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Sample records for alpha-u charge density

  1. Holographic charge density waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with non-zero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  2. Holographic charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  3. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  4. Microscopic Charge Density Wave Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Erwin

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the work performed on crystals with a phase transition to a Charge-Density Wave (CDW). The electrical transport properties change when crystal sizes are smaller than characteristic length scales for CDWs, typically 1 micrometer. In contrast to metals, semiconductors and superco

  5. Periodic trends governing the interactions between impurity atoms [H-Ar] and (alpha)-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Christopher David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The binding energies, geometries, charges and electronic structures of a series of impurity atoms [H-Ar] interacting with the {alpha}-U lattice in various configurations were assessed by means of density functional theory calculations. Periodic trends governing the binding energy were highlighted and related to the electronic properties of the impurity atoms, with some consideration given to the band-structure of {alpha}-U. The strongest bound impurity atoms include [C, N, O] and [Si, P, S]. The general trends in the binding energy can be reproduced by a simple parameterisation in terms of the electronegativity (charge-transfer) and covalent radius (elasticity theory) of the impurity atom. The strongest bound atoms deviate from this model, due to their ability to bind with an optimum mixture of covalency and ionicity. This last point is evidenced by the partial overlap of the impurity atom p-band with the hybrid d-/f-band of {alpha}-U. It is expected that the trends and general behaviour reported in this work can be extended to the interactions of impurity atoms with other metallic systems.

  6. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crys...

  7. Bonding charge density from atomic perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, William Yi; Chen, Long-Qing; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-05-15

    Charge transfer among individual atoms is the key concept in modern electronic theory of chemical bonding. In this work, we present a first-principles approach to calculating the charge transfer. Based on the effects of perturbations of an individual atom or a group of atoms on the electron charge density, we determine unambiguously the amount of electron charge associated with a particular atom or a group of atoms. We computed the topological electron loss versus gain using ethylene, graphene, MgO, and SrTiO3 as examples. Our results verify the nature of chemical bonds in these materials at the atomic level.

  8. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Büttiker

    2002-02-01

    We introduce a hierarchy of density of states to characterize the charge distribution in a mesoscopic conductor. At the bottom of this hierarchy are the partial density of states which represent the contribution to the local density of states if both the incident and the out-going scattering channel is prescribed. The partial density of states play a prominent role in measurements with a scanning tunneling microscope on multiprobe conductors in the presence of current flow. The partial density of states determine the degree of dephasing generated by a weakly coupled voltage probe. In addition the partial density of states determine the frequency-dependent response of mesoscopic conductors in the presence of slowly oscillating voltages applied to the contacts of the sample. The partial density of states permit the formulation of a Friedel sum rule which can be applied locally. We introduce the off-diagonal elements of the partial density of states matrix to describe charge fluctuation processes. This generalization leads to a local Wigner–Smith life-time matrix.

  9. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  10. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  11. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Wall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  12. Competition between superconductivity and charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seok

    2007-02-01

    We derive an effective field theory for the competition between superconductivity (SC) and charge density waves (CDWs) by employing the SO(3) pseudospin representation of the SC and CDW order parameters. One important feature in the effective nonlinear σ model is the emergence of a Berry phase even at half filling, originating from the competition between SC and CDWs, i.e., the pseudospin symmetry. A-well known conflict between the previous studies of Oshikawa [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1535 (2000)] and Lee and Shankar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1490 (1990)] is resolved by the appearance of the Berry phase. The Berry phase contribution allows a deconfined quantum critical point of fractionalized charge excitations with e instead of 2e in the SC-CDW quantum transition at half filling. Furthermore, we investigate the stability of the deconfined quantum criticality against quenched randomness by performing a renormalization group analysis of an effective vortex action. We argue that, although randomness results in a weak disorder fixed point differing from the original deconfined quantum critical point, deconfinement of the fractionalized charge excitations still survives at the disorder fixed point owing to a nonzero fixed point value of the vortex charge.

  13. Thermoelectric studies of charge density wave dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ross; Harrison, Neil; Singleton, John

    2008-03-01

    The conventional pyroelectric effect is intimately connected to the symmetry, or rather lack of center of symmetry, of the material. Although the experiments we discuss involve studies of low symmetry materials, the pyroelectric currents observed are of an entirely new origin. Systems with broken-translational-symmetry phases that incorporate orbital quantization can exhibit significant departures from thermodynamic equilibrium due to a change in magnetic induction. For charge density wave systems, this metastable state consists of a balance between the density-wave pinning force and the Lorentz force on the extended currents due to the drift of cyclotron orbits. In this way the density wave pinning potential plays a similar role to the edge potential in a two-dimensional electron gas, leading to a large Hall angle and quantization of the Hall resistance. A thermal perturbation that reduces the pinning potential returns the system towards thermal equilibrium, via a phason avalanche orthogonal to the sample surface. The observation of this new form of pyroelectric effect in the high magnetic field phase (B > 30 T) of the organic charge transfer salt α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4, thus provides a measure of the phason thermopower.

  14. An experimental charge density of HEPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledź, Paweł; Kamiński, Radosław; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Minor, Wladek; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2010-08-01

    We report the experimental charge density of HEPES [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid], which is a common buffering agent. The structure was refined using the Hansen-Coppens formalism. The ability of the HEPES molecule to form stable intermolecular interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure is discussed in terms of its buffering properties. The protonation mode observed in the crystal structure is different from that expected in solution, suggesting that additional factors must be taken into consideration in order to explain the solution properties of the compound. As ordered HEPES molecules are found in the active sites of proteins in several protein crystal structures, our results will allow for quantitative analysis of the electrostatic potential of the interacting surfaces of those proteins.

  15. Charge Exchange Effect on Space-Charge-Limited Current Densities in Ion Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊

    2002-01-01

    The article theoretically studied the charge-exchange effects on space charge limited electron and ion current densities of non-relativistic one-dimensional slab ion diode, and compared with those of without charge exchange.

  16. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  17. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  18. Charge and spin fluctuations in the density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoerffy, B.L.; Barbieri, A. (Bristol Univ. (UK). H.H. Wills Physics Lab.); Staunton, J.B. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (UK). Dept. of Physics); Shelton, W.A.; Stocks, G.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework which allow us to treat charge and spin fluctuations about the Local density Approximation (LDA) to the Density Functional Theory (DFT). We illustrate the approach by explicit study of the Disordered Local Moment (DLM) state in Fe above the Curie Temperature {Tc} and the Mott insulating state in MnO. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  20. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. The effect of polymer charge density and charge distribution on the formation of multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Voigt, U; Tauer, K; Hahn, M; Jäger, W; Klitzing, K V

    2003-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers which are built up by alternating adsorption of polyanions and polycations from aqueous solutions at a solid interface are investigated by reflectometry and ellipsometry. Below a degree of charge of about 70% the adsorption stops after a certain number of dipping cycles and no multilayer formation occurs. This indicates an electrostatically driven adsorption process. Below a charge density of 70% an adsorption can take place if the charged segments are combined as a block of the polymer.

  2. Nuclear charge radii: Density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Utama, Raditya; Piekarewicz, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. We explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonst...

  3. Contributions of charge-density research to medicinal chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Dittrich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews efforts in accurate experimental charge-density studies with relevance to medicinal chemistry. Initially, classical charge-density studies that measure electron density distribution via least-squares refinement of aspherical-atom population parameters are summarized. Next, interaction density is discussed as an idealized situation resembling drug–receptor interactions. Scattering-factor databases play an increasing role in charge-density research, and they can be applied both to small-molecule and macromolecular structures in refinement and analysis; software development facilitates their use. Therefore combining both of these complementary branches of X-ray crystallography is recommended, and examples are given where such a combination already proved useful. On the side of the experiment, new pixel detectors are allowing rapid measurements, thereby enabling both high-throughput small-molecule studies and macromolecular structure determination to higher resolutions. Currently, the most ambitious studies compute intermolecular interaction energies of drug–receptor complexes, and it is recommended that future studies benefit from recent method developments. Selected new developments in theoretical charge-density studies are discussed with emphasis on its symbiotic relation to crystallography.

  4. Breathing Charge Density Waves in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Abdelhafiz, H.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the creation of a charge density wave (CDW) along a stack of coupled Josephson junctions in layered superconductors. Electric charge in each superconducting layer oscillates around some average value, forming a breathing CDW. We show the transformation of a longitudinal plasma wave to CDW in the state corresponding to the outermost branch. Transitions between different types of CDW's related to the inner branches of current voltage characteristics are demonstrated. The effect o...

  5. Charge density of GaAl1-Sb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K B Joshi; Nishant N Patel

    2008-02-01

    Charge density calculations and electronic band structures for GaAl1- = 1.0, 0.5 and 0.0 are presented in this work. The calculations are performed using the empirical pseudopotential method. The charge density is computed for a number of planes, i.e. = 0:0, 0.125 and 0.25 0 by generating the potential through a number of potential parameters available in the literature. The virtual crystal approximation was applied for the semiconducting alloy. The characteristics of the band structure and charge density are observed to be affected by the potential parameters. Calculated band gaps and the nature of gaps are in good agreement with the experimental data reported. The ionicity is also reasonably in good agreement with other scales proposed in the literature; however the formulation needs to be improved. The present work also demands indirect experimental band gap for the alloy.

  6. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  7. Charge density asymmetry of heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, N.D.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A. (Institutul de Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara, Bucharest (Romania))

    1980-01-01

    The generalized liquid-drop model replacing surface energy by double folded Yukawa-plus-exponential function is extended for fusion of heavy ions with different charge densities. Calculated interaction barriers for some 58 pairs of nuclei are in good agreement with experimental ones, within -10% and +7%. For even-even beta-stable nuclei with Z =4-104 the general trend of variation of interaction barriers and fusion Q-values show the regions where the charge density asymmetry cannot be neglected. PES for the entrance channel of the reactions /sup 109/Ag + /sup 40/Ar, /sup 138/Ce + /sup 57/Fe, /sup 144/Nd + /sup 84/Kr and the corresponding charge-equilibrated system have been computed.

  8. C library for topological study of the electronic charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Aray, Yosslen; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2012-12-05

    The topological study of the electronic charge density is useful to obtain information about the kinds of bonds (ionic or covalent) and the atom charges on a molecule or crystal. For this study, it is necessary to calculate, at every space point, the electronic density and its electronic density derivatives values up to second order. In this work, a grid-based method for these calculations is described. The library, implemented for three dimensions, is based on a multidimensional Lagrange interpolation in a regular grid; by differentiating the resulting polynomial, the gradient vector, the Hessian matrix and the Laplacian formulas were obtained for every space point. More complex functions such as the Newton-Raphson method (to find the critical points, where the gradient is null) and the Cash-Karp Runge-Kutta method (used to make the gradient paths) were programmed. As in some crystals, the unit cell has angles different from 90°, the described library includes linear transformations to correct the gradient and Hessian when the grid is distorted (inclined). Functions were also developed to handle grid containing files (grd from DMol® program, CUBE from Gaussian® program and CHGCAR from VASP® program). Each one of these files contains the data for a molecular or crystal electronic property (such as charge density, spin density, electrostatic potential, and others) in a three-dimensional (3D) grid. The library can be adapted to make the topological study in any regular 3D grid by modifying the code of these functions.

  9. Determination of Transverse Charge Density from Kaon Form Factor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Ott, Johann; Horn, Tanja; Pegg, Ian; Mecholski, Nicholas; Carmignotto, Marco; Ali, Salina

    2016-09-01

    At the level of nucleons making up atomic nuclei, among subatomic particles made up of quarks, K-mesons or kaons represent the most simple hadronic system including the heavier strange quark, having a relatively elementary bound state of a quark and an anti-quark as its valence structure. Its electromagnetic structure is then parametrized by a single, dimensionless quantity known as the form factor, the two-dimensional Fourier transform of which yields the quantity of transverse charge density. Transverse charge density, in turn, provides a needed framework for the interpretation of form factors in terms of physical charge and magnetization, both with respect to the propagation of a fast-moving nucleon. To this is added the value of strange quarks in ultimately presenting a universal, process-independent description of nucleons, further augmenting the importance of studying the kaon's internal structure. The pressing character of such research questions directs the present paper, describing the first extraction of transverse charge density from electromagnetic kaon form factor data. The extraction is notably extended to form factor data at recently acquired higher energy levels, whose evaluation could permit more complete phenomenological models for kaon behavior to be proposed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  10. Survival of charged rho condensation at high temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The charged vector $\\rho$ mesons in the presence of external magnetic fields at finite temperature $T$ and chemical potential $\\mu$ have been investigated in the framework of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We compute the masses of charged $\\rho$ mesons numerically as a function of the magnetic field for different values of temperature and chemical potential. The self-energy of the $\\rho$ meson contains the quark-loop contribution, i.e. the leading order contribution in $1/N_c$ expansion. The charged $\\rho$ meson mass decreases with the magnetic field and drops to zero at a critical magnetic field $eB_c$, which means that the charged vector meson condensation, i.e. the electromagnetic superconductor can be induced above the critical magnetic field. Surprisingly, it is found that the charged $\\rho$ condensation can even survive at high temperature and density. At zero temperature, the critical magnetic field just increases slightly with the chemical potential, which indicates that the charged $\\rho$ condensatio...

  11. Geometric interpretation of density displacements and charge sensitivities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roman F Nalewajski

    2005-09-01

    The ``geometric” interpretation of the electronic density displacements in the Hilbert space is given and the associated projection-operator partitioning of the hardness and softness operators (kernels) is developed. The eigenvectors |á 〉 = \\{| 〉 \\} of the hardness operator define the complete (identity) projector $\\hat{P}$ = | 〉 〈 = 1 for general density displacements, including the charge-transfer (CT) component, while the eigenvectors | i 〉 = { | 〉} of the linear response operator determine the polarizational -projector, $\\hat{P}$ = | 〉 〈 |. Their difference thus defines the complementary CT-projector: $\\hat{P}$ = 1 - $\\hat{P}$. The complete vector space for density displacements can be also spanned by supplementing the -modes with the homogeneous CT-mode. These subspaces separate the integral (normalization) and local aspects of density shifts in molecular systems.

  12. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  13. Magnetothermopower and Nernst effect in unconventional charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Maki, Kazumi; Ványolos, András; Virosztek, Attila

    2003-12-01

    Recently we have shown that the striking angular dependent magnetoresistance in the low-temperature phase (LTP) of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is consistently described in terms of unconventional charge density wave (UCDW). Here we investigate theoretically the thermoelectric power and the Nernst effect in unconventional density wave (UDW). The present results account consistently for the recent data of magnetothermopower in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 obtained by Choi et al. [Phys. Rev. B 65, 205119 (2002)]. This confirms further our identification of LTP in this salt as UCDW. We propose also that the Nernst effect provides a clear signature of UDW.

  14. Charge density study of two FeS2 polymorphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Jørgensen, Mads Ry Vogel; Bjerg, Lasse

    experimental electron density studies of an inorganic solid containing a transition metal was presented by Stevens et al. [2] who investigated the effect of crystal-field splitting of the partially filled iron d-orbitals in the pyrite structure of FeS2. Other studies of various FeS2 structures, including......-temperature single crystal diffraction data were collected with synchrotron radiation on both compounds at the ChemMatCARS beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Extinction and absorption effects were minimized using small crystals (10 μm) and high-energy (28 keV) radiation. The experimental charge density has...

  15. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  16. Thermal Rounding of the Charge Density Wave Depinning Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Middleton, A. Alan

    1992-01-01

    The rounding of the charge density wave depinning transition by thermal noise is examined. Hops by localized modes over small barriers trigger ``avalanches'', resulting in a creep velocity much larger than that expected from comparing thermal energies with typical barriers. For a field equal to the $T=0$ depinning field, the creep velocity is predicted to have a {\\em power-law} dependence on the temperature $T$; numerical computations confirm this result. The predicted order of magnitude of t...

  17. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  18. Study of the Charge Density Control Method Including the Space Charge Effect in the Proton Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Okabe, Kota; Yamamoto, Kazami; Kinsho, Michikazu

    For high intensity proton accelerators, one of the beam loss sources is the incoherent tune spread caused by the space charge force. In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, beams are injected sequentially and shifted slightly from the central orbit in order to increase the beam size intentionally and suppress the charge density and incoherent tune spread. This injection method has been adopted and suppressed the beam loss. However, simulations clarified that beams did not spread as much as expected because of the space charge effect in the high current case. As simulation results of the optimized beam shift pattern when the space charge effect is considered, it was obtained that the incoherent tune spread could be suppressed to an extent that has not been achieved previously.

  19. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A; Weiss, C

    2011-01-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range sqrt{t} ~< 1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b ~ 0.5 - 1.5 fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the rho meson region, with only a ~10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the omega are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transv...

  20. Charge Order Induced in an Orbital Density-Wave State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent angle resolved photoemission measurements [D. V. Evtushinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 147201 (2010)] and evidence of the density-wave state for the charge and orbital ordering [J. García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107202 (2012)] in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4, the issue of charge and orbital ordering in a two-orbital tight-binding model for layered manganite near half doping is revisited. We find that the charge order with the ordering wavevector 2{Q} = (π ,π ) is induced by the orbital order of d-/d+-type having B1g representation with a different ordering wavevector Q, where the orbital order as the primary order results from the strong Fermi-surface nesting. It is shown that the induced charge order parameter develops according to TCO - T by decreasing the temperature below the orbital ordering temperature TCO, in addition to the usual mean-field behavior of the orbital order parameter. Moreover, the same orbital order is found to stabilize the CE-type spin arrangement observed experimentally below TCE < TCO.

  1. Surface modification for polystyrene colloidal particles with controlled charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo; Song, Ju-Myung; Kim, Joon-Seop; Seo, Young-Soo; Tael, Giyoong; Jon, Sangyong

    2007-11-01

    A significant amount of polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) (PSAA) random copolymer can be adsorbed by dispersion of PS particles via a swelling-quenching process. A THF-water mixed solvent was used in the swelling process and a large amount of pure water was used, to give a low concentration of THF% in quenching process. Our results showed that functional PSSA groups were randomly and tightly adsorbed to the PS particles. When the mol.% of charged segments was increased, the progressive adsorption of PSSA chains to the PS particles leads to an increase in the electrophoretic mobility and zeta-potential of aqueous dispersions. Thus, we were able to obtain well-distributed surface charge density on the PS particles.

  2. Charge-density waves physics revealed by photoconduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev-Zotov, S.V., E-mail: serzz@cplire.ru [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of the RAS, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Nasretdinova, V.F.; Minakova, V.E. [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of the RAS, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-01

    The results of photoconduction study of the Peierls conductors are reviewed. The studied materials are quasi-one-dimensional conductors with the charge-density wave: K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3}, both monoclinic and orthorhombic TaS{sub 3} and also a semiconducting phase of NbS{sub 3} (phase I). Experimental methods, relaxation times, effects of illumination on linear and nonlinear charge transport, the electric-field effect on photoconduction and results of the spectral studies are described. We demonstrate, in particular, that a simple model of modulated energy gap slightly smoothed by fluctuations fits the available spectral data fairly well. The level of the fluctuations is surprisingly small and does not exceed a few percent of the optical energy gap value.

  3. Photoemission spectra of charge density wave states in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Chen, Peng-Jen; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy(ARPES) experiments have reported many exotic properties of cuprates, such as Fermi arc at normal state, two gaps at superconducting state and particle-hole asymmetry at the antinodal direction. On the other hand, a number of inhomogeneous states or so-called charge density waves(CDW) states have also been discovered in cuprates by many experimental groups. The relation between these CDW states and ARPES spectra is unclear. With the help of Gutzwiller projected mean-field theory, we can reproduce the quasiparticle spectra in momentum space. The spectra show strong correspondence to the experimental data with afore-mentioned exotic features in it.

  4. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-22

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect 'functionalizes' the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences.

  5. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect ‘functionalizes’ the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences.

  6. Charge carrier density in Li-intercalated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structures of bulk C 6Li, Li-intercalated free-standing bilayer graphene, and Li-intercalated bilayer and trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) are studied using density functional theory. Our estimate of Young\\'s modulus suggests that Li-intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For decreasing Li-C interaction, the Dirac point shifts to the Fermi level and the associated band splitting vanishes. For Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) the splitting at the Dirac point is tiny. It is also very small at the two Dirac points of Li-intercalated trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1). For all the systems under study, a large enhancement of the charge carrier density is achieved by Li intercalation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Photoinduced Enhancement of the Charge Density Wave Amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, A.; Patel, S. K. K.; Kukreja, R.; Uhlíř, V.; Wingert, J.; Festersen, S.; Zhu, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Nelson, S.; Kozina, M.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.; Murphy, B. M.; Magnussen, O. M.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking and the emergence of order is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics. It leads to a plethora of intriguing ground states found in antiferromagnets, Mott insulators, superconductors, and density-wave systems. Exploiting states of matter far from equilibrium can provide even more striking routes to symmetry-lowered, ordered states. Here, we demonstrate for the case of elemental chromium that moderate ultrafast photoexcitation can transiently enhance the charge-density-wave (CDW) amplitude by up to 30% above its equilibrium value, while strong excitations lead to an oscillating, large-amplitude CDW state that persists above the equilibrium transition temperature. Both effects result from dynamic electron-phonon interactions, providing an efficient mechanism to selectively transform a broad excitation of the electronic order into a well-defined, long-lived coherent lattice vibration. This mechanism may be exploited to transiently enhance order parameters in other systems with coupled degrees of freedom.

  8. Breathing charge density waves in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Abdelhafiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the creation of a charge density wave (CDW) along a stack of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) in layered superconductors. Electric charge in each superconducting layer oscillates around some average value, forming a breathing CDW. We show the transformation of a longitudinal plasma wave to CDW in the state corresponding to the outermost branch. Transition between different types of CDW's related to the inner branches of IV characteristic is demonstrated. The effect of the external electromagnetic radiation on the states corresponding to the inner branches differs crucially from the case of the single JJ. The Shapiro steps in the IV characteristics of the junctions in the stack do not correspond directly to the frequency of radiation ω. The system of JJs behaves like a single whole system: the Shapiro steps or their harmonics in the total IV characteristics appear at voltage , where V l is the voltage in the lth junction, N R is the number of JJs in the rotating state, and m and n are integers.

  9. Plane density of induced vacuum charge in a supercritical Coulomb potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khalilov, V R

    2016-01-01

    An expression for the density of a planar induced vacuum charge is obtained in a strong Coulomb potential in coordinate space. Treatment is based on a self-adjoint extension approach for constructing of the Green's function of a charged fermion in this potential. Induced vacuum charge density is calculated and analyzed at the subcritical and supercritical Coulomb potentials for massless and massive fermions. The behavior of the obtained vacuum charge density is investigated at long and short distances from the Coulomb center. The induced vacuum charge has a screening sign. Screening of a Coulomb impurity in graphene is briefly discussed. We calculate the real vacuum polarization charge density that acquires the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in the supercritical Coulomb potential due to the so-called real vacuum polarization. It is shown that the vacuum charge densities essentially differ in massive and massless cases. We expect that our results can, as a matter of principle, be tested in graphene with a supe...

  10. Experimental surface charge density of the Si (100)-2x1H surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciston, J.; Marks, L.D.; Feidenhans'l, R.;

    2006-01-01

    We report a three-dimensional charge density refinement from x-ray diffraction intensities of the Si (100) 2x1H surface. By paying careful attention to parameterizing the bulk Si bonding, we are able to locate the hydrogen atoms at the surface, which could not be done previously. In addition, we...... are able to partially refine the local charge density at the surface. We find experimentally an increased, slightly localized bond density of approximately 0.31 electrons between each Si atom pair at the surface. Both the atomic positions and the charge density are in remarkably good agreement with density...

  11. Rendering high charge density of states in ionic liquid-gated MoS 2 transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.; Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Park, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated high charge density of states (DOS) in the bandgap of MoS2 nanosheets with variable temperature measurements on ionic liquid-gated MoS2 transistors. The thermally activated charge transport indicates that the electrical current in the two-dimensional MoS 2 nanosheets under high charg

  12. Solution of Equations of Internal Ballistics for the Composite Charge Using Lagrange Density Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Narvilkar

    1979-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the equations of internal ballistics of composite charge consisting of N component charge with quadratic form are solved. Largange density approximation and hydrodynamic flow behaviour, have been assumed and the solutions are obtained for the composite charge for these assumptions.

  13. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  14. Far-Infrared Study of the Charge Density Wave in Tetrathiofulvalene Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, D. B.; Cummings, K. D.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1981-01-01

    Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...

  15. Deformations of charge-density wave crystals under electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovskii, V.Ya. [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya 11, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: pok@cplire.ru; Zybtsev, S.G.; Loginov, V.B. [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya 11, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V.N. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy of RAS, Leninsky prosp. 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolesov, D.V.; Yaminsky, I.V. [Advanced Technologies Center, Department of Physics, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gori, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorlova, I.G. [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya 11, 125009 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-01

    We report the effects of electric field induced deformations of quasi one-dimensional conductors with charge-density wave (CDW). The most pronounced sort of deformation is torsional strain (TS). The TS is found to comprise two contributions. The features of the 1st-the larger one-are threshold hysteretic dependence on electric field and high relaxation time {tau}: For o-TaS{sub 3}{tau}{approx}10{sup -2} s at T=80 K and falls as exp(900 K/T) with increasing T. The 2nd contribution is linear in electric field and does not drop with frequency increase. The amplitude of this contribution falls abruptly with T approaching the Peierls transition temperature T{sub P} from below. Similar features of TS are demonstrated for other CDW compounds: (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I, K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} and NbS{sub 3} type II, for which T{sub P}{approx}360 K. We attribute the 1st and the 2nd contributions to large (hysteretic) and small (near-equilibrium) CDW deformations, respectively, likely-shear at the surface. The TS is observed also above T{sub P}: For TaS{sub 3} and (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I typical torsional amplitude is 10{sup -1} deg./V in the resonance regimes, corresponding to the piezomodulus {approx}10{sup -9} m/V. A separate study of TS was performed at room temperature with AFM technique. Apart from this ('intrinsic') effect, we observe electrostatic contribution to the TS. In contrast to the intrinsic response, the electrostatic one is proportional to the potential either over the sample, or over an additional electrode ('gate') placed nearby, but not to the difference of potentials between the sample ends. It is typically 2 orders of magnitude less. The intrinsic TS reveals a new electromechanical effect at room temperature, presumably associated with the excitations of the pinned mode of the CDW fluctuations. Its observation opens prospects for application of quasi one-dimensional conductors as micro- and nano-actuators. Basing on the electrostatic

  16. Topics in the Dynamics of Charge-Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Sathyanarayan (Satish).

    This dissertation is an investigation into some interesting transport properties of charge-density-waves (CDWs). The field of CDW dynamics is an arena for the battle between mathematical analysis and random disorder. It is a very difficult physical situation to analyze. The theoretical study of CDW dynamics dates to the prescient suggestion of John Bardeen (in the 70s) that the nonlinear I-V characteristic of the quasi one-dimensional material TTF-TCNQ was a consequence of collective transport of condensate resulting from a Peierls instability. This instability, described first by Peierls, is studied in Chapter 1. Once the underlying physics of the instability was understood, the effects of coupling the CDW to impurities and to electric and magnetic fields were studied. The most striking effect of impurities is to produce CDW pinning, so that collective-mode transport ceases to occur if the applied electric field is smaller than a threshold field. Intensive research led to the Fukuyama-Lee-Rice model of CDW pinning. Experiments in the field are complicated by the difficulty in preparing well characterized samples of the relevant materials, among which are the trichalco-genides NbSe_3, TaS_3, the dichalcogenides (TaSe_4)_2I, TaS_2, NbSe_2 and blue bronze K_{0.3}MoO _3. Over the last decade, growth techniques have been perfected and intensive comparison between the various theoretical models and experiment is feasible. An outline of the dissertation is as follows. First, we review the theoretical ideas that underlie the subject. Then we discuss each new piece of work separately. First, this thesis presents one important theoretical approach to the study of CDW dynamics. The approach builds upon previous work on the microscopic theory of superconductors and results in a new formulation of the problem that seems likely to lend itself to non-perturbative approaches. The perturbative approach cannot provide answers to the question of what happens near the depinning

  17. Empirical transverse charge densities in the nucleon and the nucleon-to-Delta transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2008-01-01

    Using only the current empirical information on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors we map out the transverse charge density in proton and neutron as viewed from a light front moving towards a transversely polarized nucleon. These charge densities are characterized by a dipole pattern, in addition to the monopole field corresponding with the unpolarized density. Furthermore, we use the latest empirical information on the $N \\to \\Delta$ transition form factors to map out the transition charge density which induces the $N \\to \\Delta$ excitation. This transition charge density in a transversely polarized $N$ and $\\Delta$ contains both monopole, dipole and quadrupole patterns, the latter corresponding with a deformation of the hadron's charge distribution.

  18. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil; Singleton, John; Migliori, Albert

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  19. From super-charged nuclei to massive nuclear density cores

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Due to $e^+e^-$-pair production in the field of supercritical $(Z \\gg Z_{cr}\\approx 170 $) nucleus an electron shell, created out of the vacuum, is formed. The distribution of the vacuum charge in this shell has been determined for super-charged nuclei $Ze^3 \\ga 1$ within the framework of the Thomas-Fermi equation generalized to the relativistic case. For $Ze^3 \\gg 1$ the electron shell penetrates inside the nucleus and almost completely screens its charge. Inside such nucleus the potential takes a constant value equal to $V_0=-(3\\pi^2 n_p)^{1/3} \\sim -2m_{\\pi}c^2$, and super-charged nucleus represents an electrically neutral plasma consisting of $e,p$ and $n$. Near the edge of the nucleus a transition layer exists with a width $\\lambda \\approx \\alpha^{-1/2} \\hbar/m_{\\pi} c\\sim 15$ fm, which is independent of $Z~~ (\\hbar/m_{\\pi} c \\ll \\lambda \\ll \\hbar/m_e c)$. The electric field and surface charge are concentrated in this layer. These results, obtained earlier for hypothetical superheavy nuclei with $Z \\sim ...

  20. Modulated spin and charge densities in cuprate superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have played a crucial role in characterizing the spin and charge correlations in copper-oxide superconductors. While the data are often interpreted with respect to specific theories of the cuprates, an attempt is made here to distinguish those facts that can be extracted empirically, and the connections that can be made with minimal assumptions.

  1. Molecular Weight and Charge Density Asymmetry in Polyelectrolyte Complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn; Duechs, Dominik

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the phase diagram of oppositely charged polymers in a good solvent using a field-theoretic model. Mean-field solutions fail to predict the experimentally observed macroscopic phase separation into a solvent-rich phase and a dense liquid aggregate of polymers - a ``complex coacervate.'' We therefore study the model within a one-loop approximation, which accounts for Gaussian fluctuations in electrostatic and chemical potentials. Our particular focus is the effect of molecular weight, ionic strength, and charge asymmetry on the phase envelope. A set of dimensionless parameters is identified that dictate the size and shape of the two-phase region. Our results should be helpful in guiding experimental studies of coacervation.

  2. Influence of electric charge and modified gravity on density irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, M.Z. Ul Haq; Yousaf, Z. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-04-15

    This work aims to identify some inhomogeneity factors for a plane symmetric topology with anisotropic and dissipative fluid under the effects of both electromagnetic field as well as Palatini f(R) gravity. We construct the modified field equations, kinematical quantities, and mass function to continue our analysis. We have explored the dynamical quantities, conservation equations and modified Ellis equations with the help of a viable f(R) model. Some particular cases are discussed with and without dissipation to investigate the corresponding inhomogeneity factors. For a non-radiating scenario, we examine such factors as dust, and isotropic and anisotropic matter in the presence of charge. For a dissipative fluid, we investigate the inhomogeneity factor with a charged dust cloud. We conclude that the electromagnetic field increases the inhomogeneity in matter while the extra curvature terms make the system more homogeneous with the evolution of time. (orig.)

  3. Influence of Electric Charge and Modified Gravity on Density Irregularities

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatti, M Zaeem Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to identify some inhomogeneity factors for plane symmetric topology with anisotropic and dissipative fluid under the effects of both electromagnetic field as well as Palatini $f(R)$ gravity. We construct the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and mass function to continue our analysis. We have explored the dynamical quantities, conservation equations and modified Ellis equations with the help of a viable $f(R)$ model. Some particular cases are discussed with and without dissipation to investigate the corresponding inhomogeneity factors. For non-radiating scenario, we examine such factors with dust, isotropic and anisotropic matter in the presence of charge. For dissipative fluid, we investigate the inhomogeneity factor with charged dust cloud. We conclude that electromagnetic field increases the inhomogeneity in matter while the extra curvature terms make the system more homogeneous with the evolution of time.

  4. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, L.; Fukushima, A.; Kubota, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yuasa, S.

    2006-12-01

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements.

  5. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravier, L [Institut de Physique des Nanostructures, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), EPFL-SB-IPN station 3, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fukushima, A [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kubota, H [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamamoto, A [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yuasa, S [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2006-12-21

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements.

  6. Melting Point Of Metals In Relation Io Electron Charge Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boczkal G.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of spatial criterion of the electron charge concentration is applied to determine the metal melting point. Based on the model proposed for bcc metals, a model for hcp metals and general form for others has been developed. To calculate the melting point, only structural data and atomic number are required. The obtained results show good consistency with the experimental data for metals with atomic number Z < 70.

  7. Charge-density analysis of 1-nitroindoline: refinement quality using free R factors and restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, Bartosz; Zaleski, Jacek; Kyzioł, Janusz; Daszkiewicz, Zdzisław; Jelsch, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Nitramines and related N-nitro compounds have attracted significant attention owing to their use in rocket fuel and as explosives. The charge density of 1-nitroindoline was determined experimentally and from theoretical calculations. Electron-density refinements were performed using the multipolar atom formalism. In order to design the ideal restraint strategy for the charge-density parameters, R-free analyses were performed involving a series of comprehensive refinements. Different weights were applied to the charge-density restraints, namely the similarity between chemically equivalent atoms and local symmetry. Additionally, isotropic thermal motion and an anisotropic model calculated by rigid-body analysis were tested on H atoms. The restraint weights which resulted in the lowest values of the averaged R-free factors and the anisotropic H-atom model were considered to yield the best charge density and were used in the final refinement. The derived experimental charge density along with intra- and intermolecular interactions was analysed and compared with theoretical calculations, notably with respect to the symmetry of multipole parameters. A comparison of different refinements suggests that the appropriate weighting scheme applied to charge-density restraints can reduce the observed artefacts. The topological bond orders of the molecule were calculated.

  8. A study of transverse charge density of pions in relativistic quantum mechanics%A study of transverse charge density of pions in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董宇兵; 王翼展

    2011-01-01

    The transverse charge density of pions is calculated based on relativistic quantum mechanics, where the pion is regarded as a quark-antiquark bound state. Corrections from the two spin-1/2 constituents and from the wave function of a quark and antiquark i

  9. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  10. Determination of charge carrier mobility in doped low density polyethylene using DC transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M.Salah; Henk, Peter O; Henriksen, Mogens

    1989-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility was determined for plain and doped low-density polyethylene (LDPE) using DC transient currents. Barium titanate was used as a strongly polar dopant and titanium dioxide as a semiconductor dopant. The values of the mobility obtained were on the order of 10-10 cm2 v-1 s-1...... by a factor of five. Charge trapping and space charge formation were modified by the introduction of titanium dioxide...

  11. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    OpenAIRE

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T=0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment thermo...

  12. A topological analysis of charge densities in diamond, silicon and germanium crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Yu.A. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Okamura, F.P. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The Hansen-Coppens multipole model of charge density has been fitted to highly accurate published experimental and theoretical structure factors for diamond, silicon and germanium crystals. Analysis of both model experimental and theoretical charge densities using the resulting model parameters was performed in terms of Bader`s topological theory. The general topology of the charge density appeared to be identical for all crystals, containing the four possible types of critical points of rank three, and no non-nuclear attractors between neighboring atoms were found within achieved accuracy. Theoretical and experimental values of charge density and its Laplacian show quantitative and semiquantitative agreement, respectively, at the critical points of model charge densities. For Ge crystals, such agreement is worse at the ring critical point. These results suggest the possibility of semiquantitative (within 10-30%) study of the topological characteristics of highly accurate X-ray charge densities of crystals displaying shared interatomic interactions. Comparative topological analysis of the chemical bond in this series of crystals is discussed in terms of the quantum topological theory. (orig.).

  13. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Ahn

    Full Text Available The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive

  14. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  15. The angular magnetothermoelectric power of a charge density wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovska, D.; Choi, E. S.; Steven, E.; Brooks, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetothermopower of a charge transfer organic salt α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 below (4 K) and above (9 K) the phase transition temperature, Tp = 8 K, and under fields of 15 T and 25 T, below and above the ‘kinkfield’, has been studied. We find that for a longitudinal thermoelectric measurement both an interlayer thermopower (the Seebeck effect), Szz, and a transverse thermopower (the Nernst effect), Syz, exist in all three different B-T phases (the CDW 0, CDW x and metallic states) with large amplitude. Both thermoelectric effects display a resonant-like behavior without a sign reversal at the angles corresponding to angular magnetoresistance oscillation minima and maxima in this compound. The resonant behavior is most evident in the CDW0 state, indicating a mechanism involving the Fermi surface nesting. Angular dependences reveal different behaviors of the thermopower and Nernst effect in the high magnetic field (CDWx) state.

  16. Dimensionality-driven phonon softening and incipient charge density wave instability in TiS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolui, Kapildeb; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory are used to investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of TiS2. Within the local density approximation the material is a semimetal both in the bulk and in the monolayer form. Most interestingly we observe a Kohn anomaly in the bulk phonon dispersion, which turns into a charge density wave instability when TiS2 is thinned to less than four monolayers. Such instability, however, disappears when one calculates the electronic structure with a functional, such as the LDA+U, which returns an insulating ground state. In this situation charge-doping or strain does not bring back the charge density wave instability, whereas the formation of the TiSSe alloy does.

  17. Comparison of the Volume Charge Density of Nanofiltration Membranes Obtained from Retention and Conductivity Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Silva, V.; Pradanos, P.;

    2010-01-01

    by impedance spectroscopy, and the electric potential drop during retention experiments has also been measured. These experimental data on conductivity and electric potential are analyzed, by using the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and the space charge model, to obtain the pore charge density......A version of the Donnan steric-partitioning pore model with dielectrical exclusion (DSPM-DE) has been used to get information on the pore size and charge density of a commercial membrane, NF45 from FilmTec, from its retention of KCl solutions. The conductivity inside the pores has been measured...

  18. A relativistic non-relativistic Goldstone theorem: gapped Goldstones at finite charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We adapt the Goldstone theorem to study spontaneous symmetry breaking in relativistic theories at finite charge density. It is customary to treat systems at finite density via non-relativistic Hamiltonians. Here we highlight the importance of the underlying relativistic dynamics. This leads to seemingly new results whenever the charge in question is spontaneously broken and does not commute with other broken charges. These would normally be associated with gapless Goldstone excitations. We find that, in fact, their currents interpolate gapped excitations. We derive exact non-perturbative expressions for their gaps, in terms of the chemical potential and of the symmetry algebra.

  19. d-Density Wave Scenario Description of the New Hidden Charge Order in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhfudz, Imam

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that the theory of high Tc superconductivity based on a microscopic model with d-density wave (DDW) scenario in the pseudogap phase is able to reproduce some of the most important features of the recent experimentally discovered hidden charge order in several families of Cuprates. In particular, by computing and comparing energies of charge orders of different modulation directions derived from a full microscopic theory with d-density wave scenario, the axial charge order ϕX(Y) with wavevector Q = (Q0,0)((0,Q0)) is shown to be unambiguously energetically more favorable over the diagonal charge order ϕX±Y with wavevector Q = (Q0, ± Q0) at least in commensurate limit, to be expected also to hold even to more general incommensurate case, in agreement with experiment. The two types of axial charge order ϕX and ϕY are degenerate by symmetry. We find that within the superconducting background, biaxial (checkerboard) charge order is energetically more favorable than uniaxial (stripe) charge order, and therefore checkerboard axial charge order should be the one observed in experiments, assuming a single domain of charge ordered state on each CuO2 plane.

  20. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Haddad

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable.

  1. Density Functional Theory Approach for Charged Hard Sphere Fluids Confined in Spherical Micro-Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Yan-Shuang; WANG Hai-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Within the framework of the density functional theory for classical fluids,the equilibrium density profiles of charged hard sphere fluid confined in micro-cavity are studied by means of the modified fundamental measure theory.The dimension of micro-cavity,the charge of hard sphere and the applied electric field are found to have significant effects on the density profiles.In particular,it is shown that Coulomb interaction,excluded volume interaction and applied electric Geld play the central role in controlling the aggregated structure of the system.

  2. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...

  3. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  4. Direct Observation of Spin- and Charge-Density Waves in a Luttinger Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chenglin; Marcum, Andrew; Mawardi Ismail, Arif; Fonta, Francisco; O'Hara, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    At low energy, interacting fermions in one dimension (e.g. electrons in quantum wires or fermionic atoms in 1D waveguides) should behave as Luttinger liquids. In stark contrast to Fermi liquids, the low-energy elementary excitations in Luttinger liquids are collective sound-like modes that propagate independently as spin-density and/or charge-density (i.e. particle-density) waves with generally unequal, and interaction-dependent, velocities. Here we aim to unambiguously confirm this hallmark feature of the Luttinger liquid - the phenomenon of spin-charge separation - by directly observing in real space the dynamics of spin-density and ``charge''-density waves excited in an ultracold gas of spin-1/2 fermions confined in an array of 1D optical waveguides. Starting from a two-component mixture of 6 Li atoms harmonically confined along each of the 1D waveguides, we excite low lying normal modes of the trapped system - namely the spin dipole and density dipole and quadrupole modes - and measure their frequency as a function of interaction strength. Luttinger liquid theory predicts that the spin dipole frequency is strongly dependent on interaction strength whereas the density dipole and quadrupole mode frequencies are relatively insensitive. We will also discuss extending our approach to exciting localized spin density and particle density wavepackets which should propagate at different velocities. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  5. Low Density Phases in a Uniformly Charged Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knüpfer, Hans; Muratov, Cyrill B.; Novaga, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the macroscopic behavior of global energy minimizers in the three-dimensional sharp interface unscreened Ohta-Kawasaki model of diblock copolymer melts. This model is also referred to as the nuclear liquid drop model in the studies of the structure of highly compressed nuclear matter found in the crust of neutron stars, and, more broadly, is a paradigm for energy-driven pattern forming systems in which spatial order arises as a result of the competition of short-range attractive and long-range repulsive forces. Here we investigate the large volume behavior of minimizers in the low volume fraction regime, in which one expects the formation of a periodic lattice of small droplets of the minority phase in a sea of the majority phase. Under periodic boundary conditions, we prove that the considered energy {Γ}-converges to an energy functional of the limit "homogenized" measure associated with the minority phase consisting of a local linear term and a non-local quadratic term mediated by the Coulomb kernel. As a consequence, asymptotically the mass of the minority phase in a minimizer spreads uniformly across the domain. Similarly, the energy spreads uniformly across the domain as well, with the limit energy density minimizing the energy of a single droplet per unit volume. Finally, we prove that in the macroscopic limit the connected components of the minimizers have volumes and diameters that are bounded above and below by universal constants, and that most of them converge to the minimizers of the energy divided by volume for the whole space problem.

