM Mg++, suggesting a consistent component of Ca(++)-dependent [3H]Gly release. Acetylcholine (ACh; 1-100 microM), added during K(+)-depolarization, increased the release of tritium in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal effect, 60%; EC50 = 7 microM). Oxotremorine (1-100 microM) mimicked ACh. The effect of 10 microM ACh was insensitive to the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (100 microM), but it was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (0.1 microM). Three muscarinic receptor antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-[12-[diethylamino-methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl-5-11-dihydro -6H-pyrido-[2-3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one) and himbacine, endowed with relative selectivity for various muscarinic receptor subtypes, prevented with differential affinities the effect of 10 microM ACh. Himbacine was the most potent antagonist of ACh, its pA2 (8.34) being 20- or 50-fold higher than that of pirenzepine (7.27) or AF-DX 116 (6.65). It is concluded that: 1) ACh can increase the release of Gly in human cerebral cortex; 2) the interaction occurs through muscarinic receptors which resemble most the M4 subtype; and 3) considering that Gly is required to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor, the ACh-evoked Gly release may represent a linkage between cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission, two systems strongly implicated in cognitive processes.

  4. Preclinical abuse liability assessment of ABT-126, an agonist at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudzik, Thomas J; Basso, Ana M; Lynch, James J; Bracken, William M; Mohler, Eric G; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Xu, Hongyu; Haig, George; Gault, Laura

    2017-07-01

    ABT-126 is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that is selective for the α7 subtype of the receptor. nAChRs are thought to play a role in a variety of neurocognitive processes and have been a pharmacologic target for disorders with cognitive impairment, including schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. As part of the preclinical safety package for ABT-126, its potential for abuse was assessed. While the involvement of the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor in the addictive properties of nicotine has been demonstrated, the role of the α7 receptor has been studied much less extensively. A number of preclinical assays of abuse potential including open-field, drug discrimination and self-administration were employed in male rats. ABT-126 had modest effects on locomotor activity in the open-field assay. In nicotine and d-amphetamine drug discrimination assays, ABT-126 administration failed to produce appreciable d-amphetamine-like or nicotine-like responding, suggesting that its interoceptive effects are distinct from those of these drugs of abuse. In rats trained to self-administer cocaine, substitution with ABT-126 was similar to substitution with saline, indicating that it lacks reinforcing effects. No evidence of physical dependence was noted following subchronic administration. Overall, these data suggest that ABT-126 has a low potential for abuse. Together with other literature on this drug class, it appears that drugs that selectively activate α7 nAChRs are not likely to result in abuse or dependence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of Acetylcholine Using Receptor-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihong; Kim, Byeongju; Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in a human central nervous system and is related to various neural functions such as memory, learning and muscle contractions. Dysfunctional ACh regulations in a brain can induce several neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis. In researching such diseases, it is important to measure the concentration of ACh in the extracellular fluid of the brain. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive and selective ACh sensor based on single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistors (swCNT-FETs). In our work, M1 mAChR protein, an ACh receptor, was expressed in E.coli and coated on swCNT-FETs with lipid membranes. Here, the binding of ACh onto the receptors could be detected by monitoring the change of electrical currents in the underlying swCNT-FETs, allowing the real-time detection of ACh at a 100 pM concentration. Furthermore, our sensor could selectively detect ACh from other neurotransmitters. This is the first report of the real-time sensing of ACh utilizing specific binding between the ACh and M1 mAChR, and it may lead to breakthroughs in various biomedical applications such as drug screening and disease diagnosis.

  6. The α4β2 nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist ispronicline induces c-Fos expression in selective regions of the rat forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie; Hansen, Henrik H; Kiss, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The dominant nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in the brain is the pentameric receptor containing both α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2). Due to the lack of selective agonists it has not been ruled out what neuronal circuits that are stimulated after systemic administration with nicotine. We...... or indirectly involved in acute stress regulation after a single dose of ispronicline, supports earlier studies that the α4β2 receptors are strongly involved in nicotine-dependent activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenocortical axis....

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymke Ockenga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation.

