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Sample records for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency pizz

  1. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  2. [Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelier, Aquiles A; Winter, Daniel Hugo; Jardim, José Roberto; Barboza, Carlos Eduardo Galvão; Cukier, Alberto; Miravitlles, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues. PMID:18695797

  3. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy. PMID:26238635

  4. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  6. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ.

  7. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  8. Increased outer arm and core fucose residues on the N-glycans of mutated alpha-1 antitrypsin protein from alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; O'Brien, M Emmet; Bergin, David A; Carroll, Tomás P; Keenan, Joanne; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Rudd, Pauline M; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major physiological inhibitor of a range of serine proteases, and in the lung, it maintains a protease-antiprotease balance. AAT deficiency (AATD) is an autosomal co-dominant condition with the Z mutation being the most common cause. Individuals homozygous for Z (PiZZ) have low levels of circulating mutant Z-AAT protein leading to premature emphysematous lung disease. Extensive glycoanalysis has been performed on normal AAT (M-AAT) from healthy individuals and the importance of glycosylation in affecting the immune modulatory roles of AAT is documented. However, no glycoanalysis has been carried out on Z-AAT from deficient individuals to date. In this study, we investigate whether the glycans present on Z-AAT differ to those found on M-AAT from healthy controls. Plasma AAT was purified from 10 individuals: 5 AATD donors with the PiZZ phenotype and 5 PiMM healthy controls. Glycoanalysis was performed employing N-glycan release, exoglycosidase digestion and UPLC analysis. No difference in branched glycans was identified between AATD and healthy controls. However, a significant increase in both outer arm (α1-3) (p = 0.04) and core (α1-6) fucosylated glycans (p < 0.0001) was found on Z-AAT compared to M-AAT. This study has identified increased fucosylation on N-glycans of Z-AAT indicative of ongoing inflammation in AATD individuals with implications for early therapeutic intervention.

  9. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  10. Blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease, and longevity in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik;

    2003-01-01

    Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity.......Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity....

  11. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: a clinical-genetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abboud RT

    2011-03-01

    in patients with chronic irreversible airflow obstruction, especially in those with early onset of disease or positive family history. Testing is also recommended for immediate family members of those with AATD, asthmatics with persistent airflow obstruction, and infants and older subjects with unexplained liver disease. There are over 100 different AAT gene variants; most are rare and only some are associated with clinical disease.Keywords: AAT, AATD, ZZ, early onset emphysema, panacinar emphysema, neonatal jaundice and hepatitis, childhood liver disease, genetics of alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antitrypsin laboratory testing and phenotyping

  12. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and its clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolk Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a genetic disorder that manifests as pulmonary emphysema, liver cirrhosis and, rarely, as the skin disease panniculitis, and is characterized by low serum levels of AAT, the main protease inhibitor (PI in human serum. The prevalence in Western Europe and in the USA is estimated at approximately 1 in 2,500 and 1 : 5,000 newborns, and is highly dependent on the Scandinavian descent within the population. The most common deficiency alleles in North Europe are PI Z and PI S, and the majority of individuals with severe AATD are PI type ZZ. The clinical manifestations may widely vary between patients, ranging from asymptomatic in some to fatal liver or lung disease in others. Type ZZ and SZ AATD are risk factors for the development of respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea, coughing, early onset emphysema, and airflow obstruction early in adult life. Environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, and dust exposure are additional risk factors and have been linked to an accelerated progression of this condition. Type ZZ AATD may also lead to the development of acute or chronic liver disease in childhood or adulthood: prolonged jaundice after birth with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and abnormal liver enzymes are characteristic clinical signs. Cirrhotic liver failure may occur around age 50. In very rare cases, necrotizing panniculitis and secondary vasculitis may occur. AATD is caused by mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding AAT, and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The diagnosis can be established by detection of low serum levels of AAT and isoelectric focusing. Differential diagnoses should exclude bleeding disorders or jaundice, viral infection, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. For treatment of lung disease, intravenous alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy, annual flu vaccination and a pneumococcal vaccine every 5 years are recommended. Relief of breathlessness

  13. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2011-07-13

    Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. Methods We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. Results The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  14. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. METHODS: We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. RESULTS: The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  15. Prognosis of patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency on long-term oxygen therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Seersholm, Niels; Perch, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data on patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency (AATD) on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is sparse. The aim of this study was to present the incidence of patients with AATD on LTOT, and compare their characteristics, comorbidities and prognosis (lung transplantation, termination...

  16. The parallel lives of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Trapnell, Bruce C.; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In 1963, five cases of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency were reported in the scientific literature, as well as an attempt to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by a massive washing of the lung (whole lung lavage). Now, fifty years later, it seems the ideal moment not only to commemorate these publications, but also to point out the influence both papers had in the following decades and how knowledge on these two fascinating rare respiratory disorders progressed over the years. This paper is th...

  17. Alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in deficient individuals enrolled in the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Adriano R Tonelli1, Farshid Rouhani1, Ning Li2, Pam Schreck1, Mark L Brantly11Alpha-1 Research Program, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAIntroduction: Intravenous augmentation therapy with purified intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin replaces the deficient protein and is the only currently approved treatment for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT...

  18. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  19. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona McLean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caitriona McLean*, Catherine M Greene*, Noel G McElvaneyRespiratory Research Division, Dept. Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland; *Each of these authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys. ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and RNA interference (RNAi, which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, siRNA, peptide nucleic acid, ribozymes

  20. Infected tracheal diverticulum: a rare association with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

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    Cecília Beatriz Alves Amaral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal diverticulum, defined as a benign outpouching of the tracheal wall, is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. It can be congenital or acquired in origin, and most cases are asymptomatic, typically being diagnosed postmortem. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who was hospitalized after presenting with fever, fatigue, pleuritic chest pain, and a right neck mass complicated by dysphagia. Her medical history was significant: pulmonary emphysema (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; bronchiectasis; and thyroidectomy. On physical examination, she presented diminished breath sounds and muffled heart sounds, with a systolic murmur. Laboratory tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers, a CT scan showed an air-filled, multilocular mass in the right tracheal wall, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the CT findings. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy failed to reveal any abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal diverticulum. The treatment approach was conservative, consisting mainly of antibiotics. After showing clinical improvement, the patient was discharged.

  1. Emergence of a Stage-Dependent Human Liver Disease Signature with Directed Differentiation of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient iPS Cells

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    Andrew A. Wilson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an inexhaustible source of cells for modeling disease and testing drugs. Here we develop a bioinformatic approach to detect differences between the genomic programs of iPSCs derived from diseased versus normal human cohorts as they emerge during in vitro directed differentiation. Using iPSCs generated from a cohort carrying mutations (PiZZ in the gene responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, we find that the global transcriptomes of PiZZ iPSCs diverge from normal controls upon differentiation to hepatic cells. Expression of 135 genes distinguishes PiZZ iPSC-hepatic cells, providing potential clues to liver disease pathogenesis. The disease-specific cells display intracellular accumulation of mutant AAT protein, resulting in increased autophagic flux. Furthermore, we detect beneficial responses to the drug carbamazepine, which further augments autophagic flux, but adverse responses to known hepatotoxic drugs. Our findings support the utility of iPSCs as tools for drug development or prediction of toxicity.

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency resulting in a hitherto unseen presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Polycythemia but with normal alpha fetoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Ryan Owen; Ramachandran Sivakumar; Eui-Sik Suh; Murugiah Seevaratnam

    2006-01-01

    Polycythemia is a known paraneopastic manifestation of hepatoma, but only in the presence of alpha-fetopro (AFP). We present a case of polycythemia in the absence of AFP, and suggest concurrent alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as the cause for breaking this rule. We also suggest a reason for the apparent constant conjunction between polycythemia and AFP in hepatoma.