  6. Theoretical study of the central depression of nuclear charge density distribution by electron scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian; CHU Yan-Yun; REN Zhong-Zhou; WANG Zai-Jun

    2012-01-01

    The charge form factors of elastic electron scattering for isotones with N =20 and N =28 are calculated using the phase-shift analysis method,with corresponding charge density distributions from relativistic mean-field theory.The results show that there are sharp variations at the inner parts of charge distributions with the proton number decreasing.The corresponding charge form factors are divided into two groups because of the unique properties of the s-states wave functions,though the proton numbers change uniformly in two isotonic chains.Meanwhile,the shift regularities of the minima are also discussed,and we give a clear relation between the minima of the charge form factors and the corresponding charge radii.This relation is caused by the diffraction effect of the electron.Under this conclusion,we calculate the charge density distributions and the charge form factors of the A =44 nuclei chain.The results are also useful for studying the central depression in light exotic nuclei.

  7. Charge density modification of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals for stable silver nanoparticles suspension preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore [Université Grenoble Alpes, LGP2 (France); Neuman, Charles [Poly-Ink (France); Bras, Julien, E-mail: julien.bras@grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, LGP2 (France)

    2015-06-15

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) has been found to be a great method for producing metallic particles in a sustainable way. In this work, we propose to evaluate the influence of the charge density of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO)-oxidized CNC on the morphology and the stability of synthetized silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by sol–gel reaction using borohydride reduction, and charge density of TEMPO-oxidized CNC was tuned by an amine grafting. The grafting was performed at room temperature and neutral pH. Crystallinity and morphology were kept intact during the peptidic reaction on CNC allowing knowing the exact impact of the charge density. Charge density has been found to have a strong impact on shape, organization, and suspension stability of resulting silver particles. Results show an easy way to tune the charge density of CNC and propose a sustainable way to control the morphology and stability of silver nanoparticles in aqueous suspension.

  8. Vortex Dynamics in Selfdual Maxwell-Higgs Systems with Uniform Background Electric Charge Density

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K M

    1994-01-01

    We introduce selfdual Maxwell-Higgs systems with uniform background electric charge density and show that the selfdual equations satisfied by topological vortices can be reduced to the original Bogomol'nyi equations without any background. These vortices are shown to carry no spin but to feel the Magnus force due to the shielding charge carried by the Higgs field. We also study the dynamics of slowly moving vortices and show that the spin-statistics theorem holds to our vortices.

  9. Charge carrier density dependence of the hole mobility in poly(p-phenylene vinylene)

    OpenAIRE

    Tanase, C; Blom, PWM; De Leeuw, DM; de Meijer, EJ

    2004-01-01

    The hole transport in various poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives has been investigated in field-effect transistors (FETs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a function of temperature and applied bias. The discrepancy between the experimental hole mobilities extracted from FETs and LEDs based on a single disordered polymeric semiconductor originates from the strong dependence of the hole mobility on the charge carrier density. The microscopic charge transport parameters are directly...

  10. Effects of charge density and hydrophobicity of poly(amido amine)s for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piest, Martin; Engbersen, Johan F.J.

    2010-01-01

    High cationic charge densities in polymeric vectors result in tight DNA condensation, leading to small highly positively charged polyplexes which show generally high cellular uptake in vitro. However, high cationic charge densities also introduce membrane-disruptive properties to the polymers, there

  11. Energy and centrality dependences of charged multiplicity pseudorapidity density in relativistic nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou Dai Mei; Sá Ben-Hao; Li Zhong Dao

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, and the corresponding Monte Carlo events generator, the energy and centrality dependences of charged particle pseudorapidity density in relativistic nuclear collisions were studied. Within the framework of this model, both the relativistic p anti p experimental data and the PHOBOS and PHENIX Au + Au data could be reproduced fairly well without retuning the model parameters. The author shows that since is not a well defined physical variable both experimentally and theoretically, the charged particle pseudorapidity density per participant pair can increase and also can decrease with increasing of , so it may be hard to use charged particle pseudorapidity density per participant pair as a function of to distinguish various theoretical models for particle production

  12. Trapped charge densities in Al2O3-based silicon surface passivation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul M.; Simon, Daniel K.; Mikolajick, Thomas; Dirnstorfer, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    In Al2O3-based passivation layers, the formation of fixed charges and trap sites can be strongly influenced by small modifications in the stack layout. Fixed and trapped charge densities are characterized with capacitance voltage profiling and trap spectroscopy by charge injection and sensing, respectively. Al2O3 layers are grown by atomic layer deposition with very thin (˜1 nm) SiO2 or HfO2 interlayers or interface layers. In SiO2/Al2O3 and HfO2/Al2O3 stacks, both fixed charges and trap sites are reduced by at least a factor of 5 compared with the value measured in pure Al2O3. In Al2O3/SiO2/Al2O3 or Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 stacks, very high total charge densities of up to 9 × 1012 cm-2 are achieved. These charge densities are described as functions of electrical stress voltage, time, and the Al2O3 layer thickness between silicon and the HfO2 or the SiO2 interlayer. Despite the strong variation of trap sites, all stacks reach very good effective carrier lifetimes of up to 8 and 20 ms on p- and n-type silicon substrates, respectively. Controlling the trap sites in Al2O3 layers opens the possibility to engineer the field-effect passivation in the solar cells.

  13. Correlation between the extent of catalytic activity and charge density of montmorillonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Gözen; Steudel, Annett; Emmerich, Katja; Lagaly, Gerhard; Schuhmann, Rainer

    2010-09-01

    The clay mineral montmorillonite is a member of the phyllosilicate group of minerals, which has been detected on martian soil. Montmorillonite catalyzes the condensation of activated monomers to form RNA-like oligomers. Extent of catalysis, that is, the yield of oligomers, and the length of the longest oligomer formed in these reactions widely varies with the source of montmorillonite (i.e., the locality where the mineral is mined). This study was undertaken to establish whether there exists a correlation between the extent of catalytic property and the charge density of montmorillonites. Charge density was determined by saturating the montmorillonites with alkyl ammonium cations that contained increasing lengths of alkyl chains, [CH₃-(CH₂)(n)-NH₃](+), where n = 3-16 and 18, and then measuring d(₀₀₁), interlayer spacing of the resulting montmorillonite-alkyl ammonium-montmorillonite complex by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Results demonstrate that catalytic activity of montmorillonites with lower charge density is superior to that of higher charge density montmorillonite. They produce longer oligomers that contain 9 to 10 monomer units, while montmorillonite with high charge density catalyzes the formation of oligomers that contain only 4 monomer units. The charge density of montmorillonites can also be calculated from the chemical composition if elemental analysis data of the pure mineral are available. In the next mission to Mars, CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy), a combined X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument, will provide information on the mineralogical and elemental analysis of the samples. Possible significance of these results for planning the future missions to Mars for the search of organic compounds and extinct or extant life is discussed.

  14. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...... approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity...

  15. Interplay between the orbital quantization and Pauli effect in a charge-density-wave organic conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsovnik, Mark; Andres, Dieter; Grigoriev, Pavel; Biberacher, Werner; Müller, Harald

    2004-04-01

    The interlayer magnetoresistance of the low-dimensional organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF) 2KHg(SCN) 4 under pressure shows features which are likely associated with theoretically predicted field-induced charge-density-wave (FICDW) transitions. At ambient pressure, a magnetic field strongly tilted towards the conducting layers induces a series of hysteretic anomalies. We attribute these anomalies to a novel kind of FICDW originating from a superposition of the orbital quantization of the nesting vector and Pauli effect on the charge-density wave.

  16. Orbital quantization in the high-magnetic-field state of a charge-density-wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Grigoriev, P. D.; Biberacher, W.; Müller, H.

    2003-11-01

    A superposition of the Pauli and orbital couplings of a high magnetic field to charge carriers in a charge-density-wave (CDW) system is proposed to give rise to transitions between subphases with quantized values of the CDW wave vector. By contrast to the purely orbital field-induced density-wave effects which require a strongly imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface, the new transitions can occur even if the Fermi surface is well nested at zero field. We suggest that such transitions are observed in the organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 under a strongly tilted magnetic field.

  17. Interplay between the orbital quantization and Pauli effect in a charge-density-wave organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartsovnik, Mark; Andres, Dieter; Grigoriev, Pavel; Biberacher, Werner; Mueller, Harald

    2004-04-30

    The interlayer magnetoresistance of the low-dimensional organic metal {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} under pressure shows features which are likely associated with theoretically predicted field-induced charge-density-wave (FICDW) transitions. At ambient pressure, a magnetic field strongly tilted towards the conducting layers induces a series of hysteretic anomalies. We attribute these anomalies to a novel kind of FICDW originating from a superposition of the orbital quantization of the nesting vector and Pauli effect on the charge-density wave.

  18. Analysis of charge photogeneration as a key determinant of photocurrent density in polymer: fullerene solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Tracey M.; Shoaee, Safa; Soon, Ying W.; Durrant, James R. [Centre for Plastic Electronics, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ballantyne, Amy; Nelson, Jenny [Centre for Plastic Electronics, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Duffy, Warren; Heeney, Martin; McCulloch, Iain [Centre for Plastic Electronics, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Merck Chemicals, Chilworth Science Park, Southampton SO16 7QD (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-07

    Charge photogeneration: The correlation between the efficiency of photogeneration of dissociated polarons and photocurrent densities for organic solar cells based on polymer:fullerene blend films is investigated. Optical assays of polaron yield measured in films without electrodes show a remarkably clear correlation with short circuit density and quantum yield measured in complete devices. For the blend films studied herein, the primary determinant of photocurrent generation is the efficiency of dissociation of photogenerated charges away from the polymer/fullerene interface and the primary loss pathway is geminate recombination. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Theoretical description of pump/probe experiments in electron-mediated charge-density-wave insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freericks, J. K.; Matveev, O. P.; Shen, Wen; Shvaika, A. M.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-03-01

    In this review, we develop the formalism employed to describe charge-density-wave insulators in pump/probe experiments that use ultrashort driving pulses of light. The theory emphasizes exact results in the simplest model for a charge-density-wave insulator (given by a noninteracting system with two bands and a gap) and employs nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to solve the Falicov–Kimball model in its ordered phase. We show how to develop the formalism and how the solutions behave. Care is taken to describe the details behind these calculations and to show how to verify their accuracy via sum-rule constraints.

  20. Extension of many-body theory and approximate density functionals to fractional charges and fractional spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Mori-Sánchez, Paula; Cohen, Aron J

    2013-09-14

    The exact conditions for density functionals and density matrix functionals in terms of fractional charges and fractional spins are known, and their violation in commonly used functionals has been shown to be the root of many major failures in practical applications. However, approximate functionals are designed for physical systems with integer charges and spins, not in terms of the fractional variables. Here we develop a general framework for extending approximate density functionals and many-electron theory to fractional-charge and fractional-spin systems. Our development allows for the fractional extension of any approximate theory that is a functional of G(0), the one-electron Green's function of the non-interacting reference system. The extension to fractional charge and fractional spin systems is based on the ensemble average of the basic variable, G(0). We demonstrate the fractional extension for the following theories: (1) any explicit functional of the one-electron density, such as the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximations; (2) any explicit functional of the one-electron density matrix of the non-interacting reference system, such as the exact exchange functional (or Hartree-Fock theory) and hybrid functionals; (3) many-body perturbation theory; and (4) random-phase approximations. A general rule for such an extension has also been derived through scaling the orbitals and should be useful for functionals where the link to the Green's function is not obvious. The development thus enables the examination of approximate theories against known exact conditions on the fractional variables and the analysis of their failures in chemical and physical applications in terms of violations of exact conditions of the energy functionals. The present work should facilitate the calculation of chemical potentials and fundamental bandgaps with approximate functionals and many-electron theories through the energy derivatives with respect to the

  1. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun, E-mail: chjliang@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun, E-mail: chjliang@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chunxiu [Information Recording Materials Lab, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, Beijing 102600 (China)

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  2. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Chunxiu; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun

    2015-02-01

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the orientation as an example, I1, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I2 and I3) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I1 atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I1 atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I1 atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  3. Induced fermionic charge and current densities in two-dimensional rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Grigoryan, A Kh

    2016-01-01

    For a massive quantum fermionic field, we investigate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the charge and current densities induced by an external magnetic flux in a two-dimensional circular ring. Both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra are considered. On the ring edges the bag (infinite mass) boundary conditions are imposed for the field operator. This leads to the Casimir type effect on the vacuum characteristics. The radial current vanishes. The charge and the azimuthal current are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Both these contributions are odd periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. An important feature that distinguishes the VEVs of the charge and current densities from the VEV of the energy density, is their finiteness on the ring edges. The current density is equal to the charge density for the outer edge and has the opposite sign on the inner edge. The VEVs are peaked near the inner edge and, as f...

  4. Density decrease in vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Galvin, T.M.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density decrease (swelling) of V-4Cr-4Ti, V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, and V-8Cr-6Ti alloys have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). To ensure better accuracy in density measurement, broken pieces of tensile specimens {approx} 10 times heavier than a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disk were used. Density increases of the four alloys irradiated in the DHCE were <0.5%. This small change seems to be consistent with the negligible number density of microcavities characterized by TEM. Most of the dynamically produced helium atoms seem to have been trapped in the grain matrix without significant cavity nucleation or growth.

  5. Spin and charge distribution in iron porphyrin models: a coupled cluster and density-functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Mikael P; Sundholm, Dage

    2004-02-15

    We recently performed detailed analyses of the electronic structure of low-spin iron porphyrins using density-functional theory (DFT). Both the spin-density distributions of the oxidized, ferric forms, as well as the changes in total charge density upon reduction to the ferrous forms have been explored. Here, we compare the DFT results with wave-function theory, more specifically, with the approximate singles and doubles coupled-cluster method (CC2). Different spin states are considered by studying representative models of low spin, intermediate spin, and high spin species. The CC2 calculations corroborate the DFT results; the spin density exhibits the same amount of molecular spin polarization, and the charge delocalization is of comparable magnitude. Slight differences in the descriptions are noted and discussed.

  6. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Bragança, E; Saharian, A A

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even funct...

  7. Charged impurity scattering limited low temperature resistivity of low density silicon inversion layers

    OpenAIRE

    Sarma, S. Das; Hwang, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    We calculate within the Boltzmann equation approach the charged impurity scattering limited low temperature electronic resistivity of low density $n$-type inversion layers in Si MOSFET structures. We find a rather sharp quantum to classical crossover in the transport behavior in the $0 - 5$K temperature range, with the low density, low temperature mobility showing a strikingly strong non-monotonic temperature dependence, which may qualitatively explain the recently observed anomalously strong...

  8. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Bezerra de Mello, E.R. [Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Braganca, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Saharian, A.A. [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-06-15

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. The behavior of the expectation values in various asymptotic regions of the parameters are discussed in detail. In particular, we show that for points near the cone apex the vacuum parts dominate. For a massless field with zero chemical potential the fermion condensate and charge density vanish. Simple expressions are derived for the part in the total charge induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux. Combining the results for separate irreducible representations, we also consider the fermion condensate, charge and current densities in parity and time-reversal symmetric models. Possible applications to graphitic nanocones are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Resonant soft x-ray scattering and charge density waves in correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusydi, Andrivo

    2006-01-01

    Summary This work describes results obtained on the study of charge density waves (CDW) in strongly correlated systems with a new experimental method: resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS). The basic motivation is the 1986 discovery by Bednorz and Müler of a new type of superconductor, based on Cu a

  10. THEORY OF THE THRESHOLD FIELD FOR THE DEPINNING TRANSITION OF A CHARGE-DENSITY WAVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIETRONERO, L; VERSTEEG, M

    1991-01-01

    The Hamiltonian of an elastic string pinned by random potentials is often used to describe the depinning transition of a charge density wave in the presence of impurity pinning. The properties of the pinned states show close analogies to those of glassy systems, while the depinning transition resemb

  11. Reversible Electrochemical Sensor for Detection of High-Charge Density Polyanion Contaminants in Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jacob; Chandler, Timothy; Gemene, Kebede L

    2015-11-17

    We present a simple, rapid, and inexpensive electrochemical sensor based on a reversible pulsed chronopotentiometric polyanion-selective membrane electrode for the detection and quantification of oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) and other high charge-density polyanions that could potentially be used to adulterate heparin. The membrane is free of ion exchanger and is formulated with plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and an inert lipophilic salt, tridodecylmethylammonium-dinonylnaphthaline sulfonate (TDMA-DNNS). The neutral salt is used to reduce membrane resistance and to ensure reversibility of the sensor. More importantly, TDMA(+) is used as the recognition element for the polyanions. Here an anodic galvanostatic current pulse is applied across the membrane to cause the extraction of the polyanions from the sample into the membrane and potential is measured at the sample-membrane interface. The measured electromotive force (emf) is proportional to the concentration and the charge density of the polyanions. High charge-density polyanion contaminants and impurities in heparin can be detected using this method since the overall equilibrium potential response of polyions increases with increasing charge density of the polyions. Here, first the potential response of pure heparin is measured at a saturation concentration, the concentration beyond which further addition of heparin does not produce a change in potential response. Then the potential response of heparin tainted with different quantities of the high charge-density contaminant is measured at a fixed total polyion concentration (heparin concentration + contaminant concentration). The latter gives a greater negative potential response due to the presence of the high charge-density contaminant. The increase in the negative potential response can be used for detection and quantification of high charge-density contaminants in heparin. We demonstrate here that 0.3% (w/w) OSCS as well as 0.1% (w

  12. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory(Ⅷ) Charge polarization modes in a closed system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory and the atom-bond electronegativity equalization model (ABEEM), a method is proposed to construct the softness matrix and to obtain the electron population normal modes (PNMs) for a closed system. Using this method the information about the bond charge polarization in a molecule can be obtained easily. The test calculation shows that the PNM obtained by this method includes all the modes about the bond charge polarization explicitly. And the bond charge polarization mode characterized by the biggest eigenvalue, which is the softest one of all modes related with chemical bonds, can describe the charge polarization process in a molecule as exquisitely as the corresponding ab initio method.

  13. Modeling noncovalent radical-molecule interactions using conventional density-functional theory: beware erroneous charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin R; Salamone, Michela; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A

    2013-02-07

    Conventional density-functional theory (DFT) has the potential to overbind radical-molecule complexes because of erroneous charge transfer. We examined this behavior by exploring the ability of various DFT approximations to predict fractional charge transfer and by quantifying the overbinding in a series of complexes. It is demonstrated that too much charge is transferred from molecules to radicals when the radical singly unoccupied molecular orbitals are predicted to be erroneously too low in energy relative to the molecule highest occupied molecular orbitals, leading to excessive Coulombic attraction. In this respect, DFT methods formulated with little or no Hartree-Fock exchange perform most poorly. The present results illustrate that the charge-transfer problem is much broader than may have been previously expected and is not limited to conventional (i.e., molecule-molecule) donor-acceptor complexes.

  14. The influence of oxidation on space charge formation in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, G; Xie, H K; Banford, H M; Davies, A E

    2003-01-01

    The research presented in this paper investigates the role of oxidation in the formation of space charge in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene after being electrically stressed under dc voltage. Polyethylene plaques both with and without antioxidant were irradiated up to 500 kGy using a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma source and space charge distributions were measured using the piezoelectric induced pressure wave propagation method. It has been found that a large amount of positive charge evolved adjacent to the cathode in the sample without antioxidant and was clearly associated with oxidation of the surface. The amount of charge formed for a given applied stress increased with the dose absorbed by the material. A model has been proposed to explain the formation of space charge and its profile. The charge decay after the removal of the external applied stress is dominated by a process being controlled by the cathode interfacial stress (charge injection) rather than a conventional RC circuit model. On the other ...

  15. Quantifying the nucleon’s pion cloud with transverse charge densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2010-10-01

    The transverse densities in a fast-moving nucleon offer a model-independent framework for analyzing the spatial structure of the pion cloud and its role in current matrix elements. We calculate the chiral large-distance component of the charge density in a dispersion representation of the form factor and discuss its partonic interpretation. It dominates over the nonchiral density only at surprisingly large distances above ~2 fm. The chiral component can be probed in precision low-Q^2 elastic eN scattering or in peripheral deep-inelastic processes that resolve its quark/gluon content.

  16. Electrostatic force density for a scanned probe above a charged surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passian, A.; Wig, A.; Meriaudeau, F.; Buncick, M.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2001-07-15

    The Coulomb interaction of a dielectric probe tip with a uniform field existing above a semi-infinite, homogeneous dielectric substrate is studied. The induced polarization surface charge density and the field distribution at the bounding surface of the dielectric medium with the geometry of half of a two sheeted hyperboloid of revolution located above the dielectric half space interfaced with a uniform surface charge density is calculated. The force density on the hyperboloidal probe medium is calculated as a function of the probe tip shape. The calculation is based on solving Laplace's equation and employing a newly derived integral expansion for the vanishing dielectric limit of the potential. The involved numerical simulations comprise the evaluation of infinite double integrals involving conical functions.

  17. Electrostatic force density for a scanned probe above a charged surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Wig, A.; Meriaudeau, F.; Buncick, M.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2001-07-01

    The Coulomb interaction of a dielectric probe tip with a uniform field existing above a semi-infinite, homogeneous dielectric substrate is studied. The induced polarization surface charge density and the field distribution at the bounding surface of the dielectric medium with the geometry of half of a two sheeted hyperboloid of revolution located above the dielectric half space interfaced with a uniform surface charge density is calculated. The force density on the hyperboloidal probe medium is calculated as a function of the probe tip shape. The calculation is based on solving Laplace's equation and employing a newly derived integral expansion for the vanishing dielectric limit of the potential. The involved numerical simulations comprise the evaluation of infinite double integrals involving conical functions.

  18. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  19. Fractional-charge and fractional-spin errors in range-separated density-functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    We investigate fractional-charge and fractional-spin errors in range-separated density-functional theory. Specifically, we consider the range-separated hybrid (RSH) method which combines long-range Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange with a short-range semilocal exchange-correlation density functional, and the RSH+MP2 method which adds long-range second-order M{{\\o}}ller-Plesset (MP2) correlation. Results on atoms and molecules show that the fractional-charge errors obtained in RSH are much smaller than in the standard Kohn-Sham (KS) scheme applied with semilocal or hybrid approximations, and also generally smaller than in the standard HF method. The RSH+MP2 method tends to have smaller fractional-charge errors than standard MP2 for the most diffuse systems, but larger fractional-charge errors for the more compact systems. Even though the individual contributions to the fractional-spin errors in the H atom coming from the short-range exchange and correlation density-functional approximations are smaller than the corre...

  20. The generalization of charged AdS black hole specific volume and number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Liang; He, Miao; Fang, Chao; Sun, Dao-Quan; Deng, Jian-Bo

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, by proposing a generalized specific volume, we restudy the P- V criticality of charged AdS black holes in the extended phase space. The results show that most of the previous conclusions can be generalized without change, but the ratio {\\tilde{ρ }}_c should be 3 {\\tilde{α }}/16 in general case. Further research on the thermodynamical phase transition of black hole leads us to a natural interpretation of our assumption, and more black hole properties can be generalized. Finally, we study the number density for charged AdS black hole in higher dimensions, the results show the necessity of our assumption.

  1. Charge Density Analysis and Transport Properties of TTF Based Molecular Nanowires: A DFT Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppannan Selvaraju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been performed to understand the charge density distribution and the electrical characteristics of Au and thiol substituted tetrathiafulvalene (TTF based molecular nanowire. A quantum chemical calculation has been carried out using DFT method (B3LYP with the LANL2DZ basis set under various applied electric fields (EFs. The bond topological analysis characterizes the terminal Au–S and S–C bonds as well as all the bonds of central TTF unit of the molecule. The variation of electron density and Laplacian of electron density at the bond critical point of bonds for zero and different applied fields reveal the electron density distribution of the molecule. The molecular conformation, the variation of atomic charges and energy density distribution of the molecule have been analyzed for the various levels of applied EFs. The HOMO-LUMO gap calculated from quantum chemical calculations has been compared with the value calculated from the density of states. The variation of dipole moment due to the polarization effect and the I-V characteristics of the molecule for the various applied EFs have been well discussed.

  2. Static and Dynamical Valence-Charge-Density Properties of GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Ullrich

    1993-02-01

    Owing to the close neighbourhood of Ga and As in Mendeleev's table, GaAs shows two fundamental classes of X-ray structure amplitudes distinguished by their extremely different scattering power. They are differently sensitive to the valence electron density (VED) redistribution caused by the chemical bond and must be measured by different experimental methods. Using such data, both the VED and the difference electron densities (DED) are calculated here. Comparison with theoret-ical densities shows that the VED is characterized by covalent, ionic and metallic contributions. The DED constructed from GaAs and Ge data demonstrates the electronic response caused by a "protonic" charge transfer between both f.c.c. sublattices as well as the transition from a purely covalent to a mixed covalent-ionic bond. Especially the charge-density accumulation between nearest neighbours (bond charge (BC)) depends on the distance between the bonding atoms and changes under the influence of any lattice deformation. This phenomenon is described by a BC-transfer model. Its direct experimental proof is given by measuring the variation of the scattering power of weak reflections under the influence of an external electric field. This experiment demonstrates that the ionicity of the bond changes in addition to the BC variation.

  3. Charge-density analysis using multipolar atom and spherical charge models: 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione, a compound displaying a resonance-assisted hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Ayoub; Kubicki, Maciej; Wright, Jonathan; Borowiak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Grzegorz; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The experimental charge-density distribution in 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione in the crystal state was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collection at 0.33 Å resolution. The molecule in the crystal is in the enol form. The experimental electron density was refined using the Hansen-Coppens multipolar model and an alternative modeling, based on spherical atoms and additional charges on the covalent bonds and electron lone-pair sites. The crystallographic refinements, charge-density distributions, molecular electrostatic potentials, dipole moments and intermolecular interaction energies obtained from the different charge-density models were compared. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical charge densities using theoretical structure factors obtained from periodic quantum calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. A strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bond connects molecules along the [001] direction. The deformation density maps show the resonance within the O=C-C=C-OH fragment and merged lone pair lobes on the hydroxyl O atom. This resonance is further confirmed by the analysis of charges and topology of the electron density.

  4. Charge density and particle size effects on oligonucleotide and plasmid DNA binding to nanosized hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Brian A; Sowersby, Drew S; Crosby, Sergio; Goss, Marcus; Lewis, L Kevin; Beall, Gary W

    2013-12-01

    Hydrotalcite (HT) and other layered double metal hydroxides are of great interest as gene delivery and timed release drug delivery systems and as enteric vehicles for biologically active molecules that are sensitive to gastric fluids. HT is a naturally occurring double metal hydroxide that can be synthesized as a nanomaterial consisting of a brucite structure with isomorphous substitution of aluminum ions. These positively charged nanoparticles exhibit plate-like morphology with very high aspect ratios. Biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins form strong associations with HT because they can associate with the positively charged layers. The binding of nucleic acids with HT and other nanomaterials is currently being investigated for potential use in gene therapy; however, the binding of specific nucleic acid forms, such as single- and double-stranded DNA, has been little explored. In addition, the effects of charge density and particle size on DNA adsorption has not been studied. In this paper, the binding of different forms of DNA to a series of HTs prepared at different temperatures and with different anion exchange capacities has been investigated. Experiments demonstrated that HTs synthesized at higher temperatures associate with both single- and double-stranded oligomers and circular plasmid DNA more tightly than HTs synthesized at room temperature, likely due to the hydrothermal conditions promoting larger particle sizes. HT with an anion exchange capacity of 300 meq/100 g demonstrated the highest binding of DNA, likely due to the closer match of charge densities between the HT and DNA. The details of the interaction of various forms of DNA with HT as a function of charge density, particle size, and concentration are discussed.

  5. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, Bram L. H. M.; Schols, Henk A.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem; Voragen, Alphons G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness. Vary

  6. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzyanov, Ramil S.; Rozhkov, Alexander V.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T = 0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment, the thermodynamic properties of a random impurity ensemble is studied. Magnetic susceptibility of the ensemble diverges at low temperature; heat capacity as a function of the magnetic field demonstrates pronounced low field peak. Both features are consistent with experiments on orthorhombic TaS3 and blue bronze.

  7. Universal Field-Induced Charge-Density-Wave Phase Diagram: Theory versus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2009-07-01

    We suggest a theory of field-induced charge-density-wave phases, generated by high magnetic fields in quasi-low-dimensional conductors. We demonstrate that, in layered quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the corresponding critical magnetic field ratios are universal and do not depend on any fitting parameter. In particular, we find that H1/H0=0.73, H2/H0=0.59, H3/H0=0.49, and H4/H0=0.42, where Hn is a critical field of a phase transition between the field-induced charge-density-wave phases with numbers n and n+1. The suggested theory is in very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data in α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 material.

  8. Charged Multiplicity Density and Number of Participant Nucleons in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA Ben-Hao; CAI Xu; ZHOU Dai-Mei

    2003-01-01

    The energy and centrality dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density in relativistic nuclearcollisions were studied using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE. Both the relativistic p+p experimental dataand the PHOBOS and PHENIX Au+Au data at RHIC energy could be fairly reproduced within the framework ofJPCIAE model and without retuning the model parameters. The predictions for Pb + Pb collisions at the LHC energywere also given. We computed the participant nucleon distributions using different methods. It was found that thenumber of participant nucleons is not a well defined variable both experimentally and theoretically. Thus it may beinappropriate to use the charged particle pseudorapidity density per participant pair .as a function of the number ofparticipant nucleons for distinguishing various theoretical models.

  9. Local distortion in Co-doped LSMO from entropy-maximized charge density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed Ali, K.S. [Department of Physics, The Madura College, Madurai 625011 (India); Saravanan, R., E-mail: saragow@dataone.i [Department of Physics, The Madura College, Madurai 625011 (India); Pashchenko, A.V.; Pashchenko, V.P. [Galkin Donetsk Institute of Physics and Technology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk 83114 (Ukraine)

    2010-07-09

    Perovskite structure manganites La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 1.11-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} were prepared by the solid state reaction method. An X-ray analysis of the structure was undertaken using the Rietveld technique on the experimental powder X-ray diffraction data and, then, a charge density distribution study was undertaken, using the maximum entropy method (MEM). The charge density in the unit cell was reconstructed and the effect of Co{sup 3+} doping in the Mn-O matrix was studied. Local distortions due to Co doping were analyzed and the results are now discussed.

  10. Bond length and charge density variations within extended arm chair defects in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I

    2013-11-26

    Extended linear arm chair defects are intentionally fabricated in suspended monolayer graphene using controlled focused electron beam irradiation. The atomic structure is accurately determined using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy with monochromation of the electron source to achieve ∼80 pm spatial resolution at an accelerating voltage of 80 kV. We show that the introduction of atomic vacancies in graphene disrupts the uniformity of C-C bond lengths immediately surrounding linear arm chair defects in graphene. The measured changes in C-C bond lengths are related to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of charge density variation and corresponding DFT calculated structural models. We show good correlation between the DFT predicted localized charge depletion and structural models with HRTEM measured bond elongation within the carbon tetragon structure of graphene. Further evidence of bond elongation within graphene defects is obtained from imaging a pair of 5-8-5 divacancies.

  11. Semilocal and Hybrid Density Embedding Calculations of Ground-State Charge-Transfer Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Della Sala, F; 10.1063/1.4795825

    2013-01-01

    We apply the frozen density embedding method, using a full relaxation of embedded densities through a freeze-and-thaw procedure, to study the electronic structure of several benchmark ground-state charge-transfer complexes, in order to assess the merits and limitations of the approach for this class of systems. The calculations are performed using both semilocal and hybrid exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. The results show that embedding calculations using semilocal XC functionals yield rather large deviations with respect to the corresponding supermolecular calculations. Due to a large error cancellation effect, however, they can often provide a relatively good description of the electronic structure of charge-transfer complexes, in contrast to supermolecular calculations performed at the same level of theory. On the contrary, when hybrid XC functionals are employed, both embedding and supermolecular calculations agree very well with each other and with the reference benchmark results. In conclusion, fo...

  12. Charge density waves in the graphene sheets of the superconductor CaC(6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnejat, K C; Howard, C A; Shuttleworth, N E; Schofield, S R; Iwaya, K; Hirjibehedin, C F; Renner, Ch; Aeppli, G; Ellerby, M

    2011-11-29

    Graphitic systems have an electronic structure that can be readily manipulated through electrostatic or chemical doping, resulting in a rich variety of electronic ground states. Here we report the first observation and characterization of electronic stripes in the highly electron-doped graphitic superconductor, CaC(6), by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. The stripes correspond to a charge density wave with a period three times that of the Ca superlattice. Although the positions of the Ca intercalants are modulated, no displacements of the carbon lattice are detected, indicating that the graphene sheets host the ideal charge density wave. This provides an exceptionally simple material-graphene-as a starting point for understanding the relation between stripes and superconductivity. Furthermore, our experiments suggest a strategy to search for superconductivity in graphene, namely in the vicinity of striped 'Wigner crystal' phases, where some of the electrons crystallize to form a superlattice.

  13. Exploring effective interactions through transition charge density study of 70,72,74,76Ge nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Shukla; P K Raina; P K Rath

    2005-02-01

    Transition charge densities (TCD) for $0^{+} → 2_{1}^{+}$ excitation have been calculated for 70, 72, 74, 76Ge nuclei within microscopic variational framework employing 23/2, 15/2, 21/2 and 19/2 valence space. The calculated TCDs for different monopole variants of Kuo interaction are compared with available experimental results. Other systematics like reduced transition probabilities (2) and static quadrupole moments (2) are also presented. It is observed that the transition density study acts as a sensitive probe for discriminating the response of different parts of effective interactions.

  14. Extended phonon collapse in the charge-density-wave compound NbSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Frank [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States); Rosenkranz, Stephan; Castellan, John-Paul; Osborn, Raymond [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States); Hott, Roland; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Egami, Takeshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee (United States); Said, Ayman [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois (United States); Reznik, Dmitry [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the phonon softening in the charge density wave compound NbSe{sub 2} using the high-resolution hard inelastic X-ray scattering beamline 30-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The acoustic {sigma}{sub 1} phonon branch was measured from the zone center {gamma} to the M point at temperatures between 250 K and 8 K across the CDW transition at T{sub CDW}=33 K. Density functional theory calculations for the lattice dynamical properties which predict an extended phonon breakdown are used to analyze the detailed nature of the softening phonon branch.

  15. The scaling dimension of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and of the topological charge density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, C. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bernard, C. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Gottlieb, Steven [Department of Physics, Indiana Univerity, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Gregory, E.B. [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society, One Research Road, Box 9000, Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Hetrick, J.E. [Physics Department, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Osborn, J.; Sugar, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Forcrand, Ph. de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Jahn, O. [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2005-03-15

    As a quantitative measure of localization, the inverse participation ratio of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and topological charge density is calculated on quenched lattices over a wide range of lattice spacings and volumes. Since different topological objects (instantons, vortices, monopoles, and artifacts) have different co-dimension, scaling analysis provides information on the amount of each present and their correlation with the localization of low lying eigenmodes.

  16. Field-Induced Dynamic Diamagnetism in a Charge-Density-Wave System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N.; Mielke, C. H.; Christianson, A. D.; Brooks, J. S.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-02-01

    ac susceptibility measurements of the charge-density-wave (CDW) compound α-\\(BEDT-TTF\\)2-KHg\\(SCN\\)4 at magnetic fields, μ0H>23 T, above its Pauli paramagnetic limit, reveal unambiguously that the magnetic hysteresis observed previously within this CDW phase is diamagnetic and can only be explained by induced currents. It is argued that the ensemble of experimental techniques amounts to a strong case for dissipationless conductivity within this phase.

  17. Intermolecular interactions, charge-density distribution and the electrostatic properties of pyrazinamide anti-TB drug molecule: an experimental and theoretical charge-density study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Gnanasekaran; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2014-06-01

    An experimental charge-density analysis of pyrazinamide (a first line antitubercular drug) was performed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction data [(sin θ/λ)max = 1.1 Å(-1)] measured at 100 (2) K. The structure was solved by direct methods using SHELXS97 and refined by SHELXL97. The total electron density of the pyrazinamide molecule was modeled using the Hansen-Coppens multipole formalism implemented in the XD software. The topological properties of electron density determined from the experiment were compared with the theoretical results obtained from CRYSTAL09 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The crystal structure was stabilized by N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bonds, in which the N3-H3B...N1 and N3-H3A...O1 interactions form two types of dimers in the crystal. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The fingerprint plot reveals that the N...H and O...H hydrogen-bonding interactions contribute 26.1 and 18.4%, respectively, of the total Hirshfeld surface. The lattice energy of the molecule was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-31G** basis set. The molecular electrostatic potential of the pyrazinamide molecule exhibits extended electronegative regions around O1, N1 and N2. The existence of a negative electrostatic potential (ESP) region just above the upper and lower surfaces of the pyrazine ring confirm the π-electron cloud.

  18. Time-domain pumping a quantum-critical charge density wave ordered material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, O. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Devereaux, T. P.; Freericks, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the exact time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for a nesting driven charge density wave (described by the spinless Falicov-Kimball model within dynamical mean-field theory). The pump-probe experiment involves two light pulses: the first is an ultrashort intense pump pulse that excites the system into nonequilibrium, and the second is a lower amplitude, higher frequency probe pulse that photoexcites electrons. We examine three different cases: the strongly correlated metal, the quantum-critical charge density wave, and the critical Mott insulator. Our results show that the quantum critical charge density wave has an ultraefficient relaxation channel that allows electrons to be de-excited during the pump pulse, resulting in little net excitation. In contrast, the metal and the Mott insulator show excitations that are closer to what one expects from these systems. In addition, the pump field produces spectral band narrowing, peak sharpening, and a spectral gap reduction, all of which rapidly return to their field free values after the pump is over.

  19. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  20. Near Gap Excitation of Collective Modes in a Charge Density Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Dominik; Sobota, Jonathan; Yang, Shuolong; Kemper, Alexander; Giraldo, Paula; Moore, Rob; Fisher, Ian; Kirchmann, Patrick; Devereaux, Thomas; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-03-01

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) measurements on the charge density wave system's (CDW) CeTe3. Optical excitation transiently populates the unoccupied band structure and reveals a CDW gap size of 2 Δ = 0 . 59 eV. In addition, the occupied Te- 5 p band dispersion is coherently modified by three collective modes. First, the spatial polarization of the modes is analyzed by fits of a transient model dispersion and DFT frozen phonon calculations. We thereby demonstrate how the rich information from trARPES allows identification of collective modes and their spatial polarization, which explains the mode-dependent coupling to charge order. Second, the exciting photon energy hν was gradually lowered towards 2 Δ , at constant optical excitation density. The coherent response of the amplitude mode deviates from the optical conductivity, which is dominated by direct interband transitions between the lower and upper CDW bands. The measured hν -dependence can be reproduced by a calculated joint density of states for optical transition between bands with different orbital character. This finding suggests, that the coherent response of the CDW amplitude mode is dominated by photo-doping of the charge ordering located in the Te-planes.

  1. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles.

  2. Expanding the Scope of Density Derived Electrostatic and Chemical Charge Partitioning to Thousands of Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Louis P; Limas, Nidia Gabaldon; Cole, Daniel J; Payne, Mike C; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Manz, Thomas A

    2014-12-01

    The density derived electrostatic and chemical (DDEC/c3) method is implemented into the onetep program to compute net atomic charges (NACs), as well as higher-order atomic multipole moments, of molecules, dense solids, nanoclusters, liquids, and biomolecules using linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) in a distributed memory parallel computing environment. For a >1000 atom model of the oxygenated myoglobin protein, the DDEC/c3 net charge of the adsorbed oxygen molecule is approximately -1e (in agreement with the Weiss model) using a dynamical mean field theory treatment of the iron atom, but much smaller in magnitude when using the generalized gradient approximation. For GaAs semiconducting nanorods, the system dipole moment using the DDEC/c3 NACs is about 5% higher in magnitude than the dipole computed directly from the quantum mechanical electron density distribution, and the DDEC/c3 NACs reproduce the electrostatic potential to within approximately 0.1 V on the nanorod's solvent-accessible surface. As examples of conducting materials, we study (i) a 55-atom Pt cluster with an adsorbed CO molecule and (ii) the dense solids Mo2C and Pd3V. Our results for solid Mo2C and Pd3V confirm the necessity of a constraint enforcing exponentially decaying electron density in the tails of buried atoms.

  3. Tailoring Membrane Nanostructure and Charge Density for High Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldrup, Sofie; Catalano, Jacopo; Hinge, Mogens; Jensen, Grethe V; Pedersen, Jan S; Bentien, Anders

    2016-02-23

    The electrokinetic energy conversion (EKEC) of hydraulic work directly into electrical energy has been investigated in charged polymeric membranes with different pore charge densities and characteristic diameters of the nanoporous network. The membranes were synthesized from blends of nitrocellulose and sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) and were comprehensively characterized with respect to structure, composition, and transport properties. It is shown that the SPS can be used as a sacrificial pore generation medium to tune the pore size and membrane porosity, which in turn highly affects the transport properties of the membranes. Furthermore, it is shown that very high EKEC efficiencies (>35%) are encountered in a rather narrow window of the properties of the nanoporous membrane network, that is, with pore diameters of ca. 10 nm and pore charge densities of 4.6 × 10(2) to 1.5 × 10(3) mol SO3(-) m(-3) for dilute solutions (0.03 M LiCl). The high absolute value of the efficiency combined with the determination of the optimal membrane morphology makes membrane-based EKEC devices a step closer to practical applications and high-performance membrane design less empirical.

  4. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A.; Blanco-Canosa, S.; Schierle, E.; Lu, Y.; Wu, M.; Bluschke, M.; Minola, M.; Christiani, G.; Habermeier, H. U.; Logvenov, G.; Wang, Y.; van Aken, P. A.; Benckiser, E.; Weschke, E.; Le Tacon, M.; Keimer, B.