  8. Pharmacological and kinetic properties of alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnet, P; Labarca, C; Cohen, B N; Davidson, N; Lester, H A; Pilar, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Co-injection of RNA synthesized from cloned neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (alpha 4 and beta 2) in Xenopus oocytes produced functional receptors. In macroscopic voltage-clamp experiments, the agonist-induced current exhibited a strong inward rectification. 2. Voltage jumps from +50 mV to more negative potentials produced relaxations of the agonist-induced current with a single exponential time course. The relaxation rate constant was only weakly voltage dependent. 3. At the single-channel level, three conductances were recorded of 12, 22 and 34 pS. Their burst durations were similar and varied only weakly with voltage (e-fold for 120 to 370 mV), consistent with the poorly voltage-dependent relaxation rate constants. However, the burst durations were less than 10 ms, or less than 1/5 the value expected from voltage-jump relaxations. 4. Hexamethonium (Hex, 0.5 to 8 microM) inhibited the agonist-induced current and produced voltage-jump relaxations characterized by a rapid conductance increase and a slower conductance decrease. Analysis of these relaxations suggested that the Hex-receptor interaction is open-channel blockade characterized by a forward binding rate of 1 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and a dissociation rate constant of about 25 s-1. 5. For the relaxations produced by QX222, the slowest phase was a conductance increase, suggesting that the dissociation rate constant for QX222 is 10-30-fold greater than for Hex. 6. Hex but not QX222 produced an additional use-dependent blockade that was manifest during repetitive hyperpolarizing pulses. 7. With mouse muscle ACh receptors expressed in oocytes, the blockade by Hex did not depend strongly on voltage. Neither Hex nor QX222 produced appreciable use-dependent block on muscle ACh receptors. 8. Of the four conditions studied (neuronal and muscle receptors, Hex and QX222), only the blockade of the neuronal AChR by Hex is characterized by a residence time longer than the normal open time. 9. It is concluded

  9. The Efficacy of LY293558 in Blocking Seizures and Associated Morphological, and Behavioral Alterations Induced by Soman in Immature Male Rats and the Role of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Organophosphate Induced Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Grunberg NE. 2001. Adult vs. adolescent rats differ in biobehavioral responses to chronic nicotine administration . Pharmacology, biochemistry, and...muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The use of OP nerve agents in attacks in Syria recently...higher AChE activity within the BLA. Seizures, if treated within 20 min or 60 min post-soman exposure could be arrested with the administration of

  10. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  11. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor...... antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson's disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which five subtypes (M1–M5) exist. Muscarinic M4 receptors are found at high concentrations in motor parts...... of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  12. The prototoxin LYPD6B modulates heteromeric α3β4-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but not α7 homomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Vanessa; George, Andrew A; Nishi, Rae; Whiteaker, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Prototoxins are a diverse family of membrane-tethered molecules expressed in the nervous system that modulate nicotinic cholinergic signaling, but their functions and specificity have yet to be completely explored. We tested the selectivity and efficacy of leukocyte antigen, PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor) domain-containing (LYPD)-6B on α3β4-, α3α5β4-, and α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To constrain stoichiometry, fusion proteins encoding concatemers of human α3, β4, and α5 (D and N variants) subunits were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and tested with or without LYPD6B. We used the 2-electrode voltage-clamp method to quantify responses to acetylcholine (ACh): agonist sensitivity (EC50), maximal agonist-induced current (Imax), and time constant (τ) of desensitization. For β4-α3-α3-β4-α3 and β4-α3-β4-α3-α3, LYPD6B decreased EC50 from 631 to 79 μM, reduced Imax by at least 59%, and decreased τ. For β4-α3-α5D-β4-α3 and β4-α3-β4-α-α5D, LYPD6B decreased Imax by 63 and 32%, respectively. Thus, LYPD6B acted only on (α3)3(β4)2 and (α3)2(α5D)(β4)2 and did not affect the properties of (α3)2(β4)3, α7, or (α3)2(α5N)(β4)2 nAChRs. Therefore, LYPD6B acts as a mixed modulator that enhances the sensitivity of (α3)3(β4)2 nAChRs to ACh while reducing ACh-induced whole-cell currents. LYPD6B also negatively modulates α3β4 nAChRs that include the α5D common human variant, but not the N variant associated with nicotine dependence. © FASEB.