  3. Impaired hepcidin expression in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with iron overload and progressive liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benedikt; Haschka, David; Finkenstedt, Armin; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Theurl, Igor; Henninger, Benjamin; Janecke, Andreas R; Wang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Herbert Y; Veits, Lothar; Vogel, Wolfgang; Weiss, Günter; Franke, Andre; Zoller, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    Liver disease due to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is associated with hepatic iron overload in a subgroup of patients. The underlying cause for this association is unknown. The aim of the present study was to define the genetics of this correlation and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) on the expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Full exome and candidate gene sequencing were carried out in a family with A1ATD and hepatic iron overload. Regulation of hepcidin expression by A1AT was studied in primary murine hepatocytes. Cells co-transfected with hemojuvelin (HJV) and matriptase-2 (MT-2) were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Observed familial clustering of hepatic iron overload with A1ATD suggests a genetic cause, but genotypes known to be associated with hemochromatosis were absent. Individuals homozygous for the A1AT Z-allele with environmental or genetic risk factors such as steatosis or heterozygosity for the HAMP non-sense mutation p.Arg59* presented with severe hepatic siderosis. In hepatocytes, A1AT induced hepcidin mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments in overexpressing cells show that A1AT reduces cleavage of the hepcidin inducing bone morphogenetic protein co-receptor HJV via inhibition of the membrane-bound serine protease MT-2. The acute-phase protein A1AT is an inducer of hepcidin expression. Through this mechanism, A1ATD could be a trigger of hepatic iron overload in genetically predisposed individuals or patients with environmental risk factors for hepatic siderosis. PMID:26310624

  4. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

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    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  5. Historical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in respiratory and hepatic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen

    2016-09-10

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a heritable disease that is commonly associated with complications in the respiratory and hepatic systems. AAT acts as a regulatory enzyme that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase activity thus protecting tissues from proteolytic damage after inflammation. This paper provides a historical review of the discovery, classification, phenotypic expression, and treatment of AAT deficiency. While its pattern of inheritance has been long understood, the underlying mechanism between AAT deficiency and related diseases remains to be elucidated. Most commonly, AAT deficiency is associated with the development of emphysema in the lungs as well as various liver injuries. Cigarette smoke has been shown to be particularly detrimental in AAT deficient individuals during the development of lung disease. Therefore, understanding familial history may be beneficial when educating patients regarding lifestyle choices. While numerous AAT deficient phenotypes exist in the human populations, only specific variants have been proven to markedly predispose individuals to lung and liver disorders. The exact relationship between AAT levels and the aforementioned diseases is an essential area of further research. It is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike strive to standardize diagnostic criteria and develop safe and effective therapies for this genetic disease. PMID:26768576

  6. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, Caitriona

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys). ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and RNA interference (RNAi), which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.

  7. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 modifies endoplasmic reticulum stress in Z variant alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-06-19

    Z alpha(1)-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected with the mutant form of AAT, a ZAAT transgene. We evaluated levels of NFkappaB activity as a marker of the ER overload response. To determine the effect of selenium supplementation on the function of SEPS1, we investigated glutathione peroxidase activity, grp78 promoter activity, and NFkappaB activity in the presence or absence of selenium. SEPS1 reduced levels of active ATF6. Overexpression of SEPS1 also inhibited grp78 promoter and NFkappaB activity, and this effect was enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. This finding demonstrates a role for SEPS1 in ZAAT deficiency and suggests a possible therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation.

  8. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    de Serres Frederick; Lara Beatriz; Blanco Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations

  9. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  10. Aberrant disulphide bonding contributes to the ER retention of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Riccardo; Berardelli, Romina; Medicina, Daniela; Sitia, Roberto; Gooptu, Bibek; Fra, Anna Maria

    2016-02-15

    Mutations in alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) can cause the protein to polymerise and be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. The ensuing systemic AAT deficiency leads to pulmonary emphysema, while intracellular polymers are toxic and cause chronic liver disease. The severity of this process varies considerably between individuals, suggesting the involvement of mechanistic co-factors and potential for therapeutically beneficial interventions. We show in Hepa1.6 cells that the mildly polymerogenic I (Arg39Cys) AAT mutant forms aberrant inter- and intra-molecular disulphide bonds involving the acquired Cys39 and the only cysteine residue in the wild-type (M) sequence (Cys232). Substitution of Cys39 to serine partially restores secretion, showing that disulphide bonding contributes to the intracellular retention of I AAT. Covalent homodimers mediated by inter-Cys232 bonding alone are also observed in cells expressing the common Z and other polymerising AAT variants where conformational behaviour is abnormal, but not in those expressing M AAT. Prevention of such disulphide linkage through the introduction of the Cys232Ser mutation or by treatment of cells with reducing agents increases Z AAT secretion. Our results reveal that disulphide interactions enhance intracellular accumulation of AAT mutants and implicate the oxidative ER state as a pathogenic co-factor. Redox modulation, e.g. by anti-oxidant strategies, may therefore be beneficial in AAT deficiency-associated liver disease.

  11. Is PiSS Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Associated with Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn McGee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT is an inherited condition that predisposes to lung and/or liver disease. Objective. The current study examined the clinical features of the PiSS genotype. Methods. Nineteen study participants (PiSS and 29 matched control participants (PiMM were telephone interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Demographic features, cigarette smoking, vocation, medication history, and clinical diagnoses were compared. Statistical analysis was performed. Finally, a comprehensive literature review was performed by two investigators. Results. 12/19 (63.2% study participants reported the presence of lung and/or liver disease compared to 12/29 (41.4% control participants. There trended toward having a higher frequency of medication allergies in the study population (42.11% versus 20.69%. Conclusions. The PiSS genotype was associated with a similar incidence of obstructive lung disease to controls. Selective bias intrinsic in testing for AAT deficiency and the rarity of the PiSS genotype will make future study of this association dependent on population-based tests.

  12. Conductivity in Exhaled Breath Condensate from Subjects with Emphysema and Type ZZ alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jan; Fumagalli, Marco; Viglio, Simona; Iadarola, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of biomarkers in biological samples from the lung has long been employed. Upon cooling water vapor present in exhaled breath, variable amounts of droplets of condensate (EBC) containing volatile and non-volatile compounds may be easily and non-invasively obtained from patients of any age.Objective of the present study was to compare the level of EBC conductivity determined for cohorts of individuals with different inflammatory lung disorders with that of healthy never-smoking individuals.The conductivity in EBC of PiZZ-Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency patients with a diagnosis of emphysema (PiZZ-AATD) was 3 fold lower than in spouse controls (54.5 ± 11.6 vs 165.3 ± 10.7 μS/cm). Non-PiZZ emphysema patients had conductivity in EBC of 59.6 ± 5.8 μS/cm and patients with sarcoidosis without airflow obstruction had EBC conductivity of 178,8 ± 6,2 μS/cm, 
not significantly different (p = 0.5) from healthy controls. Conductivity in serial EBC samples from patients with PiZZ-AATD emphysema and healthy controls was stable in 6 different samples collected over a period of 14 months. We conclude that conductivity values in EBC can be used as a correction factor for dilution of non-volatile components in EBC.