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ~ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  5. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A; Blanco-Canosa, S; Schierle, E; Lu, Y; Wu, M; Bluschke, M; Minola, M; Christiani, G; Habermeier, H U; Logvenov, G; Wang, Y; van Aken, P A; Benckiser, E; Weschke, E; Le Tacon, M; Keimer, B

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ∼ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  6. Investigation of asymmetric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) reduction of acetophenone derivatives: effect of charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Hemantkumar G; Yeniad, Bahar; Koning, Cor E; Heise, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    In an effort to study the effect of substituent groups of the substrate on the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) reductions of aryl-alkyl ketones, several derivatives of acetophenone have been evaluated against ADHs from Lactobacillus brevis (LB) and Thermoanaerobacter sp. (T). Interestingly, ketones with non-demanding (neutral) para-substituents were reduced to secondary alcohols by these enzymes in enantiomerically pure form whereas those with demanding (ionizable) substituents could not be reduced. The effect of substrate size, their solubility in the reaction medium, electron donating and withdrawing properties of the ligand and also the electronic charge density distribution on the substrate molecules have been studied and discussed in detail. From the results, it is observed that the electronic charge distribution in the substrate molecules is influencing the orientation of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme and hence the ability to reduce the substrate.

  7. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  8. Calculation of the Nuclear Transition Charge Density in a Microscopic sdgIBM-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhan-Jun; SANG Jian-ping; LIU Yong

    2000-01-01

    Formulae of proton and neutron boson structure functions (BSF's) are deduced in terms of a microscopic approach of sdgIBM (namely, microscopic sdgIBM). For the nucleus 190Os, the value of BSF's is worked out. Due to the high similarity, the maximum F-spin truncation is made under the full-symmetry approximation. Thereafter, calculations of E2 and E4 transition charge densities (TCD's) are performed in the sdgIBM-1. It is found that the E2 and E4 TCD's can be reproduced quite satisfactorily in the uniform frame of microscopic sdgIBM-1.

  9. Effect of the surface charge density on the creep of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmakin, Yu. D.; Rybyanets, V. A.; Nevskii, S. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    The creep of polycrystalline copper under the action of high and low electric potentials is studied. At potentials of ±4 kV and ±5 V, the steady-state creep rate decreases, and the effect in the former case is weaker than in the latter by a factor of 2.5. This difference is caused by the fact that the charge density in the sample-capacitor bank system at the high electric potentials is lower than at the low potentials.

  10. Magnetic field dependence of the threshold electric field in unconventional charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    2002-04-01

    Many experiments suggest that the unidentified low-temperature phase of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is most likely unconventional charge density wave (UCDW). To further extend this identification we present our theoretical study of the threshold electric field of UCDW in a magnetic field. The magnetic field-temperature phase diagram is very similar to those in a d-wave superconductor. The optical conductivity shows clear features characteristic to both UDW and magnetic field. We find a rather strong field dependence of the threshold electric field, which shows qualitatively good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Metal-charge density wave coexistence in TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaddour, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Campus Universitaire, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Tunis 2092 (Tunisia); Auban-Senzier, P.; Raffy, H.; Monteverde, M.; Pouget, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Pasquier, C.R., E-mail: pasquier@lps.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Alemany, P. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canadell, E. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Valade, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Route de Narbonne F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-01

    We have established a new pressure–temperature phase diagram of TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2} based on longitudinal and transverse resistivity measurements under pressure up to 30 kbar. We were able to identify three different charge density wave (CDW) states which all coexist with a metallic state in a wide temperature range and superconductivity at the lowest temperatures. At low pressure, two successive CDW transitions have been clearly identified. These two transitions merge into a single one at 12 kbar. A maximum of this unique CDW transition temperature is observed at 19 kbar.

  12. A study of transverse charge density of pions in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing; WANG Yi-Zhan

    2011-01-01

    The transverse charge density of pions is calculated based on relativistic quantum mechanics,where the pion is regarded as a quark-antiquark bound state. Corrections from the two spin-1/2 constituents and from the wave function of a quark and antiquark inside the bound system are discussed. The calculated results are compared to the results with a realistic effective Lagrangian approach as well as to that with a simple covariant model where the pion is regarded as a composite system with two scalar particles.

  13. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Perucchi, A.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH

    2009-12-14

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe{sub 3}, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe{sub 3}.

  14. Optical properties of the Ce and La ditelluride charge density wave compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagnini, M.; Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-02-15

    The La and Ce di-tellurides LaTe{sub 2} and CeTe{sub 2} are deep in the charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state even at 300 K. We have collected their electrodynamic response over a broad spectral range from the far infrared up to the ultraviolet. We establish the energy scale of the single particle excitation across the CDW gap. Moreover, we find that the CDW collective state gaps a very large portion of the Fermi surface. Similarly to the related rare earth tri-tellurides, we envisage that interactions and Umklapp processes play a role in the onset of the CDW broken symmetry ground state.

  15. Origin of the charge density wave in 1T-TiSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-27

    All-electron ab initio calculations are used to study the microscopic origin of the charge density wave (CDW) in 1T-TiSe2. A purely electronic picture is ruled out as a possible scenario, indicating that the CDW transition in the present system is merely a structural phase transition. The CDW instability is the result of a symmetry lowering by electron correlations occurring with electron localization. Suppression of the CDW in pressurized and in Cu-intercalated 1T-TiSe2 is explained by a delocalization of the electrons, which weakens the correlations and counteracts the symmetry lowering.

  16. Observation of a Charge Density Wave Incommensuration Near the Superconducting Dome in Cux TiSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogar, A.; de la Pena, G. A.; Lee, Sangjun; Fang, Y.; Sun, S. X.-L.; Lioi, D. B.; Karapetrov, G.; Finkelstein, K. D.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Abbamonte, P.; Rosenkranz, S.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was employed to study the evolution of the charge density wave (CDW) in Cux TiSe2 as a function of copper intercalation in order to clarify the relationship between the CDW and superconductivity. The results show a CDW incommensuration arising at an intercalation value coincident with the onset of superconductivity at around x =0.055 (5 ) . Additionally, it was found that the charge density wave persists to higher intercalant concentrations than previously assumed, demonstrating that the CDW does not terminate inside the superconducting dome. A charge density wave peak was observed in samples up to x =0.091 (6 ), the highest copper concentration examined in this study. The phase diagram established in this work suggests that charge density wave incommensuration may play a role in the formation of the superconducting state.

  17. Electronic properties and charge density of BeZn1−Te alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Swarnkar; U Paliwal; N N Patel; K B Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Electronic band structure calculations are performed for the BeZn1−Te (0 ≤ ≤ 1 in steps of 0.2) alloys following the empirical pseudopotential method. The alloying effects are modelled through the modified virtual crystal approximation. Throughout the composition, valence band maximum resides at the point. The conduction band minimum, however, shifts from to point of symmetry when = 0.27. The observed crossover from direct to indirect bandgap is well in accordance with the experimental observations. Effect of alloying on the density of states is also discussed. The charge density distribution along a few major planes is computed and discussed. The electronic band structure related parameters like bandwidths, bandgaps and ionicity are reported and compared with experimental data wherever available. We also give estimates of cohesive energy and bulk modulus for the alloys.

  18. Density functional theory for the description of charge-transfer processes at TTF/TCNQ interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Van Regemorter, Tanguy

    2012-09-15

    In the field of organic electronics, a central issue is to assess how the frontier electronic levels of two adjacent organic layers align with respect to one another at the interface. This alignment can be driven by the presence of a partial charge transfer and the formation of an interface dipole; it plays a key role for instance in determining the rates of exciton dissociation or exciton formation in organic solar cells or light-emitting diodes, respectively. Reliably modeling the processes taking place at these interfaces remains a challenge for the computational chemistry community. Here, we review our recent theoretical work on the influence of the choice of density functional theory (DFT) methodology on the description of the charge-transfer character in the ground state of TTF/ TCNQ model complexes and interfaces. Starting with the electronic properties of the isolated TTF and TCNQ molecules and then considering the charge transfer and resulting interface dipole in TTF/TCNQ donor-acceptor stacks and bilayers, we examine the impact of the choice of DFT functional in describing the interfacial electronic structure. Finally, we employ computations based on periodic boundary conditions to highlight the impact of depolarization effects on the interfacial dipole moment. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  19. Dissipative particle dynamics for systems with high density of charges: Implementation of electrostatic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, A. A.; Chertovich, A. V.; Kramarenko, E. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the question of how to introduce electrostatic interactions in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method in order to correctly reproduce the properties of systems with high density of charges, including those with inhomogeneous charge distribution. To this end, we formulate general requirements for the electrostatic force in DPD and propose a new functional form of the force which suits better for satisfying these requirements than the previously used ones. In order to verify the proposed model, we study the problem of a single polyelectrolyte chain collapse and compare the results with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which the exact Coulomb force is used. We show that an excellent quantitative agreement between MD and DPD models is observed if the length parameter D of the proposed electrostatic force is chosen properly; the recommendations concerning the choice of this parameter value are given based on the analysis of a polyelectrolyte chain collapse behavior. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of DPD with the proposed electrostatic force to studying microphase separation phenomenon in polyelectrolyte melts and show that the same values of D as in the case of single chain collapse should be used, thus indicating universality of the model. Due to the charge correlation attraction, a long-range order in such melts can be observed even at zero Flory-Huggins parameter.

  20. Charged-particle rapidity density in Au+Au collisions in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Yao, Tao; Xie, Qu-Bing

    2007-03-01

    Rapidity/pseudorapidity densities for charged particles and their centrality, rapidity, and energy dependence in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a quark combination model. Using a Gaussian-type rapidity distribution for constituent quarks as a result of Landau hydrodynamic evolution, the data at sNN=130,200 GeV at various centralities in full pseudorapidity range are well described, and the charged-particle multiplicities are reproduced as functions of the number of participants. The energy dependence of the shape of the dNch/dη distribution is also described at various collision energies sNN=200,130,62.4 GeV in central collisions with same value of parameters except 19.6 GeV. The calculated rapidity distributions and yields for the charged pions and kaons in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration.

  1. Surface electrochemical properties of red mud (bauxite residue): zeta potential and surface charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravendra; Ming, Hui

    2013-03-15

    The surface electrochemical properties of red mud (bauxite residue) from different alumina refineries in Australia and China were studied by electrophoresis and measuring surface charge density obtained from acid/base potentiometric titrations. The electrophoretic properties were measured from zeta potentials obtained in the presence of 0.01 and 0.001 M KNO(3) over a wide pH range (3.5-10) by titration. The isoelectric point (IEP) values were found to vary from 6.35 to 8.70 for the red mud samples. Further investigation into the surface charge density of one sample (RRM) by acid/base potentiometric titration showed similar results for pH(PZC) with pH(IEP) obtained from electrokinetic measurements. The pH(IEP) determined from zeta potential measurements can be used as a characteristic property of red mud. The minerals contained in red mud contributed to the different values of pH(IEP) of samples obtained from different refineries. Different relationships of pH(IEP) with Al/Fe and Al/Si ratios (molar basis) were also found for different red mud samples.

  2. In situ unravelling structural modulation across the charge-density-wave transition in vanadium disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xu; Yao, Tao; Hu, Zhenpeng; Guo, Yuqiao; Liu, Qinghua; Wei, Shiqiang; Wu, Changzheng

    2015-05-28

    A deep understanding of the relationship between electronic and structure ordering across the charge-density-wave (CDW) transition is crucial for both fundamental study and technological applications. Herein, using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy coupled with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), we have illustrated the atomic-level information on the local structural evolution across the CDW transition and its influence on the intrinsic electrical properties in VS2 system. The structure transformation, which is highlighted by the formation of vanadium trimers with derivation of V-V bond length (ΔR = 0.10 Å), was clearly observed across the CDW process. Moreover, the corresponding influence of lattice variation on the electronic behavior was clearly characterized by experimental results as well as theoretical analysis, which demonstrated that vanadium trimers drive the deformation of space charge density distribution into √3 ×√3 periodicity, with the conductivity of a1g band reducing by half. These observations directly unveiled the close connection between lattice evolution and electronic property variation, paving a new avenue for understanding the intrinsic nature of electron-lattice interactions in the VS2 system and other isostructural transition metal dichalcogenides across the CDW transition process.

  3. Superficial Collagen Fibril Modulus and Pericellular Fixed Charge Density Modulate Chondrocyte Volumetric Behaviour in Early Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Tanska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if the experimentally detected altered chondrocyte volumetric behavior in early osteoarthritis can be explained by changes in the extracellular and pericellular matrix properties of cartilage. Based on our own experimental tests and the literature, the structural and mechanical parameters for normal and osteoarthritic cartilage were implemented into a multiscale fibril-reinforced poroelastic swelling model. Model simulations were compared with experimentally observed cell volume changes in mechanically loaded cartilage, obtained from anterior cruciate ligament transected rabbit knees. We found that the cell volume increased by 7% in the osteoarthritic cartilage model following mechanical loading of the tissue. In contrast, the cell volume decreased by 4% in normal cartilage model. These findings were consistent with the experimental results. Increased local transversal tissue strain due to the reduced collagen fibril stiffness accompanied with the reduced fixed charge density of the pericellular matrix could increase the cell volume up to 12%. These findings suggest that the increase in the cell volume in mechanically loaded osteoarthritic cartilage is primarily explained by the reduction in the pericellular fixed charge density, while the superficial collagen fibril stiffness is suggested to contribute secondarily to the cell volume behavior.

  4. Superconductivity and Charge Density Wave in ZrTe3-xSex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangde; Ning, Wei; Li, Lijun; Ling, Langsheng; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Jinglei; Wang, Kefeng; Liu, Yu; Pi, Li; Ma, Yongchang; Du, Haifeng; Tian, Minglian; Sun, Yuping; Petrovic, Cedomir; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-06-02

    Charge density wave (CDW), the periodic modulation of the electronic charge density, will open a gap on the Fermi surface that commonly leads to decreased or vanishing conductivity. On the other hand superconductivity, a commonly believed competing order, features a Fermi surface gap that results in infinite conductivity. Here we report that superconductivity emerges upon Se doping in CDW conductor ZrTe3 when the long range CDW order is gradually suppressed. Superconducting critical temperature Tc(x) in ZrTe3-xSex (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) increases up to 4 K plateau for 0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.07. Further increase in Se content results in diminishing Tc and filametary superconductivity. The CDW modes from Raman spectra are observed in x = 0.04 and 0.1 crystals, where signature of ZrTe3 CDW order in resistivity vanishes. The electronic-scattering for high Tc crystals is dominated by local CDW fluctuations at high temperatures, the resistivity is linear up to highest measured T = 300 K and contributes to substantial in-plane anisotropy.

  5. Characterization of the internal ion environment of biofilms based on charge density and shape of ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Andi; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Eda, Shima; Morisaki, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm polymers contain both electrically positively and negatively charged sites. These charged sites enable the biofilm to trap and retain ions leading to an important role of biofilm such as nutrient recycling and pollutant purification. Much work has focused on the ion-exchange capacity of biofilms, and they are known to adsorb ions through an exchange mechanism between the ions in solution and the ions adsorbed to the charged sites on the biofilm polymer. However, recent studies suggest that the adsorption/desorption behavior of ions in a biofilm cannot be explained solely by this ion exchange mechanism. To examine the possibility that a substantial amount of ions are held in the interstitial region of the biofilm polymer by an electrostatic interaction, intact biofilms formed in a natural environment were immersed in distilled water and ion desorption was investigated. All of the detected ion species were released from the biofilms over a short period of time, and very few ions were subsequently released over more time, indicating that the interstitial region of biofilm polymers is another ion reserve. The extent of ion retention in the interstitial region of biofilms for each ion can be determined largely by charge density, |Z|/r, where |Z| is the ion valence as absolute value and r is the ion radius. The higher |Z|/r value an ion has, the stronger it is retained in the interstitial region of biofilms. Ion shape is also a key determinant of ion retention. Spherical and non-spherical ions have different correlations between the condensation ratio and |Z|/r. The generality of these findings were assured by various biofilm samples. Thus, the internal regions of biofilms exchange ions dynamically with the outside environment.

  6. Calculation of polarization and bound charge density inside a dielectric material in triboelectric nanogenerators: Analytical and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeongMin; Ha, Jaewook; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2016-11-01

    We analytically calculated polarization and bound charge density inside the dielectric material in metal-to-dielectric-mode triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) where the transferred charges are collected on the bottom metal via electrostatic induction from the triboelectric charges that are generated by frictional contact. This bound charge density is associated with the surface density of states (DOS), overline{Ns(E)}. Two cases are considered here: i) for overline{Ns(E)} ≫ 1, it is calculated that the bound charge density is proportional to the dielectric constant and the work function difference between the two materials, but inversely proportional to the thickness of the dielectric material (ɛ0(ɛ2-1) (E0-W)/e \\cdot d2); ii) for overline{Ns(E)} ≪ 1 with constant overline{Ns(E)}, the bound charge density is mostly proportional to the work function difference between the materials, and inversely proportional to the thickness of the dielectric material ((ɛ2-1)x/d_{2+\\varepsilon2\\cdot x} \\cdot Ns(E)\\cdot e\\cdot (E0-W)).

  7. Adsorption of weak polyelectrolytes on charged nanoparticles. Impact of salt valency, pH, and nanoparticle charge density. Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnal, Fabrice; Stoll, Serge

    2011-10-27

    Complex formation between a weak flexible polyelectrolyte chain and one positively charged nanoparticle in presence of explicit counterions and salt particles is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of parameters such as the nanoparticle surface charge density, salt valency, and solution property such as the pH on the chain protonation/deprotonation process and monomer adsorption at the nanoparticle surface are systematically investigated. It is shown that the nanoparticle presence significantly modifies chain acid/base and polyelectrolyte conformational properties. The importance of the attractive electrostatic interactions between the chain and the nanoparticle clearly promotes the chain deprotonation leading, at high pH and nanoparticle charge density, to fully wrapped polyelectrolyte at the nanoparticle surface. When the nanoparticle bare charge is overcompensated by the polyelectrolyte charges, counterions and salt particles condense at the surface of the polyelectrolyte-nanoparticle complex to compensate for the excess of charges providing from the adsorbed polyelectrolyte chain. It is also shown that the complex formation is significantly affected by the salt valency. Indeed, with the presence of trivalent salt cations, competition is observed between the nanoparticle and the trivalent cations. As a result, the amount of adsorbed monomers is less important than in the monovalent and divalent case and chain conformations are different due to the collapse of polyelectrolyte segments around trivalent cations out of the nanoparticle adsorption layer.

  8. Management of deep brain stimulator battery failure: battery estimators, charge density, and importance of clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihan Fakhar

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. BACKGROUND: Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator. METHODS: A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002-2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY. RESULTS: The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson's disease was 7.2 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 3.82, for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 8.53, for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.85, and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.35. There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r = -.59, p<.001, as well as total power and battery life (r = -.64, p<.001. The UF estimator (r = .67, p<.001 and the Medtronic helpline (r = .74, p<.001 predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r = .65 and r = .70, respectively, both p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain.

  9. On the Control of the Fixed Charge Densities in Al2O3-Based Silicon Surface Passivation Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Daniel K; Jordan, Paul M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Dirnstorfer, Ingo

    2015-12-30

    A controlled field-effect passivation by a well-defined density of fixed charges is crucial for modern solar cell surface passivation schemes. Al2O3 nanolayers grown by atomic layer deposition contain negative fixed charges. Electrical measurements on slant-etched layers reveal that these charges are located within a 1 nm distance to the interface with the Si substrate. When inserting additional interface layers, the fixed charge density can be continuously adjusted from 3.5 × 10(12) cm(-2) (negative polarity) to 0.0 and up to 4.0 × 10(12) cm(-2) (positive polarity). A HfO2 interface layer of one or more monolayers reduces the negative fixed charges in Al2O3 to zero. The role of HfO2 is described as an inert spacer controlling the distance between Al2O3 and the Si substrate. It is suggested that this spacer alters the nonstoichiometric initial Al2O3 growth regime, which is responsible for the charge formation. On the basis of this charge-free HfO2/Al2O3 stack, negative or positive fixed charges can be formed by introducing additional thin Al2O3 or SiO2 layers between the Si substrate and this HfO2/Al2O3 capping layer. All stacks provide very good passivation of the silicon surface. The measured effective carrier lifetimes are between 1 and 30 ms. This charge control in Al2O3 nanolayers allows the construction of zero-fixed-charge passivation layers as well as layers with tailored fixed charge densities for future solar cell concepts and other field-effect based devices.

  10. Superconductivity in the charge-density-wave state of the organic metal α- (BEDT-TTF)2 KHg (SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Biberacher, W.; Neumaier, K.; Schuberth, E.; Müller, H.

    2005-11-01

    The superconducting transition in the layered organic compound α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 has been studied in the two hydrostatic pressure regimes where a charge-density wave is either present or completely suppressed. Within the charge-density-wave state the experimental results reveal a network of weakly coupled superconducting regions. This is especially seen in a strong enhancement of the measured critical field and the corresponding positive curvature of its temperature dependence. Further, it is shown that on lowering the pressure into the density-wave state traces of a superconducting phase already start to appear at a much higher temperature.

  11. Possibility of charge density wave transition in a SrPt2Sb2 superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibuka, Soshi; Imai, Motoharu

    2016-04-27

    The first-order transition at T(0) =  270 K for the platinum-based SrPt2Sb2 superconductor was investigated using x-ray diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements. When polycrystalline SrPt2Sb2 was cooled down through T(0), the structure was transformed from monoclinic to a modulated orthorhombic structure, and no magnetic order was formed, which illustrates the possibility of a charge density wave (CDW) transition at T(0). SrPt2Sb2 can thus be a new example to examine the interplay of CDW and superconductivity in addition to SrPt2As2, BaPt2As2, and LaPt2Si2. It is unique that the average structure of the low-temperature phase has higher symmetry than that of the high-temperature phase.

  12. First measurements of charge carrier density and mobility of in-situ enriched 28Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Dwyer, K. J.; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    Magnetotransport in top gated Hall bar devices is investigated to characterize the electrical properties of in-situ enriched 28Si. Isotopically enriched 28Si is an ideal candidate for quantum information processing devices as the elimination of unpaired nuclear spins improves the fidelity of the quantum information. Using mass filtered ion beam deposition we, in-situ, enrich and deposit epitaxial 28Si, achieving several orders of magnitude better enrichment compared to other techniques. In order to explore the electrical properties and optimize the growth conditions of in-situ enriched 28Si we perform magnetotransport measurements on top gated Hall bar devices at temperatures ranging from 300 K to cryogenic temperatures and at moderate magnetic fields. Here, we report on the charge carrier density and mobility extracted from such experiments, and will be compared among different growth conditions of in-situ enriched 28Si.

  13. Non-thermal separation of electronic and structural orders in a persisting charge density wave

    CERN Document Server

    Porer, M; Ménard, J -M; Dachraoui, H; Mouchliadis, L; Perakis, I E; Heinzmann, U; Demsar, J; Rossnagel, K; Huber, R

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous ordering of different degrees of freedom in complex materials undergoing spontaneous symmetry-breaking transitions often involves intricate couplings that have remained elusive in phenomena as wide ranging as stripe formation, unconventional superconductivity or colossal magnetoresistance. Ultrafast optical, x-ray and electron pulses can elucidate the microscopic interplay between these orders by probing the electronic and lattice dynamics separately, but a simultaneous direct observation of multiple orders on the femtosecond scale has been challenging. Here we show that ultrabroadband terahertz pulses can simultaneously trace the ultrafast evolution of coexisting lattice and electronic orders. For the example of a charge-density-wave (CDW) in 1T-TiSe2, we demonstrate that two components of the CDW order parameter - excitonic correlations and a periodic lattice distortion (PLD) - respond very differently to 12-fs optical excitation. Even when the excitonic order of the CDW is quenched, the PL...

  14. $\\eta^\\prime$ meson mass from topological charge density correlator in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Cossu, G; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Noaki, J

    2015-01-01

    The flavor-singlet component of the eta prime meson is related to the topological structure of the SU(3) gauge field through the chiral anomaly. We perform a 2+1-flavor lattice QCD calculation and demonstrate that the two-point function of a gluonically defined topological charge density after a short Yang-Mills gradient flow contains the propagation of the eta prime meson, by showing that its mass in the chiral and continuum limit is consistent with the experimental value. The gluonic correlator does not suffer from the contamination of the pion contribution, and the clean signal is obtained at significantly lower numerical cost compared to the conventional method with the quark bilinear operators.

  15. Thermodynamic and critical properties of the charge density wave system ErTe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Paul, M.; Remenyi, G.; Guttin, C.; Lejay, P.; Monceau, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present specific heat and ultrasonic measurements on the rare earth tritelluride ErTe3 compound. Thermodynamic anomalies are observed at the upper charge density wave (CDW) phase transition TCDW1=265 K and the second one at TCDW2=155 K. Similar critical behaviors are found at both CDW phase transitions and that we tentatively described in terms of the 3D XY model. Different anisotropic stress dependences ∂TCDW1 / ∂σii and ∂TCDW2 / ∂σii are found at the two successive CDW phase transitions. Magnitude of the elastic constant anomalies at TCDW2 is ten times smaller than that at TCDW1. Anomalies in the elastic constants at the upper CDW TCDW1 exhibit two dimensional features in the layer planes while in contrast a three dimensional behavior is observed at TCDW2.

  16. Finite-size effects in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with a charge-density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev-Zotov, Sergei V [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies of finite-size effects in charge-density wave conductors are reviewed. Various manifestations of finite-size effects, including the transverse-size dependence of the nonlinear-conduction threshold field, the Peierls transition temperature, high-frequency conduction, and the relaxation rates of metastable states, are discussed. Resistivity jumps in thin samples, the smeared threshold field for nonlinear conduction, and threshold conduction above the Peierls transition temperature are considered, as are mesoscopic oscillations of the threshold field, one-dimensional conduction in thin crystals, absolute negative conductivity of quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the length dependence of the phase-slip voltage, and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in sliding CDWs. Problems yet to be solved are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Spin-charge and spin-orbital separations in density-functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is known that the separation of electrons into spinons and chargons, the spin-charge separation, plays a decisive role when describing strongly correlated one-dimensional (1D) Friedel oscillations. Here, we extend the investigation by considering a third electron fractionalization: the separation into spinons and orbitons. Specifically, we deal with two exact constraints of exchange-correlation (XC) density-functionals: (i) The constancy of the highest occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues upon fractional electron numbers, and (ii) their discontinuities at integers. By means of 1D Hubbard chains, we show that spin-orbital separation can be decisive when dealing with derivative discontinuities of XC potentials, especially at strong correlations.

  18. Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

  19. Central depressions in the charge density profiles of the nuclei around $^{46}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jun Ling; Long, Wen Hui

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of the proton bubble-like structure has been studied within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) and relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theories by exploring the bulk properties, the charge density profiles and single proton spectra of argon isotopes and $N = 28$ isotones. It is found that the RHFB calculations with PKA1 effective interaction, which can properly reproduce the charge radii of argon isotopes and the $Z=16$ proton shell nearby, do not support the occurrence of the proton bubble-like structure in argon isotopes due to the prediction of deeper bound proton orbit $\\pi2s_{1/2}$ than $\\pi1d_{3/2}$. For $N = 28$ isotones, $^{42}$Si and $^{40}$Mg are predicted by both RHFB and RHB models to have the proton bubble-like structure, owing to the large gap between the proton $\\pi2s_{1/2}$ and $\\pi1d_{5/2}$ orbits, namely the $Z=14$ proton shell. Therefore, $^{42}$Si is proposed as the potential candidate of proton bubble nucleus, which has longer life-time than $^{40}$Mg.

  20. The amplitudes and the structure of the charge density wave in YBCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkov, Y. A.; Sushkov, O. P.

    2016-10-01

    We find unknown s- and d-wave amplitudes of the recently discovered charge density wave (CDW) in underdoped cuprates. To do so we perform a combined analysis of experimental data for ortho-II YBa2Cu3Oy. The analysis includes data on nuclear magnetic resonance, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering, and hard X-ray diffraction. The amplitude of doping modulation found in our analysis is 3.5 · 10‑3 in a low magnetic field and T = 60 K, the amplitude is 6.5 · 10‑3 in a magnetic field of 30T and T = 1.3 K. The values are in units of elementary charge per unit cell of a CuO2 plane. We show that the data rule out a checkerboard pattern, and we also show that the data might rule out mechanisms of the CDW which do not include phonons.

  1. Phase transitions to dipolar clusters and charge density waves in high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, M.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2017-02-01

    We show that doping of hole charge carriers leads to formation of electric dipolar clusters in cuprates. They are created by many-body interactions between the dopant ion outside and holes inside the CuO planes. Because of the two-fold degeneracy holes in the CuO plane cluster into four-particles resonance valence bond plaquettes bound with dopant ions. Such dipoles may order into charge-density waves (CDW) or stripes or form a disordered state depending on doping and temperature. The lowest energy of the ordered system corresponds to a local anti-ferroelectric ordering. The mobility of individual disordered dipoles is very low at low temperatures and they prefer first to bind into dipole-dipole pairs. Electromagnetic radiation interacts strongly with electric dipoles and when the sample is subjected to it the mobility changes significantly. This leads to a fractal growth of dipolar clusters. The existence of electric dipoles and CDW induce two phase transitions with increasing temperature, melting of the ordered state and disappearance of the dipolar state. Ferroelectricity at low doping is a natural consequence of such dipole moments. We develop a theory based on two-level systems and dipole-dipole interaction to explain the behavior of the polarization as a function of temperature and electric field.

  2. High-resolution synchrotron data collection for charge-density work at 100 and 20 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Peter; Messerschmidt, Marc; Scheins, Stephan; Wagner, Armin

    2004-09-01

    For the measurement of very accurate high-resolution X-ray data for charge-density work, synchrotron beamlines provide a bright radiation source of outstanding properties. Most important are the very high primary intensity and the possibility of choosing hard radiation with lambda approximately 0.5 A or even shorter. This together with area detection and a stable low-temperature device means that accurate and large data sets can be measured in a short time. A number of data collections are reported, which were carried out at the beamlines F1 and D3 of Hasylab (DESY, Hamburg) first at 100 K and later at 15-20 K, demonstrating the quality of the measured intensities. A low temperature of around 20 K was obtained at beamline D3 with a double-stage closed-cycle helium cryostat where the standard beryllium cylinder of the vacuum chamber was replaced by a 0.1 mm Kapton film. Comparison of different data sets measured for a strychnine crystal demonstrated how I/sigma ratios favorably improve if synchrotron radiation at a low temperature of 15 K was used. Synchrotron-based studies on several biologically active compounds are briefly summarized and a synchrotron experiment of an otherwise not sufficiently diffracting crystal of a tetraphenyl barbaralane derivative is described in detail. Atomic volumes and charges of a highly substituted C(60) fullerene are reported derived from a synchrotron data set of more than 350000 reflections.

  3. Structure-dependent charge density as a determinant of antimicrobial activity of peptide analogues of defensin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Liu, Shouping; Jiang, Ping; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jing; Tang, Charles; Verma, Chandra; Mu, Yuguang; Beuerman, Roger W; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2009-08-01

    Defensins are small (3-5 kDa) cysteine-rich cationic proteins found in both vertebrates and invertebrates constituting the front line of host innate immunity. Despite intensive research, bactericidal and cytotoxic mechanisms of defensins are still largely unknown. Moreover, we recently demonstrated that small peptides derived from defensins are even more potent bactericidal agents with less toxicity toward host cells. In this paper, structures of three C-terminal (R36-K45) analogues of human beta-defensin-3 were studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Because of indications that these peptides might target the inner bacterial membrane, they were reconstituted in dodecylphosphocholine or dodecylphosphocholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] mixed micelles, and lipid bicelles mimicking the phospholipid-constituted bilayer membrane of mammalian and bacterial cells. The results show that the binding affinity and partitioning into the lipid phase and the ability to dimerize and accrete well-defined structures upon interactions with lipid membranes contribute to compactization of positive charges within peptide oligomers. The peptide charge density, mediated by corresponding three-dimensional structures, was found to directly correlate with the antimicrobial activity. These novel observations may provide a new rationale for the design of improved antimicrobial agents.

  4. Calculations of current densities for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes using effective core potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhalahti, Markus; Taubert, Stefan; Sundholm, Dage; Liégeois, Vincent

    2017-03-08

    Magnetically induced current density susceptibilities and ring-current strengths have been calculated for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes C6X6 and C6X6(2+) with X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, SeH, SeMe, TeH, TeMe, and SbH2. The current densities have been calculated using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method, which has been interfaced to the Gaussian electronic structure code rendering current density calculations using effective core potentials (ECP) feasible. Relativistic effects on the ring-current strengths have been assessed by employing ECP calculations of the current densities. Comparison of the ring-current strengths obtained in calculations on C6At6 and C6At6(2+) using relativistic and non-relativistic ECPs show that scalar relativistic effects have only a small influence on the ring-current strengths. Comparisons of the ring-current strengths and ring-current profiles show that the C6I6(2+), C6At6(2+), C6(SeH)6(2+), C6(SeMe)6(2+), C6(TeH)6(2+), C6(TeMe)6(2+), and C6(SbH2)6(2+) dications are doubly aromatic sustaining spatially separated ring currents in the carbon ring and in the exterior of the molecule. The C6I6(+) radical cation is also found to be doubly aromatic with a weaker ring current than obtained for the dication.

  5. Monodisperse TiO2 Spheres with High Charge Density and Their Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongbo; Wu, Suli; Su, Xin; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) spheres are potential candidates to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals owing to their high refractive index and low absorption in the visible and near-infrared regions. Here, TiO2 spheres with both high surface charge density and uniform size, which are necessary for the self-assembly of TiO2 spheres, have been prepared by means of sol-gel methods in ethanol in the presence of thioglycolic acid as ligand. Thioglycolic acid, which contains two functional groups, not only acts as coordinating ligand for stabilizing and controlling the growth of TiO2 spheres but also endows the resulting TiO2 spheres with high charge density as based on ζ-potential analysis when the pH of the TiO2 aqueous dispersion was 6.5 or higher. The SEM images illustrate that the diameter of the prepared TiO2 spheres can be tuned from 100 to 300 nm by simply controlling the concentration of H2 O. FTIR spectra confirm that thioglycolic acid bonded to the surface of TiO2 spheres through carboxylic groups. As anticipated, the obtained TiO2 spheres could self-assemble to form a 3D opal photonic crystal structure by means of a simple gravity sedimentation method. Then the TiO2 spheres in the 3D opal photonic crystal structure were able to transform into a pure anatase phase by annealing at different temperatures.

  6. Charge-Density-Excitation Spectrum in the t-t'-J-V Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Andrés; Yamase, Hiroyuki; Bejas, Matías

    2017-03-01

    We study the density-density correlation function in a large-N scheme of the t-t'-J-V model. When the nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction V is zero, our model exhibits phase separation in a wide doping region and we obtain large spectral weight near momentum q = (0,0) at low energy, which originates from the proximity to phase separation. These features are much stronger for electron doping than for hole doping. However, once phase separation is suppressed by including a finite V, the low-energy spectral weight around q = (0,0) is substantially suppressed. Instead a sharp zero-sound mode is stabilized above the particle-hole continuum. We discuss that the presence of a moderate value of V, which is frequently neglected in the t-J model, is important to understand low-energy charge excitations especially close to q = (0,0) for electron doping. This insight should be taken into account in a future study of x-ray scattering measurements.

  7. First principles study on the charge density and the bulk modulus of the transition metals and their carbides and nitrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng-Bin; Li Ming-Kai; Yin Dong; Liu Fu-Qing; Fan Xiang-Jun

    2005-01-01

    A first principles study of the electronic properties and bulk modulus (B0) of the fcc and bcc transition metals,transition metal carbides and nitrides is presented. The calculations were performed by plane-wave pseudopotential method in the framework of the density functional theory with local density approximation. The density of states and the valence charge densities of these solids are plotted. The results show that B0 does not vary monotonically when the number of the valence d electrons increases. B0 reaches a maximum and then decreases for each of the four sorts of solids. It is related to the occupation of the bonding and anti-bonding states in the solid. The value of the valence charge density at the midpoint between the two nearest metal atoms tends to be proportional to B0.

  8. Incorrect diatomic dissociation in variational reduced density matrix theory arises from the flawed description of fractionally charged atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aggelen, Helen; Bultinck, Patrick; Verstichel, Brecht; Van Neck, Dimitri; Ayers, Paul W

    2009-07-21

    The behaviour of diatomic molecules is examined using the variational second-order density matrix method under the P, Q and G conditions. It is found that the method describes the dissociation limit incorrectly, with fractional charges on the well-separated atoms. This can be traced back to the behaviour of the energy versus the number of electrons for the isolated atoms. It is shown that the energies for fractional charges are much too low.

  9. Linear and angular momentum of electromagnetic fields generated by an arbitrary distribution of charge and current densities at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Thidé, B; Then, H; Tamburini, F

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Stratton-Panofsky-Phillips-Jefimenko equations for the electric and magnetic fields generated by completely arbitrary charge and current density distributions at rest, we derive far-zone approximations for the fields, containing all components, dominant as well as sub-dominant. Using these approximate formulas, we derive general formulas for the total electromagnetic linear momentum and angular momentum, valid at large distances from arbitrary, non-moving charge and current sources.

  10. Transport studies of ions across polystyrene based composite membrane: Evaluation of fixed charge density using theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imteyaz, Shahla; Rafiuddin

    2016-11-01

    Polystyrene (PS) dispersed tin molybdate (TM) composite was prepared by sol-gel method. The membrane was characterized for its thermal stability by TG-DTA. SEM reveals the formation of composite material with uniform surface morphology. Crystallinity and phosphorylation of the membrane was confirmed by X-RD and FT-IR. Membrane potential of different monovalent electrolytes with varying concentration followed the order LiCl > NaCl > NH4Cl > KCl. Membrane potential increases with dilution of electrolytes confirming it to be cation selective in nature. The theoretical value of fixed charge density for the membrane was also evaluated from membrane potential using different approaches proposed by (a) Teorell-Meyer-Sievers (b) Kobatake and (c) Nagasawa, which are comparable with the experimental values. Fixed charge density examined for the electrolytes follows the order LiCl > NaCl > NH4Cl > KCl. Li+ ion shows highest value of fixed charge density in all the methods as the Donnan exclusion is highest for the electrolyte of smaller cation size. Transport number and mobility ratio for ion selectivity also increases with dilution. Membrane shows the lowest permselectivity for K+ while highest for Li+. The strong binding affinity of K+ counter-ion with fixed charge groups on the polymer decreases the membrane charge density and permselectivity. Thus, the membrane shows its applicability in various electro-membrane processes.

  11. Strain Tuning of the Charge Density Wave in Monolayer and Bilayer 1T-TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2015-12-07

    By first-principles calculations, we investigate the strain effects on the charge density wave states of monolayer and bilayer 1T-TaS2. The modified stability of the charge density wave in the monolayer is understood in terms of the strain dependent electron localization, which determines the distortion amplitude. On the other hand, in the bilayer the effect of strain on the interlayer interaction is also crucial. The rich phase diagram under strain opens new venues for applications of 1T-TaS2. We interpret the experimentally observed insulating state of bulk 1T-TaS2 as inherited from the monolayer by effective interlayer decoupling.

  12. Void structure and density change of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J. [Argonne National Lab., Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine void structure, distribution, and density changes of several promising vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the DHCE, and the results compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation was negligible.

  13. Time-dependent transition density matrix for visualizing charge-transfer excitations in photoexcited organic donor-acceptor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The time-dependent transition density matrix (TDM) is a useful tool to visualize and interpret the induced charges and electron-hole coherences of excitonic processes in large molecules. Combined with time-dependent density functional theory on a real-space grid (as implemented in the octopus code), the TDM is a computationally viable visualization tool for optical excitation processes in molecules. It provides real-time maps of particles and holes which gives information on excitations, in particular those that have charge-transfer character, that cannot be obtained from the density alone. Some illustration of the TDM and comparison with standard density difference plots will be shown for photoexcited organic donor-acceptor molecules. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1005651

  14. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  15. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  16. Magnon-phonon coupling and implications for charge-density wave states and superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity of copper oxides (cuprates) remains unsolved puzzle in condensed matter physics. The cuprates represent extremely complicated system, showing fascinating variety of quantum phenomena and rich phase diagram as a function of doping. In the suggested "superconducting glue" mechanisms, phonon and spin excitations are invoked most frequently, and it appears that only spin excitations cover the energy scale required to justify very high transition temperature Tc ˜ 165 K (as in mercury-based triple layer cuprates compressed to 30 GPa). It appears that pressure is quite important variable helping to boost the Tc record by almost 30°. Pressure may be also considered as a clean tuning parameter, helping to understand the underlying balance of various energy scales and ordered states in cuprates. In this paper, a review of mostly our work on cuprates under pressure will be given, with the emphasis on the interactions between phonon and spin excitations. It appears that there is a strong coupling between superexchange interaction and stretching in-plane oxygen vibrations, which may give rise to a variety of complex phenomena, including the charge-density wave state intertwined with superconductivity and attracting a lot of interest recently.

  17. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  18. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  19. Mean field theory of charge-density wave state in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Pavel; Lyubshin, Dmitrij

    2005-03-01

    We develop a mean field theory of charge-density wave (CDW) state in magnetic field and study properties of this state below the transition temperature. We show that the CDW state with shifted wave vector in high magnetic field (CDWx phase) has a double harmonic modulation on the most part of the phase diagram. At perfect nesting the single harmonic CDW state with shifted wave vector exists only in a very narrow region near the triple point. We show that the transition from CDW0 to CDWx state below the critical temperature is accompanied by a jump of the CDW order parameter and of the CDW wave vector rather than by their continuous increase. This implies a first order transition between these CDW states and explains a strong hysteresis accompanying this transition. The similarities between CDW in high magnetic field and nonuniform LOFF superconducting phase are pointed out. Our investigation provides a theoretical description for recent experiments on organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 and other compounds. In particular, we explain the higher value of the kink transition field and provide the calculation of the phase diagram in the case of perfect nesting.

  20. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.; Holmes, A. T.; Christensen, N. B.; Hücker, M.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Rütt, U.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Forgan, E. M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ~0.123, we find that a field (B~10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction at B~15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry of individual bilayers is broken by the CDW at low and high fields, allowing Fermi surface reconstruction, as recently suggested.

  1. Ideal charge-density-wave order in the high-field state of superconducting YBCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, H.; Lee, W.-S.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Nie, L.; Maharaj, A. V.; Gerber, S.; Liu, Y.-J.; Mehta, A.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W. N.; Burns, C. A.; Islam, Z.; Song, S.; Hastings, J.; Devereaux, T. P.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kivelson, S. A.; Kao, C.-C.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J.-S.