  13. Wash-Resistantly Bound Xanomeline Inhibits Acetylcholine Release by Persistent Activation of Presynaptic M2 and M4 Muscarinic Receptors in Rat Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, č. 1 (2007), s. 316-323 ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:-(US) NS25743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * xanomeline * muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.003, year: 2007

  14. Regulation of synaptic MAPK/ERK phosphorylation in the rat striatum and medial prefrontal cortex by dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Wang, John Q

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine and acetylcholine are two principal transmitters in the striatum and are usually balanced to modulate local neural activity and to maintain striatal homeostasis. This study investigates the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of a central signaling protein, i.e., the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We focus on the synaptic pool of MAPKs because of the fact that these kinases reside in peripheral synaptic structures in addition to their somatic locations. We show that a systemic injection of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) agonist SKF81297 enhances phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), a prototypic subclass of MAPKs, in the adult rat striatum. Similar results were observed in another dopamine-responsive region, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole had no such effects. Pretreatment with a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptors (M4Rs), VU0152100, attenuated the D1R agonist-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in the two regions, whereas the PAM itself did not alter basal ERK phosphorylation. All drug treatments had no effect on phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), another MAPK subclass, in the striatum and mPFC. These results demonstrate that dopamine and acetylcholine are integrated to control synaptic ERK but not JNK activation in striatal and mPFC neurons in vivo. Activation of M4Rs exerts an inhibitory effect on the D1R-mediated upregulation of synaptic ERK phosphorylation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dual Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4β2 Antagonists/α7 Agonists: Synthesis, Docking Studies, and Pharmacological Evaluation of Tetrahydroisoquinolines and Tetrahydroisoquinolinium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A; Soerensen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of tetrahydroisoquinolines and tetrahydroisoquinolinium salts together with their pharmacological properties at various nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In general, the compounds were α4β2 nAChR antagonists, with the tetrahydroisoquinolinium salts being more potent tha...... evaluation revealed antidepressant-like effects of both (R)-5c and (R)-6c in the mouse forced swim test, supporting the therapeutic potential of α4β2 nAChR antagonists for this indication....

  16. Dopamine D3 receptor antagonism contributes to blonanserin-induced cortical dopamine and acetylcholine efflux and cognitive improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Kwon, Sunoh; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug (APD), which, unlike most atypical APDs, has a slightly higher affinity for dopamine (DA) D2 than serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors, and is an antagonist at both, as well as at D3 receptors. The effects of atypical APDs to enhance rodent cortical, hippocampal, limbic, and dorsal striatal (dSTR) DA and acetylcholine (ACh) release, contribute to their ability to improve novel object recognition (NOR) in rodents treated with sub-chronic (sc) phencyclidine (PCP) and cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Here we determined the ability of blonanserin, the D3 antagonist NGB 2904, and the typical APD, haloperidol, a D2 antagonist, to enhance neurotransmitter efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dSTR of mice, and to ameliorate the scPCP-induced deficit in NOR in rats. Blonanserin, 10mg/kg, i.p., increased DA, norepinephrine (NE), and ACh efflux in mPFC and dSTR. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, increased DA and ACh, but not NE, efflux in mPFC, and DA, but not ACh, efflux in dSTR. Haloperidol increased DA and NE efflux in dSTR only. The selective D3 agonist PD 128907 partially blocked the blonanserin-induced cortical ACh, DA, NE and striatal DA efflux. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, like blonanserin, 1mg/kg, and the combination of sub-effective doses of NGB 2904 and blonanserin (both 0.3mg/kg), ameliorated the scPCP-induced NOR deficit in rats. These results suggest that D3 receptor blockade may contribute to the ability of blonanserin to increase cortical DA and ACh efflux, as well as to restore NOR and improve CIAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Activation of 5-HT2 receptors enhances the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunila G; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2004-09-15