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the risk of hepatocellularcarcinoma in end-stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the association between alpha-1antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) and hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC) in patients with end-stage liver disease(ESLD).METHODS: Patients with cirrhosis and ESLD referred tothe Cleveland Clinic Foundation for liver transplantationbetween 2003 and 2014 were included in the study (N =675). ESLD was defined as having histological features ofcirrhosis and/or radiological evidence of cirrhosis in thecontext of portal hypertension (ascites, variceal bleeding,thrombocytopenia, or hepatic encephalopathy). A1ATDwas diagnosed using phenotype characterization (MZor ZZ), liver biopsy detection of PAS-positive diastaseresistant(PAS+) globules, or both. Patients with othercauses of liver diseases such as hepatitis C virus (HCV),alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH) or NASH were also included in the study. HCCwas diagnosed by using imaging modalities, biopsyfindings, or explanted liver inspection. Follow-up timewas defined as the number of years from the diagnosisof cirrhosis to the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma,or from the diagnosis of cirrhosis to the last follow upvisit. The rate of HCC was assessed using time-tointervalanalysis for interval censored data.RESULTS: This study included 675 patients. 7% ofsubjects had A1ATD (n = 47). Out of all subjects whodid not have A1ATD, 46% had HCV, 17% had alcoholicliver disease, 19% had NASH and 18% had anotherprimary diagnosis. Of the 47 subjects with A1ATD, 15had a primary diagnosis of A1ATD (PI*ZZ phenotypeand PAS+ globules), 8 had a PI*MZ phenotype alone,14 had PAS+ alone, and 10 had both the PI*MZphenotype and PAS+. Median follow-up time was 3.4(25th, 75th percentiles: 1, 5.2) years. The overall rate ofhepatocellular carcinoma in all subjects was 29% (n =199). In the A1ATD group, the incidence rate of HCCwas 8.5% compared to 31% in the group of patientswith other causes of cirrhosis (P = 0

  14. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles A Camelier

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que determina polimerização e acúmulo dentro dos hepatócitos. O acúmulo e a conseqüente redução dos níveis séricos de alfa-1 antitripsina determinam, respectivamente, doença hepática e pulmonar, sendo que esta se manifesta principalmente sob a forma de enfisema de aparecimento precoce, habitualmente com predomínio basal. O diagnóstico envolve a detecção de níveis séricos reduzidos de alfa-1 antitripsina e a confirmação fenotípica. Além do tratamento usual para doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, existe atualmente uma terapia específica com infusão de concentrados de alfa-1 antitripsina. Essa terapia de reposição, aparentemente segura, ainda não teve a eficácia clínica definitivamente comprovada, e o custo-efetividade também é um tema controverso e ainda pouco abordado. Apesar da sua importância, não existem dados epidemiológicos brasileiros a respeito da prevalência da doença ou da freqüência de ocorrência dos alelos deficientes. O subdiagnóstico também tem sido uma importante limitação tanto para o estudo da doença quanto para o tratamento adequado dos pacientes. Espera-se que a criação do Registro Internacional de Alfa-1 venha a resolver essas e outras importantes questões.Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical

  15. A comparative ultrastructural and molecular biological study on Chlamydia psittaci infection in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and non-alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency emphysema versus lung tissue of patients with hamartochondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogilevski Grigori

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiales are familiar causes of acute and chronic infections in humans and animals. Human pulmonary emphysema is a component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and a condition in which chronic inflammation manifested as bronchiolitis and intra-alveolar accumulation of macrophages is common. It is generally presumed to be of infectious origin. Previous investigations based on serology and immunohistochemistry indicated Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection in cases of COPD. Furthermore, immunofluorescence with genus-specific antibodies and electron microscopy suggested involvement of chlamydial infection in most cases of pulmonary emphysema, but these findings could not be verified by PCR. Therefore, we examined the possibility of other chlamydial species being present in these patients. Methods Tissue samples from patients having undergone lung volume reduction surgery for advanced alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD, n = 6 or non-alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency emphysema (n = 34 or wedge resection for hamartochondroma (n = 14 were examined by transmission electron microscopy and PCR. Results In all cases of AATD and 79.4% of non-AATD, persistent chlamydial infection was detected by ultrastructural examination. Intra-alveolar accumulation of macrophages and acute as well as chronic bronchiolitis were seen in all positive cases. The presence of Chlamydia psittaci was demonstrated by PCR in lung tissue of 66.7% AATD vs. 29.0% non-AATD emphysema patients. Partial DNA sequencing of four positive samples confirmed the identity of the agent as Chlamydophila psittaci. In contrast, Chlamydophila pneumoniae was detected only in one AATD patient. Lung tissue of the control group of non-smokers with hamartochondroma was completely negative for chlamydial bodies by TEM or chlamydial DNA by PCR. Conclusions These data indicate a role of Chlamydophila psittaci in pulmonary emphysema by linking this chronic inflammatory process

  16. Correction: Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Berden, J.H.M.; Luisetti, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  17. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J; Veldhuisen, B; Annovazzi, L; Zanone, C; Versteeg, EM; van Kuppevelt, TH; Nieuwenhuizen, W; Iadarola, P; Luisetti, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  18. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Luisetti, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  19. Regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion has been determined of 13 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Eight patients had alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (α1ATD). Ventilation studies were carried out using xenon-133 (133Xe) and krypton-81m (sup(81m)Kr) gases. Trapping indices were determined from the wash-out part of the xenon ventilation studies. Results obtained from patients were compared with those of normal controls. Ventilation studies with sup(81m)Kr showed pulmonary changes more clearly than did 133Xe studies and the trapping of radio-xenon was more extensive in lung bases than in apices whether or not the patients had α1 ATD. The distribution of perfusion followed a pattern similar to that of ventilation, but did not differ statistically from that of the normal controls. (orig.)

  20. Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with Atypical Cutaneous Involvement and Diagnosis of ZZ Phenotype Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khawandanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare condition. Specific neoplastic involvement can be primary (confined to the skin or secondary to systemic involvement (metastatic. Cutaneous involvement by HL usually occurs late in the course and is associated with poor prognosis; however in some cases it can exhibit indolent behavior. Skin involvement with nonspecific cutaneous findings may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. We describe a case of 46-year-old white male patient presented with rash and lymphadenopathy which led to the diagnosis of stage IVE mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma with skin involvement. His disease was refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy including (1 AVD (doxorubicin/bleomycin/dacarbazine, (2 brentuximab, and (3 bendamustine, he later achieved complete remission with (4 GCD (gemcitabine/carboplatin/dexamethasone salvage regimen. Bleomycin was not given secondary to poor pulmonary function tests. His treatment was complicated after AVD with multiple pneumothoraces which unmasked the diagnosis of ZZ phenotype alpha-1 antitrypsin (ATT deficiency. Simultaneous existence of Hodgkin lymphoma and ATT is rarely reported.

  1. A novel SERPINA1 mutation causing serum alpha(1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren N Saunders

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can cause deficiency in the circulating serine protease inhibitor α(1-Antitrypsin (α(1AT. α(1AT deficiency is the major contributor to pulmonary emphysema and liver disease in persons of European ancestry, with a prevalence of 1 in 2500 in the USA. We present the discovery and characterization of a novel SERPINA1 mutant from an asymptomatic Middle Eastern male with circulating α(1AT deficiency. This 49 base pair deletion mutation (T379Δ, originally mistyped by IEF, causes a frame-shift replacement of the last sixteen α(1AT residues and adds an extra twenty-four residues. Functional analysis showed that the mutant protein is not secreted and prone to intracellular aggregation.

  2. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, David R; Koth, Laura L; Maier, Lisa A; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K; Collman, Ronald G; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J; Zhang, Yingze; O'Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gibson, Kevin F

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant's clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis.

  3. Screening for Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in Tunisian subjects with obstructive lung disease: a feasibility report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibani Jemni

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AATD is one of the most common inherited disorders in the World. However, it is generally accepted that AATD in North African populations is not a risk factor for lung and/or liver disease, based on a number of small studies. We therefore planned a screening study for detection of AATD in patients with OLD in a cohort of patients from Kairouan in central Tunisia. Methods: One hundred twenty patients with OLD (asthma, emphysema, COPD were enrolled in the screening programme. Laboratory diagnosis for AATD was performed according to current diagnostic standards. Results We found that 6/120 OLD patients carried an AAT deficient allele, 1 PI*MZ, 1 PI*MPlowel, 3 PI*MMmalton, 1 PI*MMwurzburg. Conclusion this pilot study demonstrated that alleles related to deficiency of AAT are not absent in the Tunisian population, and that rare AATD variants prevailed over commonest PI*Z variant. These results would support a larger scale screening for AATD in Tunisia.

  4. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...