    2016-12-01

    The existence of charge-density-wave (CDW) correlations in cuprate superconductors has now been established. However, the nature of the CDW ground state has remained uncertain because disorder and the presence of superconductivity typically limit the CDW correlation lengths to only a dozen unit cells or less. Here we explore the field-induced 3D CDW correlations in extremely pure detwinned crystals of YBa2Cu3O2 (YBCO) ortho-II and ortho-VIII at magnetic fields in excess of the resistive upper critical field (Hc2Hc2) where superconductivity is heavily suppressed. We observe that the 3D CDW is unidirectional and possesses a long in-plane correlation length as well as significant correlations between neighboring CuO2 planes. It is significant that we observe only a single sharply defined transition at a critical field proportional to Hc2Hc2, given that the field range used in this investigation overlaps with other high-field experiments including quantum oscillation measurements. The correlation volume is at least two to three orders of magnitude larger than that of the zero-field CDW. This is by far the largest CDW correlation volume observed in any cuprate crystal and so is presumably representative of the high-field ground state of an “ideal” disorder-free cuprate.

  2. First-principles studies on the charge density wave in uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ruizhi; Lu, Haiyan; Ao, Bingyun; Tang, Tao; Chen, Piheng

    2016-06-01

    The charge density wave (CDW) state of α-U (called {α1} -U) was studied through a first-principles total-energy minimization using the conjugate gradient algorithm. The optimized crystal structure of {α1} -U was found to have the space group Pbnm, which was proposed in the earlier Landau-type theory and is isostructural with the α-Np structure. In particular, the changes in the lattice parameters of Pbnm-U with respect to α-U are consistent with the experimental observations. In addition, the energetic stability of Pbnm-U with respect to α-U was confirmed by enthalpy calculations, and the value of the critical pressure in the pressure-induced quantum transition from Pbnm-U to α-U is in good agreement with the experimental result. Moreover, the phonon calculation verified the dynamical instability of α-U and the stability of Pbnm-U. Finally, the calculated electronic structures exhibit features of the CDW state.

  3. Thickness dependent charge transfer states and dark carriers density in vacuum deposited small molecule organic photocell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Tzabari, Lior; Solomeshch, Olga; Tessler, Nir

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the influence of the active layer thickness on the balance of the internal mechanisms affecting the efficiency of copper phthalocyanine - fullerene (C60) based vacuum deposited bulk heterojunction organic photocell. We fabricated a range of devices for which we varied the thickness of the active layer from 40 to 120 nm and assessed their performance using optical and electrical characterization techniques. As reported previously for phthalocyanine:C60, the performance of the device is highly dependent on the active layer thickness and of all the thicknesses we tried, the 40 nm thin active layer device showed the best solar cell characteristic parameters. Using the transfer matrix based optical model, which includes interference effects, we calculated the optical power absorbed in the active layers for the entire absorption band, and we found that this cannot explain the trend with thickness. Measurement of the cell quantum efficiency as a function of light intensity showed that the relative weight of the device internal processes changes when going from 40 nm to 120 nm thick active layer. Electrical modeling of the device, which takes different internal processes into account, allowed to quantify the changes in the processes affecting the generation - recombination balance. Sub gap external quantum efficiency and morphological analysis of the surface of the films agree with the model's result. We found that as the thickness grows the density of charge transfer states and of dark carriers goes up and the uniformity in the vertical direction is reduced.

  4. Analysis of Interface Charge Densities for High-k Dielectric Materials based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, N. P.; Thakur, R. R.; Maity, Reshmi; Thapa, R. K.; Baishya, S.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the interface charge densities (Dit) are studied and analyzed for ultra thin dielectric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices using different high-k dielectric materials such as Al2O3, ZrO2 and HfO2. The Dit have been calculated by a new approach using conductance method and it indicates that by reducing the thickness of the oxide, the Dit increases and similar increase is also found by replacing SiO2 with high-k. For the same oxide thickness, SiO2 has the lowest Dit and found to be the order of 1011cm-2eV-1. Linear increase in Dit has been observed as the dielectric constant of the oxide increases. The Dit is found to be in good agreement with published fabrication results at p-type doping level of 1×1017cm-3. Numerical calculations and solutions are performed by MATLAB and device simulation is done by ATLAS.

  5. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R5Ir4Si10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2002-05-01

    We review the observation of novel charge density wave (CDW) transitions in ternary R5Ir4Si10 compounds. A high quality single crystal of Lu5Ir4Si10 shows the formation of a commensurate CDW along -axis below 80 K in the (ℎ, 0, ) plane that coexists with BCS type superconductivity below 3.9 K. However, in a single crystal of Er5Ir4Si10, one observes the development of a 1D-incommensurate CDW at 155 K, which then locks into a purely commensurate state below 55 K. The well-localized Er3 moments are antiferromagnetically ordered below 2.8 K which results in the coexistence of strongly coupled CDW with local moment antiferromagnetism in Er5Ir4Si10. Unlike conventional CDW systems, extremely sharp transition (width ∼ 1.5 K) in all bulk properties along with huge heat capacity anomalies in these compounds makes this CDW transition an interesting one.

  6. The electrostatic interaction of an external charged system with a metal surface: a simplified density functional theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivetti, Iván; Persson, Mats

    2013-09-01

    As a first step to meet the challenge to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of charged states of atoms and molecules adsorbed on ultrathin insulating films supported by a metallic substrate using density functional theory (DFT), we have developed a simplified new DFT scheme that only describes the electrostatic interaction of an external charged system with a metal surface. This purely electrostatic interaction is obtained from the assumption that the electron densities of the two fragments (charged system and metal surface) are non-overlapping and by neglecting non-local exchange-correlation effects such as the van der Waals interactions between the two fragments. In addition, the response of the metal surface to the electrostatic potential from the charged system is treated to linear order, whereas the charged system is treated fully within DFT. In particular, we consider the classical perfect conductor model for the metal response, although our formalism is not limited to this approximation. To test the computational implementation of this new scheme, we have considered the case of a Na+ cation interacting with a perfect conductor. The application of this new methodology to realistic problems involving charged systems adsorbed on insulating films supported by a metal surface are deferred to a separate following publication.

  7. Two-dimensional aligned-field magnetofluiddynamic flow. I Steady incompressible flow with non-zero charge density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.-L.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown that, in the case of non-zero charge density, the class of steady, plane, incompressible, aligned-fluid magnetofluiddynamic flows contains no rotational motions. Therefore, this class of flows is exhausted by the irrotational solutions of Kingston and Power.

  8. Dislocations as a boundary between charge density wave and oxygen rich phases in a cuprate high temperature superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Campi, Gaetano; Bianconi, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Multiple functional ionic and electronic orders are observed in high temperature superconducting cuprates. The charge density wave order is one of them and it is spatially localized in different regions of the material. It is also known that the oxygen interstitials introduced by chemical intercalation self-organize in different oxygen rich regions corresponding with hole rich regions in the CuO2 layers left empty by the charge density wave order domains. However, what happens in between these two orders is not known, and neither there is a method to control this spatial separation. Here we demonstrate by using scanning nano x-ray diffraction, that dislocations or grain boundaries in the material can act as boundary between charge density wave and oxygen rich phases in a optimally doped {{La}}2{{CuO}}4+y high temperature superconductor. Dislocations can be used therefore to control the anti-correlation of the charge density wave order with the oxygen interstitials in specific portion of the material.

  9. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Kettenis; L.G. Suttorp

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  10. SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION X-RAY-DIFFRACTION OF MODULATED STRUCTURES IN CHARGE-DENSITY-WAVE MATERIALS - APPLICATION TO NBSE3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSMAALEN, S; DEBOER, JL; COPPENS, P

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction has been performed on niobium triselenide at 20K. The modulation parameters belonging to both Charge-Density-Waves (CDW's) have been determined. The high-temperature CDW is found to comprise of displacements on all atoms of column III, as well as on Se atoms o

  11. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory(Ⅷ)——Charge polarization modes in a closed system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠志; 王长生

    2000-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory and the atom-bond electronegativity equalization model (ABEEM), a method is proposed to construct the softness matrix and to obtain the electron population normal modes (PNMs) for a closed system. Using this method the information about the bond charge polarization in a molecule can be obtained easily. The test calculation shows that the PNM obtained by this method includes all the modes about the bond charge polarization explicitly. And the bond charge polarization mode characterized by the biggest eigenvalue, which is the softest one of all modes related with chemical bonds, can describe the charge polarization process in a molecule as exquisitely as the corresponding ab initio method.

  12. Origin of charge density at LaAlO3-on-SrTiO3 heterointerfacespossibility of intrinsic doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemons, W.

    2010-04-29

    As discovered by Ohtomo et al., a large sheet charge density with high mobility exists at the interface between SrTiO{sub 3} and LaAlO{sub 3}. Based on transport, spectroscopic and oxygen-annealing experiments, we conclude that extrinsic defects in the form of oxygen vacancies introduced by the pulsed laser deposition process used by all researchers to date to make these samples is the source of the large carrier densities. Annealing experiments show a limiting carrier density. We also present a model that explains the high mobility based on carrier redistribution due to an increased dielectric constant.

  13. Multiple charge density wave transitions in the antiferromagnets R NiC2 (R =Gd ,Tb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, S.; Hayashi, C.; Hanasaki, N.; Ohnuma, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakao, H.; Mizumaki, M.; Onodera, H.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray scattering and electrical resistivity measurements were performed on GdNiC2 and TbNiC2. We found a set of satellite peaks characterized by q1=(0.5 ,η ,0 ) below T1, at which the resistivity shows a sharp inflection, suggesting the charge density wave (CDW) formation. The value of η decreases with decreasing temperature below T1, and then a transition to a commensurate phase with q1 C=(0.5 ,0.5 ,0 ) takes place. The diffuse scattering observed above T1 indicates the presence of soft phonon modes associated with CDW instabilities at q1 and q2=(0.5 ,0.5 ,0.5 ) . The long-range order given by q2 is developed in addition to that given by q1 C in TbNiC2, while the short-range correlation with q2 persists even at 6 K in GdNiC2. The amplitude of the q1 C lattice modulation is anomalously reduced below an antiferromagnetic transition temperature TN in GdNiC2. In contrast, the q2 order vanishes below TN in TbNiC2. We demonstrate that R NiC2 (R = rare earth) compounds exhibit similarities with respect to their CDW phenomena, and discuss the effects of magnetic transitions on CDWs. We offer a possible displacement pattern of the modulated structure characterized by q1 C and q2 in terms of frustration.

  14. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2011-11-28

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows the utilization of asymmetric contacts to describe the built-in potential within the device. The model has been applied to extract information of the distribution of traps from experimental current-voltage measurements of a rubrene single crystal from Krellner showing excellent agreement across several orders of magnitude in the current. Although the two contacts are made of the same metal, an energy offset of 580 meV between them, ascribed to differences in the deposition techniques (lamination vs evaporation) was essential to correctly interpret the shape of the current-voltage characteristics at low voltage. A band mobility of 0.13cm 2V-1s-1 for holes is estimated, which is consistent with transport along the long axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The total density of traps deeper than 0.1 eV was 2.2×1016cm -3. The sensitivity analysis and error estimation in the obtained parameters show that it is not possible to accurately resolve the shape of the trap distribution for energies deeper than 0.3 eV or shallower than 0.1 eV above the valence-band edge. The total number of traps deeper than 0.3 eV, however, can be estimated. Contact asymmetry and the diffusion component of the current play an important role in the description of the device at low bias and are required to obtain reliable information about the distribution of deep traps. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  15. Charge density wave order in 1D mirror twin boundaries of single-layer MoSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja, Sara; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Zhang, Yi; Ryu, Hyejin; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Wong, Ed; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We provide direct evidence for the existence of isolated, one-dimensional charge density waves at mirror twin boundaries (MTBs) of single-layer semiconducting MoSe2. Such MTBs have been previously observed by transmission electron microscopy and have been predicted to be metallic in MoSe2 and MoS2. Our low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements revealed a substantial bandgap of 100 meV opening at the Fermi energy in the otherwise metallic one-dimensional structures. We found a periodic modulation in the density of states along the MTB, with a wavelength of approximately three lattice constants. In addition to mapping the energy-dependent density of states, we determined the atomic structure and bonding of the MTB through simultaneous high-resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy. Density functional theory calculations based on the observed structure reproduced both the gap opening and the spatially resolved density of states.

  16. Form factors and transverse charge and magnetization densities in the hard-wall AdS/QCD model

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the flavor form factors in the framework of a hard-wall AdS/QCD model and compare with the available experimental data. We obtain the flavor form factors by decomposing the Dirac and Pauli form factors for the nucleons using the charge and isospin symmetry. Further, we present a detailed study of the flavor structures of the charge and anomalous magnetization densities in the transverse plane. Both the unpolarized and the transversely polarized nucleons are considered here. We compare the AdS/QCD results with two standard phenomenological parametrizations.

  17. Evaluation of intramolecular charge transfer state of 4-, -dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde using time-dependent density functional theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surajit Ghosh; K V S Girish; Subhadip Ghosh

    2013-07-01

    Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-,-dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde (DMACA) in vacuum and in five different aprotic solvents has been studied by using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Polarizable continuum model (PCM) was employed to consider solvent-solute interactions. The potential energy curves were constructed at different torsional angle of ,-dimethylamino moiety with respect to the adjacent phenyl ring. A large bathochromic shift in our calculated emission and absorption energies for polar solvents is a clear reminiscent of charge transfer nature of the excited state. Finally, the reported results are in agreement with experimental findings.

  18. First experimental charge density study using a Bruker CMOS-type PHOTON 100 detector: the case of ammonium tetraoxalate dihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N; Kamiński, Radosław; Dobrzycki, Lukasz; Cyrański, Michał K

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test the applicability of a Bruker AXS CMOS-type PHOTON 100 detector for the purpose of a fine charge density quality data collection. A complex crystal containing oxalic acid, ammonium oxalate and two water molecules was chosen as a test case. The data was collected up to a resolution of 1.31 Å(-1) with high completeness (89.1%; Rmrg = 0.0274). The multipolar refinement and subsequent quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis resulted in a comprehensive description of the charge density distribution in the crystal studied. The residual density maps are flat and almost featureless. It was possible to derive reliable information on intermolecular interactions to model the anharmonic motion of a water molecule, and also to observe the fine details of the charge density distribution, such as polarization on O and H atoms involved in the strongest hydrogen bonds. When compared with our previous statistical study on oxalic acid data collected with the aid of CCD cameras, the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detector can certainly be classified as a promising alternative in advanced X-ray diffraction studies.

  19. Full charge-density scheme with a kinetic-energy correction: Application to ground-state properties of the 4d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We present a full charge-density technique to evaluate total energies from the output of self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) calculations in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA). The Coulomb energy is calculated exactly from the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density def...

  20. Stripe and Short Range Order in the Charge Density Wave of 1 T -CuxTiSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novello, A. M.; Spera, M.; Scarfato, A.; Ubaldini, A.; Giannini, E.; Bowler, D. R.; Renner, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    We study the impact of Cu intercalation on the charge density wave (CDW) in 1 T -CuxTiSe2 by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Cu atoms, identified through density functional theory modeling, are found to intercalate randomly on the octahedral site in the van der Waals gap and to dope delocalized electrons near the Fermi level. While the CDW modulation period does not depend on Cu content, we observe the formation of charge stripe domains at low Cu content (x domains at higher Cu content. The latter shrink with increasing Cu concentration and tend to be phase shifted. These findings invalidate a proposed excitonic pairing as the primary CDW formation mechanism in this material.

  1. Charge density analysis of two proton transfer complexes: Understanding hydrogen bonding and determination of in-crystal dipole moments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reji Thomas; Shrinwantu Pal; Ayan Datta; Mariusz K Marchewka; Henryk Ratajczak; Swapan K Pati; G U Kulkarni

    2008-11-01

    An experimental charge density study has been carried out on proton-transfer complexes exhibiting nonlinear optical (NLO) properties-melaminium tartrate monohydrate and L-asparaginium picrate employing high-resolution X-ray diffraction at 100 K. Both the complexes crystallize in non-centric space group P21 and the structures exhibit interesting patterns of N-H…O and O-H…O hydrogen bonding. Experimental determination of the dipole moment () for the asymmetric unit reveals that for both the crystals, there is a large cooperative enhancement in the crystalline arising essentially due to hydrogen bond mediated charge transfer between the melaminium ion and the L-tartrate in one case, between the Lasparaginium ion and the picrate in the other complex. We have additionally performed theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (DFT) level to understand the origin of enhancement of the dipole moments in the two systems.

  2. Spin polarization driven by a charge-density wave in monolayer 1T−TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2014-08-06

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of monolayer T-phase TaS2. We demonstrate that a charge-density wave is energetically favorable at low temperature, similar to bulk 1T-TaS2. Electron-phonon coupling is found to be essential for the lattice reconstruction. The charge-density wave results in a strong localization of the electronic states near the Fermi level and consequently in spin polarization, transforming the material into a magnetic semiconductor with enhanced electronic correlations. The combination of inherent spin polarization with a semiconducting nature distinguishes the monolayer fundamentally from the bulk compound as well as from other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Monolayer T-phase TaS2 therefore has the potential to enable two-dimensional spintronics. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  3. Development and Application of a Wireless Sensor for Space Charge Density Measurement in an Ultra-High-Voltage, Direct-Current Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Encheng; Ju, Yong; Yuan, Haiwen

    2016-10-20

    A space charge density wireless measurement system based on the idea of distributed measurement is proposed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density in an ultra-high-voltage direct-current (UHVDC) environment. The proposed system architecture is composed of a number of wireless nodes connected with space charge density sensors and a base station. The space charge density sensor based on atmospheric ion counter method is elaborated and developed, and the ARM microprocessor and Zigbee radio frequency module are applied. The wireless network communication quality and the relationship between energy consumption and transmission distance in the complicated electromagnetic environment is tested. Based on the experimental results, the proposed measurement system demonstrates that it can adapt to the complex electromagnetic environment under the UHVDC transmission lines and can accurately measure the space charge density.

  4. Unconventional charge density wave in the organic conductor alpha-(BEDT-TTF)_2KHg(SCN)_4

    OpenAIRE

    Maki, Kazumi; Dóra, Balázs; Kartsovnik, Mark; Virosztek, Attila; Korin-Hamzic, Bojana; Basletic, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The low temperature phase (LTP) of alpha-(BEDT-TTF)_2KHg(SCN)_4 salt is known for its surprising angular dependent magnetoresistance (ADMR), which has been studied intensively in the last decade. However, the nature of the LTP has not been understood until now. Here we analyse theoretically ADMR in unconventional (or nodal) charge density wave (UCDW). In magnetic field the quasiparticle spectrum in UCDW is quantized, which gives rise to spectacular ADMR. The present model accounts for many st...

  5. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory (II) --Direct calculation of group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠志; 沈尔忠

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of a more precise expression of the atomic effective electronegativity deduced from the density functional theory and electronegativity equalization principle, a new scheme for calculating the group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group is proposed and programed, and various parameters of electronegativity and hardness are given for some common atoms. Through calculation, analysis and comparison of more than one hundred groups, it is shown that the results from this scheme are reasonable and may be extended.

  6. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the charge-density wave compound lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Borzi, R.A.; Rost, A.; Mackenzie, A.P.; /St. Andrews U., Phys. Astron.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; /Bristol U.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were measured in lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe{sub 3}) to probe the partially gapped Fermi surface resulting from charge density wave (CDW) formation. Three distinct frequencies were observed, one of which can be correlated with a FS sheet that is unaltered by CDW formation. The other two frequencies arise from FS sheets that have been reconstructed in the CDW state.

  7. Giant Nernst effect in the incommensurate charge density wave state of P4W12O44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolincio, Kamil K.; Daou, Ramzy; Pérez, Olivier; Guérin, Laurent; Fertey, Pierre; Pautrat, Alain

    2016-12-01

    We report the study of Nernst effect in quasi-low-dimensional tungsten bronze P4W12O44 showing a sequence of Peierls instabilities. We demonstrate that both condensation of the electronic carriers in the charge density wave state and the existence of high-mobility electrons and holes originating from the small pockets remaining in the incompletely nested Fermi surface give rise to a Nernst effect of a magnitude similar to that observed in heavy fermion compounds.

  8. A simplified density functional theory method for charged adsorbates on an ultrathin, insulating film supported by a metal substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Scivetti, Ivan; Persson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    A simplified density functional theory (DFT) method for charged adsorbates on an ultrathin, insulating film supported by a metal substrate is developed and presented. This new method is based on a previous DFT development that uses a perfect conductor (PC) model to approximate the electrostatic response of the metal substrate, while the film and the adsorbate are both treated fully within DFT [I. Scivetti and M. Persson, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 25, 355006 (2013)]. The missing int...

  9. Spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level in the metallic LaB6 through accurate X-ray charge density study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Charge densities of iso-structural metal hexaborides, a transparent metal LaB6 and a semiconductor BaB6, have been determined using the d > 0.22 Å ultra-high resolution synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction data by a multipole refinement and a maximum entropy method (MEM). The quality of the experimental charge densities was evaluated by comparison with theoretical charge densities. The strong inter-octahedral and relatively weak intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds were observed in the charge densities. A difference of valence charge densities between LaB6 and BaB6 was calculated to reveal a small difference between isostructural metal and semiconductor. The weak electron lobes distributed around the inter B6 octahedral bond were observed in the difference density. We found the electron lobes are the conductive π-electrons in LaB6 from the comparison with the theoretical valence charge density. We successfully observed a spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level from the X-ray charge density study of the series of iso-structural solids. PMID:28120900

  10. Mapping Optimal Charge Density and Length of ROMP-Based PTDMs for siRNA Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Leah M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-10-10

    A fundamental understanding of how polymer structure impacts internalization and delivery of biologically relevant cargoes, particularly small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA), is of critical importance to the successful design of improved delivery reagents. Herein we report the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) methods to synthesize two series of guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs): one based on an imide scaffold that contains one guanidinium moiety per repeat unit, and another based on a diester scaffold that contains two guanidinium moieties per repeat unit. By varying both the degree of polymerization and, in effect, the relative number of cationic charges in each PTDM, the performances of the two ROMP backbones for siRNA internalization were evaluated and compared. Internalization of fluorescently labeled siRNA into Jurkat T cells demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-siRNA internalization had a charge content dependence, with PTDMs containing approximately 40 to 60 cationic charges facilitating the most internalization. Despite this charge content dependence, the imide scaffold yielded much lower viabilities in Jurkat T cells than the corresponding diester PTDMs with similar numbers of cationic charges, suggesting that the diester scaffold is preferred for siRNA internalization and delivery applications. These developments will not only improve our understanding of the structural factors necessary for optimal siRNA internalization, but will also guide the future development of optimized PTDMs for siRNA internalization and delivery.

  11. Synthesis of crosslinked poly(styrene--divinylbenzene--sulfopropyl methacrylate) nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization: Tuning the particle size and surface charge density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhamodaran Arunbabu; Mousumi Hazarika; Somsankar Naik; Tushar Jana

    2009-12-01

    We have synthesized highly charged, crosslinked poly (styrene--divinylbenzene--sulfopropyl methacrylate) copolymer colloidal particles using emulsion polymerization. The effects of concentration of the emulsifier and the initiator on the particle size and the charge density of the colloidal particles are studied. Colloidal particle size is highly dependent upon the concentration of the emulsifier and the initiator. The colloidal particle diameter decreases with increasing concentration of the emulsifier and increases with increasing concentration of the initiator in the polymerization mixture. Number of particles, surface charge density and charges per particle are also functions of both the emulsifier and the initiator concentration. The surface charge density and the number of charges per sphere increase with increasing particle diameter. These copolymer colloid particles self assemble readily and diffract visible light. Polymer hydrogel imbibed with these colloids shows the light diffraction.

  12. Charge compensation and electrostatic transferability in three entropy-stabilized oxides: Results from density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Zs.; Rost, C. M.; Lim, M.; Sarker, P.; Toher, C.; Curtarolo, S.; Maria, J.-P.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out for three entropic rocksalt oxides, (Mg0.1Co0.1Ni0.1Cu0.1Zn0.1)O0.5, termed J14, and J14 + Li and J14 + Sc, to understand the role of charge neutrality and electronic states on their properties, and to probe whether simple expressions may exist that predict stability. The calculations predict that the average lattice constants of the ternary structures provide good approximations to that of the random structures. For J14, Bader charges are transferable between the binary, ternary, and random structures. For J14 + Sc and J14 + Li, average Bader charges in the entropic structures can be estimated from the ternary compositions. Addition of Sc to J14 reduces the majority of Cu, which show large displacements from ideal lattice sites, along with reduction of a few Co and Ni cations. Addition of Li to J14 reduces the lattice constant, consistent with experiment, and oxidizes some of Co as well as some of Ni and Cu. The Bader charges and spin-resolved density of states (DOS) for Co+3 in J14 + Li are very different from Co+2, while for Cu and Ni the Bader charges form continuous distributions and the two DOS are similar for the two oxidation states. Experimental detection of different oxidation states may therefore be challenging for Cu and Ni compared to Co. Based on these results, empirical stability parameters for these entropic oxides may be more complicated than those for non-oxide entropic solids.

  13. X-ray derived experimental charge density distribution in GaF3 and VF3 solid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, K.; Israel, S.; Anzline, C.; Niranjana Devi, R.; Sheeba, R. A. J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure and bonding features of metal and transition metal fluorides in low oxidation states, GaF3 and VF3, have been studied from precise single crystal X-ray diffraction data using multipole and maximum entropy methods. The topology of the charge density is analyzed and the (3,-1) bond critical points are determined. Existences of ionic nature of bonding in low valent fluorine compounds are clearly evident. The spherical core of metal atom and aspherical or twisted core of transition metal atom reveal the fact that GaF3 is much more rigid than VF3. Aspherical cores of the polarized ligand atoms are also visible in the two-dimensional density distribution pictures. The true valence charge density surfaces with encapsulating the atomic basins maps are elucidated. An elongated saddle with mid-bond density of 0.6191 e/Å3, observed in the compound VF3, shows that its lattice is less rigid and has more ionic character than GaF3.

  14. Standard hydrogen electrode and potential of zero charge in density functional calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten; Skúlason, Egill

    2011-01-01

    functional setups. By analyzing a dozen different water structures, built up from water hexamers, in their uncharged [potential of zero charge (PZC)] states on Pt(111), we then determine three different criteria (no net dipole, no charge transfer, and high water flexibility) that a water structure should...... possess in order for its computed ASHEP to closely match the experimental benchmark. We capture and quantify these three effects by calculating trends in the ASHEP and PZC on eight close-packed transition metals, considering the four most simple and representative water models. Finally, it is also...

  15. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  16. A simplified density functional theory method for investigating charged adsorbates on an ultrathin, insulating film supported by a metal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivetti, Ivan; Persson, Mats

    2014-04-02

    A simplified density functional theory (DFT) method for investigating charged adsorbates on an ultrathin, insulating film supported by a metal substrate is developed and presented. This new method is based on a previous DFT development that uses a perfect conductor (PC) model to approximate the electrostatic response of the metal substrate, while the film and the adsorbate are both treated fully within DFT (Scivetti and Persson 2013 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25 355006). The missing interactions between the metal substrate and the insulating film in the PC approximation are modelled by a simple force field (FF). The parameters of the PC model and the force field are obtained from DFT calculations of the film and the substrate, here shown explicitly for a NaCl bilayer supported by a Cu(100) surface. In order to obtain some of these parameters and the polarizability of the force field, we have to include an external, uniformly charged plane in the DFT calculations, which has required the development of a periodic DFT formalism to include such a charged plane in the presence of a metal substrate. This extension and implementation should be of more general interest and applicable to other challenging problems, for instance, in electrochemistry. As illustrated for the gold atom on the NaCl bilayer supported by a Cu(100) surface, our new DFT-PC-FF method allows us to handle different charge states of adsorbates in a controlled and accurate manner with a considerable reduction of the computational time. In addition, it is now possible to calculate vertical transition and reorganization energies for the charging and discharging of adsorbates that cannot be obtained by current DFT methodologies that include the metal substrate. We find that the computed vertical transition energy for charging of the gold adatom is in good agreement with experiments.

  17. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  18. Laboratory scale investigation to improve the productivity of stamp charge coke oven through optimisation of bulk density of coal cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, P.S.; Krishnan, S.H.; Sharma, R.; Banerjee, P.K.; Haldar, S.K. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    In the recent past, it was realised that the gross coke yield was going down as a result of lower oven throughput in the stamp charged batteries of Tata Steel. The basic reason for this being the net reduction in the ash content of the coal blend used due to the incorporation of higher percentage of low ash imported coals and reduction in the ash content of captive coals through washing. The coals having higher ash content improves the bulk density, as the specific gravity of ash is higher than that of pure coal. Moreover, the ash components have affinity for water and pure coal repels water, which in case of pure coal, works against the holding together of the blend. Hence, lower the ash content, less is the bulk density of cake under identical stamping energy and lower the bulk density, less is the oven throughput. In order to maximise the oven throughput and productivity, a study was conducted in the laboratory mainly to assess the effect of various blend constituents and their ash content on the bulk density of coal charge. The effect of ash content on the coal cake stability has also been dealt with. This study, in short, is a useful tool for selecting the right type of coals and designing the optimum blend for stamp charging to achieve maximum throughput and productivity. In addition, studies were also carried out to assess the effect of addition of various binders on coal cake stability at lower moisture level which would also help in achieving higher throughput and productivity.

  19. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  20. Microtubule Protofilament Number Is Modulated in a Step-Wise Fashion By the Charge of Density of An Enveloping Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raviv, U.; Nguyen, T.; Ghafouri, R.; Needleman, D.J.; Li, Y.; Miller, H.P.; Wilson, L.; Bruinsma, R.F.; Safinya, C.R.; /UC, Santa Barbara /UCLA

    2007-07-12

    Microtubules are able to adjust their protofilament (PF) number and, as a consequence, their dynamics and function, to the assembly conditions and presence of cofactors. However, the principle behind such variations is poorly understood. Using synchrotron x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, we studied how charged membranes, which under certain conditions can envelop preassembled MTs, regulate the PF number of those MTs. We show that the mean PF number, , is modulated primarily by the charge density of the membranes. decreases in a stepwise fashion with increasing membrane charge density. does not depend on the membrane-protein stoichiometry or the solution ionic strength. We studied the effect of taxol and found that increases logarithmically with taxol/tubulin stoichiometry. We present a theoretical model, which by balancing the electrostatic and elastic interactions in the system accounts for the trends in our findings and reveals an effective MT bending stiffness of order 10-100 k{sub B}T/nm, associated with the observed changes in PF number.

  1. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2009-08-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the mass density, the specific surface area, and the particle size are quantified. As derived theoretically, molecular mass and mass density of nanoparticles will depend on the types of surface groups and the corresponding site densities and will vary with particle size and surface area because of a relatively large contribution of the surface groups in comparison to the mineral core of nanoparticles. The nano-sized (˜2.6 nm) particles of freshly prepared 2-line Fh as a whole have an increased molar mass of M ˜ 101 ± 2 g/mol Fe, a reduced mass density of ˜3.5 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, both relatively to the mineral core. The specific surface area is ˜650 m 2/g. Six-line Fh (5-6 nm) has a molar mass of M ˜ 94 ± 2 g/mol, a mass density of ˜3.9 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, and a surface area of ˜280 ± 30 m 2/g. Data analysis shows that the mineral core of Fh has an average chemical composition very close to FeOOH with M ˜ 89 g/mol. The mineral core has a mass density around ˜4.15 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, which is between that of feroxyhyte, goethite, and lepidocrocite. These results can be used to constrain structural models for Fh. Singly-coordinated surface groups dominate the surface of ferrihydrite (˜6.0 ± 0.5 nm -2). These groups can be present in two structural configurations. In pairs, the groups either form the edge of a single Fe-octahedron (˜2.5 nm -2) or are present at a single corner (˜3.5 nm -2) of two adjacent Fe octahedra. These configurations can form bidentate surface complexes by edge- and double-corner sharing, respectively, and may therefore respond differently to the binding of ions such as uranyl, carbonate, arsenite, phosphate, and others. The relatively low PZC of

  2. Effect of Loading Densities in Closed Vessel Tests on the Burning Rate of a Propelling Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Mehta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Closed vessel firing of gun propellant at different loading densities is conducted for evaluation of its ballistic parameters. Although in actual gun applications, loading densities are higher, but for closed vessel evaluation standard loading density is taken as 0.2 g/cc for interior ballistic calculations of guns. Closed vessel evaluation of standard triple-base propellant in hepta-tubular configuration with loading density varying in the range of 0.2 g/cc to 0.3 g/cc is conducted for the evaluation of salient ballistic parameters. It is observed that maximum pressure increases with increase in loading density of propellants. As loading density increases, rate of rise of pressure also increases. Accordingly, a rise in burning rate is also observed. However, the burning rate index (α and coefficient (β of the power law of burning (r = βPα is found independent of loading density. The average values of these burning rate parameters are calculated as (α = 0.78 and (β = 0.45 for the studied propellant.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 2, March 2015, pp.126-130, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8158

  3. Manipulating charge density waves in 1 T -TaS2 by charge-carrier doping: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, D. F.; Xiao, R. C.; Lu, W. J.; Lv, H. Y.; Li, J. Y.; Zhu, X. B.; Sun, Y. P.

    2016-09-01

    The transition-metal dichalcogenide 1 T -TaS2 exhibits a rich set of charge-density-wave (CDW) orders. Recent investigations suggested that using light or an electric field can manipulate the commensurate CDW (CCDW) ground state. Such manipulations are considered to be determined by charge-carrier doping. Here we use first-principles calculations to simulate the carrier-doping effect on the CCDW in 1 T -TaS2 . We investigate the charge-doping effects on the electronic structures and phonon instabilities of the 1 T structure, and we analyze the doping-induced energy and distortion ratio variations in the CCDW structure. We found that both in bulk and monolayer 1 T -TaS2 , the CCDW is stable upon electron doping, while hole doping can significantly suppress the CCDW, implying different mechanisms of such reported manipulations. Light or positive perpendicular electric-field-induced hole doping increases the energy of the CCDW, so that the system transforms to a nearly commensurate CDW or a similar metastable state. On the other hand, even though the CCDW distortion is more stable upon in-plane electric-field-induced electron injection, some accompanied effects can drive the system to cross over the energy barrier from the CCDW to a nearly commensurate CDW or a similar metastable state. We also estimate that hole doping can introduce potential superconductivity with a Tc of 6-7 K. Controllable switching of different states such as a CCDW/Mott insulating state, a metallic state, and even a superconducting state can be realized in 1 T -TaS2 . As a result, this material may have very promising applications in future electronic devices.

  4. Magnetic field-induced charge-density-wave transitions: The role of the orbital and Pauli effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsovnik, M. V.; Andres, D.; Biberacher, W.; Müller, H.

    2009-03-01

    Due to a low transition temperature and, correspondingly, a small energy gap, the charge-density-wave (CDW) state of the layered organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is very sensitive to pressure and magnetic field. The latter couples to the CDW via two competing mechanisms: Pauli paramagnetism and orbital motion of charge carriers in a magnetic field. We study the interplay between the Pauli and orbital effects under a pressure of 2.8 kbar, in the region of the field-induced CDW (FICDW) instability. We find that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, the FICDW state is enhanced when the Zeeman splitting becomes commensurate with the orbital quantization.

  5. Magnetic field-induced charge-density-wave transitions: The role of the orbital and Pauli effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartsovnik, M.V. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de; Andres, D.; Biberacher, W. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mueller, H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-01

    Due to a low transition temperature and, correspondingly, a small energy gap, the charge-density-wave (CDW) state of the layered organic metal {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} is very sensitive to pressure and magnetic field. The latter couples to the CDW via two competing mechanisms: Pauli paramagnetism and orbital motion of charge carriers in a magnetic field. We study the interplay between the Pauli and orbital effects under a pressure of 2.8 kbar, in the region of the field-induced CDW (FICDW) instability. We find that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, the FICDW state is enhanced when the Zeeman splitting becomes commensurate with the orbital quantization.

  6. Anisotropic symmetry breaking in two-dimensional charge density waves of ErTe3 investigated by femtosecond electron crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Faran; Golubev, Timofey; Hwang, Bin; Ruan, Chong-Yu; Duxbury, Phil; Malliakas, Christos; Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2015-03-01

    Electron-phonon interactions can give rise to various charge-ordered states, especially at low dimensions, where Fermi surface is more prone to form nesting. Rare earth tritellurides compound ErTe3 develops charge density waves (CDW) along two perpendicular directions at different temperatures. By directly probing the order parameters of the two CDWs using femtosecond electron crystallography under different temperatures and driving photonic energy, we investigated the emergences of competing CDW orders in a dynamical phase diagram. The anisotropic symmetry breaking and the role of electron-phonon coupling, and photo-doping effect are discussed in reference to other CDW systems. Our work is supported by Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46309.

  7. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Regnier, D; Schunck, N; Verriere, M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically using the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in tw...

  8. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  9. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd [Centre of Photonics and Advance Material, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  10. Demonstration of the difference Casimir force for samples with different charge carrier densities

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, F; Mohideen, U; Mostepanenko, V M

    2006-01-01

    A measurement of the Casimir force between a gold coated sphere and two Si plates of different carrier densities is performed using a high vacuum based atomic force microscope. The results are compared with the Lifshitz theory and good agreement is found. Our experiment demonstrates that by changing the carrier density of the semiconductor plate by several orders of magnitude it is possible to modify the Casimir interaction. This result may find applications in nanotechnology.

  11. Ions in mixed dielectric solvents: density profiles and osmotic pressure between charged interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Harries, Daniel; Podgornik, Rudi

    2009-04-30

    The forces between charged macromolecules, usually given in terms of osmotic pressure, are highly affected by the intervening ionic solution. While in most theoretical studies the solution is treated as a homogeneous structureless dielectric medium, recent experimental studies concluded that, for a bathing solution composed of two solvents (binary mixture), the osmotic pressure between charged macromolecules is affected by the binary solvent composition. By adding local solvent composition terms to the free energy, we obtain a general expression for the osmotic pressure, in planar geometry and within the mean-field framework. The added effect is due to the permeability inhomogeneity and nonelectrostatic short-range interactions between the ions and solvents (preferential solvation). This effect is mostly pronounced at small distances and leads to a reduction in the osmotic pressure for macromolecular separations of the order 1-2 nm. Furthermore, it leads to a depletion of one of the two solvents from the charged macromolecules (modeled as planar interfaces). Lastly, by comparing the theoretical results with experimental ones, an explanation based on preferential solvation is offered for recent experiments on the osmotic pressure of DNA solutions.

  12. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average pT ratios of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector Δ (1232 ) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average pT of charged pions / in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so-called S -wave and P -wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework of a quantum molecular dynamics transport model that enforces the conservation of the total energy of the system. It is shown that constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density and the strength of the Δ (1232) potential can be simultaneously extracted. A symmetry energy with a value of the slope parameter L >50 MeV is favored, at 1 σ confidence level, from a comparison with published FOPI experimental data. A precise constraint will require experimental data more accurate than presently available, particularly for the charged pion multiplicity ratio, and better knowledge of the density and momentum dependence of the pion potential for the whole range of these two variables probed in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  14. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  15. Unconventional Charge-Density Wave in the Organic Conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kazumi; Dóra, Balázs; Kartsovnik, Mark; Virosztek, Attila; Korin-Hamzić, Bojana; Basletić, Mario

    2003-06-01

    The low temperature phase (LTP) of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 salt is known for its surprising angular dependent magnetoresistance (ADMR), which has been studied intensively in the last decade. However, the nature of the LTP has not been understood until now. Here we analyze theoretically ADMR in unconventional (or nodal) charge-density wave (UCDW). In magnetic field the quasiparticle spectrum in UCDW is quantized, which gives rise to spectacular ADMR. The present model accounts for many striking features of ADMR data in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4.

  16. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  17. Flavor structure of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors and transverse charge densities in the chiral quark-soliton model

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Antonio; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the flavor decomposition of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, based on the chiral quark-soliton model with symmetry-conserving quantization. We consider the rotational 1/N_c and linear strange-quark mass (m_s) corrections. To extend the results to higher momentum transfer, we take into account the kinematical relativistic effects. We discuss the results of the flavor-decomposed electromagnetic form factors in comparison with the recent experimental data. In order to see the effects of the strange quark, we compare the SU(3) results with those of SU(2). We finally discuss the transverse charge densities for both unpolarized and polarized nucleons.

  18. The 181Ta Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction in the Charge Density Wave Phases of 1T-TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganal, P.; Butz, T.; Lerf, A.; Naito, M.; Nishihara, H.

    1990-04-01

    With a high resolution time differential perturbed angular correlation spectrometer we investigated the nuclear quadrupole interaction of Ta in 1T-TaS2 . The results obtained for the commensurate charge density wave phase lead to a revised assignment of the previously observed 181Ta NQR resonances. Differences in the intracluster architecture of the 13-atom Star of David cluster between 1T-TaS2 and 1T-TaSe2 could be responsible for the metal to semiconductor transition which occurs in lT-TaS2 but not in lT-TaSe2 .

  19. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide Compounds R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuner, F.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the rare-earth polychalcogenide R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (R = Nd, Sm and Gd) charge-density-wave (CDW) compounds by optical methods. From the absorption spectrum we extract the excitation energy of the CDW gap and estimate the fraction of the Fermi surface which is gapped by the formation of the CDW condensate. In analogy to previous findings on the related RTe{sub n} (n = 2 and 3) families, we establish the progressive closing of the CDW gap and the moderate enhancement of the metallic component upon chemically compressing the lattice.

  20. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of undoped and lanthanum doped barium titanate ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J MANGAIYARKKARASI; R SARAVANAN; MUKHLIS M ISMAIL

    2016-12-01

    A-site deficient, Lanthanum substituted Ba1−xLa2x/3TiO3 (x=0.000, 0.005, 0.015, 0.020 and 0.025) ceramics have been synthesized by chemical route. The effects of lanthanum dopant on the BaTiO3 lattice and the electron density distributions in the unit cell of the samples were investigated. Structural studies suggested the reduction in cell parameters and shrinkage in cell volume with the increase in lanthanum content. Chemical bonding and electron density distributions were examined through high resolution maximum entropy method (MEM). The mid bond electron density values revealed the enhancement of covalent nature between titanium and oxygen ions and predominant ionic nature between barium and oxygen ions. Average grain sizes were estimated for the undoped and doped samples. SEM investigations showed the existence of smaller grains with large voids in between them.

  1. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grigoryan, Ara; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Harton, Austin; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Rudolf; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Kamal Hussain; Khan, Palash; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Dong Jo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kour, Ravjeet; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nikulin, Sergey; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oh, Saehanseul; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; 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Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Boris; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilk, Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over 4 units of pseudorapidity in non-single-diffractive (NSD) p-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81 $\\pm$ 0.71 (syst.), which corresponds to 2.14 $\\pm$ 0.17 (syst.) per participating nucleon. This is 16% lower than in NSD pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy, and 84% higher than in d-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p-Pb collisions is compared to model predictions, and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  2. High charge carrier density at the NaTaO3/SrTiO3 hetero-interface

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-08-05

    The formation of a (quasi) two-dimensional electron gas between the band insulators NaTaO3 and SrTiO3 is studied by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method of density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions points to only small changes in the chemical bonding at the interface. Both the p-type (NaO)−/(TiO2)0 and n-type (TaO2)+/(SrO)0 interfaces are found to be metallic with high charge carrier densities. The effects of O vacancies are discussed. Spin-polarized calculations point to the formation of isolated O 2pmagnetic moments, located in the metallic region of the p-type interface.