    The role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release was examined in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus using in vivo microdialysis. The 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist +/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl) -2- aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the extracellular concentration of ACh in both brain regions, and this response was attenuated in rats treated with the 5-HT(2A/2B/2C) antagonist LY-53,857 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Treatment with LY-53,857 alone did not significantly alter ACh release in either brain region The 5-HT(2C) agonist 6-chloro-2-(1-piperazinyl)-pyrazine) (MK-212) (5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the release of ACh in both the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, whereas the 5-HT2 agonist mescaline (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a 2-fold increase in ACh release only in the prefrontal cortex. Intracortical, but not intrahippocampal, infusion of DOI (100 microM) significantly enhanced the release of ACh, and intracortical infusion of LY-53,857 (100 microM) significantly attenuated this response. These results suggest that the release of ACh in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus is influenced by 5-HT2 receptor mechanisms. The increase in release of ACh induced by DOI in the prefrontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus, appears to be due to 5-HT2 receptor mechanisms localized within this brain region. Furthermore, it appears that the prefrontal cortex is more sensitive than the dorsal hippocampus to the stimulatory effect of 5-HT2 agonists on ACh release.

  18. Nicotine acts on growth plate chondrocytes to delay skeletal growth through the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawakita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking adversely affects endochondral ossification during the course of skeletal growth. Among a plethora of cigarette chemicals, nicotine is one of the primary candidate compounds responsible for the cause of smoking-induced delayed skeletal growth. However, the possible mechanism of delayed skeletal growth caused by nicotine remains unclarified. In the last decade, localization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, a specific receptor of nicotine, has been widely detected in non-excitable cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine affect growth plate chondrocytes directly and specifically through nAChR to delay skeletal growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of nicotine on human growth plate chondrocytes, a major component of endochondral ossification. The chondrocytes were derived from extra human fingers. Nicotine inhibited matrix synthesis and hypertrophic differentiation in human growth plate chondrocytes in suspension culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Both human and murine growth plate chondrocytes expressed alpha7 nAChR, which constitutes functional homopentameric receptors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA, a specific antagonist of alpha7 nAChR, reversed the inhibition of matrix synthesis and functional calcium signal by nicotine in human growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. To study the effect of nicotine on growth plate in vivo, ovulation-controlled pregnant alpha7 nAChR +/- mice were given drinking water with or without nicotine during pregnancy, and skeletal growth of their fetuses was observed. Maternal nicotine exposure resulted in delayed skeletal growth of alpha7 nAChR +/+ fetuses but not in alpha7 nAChR -/- fetuses, implying that skeletal growth retardation by nicotine is specifically mediated via fetal alpha7 nAChR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that nicotine, from cigarette smoking, acts directly on growth plate chondrocytes to decrease

  19. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte; Gould, Robert W; Grannan, Michael; Noetzel, Meredith J; Lamsal, Atin; Niswender, Colleen M; Daniels, J Scott; Poslusney, Michael S; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Byers, Frank W; Wess, Jürgen; Duggan, Mark E; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W; Brandon, Nicholas J; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-10-15

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4 PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eElgueta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline, suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetyl-cholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram, suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing.

  1. Characterization of the muscarinic receptor subtype(s) mediating contraction of the guinea-pig lung strip and inhibition of acetylcholine release in the guinea-pig trachea with the selective muscarinic receptor antagonist tripitramine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, A.F; Davids, J.H; Elzinga, C.R S; Wolf, D; Zaagsma, Hans; Kilbinger, H

    1 The muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of the guinea-pig lung strip and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic vagus nerve endings in the guinea-pig trachea in vitro have previously been characterized as M-2-like, i.e. having antagonist affinity profiles that

  2. An Unaltered Orthosteric Site and a Network of Long-Range Allosteric Interactions for PNU-120596 in α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher B; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2015-08-20