  5. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieuwenhuizen Willem

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longitudinal variability of these biomarkers is unknown but desirable for clinical studies with proteinase inhibitors. Methods We measured three different types of biomarkers, including desmosines, elastase-formed fibrinogen fragments and heparan sulfate epitope JM403, in plasma and urine for a period of 7 weeks in a group of 12 patients who participated in a placebo-controlled study to assess the safety of a single inhalation of hyaluronic acid. Results Effect of study medication on any of the biomarkers was not seen. Baseline desmosines in plasma and urine correlated with baseline CO diffusion capacity (R = 0.81, p = 0.01 and R = 0.65, p = 0.05. Mean coefficient of variation within patients (CVi for plasma and urine desmosines was 18.7 to 13.5%, respectively. Change in urinary desmosine levels correlated significantly with change in plasma desmosine levels (R = 0.84, p Conclusion We found acceptable variability in our study parameters, indicating the feasibility of their use in an evaluation of biochemical efficacy of alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in Pi Z subjects.

  6. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...... (difference 1.14 g/l; 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 2.14; p = 0.03) over the total course of the trials. Augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin cannot be recommended in view of the lack of evidence of clinical benefit and the cost of treatment....

  7. Relationship between frequency, length, and treatment outcome of exacerbations to baseline lung function and lung density in alpha-1 antitrypsin-deficient COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasaratha K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kesavaperumal Vijayasaratha,1 Robert A Stockley21Lung Investigation Unit, 2Research and Development, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham, UKBackground: Diary cards are useful for analyzing exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, although factors influencing the length and frequency of each episode are poorly understood. This study investigated factors that influence the features of exacerbations in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency (PiZ phenotype and COPD.Methods: Daily diary cards were collected over 2 years. Patients had emphysema visualized and quantified by computed tomography scan, and had at least one documented exacerbation in the previous year.Results: The patients (n = 23 had a mean age of 52.5 years, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 of 1.2 L (38.4% predicted, corrected gas transfer (KCO of 0.90 mmol/min/kPa/L (59.7% predicted, and 15th percentile lung density of 44.55 g/L. Two hundred and sixty-three exacerbations (164 treated were identified. The frequency of treated exacerbations correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.432; P = 0.022. Exacerbation length (determined for 17 of the patients for whom diary card data through the episode were available correlated negatively with baseline 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.361; P = 0.003, and increased the longer treatment was delayed (r = 0.503; P < 0.001. Treatment delay was shorter with higher day 1 symptom score, lower baseline FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity, and lower 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.368, 0.272, 0.461, and 0.786; P = 0.004, 0.036, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively. Time to resolution of exacerbation after treatment initiation was not affected by treatment delay, but correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.647; P = 0.007.Conclusion: In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the frequency and length of resolution of exacerbation were related to baseline gas transfer. Treatment

  8. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milger K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Katrin Milger,1 Lesca Miriam Holdt,2 Daniel Teupser,2 Rudolf Maria Huber,1 Jürgen Behr,1 Nikolaus Kneidinger1 1Department of Internal Medicine V, University of Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, 2Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT, is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL. No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null. This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, bronchiectasis, SERPINA-1 mutation, pulmonary embolism

  9. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aquiles A Camelier; Daniel Hugo Winter; José Roberto Jardim; Carlos Eduardo Galvão Barboza; Alberto Cukier; Marc Miravitlles

    2008-01-01

    A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que de...

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in alpha1-antitrypsin PI MZ heterozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Dahl, Morten; Ly, N P;

    2004-01-01

    Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial....

  11. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  12. Immunoassay of serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A K; Sarin, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured in 60 patients with endogenous uveitis, 27 patients with phacoallergic endophthalmitis, 12 patients with phacolytic glaucoma, and 58 healthy subjects. Thirty-four patients with endogenous uveitis were also followed up for 6 months after treatment, and the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured again. There was a significant rise in the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in cases of endogenous uveitis and phacoallergic endophthalmitis but no ...

  13. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  14. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He) Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavngaard, T.; Vejby Soegaard, L. (Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Batz, M. (Inst. of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)); Schreiber, L.M. (Dept. of Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Medical School, Mainz (Germany)); Dirksen, A. (Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2009-11-15

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P<0.001). Conclusion: This pilot study indicates the possible use of nonionizing HP 3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  15. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Coverage & Reimbursement of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Human Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research ... symptoms can include repeated respiratory infections, fatigue, rapid heartbeat upon standing, vision problems and unintentional weight loss. ...

  16. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include flower and tree pollen, ash, allergens, air pollution, wood burning stoves, paint fumes, and fumes from ... protein foods, such as lean meats, poultry without skin, seafood, processed soy products, nuts, seeds, beans, and ...

  17. Augmentation therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockley, Robert A; Miravitlles, Marc; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    combination of age, physiological impairment, exacerbation history and rate of decline in spirometry and other measures of emphysema may be used to improve therapeutic decision making, until a reliable predictive biomarker of the evolution of lung impairment can be identified. In addition, individual...

  18. Role of alpha-1 antitrypsin in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Serres, F; Blanco, I

    2014-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an under-recognized hereditary disorder associated with the premature onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver cirrhosis in children and adults, and less frequently, relapsing panniculitis, systemic vasculitis and other inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. Severe AAT deficiency mainly affects Caucasian individuals and has its highest prevalence (1 : 2000-1 : 5000 individuals) in Northern, Western and Central Europe. In the USA and Canada, the prevalence is 1: 5000-10 000. Prevalence is five times lower in Latin American countries and is rare or nonexistent in African and Asian individuals. The key to successful diagnosis is by measuring serum AAT, followed by the determination of the phenotype or genotype if low concentrations are found. Case detection allows implementation of genetic counselling and, in selected cases, the application of augmentation therapy. Over the past decade, it has been demonstrated that AAT is a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-infective and tissue-repair molecule. These new capacities are promoting an increasing number of clinical studies, new pharmacological formulations, new patent applications and the search for alternative sources of AAT (including transgenic and recombinant AAT) to meet the expected demand for treating a large number of diseases, inside and outside the context of AAT deficiency.

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Investigations Using Animal Models of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kevin; Serban, Karina A; Batra, Chanan; Petrache, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Animal models of disease help accelerate the translation of basic science discoveries to the bedside, because they permit experimental interrogation of mechanisms at relatively high throughput, while accounting for the complexity of an intact organism. From the groundbreaking observation of emphysema-like alveolar destruction after direct instillation of elastase in the lungs to the more clinically relevant model of airspace enlargement induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, animal models have advanced our understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) function. Experimental in vivo models that, at least in part, replicate clinical human phenotypes facilitate the translation of mechanistic findings into individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and with AAT deficiency. In addition, unexpected findings of alveolar enlargement in various transgenic mice have led to novel hypotheses of emphysema development. Previous challenges in manipulating the AAT genes in mice can now be overcome with new transgenic approaches that will likely advance our understanding of functions of this essential, lung-protective serine protease inhibitor (serpin). PMID:27564666

  20. DNA polymorphisms of the human alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in normal subjects and in patients with pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, I; Kalsheker, N

    1987-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency predisposes subjects to developing pulmonary emphysema and childhood liver cirrhosis. We have studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in a normal population and a group of patients with pulmonary emphysema. We have identified five RFLPs with eight restriction enzymes. The most frequent polymorphisms have been detected with the enzymes MspI, PstI, and TaqI at frequencies of 46.8%, 6.4%, and 5.0% respectively in th...

  1. Fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin in COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Marott, J. L.; Rode, L.;

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the hypotheses that fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin are observationally and genetically associated with exacerbations in COPD. Methods We studied 13 591 individuals with COPD from the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2013), of whom 6857 were genotyped for FGB -455...... (rs1800790, G>A) and FGB -448 (rs4220, G>A) and had plasma fibrinogen measured. Furthermore, 13 405 individuals were genotyped for the SERPINA1 S-allele (rs17580) and the Z-allele (rs28929474) and had measurements of plasma alpha(1)-antitrypsin. Exacerbations were defined as hospital admissions or...... exacerbations in instrumental variable analyses. Results Elevated fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were associated with increased risk of exacerbations in COPD, HR=1.14 (1.07 to 1.22, p...