  3. ‘Living’ PEGylation on gold nanoparticles to optimize cancer cell uptake by controlling targeting ligand and charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley; Ito, Masayuki; Sansanaphongpricha, Kanokwan; Qian, Wei; Che, Yong; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    We report and demonstrate biomedical applications of a new technique—‘living’ PEGylation—that allows control of the density and composition of heterobifunctional PEG (HS-PEG-R; thiol-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We first establish ‘living’ PEGylation by incubating HS-PEG5000-COOH with AuNPs (˜20 nm) at increasing molar ratios from zero to 2000. This causes the hydrodynamic layer thickness to differentially increase up to 26 nm. The controlled, gradual increase in PEG-COOH density is revealed after centrifugation, based on the ability to re-suspend the pellet and increase the AuNP absorption. Using a fluorescamine-based assay we quantify differential HS-PEG5000-NH2 binding to AuNPs, revealing that it is highly efficient until AuNP saturation is reached. Furthermore, the zeta potential incrementally changes from -44.9 to +52.2 mV and becomes constant upon saturation. Using ‘living’ PEGylation we prepare AuNPs with different ratios of HS-PEG-RGD (RGD: Arg-Gly-Asp) and incubate them with U-87 MG (malignant glioblastoma) and non-target cells, demonstrating that targeting ligand density is critical to maximizing the efficiency of targeting of AuNPs to cancer cells. We also sequentially control the HS-PEG-R density to develop multifunctional nanoparticles, conjugating positively charged HS-PEG-NH2 at increasing ratios to AuNPs containing negatively charged HS-PEG-COOH to reduce uptake by macrophage cells. This ability to minimize non-specific binding/uptake by healthy cells could further improve targeted nanoparticle efficacy.

  4. Charge-constrained auxiliary-density-matrix methods for the Hartree–Fock exchange contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlot, Patrick; Izsak, Robert; Borgoo, Alex;

    2014-01-01

    Three new variants of the auxiliary-density-matrix method (ADMM) of Guidon, Hutter, and VandeVondele [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2348 (2010)] are presented with the common feature thatthey have a simplified constraint compared with the full orthonormality requirement of the earlier ADMM1 method...

  5. Energy and Centrality Dependences of Charged Multiplicity Density in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA; Ben-hao; Bonasera; A; TAI; An

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, the energy and centrality dependences of chargedparticle pseudo rapidity density in relativistic nuclear collisions were studied. Within the framework ofthis model, both the relativistic p + p experimental data and the PHOBOS and PHENIX Au + Au data at

  6. Cell-penetrating compounds preferentially bind glycosaminoglycans over plasma membrane lipids in a charge density- and stereochemistry-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevette, Lisa E; Benish, Nicolas C; Schoenecker, Amber R; Braden, Kristin J

    2015-12-01

    Cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) are often conjugated to drugs and genes to facilitate cellular uptake. We hypothesize that the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amines of the cell-penetrating compounds and the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) extending from cell surfaces is the initiating step in the internalization process. The interactions of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer, Tat peptide and 25 kDa linear PEI with four different GAGs have been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry to elucidate structure-function relationships that could lead to improved drug and gene delivery methods to a wide variety of cell types. Detailed thermodynamic analysis has determined that CPC-GAG binding constants range from 8.7×10(3) to 2.4×10(6)M(-1) and that affinity is dependent upon GAG charge density and stereochemistry and CPC molecular weight. The effect of GAG composition on affinity is likely due to hydrogen bonding between CPC amines and amides and GAG hydroxyl and amine groups. These results were compared to the association of CPCs with lipid vesicles of varying composition as model plasma membranes to finally clarify the relative importance of each cell surface component in initial cell recognition. CPC-lipid affinity increases with anionic lipid content, but GAG affinity is higher for all cell-penetrating compounds, confirming the role these heterogeneous polysaccharides play in cellular association and clustering.

  7. Impact of quenched oxygen disorder on charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6+x.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, A J; Mao, X; McMahon, Christopher; Sutarto, R; He, F; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Hawthorn, D G

    2014-09-05

    The competition between superconductivity and charge density wave (CDW) order in underdoped cuprates has now been widely reported, but the role of disorder in this competition has yet to be fully resolved. A central question is whether disorder sets the length scale of the CDW order, for instance by pinning charge density fluctuations or disrupting an otherwise long-range order. Using resonant soft x-ray scattering, we investigate the sensitivity of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) to varying levels of oxygen disorder. We find that quench cooling YBCO6.67 (YBCO6.75) crystals to destroy their o-V and o-VIII (o-III) chains decreases the intensity of the CDW superlattice peak by a factor of 1.9 (1.3), but has little effect on the CDW correlation length, incommensurability, and temperature dependence. This reveals that while quenched oxygen disorder influences the CDW order parameter, the spatial extent of the CDW order is insensitive to the level of quenched oxygen disorder and may instead be a consequence of competition with superconductivity.

  8. Artificial Modulation of Ferroelectric Thin Films into Antiferroelectric through H+ Implantation for High-Density Charge Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Jun; FEI Jin-Wen; TANG Wing-Ao; JIANG An-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen ions are implanted into Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 thin films at the energy of 40keV with a flux of 5 ×1014 ions/cm2.Pseudo-antiferroelectric behaviour in the implanted thin films is observed,as confirmed by the measurements of polarization versus electric hysteresis loops and capacitance versus voltage curves.X-ray diffraction patterns show the film structures before and after H+ implantation both to be perovskite of a tetragonal symmetry.These findings indicate that hydrogen ions exist as stable dopants within the films.It is believed that the dopants change domain-switching behaviour via the boundary charge compensation.Meanwhile,time dependence of leakage current density after time longer than lOs indicates the enhancement of the leakage current nearly in one order for the implanted film,but the current at time shorter than I s is mostly the same as that of the original film without the ionic implantation.The artificial tailoring of the antiferroelectric behaviour through H+ implantation in ferroelectric thin films is finally proven to be achievable for the device application of high-density charge storage.

  9. Charge carrier density at the (Na/K)TaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Nazir, Safdar [KAUST, PSE Division, Thuwal 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of a quasi two-dimensional electron gas between the band insulators NaTaO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} as well as KTaO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} is studied by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method of density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions points to only small changes in the chemical bonding at the interface. The creation of metallic interface states thus is not affected by structural relaxation but can be explained by charge transfer between transition metal and oxygen atoms. It is to be expected that a charge transfer is likewise important for related interfaces such as LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}. Both the p-type (NaO){sup -}/(TiO{sub 2}){sup 0} and n-type (TaO{sub 2}){sup +}/(SrO){sup 0} interfaces in NaTaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} are found to be metallic with strongly enhanced charge carrier densities as compared to the respective interfaces in KTaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}. The effects of O vacancies are discussed. Spin-polarized calculations point to the formation of isolated O 2p magnetic moments, located in the metallic region of the p-type interface. The systems under investigation are suitable for disentangling the complex behavior of metallic interface states, since the structural relaxation is small.

  10. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J -P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spec-troscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N 2 /O 2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental setup and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g -- 4 f $\\pi$N transition line and the 5g -- 4 f $\\mu$O transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  11. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trassinelli M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N2/O2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g − 4f πN transition line and the 5g − 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  12. AB-INITIO STUDY OF BULK MODULUS AND CHARGE DENSITY OF CUBIC SrMO3 PEROVSKITES (M = Ti, Zr, Mo, Rh, Ru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AVINASH DAGA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bulk modulus & charge density of cubic SrMO3 perovskites (M = Ti, Zr, Mo, Rh & Ru have been investigated systematically using the first principle density functional calculations. Local density approximation (LDAmethod has been used to compute the two quantities for five perovskites. It is found that the calculated bulk modulus for all the transition metal oxides are in good agreement with the available experimental data and with other theoretical results previously reported in the literature. ABINIT computer code is used to carry out all the calculations. Charge density plots for all the five cubic SrMO3 perovskites have been drawn using MATLAB. The maximum and minimum values of charge density along with the corresponding reduced coordinates are reported for all the perovskites.

  13. Ionic Strength, Surface Charge, and Packing Density Effects on the Properties of Peptide Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Norman; Liu, Juan; Archbold, Ian; Tang, Yongan; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2017-02-28

    The various environmental parameters of packing density, ionic strength, and solution charge were examined for their effects on the properties of the immobilized peptide mimotope CH19 (CGSGSGSQLGPYELWELSH) that binds with the therapeutic antibody Trastuzumab (Herceptin) on a gold substrate. The immobilization of CH19 onto gold was examined with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The QCM data showed the presence of intermolecular interactions resulting in the increase of viscoelastic properties of the peptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The CH19 SAM was diluted with CS7 (CGSGSGS) to decrease the packing density as CH19/CS7. The packing density and ionic strength parameters were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry, and QCM. AFM and ellipsometry showed a distinct conformational difference between CH19 and CH19/CS7, indicating a relationship between packing density and conformational state of the immobilized peptide. The CH19 SAM thickness was 40 Å with a rough topology, while the CH19/CS7 SAM thickness was 20 Å with a smooth topology. The affinity studies showed that the affinity of CH19 and CH19/CS7 to Trastuzumab were both on the order of 10(7) M(-1) in undiluted PBS buffer, while the dilution of the buffer by 1000× increased both SAMs affinities to Trastuzumab to the order of 10(15) M(-2) and changed the binding behavior from noncooperative to cooperative binding. This indicated that ionic strength had a more pronounced effect on binding properties of the CH19 SAM than packing density. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted on the CH19/CS7 SAM, which showed an increase in impedance after each EIS measurement cycle. Cyclic voltammetry on the CH19/CS7 SAM decreased impedance to near initial values. The impact of the packing density, buffer ionic strength, and local charge perturbation of the peptide SAM properties was interpreted based on the titratable sites in CH19 that could participate in the proton transfer and

  14. The Beam-Density Effect on Energy Loss of a Relativistic Charged Particle Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    media. t iU NSWC TR 83-348 Folloving the method developed by Sternheimer 24 in his calculations of the Fermi density effect, i l L2 -2in.v-v 2 (2.16...where Z 2v 2 + f.. The Sternheimer factor P is chosen so that the i i i value of the Bethe logarithm, InI, obtained in non-relativistic experiments, is...first three eigenfrequencies were taken from Reference 25. A more recent set has been given by Sternheimer and Peierls,2 6 but the ones of Reference 25

  15. Universal bulk charge-density-wave (CDW) correlations in the cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabis, Wojciech

    2014-03-01

    The recent observation of bulk CDW order in YBa2Cu3O8+δ(YBCO) in competition with superconductivity is a significant development. Using Cu L-edge resonant X-ray scattering, we also observe bulk CDW order in HgBa2CuO4+δ(Hg1201 Tc = 72K). The correlations appear below TCDW ~ 200K, well below the pseudogap temperature T* ~ 320K associated with unusual magnetism, but coincident with the onset of Fermi-liquid-like charge transport. In contrast to YBCO, we observe no decrease of the CDW amplitude below Tc, and the correlation length is short and temperature independent. CDW correlations therefore are a universal property of underdoped cuprates, enhanced by low structural symmetry and a magnetic field, but fundamentally not in significant competition with superconductivity. We also discuss the relationship between the CDW modulation wave vector and the Fermi surface area extracted from QO experiments. Work supported by DOE-BES. In collaboration with Y. Li, M. Le Tacon, L. Braicovich, A. Kreyssig, M. Minola, G. Dellea, E. Weschke, M. Veit, A. Goldman, T. Schmitt, G. Ghiringhelli, N. Barisic, M.K. Chan, C. Dorow, G. Yu, X. Zhao, B. Keimer, M. Greven.

  16. Electronic and atomic structures of the Sr3Ir4Sn13 single crystal: A possible charge density wave material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.-T.; Srivastava, M. K.; Wu, C.-C.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Shao, Y.-C.; Liang, Y.-H.; Du, C.-H.; Chiou, J.-W.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chen, J.-L.; Pao, C.-W.; Lee, J.-F.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wu, M.-K.; Pong, W.-F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering (XRS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality Sr3Ir4Sn13 (SIS) single crystal below and above the transition temperature (T* ≈ 147 K). The evolution of a series of modulated satellite peaks below the transition temperature in the XRS experiment indicated the formation of a possible charge density wave (CDW) in the (110) plane. The EXAFS phase derivative analysis supports the CDW-like formation by revealing different bond distances [Sn1(2)-Sn2] below and above T* in the (110) plane. XANES spectra at the Ir L3-edge and Sn K-edge demonstrated an increase (decrease) in the unoccupied (occupied) density of Ir 5d-derived states and a nearly constant density of Sn 5p-derived states at temperatures T atomic structures and the CDW-like phase in the SIS single crystal. PMID:28106144

  17. Modeling environmental effects on charge density distributions in polar organometallics: validation of embedded cluster models for the methyl lithium crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Kathrin; Meier, Florian; Gatti, Carlo; Burow, Asbjörn M; Sierka, Marek; Sauer, Joachim; Kaupp, Martin

    2010-11-15

    The charge density and its Laplacian at the Li-C and C-H bond critical points and other features of the electron density distribution of the methyl lithium crystal have been compared by density functional methods for (i) the isolated (LiCH(3))(4) tetramer or larger clusters, (ii) for quantum mechanically treated clusters in polarizable continuum model (PCM) surroundings, (iii) for clusters augmented by the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster model (PEECM), and for (iv) the periodic crystal. Comparisons with identical functional and basis sets indicate that both PCM and PEECM embedding of only a tetramer did not fully account for the environmental effect. In contrast, embedding of a full unit cell gave results that were essentially converged to the periodic crystal data. Effects of basis set and exchange correlation functional on the QTAIM bond descriptors are of a comparable order of magnitude as the crystal environmental effects. In this context, embedded cluster computations provide distinct advantages over explicit solid-state calculations with respect to their freedom of the choice of computational and theoretical level. This is demonstrated by embedded MP2 calculations.

  18. Remarkable Stability of Charge Density Wave Order in La1.875 Ba0.125 CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. M.; Thampy, V.; Mazzoli, C.; Barbour, A. M.; Miao, H.; Gu, G. D.; Cao, Y.; Tranquada, J. M.; Dean, M. P. M.; Wilkins, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of charge-density-wave (CDW) order in underdoped cuprates is now well established, although the precise nature of the CDW and its relationship with superconductivity is not. Theoretical proposals include contrasting ideas such as that pairing may be driven by CDW fluctuations or that static CDWs may intertwine with a spatially modulated superconducting wave function. We test the dynamics of CDW order in La1.825 Ba0.125 CuO4 by using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the CDW wave vector, detected resonantly at the Cu L3 edge. We find that the CDW domains are strikingly static, with no evidence of significant fluctuations up to 2 ¾ h . We discuss the implications of these results for some of the competing theories.

  19. Remarkable Stability of Charge Density Wave Order in La_{1.875}Ba_{0.125}CuO_{4}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X M; Thampy, V; Mazzoli, C; Barbour, A M; Miao, H; Gu, G D; Cao, Y; Tranquada, J M; Dean, M P M; Wilkins, S B

    2016-10-14

    The occurrence of charge-density-wave (CDW) order in underdoped cuprates is now well established, although the precise nature of the CDW and its relationship with superconductivity is not. Theoretical proposals include contrasting ideas such as that pairing may be driven by CDW fluctuations or that static CDWs may intertwine with a spatially modulated superconducting wave function. We test the dynamics of CDW order in La_{1.825}Ba_{0.125}CuO_{4} by using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the CDW wave vector, detected resonantly at the Cu L_{3} edge. We find that the CDW domains are strikingly static, with no evidence of significant fluctuations up to 2 ¾  h. We discuss the implications of these results for some of the competing theories.

  20. Extended phonon collapse and the origin of the charge-density-wave in NbSe{sub 2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Rosenkranz, S.; Castellan, J.-P.; Osborn, R.; Hott, R.; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Egami, T.; Said, A. H.; Reznik, D. (X-Ray Science Division); ( MSD); (Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech.); (Univ. of Tennessee); (Univ. of Colorado at Boulder)

    2011-01-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of phonon dispersion in the prototypical charge-density-wave (CDW) compound 2H-NbSe{sub 2}. Surprisingly, acoustic phonons soften to zero frequency and become overdamped over an extended region around the CDW wave vector. This extended phonon collapse is dramatically different from the sharp cusp in the phonon dispersion expected from Fermi surface nesting. Instead, our experiments, combined with ab initio calculations, show that it is the wave vector dependence of the electron-phonon coupling that drives the CDW formation in 2H-NbSe{sub 2} and determines its periodicity. This mechanism explains the so far enigmatic behavior of CDW in 2H-NbSe{sub 2} and may provide a new approach to other strongly correlated systems where electron-phonon coupling is important.

  1. Magnetic-field-tuned charge density wave in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hechang; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.

    2017-02-01

    We report magnetic field tuned competition between magnetic order and charge density wave (CDW) states in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2 polycrystals. The destruction of CDW can be observed not only in SmNiC2 below ferromagnetic (FM) but also in NdNiC2 below antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition temperature. Moreover, the CDW states near magnetic transition temperatures can be tuned by the magnetic field for both compounds. Magnetic-field induced FM state in NdNiC2 is more effective in weakening the CDW than the AFM state at temperatures near Neel temperature T N but both ordering states have the same effect on CDW below T N. The interplay between magnetic and CDW states in SmNiC2 and NdNiC2 may be different, suggesting that these materials are good models to study correlations between magnetic and CDW wave order.

  2. Aharonov-Anandan effect induced by spin-orbit interaction and charge-density waves in mesoscopic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Y.; Bishop, A.R. [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    We study the spin-dependent geometric phase effect in mesoscopic rings of charge-density-wave (CDW) materials. When electron spin is explicitly taken into account, we show that the spin-dependent Aharonov-Casher phase can have pronounced frustration effects on such CDW materials with appropriate electron filling. We show that this frustration has observable consequences for transport experiments. We identify a phase transition from a Peierls insulator to metal, which is induced by spin-dependent phase interference effects. Mesoscopic CDW materials and spin-dependent geometric phase effects, and their interplay, are becoming attractive opportunities for exploitation with the rapid development of modern fabrication technology. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. d-Wave Superconductivity and s-Wave Charge Density Waves: Coexistence between Order Parameters of Different Origin and Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I. Voitenko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of the theory describing the coexistence between d-wave superconductivity and s-wave charge-density-waves (CDWs is presented. The CDW gapping is identified with pseudogapping observed in high-Tc oxides. According to the cuprate specificity, the analysis is carried out for the two-dimensional geometry of the Fermi surface (FS. Phase diagrams on the σ0 − α plane—here, σ0 is the ratio between the energy gaps in the parent pure CDW and superconducting states, and the quantity 2α is connected with the degree of dielectric (CDW FS gapping—were obtained for various possible configurations of the order parameters in the momentum space. Relevant tunnel and photoemission experimental data for high-Tc oxides are compared with theoretical predictions. A brief review of the results obtained earlier for the coexistence between s-wave superconductivity and CDWs is also given.

  4. A density functional theory investigation of charge mobility in titanyl-phthalocyanines and their tailored peripherally substituted complexes

    CERN Document Server

    De Lile, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Titanyl-phthalocyanines catalytic ability towards oxygen reduction is demonstrated in experimental literature. Our recent theoretical simulations revealed electronic structure origin of catalytic ability in peripherally and axially substituted triplet and singlet titanyl-phthalocyanines. However, the origin of high electron transfer ability to spontaneously reduce peroxide in chlorine substituted singlet complex and triplet state Ti(II)Pc complexes remain elusive. Thus, we performed density functional theory calculations to study Ti(IV)Pc and their tailored peripheral substituted complexes as representative compounds of titanyl-phthalocyanines for charge mobilities, reorganization energies and electronic couplings. In addition, oxo(phthalocyaninato)titanium(IV) (TiOPc) convex and concave compounds were investigated to benchmark the method. Based on the results, Reorganization energies of triplet state Ti(II)Pc and their tailored peripheral substituted complexes are compared with Ti(IV)Pc singlet complexes in ...

  5. Coherent tunneling between elementary conducting layers in NbSe sub 3 conductor with wave charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, Y I; Sinchenko, A A; Bulaevskii, L N; Monceau, P

    2002-01-01

    The peculiarities of the cross-sectional transport in the direction of the crystallographic axis alpha * in the conductor with the NbSe sub 3 wave charge density (WCD) are studied. The strong peak of dynamic conductivity is observed on the WCD of the layered structures and the NbSe sub 3 -NbSe sub 3 point contacts at low temperatures by the zero voltage shift. The identified behavior reminds in many respects the interlayer tunnel conductivity in the Bi-2212-type high-temperature layered conductors. The conductivity peak by the zero shift is explained in the model of the almost coherent interlayer tunneling of the carriers, noncondensed in the WCD

  6. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  7. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Coc, Alain; Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rat...

  8. Direct observation of competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.

    2012-01-01

    ). This sample has a hole doping of 0.12 per copper and a well-ordered oxygen chain superstructure. Below Tc, the application of a magnetic field suppresses superconductivity and enhances the CDW. Hence, the CDW and superconductivity in this typical high-Tc material are competing orders with similar energy...... scales, and the high-Tc superconductivity forms from a pre-existing CDW environment. Our results provide a mechanism for the formation of small Fermi surface pockets, which explain the negative Hall and Seebeck effects and the ‘Tc plateau’ in this material when underdoped.......Superconductivity often emerges in the proximity of, or in competition with, symmetry-breaking ground states such as antiferromagnetism or charge density waves (CDW). A number of materials in the cuprate family, which includes the high transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, show spin...

  9. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Weiyao; Bernhard, Jonah E; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and rapidity-dependent measurements of charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is compared to p+Pb and Pb+Pb single-particle distributions and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including two-particle rapidity correlations, the rapidity dependence of anisotropic flow, and event-plane decorrelations.

  10. Multiband nodeless superconductivity near the charge-density-wave quantum critical point in ZrTe3-x Sex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔珊; 何兰坡; 洪晓晨; 朱相德; Cedomir Petrovic; 李世燕

    2016-01-01

    It was found that selenium doping can suppress the charge-density-wave (CDW) order and induce bulk supercon-ductivity in ZrTe3. The observed superconducting dome suggests the existence of a CDW quantum critical point (QCP) in ZrTe3−x Sex near x≈0.04. To elucidate the superconducting state near the CDW QCP, we measure the thermal conductivity of two ZrTe3−x Sex single crystals (x=0.044 and 0.051) down to 80 mK. For both samples, the residual linear termκ0/T at zero field is negligible, which is a clear evidence for nodeless superconducting gap. Furthermore, the field dependence ofκ0/T manifests a multigap behavior. These results demonstrate multiple nodeless superconducting gaps in ZrTe3−x Sex , which indicates conventional superconductivity despite of the existence of a CDW QCP.

  11. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical-electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human-computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices.

  12. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical-electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human-computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices.

  13. Pressure dependence of the optical properties of the charge-density-wave compound LaTe2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavagnini, M.; Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Perucchi, A.; /INFM, Trieste; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report the pressure dependence of the optical response of LaTe{sub 2}, which is deep in the charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state even at 300 K. The reflectivity spectrum is collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 7 GPa. We extract the energy scale due to the single particle excitation across the CDW gap and the Drude weight. We establish that the gap decreases upon compressing the lattice, while the Drude weight increases. This signals a reduction in the quality of nesting upon applying pressure, therefore inducing a lesser impact of the CDW condensate on the electronic properties of LaTe{sub 2}. The consequent suppression of the CDW gap leads to a release of additional charge carriers, manifested by the shift of weight from the gap feature into the metallic component of the optical response. On the contrary, the power-law behavior, seen in the optical conductivity at energies above the gap excitation and indicating a weakly interacting limit within the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid scenario, seems to be only moderately dependent on pressure.

  14. Antimicrobial polymers prepared by ring-opening metathesis polymerization: manipulating antimicrobial properties by organic counterion and charge density variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienkamp, Karen; Madkour, Ahmad E; Kumar, Kushi-Nidhi; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2009-11-02

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of poly(oxanorbornene)-based synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) is presented. In the first part, the effect of different organic counterions on the antimicrobial properties of the SMAMPs was investigated. Unexpectedly, adding hydrophobicity by complete anion exchange did not increase the SMAMPs' antimicrobial activity. It was found by dye-leakage studies that this was due to the loss of membrane activity of these polymers caused by the formation of tight ion pairs between the organic counterions and the polymer backbone. In the second part, the effect of molecular charge density on the biological properties of a SMAMP was investigated. The results suggest that, above a certain charge threshold, neither minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) nor hemolytic activity (HC50) is greatly affected by adding more cationic groups to the molecule. A SMAMP with an MIC90 of 4 microg mL(-1) against Staphylococcus aureus and a selectivity (=HC50/MIC90) of 650 was discovered, the most selective SMAMP to date.

  15. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average $p_T$ ratios of charged pions

    CERN Document Server

    Cozma, M D

    2016-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector $\\Delta$(1232) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no current knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints for the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average $p_T$ of charged pions $\\langle p_T^{(\\pi^+)}\\rangle/\\langle p_T^{(\\pi^-)}\\rangle$ in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires the accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so called S-wave and P-wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework...

  16. Charge density wave and excitonic magnetic polarons in CeTe sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kasuya, T; Takabatake, T

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of anomalous magnetic and transport properties in CeTe sub 2 observed recently on single-crystal samples are studied by comparing with the nonmagnetic reference material LaTe sub 2 , as well as other typical low carrier-density systems such as Ce monopnictides, doped Eu chalcogenides and Yb sub 4 As sub 3. The present system is unique on the point of low-carrier semimetal due to CDW of near perfect nesting, which is shown to be nearly independent of the spin-orbit splitting. The large residual resistivity indicates the giant molecular scattering due to excitonic states forming the distorted Wigner crystal, similar to Yb sub 4 As sub 3. At low temperatures, induced magnetic polarons cause unusual novel transport properties with a sharp peak of resistivity without any anomaly on other physical properties. This is attributed to a sharp glassy transition from an antiferromagnetic short-range ordering to the ferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic polarons within each CeTe double layer sandwiching the mo...

  17. A two-phase charge-density real-space-pairing model of high-T{sub c} superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, C.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1999-03-01

    It is usually assumed that high-T{sub c} superconductors have a periodic band structure and a periodic charge density, although amorphous low-T{sub c} superconductors are known. In this paper, it is suggested that the CuO{sub 2} conduction planes of cuprate superconductors consist of regions of two different charge densities which do not normally repeat periodically. It is suggested that the pairing of holes occurs in real space in cuprate superconductors. It is proposed that the hole-pairing mechanism is magnetic exchange coupling and the pairing force is strong, the pairing energy being greater than kT at room temperature. The bound hole pair is essentially a bipolaron. A real-space model is very tentatively suggested in which the CuO{sub 2} planes of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} contain nanodomains of a 3 x 3 hole lattice surrounded by interfaces one unit cell wide in which the holes are paired. In the superconducting state in this model, the existing hole pairs condense and move coherently and collectively around the insulating nanodomains, like trams running around blocks of houses, with one hole on each tramline. The hole pairs move in an elegant manner with hole pairs hopping from oxygen to oxygen via adjacent copper sites. The model explains the superconducting current being in the ab plane and it also explains the very short coherence lengths. Because the pairing force is strong, the model suggests that room-temperature superconductivity might be possible in carefully designed new oxide materials. (orig.) 22 refs.

  18. A two-phase charge-density real-space-pairing model of high-Tc superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys

    1999-03-01

    It is usually assumed that high-T(c) superconductors have a periodic band structure and a periodic charge density, although amorphous low-T(c) superconductors are known. In this paper, it is suggested that the CuO(2) conduction planes of cuprate superconductors consist of regions of two different charge densities which do not normally repeat periodically. It is suggested that the pairing of holes occurs in real space in cuprate superconductors. It is proposed that the hole-pairing mechanism is magnetic exchange coupling and the pairing force is strong, the pairing energy being greater than kT at room temperature. The bound hole pair is essentially a bipolaron. A real-space model is very tentatively suggested in which the CuO(2) planes of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) contain nanodomains of a 3 x 3 hole lattice surrounded by interfaces one unit cell wide in which the holes are paired. In the superconducting state in this model, the existing hole pairs condense and move coherently and collectively around the insulating nanodomains, like trams running around blocks of houses, with one hole on each tramline. The hole pairs move in an elegant manner with hole pairs hopping from oxygen to oxygen via adjacent copper sites. The model explains the superconducting current being in the ab plane and it also explains the very short coherence lengths. Because the pairing force is strong, the model suggests that room-temperature superconductivity might be possible in carefully designed new oxide materials.

  19. Measurement of atomic electric fields and charge densities from average momentum transfers using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Krause, Florian F; Grieb, Tim; Löffler, Stefan; Schowalter, Marco; Béché, Armand; Galioit, Vincent; Marquardt, Dennis; Zweck, Josef; Schattschneider, Peter; Verbeeck, Johan; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-05-12

    This study sheds light on the prerequisites, possibilities, limitations and interpretation of high-resolution differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We draw particular attention to the well-established DPC technique based on segmented annular detectors and its relation to recent developments based on pixelated detectors. These employ the expectation value of the momentum transfer as a reliable measure of the angular deflection of the STEM beam induced by an electric field in the specimen. The influence of scattering and propagation of electrons within the specimen is initially discussed separately and then treated in terms of a two-state channeling theory. A detailed simulation study of GaN is presented as a function of specimen thickness and bonding. It is found that bonding effects are rather detectable implicitly, e.g., by characteristics of the momentum flux in areas between the atoms than by directly mapping electric fields and charge densities. For strontium titanate, experimental charge densities are compared with simulations and discussed with respect to experimental artifacts such as scan noise. Finally, we consider practical issues such as figures of merit for spatial and momentum resolution, minimum electron dose, and the mapping of larger-scale, built-in electric fields by virtue of data averaged over a crystal unit cell. We find that the latter is possible for crystals with an inversion center. Concerning the optimal detector design, this study indicates that a sampling of 5mrad per pixel is sufficient in typical applications, corresponding to approximately 10×10 available pixels.

  20. Discriminating between Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Physisorbed Adsorbates: Role of Wavelike Charge-Density Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wang; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between metallic (M ) and semiconducting (S ) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) remains a fundamental challenge in the field of nanotechnology. We address this issue by studying the adsorption of the isotropic atoms Xe, Kr, and a highly anisotropic molecule n heptane on M - and S -SWNTs with density functional theory that includes many-body dispersion forces. We find that the distinct polarizabilities of M - and S -SWNTs exhibit significantly different physisorption properties, which are also strongly controlled by the SWNT's diameter, adsorption site, adsorbate coverage, and the adsorbate's anisotropy. These findings stem from the wavelike nature of charge-density fluctuations in SWNTs. Particularly, these results allow us to rationalize the unusual √{3 }×√{3 }R 3 00 phase of Kr atoms on small gap M -SWNTs and the double desorption peak temperatures of n heptane on M -SWNTs in experiments, and also propose the n heptane as an effective sensor for experimentally discriminating M - and S -SWNTs.

  1. Splitting of the Ti-3d bands of TiSe2 in the charge-density wave phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, A.; Petaccia, L.; Janowitz, C.

    2017-02-01

    Very high resolution angular resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra on TiSe2 in two distinct polarization geometries (vertical and horizontal) at temperatures between 300 K and 22 K enabled the observation of details of bands near the Fermi level not reported so far. Calculations of the electronic band structure based on density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP hybrid functional and MBJ potential (with and without spin-orbit coupling) were performed to obtain the orbital symmetry and dispersion. Two degenerate conduction bands (CB's) were observed at the Γ-point, a weak CB- emission at the A-point, and two non degenerate CB's (i.e. splitting of CB) at the M/L-point of the Brillouin Zone (BZ). The splitting was detected at L for both polarizations, while at M remarkably only for horizontal polarization. These results cannot be fully accounted for by current theories for the charge density wave (CDW) and point to a reduced symmetry of the electronic states, possibly due to the chiral CDW.

  2. Structural and electron charge density studies of a nonlinear optical compound 4,4 di-methyl amino cyano biphenyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naima, Boubegra; Abdelkader, Chouaih; Mokhtaria, Drissi; Fodil, Hamzaoui

    2014-01-01

    The 4,4 dimethyl amino cyano biphenyl crystal (DMACB) is characterized by its nonlinear activity. The intra molecular charge transfer of this molecule results mainly from the electronic transmission of the electro-acceptor (cyano) and electro-donor (di-methyl-amino) groups. An accurate electron density distribution around the molecule has been calculated based on a high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. The data were collected at 123 K using graphite-monochromated Mo K α radiation to sin(β)/λ = 1.24 Å-1. The integrated intensities of 13796 reflections were measured and reduced to 6501 independent reflections with I >= 3σ(I). The crystal structure was refined using the experimental model of Hansen and Coppens (1978). The crystal structure has been validated and deposited at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre with the deposition number CCDC 876507. In this article, we present the thermal motion and the structural analysis obtained from the least-square refinement based on F2 and the electron density distribution obtained from the multipolar model.

  3. A method for the assessment of oxide charge density and centroid in metal-oxide-semiconductor structures after uniform gate stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, R.; Egilsson, T.; Ghibaudo, G.; Pananakakis, G.

    1996-06-01

    A method for the extraction of the oxide charge density and distribution centroid based on the exploitation of the Fowler plot derivative characteristics is proposed. To this end, the modification of the tunnel transparency due to the presence of charge within the tunneling region is accounted for. Simple analytical formulas which enable the oxide charge density and centroid to be extracted from the maximum Fowler derivative and its electric field position are derived. The comparison with the DiMaria method confirms the overall consistency of the new approach. The impact of negative charge within the oxide on the apparent Fowler barrier height, which can be deduced from the slope of the Fowler plots after uniform gate stress is also analyzed. Finally, it is pointed out that this method permits the oxide trapping properties to be studied even though only one bias polarization can be utilized for the test structure.

  4. Effect of pristine graphene incorporation on charge storage mechanism of three-dimensional graphene oxide: superior energy and power density retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kiran Pal; Bhattacharjya, Dhrubajyoti; Razmjooei, Fatemeh; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2016-08-01

    In the race of gaining higher energy density, carbon’s capacity to retain power density is generally lost due to defect incorporation and resistance increment in carbon electrode. Herein, a relationship between charge carrier density/charge movement and supercapacitance performance is established. For this purpose we have incorporated the most defect-free pristine graphene into defective/sacrificial graphene oxide. A unique co-solvent-based technique is applied to get a homogeneous suspension of single to bi-layer graphene and graphene oxide. This suspension is then transformed into a 3D composite structure of pristine graphene sheets (GSs) and defective N-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO), which is the first stable and homogenous 3D composite between GS and RGO to the best of our knowledge. It is found that incorporation of pristine graphene can drastically decrease defect density and thus decrease relaxation time due to improved associations between electrons in GS and ions in electrolyte. Furthermore, N doping is implemented selectively only on RGO and such doping is shown to improve the charge carrier density of the composite, which eventually improves the energy density. After all, the novel 3D composite structure of N-RGO and GS greatly improves energy and power density even at high current density (20 A/g).

  5. A simple method of extracting the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure from current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yuan-Jie; Lin Zhao-Jun; Yu Ying-Xia; Meng Ling-Guo; Cao Zhi-Fang; Luan Chong-Biao; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    An Ni Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is fabricated.The flat-band voltage for the Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is obtained from the forward current-voltage characteristics.With the measured capacitance-voltage curve and the flat-band voltage,the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is investigated,and a simple formula for calculating the polarization charge density is obtained and analyzed.With the approach described in this paper,the obtained polarization charge density agrees well with the one calculated by self-consistently solving Schrodinger's and Poisson's equations.

  6. Self-Consistent Determination of Atomic Charges of Ionic Liquid through a Combination of Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-09

    A self-consistent scheme is developed to determine the atomic partial charges of ionic liquid. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was conducted to sample a set of ion configurations, and these configurations were subject to density functional theory (DFT) calculations to determine the partial charges. The charges were then averaged and used as inputs for the subsequent MD simulation, and MD and DFT calculations were repeated until the MD results are not altered any more. We applied this scheme to 1,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C1mim][NTf2]) and investigated its structure and dynamics as a function of temperature. At convergence, the average ionic charges were ±0.84 e at 350 K due to charge transfer among ions, where e is the elementary charge, while the reduced ionic charges do not affect strongly the density of [C1mim][NTf2] and radial distribution function. Instead, major effects are found on the energetics and dynamics, with improvements of the overestimated heat of vaporization and the too slow motions of ions observed in MD simulations using commonly used force fields.

  7. Effects of nonthermal distribution of electrons and polarity of net dust-charge number density on nonplanar dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, A A; Shukla, P K

    2009-09-01

    Effects of the nonthermal distribution of electrons as well as the polarity of the net dust-charge number density on nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) are investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic features of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the effects of nonthermal electron distribution, polarity of net dust-charge number density, and nonplanar geometry. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory dusty plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  8. Realistic calculation of the low- and high-density liquid phase separation in a charged colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S. K.; Peng, W. P.; Wang, G. F.

    2001-04-01

    A realistic statistical-mechanics model is applied to describe the repulsive interaction between charged colloids. The latter, in combination with the long-range van der Waals attraction simulated under excess salt environment, gives rise to a total intercolloidal particle potential showing a clear second potential minimum. Differing from the usual Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model, the present model is valid at any finite concentration of colloids and is thus an appropriate model for investigating the low- and high-density liquid phase transition. Employing this two-body colloid-colloid potential and in conjunction with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen [J. D. Weeks, D. Chandler, and H. C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 54, 5237 (1971)] thermodynamic perturbation theory, we derive analytical expressions for the pressure, chemical potential, and related thermodynamic functions. These thermodynamic quantities were used to calculate the phase diagrams of charged colloidal dispersions in terms of the critical parameters: temperature, volume fraction, and electrolyte concentration parameter kD. Compared with the DLVO model, we find the areas enclosed within the spinodal decomposition and also the liquid-liquid coexistence curves broader in the present model for an excess salt condition κ=kDσ0300, the disparities between the two models reduce. The same thermodynamic perturbation theory has been employed to study also the weak reversible coagulation whose physical origin is attributed to the presence of the second potential minimum. We examine various colloidal parameters that affect the structure of the latter and deduce from our analysis the conditions of colloidal stability. In comparison with the measured flocculation data for a binary mixture of polystyrene lattices and water, we find that our calculated results are generally reasonable, thus lending great credence to the presently used model.

  9. Electronic Coupling Calculations for Bridge-Mediated Charge Transfer Using Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) and Effective Hamiltonian Approaches at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Fragment-Orbital Density Functional Tight Binding (FODFTB) Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillet, Natacha; Berstis, Laura; Wu, Xiaojing; Gajdos, Fruzsina; Heck, Alexander; de la Lande, Aurelien; Blumberger, Jochen; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-10-11

    In this article, four methods to calculate charge transfer integrals in the context of bridge-mediated electron transfer are tested. These methods are based on density functional theory (DFT). We consider two perturbative Green's function effective Hamiltonian methods (first, at the DFT level of theory, using localized molecular orbitals; second, applying a tight-binding DFT approach, using fragment orbitals) and two constrained DFT implementations with either plane-wave or local basis sets. To assess the performance of the methods for through-bond (TB)-dominated or through-space (TS)-dominated transfer, different sets of molecules are considered. For through-bond electron transfer (ET), several molecules that were originally synthesized by Paddon-Row and co-workers for the deduction of electronic coupling values from photoemission and electron transmission spectroscopies, are analyzed. The tested methodologies prove to be successful in reproducing experimental data, the exponential distance decay constant and the superbridge effects arising from interference among ET pathways. For through-space ET, dedicated p-stacked systems with heterocyclopentadiene molecules were created and analyzed on the basis of electronic coupling dependence on donor-acceptor distance, structure of the bridge, and ET barrier height. The inexpensive fragment-orbital density functional tight binding (FODFTB) method gives similar results to constrained density functional theory (CDFT) and both reproduce the expected exponential decay of the coupling with donor-acceptor distances and the number of bridging units. These four approaches appear to give reliable results for both TB and TS ET and present a good alternative to expensive ab initio methodologies for large systems involving long-range charge transfers.

  10. Electronic Coupling Calculations for Bridge-Mediated Charge Transfer Using Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) and Effective Hamiltonian Approaches at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Fragment-Orbital Density Functional Tight Binding (FODFTB) Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Natacha; Berstis, Laura; Wu, Xiaojing; Gajdos, Fruzsina; Heck, Alexander; de la Lande, Aurélien; Blumberger, Jochen; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-10-11

    In this article, four methods to calculate charge transfer integrals in the context of bridge-mediated electron transfer are tested. These methods are based on density functional theory (DFT). We consider two perturbative Green's function effective Hamiltonian methods (first, at the DFT level of theory, using localized molecular orbitals; second, applying a tight-binding DFT approach, using fragment orbitals) and two constrained DFT implementations with either plane-wave or local basis sets. To assess the performance of the methods for through-bond (TB)-dominated or through-space (TS)-dominated transfer, different sets of molecules are considered. For through-bond electron transfer (ET), several molecules that were originally synthesized by Paddon-Row and co-workers for the deduction of electronic coupling values from photoemission and electron transmission spectroscopies, are analyzed. The tested methodologies prove to be successful in reproducing experimental data, the exponential distance decay constant and the superbridge effects arising from interference among ET pathways. For through-space ET, dedicated π-stacked systems with heterocyclopentadiene molecules were created and analyzed on the basis of electronic coupling dependence on donor-acceptor distance, structure of the bridge, and ET barrier height. The inexpensive fragment-orbital density functional tight binding (FODFTB) method gives similar results to constrained density functional theory (CDFT) and both reproduce the expected exponential decay of the coupling with donor-acceptor distances and the number of bridging units. These four approaches appear to give reliable results for both TB and TS ET and present a good alternative to expensive ab initio methodologies for large systems involving long-range charge transfers.