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are vital to neuronal signaling, are implicated in important processes such as learning and memory, and are therapeutic targets for neural diseases. The α7 nAChR has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, and allosteric modulators have become one focus of drug development efforts. We investigate the mode of action of the α7-selective positive allosteric modulator, PNU-120596, and show that the higher potency of acetylcholine in the presence of PNU-120596 is not due to an altered agonist binding site. In addition, we propose several residues in the gating interface and transmembrane region that are functionally important to transduction of allosteric properties, and link PNU-120596, the acetylcholine binding region, and the receptor gate. These results suggest global protein stabilization from a communication network through several key residues that alter the gating equilibrium of the receptor while leaving the agonist binding properties unperturbed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation blocks long-term potentiation at cerebellar parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses via cannabinoid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are known to modulate synaptic plasticity in various brain areas. A signaling pathway triggered by mAChR activation is the production and release of endocannabinoids that bind to type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) located on synaptic terminals. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar slices, we have demonstrated that the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-m (oxo-m) blocks the induction of presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at parallel fiber (PF)–Purkinje cell synapses in a CB1R-dependent manner. Under control conditions, LTP was induced by delivering 120 PF stimuli at 8 Hz. In contrast, no LTP was observed when oxo-m was present during tetanization. PF-LTP was restored when the CB1R antagonist N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was coapplied with oxo-m. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of oxo-m on PF-LTP was abrogated by the GDP analog GDP-β-S (applied intracellularly), the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, and the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), suggesting that cannabinoid synthesis results from the activation of Gq-coupled mAChRs present on Purkinje cells. The oxo-m–mediated suppression of LTP was also prevented in the presence of the M3 receptor antagonist DAU 5884, and was absent in M1/M3 receptor double-KO mice, identifying M3 receptors as primary oxo-m targets. Our findings allow for the possibility that cholinergic signaling in the cerebellum—which may result from long-term depression (LTD)-related disinhibition of cholinergic neurons in the vestibular nuclei—suppresses presynaptic LTP to prevent an up-regulation of transmitter release that opposes the reduction of postsynaptic responsiveness. This modulatory capacity of mAChR signaling could promote the functional penetrance of LTD. PMID:23776234

  4. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p 3 H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([ 3 H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [ 3 H]pirenzepine ([ 3 H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [ 3 H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([ 3 H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K d ) and density (B max ) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [ 3 H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  5. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in cognitively intact subjects at an early stage of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Ugo eIsaias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated in vivo brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR distribution in cognitively intact subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD at an early stage of the disease. Fourteen patients and 13 healthy subjects were imaged with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and the radiotracer 5-[123I]iodo-3-[2(S-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine ([123I]5IA. Patients were selected according to several criteria, including short duration of motor signs (<7 years and normal scores at an extensive neuropsychological evaluation. In PD patients, nAChR density was significantly higher in the putamen, the insular cortex and the supplementary motor area and lower in the caudate nucleus, the orbitofrontal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus. Disease duration positively correlated with nAChR density in the putamen ipsilateral (ρ=0.56, p<0.05 but not contralateral (ρ=0.49, p=0.07 to the clinically most affected hemibody.We observed, for the first time in vivo, higher nAChR density in brain regions of the motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits of subjects with PD. Our findings support the notion of an up-regulated cholinergic activity at the striatal and possibly cortical level in cognitively intact PD patients at an early stage of disease.

  7. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Mediates Nicotine-Induced Actin Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhizhan; Fonseca, Vera; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis, which involves the invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from the media to intima. A hallmark of many invasive cells is actin cytoskeletal remodeling in the form of podosomes, accompanied by extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. A7r5 VSMCs form podosomes in response to PKC activation. In this study, we found that cigarette smoke extract, nicotine, and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, were similarly effective in inducing the formation of podosome rosettes in A7r5 VSMCs. α-Bungarotoxin and atropine experiments confirmed the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments revealed the aggregation of nAChRs at podosome rosettes. Cycloheximide experiments and media exchange experiments suggested that autocrine factor(s) and intracellular phenotypic modulation are putative mechanisms. In situ zymography experiments indicated that, in response to PKC activation, nicotine-treated cells degraded ECM near podosome rosettes, and possibly endocytose ECM fragments to intracellular compartments. Invasion assay of human aortic smooth muscle cells indicated that nicotine and PKC activation individually and synergistically enhanced cell invasion through ECM. Results from this study suggest that nicotine enhances the ability of VSMCs to degrade and invade ECM. nAChR activation, actin cytoskeletal remodeling and phenotypic modulation are possible mechanisms. PMID:22940282

  8. Transgenic mouse model reveals an unsuspe