  2. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  3. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  4. Fluorescent antibody studies of alpha-1-antitrypsin in adult human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of alpha-1-antitrypsin in frozen sections prepared from four specimens of human lung was determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Three of the specimens were obtained directly from surgical procedures and were peripheral tissue excised with tumors. Specific fluorescence for alpha-1-antitrypsin was observed lining the terminal airways and alveoli throughout the sections from two of the cases. In the other cases, a few focal areas of specific fluorescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that alpha-1-antitrypsin may be distributed in lung in association with pulmonary surfactant and that local tissue concentrations of alpha-1-antitrypsin are variable. (U.S.)

  5. Circulating alpha1-antitrypsin in the general population: Determinants and association with lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency associated with low AAT blood concentrations is an established genetic COPD risk factor. Less is known about the respiratory health impact of variation in AAT serum concentrations in the general population. We cross-sectionally investigated correlates of circulating AAT concentrations and its association with FEV1. Methods In 5187 adults (2669 females with high-sensitive c-reactive protein (CRP levels ≤ 10 mg/l from the population-based Swiss SAPALDIA cohort, blood was collected at the time of follow-up examination for measuring serum AAT and CRP. Results Female gender, hormone intake, systolic blood pressure, age in men and in postmenopausal women, as well as active and passive smoking were positively, whereas alcohol intake and BMI inversely correlated with serum AAT levels, independent of CRP adjustment. We observed an inverse association of AAT with FEV1 in the total study population (p Conclusion The results of this population-based study reflect a complex interrelationship between tobacco exposure, gender related factors, circulating AAT, systemic inflammatory status and lung function.

  6. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  7. C3, factor B, alpha-1-antitrypsin in neonatal septicaemia with sclerema.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelet, B

    1980-01-01

    C3, factor B, and alpha-1-antitrypsin were determined in newborn infants with septicaemia and sclerema, associated with suspected infections, ABO or Rh incompatibility, and hyperbilirubinaemia of unknown origin, during and after treatment with exchange transfusion. Activation products from C3 and factor B, the clearance of the transfused C3, and its synthesis by the recipient were determined also. Infected newborn infants had low levels of C3 and factor B, but a normal amount of alpha-1-antit...

  8. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    OpenAIRE

    AL-Bayaty, Fouad H.; NorAdinar Baharuddin; Mahmood A. Abdulla; Hapipah Mohd Ali; Arkilla, Magaji B.; ALBayaty, Mustafa F.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at alpha < 0.05. ...

  9. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is markedly decreased following pulmonary F. tularensis challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Patrick Chambers

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin, a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor of neutrophil elastase has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. However, we report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and SCHU S4 (Type A strain following pulmonary challenge. Consistent with an imbalance of protease-antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresistivity. These data are suggestive of targeted tissue destruction via unchecked neutrophhil elastase activity in infected animals.

  11. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  12. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  13. Inhibition of activated protein C by recombinant alpha 1-antitrypsin variants with substitution of arginine or leucine for methionine358

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeb, M.J.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) was recently identified as a major physiologic plasma inhibitor of activated protein C. The reaction with activated protein C of recombinant alpha 1-AT containing amino acid substitutions at the reactive center was studied. The substitution of Arg358 for Met, as obse

  14. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  15. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene polymorphism in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Denden

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT plays an important role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, the pathological lesion underlying the majority of the manifestations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that common AAT polymorphisms influence the risk of developing COPDs. We investigated PiM1 (Ala213Val, PiM2 (Arg101His, PiM3 (Glu376Asp, PiS (Glu264Val and PiZ (Glu342Lys SERPINA1 alleles in 100 COPD patients and 200 healthy controls. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between COPD patients and controls, neither did haplotype analysis show significant differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional study revealed no significant relationship between common SERPINA1 polymorphisms (PiM1, PiM2, PiM3 and the emphysematous type of COPD. In addition, FEV1 annual decline, determined during a two-year follow up period, revealed no difference among carriers of the tested polymorphisms.

  17. Alpha-1 antitrypsin prevents the development of preeclampsia through suppression of oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling eFeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  18. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Blaurock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis.

  19. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, R F; Li, Y.; Sifers, R N; Wang, H.; Hardick, C; Tsai, S. Y.; Woo, S L

    1987-01-01

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientati...

  20. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad H. Al-Bayaty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP, and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α≤0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39±5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03±8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05±1.48 and moderate plaque indexes (51.35±11.27 were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9±30.71 ng/dL, haptoglobin (76.04±52.48 mg/dL, and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90±18.40 mg/dL were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers.

  1. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Aleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Stanković Marija; Dinić Jelena; Lukić Snežana; Anđelić-Jelić Marina; Popović Dragan; Radojković Dragica

    2010-01-01

    One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT...

  2. The influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of haptoglobin and alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad H; Baharuddin, Noradinar; Abdulla, Mahmood A; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Arkilla, Magaji B; ALBayaty, Mustafa F

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α ≤ 0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39 ± 5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03 ± 8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05 ± 1.48) and moderate plaque indexes (51.35 ± 11.27) were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9 ± 30.71 ng/dL), haptoglobin (76.04 ± 52.48 mg/dL), and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90 ± 18.40 mg/dL) were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years) and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers. PMID:24286083

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin is Markedly Decreased Following Pulmonary F. tularensis Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, James P.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Jupelli, Madhulika; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Valdes, James J.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense during infection and are indispensable in this function. The neutrophil elastase is a key effector molecule of the innate immune system with potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria, spirochaetes, and fungi. However, the release of neutrophil elastase during bacterial infection must be checked otherwise its release in the extracellular milieu will result in damage to surrounding tissues. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor and has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Type A strains are the most virulent with an infectious dose as low as 10 colony forming units and a mortality rate of 30–60% among untreated cases of pneumonic tularemia. We report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of the neutrophil elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 infected animals following pulmonary challenge. Associated with an imbalance of protease–antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresivity. Consistent with a competent acute phase response following F. tularensis LVS and F. tularensis (type A) SCHU S4 pulmonary challenge and proposed up-regulation of plasma haptoglobin during the course of the acute phase reaction, haptoglobin was observed significantly increased. These data suggest that unchecked neutrophil serine protease activity may arise from F. tularensis targeted reduction of plasma α1-antitrysin promoting lung tissue damage facilitating increased dissemination of this bacterium in infected animals. PMID:22919586

  4. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  5. Reduction of the elastase inhibitory capacity of alpha 1-antitrypsin by peroxides in cigarette smoke: an analysis of brands and filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.B.; James, H.L.

    1982-07-01

    A procedure for measuring the oxidant content of aqueous condensates of tobacco cigarette smoke is described. The procedure was used in conjunction with analysis of the ability of the smoke solutions to inactivate the elastase inhibitory capacity (EIC) of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The ability of the smoke of a brand to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin correlates well with the known tar and nicotine and with the amount of oxidants as measured using o-dianisidine. Filters were found to remove about 73% of the oxidants from smoke. Smoke from a commercial nontobacco cigarette was also found to contain a significant amount of oxidants and to also destroy alpha 1-antitrypsin. Catalase and superoxide dismutase reduce the effect of solutions containing smoke on the EIC of alpha 1-antitrypsin, suggesting that peroxides and superoxide anions in smoke contribute to the oxidant capacity of the smoke. The extent of apparent oxidation by a given quantity of smoke condensate increases for as long as an hour from the time the condensate is collected. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the smoke solution increases both its oxidant content and its ability to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin. These data suggest that occurrence of hydrogen peroxide caused by secretion from macrophages found in the small airways of smokers may contribute to a locally damaging environment for alpha 1-antitrypsin in the presence of cigarette smoke that could promote the development of centrilobular emphysema.

  6. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara;

    2011-01-01

    stimulation. A1AT is produced at all stages of myeloid maturation in the bone marrow. The production increases as neutrophils enter circulation and increases further upon migration to tissues as observed in skin windows and when blood neutrophils are incubated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor......Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associated...... with azurophile granules in neutrophils indicative of A1AT expression being restricted to the promyelocyte stage. We examined the localization and production of A1AT in healthy donor neutrophils and found A1AT to be a constituent of all granule subtypes and to be released from neutrophils following...