  11. Band gap engineering of NaTaO3 using density functional theory: a charge compensated codoping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Brindaban; Srinivasu, K; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2014-08-28

    In this theoretical study, we employ a codoping strategy to reduce the band gap of NaTaO3 aimed at improving the photocatalytic activity under visible light. The systematic study includes the effects of metal (W) and nonmetal (N) codoping on the electronic structure of NaTaO3 in comparison to the effect of individual dopants. The feasibility of the introduction of N into the NaTaO3 crystal structure is found to be enhanced in the presence of W, as indicated by the calculated formation energy. This codoping leads to formation of a charge compensated system, beneficial for the minimization of vacancy related defect formation. The electronic structure calculations have been carried out using a hybrid density functional for an accurate description of the proposed system. The introduction of W in place of Ta leads to the appearance of donor states below the conduction band, while N doping in place of oxygen introduces isolated acceptor states above the valence band. The codoping of N and W also passivates undesirable discrete midgap states. This feature is not observed in the case of (Cr, N) codoped NaTaO3 in spite of its charge compensated nature. We have also studied charge non-compensated codoping using several dopant pairs, including anion-anion and cation-anion pairs. However, this non-compensated codoping introduces localized states in between the valence band and the conduction band, and hence may not be effective in enhancing the photocatalytic properties of NaTaO3. The optical spectrum shows that the absorption curve for the (W, N)-codoped NaTaO3 is extended to the visible region due to narrowing of the band gap to 2.67 eV. Moreover, its activity for the photo decomposition of water to produce both H2 and O2 remains intact. Hence, based on the present investigation we can propose (W, N) codoped NaTaO3 as a promising photocatalyst for visible light driven water splitting.

  12. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-T sub c superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I and TaS{sub 3} have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe{sub 4}){sub 2}I and K{sub 0. 3}MoO{sub 3}. The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm{sup {minus}1} and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}Se{sub 4}){sub 2}I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS{sub 3}, the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm{sup {minus}1} dominates {var epsilon}({omega}) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm{sup {minus}1}. The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} has been determined by substitution of {sup 18}O for {sup 16}O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities.

  13. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  14. Experimental Charge Density Study of Trichromium Linear Metal String Complex – Cr3(dpa)4Cl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lai-Chin; Cheng, Ming-Chuan; Thomsen, Maja Krüger

    An experimental and theoretical charge density study, based on Bader’s Quantum Theory: Atoms in Molecule (QTAIM), on a trichromium metal string complex, Cr3(dpa)4Cl2(C2H5OC2H5)x(CH2Cl2)1-x (1, dpa- = bis(2-pyridyl)amido)) is performed. The structure and multipole model of 1 are performed by using...... experimental X-ray diffraction data which are collected at both 100 K using conventional X-ray source (DS1) and 15 K using synchrotron source (DS2). The three chromium metal string is bridged by four dpa- ligands. These tri-chromium metal ions are bonded to each other and terminated by two Cl- ions on the both...... ends, forming a [Cl(1)Cr(1)Cr(2)Cr(3)Cl(2)] linear string. Each Cr atoms are coordinated by four N atoms of each dpa- ligand. This metal string is slightly unsymmetrical at both data sets. The bond distance, from DS1 (DS2), of Cr(1)Cr(2), 2.3480(2) (2.3669(1)) Å, is 0.03 (0.003) Å shorter than Cr...

  15. Emergence of coherence in the charge-density wave state of 2H-NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, U.; Zhao, J.; Iavarone, M.; Di Capua, R.; Castellan, J. P.; Karapetrov, G.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Claus, H.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Weber, F.; van Wezel, J.; Campuzano, J. C.; Osborn, R.; Randeria, M.; Trivedi, N.; Norman, M. R.; Rosenkranz, S.

    2015-01-01

    A charge-density wave (CDW) state has a broken symmetry described by a complex order parameter with an amplitude and a phase. The conventional view, based on clean, weak-coupling systems, is that a finite amplitude and long-range phase coherence set in simultaneously at the CDW transition temperature Tcdw. Here we investigate, using photoemission, X-ray scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy, the canonical CDW compound 2H-NbSe2 intercalated with Mn and Co, and show that the conventional view is untenable. We find that, either at high temperature or at large intercalation, CDW order becomes short-ranged with a well-defined amplitude, which has impacts on the electronic dispersion, giving rise to an energy gap. The phase transition at Tcdw marks the onset of long-range order with global phase coherence, leading to sharp electronic excitations. Our observations emphasize the importance of phase fluctuations in strongly coupled CDW systems and provide insights into the significance of phase incoherence in ‘pseudogap’ states. PMID:25687135

  16. EFFECT OF RADIATION ON HIGH-CHARGE-DENSITY POLYDIALLY-DIMETHYL AMMONIUM CHLORIDE IN DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-long Zhang; Min Yi; Jing Ren; Hong-fei Ha

    2003-01-01

    The effect of radiation on high-charge-density cationic polymer, polydiallyl-dimethyl ammonium chloride (polyDADMAC), in dilute aqueous solution was investigated. The irradiated samples were characterized in terms of reduced viscosity and electric conductivity. The crosslinking reaction of polyDADMAC chains occurs preferentially in the irradiated samples at a concentration of polyDADMAC higher than 1.3 g/100 mL that was induced indirectly by the OH radicals, one of the radiolysis products of water. In more dilute samples (less than 0.8 g/100 mL) the chain scission of macro radicals appears to be the main reaction. N2O atmosphere enhances the erosslinking due to the extra OH radicals produced by reaction between N2O and eaq, another radiolysis products of water. Methanol and some mineral salts such as KC1, KBr inhibit the crosslinking to a certain extent. The mechanism of sensitization and inhibition is discussed in detail.

  17. Charge density wave and superconductivity in 2H- and 4H-NbSe2: A revisit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Naik; A K Rastogi

    2011-06-01

    Good-quality hexagonal NbSe2 single crystals were prepared. In 2H-NbSe2, superconducting and charge density wave (CDW) transitions were found at = 7.4 K and = 35 K respectively as reported previously. We have noticed that these two transitions are changed to = 42 K and = 6.5 K, in 4H-NbSe2. Thermopower has shown clear anomaly at CDW transitions. The anisotropic upper critical field was calculated as ∼ 3 and 6.3 for 2H- and 4H-single crystals around = 0.81, where = /, from resistivity and explained in terms of coherence length. From the relation, $H_{c2}() = H_{c2}(0)[1 − ^2]$, $H^l_{c2}(0)$ was calculated as ∼ 8.15 T and 16.98 T at = 0.84 in 2H-NbSe2 and 4H-NbSe2 respectively. However, $H^_{c2}(0) = 2.68$ T for both single crystals.

  18. Effect of charge density in chain extension reactions involving complexes of 4, 4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and various alkali metal salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Subrajeet; Carrasquillo, Katherine; Tsai, Fang Chang; Wu, Lina; Hsu, Shaw Ling; University of Massachusetts Amherst Team

    Controlling the reaction of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI)-terminated polyester prepolymer and 4, 4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA) is extremely important in many large scale applications. The ion-diamine complex has the advantage of blocking the instantaneous reaction between the diamine and isocyanate from taking place until it is released at elevated temperatures. We synthesized complexes of MDA with various alkali metal salts. These complexes create a barrier between the diamine and isocyanate thus preventing the premature reaction. We compared the complexes in terms of their dissociation and the subsequent curing with the prepolymer. Charge density had a tremendous effect. DSC showed that Na complexes dissociated at a lower temperature and needed less energy to dissociate than the Li complexes. The effect of change in cation on complex dissociation was more pronounced compared to the change in anion. Also, the ionic liquid introduced greatly altered the dissociation behavior. Temperature and time resolved IR spectroscopy was used to monitor the urea and NH band. By DSC and IR, we showed that NaCl complex is best suited for the curing of prepolymer with regards to curing temperature and energy.

  19. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Chung, H.-K.; Gutt, C.; Huang, L. G.; Zacharias, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength, and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (resonant coherent X-ray diffraction). In this case, the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribution, charge state distribution, and plasma temperature with such high spatial and temporal resolution will make a vast number of processes in shortpulse laser-solid interaction accessible for direct experimental observation, e.g., hole-boring and shock propagation, filamentation and instability dynamics, electron transport, heating, and ultrafast ionization dynamics.

  20. Spectral properties of actinide materials: Charge density self-consistent LDA+Hubbard I method in FP-LAPW basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolorenc, Jindrich [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Shick, Alexander B. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Havela, Ladislav [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Lichtenstein, Alexander I. [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We provide a numerically efficient procedure to perform LDA+Hubbard I calculations including self-consistency over the charge density in the FP-LAPW basis. The method is applied to Pu, Am, and PuAm and PuCe alloys. Our results for valence photoemission spectra (PES) agree with experimental data and with previous LDA+DMFT calculations. Analysis of the J=5/2 and J=7/2 contributions to the f-occupation supports the intermediate-coupling picture of f-states in heavy actinides. The electronic specific heat coefficient is calculated for PuAm and PuCe alloys in reasonable agreement with recent experiments. We show that Pu atoms keep their mixed-valence character in these alloys. Next, we study electronic and spectral properties of Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} and obtain good agreement with experimental PES. Finally, we analyze surface effects. In Pu monolayer, we find substantial modification of PES due to 5f-electron localization consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Garg, Prakhar; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Grull, Frederik Rolf; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; 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Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; 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Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; 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Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zimmermann, Sebastian; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We present the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}=5.02\\,\\mathrm{Te\\kern-.25exV}$ in centrality classes measured by ALICE. The measurement covers a wide pseudorapidity range from $-3.5$ to $5$, which is sufficient for reliable estimates of the total number of charged particles produced in the collisions. For the most central collisions we find $21\\,400\\pm 1\\,300$ while for the most peripheral we find $230\\pm 38$. This corresponds to an increase of $(27\\pm4)\\%$ over the results at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}=2.76\\,\\mathrm{Te\\kern-.25exV}$ previously reported by ALICE. The energy dependence of the total number of charged particles produced in heavy-ion collisions is found to obey a modified power-law like behaviour. The charged-particle pseudorapidity density of the most central collisions is compared to model calculations --- none of which fully describes the measured distribution. We also present an estimate of the rapidity density of charged particles. Th...

  2. Effect of doping- and field-induced charge carrier density on the electron transport in nanocrystalline ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Maria S; Rauh, Daniel; Lorrmann, Volker; Deibel, Carsten; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2008-12-03

    The charge transport properties of thin films of sol-gel processed undoped and Al-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles with variable doping level between 0.8 and 10 at.% were investigated. The x-ray diffraction studies revealed a decrease of the average crystallite sizes in highly doped samples. We provide estimates of the conductivity and the resulting charge carrier densities with respect to the doping level. The increase of charge carrier density due to extrinsic doping was compared to the accumulation of charge carriers in field effect transistor structures. This allowed us to assess the scattering effects due to extrinsic doping on the electron mobility. The latter decreases from 4.6 × 10(-3) to 4.5 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with increasing doping density. In contrast, the accumulation leads to an increasing mobility up to 1.5 × 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The potential barrier heights related to grain boundaries between the crystallites were derived from temperature dependent mobility measurements. The extrinsic doping initially leads to a grain boundary barrier height lowering, followed by an increase due to doping-induced structural defects. We conclude that the conductivity of sol-gel processed nanocrystalline ZnO:Al is governed by an interplay of the enhanced charge carrier density and the doping-induced charge carrier scattering effects, achieving a maximum at 0.8 at.% in our case.

  3. Origin of Charge Density at LaAlO3 on SrTiO3 Heterointerfaces: Possibility of Intrinsic Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemons, Wolter; Koster, Gertjan; Yamamoto, Hideki; Harrison, Walter A.; Lucovsky, Gerald; Geballe, Theodore H.; Blank, Dave H. A.; Beasley, Malcolm R.

    2007-05-01

    As discovered by Ohtomo and Hwang, a large sheet charge density with high mobility exists at the interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. Based on transport, spectroscopic, and oxygen-annealing experiments, we conclude that extrinsic defects in the form of oxygen vacancies introduced by the pulsed laser deposition process used by all researchers to date to make these samples is the source of the large carrier densities. Annealing experiments show a limiting carrier density. We also present a model that explains the high mobility based on carrier redistribution due to an increased dielectric constant.

  4. Extraction of high charge density of states in electrolyte-gated polymer thin-film transistor with temperature-dependent measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoul

    2016-05-01

    Using temperature-dependent charge transport measurements, we investigated spectral density of states (DOS) in the bandgap of polythiophene thin-films under high carrier densities (Meyer-Neldel rule. The spectral DOS extracted from the electrolyte-gated polymer film lie in the range of 8.0 × 1019 cm-3 eV-1-8.0 × 1021 cm-3 eV-1, which are at least two orders of magnitude larger than the DOS extracted from the same polymer film at relatively low induced carrier densities by general oxide dielectrics.

  5. Field-induced charge-density-wave transitions in the organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, D.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Biberacher, W.; Neumaier, K.; Sheikin, I.; Müller, H.; Kushch, N. D.

    2011-10-01

    Successive magnetic-field-induced charge-density-wave transitions in the layered molecular conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 are studied in a hydrostatic pressure regime in which the zero field charge-density- wave (CDW) state is completely suppressed. It is shown that the orbital effect of the magnetic field restores the density wave, while orbital quantization induces transitions between different CDW states as the field strength is varied. The latter show up as distinct anomalies in the magnetoresistance as a function of field. The interplay between the orbital and Pauli paramagnetic effects, which act, respectively, to enhance and to suppress the CDW instability, is particularly manifest in the angular dependence of the field-induced anomalies.

  6. Suppression and inducement of the charge-density-wave state in Cr x TiSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selezneva, N V; Sherokalova, E M; Pleshchev, V G; Kazantsev, V A; Baranov, N V

    2016-08-10

    The x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and thermal expansion measurements have been employed to study how the intercalation of Cr atoms into TiSe2 matrix affects the crystal structure, formation of the charge density wave (CDW) and electrical properties. The intercalation of a small amount of Cr atoms (up to x ~ 0.03) is observed to suppress the CDW formation. The electrical resistivity of Cr x TiSe2 compounds with the Cr concentrations 0.03  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.20 shows a metallic-type behavior; while in the concentration range 0.25  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.5, the resistivity shows an anomalous behavior indicating the reappearance of the transition to a CDW-like state; further growth of the Cr content up to x  =  0.6 again leads to the metallic-type resistivity. For the compound Cr0.25TiSe2, the phase transition below 160 K together with abnormal change in the electrical resistivity is found to be accompanied by anomalies in the lattice parameters and thermal expansion behavior; this transition is classified as first-order type. It has been found that despite the intercalation of Cr atoms some Ti-Se bonds in the Se-Ti-Se tri-layers of Cr x TiSe2 with x  ⩽  0.5 have nearly the same lengths as in the host lattice TiSe2, which apparently allows the transition to be returned to the CDW-like state.

  7. Controlling the interface charge density in GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures by plasma oxidation of metal layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Herwig, E-mail: herwig.hahn@rwth-aachen.de; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technologies, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Pécz, Béla [MTA EK MFA, Konkoly Thege Street 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Kovács, András [JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technologies, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Forschungszentrum Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-5), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Heuken, Michael [GaN Device Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); AIXTRON SE, 52134 Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    In recent years, investigating and engineering the oxide-semiconductor interface in GaN-based devices has come into focus. This has been driven by a large effort to increase the gate robustness and to obtain enhancement mode transistors. Since it has been shown that deep interface states act as fixed interface charge in the typical transistor operating regime, it appears desirable to intentionally incorporate negative interface charge, and thus, to allow for a positive shift in threshold voltage of transistors to realise enhancement mode behaviour. A rather new approach to obtain such negative charge is the plasma-oxidation of thin metal layers. In this study, we present transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis as well as electrical data for Al-, Ti-, and Zr-based thin oxide films on a GaN-based heterostructure. It is shown that the plasma-oxidised layers have a polycrystalline morphology. An interfacial amorphous oxide layer is only detectable in the case of Zr. In addition, all films exhibit net negative charge with varying densities. The Zr layer is providing a negative interface charge density of more than 1 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup –2} allowing to considerably shift the threshold voltage to more positive values.

  8. Mismatch of dielectric constants at the interface of nanometer metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with high- gate dielectric impacts on the inversion charge density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling-Feng Mao

    2011-04-01

    The comparison of the inversion electron density between a nanometer metal-oxidesemiconductor (MOS) device with high- gate dielectric and a SiO2 MOS device with the same equivalent oxide thickness has been discussed. A fully self-consistent solution of the coupled Schrödinger–Poisson equations demonstrates that a larger dielectric-constant mismatch between the gate dielectric and silicon substrate can reduce electron density in the channel of a MOS device under inversion bias. Such a reduction in inversion electron density of the channel will increase with increase in gate voltage. A reduction in the charge density implies a reduction in the inversion electron density in the channel of a MOS device. It also implies that a larger dielectric constant of the gate dielectric might result in a reduction in the source–drain current and the gate leakage current.

  9. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C{sub 15}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for the local density approximation (Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C–H…O, C–H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C–H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C–H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π–π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å). - Highlights: • Electronic structure, chemical bonding, and electron charge density were studied. • Density of states at Fermi level is 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, for LDA (EVGGA). • Bare electronic specific heat coefficient is 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for LDA(EVGGA). • There are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory (I)——Direct calculation of atomic charges in a molecule via electronegativity equalization principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠志; 沈尔忠

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of electronegativity expressed in density functional theory and electronegativity equalization principle, a new scheme for calculating the atomic charges in a molecule has been proposed and designed, which gives a new scale of the atomic electronegativity and hardness in a certain molecular environment and takes the harmonic mean electronegativity as a reference value of the molecular electronegativity so that the multiple-regression and nonuniform parameters in the original method are avoided. This approach can be easily and widely applied to the calculation of atomic charges for a big molecule and quite good results of atomic charges in some illustrated molecules are obtained as compared with those from the ab initio STO-3G SCF calculations.

  11. Impact of electron delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer states in model pentacene/C60 Interfaces: A density functional theory study

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Bing

    2014-12-04

    Electronic delocalization effects have been proposed to play a key role in photocurrent generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Here, we study the role of charge delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer (CT) states in the case of model complexes consisting of several pentacene molecules and one fullerene (C60) molecule, which are representative of donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The energies of the CT states are examined by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the long-range-corrected functional, ωB97X, with an optimized range-separation parameter, ω. We provide a general description of how the nature of the CT states is impacted by molecular packing (i.e., interfacial donor/acceptor orientations), system size, and intermolecular interactions, features of importance in the understanding of the charge-separation mechanism.

  12. Far-from-equilibrium dynamics of a strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma with non-zero charge density or external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Fuini, John F

    2015-01-01

    Using holography, we study the evolution of a spatially homogeneous, far from equilibrium, strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with a non-zero charge density or a background magnetic field. This gauge theory problem corresponds, in the dual gravity description, to an initial value problem in Einstein-Maxwell theory with homogeneous but anisotropic initial conditions. We explore the dependence of the equilibration process on different aspects of the initial departure from equilibrium and, while controlling for these dependencies, examine how the equilibration dynamics are affected by the presence of a non-vanishing charge density or an external magnetic field. The equilibration dynamics are remarkably insensitive to the addition of even large chemical potentials or magnetic fields; the equilibration time is set primarily by the form of the initial departure from equilibrium. For initial deviations from equilibrium which are well localized in scale, we formulate a simple model for equilibratio...

  13. Far-from-equilibrium dynamics of a strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma with non-zero charge density or external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuini, John F.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2015-07-01

    Using holography, we study the evolution of a spatially homogeneous, far from equilibrium, strongly coupled supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with a non-zero charge density or a background magnetic field. This gauge theory problem corresponds, in the dual gravity description, to an initial value problem in Einstein-Maxwell theory with homogeneous but anisotropic initial conditions. We explore the dependence of the equilibration process on different aspects of the initial departure from equilibrium and, while controlling for these dependencies, examine how the equilibration dynamics are affected by the presence of a non-vanishing charge density or an external magnetic field. The equilibration dynamics are remarkably insensitive to the addition of even large chemical potentials or magnetic fields; the equilibration time is set primarily by the form of the initial departure from equilibrium. For initial deviations from equilibrium which are well localized in scale, we formulate a simple model for equilibration times which agrees quite well with our results.

  14. Modeling the effect of charge density in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes on the rejection of arsenic(III) and potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronell, Orlando; Mi, Baoxia; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2013-01-02

    We used an extended solution-diffusion model that incorporates Donnan electrostatic exclusion of ions and unhindered advection due to imperfections, and measurements of charge density in the polyamide active layers of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes, to predict the rejection of a strong electrolyte (i.e., potassium iodide) and a weak acid (i.e., arsenious acid) as a function of the pH of the feed aqueous solution. Predictions of solute rejection were in agreement with experimental data indicating that (i) the extended solution-diffusion model taking into account Donnan exclusion and unhindered advection due to imperfections satisfactorily describes the effect of pH on solute rejection by RO/NF membranes and (ii) measurement of charge density in active layers provides a valuable characterization of RO/NF membranes. Our results and analysis also indicate that independent ions, and not ion pairs, dominate the permeation of salts.

  15. Charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, K; Abrahantes Quintana, A; Adamova, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaraz Avina, E; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anson, C; Anticic, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshauser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aysto, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badala, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Ban, J; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnafoldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdermann, E; Berdnikov, Y; Bergmann, C; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bilandzic, A; Biolcati, E; Blanc, A; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Bogdanov, A; Boggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsar, L; Bombara, M; Bombonati, C; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bortolin, C; Bose, S; Bossu, F; Botje, M; Bottger, S; Boyer, B; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bugaiev, K; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Casanova Diaz, A; Caselle, M; Castillo Castellanos, J; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Coffin, J P; Coli, S; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortes Maldonado, I; Cortese, P; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; D'Erasmo, G; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, I; Das, K; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; De Azevedo Moregula, A; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; De Remigis, R; de Rooij, R; Debski, P R; Del Castillo Sanchez, E; Delagrange, H; Delgado Mercado, Y; Dellacasa, G; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; Denes, E; Deppman, A; Di Bari, D; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Dietel, T; Divia, R; Djuvsland, O; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Dominguez, I; Donigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubuisson, J; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Evrard, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabjan, C W; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Fekete, V; Felea, D; Feofilov, G; Fernandez Tellez, A; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Fini, R; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Fragkiadakis, M; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furano, F; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhoje, J J; Gadrat, S; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Ganti, M S; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gemme, R; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glassel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; Gonzalez Santos, H; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, O; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heide, M; Heinz, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Hernandez, C; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hrivnacova, I; Huang, M; Huber, S; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jancurova, L; Jangal, S; Janik, R; Jena, S; Jirden, L; Jones, G T; Jones, P G; Jovanovic, P; Jung, H; Jung, W; Jusko, A; Kalcher, S; Kalinak, P; Kalisky, M; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kamermans, R; Kanaki, K; Kang, E; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, M M; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, D J; Kim, D S; Kim, D W; Kim, H N; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S; Kim, S H; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bosing, C; Kliemant, M; Klovning, A; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Koch, K; Kohler, M; Kolevatov, R; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskih, A; Kornas, E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kozlov, K; Kral, J; Kralik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krumbhorn, D; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; La Rocca, P; Ladron de Guevara, P; Lafage, V; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; Larsen, D T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Bornec, Y; Lea, R; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lefevre, F; Lehnert, J; Leistam, L; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; Leon Monzon, I; Leon Vargas, H; Levai, P; Li, X; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; Lopez Noriega, M; Lopez Torres, E; Lovhoiden, G; Lu, X G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Mal'Kevich, D; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Mares, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marin, A; Markert, C; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martinez, M I; Martinez Davalos, A; Martinez Garcia, G; Martynov, Y; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastromarco, M; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayani, D; Mayer, C; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mendez Lorenzo, P; Menis, I; Mercado Perez, J; Meres, M; Mereu, P; Miake, Y; Midori, J; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Miskowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, A K; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montano Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Muller, H; Munhoz, M G; Munoz, J; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Navach, F; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nendaz, F; Newby, J; Nicassio, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Obayashi, H; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S K; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otterlund, I; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Jayarathna, S P; Paic, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Peresunko, D; Perez Lara, C E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Peters, A J; Petracek, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piuz, F; Piyarathna, D B; Platt, R; Ploskon, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polak, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf, S; Pospisil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, V; Putis, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Rademakers, O; Radomski, S; Raiha, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramirez Reyes, A; Rammler, M; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Rasanen, S S; Read, K F; Real, J; Redlich, K; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J P; Reygers, K; Ricaud, H; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M; Rohr, D; Rohrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosinsky, P; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Rousseau, S; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Rivetti, A; Rusanov, I; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safarik, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Saiz, P; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Samanta, T; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Sandor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Saturnini, P; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, P A; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Sgura, I; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siemiarczuk, T; Silenzi, A; Silvermyr, D; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sogaard, C; Soloviev, A; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, J; Song, M; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Stefanini, G; Steinbeck, T; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stocco, D; Stock, R; Stokkevag, C H; Stolpovskiy, M; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vasquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Swoboda, D; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szostak, A; Tagridis, C; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tauro, A; Tavlet, M; Tejeda Munoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thader, J; Thomas, D; Thomas, J H; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Traczyk, T; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Turvey, A J; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Urban, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vacchi, A; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vande Vyvre, P; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernekohl, D C; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Ovrebekk, G; Vrlakova, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wan, R; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I K; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zabrodin, E; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Zavada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zenin, A; Zgura, I; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zichichi, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M

    2010-01-01

    The first measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV is presented. For an event sample corresponding to the most central 5% of the hadronic cross section the pseudo-rapidity density of primary charged particles at mid-rapidity is 1584 +- 4 (stat) +- 76 (sys.), which corresponds to 8.3 +- 0.4 (sys.) per participating nucleon pair. This represents an increase of about a factor 1.9 relative to pp collisions at similar collision energies, and about a factor 2.2 to central Au-Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 0.2 TeV. This measurement provides the first experimental constraint for models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies.

  16. Ab initio full charge-density study of the atomic volume of α-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and exper...... and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation....

  17. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy: Mathematical formulation of the relation between the experimental observables and the optically driven charge density of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Tae; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) enables the visualization of the plasmon fields of nanoparticles via measurement of photon-electron interaction [S. T. Park et al., New J. Phys. 12, 123028 (2010), 10.1088/1367-2630/12/12/123028]. In this paper, the field integral, which is a mechanical work performed on a fast electron by the total electric field, plays a key role in understanding the interaction. Here, we reexamine the field integral and give the physical meaning by decomposing the contribution of the field from the charge-density distribution. It is found that the "near-field integral" (the near-field approximation of the field integral) can be expressed as a convolution of the two-dimensional projection of the optically driven charge-density distribution in the nanoparticle with a broad radial response function. This approach, which we call the "convolution method," is validated by applying it to Rayleigh scattering cases, where previous analytical expressions for the field integrals in near-field approximations are reproduced by the convolution method. The convolution method is applied to discrete dipole approximation calculations of a silver nanorod, and the nature of the induced charge-density distributions of its plasmons is discussed.

  18. Model-independent measurement of the charge density distribution along an Fe atom probe needle using off-axis electron holography without mean inner potential effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, V., E-mail: v.migunov@fz-juelich.de; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); London, A. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Farle, M. [Fakultät für Physik and Center of Nanointegration (CeNIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    The one-dimensional charge density distribution along an electrically biased Fe atom probe needle is measured using a model-independent approach based on off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Both the mean inner potential and the magnetic contribution to the phase shift are subtracted by taking differences between electron-optical phase images recorded with different voltages applied to the needle. The measured one-dimensional charge density distribution along the needle is compared with a similar result obtained using model-based fitting of the phase shift surrounding the needle. On the assumption of cylindrical symmetry, it is then used to infer the three-dimensional electric field and electrostatic potential around the needle with ∼10 nm spatial resolution, without needing to consider either the influence of the perturbed reference wave or the extension of the projected potential outside the field of view of the electron hologram. The present study illustrates how a model-independent approach can be used to measure local variations in charge density in a material using electron holography in the presence of additional contributions to the phase, such as those arising from changes in mean inner potential and specimen thickness.

  19. Real-time density matrix renormalization group dynamics of spin and charge transport in push-pull polyenes and related systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tirthankar; Ramasesha, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of terminal substituents on the dynamics of spin and charge transport in donor-acceptor substituted polyenes [D-(CH)x-A] chains, also known as push-pull polyenes. We employ a long-range correlated model Hamiltonian for the D-(CH)x-A system, and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group technique for time propagating the wave packet obtained by injecting a hole at a terminal site, in the ground state of the system. Our studies reveal that the end groups do not affect spin and charge velocities in any significant way, but change the amount of charge transported. We have compared these push-pull systems with donor-acceptor substituted polymethine imine (PMI), D-(CHN)x-A, systems in which besides electron affinities, the nature of pz orbitals in conjugation also alternate from site to site. We note that spin and charge dynamics in the PMIs are very different from that observed in the case of push-pull polyenes, and within the time scale of our studies, transport of spin and charge leads to the formation of a “quasi-static” state.

  20. Investigation of space charge distribution of low-density polyethylene/GO-GNF (graphene oxide from graphite nanofiber) nanocomposite for HVDC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jin; Ha, Son-Tung; Lee, Gun Joo; Nam, Jin Ho; Ryu, Ik Hyun; Nam, Su Hyun; Park, Cheol Min; In, Insik; Kim, Jiwan; Han, Chul Jong

    2013-05-01

    This paper reported a research on space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites with different types of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) at low filler content (0.05 wt%) under high DC electric field. Effect of addition of graphene oxide or graphene, its dispersion in LDPE polymer matrix on the ability to suppress space charge generation will be investigated and compared with MgO/LDPE nanocomposite at the same filler concentration. At an applied electric field of 80 kV/mm, a positive packet-like charge was observed in both neat LDPE, MgO/LDPE, and graphene/LDPE nanocomposites, whereas only little homogenous space charge was observed in GO/LDPE nanocomposites, especially with GO synthesized from graphite nano fiber (GNF) which is only -100 nm in diameter. Our research also suggests that dispersion of graphene oxide particles on the polymer matrix plays a significant role to the performance of nanocomposites on suppressing packet-like space charge. From these results, it is expected that nano-sized GO synthesized from GNF can be a promising filler material to LDPE composite for HVDC applications.

  1. Surface charge dynamics and OH and H number density distributions in near-surface nanosecond pulse discharges at a liquid / vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Caroline; Petrishchev, Vitaly; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2015-10-01

    The present work provides insight into surface charge dynamics and kinetics of radical species reactions in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained at a liquid-vapor interface, above a distilled water surface. The near-surface plasma is sustained using two different discharge configurations, a surface ionization wave discharge between two exposed metal electrodes and a double dielectric barrier discharge. At low discharge pulse repetition rates (~100 Hz), residual surface charge deposition after the discharge pulse is a minor effect. At high pulse repetition rates (~10 kHz), significant negative surface charge accumulation over multiple discharge pulses is detected, both during alternating polarity and negative polarity pulse trains. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and two-photon absorption LIF (TALIF) line imaging are used for in situ measurements of spatial distributions of absolute OH and H atom number densities in near-surface, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas. Both in a surface ionization wave discharge and in a double dielectric barrier discharge, peak measured H atom number density, [H] is much higher compared to peak OH number density, due to more rapid OH decay in the afterglow between the discharge pulses. Higher OH number density was measured near the regions with higher plasma emission intensity. Both OH and especially H atoms diffuse out of the surface ionization wave plasma volume, up to several mm from the liquid surface. Kinetic modeling calculations using a quasi-zero-dimensional H2O vapor / Ar plasma model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrate the experimental capability of in situ radical species number density distribution measurements in liquid-vapor interface plasmas, in a simple canonical geometry that lends itself to the validation of kinetic models.

  2. Method for Slater-Type Density Fitting for Intermolecular Electrostatic Interactions with Charge Overlap. I. The Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrn, Anders; Hermida-Ramon, Jose M; Karlström, Gunnar

    2016-05-10

    The effects of charge overlap, or charge penetration, are neglected in most force fields and interaction terms in QM/MM methods. The effects are however significant at intermolecular distances near the van der Waals minimum. In the present study, we propose a method to evaluate the intermolecular Coloumb interaction using Slater-type functions, thus explicitly modeling the charge overlap. The computational cost of the method is low, which allows it to be used in large systems with most force fields as well as in QM/MM schemes. The charge distribution is modeled as a distributed multipole expansion up to quadrupole and Slater-type functions of angular momentum up to L = 1. The exponents of the Slater-type functions are obtained using a divide-and-conquer method to avoid the curse of dimensionality that otherwise is present for large nonlinear optimizations. A Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is applied in the fitting process. A set of parameters is obtained for each molecule, and the process is fully automated. Calculations have been performed in the carbon monoxide and the water dimers to illustrate the model. Results show a very good accuracy of the model with relative errors in the electrostatic potential lower than 3% over all reasonable separations. At very short distances where the charge overlaps is the most significant, errors are lower than 8% and lower than 3.5% at distances near the van der Waals minimum.

  3. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  4. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  5. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Ehab; Adam, Jaroslav; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanuel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Ramni; Gupta, Anik; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Harton, Austin; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Kamal Hussain; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kompaniets, Mikhail; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Sudhir; Raniwala, Rashmi; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauch, Wolfgang; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Rohni; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Jihye; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; 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Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Alexander; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Sergey; Voloshin, Kirill; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Ping; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    We present the first wide-range measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density distribution, for different centralities (the 0-5%, 5-10%, 10-20%, and 20-30% most central events) in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed using the full coverage of the ALICE detectors, -5.0 < $\\eta$ < 5.5, and employing a special analysis technique based on collisions arising from LHC ' satellite' bunches. We present the pseudorapidity density as a function of the number of participating nucleons as well as an extrapolation to the total number of produced charged particles ($N_{ch}$ = 17165 +/- 772 for the 0-5% most central collisions). From the measured d$N_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ distribution we derive the rapidity density distribution, d$N_{ch}$/dy, under simple assumptions. The rapidity density distribution is found to be significantly wider than the predictions of the Landau model, which reproduce data well at RHIC energies. We assess the validity of longitudinal sca...

  6. X-ray derived experimental charge density distribution in GaF{sub 3} and VF{sub 3} solid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujatha, K.; Israel, S., E-mail: israel.samuel@gmail.com; Anzline, C.; Niranjana Devi, R.; Sheeba, R.A.J.R.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure and bonding features of metal and transition metal fluorides in low oxidation states, GaF{sub 3} and VF{sub 3}, have been studied from precise single crystal X-ray diffraction data using multipole and maximum entropy methods. The topology of the charge density is analyzed and the (3,−1) bond critical points are determined. Existences of ionic nature of bonding in low valent fluorine compounds are clearly evident. The spherical core of metal atom and aspherical or twisted core of transition metal atom reveal the fact that GaF{sub 3} is much more rigid than VF{sub 3}. Aspherical cores of the polarized ligand atoms are also visible in the two-dimensional density distribution pictures. The true valence charge density surfaces with encapsulating the atomic basins maps are elucidated. An elongated saddle with mid-bond density of 0.6191 e/Å{sup 3}, observed in the compound VF{sub 3}, shows that its lattice is less rigid and has more ionic character than GaF{sub 3}.

  7. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, E. [Academy of Scientific Research and Technology (ASRT), Cairo (Egypt); Abelev, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Adam, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Adamová, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Řež u Prahy (Czech Republic); Adare, A.M. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Aggarwal, M.M. [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Aglieri Rinella, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Agnello, M. [Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Agocs, A.G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Agostinelli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Università and Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ahammed, Z. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Ahn, S.U.; Ahn, S.A. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Aimo, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università and Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Ajaz, M. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Akindinov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, D. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alessandro, B. [Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); and others

    2013-11-04

    We present the first wide-range measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density distribution, for different centralities (the 0–5%, 5–10%, 10–20%, and 20–30% most central events) in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed using the full coverage of the ALICE detectors, −5.0<η<5.5, and employing a special analysis technique based on collisions arising from LHC ‘satellite’ bunches. We present the pseudorapidity density as a function of the number of participating nucleons as well as an extrapolation to the total number of produced charged particles (N{sub ch}=17165±772 for the 0–5% most central collisions). From the measured dN{sub ch}/dη distribution we derive the rapidity density distribution, dN{sub ch}/dy, under simple assumptions. The rapidity density distribution is found to be significantly wider than the predictions of the Landau model. We assess the validity of longitudinal scaling by comparing to lower energy results from RHIC. Finally the mechanisms of the underlying particle production are discussed based on a comparison with various theoretical models.

  8. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  9. Relationship between hole density and charge-ordering wave vector in Sr14-xCaxCu24O41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusydi, A.; Berciu, M.; Abbamonte, P.; Smadici, S.; Eisaki, H.; Fujimaki, Y.; Uchida, S.; Ruebhausen, M.; Sawatzky, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of holes in Sr14-xCaxCu24O41 is revisited with semiempirical reanalysis of the x-ray absorption data and exact diagonalization cluster calculations. Another interpretation of the XAS data leads to much larger ladder hole densities than previously suggested. These new hole densities

  10. Electron density characteristics and charge transfer effect of hydrogen bond O-H···Pt(II): atoms in molecules study and natural bond orbital analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiqiu; Li, Xiwen; Li, Yan; Chen, Dezhan

    2013-11-01

    In this report, we extended the works of Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] on the nature of O-H...Pt hydrogen bond in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex, by computational study of O-H...Pt interaction in [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)], with emphasis on charge transfer effect in this interaction of platinum(II) and hydrogen atom. According to the crystallographic geometry reported by José María Casas et al., [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)] possesses one O-H...Pt hydrogen bridging interaction, similar to the case in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex. On the basis of topological criteria of electron density, we characterised this O-H...Pt interaction. Charge transferred between platinum(II) and σ*O-H orbital in this complex was calculated by using NBO method. The stabilised energy associated to charge transfer was estimated using a direct proportionality, that is 2-3 eV per electron transferred. Charge transfer effects in O-H...Pt hydrogen bonds were studied for these two complexes. Our results indicate that the interaction of O-H...Pt is closed-shell in nature with significant charge transfer, and that charge transfer effect is not negligible in the interaction of O-H...Pt. The second conclusion is different from the result of Rizzato et al.

  11. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite II: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Rossberg, A.; Ulrich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl (UO22+) on ferrihydrite has been evaluated with the charge distribution (CD) model for systems covering a very large range of conditions, i.e. pH, ionic strength, CO2 pressure, U(VI) concentration, and loading. Modeling suggests that uranyl forms bidentate inner sphere compl

  12. Influence of the density of states on the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution of the emitted fragments in nuclear heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleya, N. L.; Souza, S. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The fragmentation of thermalized sources is studied using a version of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model which employs state densities that take the pairing gap in the nuclear levels into account. Attention is focused on the properties of the charge distributions observed in the breakup of the source. Since the microcanonical version of the model used in this study provides the primary fragment excitation energy distribution, one may correlate the reduction of the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution with the increasing occupation of high-energy states. Thus, in the framework of this model, such staggering tends to disappear as a function of the total excitation energy of the source, although the energy per particle may be small for large systems. We also find that, although the deexcitation of the primary fragments should, in principle, blur these odd-even effects as the fragments follow their decay chains, the consistent treatment of pairing may significantly enhance these staggering effects on the final yields. In the framework of this model, we find that odd-even effects in the charge distributions should be observed in the fragmentation of relatively light systems at very low excitation energies. Our results also suggest that the odd-even staggering may provide useful information on the nuclear state density.

  13. Investigation of charges carrier density in phosphorus and boron doped SiN{sub x}:H layers for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Salomon, B., E-mail: bertrand.paviet-salomon@epfl.ch [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Gall, S. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Slaoui, A. [Institut de l’Électronique du Solide et des Systèmes (InESS), Unité Mixte de Recherche 7163 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Université de Strasbourg (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 20 CR, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We investigate the properties of phosphorus and boron-doped silicon nitride films. ► Phosphorus-doped layers yield higher lifetimes than undoped ones. ► The fixed charges density decreases when increasing the films phosphorus content. ► Boron-doped films feature very low lifetimes. ► These doped layers are of particular interest for crystalline silicon solar cells. -- Abstract: Dielectric layers are of major importance in crystalline silicon solar cells processing, especially as anti-reflection coatings and for surface passivation purposes. In this paper we investigate the fixed charge densities (Q{sub fix}) and the effective lifetimes (τ{sub eff}) of phosphorus (P) and boron (B) doped silicon nitride layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. P-doped layers exhibit a higher τ{sub eff} than standard undoped layers. In contrast, B-doped layers exhibit lower τ{sub eff}. A strong Q{sub fix} decrease is to be seen when increasing the P content within the film. Based on numerical simulations we also demonstrate that the passivation obtained with P- and B-doped layers are limited by the interface states rather than by the fixed charges.

  14. Challenging Adiabatic Time-dependent Density Functional Theory with a Hubbard Dimer: The Case of Time-Resolved Long-Range Charge Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Johanna I

    2014-01-01

    We explore an asymmetric two-fermion Hubbard dimer to test the accuracy of the adiabatic approximation of time-dependent density functional theory in modelling time-resolved charge transfer. We show that the model shares essential features of a ground state long-range molecule in real-space, and by applying a resonant field we show that the model also reproduces essential traits of the CT dynamics. The simplicity of the model allows us to propagate with an "adiabatically-exact" approximation, i.e. one that uses the exact ground-state exchange-correlation functional, and compare with the exact propagation. This allows us to study the impact of the time-dependent charge-transfer step feature in the exact correlation potential of real molecules on the resulting dynamics. Tuning the parameters of the dimer allows a study both of charge-transfer between open-shell fragments and between closed-shell fragments. We find that the adiabatically-exact functional is unable to properly transfer charge, even in situations ...

  15. Magnetic field effects on the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in pressurized {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartsovnik, M.V., E-mail: mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Biberacher, W.; Andres, D.; Jakob, S.; Kunz, M.; Neumaier, K. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mueller, H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kushch, N.D. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-01

    Coupling of a magnetic field to the orbital and spin degrees of freedom of charge carriers is well known to cause suppression of superconductivity. While the orbital pair-breaking generally dominates in conventional superconductors, the Pauli paramagnetic effect may become important in some heavy fermion compounds or strongly anisotropic materials such as high-T{sub c} or organic superconductors. The same two mechanisms are predicted to be operative also in the case of charge-density-wave (CDW) ordering. However, now they lead to opposite effects: the paramagnetic coupling weakens the CDW interaction whereas the orbital coupling enhances it in a system with an imperfectly nested Fermi surface. Here we report on the experimental evidence of both kinds of magnetic field effects on the CDW and superconducting instabilities in the layered organic metal {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} under quasihydrostatic pressure.

  16. Magnetic field effects on the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in pressurized α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsovnik, M. V.; Biberacher, W.; Andres, D.; Jakob, S.; Kunz, M.; Neumaier, K.; Müller, H.; Kushch, N. D.

    2012-06-01

    Coupling of a magnetic field to the orbital and spin degrees of freedom of charge carriers is well known to cause suppression of superconductivity. While the orbital pair-breaking generally dominates in conventional superconductors, the Pauli paramagnetic effect may become important in some heavy fermion compounds or strongly anisotropic materials such as high-Tc or organic superconductors. The same two mechanisms are predicted to be operative also in the case of charge-density-wave (CDW) ordering. However, now they lead to opposite effects: the paramagnetic coupling weakens the CDW interaction whereas the orbital coupling enhances it in a system with an imperfectly nested Fermi surface. Here we report on the experimental evidence of both kinds of magnetic field effects on the CDW and superconducting instabilities in the layered organic metal α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 under quasihydrostatic pressure.