  7. Alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein reduce the sensitivity of human dermal fibroblast to endotoxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that acute phase reactants, such as alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, could protect mammalian cells from further damage.Methods: Human dermal fibroblasts (5 × 104) were cultured with DMEM plus 10% FBS at 37℃ in a 5% CO2incubator. Different doses of LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and/or acute phase reactants were added. After 24 hours, the cultured supernatant was aspirated, the cells were washed, fixed and stained by methylene blue. The unbound stain was washed off. The stained cells were solubilized in 0.1 mi of 1% Triton X-100. The absorbance of each well was measured using an ELISA spectrophotometer. The concentration of LPS which decreased the absorbance to 70% of the control LPS-free ) cultures was defined as LD30.Results: In order to achieve LD30 in the presence of acute phase proteins, it was necessary to alter the LPS concentrations. The LD30 of LPS treated with 0, 0.5, 2, 10mg/ml antitrypsin and 0, 0.5, 2, 10 mg/ml glycoprotein was 5.4, 6.5, 7.6, 14.2 mg/ml and 5.2, 5.9, 6.9, 10.5mg/ml, respectively. Statistically, with the treatment of more than 2 mg/ml antitrypsin or glycoprotein, LD30increased significantly.Conclusions: Our data show that fibroblasts are susceptible to the direct toxicity of LPS. Alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein can reduce the toxicity and/or increase the tolerance of mammalian cells to LPS., LD

  8. Proteome Profiling of Urinary Exosomes Identifies Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and H2B1K as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Urothelial Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Wu, His-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chan; Chang, Kai-Po; Yang, Chi-Rei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Chen, Chao-Jung

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF spectrometry has not been used for urinary exosome analysis. We used it for determining UC biomarkers. From 2012 to 2015, we enrolled 129 consecutive patients with UC and 62 participants without UC. Exosomes from their urine were isolated, and analyzed through MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of another 122 UC and 26 non-UC tissues was conducted to verify the discovered biomarkers. Two peaks at m/z 5593 (fragmented peptide of alpha-1-antitrypsin; sensitivity, 50.4%; specificity, 96.9%) and m/z 5947 (fragmented peptide of histone H2B1K sensitivity, 62.0%; specificity, 92.3%) were identified as UC diagnosis exosome biomarkers. UC patients with detectable histone H2B1K showed 2.29- and 3.11-fold increased risks of recurrence and progression, respectively, compared with those with nondetectable histone H2B1K. Verification results of IHC staining revealed significantly higher expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin (p = 0.038) and H2B1K (p = 0.005) in UC tissues than in normal tissues. The expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin and H2B1K in UC tissues was significantly correlated with UC grades (p exosome proteins alpha 1-antitrypsin and histone H2B1K, which are identified through MALDI-TOF analysis, could facilitate rapid diagnosis and prognosis of UC. PMID:27686150

  9. Effect of Recombinant alpha1-Antitrypsin Fc-Fused (AAT-Fc)Protein on the Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Lee, Y.; Hong, K.; Hong, J.; Bae, S.; Choi, J.; Jhun, H.; Kwak, A.; Kim, E.; Jo, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; Kim, S.

    2013-01-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor family that impedes the enzymatic activity of serine proteinases, including human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and neutrophil proteinase 3. Here, we expressed recombinant AAT by fusing the intact AAT gene to the constant reg

  10. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R F; Li, Y; Sifers, R N; Wang, H; Hardick, C; Tsai, S Y; Woo, S L

    1987-10-26

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientations when complemented by the proximal region in the sense orientation. The results strongly suggest that there are multiple cis-acting elements in the human AAT gene that confer cell specificity for its expression. Nuclear proteins prepared from the hepatoma cells bound specifically to the proximal region in a band-shifting assay that was resistant to competition by the globin promoter DNA. Foot-printing analysis showed a protected domain within the proximal region that contains a nearly perfect palindromic sequence TGGTTAATATTCACCA, which may be important in the regulation of AAT expression in the liver. PMID:2823229

  11. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT mutations Z and S was analyzed in 160 patients with pancreatic diseases (50 patients with pancreatic cancer, 50 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 129 healthy individuals by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis (PSM method. One patient with pancreatic cancer was found to be a carrier of Z mutation, as well as one patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One patient with chronic pancreatitis was found to be a carrier of S mutation. The common AAT mutations were statistically significantly over-represented in patients with pancreatic diseases (3 of 160 patients, allelic frequency 0.9% than in the control group (1 of 129 individuals, allelic frequency 0.4%. The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that common AAT mutations Z and S may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to the development of pancreatic disease.

  12. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria;

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset...... a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated...... with an estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12)). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare...

  13. Polymorphisms in the HPC/ELAC-2 and alpha 1-antitrypsin genes that correlate with human diseases in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, Ranbir C; Thakur, Hitender; Gupta, Lipsy; Janmeja, Ashok K; Seth, Amlesh; Singh, Sharwan K

    2011-06-01

    Two genes HPC/ELAC-2 and AAT were studied in north Indian population. HPC/ELAC-2 was studied in prostate cancer cases and AAT was studied in COPD patients. HPC/ELAC-2 is considered as an important cancer-susceptibility gene in prostate cancer. There are two common polymorphisms of this gene, i.e., Ser217Leu and Ala541Thr. Alpha 1 antitrypsin is a highly polymorphic anti-elastase enzyme, especially active in the protection of alveoli and liver. In the present study, we observed the distribution of two deficient alleles PiZ and Pi S in COPD patients. We extracted the DNA from 157 prostate cancer cases, 200 COPD patients, 170 BPH and 370 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were studied by PCR-RFLP technique. The mutant genotype (Leu/Leu) of HPC/ELAC-2 was present in 9.6, 7.6 and 5.9% of BPH, cancer cases and healthy controls, respectively. Higher risk of Ser/Leu as well as Leu/Leu had shown when compared to healthy controls. That was about 1.5 and 1.7-fold (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 0.96-2.51; OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 0.74-3.92), respectively. Risk was found to be increased in smokers and those consuming non-vegetarian diet. Our results suggest that the HPC/ELAC-2 polymorphisms, especially in localized cases, could help to predict prostate cancer risk and confirm its high prevalence of the leu/leu allele in north Indian population. Considering heterozygous PiZ genotype, we obtained an OR of 3.82 (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis adjusted by age sex and drinking habit showed 4.15-fold increased risk for COPD in PiZ heterozygous individuals. No increased risk was observed in the individuals carrying PiS alleles. PMID:20119870

  14. Causal and synthetic associations of variants in the SERPINA gene cluster with alpha1-antitrypsin serum levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Andri Thun

    Full Text Available Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12. But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410, suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1% and low-frequent (MAF 1-5% variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273 was successful (P<0.0001, as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57. Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397, associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in the SERPINA gene

  15. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirooznia Nazanin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide (PLGA is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release

  16. Exploring the role of CT densitometry: a randomised study of augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Piitulainen, E; Parr, D G;

    2009-01-01

    than other measures of emphysema progression, and the changes in CT and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were correlated. All methods of densitometric analysis concordantly showed a trend suggestive of treatment benefit (p-values for Prolastin versus placebo ranged 0.049-0.084). Exacerbation frequency......Assessment of emphysema-modifying therapy is difficult, but newer outcome measures offer advantages over traditional methods. The EXAcerbations and Computed Tomography scan as Lung End-points (EXACTLE) trial explored the use of computed tomography (CT) densitometry and exacerbations for the......-point was change in CT lung density, and an exploratory approach was adopted to identify optimal methodology, including two methods of adjustment for lung volume variability and two statistical approaches. Other end-points were exacerbations, health status and physiological indices. CT was more sensitive...

  17. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  18. The role and importance of glycosylation of acute phase proteins with focus on alpha-1 antitrypsin in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2014-07-01

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are a group of circulating plasma proteins which undergo changes quantitatively or qualitatively at the time of inflammation. Many of these APPs are glycosylated, and it has been shown that alterations in glycosylation may occur in inflammatory and malignant conditions. Changes in glycosylation have been studied as potential biomarkers in cancer and also in chronic inflammatory conditions and have been shown to correlate with disease severity in certain conditions. Serine protease inhibitors (serpins), many of which are also APPs, are proteins involved in the control of proteases in numerous pathways. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serpin within the circulation and is an APP which has been shown to increase in response to inflammation. The primary role of AAT is maintaining the protease/antiprotease balance in the lung, but it also possesses important anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Several glycoforms of AAT exist, and they possess differing properties in regard to plasma half-life and stability. Glycosylation may also be important in determining the immune modulatory properties of AAT. The review will focus on the role and importance of glycosylation in acute phase proteins with particular attention to AAT and its use as a biomarker of disease. The review describes the processes involved in glycosylation, how glycosylation changes in differing disease states, and the alterations that occur to glycans of APPs with disease and inflammation. Finally, the review explores the importance of changes in glycosylation of AAT at times of inflammation and in malignant conditions and how this may impact upon the functions of AAT.

  19. Two novel nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction-based assays of dried blood spots, genomic DNA, or whole cells for fast, reliable detection of Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Knudsen, I; Jensen, P K;

    1992-01-01

    Two new nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for the Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene are presented. The assays take advantage of PCR-mediated mutagenesis, creating new diagnostic restriction enzyme sites for unambiguous discrimination between test samples...... from individuals who are normal, heterozygous, or homozygous for the mutations. We show that the two assays can be performed with purified genomic DNA as well as with boiled blood spots. The new assays were validated by parallel testing with a technique in which PCR is combined with allele...

  20. Prevalence of the serpin peptidase inhibitor (alpha-1-antitrypsin PI*S and PI*Z alleles in Brazilian children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Baldo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A (alpha-1 antiproteinase, antitrypsin, member 1 (SERPINA1 deficiency is one of the main genetic causes related to liver disease in children. In SERPINA1 deficiency the most frequent SERPINA1 alleles found are the PI*S and PI*Z alleles. We used the polymerase chain reaction and the amplification created restriction site (ACRS technique to investigate the prevalence of the PI*S and PI*Z alleles in a group of Brazilian children (n = 200 with liver disease and established the general frequency of the PI*S allele in our population. We found a significant association of the PI*Z allele and liver disease, but no such relationship was found for the PI*S allele. Our results show that SERPINA1 deficiency due to the PI*Z allele, even when heterozygous, is a frequent cause of liver disease in our group of Brazilian children but that the PI*S allele does not confer an increased risk of hepatic disorders in our group of Brazilian children.

  1. alpha-1-antitrypsin in breast milk of healthy Nigerian mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeme, J A; Lantos, J D; Ihongbe, J C

    1981-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitryspin (x-1-AT) may play a possible role as effector of immunological stasis. This study examines the levels of this glycoprotein in 73 breast milk samples from 60 healthy Nigerian mothers. Levels of x-1-AT were measured by single radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini. Serum protein was measured by Lowry's method, albumin by Doumas' method. Highest mean levels of x-1-AT were found in colostrum (25 mg/dl). The level was significantly higher compared to transitional milk (14.2 mg/dl) or mature milk (165 mg/dl) (p0.001). Breast milk contains substantial amounts of x-1-AT which is not destroyed by pasturization at 56 degrees Centigrade. The immunological protective properties of breast milk are ideal for newborn babies, particularly those who are low birthweight and are thus most susceptible to neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

  2. Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Jefferey L; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Poplin, Gerald S;

    2014-01-01

    this relationship is modified by selenium. A total of 55 subjects were evaluated in Ajo and Tucson, Arizona. Tap water and first morning void urine were analyzed for arsenic species, induced sputum for AAT and toenails for selenium and arsenic. Household tap-water arsenic, toenail arsenic and urinary inorganic...... arsenic and metabolites were significantly higher in Ajo (20.6±3.5 μg/l, 0.54±0.77 μg/g and 27.7±21.2 μg/l, respectively) than in Tucson (3.9±2.5 μg/l, 0.16±0.20 μg/g and 13.0±13.8 μg/l, respectively). In multivariable models, urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) was negatively, and toenail selenium...... positively associated with sputum AAT (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). In analyses stratified by town, these relationships remained significant only in Ajo, with the higher arsenic exposure. Reduction in AAT may be a means by which arsenic induces respiratory disease, and selenium may protect against...

  3. Evaluación del efecto de la ingesta de una alta carga de ácidos grasos saturados sobre los niveles séricos de la proteína C reactiva, alfa1-antitripsina, fibrinógeno y alfa1-glicoproteína ácida en mujeres obesas Effect of a high saturated fatty acids load on serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen and alpha1-acid glycoprotein in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª M. Ramírez Alvarado

    2010-02-01

    en mujeres obesas. Los niveles séricos de PCR y fibrinógeno están incrementados en mujeres obesas y se correlacionan positivamente con el IMC.Obesity is associated with increased inflammation. Creactive protein (CRP and inflammation-sensitive plasma protein (ISPs are inflammatory markers. Proinflammatory process may be influenced by high saturated fatty acid intake. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of saturated fatty acids load on postprandial circulating levels of PCR and ISPs (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen in obese women. Design: A total of 15 obese women (age = 31,7 ± 4,5 years, BMI = 37,9 ± 7,3 kg/m² and 15 lean controls women (age = 30,6 ± 4,6 years, BMI = 20,6 ± 2,6 kg/m² were recruited for this study. After and overnight fast subjects ate the fat load consisted of 75 g of fat (100% saturated fatty acid, 0% cholesterol, 5 g of carbohydrates, and 6 g of protein per m2 body surface area. Postprandial serum levels of CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen were measured. Anthropometry and blood biochemical parameters were measured in both groups. Results: The obese women had fasting serum PCR levels higher (p = 0,013 and fibrinogen (p = 0,04 than those of control women. Serum CRP and fibrinogen levels was positively related to body mass index (BMI in obese group. There weren't differences in fasting serum alpha1- antitrypsin levels (p = 0,40, and alpha1-acid glucoprotein (p = 0,28 levels in obese group in comparison to lean control group. Serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen did not change postprandially (p = > 0,05 difference to fasting levels. Conclusion: A high-saturated fatty acids load is not associated with serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen levels increase. Serum alpha1-antitripsin and alpha1-acid glucoprotein levels are not increased in obese women. Serum PCR and fibrinogen levels are

  4. A 32 year old male with idiopathic hepatic encephalopathy and necrotic lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz ED

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old with undiagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency had an unusual initial presentation of acute liver failure, septic shock; adult respiratory distress syndrome and what appeared to be a left lower extremity soft tissue infection. Skin biopsy revealed panniculitis. Because of the diagnosis of panniculitis, an alpha-1 antitrypsin level was ordered and demonstrated alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with a ZZ phenotype. The patient recovered with antibiotics and supportive therapy. This case illustrates that alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can present other that the more usual adult presentation of progressive emphysema. Unexplained panniculitis should prompt investigation of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in the adult patient.

  5. Assessment of regional progression of pulmonary emphysema with CT densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, M Els; Putter, Hein; Stolk, Jan;

    2008-01-01

    with general emphysema (general emphysema without phenotype PiZZ [non-PiZ] group) were scanned with CT at baseline and after 30 months. Densitometry was performed in 12 axial partitions of equal volumes. To indicate predominant location, craniocaudal locality was defined as the slope in the plot of densities......BACKGROUND: Lung densitometry is an effective method to assess overall progression of emphysema, but generally the location of the progression is not estimated. We hypothesized that progression of emphysema is the result of extension from affected areas toward less affected areas in the lung....... To test this hypothesis, a method was developed to assess emphysema severity at different levels in the lungs in order to estimate regional changes. METHODS: Fifty subjects with emphysema due to alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) [AATD deficiency of phenotype PiZZ (PiZ) group] and 16 subjects...