  17. Local charge neutrality condition, Fermi level and majority carrier density of a semiconductor with multiple localized multi-level intrinsic/impurity defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken K. Chin

    2011-01-01

    For semiconductors with localized intrinsic/impurity defects,intentionally doped or unintentionally incorporated,that have multiple transition energy levels among charge states,the general formulation of the local charge neutrality condition is given for the determination of the Fermi level and the majority carrier density.A graphical method is used to illustrate the solution of the problem.Relations among the transition energy levels of the multi-level defect are derived using the graphical method.Numerical examples are given for p-doping of the CdTe thin film used in solar panels and semi-insulating Si to illustrate the relevance and importance of the issues discussed in this work.

  18. Measurement of the forward charged particle pseudorapidity density in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using a displaced interaction point

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Georgiev, V.; Giani, S.; Grzanka, L.; Hammerbauer, J.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajíček, M.V.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Peroutka, Z.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sodzawiczny, T.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K.

    2015-01-01

    The the pseudorapidity density of charged particles dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ is measured by the TOTEM experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV within the range 3.9 0 MeV/c, produced in inelastic interactions with at least one charged particle in −7 < $\\eta$ < −6 or 3.7< $\\eta$ < 4.8. The dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ has been found to decrease with |$\\eta$|, from 5.11 ± 0.73 at $\\eta$ =3.95 to 1.81 ± 0.56 at $\\eta$ = −6.925. Several MC generators are compared to the data and are found to be within the systematic uncertainty of the measurement.

  19. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  20. DNA Condensation by Partially Acetylated Poly(amido amine Dendrimers: Effects of Dendrimer Charge Density on Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald G. Larson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of poly(amido amine (or PAMAM dendrimers to condense semiflexible dsDNA and penetrate cell membranes gives them great potential in gene therapy and drug delivery but their high positive surface charge makes them cytotoxic. Here, we describe the effects of partial neutralization by acetylation on DNA condensation using light scattering, circular dichroism, and single molecule imaging of dendrimer-DNA complexes combed onto surfaces and tethered to those surfaces under flow. We find that DNA can be condensed by generation-five (G5 dendrimers even when the surface charges are more than 65% neutralized, but that such dendrimers bind negligibly when an end-tethered DNA is stretched in flow. We also find that when fully charged dendrimers are introduced by flow to end-tethered DNA, all DNA molecules become equally highly coated with dendrimers at a rate that becomes very fast at high dendrimer concentration, and that dendrimers remain bound during subsequent flow of dendrimer-free buffer. These results suggest that the presence of dendrimer-free DNA coexisting with dendrimer-bound DNA after bulk mixing of the two in solution may result from diffusion-limited irreversible dendrimer-DNA binding, rather than, or in addition to, the previously proposed cooperative binding mechanism of dendrimers to DNA.

  1. In-plane and transverse superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism in the presence of charge-density waves in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the superconducting transition was measured in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound, and some experimental improvements, allowed us to measure the superconducting fluctuation effects in the two main crystallographic directions. These results reveal that the nonlocal electrodynamic effects on the FD are highly anisotropic, and they also discard a possible contribution to the FD coming from the charge-density waves (CDWs) appearing below TCDW>TC in 2H-NbSe2 , in agreement with a phenomenological estimate.

  2. Dopant selection for control of charge carrier density and mobility in amorphous indium oxide thin-film transistors: Comparison between Si- and W-dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Aikawa, Shinya; Ou-Yang, Wei; Gao, Xu; Kizu, Takio; Lin, Meng-Fang; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of oxygen vacancy suppression on dopant species in amorphous indium oxide (a-InOx) thin film transistors (TFTs) is reported. In a-InOx TFTs incorporating equivalent atom densities of Si- and W-dopants, absorption of oxygen in the host a-InOx matrix was found to depend on difference of Gibbs free energy of the dopants for oxidation. For fully oxidized films, the extracted channel conductivity was higher in the a-InOx TFTs containing dopants of small ionic radius. This can be explained by a reduction in the ionic scattering cross sectional area caused by charge screening effects.

  3. Measuring one-dimensional and two-dimensional impurity density profiles on TEXTOR using combined charge exchange-beam emission spectroscopy and ultrasoft x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, M.; Jakubowska, K.; Hellermann, M. von; Jaspers, R.; Donné, A. J. H.; Shmaenok, L.

    2004-10-01

    Two techniques are presented that allow us to measure impurity density profiles in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma. The one-dimensional profiles are gathered by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) in combination with beam emission spectroscopy (BES). Combining CXRS and BES eliminate the need for absolute calibration. For two-dimensional profiles an ultrasoft x-ray tomography system has been developed. The system is spectrally resolved and produces local emissivity profiles of several ionization stages of impurities. Both systems are presently being commissioned. They are complementary and give an insight into the impurity distribution and transport in plasmas.

  4. Direct space decomposition of ELI-D: interplay of charge density and pair-volume function for different bonding situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Frank R; Kohout, Miroslav; Grin, Yuri

    2008-10-01

    The topological features, i.e., gradients and curvatures of the same-spin electron pair restricted electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) in position space are analyzed in terms of those of the electron density and the pair-volume function. The analysis of the topology of these constituent functions and their interplay on ELI-D attractor formation for a number of molecules representing chemically different bonding situations allows distinguishing between different chemical bonding scenarios on a quantum mechanical basis without the recourse to orbitals. The occurrence of the Laplacian of the electron density in the expression for the Laplacian of ELI-D allows us to establish a physical link between electron localizability and electron pairing as displayed by ELI-D and the role of Laplacian of the density in this context.

  5. Magnetothermopower in unconventional charge density wave ground state of α-(BEDT-TTF){_2}KHg(SCN){_4}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, B.; Maki, K.; Virosztek, A.; Ványolos, A.

    2004-04-01

    We have investigated theoretically the thermoelectric power and the Nernst effect in unconventional density waves (UDW). Due to the presence of magnetic field, Landau levels are formed, and the low energy excitations change from gapless to gapped. The present results account consistently for the recent data of magnetothermopower in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 obtained by Choi et al. (Phys. Rev. B, 65, 205119 (2002)). This confirms further our identification of low temperature phase (LTP) in this salt as UCDW. Key words. density waves, α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4, thermoelectric power.

  6. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odorici, F., E-mail: fabrizio.odorici@bo.infn.it; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A. [INFN—Bologna, Viale B. Pichat, 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rizzoli, R. [INFN—Bologna, Viale B. Pichat, 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); CNR–Istituto per la Microelettronica ed i Microsistemi, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L. [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to “screen” the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  7. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorici, F.; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  8. Low-energy charge-density excitations in MgB2: Striking interplay between single-particle and collective behavior for large momenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y Q; Chow, P C; Restrepo, O D; Takano, Y; Togano, K; Kito, H; Ishii, H; Chen, C C; Liang, K S; Chen, C T; Tsuda, S; Shin, S; Kao, C C; Ku, W; Eguiluz, A G

    2006-10-27

    A sharp feature in the charge-density excitation spectra of single-crystal MgB2, displaying a remarkable cosinelike, periodic energy dispersion with momentum transfer (q) along the c* axis, has been observed for the first time by high-resolution nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS). Time-dependent density-functional theory calculations show that the physics underlying the NIXS data is strong coupling between single-particle and collective degrees of freedom, mediated by large crystal local-field effects. As a result, the small-q collective mode residing in the single-particle excitation gap of the B pi bands reappears periodically in higher Brillouin zones. The NIXS data thus embody a novel signature of the layered electronic structure of MgB2.

  9. Detailed investigation of the phase transition in KxP4W8O32 and experimental arguments for a charge density wave due to hidden nesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolincio, Kamil; Pérez, Olivier; Hébert, Sylvie; Fertey, Pierre; Pautrat, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Detailed structural and magnetotransport properties of monophosphate tungsten bronze Kx(PO2)4(WO3)8 single crystals are reported. Both galvanomagnetic and thermal properties are shown to be consistent with a charge density wave electronic transition due to hidden nesting of the quasi-1D portion of the Fermi surface. We also observe the enhancement of electronic anisotropy due to reconstruction of the Fermi surface at the Peierls transition. The resistivity presents a thermal hysteresis suggesting a first-order nature characteristic of a strong-coupling scenario. However, other measurements such as the change of carrier density demonstrate a second-order Peierls scenario with weak-coupling features. We suggest that the structural transition driven by the residual strain in the K-P-O environment is responsible for the resistivity hysteresis and modifies the Fermi surface which then helps the rise to the second-order Peierls instability.

  10. Experimental charge-density study of paracetamol - multipole refinement in the presence of a disordered methyl group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, J. M.; Dominiak, P. M.; Wilson, C. C.; Wozniak, K.

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction data for paracetamol, different approaches (including those based on pseudoatom databases) to modeling of the static experimental electron density in the presence of a dynamically disordered molecular fragment were tested. The electrostatic properties obtained were compared with the results of theoretical single-point periodic calculations.

  11. Charge density study with the Maximum Entropy Method on model data of silicon. A search for non-nuclear attractors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.Y.; Briels, W.J.; Feil, D.; Velde, te G.; Baerends, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    1990 Sakata and Sato applied the maximum entropy method (MEM) to a set of structure factors measured earlier by Saka and Kato with the Pendellösung method. They found the presence of non-nuclear attractors, i.e., maxima in the density between two bonded atoms. We applied the MEM to a limited set of

  12. The nature of photogenerated charge separation among different crystal facets of BiVO4 studied by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taifeng; Zhou, Xin; Dupuis, Michel; Li, Can

    2015-09-28

    Charge separation among different crystal facets of a semiconductor has been observed experimentally, but the underlying reasons behind this phenomenon are unknown. In this work, the activation energies of carrier hopping and the mobility of electron/hole transport along seven low-index crystal orientations of bulk BiVO4 have been calculated using a small polaron model. The calculated mobility and our previous experimental results reveal that there is a parallel relationship between the carrier mobility along the crystal axis and the carrier preferred accumulation on the corresponding crystal facets. It is proposed that the mobility of electrons (or holes) along the crystal axis [hkl] might be essentially related to the charge separation among the indices of corresponding facets (hkl); namely, the mobility of electrons (or holes) along the crystal axis [hkl] is the largest among all possible crystal axes, and the photogenerated electrons (or holes) tend to be accumulated on the indices of the corresponding facet (hkl) when the surface factors like surface band bending, surface energetic differences, etc. are not considered.

  13. Hall effect in the low charge-carrier density ferromagnet UCo{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, V.H.; Troc, R.; Bukowski, Z. [W. Trzebiatowski Institute for Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland); Paschen, S.; Steglich, F. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The Hall coefficient R {sub H} of ferromagnetic UCo{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 2} (T {sub C}=64.5 K) has been measured on a single crystal in the temperature range 2-300 K and in magnetic fields up to 7 T. The values of the normal R{sub 0} and anomalous R{sub s} coefficients were estimated by comparing R{sub H}(B) with magnetisation M (B) data. The charge carrier concentration is found to decrease rapidly when the system undergoes a transition to the ferromagnetic ordered state. The charge mobility appears to fall down by as much as two orders of magnitude for temperatures from 20 K to 2 K. We ascribe this behaviour to an enormous decrease of the carrier collision time. The temperature dependencies of the Hall mean free path and mobility can be consistently interpreted within the 2D-weak localization feature. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. X-ray diffraction observations of a charge-density-wave order in superconducting ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.54 single crystals in zero magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, E.; Chang, J.; Hücker, M.;

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements show that the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.54, with ortho-II oxygen order, has charge-density-wave order in the absence of an applied magnetic field. The dominant wave vector of the charge density wave is qCDW=(0,0.328(2),0.5), with the in-plane compone...

  15. Investigating the effect of acene-fusion and trifluoroacetyl substitution on the electronic and charge transport properties by density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Irfan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We designed novel derivatives of 4,6-di(thiophen-2-ylpyrimidine (DTP. Two benchmark strategies including mesomerically deactivating group, as well as the extension of π-conjugation bridge (acene-fusion have been employed to enhance the electrical and charge transport properties. The density functional theory (DFT and time dependent DFT methods have been used to get optimized geometries in ground and first excited state, respectively. The structural properties (geometric parameters, electronic properties (frontier molecular orbitals; highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, and important charge transport properties are discussed to establish a molecular level structure–property relationship among these derivatives. Our calculated electronic spectra i.e., absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence have been found in good semi-quantitative agreement with available experimental data. All the newly designed derivatives displayed significantly improved electron injection ability than those of the parent molecule. The values of reorganization energy and transfer integral elucidate that DTP is a potential hole transport material. Based on our present investigation, it is expected that the naphtho and anthra derivatives of DTP are better hole transporters than those of some well-known charge transporter materials like naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and pentacene.

  16. Charge density wave fluctuations in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and their competition with superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Thomas; Lester, Christopher; Hayden, Stephen [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bombardi, Alessandro; Senn, Mark [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The recent observations of charge and stripe correlations in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} has reinvigorated interest in their role in influencing the superconductivity of the cuprates. However, structural complications of these systems makes it difficult to isolate the effect the lattice has in inducing the charge order. Here, we report hard X-ray diffraction measurements on three compositions (x=0.11,0.12,0.13) of the high-temperature superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, a canonical example of HTS with T{sub c} ∼ 35 K and a simple crystal structure. All samples show charge-density-wave (CDW) order with onset temperatures in the range 51-80 K and ordering wavevectors close to (0.23,0,0.5). We present a phase diagram of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} including the pseudogap phase, CDW and magnetic order.

  17. Charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the 7-azaindole dimer. A hybrid configuration interactions singles/time-dependent density functional theory description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M

    2006-01-26

    The hybrid configuration interaction singles/time dependent density functional theory approach of Dreuw and Head-Gordon [Dreuw, A.; Head-Gordon, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 4007] has been applied to study the potential energy landscape and accessibility of the charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the dimer of 7-azaindole, which has been traditionally considered a model for DNA base pairing. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state preferentially stabilizes the product of a single proton transfer. In this situation, the crossing between this state and the photoactive electronic state of the dimer is accessible. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state has a very steep potential energy profile with respect to any single proton-transfer coordinate and, in contrast, an extremely flat potential energy profile with respect to the stretch of the single proton-transfer complex. This is predicted to bring about a pair of rare fragments of the 7-azaindole dimer, physically separated and hence having very long lifetimes. This could have implications in the DNA base pairs of which the system is an analogue, in the form of replication errors.

  18. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernenkaya, A.; Morherr, A.; Backes, S.; Popp, W.; Witt, S.; Kozina, X.; Nepijko, S. A.; Bolte, M.; Medjanik, K.; Öhrwall, G.; Krellner, C.; Baumgarten, M.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.; Jeschke, H. O.; Valentí, R.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2.

  19. X-ray study of femtosecond structural dynamics in the 2D charge density wave compound 1T-TaS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulhé, C., E-mail: laulhe@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin - BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Cario, L.; Corraze, B.; Janod, E. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel - UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, F-44322 Nantes (France); Huber, T. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, Physics Department, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lantz, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, F-91405 Orsay (France); Boulfaat, S. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin - BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferrer, A.; Mariager, S.O.; Johnson, J.A.; Grübel, S.; Lübcke, A.; Ingold, G.; Beaud, P. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232, Villigen (Switzerland); Johnson, S.L. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, Physics Department, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ravy, S. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin - BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-03-01

    1T-TaS{sub 2} is a 2D metallic compound which undergoes a series of electronically driven phase transitions toward charge density wave and Mott phases. Its intricate electron–phonon interactions and electron–electron correlations have been promising peculiar out-of-equilibrium dynamics. In this paper, we provide the first direct information on the atomic structure response to an ultra-fast infrared laser pulse in the commensurate phase of 1T-TaS{sub 2}, by using femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction. We show that ultra-fast excitation with near-infrared photons drives a displacive excitation of the amplitude mode of the commensurate charge density wave. About 3 ps after laser excitation, the system reaches a new, photo-induced state that is maintained for at least 10 ps. We give evidence that this long-lived state exhibits the same structural modulation as in the thermodynamically stable commensurate phase, with a large correlation length. Only the average amplitude of the modulation is found to decrease. We propose that the long-lived state is formed from the commensurate phase by reducing the modulation amplitude on few superlattice nodes. The underlying mechanism proposed is the annihilation of self-trapped polarons.

  20. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernenkaya, A; Morherr, A; Backes, S; Popp, W; Witt, S; Kozina, X; Nepijko, S A; Bolte, M; Medjanik, K; Öhrwall, G; Krellner, C; Baumgarten, M; Elmers, H J; Schönhense, G; Jeschke, H O; Valentí, R

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2.

  1. Experimental and theoretical charge-density analysis of 1,4-bis(5-hexyl-2-thienyl)butane-1,4-dione: applications of a virtual-atom model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maqsood; Nassour, Ayoub; Noureen, Sajida; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical charge densities of 1,4-bis(5-hexyl-2-thienyl)butane-1,4-dione, a precursor in the synthesis of thiophene-based semiconductors and organic solar cells, are presented. A dummy bond charges spherical atom model is applied besides the multipolar atom model. The results show that the dummy bond charges model is accurate enough to calculate electrostatic-derived properties which are comparable with those obtained by the multipolar atom model. The refinement statistics and the residual electron density values are found to be intermediate between the independent atom and the multipolar formalisms.

  2. The electron density of a-Oxalic acid dihydrate at 100 K by X-ray diffraction: a contribution to the IUCr Commission on Charge, Spin and Momentum Densities project on the accurate determination of electron densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, J.; Harkema, S.; Feil, D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of the determination of the electron density of u-oxalic acid dihydrate at 100 K by means of X-ray diffraction are reported as part of the project on the accurate determination of electron densities which was initiated by the International Union of Crystallography. An extensive data set,

  3. Effect of equivalent surface charge density on electrical field of positively beveled p-n junction%等效表面电荷对斜角造型p-n结表面电场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春瑜; 王颖; 朱长纯

    2008-01-01

    The space-charge layer (SCL) and surface depletion area (SDA) model for beveled p-n junction is presented. Thesurface space-charge density is calculated for depletion case of beveled p-n junction. Based on the finite difference method,the effect of the equivalent surface charge density on the surface depletion area for positively beveled p-n junction is alsostudied. Thyristors passivated with polyimide (PI) or polyester improved silicon paint (SP) are fabricated to verify the effectof equivalent surface charge on the peripheral surface of beveled p-n junction. The change of leakage current is sensitive tothe surface charges. It indicates that the selection of passivation materials is a significant process to ensure the breakdownvoltage capability of beveled devices.

  4. An analysis of the impact of native oxide, surface contamination and material density on total electron yield in the absence of surface charging effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Susumu; Ohya, Kaoru; Hirano, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-10-01

    The effects of the presence of a native oxide film or surface contamination as well as variations in material density on the total electron yield (TEY) of Ru and B4C were assessed in the absence of any surface charging effect. The experimental results were analyzed using semi-empirical Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrated that a native oxide film increased the TEY, and that this effect varied with film thickness. These phenomena were explained based on the effect of the backscattered electrons (BSEs) at the interface between Ru and RuO2, as well as the lower potential barrier of RuO2. Deviations in the material density from the theoretical values were attributed to the film deposition procedure based on fitting simulated TEY curves to experimental results. In the case of B4C, the TEY was enhanced by the presence of a 0.8-nm-thick surface contamination film consisting of oxygenated hydrocarbons. The effect of the low potential barrier of the contamination film was found to be significant, as the density of the B4C was much lower than that of the Ru. Comparing the simulation parameters generated in the present work with Joy's database, it was found that the model and the input parameters used in the simulations were sufficiently accurate.

  5. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  6. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( { } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  7. Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers%Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡祖权; 陈银华; 郑聚高; 刘昊; 郁明阳; 吴剑

    2011-01-01

    Time evolution of ionospheric D-region plasmas including the perturbations of electrons and charged aerosol particles is investigated under the conditions of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). It is shown that the time scale of decay of the electron density is in the order of an hour under typical PMSE conditions, in the majority of cases, the electron density is anticorrelated to the ion density, except that the radius of aerosol particles is greater than 50 nm. Also, the evolutions under varied parameters, such as the amplitude and width of perturbation, the aerosol particle radius, and the altitude of the PMSE occurrence are investigated. The obtained results are useful for interpreting the experimental observations.

  8. The Second Threshold Field of Charge-Density-Wave Conductor Rb0.3MoO3 in High Temperature Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da-Hua; XIONG Rui; WANG Jun-Feng; LI Chang-Zhen; YIN Di; YI Fan; TANG Wu-Feng; SHI Jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The switching and threshold properties of quasi-one-dimensional charge-density-wave conductor rubidium blue bronze Rb0.3MoO3 single crystals are investigated in a comparative high and large temperature range. Beyond the limit temperature 50 K of Littlewood's theory, even up to about 100K, typical sharp switching to negative or zero differential resistance is observed in E-I characteristic curves. Correspondingly, an obvious switching between two conducting states, from a lowly conducting state to a highly conducting state, is observed in the I-E characteristic curves in the same temperature range. Temperature dependence of the second threshold field ET2 accompanied by this kind of high field switching behaviour is firstly obtained. These new observations are discussed in the mechanism of the current inhomogeneity and redistribution due to the existence of transverse energy barriers suggested by Zhang et al. [Solid State Commun. 85 (1993) 121

  9. Argument for charge density wave sub-phases in the ground state of α-(BEDT-TTF) 2KHg(SCN) 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, N.; Perenboom, J. A. A. J.; Brooks, J. S.; Qualls, J. S.

    1998-07-01

    A resistive anomaly at temperature Tp in the title compound is associated with a Fermi surface reconstruction from a metallic to a (spin or charge) density wave state. At high magnetic fields a corresponding feature in the magnetoresistance above a field BK indicates the breaking of this state. We argue that TP indicates a second order phase line identical to that measured by specific heat methods and show that it decreases monotonically up to 30T. We find that Pauli (rather than orbital) effects, dominate the reduction in Tp. We further argue that BK is a first-order transition between two subphases below Tp. We compare the phase diagram with recent theoretical models for CDW and SDW ground states in high magnetic fields.

  10. Influence of the spatially inhomogeneous gap distribution on the quasiparticle current in c-axis junctions involving d-wave superconductors with charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekino, T.; Gabovich, A. M.; Li, Mai Suan; Szymczak, H.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The quasiparticle tunnel current J(V) between the superconducting ab-planes along the c-axis and the corresponding conductance G(V)=\\text{d}J/\\text{d}V were calculated for symmetric junctions composed of disordered d-wave layered superconductors partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWs). Here, V is the voltage. Both the checkerboard and unidirectional CDWs were considered. It was shown that the spatial spread of the CDW-pairing strength substantially smears the peculiarities of G(V) appropriate to uniform superconductors. The resulting curves G(V) become very similar to those observed for a number of cuprates in intrinsic junctions, e.g. mesas. In particular, the influence of CDWs may explain the peak-dip-hump structures frequently found for high-T c oxides.

  11. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forgan, E.M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A.T.;

    2015-01-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6...... with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements........54 at its superconducting transition temperature ∼60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar...

  12. Charge Density Wave and Crystal Structure of KxWO3 (x=0.20 and 0.22) Prepared by Hybrid Microwave Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Runze; Gao, Chaojun; Bu, Kun; Hao, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zichen; Wen, Lianjun; Guo, Juan; Chao, Mingju; Liang, Erjun; Yang, Lihong; Dong, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Potassium tungsten bronzes KxWO3 (x=0.20 and 0.22) with the coexistence of charge density wave (CDW) and superconductivity (SC) were prepared from K2WO4, WO3 and W powders using a hybrid microwave method. The structure refinement confirmed that all samples had a pure hexagonal phase with the space group of P63 /mcm. The distortion degree of W-O octahedron declines with x and is independent of synthesis condition for the same x (=0.20). The CDW transition is studied as a function of residual resistivity ratio. By increasing the crystallinity of sample, this transition can be suppressed, which is probably attributed to the interaction between CDW and defects in crystallites. The CDW transition temperature increases with x, which may be related to the decline of the distortion degree of W-O octahedron. The competition between CDW and SC is observed according to the resistivity and magnetization measurements.

  13. The self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory study of carbon adatoms using tuned Hubbard U parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Wanrun; Yu, Tianrong; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory is a useful tool for realizing the electronic structures of large molecular complex systems. In this study, we analyze the electronic structure of C61, formed by fullerene C60 with a carbon adatom, using the fully localized limit and pseudo self-interaction correction methods of DFTB to adjust the Hubbard U parameter (DFTB+U). The results show that both the methods used to adjust U can significantly reduce the molecular orbital energy of occupied states localized on the defect carbon atom and improve the gap between highest occupied molecular orbital(HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital(LUMO) of C61. This work will provide a methodological reference point for future DFTB calculations of the electronic structures of carbon materials.

  14. Vacuum expectation values of the current density and energy-momentum tensor for a charged scalar field in curved spacetime with toroidally compactified spatial dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, Aram; Kotanjyan, Anna; Sargsyan, Hayk; Simonyan, David

    2016-07-01

    The models with compact spatial dimensions appear in a number of fundamental physical theories. In particular, the idea of compactified dimensions has been extensively used in supergravity and superstring theories. In quantum field theory, the modification of the vacuum fluctuations spectrum by the periodicity conditions imposed on the field operator along compact dimensions leads to a number of interesting physical effects. A well known example of this kind, demonstrating the close relation between quantum phenomena and global geometry, is the topological Casimir effect. In models with extra compact dimensions, the Casimir energy creates a nontrivial potential for the compactification radius. This can serve as a stabilization mechanism for moduli fields and for the effective gauge couplings. The Casimir effect has also been considered as a possible origin for the dark energy in Kaluza-Klein-type and braneworld models. In the resent presentation we investigate the effects of the gravity and topology on the local properties of the quantum vacuum for a charged scalar field in the presence of a classical gauge field. Vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor and current density are investigated for a charged scalar field in dS spacetime with toroidally compact spatial dimensions in the presence of a classical constant gauge field. Due to the nontrivial topology, the latter gives rise to Aharonov-Bohm-like effect on the vacuum characteristics. The vacuum current density, energy density and stresses are even periodic functions of the magnetic flux enclosed by compact dimensions. For small values of the comoving lengths of compact dimensions, compared with the dS curvature radius, the effects of gravity on the topological contributions are small and the expectation values are expressed in terms of the corresponding quantities in the Minkowski bulk by the standard conformal relation. For large values of the comoving lengths, depending on the field mass, two

  15. Magnetothermopower study of the charge density wave state in a multiband organic conductor α - (BEDT - TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovska, Danica

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field dependence of the thermopower and Nernst effect of the multiband organic conductor α - (BEDT - TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is theoretically studied at low temperatures in the charge density wave (CDW) state, to fields of 30 T and several field directions. A theoretical model of quantum interlayer tunneling for the q1D charge carriers is used to probe the thermoelectric effects in the CDW state. The contribution from the q2D carriers is calculated by using the Boltzmann transport theory. The background components of the thermopower and Nernst effect as well as the quantum oscillations that originate from the closed Fermi surface orbits are analyzed. The model implies that in the CDW state, the properties of α - (BEDT - TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 are determined mostly by the orbits on the new open Fermi sheets. This is in accord with the previously reported CDW scenario of the low temperature state of α - (BEDT - TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 with imperfect nesting of the open Fermi surface sections.

  16. Measurement of the forward charged particle pseudorapidity density in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the TOTEM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Brogi, P; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Deile, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, M R; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajíček, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Magaletti, L; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vitek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J

    2012-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment has measured the charged particle pseudorapidity density dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV for 5.3<|$\\eta$|<6.4 in events with at least one charged particle with transverse momentum above 40 MeV/c in this pseudorapidity range. This extends the analogous measurement performed by the other LHC experiments to the previously unexplored forward $\\eta$ region. The measurement refers to more than 99% of non-diffractive processes and to single and double diffractive processes with diffractive masses above ~3.4 GeV/c$^2$, corresponding to about 95% of the total inelastic cross-section. The dN$_{ch}$/d$\\eta$ has been found to decrease with |$\\eta$|, from 3.84 $\\pm$ 0.01(stat) $\\pm$ 0.37(syst) at |$\\eta$| = 5.375 to 2.38 $\\pm$ 0.01(stat) $\\pm$ 0.21(syst) at |$\\eta$| = 6.375. Several MC generators have been compared to data; none of them has been found to fully describe the measurement.

  17. Determination of Charge Density of Cationic Starch by Colloidal Titration%胶体滴定法测定阳离子淀粉的电荷密度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宗华; 陈少平

    2001-01-01

    A particle charge detector (PCD) was applied to determine the end point of collo idal titration for cationic starch having small charge density.The results showe d that the curve of streaming potential indicated sharply the end point of titrati on for cationic starch.Degree of substitution obtained from colloidal titration was in good agreement with that determined by Kjeldahl method.%应用粒子电荷测定仪(PCD)的流动电位变化判定阳离子淀粉胶体滴定的终点。结果表明流 动电位曲线敏锐地指示了低电荷密度的阳离子淀粉胶体滴定的终点。测得的阳离子淀粉的取 代度与国标凯氏定氮法测得的数值相近,最大偏差为0.003。

  18. Variation of interface trap level charge density within the bandgap of 4H-SiC with varying oxide thickness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjeev K Gupta; A Azam; J Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial characteristics of metal oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structure with different thickness of SiO2, thermally grown in steam ambient on Si-face of 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate were investigated. Variations in interface trapped level density (Dit) was systematically studied employing high-low (H-L) frequency – method. It was found that the distribution of Dit within the bandgap of 4H-SiC varied with oxide thickness. The calculated Dit value near the midgap of 4H-SiC remained almost stable for all oxide thicknesses in the range of 109 –1010 cm-2 eV-1. The Dit near the conduction band edge had been found to be of the order of 1011 cm-2 eV-1 for thicker oxides and for thinner oxides Dit was found to be the range of 1010 cm-2 eV-1. The process had direct relevance in the fabrication of MOS-based device structures.

  19. Density anomaly of charged hard spheres of different diameters in a mixture with core-softened model solvent. Monte Carlo simulation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hribar-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Very recently the effect of equisized charged hard sphere solutes in a mixture with core-softened fluid model on the structural and thermodynamic anomalies of the system has been explored in detail by using Monte Carlo simulations and integral equations theory (J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 137, 244502 (2012. Our objective of the present short work is to complement this study by considering univalent ions of unequal diameters in a mixture with the same soft-core fluid model. Specifically, we are interested in the analysis of changes of the temperature of maximum density (TMD lines with ion concentration for three model salt solutes, namely sodium chloride, potassium chloride and rubidium chloride models. We resort to Monte Carlo simulations for this purpose. Our discussion also involves the dependences of the pair contribution to excess entropy and of constant volume heat capacity on the temperature of maximum density line. Some examples of the microscopic structure of mixtures in question in terms of pair distributions functions are given in addition.

  20. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, E. M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; Hardy, W. N.; Christensen, N. B.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Hücker, M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ~60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.

  1. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, E M; Blackburn, E; Holmes, A T; Briffa, A K R; Chang, J; Bouchenoire, L; Brown, S D; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D; Hardy, W N; Christensen, N B; Zimmermann, M V; Hücker, M; Hayden, S M

    2015-12-09

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ∼ 60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.

  2. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-01

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  3. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-07

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  4. Centrality dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, Kenneth; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Ban, Jaroslav; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdermann, Eleni; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biolcati, Emanuele; Blanc, Aurelien Joseph; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Bock, Nicolas; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bombonati, Carlo; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Bortolin, Claudio; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Bottger, Stefan; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bravina, Larisa; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Caselle, Michele; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Coffin, Jean-Pierre Michel; Coli, S; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Azevedo Moregula, Andrea; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Remigis, R; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Delgado Mercado, Ydalia; Dellacasa, Giuseppe; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dryha, Olha; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evrard, Sebastien; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabjan, Christian; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Fekete, Vladimir; Felea, Daniel; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Fragkiadakis, Michail; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furano, Fabrizio; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gadrat, Sebastien Gabriel; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Gemme, Roberto; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Girard, Martin Robert; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Santos, Humberto; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasch, Delia; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Heinz, Mark Thomas; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Hernandez, C; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Huber, Sebastian Bernd; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jancurova, Lucia; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, S P; Jena, Satyajit; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Goronwy Tudor; Jones, Peter Graham; Jovanovic, Predrag; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jung, Won Woong; Jusko, Anton; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalisky, Matus; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamermans, Rene; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Eunggil; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Hyang Nam; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Klovning, Arne; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolevatov, Rodion; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kornas, Ewelina; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kozlov, Konstantin; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krumbhorn, Dirk Uwe Wilhelm; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lafage, Vincent Claude; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Larsen, Dag Toppe; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, C; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Noriega, Mercedes; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mendez Lorenzo, Patricia; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Mereu, P; Miake, Yasuo; Midori, Jumpei; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Munoz, Jose Lorenzo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Navach, Franco; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nendaz, Fabien; Newby, Jason Robert; Nicassio, Maria; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Obayashi, Hideyuki; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otterlund, Ingvar; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Peters, Andreas Joachim; Petracek, Vojtech; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Platt, Richard John; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Rademakers, Ornella; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Rammler, Markus; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Ricaud, Helene; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, A; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosinsky, Peter; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Rousseau, Sylvain Jean Henry; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Rusanov, Ivan Rusalinov; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saiz, Pablo; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Samanta, Tapas; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Saturnini, Pierre; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silenzi, Alessandro; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soloviev, Andrey; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Emil; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stocco, Diego; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Swoboda, Detlef; Symons, Timothy; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Tagridis, Christos; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tavlet, Marc; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Thomas, Jim; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Tosello, Flavio; Traczyk, Tomasz; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Turvey, Andrew John; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vacchi, A; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, G; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zabrodin, Evgeny; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zenin, Anton; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo

    2011-01-01

    The centrality dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV is presented. The charged-particle density normalized per participating nucleon pair increases by about a factor 2 from peripheral (70-80%) to central (0-5%) collisions. The centrality dependence is found to be similar to that observed at lower collision energies. The data are compared with models based on different mechanisms for particle production in nuclear collisions.

  5. Constructed uninterrupted charge-transfer pathways in three-dimensional micro/nanointerconnected carbon-based electrodes for high energy-density ultralight flexible supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongmin; Chen, Wanjun; Zhou, Jinyuan; Li, Xiaodong; Tang, Pengyi; Zhang, Zhenxing; Fu, Jiecai; Xie, Erqing

    2014-01-08

    A type of freestanding three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanointerconnected structure, with a conjunction of microsized 3D graphene networks, nanosized 3D carbon nanofiber (CNF) forests, and consequently loaded MnO2 nanosheets, has been designed as the electrodes of an ultralight flexible supercapacitor. The resulting 3D graphene/CNFs/MnO2 composite networks exhibit remarkable flexibility and highly mechanical properties due to good and intimate contacts among them, without current collectors and binders. Simultaneously, this designed 3D micro/nanointerconnected structure can provide an uninterrupted double charges freeway network for both electron and electrolyte ion to minimize electron accumulation and ion-diffusing resistance, leading to an excellent electrochemical performance. The ultrahigh specific capacitance of 946 F/g from cyclic voltammetry (CV) (or 920 F/g from galvanostatic charging/discharging (GCD)) were obtained, which is superior to that of the present electrode materials based on 3D graphene/MnO2 hybrid structure (482 F/g). Furthermore, we have also investigated the superior electrochemical performances of an asymmetric supercapacitor device (weight of less than 12 mg/cm(2) and thickness of ~0.8 mm), showing a total capacitance of 0.33 F/cm(2) at a window voltage of 1.8 V and a maximum energy density of 53.4 W h/kg for driving a digital clock for 42 min. These inspiring performances would make our designed supercapacitors become one of the most promising candidates for the future flexible and lightweight energy storage systems.

  6. Asymptotic correction of the exchange-correlation kernel of time-dependent density functional theory for long-range charge-transfer excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2004-07-08

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of charge-transfer excitation energies omegaCT are significantly in error when the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) is employed for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. We relate the error to the physical meaning of the orbital energy of the Kohn-Sham lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). The LUMO orbital energy in Kohn-Sham DFT--in contrast to the Hartree-Fock model--approximates an excited electron, which is correct for excitations in compact molecules. In CT transitions the energy of the LUMO of the acceptor molecule should instead describe an added electron, i.e., approximate the electron affinity. To obtain a contribution that compensates for the difference, a specific divergence of fxc is required in rigorous TDDFT, and a suitable asymptotically correct form of the kernel fxc(asymp) is proposed. The importance of the asymptotic correction of fxc is demonstrated with the calculation of omegaCT(R) for the prototype diatomic system HeBe at various separations R(He-Be). The TDDFT-ALDA curve omegaCT(R) roughly resembles the benchmark ab initio curve omegaCT CISD(R) of a configuration interaction calculation with single and double excitations in the region R=1-1.5 A, where a sizable He-Be interaction exists, but exhibits the wrong behavior omegaCT(R)

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 (R= Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2010-02-15

    We present a detailed ARPES investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven Charge Density Wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi Surface (FS) (up to 0.4eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k-space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple 2D tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure, by comparing our ARPES measurements with Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and, for the first time, of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k-space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(Ef), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  8. Spatial profiles of electron density, electron temperature, average ionic charge, and EUV emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas for EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuta; Tomita, Kentaro; Tsukiyama, Syoichi; Eguchi, Toshiaki; Uchino, Kiichiro; Kouge, Kouichiro; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Wada, Yasunori; Kunishima, Masahito; Kodama, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2017-03-01

    Spatial profiles of the electron density (n e), electron temperature (T e), and average ionic charge (Z) of laser-produced Sn plasmas for EUV lithography, whose conversion efficiency (CE) is sufficiently high for practical use, were measured using a collective Thomson scattering (TS) technique. For plasma production, Sn droplets of 26 µm diameter were used as a fuel. First, a picosecond-pulsed laser was used to expand a Sn target. Next, a CO2 laser was used to generate plasmas. By changing the injection timing of the picosecond and CO2 lasers, three different types of plasmas were generated. The CEs of the three types of plasmas differed, and ranged from 2.8 to 4.0%. Regarding the different plasma conditions, the spatial profiles of n e, T e, and Z clearly differed. However, under all plasma conditions, intense EUV was only observed at a sufficiently high T e (> 25 eV) and in an adequate n e range [1024–(2 × 1025) m‑3]. These plasma parameters lie in the efficient-EUV light source range, as predicted by simulations.

  9. Coexistence of multiple charge-density waves and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 revealed by 75As-NMR /NQR and 195Pt-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Tani, Yoshihiko; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nishikubo, Yoshihiro; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between charge-density wave (CDW) orders and superconductivity in arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 with Tc=5.2 K which crystallizes in the CaBe2Ge2 -type structure was studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements up to 520 K, and 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 195Pt-NMR measurements down to 1.5 K. At high temperature, 75As-NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin-relaxation rate (1 /T1) have revealed two distinct CDW orders, one realized in the As-Pt-As layer below TCDWAs (1 )=410 K and the other in the Pt-As-Pt layer below TCDWAs (2 )=255 K . The 1 /T1 measured by 75As-NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially well below Tc. Concomitantly, 195Pt Knight shift decreases below Tc. Our results indicate that superconductivity in SrPt2As2 is in the spin-singlet state with an s -wave gap and is robust under the two distinct CDW orders in different layers.

  10. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.;

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...

  11. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  12. Spatial distribution of superconducting and charge-density-wave order parameters in cuprates and its influence on the quasiparticle tunnel current (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabovich, Alexander M.; Voitenko, Alexander I.

    2016-10-01

    The state of the art concerning tunnel measurements of energy gaps in cuprate oxides has been analyzed. A detailed review of the relevant literature is made, and original results calculated for the quasiparticle tunnel current J(V) between a metallic tip and a disordered d-wave superconductor partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWs) are reported, because it is this model of high-temperature superconductors that becomes popular owing to recent experiments in which CDWs were observed directly. The current was calculated suggesting the scatter of both the superconducting and CDW order parameters due to the samples' intrinsic inhomogeneity. It was shown that peculiarities in the current-voltage characteristics inherent to the case of homogeneous superconducting material are severely smeared, and the CDW-related features transform into experimentally observed peak-dip-hump structures. Theoretical results were used to fit data measured for YBa2Cu3O7-δ and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The fitting demonstrated a good qualitative agreement between the experiment and model calculations. The analysis of the energy gaps in high-Tc superconductors is important both per se and as a tool to uncover the nature of superconductivity in cuprates not elucidated so far despite of much theoretical effort and experimental progress.

  13. Centrality Dependence of the Charged-Particle Multiplicity Density at Midrapidity in Pb-Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kostarakis, Panagiotis; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Sozzi, Federica; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Vargas Trevino, Aurora Diozcora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasar, Cigdem; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles ($\\mathrm{d}N_\\mathrm{ch}/\\mathrm{d}\\eta$) at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions has been measured at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. It increases with centrality and reaches a value of $1943 \\pm 54$ in $|\\eta|<0.5$ for the 5% most central collisions. A rise in $\\mathrm{d}N_\\mathrm{ch}/\\mathrm{d}\\eta$ as a function of $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ for the most central collisions is observed, steeper than that observed in proton-proton collisions and following the trend established by measurements at lower energy. The centrality dependence of $\\mathrm{d}N_\\mathrm{ch}/\\mathrm{d}\\eta$ as a function of the average number of participant nucleons, ${\\langle N_\\mathrm{part} \\rangle}$, calculated in a Glauber model, is compared with the previous measurement at lower energy. A constant factor of about 1.2 describes the increase in $\\frac{2}{\\langle N_\\mathrm{part} \\rangle}\\langle \\mathrm{d}N_\\mathrm{ch}/\\mathrm{d}\\eta \\rangle$ from $\\sq...

  14. X-ray diffraction observations of a charge-density-wave order in superconducting ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.54 single crystals in zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, E; Chang, J; Hücker, M; Holmes, A T; Christensen, N B; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Rütt, U; Gutowski, O; von Zimmermann, M; Forgan, E M; Hayden, S M

    2013-03-29

    X-ray diffraction measurements show that the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.54, with ortho-II oxygen order, has charge-density-wave order in the absence of an applied magnetic field. The dominant wave vector of the charge density wave is q(CDW)=(0,0.328(2),0.5), with the in-plane component parallel to the b axis (chain direction). It has a similar incommensurability to that observed in ortho-VIII and ortho-III samples, which have different dopings and oxygen orderings. Our results for ortho-II contrast with recent high-field NMR measurements, which suggest a commensurate wave vector along the a axis. We discuss the relationship between spin and charge correlations in YBa2Cu3O(y) and recent high-field quantum oscillation, NMR, and ultrasound experiments.

  15. X-Ray Diffraction Observations of a Charge-Density-Wave Order in Superconducting Ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.54 Single Crystals in Zero Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, E.; Chang, J.; Hücker, M.; Holmes, A. T.; Christensen, N. B.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Rütt, U.; Gutowski, O.; Zimmermann, M. v.; Forgan, E. M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2013-03-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements show that the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.54, with ortho-II oxygen order, has charge-density-wave order in the absence of an applied magnetic field. The dominant wave vector of the charge density wave is qCDW=(0,0.328(2),0.5), with the in-plane component parallel to the b axis (chain direction). It has a similar incommensurability to that observed in ortho-VIII and ortho-III samples, which have different dopings and oxygen orderings. Our results for ortho-II contrast with recent high-field NMR measurements, which suggest a commensurate wave vector along the a axis. We discuss the relationship between spin and charge correlations in YBa2Cu3Oy and recent high-field quantum oscillation, NMR, and ultrasound experiments.

  16. The temperature dependent shear strain of the (NbSe4)(10)I-3 compound, a quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave system, below the Peierls transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vucic, Z; Gladic, J; Haas, C; DeBoer, JL

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray study of the quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave (CDW) system (NbSe4)(10)I-3 as a function of temperature from room temperature down to 130 K has been performed by taking oscillation and zeroth level Weissenberg photographs. A reversible transformation of the room temperature tetragon

  17. Optical characterization of 2 kF bond-charge-density wave in quasi-one-dimensional 3 /4 -filled (EDO-TTF)2 X ( X= PF6 and AsF6 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, Olga; Yakushi, Kyuya; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Ota, Akira; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Tashiro, Hidenori; Tanner, David B.

    2004-08-01

    We present the electronic and vibrational spectra of quasi-one-dimensional (3)/(4) -filled (EDO-TTF)2X ( EDO-TTF=ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalene , X=PF6 and AsF6 ) above and below the metal-insulator phase transition ( TMI=280K for the PF6 salt and 268K for the AsF6 salt). For the low-temperature insulating phase, the pattern of both bond and charge order was identified. Almost all charge density is localized on the strongly bound central pair of 0110 tetramer giving rise to a characteristic spectrum of electronic excitations. Infrared spectra along the stacking axis show evidence of strong electron-molecular vibration coupling between the charge transfer band within the pair and some specific intramolecular vibrations. This charge order is assisted by a molecular deformation.

  18. Relative contributions of strain-dependent permeability and fixed charged density of proteoglycans in predicting cervical disc biomechanics: a poroelastic C5-C6 finite element model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mozammil; Natarajan, Raghu N; Chaudhary, Gulafsha; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2011-05-01

    Disc swelling pressure (P(swell)) facilitated by fixed charged density (FCD) of proteoglycans (P(fcd)) and strain-dependent permeability (P(strain)) are of critical significance in the physiological functioning of discs. FCD of proteoglycans prevents any excessive matrix deformation by tissue stiffening, whereas strain-dependent permeability limits the rate of stress transfer from fluid to solid skeleton. To date, studies involving the modeling of FCD of proteoglycans and strain-dependent permeability have not been reported for the cervical discs. The current study objective is to compare the relative contributions of strain-dependent permeability and FCD of proteoglycans in predicting cervical disc biomechanics. Three-dimensional finite element models of a C5-C6 segment with three different disc compositions were analyzed: an SPFP model (strain-dependent permeability and FCD of proteoglycans), an SP model (strain-dependent permeability alone), and an FP model (FCD of proteoglycans alone). The outcomes of the current study suggest that the relative contributions of strain-dependent permeability and FCD of proteoglycans were almost comparable in predicting the physiological behavior of the cervical discs under moment loads. However, under compression, strain-dependent permeability better predicted the in vivo disc response than that of the FCD of proteoglycans. Unlike the FP model (least stiff) in compression, motion behavior of the three models did not vary much from each other and agreed well within the standard deviations of the corresponding in vivo published data. Flexion was recorded with maximum P(fcd) and P(strain), whereas minimum values were found in extension. The study data enhance the understanding of the roles played by the FCD of proteoglycans and strain-dependent permeability and porosity in determining disc tissue swelling behavior. Degenerative changes involving strain-dependent permeability and/or loss of FCD of proteoglycans can further be

  19. Anisotropy in the thermal hysteresis of resistivity and charge density wave nature of single crystal SrFeO3-δ: X-ray absorption and photoemission studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S H; Solanki, R S; Wang, Y F; Shao, Y C; Lee, S H; Yao, C H; Du, C H; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Chin, Y Y; Tsai, H M; Chen, J-L; Pao, C W; Cheng, C-M; Chen, W-C; Lin, H J; Lee, J F; Chou, F C; Pong, W F

    2017-12-01

    The local electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality single crystal of SrFeO3-δ (δ~0.19) were studied using temperature-dependent x-ray absorption and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) to investigate the origin of anisotropic resistivity in the ab-plane and along the c-axis close to the region of thermal hysteresis (near temperature for susceptibility maximum, Tm~78 K). All experiments herein were conducted during warming and cooling processes. The Fe L 3,2-edge X-ray linear dichroism results show that during cooling from room temperature to below the transition temperature, the unoccupied Fe 3d e g states remain in persistently out-of-plane 3d 3z(2)-r(2) orbitals. In contrast, in the warming process below the transition temperature, they change from 3d 3z(2)-r(2) to in-plane 3d x(2)-y(2) orbitals. The nearest-neighbor (NN) Fe-O bond lengths also exhibit anisotropic behavior in the ab-plane and along the c-axis below Tm. The anisotropic NN Fe-O bond lengths and Debye-Waller factors stabilize the in-plane Fe 3d x(2)-y(2) and out-of-plane 3d 3z(2)-r(2) orbitals during warming and cooling, respectively. Additionally, a VB-PES study further confirms that a relative band gap opens at low temperature in both the ab-plane and along the c-axis, providing the clear evidence of the charge-density-wave nature of SrFeO3-δ (δ~0.19) single crystal.

  20. Centrality evolution of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density over a broad pseudorapidity range in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The centrality dependence of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured with ALICE in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV over a broad pseudorapidity range is presented. This Letter extends the previous results reported by ALICE to more peripheral collisions. No strong change of the overall shape of charged-particle pseudorapidity density distributions with centrality is observed, and when normalised to the number of participating nucleons in the collisions, the evolution over pseudorapidity with centrality is likewise small. The broad pseudorapidity range (−3.5<η<5 allows precise estimates of the total number of produced charged particles which we find to range from 162±22(syst. to 17170±770(syst. in 80–90% and 0–5% central collisions, respectively. The total charged-particle multiplicity is seen to approximately scale with the number of participating nucleons in the collision. This suggests that hard contributions to the charged-particle multiplicity are limited. The results are compared to models which describe dNch/dη at mid-rapidity in the most central Pb–Pb collisions and it is found that these models do not capture all features of the distributions.

  1. Large electric-potential bias in an EDO-TTF tetramer as a major mechanism of charge ordering observed in its PF6 salt: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Kaoru; Shimoi, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    Based on density functional theory, we investigate the electronic structures of an organic molecular solid, (EDO-TTF)2PF6 (EDO-TTF=ethylendioxy-tetrathiafulvalene) , which is known to have a so-called charge-ordered state below a critical temperature. While it has been thought that the origins of the charge ordering are molecular deformations, we find that an electric potential bias within a tetramer of EDO-TTF molecules is close to 1eV , originating from long-range Coulombic interactions with surrounding molecules, and that it is essential in reproducing the actual degree of charge ordering. We also calculate optical conductivity spectra and find a good consistency with experimental results.

  2. Anion-π recognition between [M(CN)6](3-) complexes and HAT(CN)6: structural matching and electronic charge density modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarczyk, Jedrzej; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Srebro-Hooper, Monika; Hooper, James; Podgajny, Robert

    2017-03-14

    Hexacyanidometalates (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) and multisite anion receptor HAT(CN)6 (1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile) recognize each other in acetonitrile solution and self-assemble into the novel molecular networks (PPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6] (M = Fe, 1; Co, 2) and (AsPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6]·2MeCN·H2O (M = Fe, 3; Co, 4). 1-4 contain the stacked columns {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]}∞ separated by the organic cations. All of the M-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N vectors point collectively towards the centroids of pyrazine rings on neighboring HAT(CN)6 molecules, with Ncyanidecentroidpyrazine distances that are under 3 Å. The directional character and structural parameters of the new supramolecular synthons correspond to collective triple anion-π interactions between the CN(-) ligands of the metal complexes and the π-deficient areas of HAT(CN)6. Physicochemical characterisation (IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry) and dispersion-corrected DFT studies reveal the dominating charge-transfer (CT) and polarisation characters of the interactions. The electronic density flow occurs from the CN(-) ligands of [M(CN)6](3-) to the HAT(CN)6 orbital systems and further, toward the peripheral -CN groups of HAT(CN)6. Solid-state DFT calculations determined the total interaction energy of HAT(CN)6 to be ca. -125 kcal mol(-1), which gives ca. -15 kcal mol(-1) per one CN(-)HAT(CN)6 contact after subtraction of the interaction with organic cations. The UV-Vis electronic absorption measurements prove that the intermolecular interactions persist in solution and suggest a 1 : 1 composition of the anion-π {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]} chromophore, with the formation constant Kadd = (5.8 ± 6) × 10(2) dm(3) mol(-1) and the molar absorption coefficient εadd = 180 ± 9 cm(-1) dm(3) mol(-1) at 600 nm, as estimated from concentration-dependent studies.

  3. A charge-transfer surface enhanced Raman scattering model from time-dependent density functional theory calculations on a Ag10-pyridine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Ronald L; Znamenskiy, Vasiliy; Lombardi, John R

    2010-06-07

    Vibrational frequency calculations were made for a Ag(10)-pyridine vertex complex with density functional theory (DFT) for static simulated spectra and with time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for preresonance and resonance simulated spectra using both B3LYP/LANL2DZ and BP86/TZP methodologies. In addition, 40 excited states of the complex were calculated and assigned symmetry based on a C(2v) symmetry of the optimized complex found with B3LYP/LANL2DZ. Molecular orbital isosurfaces show that the excited states involve both Ag(10) intercluster excitations and charge-transfer (CT) excitations between the Ag nanocluster and the pyridine molecule. An excitation around 500 nm involving CT from the Ag cluster to pyridine was found in both calculations. For free pyridine, the relative average deviations between unscaled calculated and experimental results were 1.5 cm(-1) for BP86 and 3.1 cm(-1) for the B3LYP calculations. For the complex, simulated spectra at a variety of excitation wavelengths were calculated. In the case of 514 nm excitation, the simulated Raman cross section from the TD-DFT calculations (near the CT resonance) was plotted versus Raman shift frequency and compared with an experimental surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum obtained on an oxidation-reduction cycle, ORC roughened Ag electrode. The BP86 TD-DFT calculation with finite damping term showed a better fit to experimental spectrum with respect to both relative intensities and frequencies. The average deviation of the unscaled BP86 calculations for 16 bands in the experimental spectrum was 13.0 cm(-1). The calculated spectrum in both cases shows many contributions from nontotally symmetric as well as totally symmetric modes, indicating the contribution of Herzberg-Teller (HT) scattering. The simulated intensities of the Raman modes of different symmetry from Ag(10)-pyridine can be correlated with HT intensity borrowing from excited states of given symmetry and decent oscillator strength. These

  4. Model to explain the behavior of 2DEG mobility with respect to charge density in N-polar and Ga-polar AlGaN-GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2016-09-01

    There are three possible ways of reducing the charge density (ns) in the N-polar high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) structures, by decreasing the channel thickness, applying reverse gate bias, or modifying the back-barrier. Understanding the behavior of 2DEG mobility as a function of ns is essential to design high performance HEMT devices. Experimental data show that in the N-polar HEMT structures, the 2DEG mobility reduces as the ns decreases by applying reverse gate bias or decreasing channel thickness, whereas in the Ga-polar HEMT structures, the 2DEG mobility increases as the ns in the channel decreases by applying reverse gate bias. In this paper, the 2DEG mobility as a function of ns is calculated in N-polar HEMTs for three different aforementioned cases, and is compared to that in the Ga-polar HEMT structures. It is shown that the conventional scattering mechanisms cannot explain these different behaviors. Two new scattering mechanisms, such as scattering from charged interface states and surface state dipoles (SSD), are introduced. It is revealed that in N-polar HEMT structures, reducing ns by applying reverse gate bias or decreasing channel thickness moves the charge centroid closer to the AlGaN-GaN interface. A combination of lower charge density (less screening of the scattering potential) and smaller distance between charge centroid and charged states at the interface leads to a severe mobility degradation in these cases. In contrast, reducing ns by modifying the back-barrier (decreasing back-barrier doping and/or decreasing AlGaN composition) in N-polar HEMT structures moves the charge centroid away from the interface. This behavior is similar to that in the Ga-polar HEMT structures. Therefore, in the last two mentioned cases, the 2DEG mobility first increases slightly as the ns decreases, and decreases slightly at very low charge densities. It is also shown that SSDs have large impact on the 2DEG mobility only in the N-polar (Ga-polar) HEMTs

  5. Stereoscopic study of the angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations across the charge-density-wave transition of the organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W.; Osada, T.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K.

    2013-11-01

    The stereoscopic angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations (AMRO) in an organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 were measured across the temperature-pressure boundary that separates the charge-density-wave state from the metallic state. The gnomonic projections of the data clearly resolved the contributions from different parts of the Fermi surfaces. The temperature and pressure dependencies of the AMRO results revealed the progressive formation of a quasi-one-dimensional orbit in the charge-density-wave state. The AMRO measurements at ambient pressures and at low temperatures revealed the presence of two sets of quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surfaces. Additional evidence for multiple quasi-one-dimensional orbits was obtained from the data collected in conjunction with the in-plane field rotations.

  6. Composition-dependent charge transport and temperature-dependent density of state effective mass interpreted by temperature-normalized Pisarenko plot in Bi2-xSbxTe3 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tae-Ho; Lim, Young Soo; Park, Mi Jin; Tak, Jang-Yeul; Lee, Soonil; Cho, Hyung Koun; Cho, Jun-Young; Park, Chan; Seo, Won-Seon

    2016-10-01

    Composition-dependent charge transport and temperature-dependent density of state effective mass-dependent Seebeck coefficient were investigated in Bi2-xSbxTe3 (x = 1.56-1.68) compounds. The compounds were prepared by the spark plasma sintering of high-energy ball-milled powder. High-temperature Hall measurements revealed that the charge transport in the compounds was governed dominantly by phonon scattering and influenced additionally by alloy scattering depending on the amount of Sb. Contrary effects of Sb content on the Seebeck coefficient were discussed in terms of carrier concentration and density of state effective mass, and it was elucidated by temperature-normalized Pisarenko plot for the first time.

  7. Absolute Stability Limit for Relativistic Charged Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Giuliani, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    We find an exact solution for the stability limit of relativistic charged spheres for the case of constant gravitational mass density and constant charge density. We argue that this provides an absolute stability limit for any relativistic charged sphere in which the gravitational mass density decreases with radius and the charge density increases with radius. We then provide a cruder absolute stability limit that applies to any charged sphere with a spherically symmetric mass and charge distribution. We give numerical results for all cases. In addition, we discuss the example of a neutral sphere surrounded by a thin, charged shell.

  8. Electronic hole transfer in rutile and anatase TiO2: Effect of a delocalization error in the density functional theory on the charge transfer barrier height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Rossmeisl, Jan; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2011-01-01

    where charge localization is strongly coupled to lattice distortion. As an example we calculate the adiabatic PES for the hole transfer process in rutile and anatase TiO2. (Semi) local DFT leads to qualitatively wrong, barrierless curves. Removal of the nonlinearity improves the PES shape and allows us...

  9. Experimental charge density and neutron structural study of cis-HMn(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}: Comprehensive analysis of chemical bonding and evidence for a C-H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Y.A.; Brammer, L. [Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Klooster, W.T.; Bullock, R.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-11-30

    The structure and bonding in cis-HMn(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3} have been studied by low-temperature neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction, the latter study using a charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. A charge density analysis, including the deformation density, a full topological analysis of {minus}{del}{sup 2}{rho}, has been conducted. The electrostatic component of the H{sup {delta}+}{hor_ellipsis}H{sup {delta}{minus}} interaction energy is calculated to be 5.7 kcal/mol from the experimental data. This electrostatic evidence coupled with the geometry C-H{hor_ellipsis}H 129.0(2){degree} and H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn 126.5(1){degree} and the identification of an H{hor_ellipsis}H bond path in the charge density distribution strongly supports the characterization of this interaction as an intramolecular C-H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn hydrogen bond. Both the deformation density and the topological study clearly illustrate the {sigma}-donor nature of both the H-Mn and Ph{sub 3}P-Mn interactions and the {sigma}-donor/{pi}-acceptor nature of the manganese-carbonyl bonds. The topological study further confirms the decrease in C-O bond order upon coordination to the metal and demonstrates for the first time by this method that the metal-ligand bonds, although showing characteristics of a closed-shell interaction, do have a significant dative covalent component to the bond. The latter is reinforced by a study of the derived Mn d-orbital populations, in which populations of the d{sub z{sup 2}} and d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} orbitals are significantly higher than would be predicted by a simple crystal field theory model of metal-ligand bonding.

  10. First-principles study of the electronic structure, charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties of zintl phases compounds Sr{sub 2}ZnA{sub 2} (A=P, As and Sb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, South .Bohemia University in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, South .Bohemia University in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    We present first-principles calculations of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of Sr{sub 2}ZnA{sub 2} (A=P, As and Sb) based on density-functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA), generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and the Engel–Vosko GGA formalism (EV-GGA). Additionally, modified Becke–Johnson (mBJ) is also used to improve the band splitting results. The calculated band structure and density of states show that Sr{sub 2}ZnA{sub 2} compounds are metallic. The total DOS at Fermi level N(E{sub F}) is 72.92, 73.06 and 33.47 states/eV and the bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is 12.64, 5.805 and 12.67 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for Sr{sub 2}ZnP{sub 2}, Sr{sub 2}ZnAs{sub 2} and Sr{sub 2}ZnSb{sub 2,} respectively. The Fermi surface of Sr{sub 2}ZnA{sub 2} compounds is composed of two bands crossing along the Γ−A direction of Brillouin zone. There exists a strong hybridization between Zn-p/s and Sb-d, Sb-p and Sr-d and also between Sr-s and Sr-p states. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane. We found that Sr forms an ionic bond with Zn, whereas Zn forms a strong covalent interaction with P/As/Sb atoms. For further insight information about the electronic structure, the optical properties are derived and analyzed. - Highlights: • The compounds are metallic. • The density of states at the Fermi energy is calculated. • The bare linear low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient is obtained. • Fermi surface is composed of two sheets. • The bonding features are analyzed using the electronic charge density.

  11. Measurement of charged particle multiplicities and densities in pp collisions at √(s) = 7 TeV in the forward region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The LHCb Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-15

    Charged particle multiplicities are studied in proton.proton collisions in the forward region at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 7 TeV with data collected by the LHCb detector. The forward spectrometer allows access to a kinematic range of 2.0 < η < 4.8 in pseudorapidity, momenta greater than 2 GeV/c and transverse momenta greater than 0.2 GeV/c. The measurements are performed using events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic acceptance. The results are presented as functions of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum and are compared to predictions from several Monte Carlo event generators. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of charged particle multiplicities and densities in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in the forward region

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Iakovenko, Viktor; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luisier, Johan; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polok, Grzegorz; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redford, Sophie; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wiggers, Leo; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Charged particle multiplicities are studied in proton-proton collisions in the forward region at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\;$TeV with data collected in 2010 by the LHCb detector. The forward spectrometer allows access to a kinematic range of $2.0<\\eta<4.8$ in pseudorapidity, momenta down to $2\\;$GeV/$c$ and transverse momenta down to $0.2\\;$GeV/$c$. The measurements are performed using minimum-bias events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic acceptance. The results are presented as functions of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum and are compared to predictions from several Monte Carlo event generators.

  13. Direct Imaging of Charge Density Modulation in Switchable Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at the Oxide Hetero-Interfaces by Using Electron Bean Inline Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-16

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The recent discovery of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between insulating perovskite ...3/10/2015 Abstract The recent discovery of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between insulating perovskite oxides SrTiO3...associated charge distributions in semiconductor materials, and therefore regarded as the only tool that can completely visualize the spatial

  14. A 2DEG charge density based drain current model for various Al and In molefraction mobility dependent nano-scale AlInGaN/AlN/GaN HEMT devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godwin Raj; Hemant Pardeshi; Sudhansu Kumar Pati; N Mohankumar; Chandan Kumar Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) charge-control mobility variation based drain current model for sheet carrier density in the channel.The model was developed for the AlInGaN/AlN/GaN highelectron-mobility transistor.The sheet carrier density model used here accounts for the independence between the Fermi levels Ef and ns along with mobility for various Al and In molefractions.This physics based ns model fully depends upon the variation of Ef,u0,the first subband E0,the second subband E1,and ns.We present a physics based analytical drain current model using ns with the minimum set of parameters.The analytical results obtained are compared with the experimental results for four samples with various molefraction and barrier thickness.A good agreement between the results is obtained,thus validating the model.

  15. Abstracts: Sagmore 9 Conference on Charge, Spin and Momentum Densities Held in Luso-Bussaco, Portugal on 26 June-2 July 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    iron : a joint experimental and theoretical study. by F.BaerL and A.LAamyen UFR do physique Sat. PS USTL 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq France. R.Wlest and...N.Benard lab. de chimle quantique InstLitut Le Bel Unlverstlt L. Pasteur F67000 Strasbourg France. An experimental electronic density and a...CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France. (2) Dept. Chemistry, Aarhus Univ., DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. (3) Lab. Spectrometric Physique , Univ. Grenoble, BP

  16. The preparation, surface structure, zeta potential, surface charge density and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures of different shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali, E-mail: bpal@thapar.edu

    2013-09-01

    Titania based nanocatalysts such as sodium titanates of different morphology having superior surface properties are getting wide importance in photocatalysis research. Despite having sodium (Na) contents and its high temperature synthesis (that generally deteriorate the photoreactivity), these Na-titanates often exhibit better photoactivity than P25-TiO{sub 2} catalyst. Hence, this work demonstrated the influence of crystal structure, BET surface area, surface charge, zeta potential (ζ) and metal loading on the photocatalytic activity of as-prepared sodium titanate nanotube (TNT) and titania nanorod (TNR). Straw like hollow orthorhombic-TNT (Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O) particles (W = 9–12 nm and L = 82–115 nm) and rice like pure anatase-TNR particles (W = 8–13 nm and L = 81–134 nm) are obtained by the hydrothermal treatment of P25-TiO{sub 2} with NaOH, which in fact, altered the net surface charge of TNT and TNR particles. The observed ζ = −2.82 (P25-TiO{sub 2}), −13.5 (TNT) and −22.5 mV (TNR) are significantly altered by the Ag and Cu deposition. It has been found here that TNT displayed best photocatalytic activity for the imidacloprid insecticide (C{sub 9}H{sub 10}ClN{sub 5}O{sub 2}) degradation to CO{sub 2} formation under UV irradiation because of its largest surface area 176 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} among the catalysts studied.

  17. Primitive Virtual Negative Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiyoung

    2008-01-01

    Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction electric equilibrium of the earth is discussed, especially about the electric field and magnetic field of the earth. For unsettled phenomena related with the earth's gravity, such as antigravity phenomenon, gravity anomalies during the solar eclipses, the connection between geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, etc., possible explanations are discussed.

  18. Interfacial charge rearrangement and intermolecular interactions: Density-functional theory study of free-base porphine adsorbed on Ag(111) and Cu(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Moritz; Maurer, Reinhard J; Reuter, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    We employ dispersion-corrected density-functional theory to study the adsorption of tetrapyrrole 2H-porphine (2H-P) at Cu(111) and Ag(111). Various contributions to adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are systematically extracted to analyze the self-assembly behavior of this basic building block to porphyrin-based metal-organic nanostructures. This analysis reveals a surprising importance of substrate-mediated van der Waals interactions between 2H-P molecules, in contrast to negligible direct dispersive interactions. The resulting net repulsive interactions rationalize the experimentally observed tendency for single molecule adsorption.

  19. Analyzing topological defects in disordered charge density waves in transition-metal dichalcogenides TaSe2 and TaS2 using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Danielle; McElroy, Kyle; Calleja, Eduardo; Dai, Jixia; Li, Lijun; Lu, Wenjian; Sun, Yuping; Zhu, Xiangde

    2014-03-01

    Charged ordered states are becoming a common feature in the phase diagrams of correlated materials. In many cased there are indications that doping controlled quantum critical points between the CO state and others are related to interesting properties including superconductivity. An interesting test case is the ordered 2D CDW found in the transition metal dichalcogenides. We performed an analytical study on the dichalcogenides tantalum disulfide (TaS2) and tantalum diselenide (TaSe2) to observe how CDWs present in the material can be melted as disorder is introduced into the system via copper doping. Data was taken using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) below the transition to the CDW state, both with and without copper dopants added. The resulting topographs were then analyzed to investigate the relationship between the phase and the amplitude of the disordered CDW. We found that the copper doping caused disorder in the CDW state characterized by phase wanderings and 2 π phase winding ``point defects'' in the CDW not present in the undoped parent compound. The locations of these point defects and windings were, in turn, found to have the characteristics of topological defects. Implications for studies of other disordered CO states seen in STM will be discussed.

  20. First principle study of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals are studied. The calculations are based on the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), in addition the Engel–Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The DFT calculations show that these compounds have metallic origin. The contribution of different bands was analyzed from total and partial density of states curves. The values of the density of states at Fermi energy (N(E{sub F})) for ThCu{sub 5}In (ThCu{sub 5}Sn) is 1.75 (1.63) states/eV unit cell. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be equal to 0.30 and 0.28 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn, respectively. The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. - Highlights: • The DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn compounds. • This study shows that the nature of the two compounds is metallic. • Crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction.

  1. Incremental Pressing Technique in Explosive Charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A pressing technique has become available that might be useful for compressing granular explosives. If the height-diameter ratio of the charge is unfavorable,the high quality charge can not be obtained with the common single-action pressing. This paper presents incremental pressing technique, which can obtain the charge with higher overall density and more uniform density.

  2. Predictive Control over Charge Density in the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at the Polar-Nonpolar NdTiO3/SrTiO3 Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Ayino, Yilikal; Cheng, Christopher; Pribiag, Vlad S.; Comes, Ryan B.; Sushko, Peter V.; Chambers, Scott A.; Jalan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    Through systematic control of the Nd concentration, we show that the carrier density of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in SrTiO3/NdTiO3/SrTiO3(001 ) can be modulated over a wide range. We also demonstrate that the NdTiO3 in heterojunctions without a SrTiO3 cap is degraded by oxygen absorption from air, resulting in the immobilization of donor electrons that could otherwise contribute to the 2DEG. This system is, thus, an ideal model to understand and control the insulator-to-metal transition in a 2DEG based on both environmental conditions and film-growth processing parameters.

  3. Linear-scaling density-functional simulations of charged point defects in Al2O3 using hierarchical sparse matrix algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, N D M; Haynes, P D; Mostofi, A A; Payne, M C

    2010-09-21

    We present calculations of formation energies of defects in an ionic solid (Al(2)O(3)) extrapolated to the dilute limit, corresponding to a simulation cell of infinite size. The large-scale calculations required for this extrapolation are enabled by developments in the approach to parallel sparse matrix algebra operations, which are central to linear-scaling density-functional theory calculations. The computational cost of manipulating sparse matrices, whose sizes are determined by the large number of basis functions present, is greatly improved with this new approach. We present details of the sparse algebra scheme implemented in the ONETEP code using hierarchical sparsity patterns, and demonstrate its use in calculations on a wide range of systems, involving thousands of atoms on hundreds to thousands of parallel processes.

  4. Effect of Te doping on superconductivity and charge-density wave in dichalcogenides 2H-NbSe2-χTeχ(χ=0,0.1,0.2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong-Tao; Li Lin-Jun; Ye De-shu; Cheng Xin-Hong; Xu Zhu-An

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of Te-doped dichalcogenides 2H-NbSe2-χTeχ(χ=0,0.10,0.20)were grown by vapour transport method.The effect of Te doping on the superconducting and charge-density wave(CDW)transitions has been investigated.The sharp decrease of residual resistance ratio,RRR=R(300K)/R(8K),with increasing Te content was observed,indicating that the disorder in the conducting plane is induced by Te doping.Meanwhile the superconducting transition temperature,Tc,decreases monotonically with Te content.However,the CDW transition temperature,TCDW,shown by a small jump in the temperature dependence of the resistivity near 30 K,increases slightly.The results show that the suppression of superconductivity might be caused by the enhancement of CDW ordering.The disorder has little influence on the CDW ordering.

  5. Inductive effect of methyl group in a series of methylated indoles: A graph theoretical analysis in the light of density functional theory and correlation with experimental charge transfer transition energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit S Tiwary; Asok K Mukherjee

    2013-07-01

    The inductive effect of methyl group has been quantified by expressing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and HOMO-1 energies of indole and a series of methylated indoles using a combination of graph theory (GT) and the Coulson-Longuett-Higgins perturbation method. By correlating these expressions with the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbital energies of the indoles obtained by density functional theory (DFT) calculation at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory, the inductive effect parameter ℎ has been estimated; the Coulomb integral of -conjugated carbon atom also comes out from the analysis. A correlation of the GT results with the HOMO and HOMO-1 energies obtained by the HF/STO-3G method yield almost the same values of ℎ and . Finally, when these estimated ℎ and are used to calculate the vertical ionization potentials of the methylated indoles in the series, an excellent correlation with experimental charge transfer transition energies of their molecular complexes with tetracyanoethylene is obtained which complies with Mulliken’s theory of charge transfer.

  6. J/$\\psi$ production as a function of charged-particle pseudorapidity density in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, Dagmar; The ALICE collaboration; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Garg, Prakhar; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Grull, Frederik Rolf; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; 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Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; 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Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zimmermann, Sebastian; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the inclusive J/$\\psi$ yield and average transverse momentum as a function of charged-particle pseudorapidity density ${\\rm d}N_{\\rm ch}/{\\rm d}\\eta$ in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV with ALICE at the LHC. The observables are normalised to their corresponding averages in non-single diffractive events. An increase of the normalised J/$\\psi$ yield with normalised ${\\rm d}N_{\\rm ch}/{\\rm d}\\eta$ is observed at mid-rapidity and backward rapidity, similar to that found earlier in pp collisions. At forward rapidity, a saturation of the relative yield is observed for high charged-particle multiplicities. The normalised average transverse momentum at forward and backward rapidity increases with multiplicity at low multiplicities and saturates beyond moderate multiplicities. In addition, the forward-to-backward nuclear modification factor ratio is also reported, showing an increasing suppression of J/$\\psi$ production at forward rapidity with respect to backward rapidity fo...

  7. UV-Vis spectroscopy and density functional study of solvent effect on the charge transfer band of the n → σ* complexes of 2-Methylpyridine and 2-Chloropyridine with molecular iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Pallavi; Mohan, Uttam; Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Baruah, Surjya Kumar

    2017-03-01

    UV-Vis spectroscopy has established that Pyridine substitutes form n→σ* charge transfer (CT) complexes with molecular Iodine. This study is a combined approach of purely experimental UV-Vis spectroscopy, Multiple linear regression theory and Computational chemistry to analyze the effect of solvent upon the charge transfer band of 2-Methylpyridine-I2 and 2-Chloropyridine-I2 complexes. Regression analysis verifies the dependence of the CT band upon different solvent parameters. Dielectric constant and refractive index are considered among the bulk solvent parameters and Hansen, Kamlet and Catalan parameters are taken into consideration at the molecular level. Density Functional Theory results explain well the blue shift of the CT bands in polar medium as an outcome of stronger donor acceptor interaction. A logarithmic relation between the bond length of the bridging atoms of the donor and the acceptor with the dielectric constant of the medium is established. Tauc plot and TDDFT study indicates a non-vertical electronic transition in the complexes. Buckingham and Lippert Mataga equations are applied to check the Polarizability effect on the CT band.

  8. Ti-doped indium tin oxide thin films for transparent field-effect transistors: control of charge-carrier density and crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-In; Ji, Kwang Hwan; Jang, Mi; Yang, Hoichang; Choi, Rino; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2011-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films are representative transparent conducting oxide media for organic light-emitting diodes, liquid crystal displays, and solar cell applications. Extending the utility of ITO films from passive electrodes to active channel layers in transparent field-effect transistors (FETs), however, has been largely limited because of the materials' high carrier density (>1 × 10(20) cm(-3)), wide band gap, and polycrystalline structure. Here, we demonstrate that control over the cation composition in ITO-based oxide films via solid doping of titanium (Ti) can optimize the carrier concentration and suppress film crystallization. On 120 nm thick SiO(2)/Mo (200 nm)/glass substrates, transparent n-type FETs prepared with 4 at % Ti-doped ITO films and fabricated via the cosputtering of ITO and TiO(2) exhibited high electron mobilities of 13.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a low subthreshold gate swing of 0.25 V decade(-1), and a high I(on/)I(off) ratio of >1 × 10(8).

  9. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  10. Molecular Orbital and Density Functional Study of the Formation, Charge Transfer, Bonding and the Conformational Isomerism of the Boron Trifluoride (BF3 and Ammonia (NH3 Donor-Acceptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal C. Ghosh

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the F3B–NH3 supermolecule by chemical interaction of its fragment parts, BF3 and NH3, and the dynamics of internal rotation about the ‘B–N’ bond have been studied in terms of parameters provided by the molecular orbital and density functional theories. It is found that the pairs of frontier orbitals of the interacting fragments have matching symmetry and are involved in the charge transfer interaction. The donation process stems from the HOMO of the donor into the LUMO of the acceptor and simultaneously, back donation stems from the HOMO of acceptor into the LUMO of the donor. The density functional computation of chemical activation in the donor and acceptor fragments, associated with the physical process of structural reorganization just prior to the event of chemical reaction, indicates that BF3 becomes more acidic and NH3 becomes more basic, compared to their separate equilibrium states. Theoretically it is observed that the chemical reaction event of the formation of the supermolecule from its fragment parts is in accordance with the chemical potential equalization principle of the density functional theory and the electronegativity equalization principle of Sanderson. The energetics of the chemical reaction, the magnitude of the net charge transfer and the energy of the newly formed bond are quite consistent, both internally and with the principle of maximum hardness, PMH. The dynamics of the internal rotation of one part with respect to the other part of the supermolecule about the ‘B–N’ bond mimics the pattern of the conformational isomerism of the isostructural ethane molecule. It is also observed that the dynamics and evolution of molecular conformations as a function of dihedral angles is also in accordance with the principle of maximum hardness, PMH. Quite consistent with spectroscopic predictions, the height of the molecule

  11. Study of electronic structure, charge density, Fermi energy and optical properties of Cs{sub 2}KTbCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KEuCl{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, South Bohemia University in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Reshak, A.H. [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, South Bohemia University in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2013-12-15

    Through the assist of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method, the calculations of the electronic band structure, density of states, charge density, Fermi energy and regularity dependent dielectric functions of Cs{sub 2}KTbCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KEuCl{sub 6} are reported. This study shows that the nature of both these compounds is metallic. The generalized gradient approximations (GGA) exchange correlation potential was applied. The densities of states around Fermi level are frequently subjugated by Eu/Tb-f and DOS below Fermi level are subjugated by Eu/Tb-s/d, Cs-s, Cl-s and K-s/p. The value of the DOS at Fermi level N(E{sub F}) is 17.02 and 4.86 (states per unit cell per eV) for Cs{sub 2}KEuCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KTbCl{sub 6}. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient, is found to be 2.95 and 0.84 mJ/mol K{sup 2} for Cs{sub 2}KEuCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KTbCl{sub 6}, respectively. Three bands crossing the Fermi level along the Γ−A direction of Brillion zone of Cs{sub 2}KTbCl{sub 6} compound and one band crossing along the Γ−A direction of Brillion zone of Cs{sub 2}KEuCl{sub 6} compounds, to form the Fermi surface. There exists a strong hybridization between Tb/Eu-K-p and Cl-s K-s and at −5.0 and −4.0 eV.

  12. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15\\%. %The rapidity profile of the charge is wider than the profile of the local energy density. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  13. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214-family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal ``quasiparticles'' and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  14. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  15. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob;

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... of conventional and novel extraction methods....

  16. Influence of the charge trap density distribution in a gate insulator on the positive-bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eungtaek; Kim, Choong-Ki; Lee, Myung Keun; Bang, Tewook; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the positive-bias stress (PBS) instability of thin film transistors (TFTs) composed of different types of first-gate insulators, which serve as a protection layer of the active surface. Two different deposition methods, i.e., the thermal atomic layer deposition (THALD) and plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) of Al2O3, were applied for the deposition of the first GI. When THALD was used to deposit the GI, amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs showed superior stability characteristics under PBS. For example, the threshold voltage shift (ΔVth) was 0 V even after a PBS time (tstress) of 3000 s under a gate voltage (VG) condition of 5 V (with an electrical field of 1.25 MV/cm). On the other hand, when the first GI was deposited by PEALD, the ΔVth value of a-IGZO TFTs was 0.82 V after undergoing an identical amount of PBS. In order to interpret the disparate ΔVth values resulting from PBS quantitatively, the average oxide charge trap density (NT) in the GI and its spatial distribution were investigated through low-frequency noise characterizations. A higher NT resulted during in the PEALD type GI than in the THALD case. Specifically, the PEALD process on a-IGZO layer surface led to an increasing trend of NT near the GI/a-IGZO interface compared to bulk GI owing to oxygen plasma damage on the a-IGZO surface.

  17. Orbital symmetry of charge-density-wave order in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O6.67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, A. J.; He, F.; Sutarto, R.; McMahon, Christopher; Zwiebler, M.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Geck, J.; Hawthorn, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    Recent theories of charge-density-wave (CDW) order in high-temperature superconductors have predicted a primarily d CDW orbital symmetry. Here, we report on the orbital symmetry of CDW order in the canonical cuprate superconductors La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 (LBCO) and YBa2Cu3O6.67 (YBCO), using resonant soft X-ray scattering and a model mapped to the CDW orbital symmetry. From measurements sensitive to the O sublattice, we conclude that LBCO has predominantly s' CDW orbital symmetry, in contrast to the d orbital symmetry recently reported in other cuprates. Furthermore, we show for YBCO that the CDW orbital symmetry differs along the a and b crystal axes and that these both differ from LBCO. This work highlights CDW orbital symmetry as an additional key property that distinguishes the different cuprate families. We discuss how the CDW symmetry may be related to the `1/8-anomaly’ and to static spin ordering.

  18. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree-Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: an application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-14

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the "dimerized" low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature.

  19. First proton-proton collisions at the LHC as observed with the ALICE detector: measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density at $\\sqrt{s}$=900 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, K; Hille, P T; Malaev, M; Petracek, V; Karavicheva, T; Tveter, T S; Kniege, S; Gulkanyan, H; Zanevsky, Yu; Vacchi, A; Chambert, V; Navach, F; Rosnet, P; Nayak, T K; Charpy, A; Shtejer, K; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M; Bhati, A K; Gorbunov, S; Camacho, E; Gheata, A; Jovanovic, P; Sumbera, M; Petris, M; Siddi, E; Zhou, S; Scharenberg, R P; Platt, R; Caines, H; Vasiliev, A; Cosentino, M R; Ullaland, K; Demanov, V; Antonczyk, D; de Groot, J; Foertsch, S; Yi, J; Kaplin, V; Rosinsky, P; Viesti, G; Riccati, L; Boccioli, M; Han, B H; Fabris, D; Huber, S; Breitner, T; Bhasin, A; Guarnaccia, C; Cobanoglu, O; Schiaua, C; Ryabinkin, E; Pujahari, P; Arend, A; Pastircak, B; Glasow, R; Krivda, M; Vilakazi, Z; Ferretti, A; Barroso, V Chibante; Toscano, L; Deloff, A; Nielsen, B S; Cherney, M; Cattaruzza, E; Mares, J; de Cataldo, G; Salur, S; Pochybova, S; Dobretsov, V; Lutz, J -R; Bartke, J; Newby, J; Lopez-Ramirez, R; Miskowiec, D; Haiduc, M; Morales, Y Corrales; Kikola, D; Nikolaev, S; Enokizono, A; Mayani, D; Grigoras, C; Ladro de Guevara, P; Grigoras, A; Fragkiadakis, M; Di Nezza, P; Tanabe, R; Redlich, K; Luvisetto, M; Preghenella, R; Kharlov, Y; Vassiliev, I; Ploskon, M; Hamar, G; Floris, M; Buesching, H; Tsuji, T; Caselle, M; Kraus, I; Piano, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Petrov, P; Tolyhy, T; Evrard, S; La Rocca, P; Fenton-Olsen, B; Sarkamo, J; Klay, J L; Molnar, L; Bourdaud, G; Manceau, L; Navin, S; D'Erasmo, G; Ahammed, Z; Brun, R; Barret, V; Putis, M; Grigoryan, A; Contin, G; Braun, M; Cerello, P; Coli, S; Mueller, H; Cuautle, E; Gemme, R; Glenn, A; Sevcenco, A; Oldenburg, M; Kim, H N; Vodopianov, A; Abeysekara, U; Nilsen, B S; Padilla, F; Blanc, A; Manso, F; Gorbunov, Y; Borel, H; Manzari, V; Sahoo, R; Beole, S; Revol, J -P; Vercellin, E; Girard, M Fusco; Stolpovsky, P; Tavares, B Mattos; Zinovjev, G; Nedosekin, A; Dupieux, P; Rossi, A; Formenti, F; Pikna, M; Scomparin, E; Santoro, R; Gheata, M; Torii, H; Harris, J W; Alfaro Molina, R; Vargas, H Leon; de Barros, G O V; Zbroszczyk, H; 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Soltz, R; Caffarri, D; Saini, J; Nikolic, V; Rossegger, S

    2010-01-01

    On 23rd November 2009, during the early commissioning of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two counter-rotating proton bunches were circulated for the first time concurrently in the machine, at the LHC injection energy of 450 GeV per beam. Although the proton intensity was very low, with only one pilot bunch per beam, and no systematic attempt was made to optimize the collision optics, all LHC experiments reported a number of collision candidates. In the ALICE experiment, the collision region was centred very well in both the longitudinal and transverse directions and 284 events were recorded in coincidence with the two passing proton bunches. The events were immediately reconstructed and analyzed both online and offline. We have used these events to measure the pseudorapidity density of charged primary particles in the central region. In the range vertical bar eta vertical bar S collider. They also illustrate the excellent functioning and rapid progress of the LHC accelerator, and of both the hardware an...

  20. First proton-proton collisions at the LHC as observed with the ALICE detector measurement of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV

    CERN Document Server

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