  6. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Guerra Serra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes incluídos no estudo (44 mulheres; idade média, 51,3 ± 18,2 anos, os alelos S e Z foram detectados em 33,3% e 5,7%, respectivamente, com freqüência gênica dos alelos S e Z de 0,16 e 0,028. Dois pacientes tinham genótipo SZ (AAT 141 mg/dL (normal, Grupo 2, n = 57. A freqüência de fumantes foi igual nos dois grupos, com carga tabágica maior no Grupo 2. O alelo S estava presente em 13 e 14 pacientes dos Grupos 1 e 2, respectivamente, enquanto que o alelo Z estava presente em 2 e 1 paciente dos mesmos grupos. Não houve diferença nos testes de função pulmonar, nem na freqüência de bronquiectasias ou enfisema entre os dois grupos. Os valores espirométricos e as concentrações de AAT foram similares entre fumantes e não-fumantes. Bronquiectasias foram mais freqüentes entre os não fumantes, e enfisema foi mais freqüente entre os fumantes. CONCLUSÕES: Trinta pacientes apresentaram níveis de AAT abaixo da média esperada para os genótipos MM e MS, e este fato não pode ser explicado por uma freqüência maior dos alelos S e Z.OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT and the presence of S and Z alleles in patients with chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Patients with chronic cough and dyspnea were submitted to clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, nephelometric determination of AAT and determination of S and Z alleles by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  8. Polymorphism of alpha 1 antitrypsin in North American species of Canis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N.E.; Kueppers, F.

    2000-01-01

    a1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) is a major protease inhibitor present in all mammalian sera that have thus far been investigated. A1AT is also highly polymorphic and is therefore a useful genetic marker. Previously reported A1AT polymorphism in domestic dogs consisted of two alleles designated as PiM and PiS which exhibited frequencies of 0.72 and 0.28, respectively, in a group of randomly collected mongrel dogs. North American species of Canis, which included gray wolves (n=29), Mexican wolves (n=20), coyotes (n=24), wolfdog crosses (n=9), and red wolves (n=27) were tested for A1AT polymorphism. A1AT phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing, followed by direct immunoblotting using a specific antiserum. A1AT concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Concentrations of A1AT were similar to those found in domestic dogs (2.26 + 0.3 mg/ml SD) and tended to be higher in females than in males, possibly indicating that A1AT may be hormonally influenced in females. Three phenotypic band patterns were observed (M, MS, S). The allele frequencies for domestic dogs and gray wolves were very similar, 0.72 and 0.69 for PiM and 0.28 and 0.31 for PiS, respectively. The Mexican wolves had a significantly lower frequency of PiS= 0.10. Coyotes and red wolves were all found to be monomorphic for the PiS allele and were indistinguishable from each other in that respect.

  9. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  10. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency causing neonatal liver failure and hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneider, B L; Setchell, K D; Whitington, P F; Neilson, K A; Suchy, F J

    1994-02-01

    Neonatal liver failure was evaluated in two infants. Neither infant had evidence of congenital infection, galactosemia, alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, tyrosinemia, Zellweger syndrome, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Abnormal levels of iron were detected in the minor salivary glands of the first infant and in the explanted liver of the second. Analyses of urinary bile salts by fast-atom bombardment ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a paucity of primary bile acids and a predominance of 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids. These findings are consistent with delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency, a primary genetic defect in bile acid synthesis. Postmortem evaluation of the first infant revealed significant iron deposition in the liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal glands, myocardium, stomach, and submucosal glands of the respiratory tract. In both infants examination of the liver revealed extensive loss of hepatic parenchyma. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of bile acid metabolism defects to include neonatal liver failure with associated hemochromatosis. PMID:8301429

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 predicts pulmonary status declines in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rames Alexis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 may be important in the progression of emphysema, but there have been few longitudinal clinical studies of MMP-9 including pulmonary status and COPD exacerbation outcomes. Methods We utilized data from the placebo arm (n = 126 of a clinical trial of patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD and emphysema to examine the links between plasma MMP-9 levels, pulmonary status, and COPD exacerbations over a one year observation period. Pulmonary function, computed tomography lung density, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT, and COPD exacerbations were assessed at regular intervals over 12 months. Prospective analyses used generalized estimating equations to incorporate repeated longitudinal measurements of MMP-9 and all endpoints, controlling for age, gender, race-ethnicity, leukocyte count, and tobacco history. A secondary analysis also incorporated highly-sensitive C-reactive protein levels in predictive models. Results At baseline, higher plasma MMP-9 levels were cross-sectionally associated with lower FEV1 (p = 0.03, FVC (p Conclusions Increased plasma MMP-9 levels generally predicted pulmonary status declines, including worsening transfer factor and lung density as well as greater COPD exacerbations in AATD-associated emphysema.

  12. Modeling the influence of vitamin D deficiency on cigarette smoke-induced emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardi A. Crane-Godreau

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the primary risk factor for COPD is cigarette smoke exposure, vitamin D deficiency has been epidemiologically implicated as a factor in the progressive development of COPD-associated emphysema. Because of difficulties inherent to studies involving multiple risk factors in the progression of COPD in humans, we developed a murine model in which to study the separate and combined effects of vitamin D deficiency and cigarette smoke exposure. During a 16 week period, mice were exposed to one of four conditions, control diet breathing room air (CD-NS, control diet with cigarette smoke exposure (CD-CSE, vitamin D deficient diet breathing room air (VDD-NS or vitamin D deficient diet with cigarette smoke exposure (VDD-CSE. At the end of the exposure period, the lungs were examined by a pathologist and separately by morphometric analysis. In parallel experiments, mice were anesthetized for pulmonary function testing followed by sacrifice and analysis. Emphysema (determined by an increase in alveolar mean linear intercept length was more severe in the VDD-CSE mice compared to control animals and animals exposed to VDD or CSE alone. The VDD-CSE and the CD-CSE mice had increased total lung capacity and increased static lung compliance. There was also a significant increase in the matrix metalloproteinase-9: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 ratio in VDD-CSE mice compared with all controls. Alpha-1 antitrypsin expression was reduced in VDD-CSE mice as well. In summary, vitamin D deficiency, when combined with cigarette smoke exposure, seemed to accelerate the appearance of emphysemas, perhaps by virtue of an increased protease-antiprotease ratio in the combined VDD-CSE animals. These results support the value of our mouse model in the study of COPD.

  13. Reactivity of alpha 1-antitrypsin mutants against proteolytic enzymes of the kallikrein-kinin, complement, and fibrinolytic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patston, P.A.; Roodi, N.; Schifferli, J.A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Schapira, M.

    1990-01-01

    Increased extracellular proteolysis because of unregulated activation of blood coagulation, complement, and fibrinolysis is observed in thrombosis, shock, and inflammation. In the present study, we have examined whether the plasma kallikrein-kinin system, the classical pathway of complement, and the

  14. Alpha One Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tested Find Support Find Doctor What Is Alpha-1? Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) is a ... results for inhaled augmentation More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website ...

  15. Alpha-1-antitripsin deficiency: the need of a new diagnostic algorithm for improving the diagnostic ability of perinatologists and pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavino Faa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Caution should be taken in considering immunoelectrofocusing (IEF as the best method for the diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT deficiency, particularly in some population, including Sardinians, in which a M-like variant represents the most frequent pathological A1AT variant. Regarding the future, my opinion is that the algorithm generally suggested for reaching a proper diagnosis of this disease should be completely changed. The cut-off of the A1AT serum values should be reconsidered, not to avoid the diagnosis of a number of heterozygous subjects who may be affected by liver and/or lung disease. Given that the two A1AT alleles are co-dominant, and since A1AT is a phase acute protein, in all heterozygous PiMZ or PiM/M-Cagliari subjects carrying an inflammation, the M allele is induced to produce high quantities of A1AT, whose serum levels may reach normal values. In these cases, PCR serum levels should be evaluated and, when increased, the diagnosis of A1AT deficiency should not be excluded even in the presence of serum A1AT levels within the normal range. Gene sequencing should be included, on the basis of our experience, in all neonates and pediatric patients with liver or lung disease of unknown origin, including asthma, avoiding IEF. Finally, for a screening in the perinatal period, I suggest the accurate examination of the electrophoresis of serum proteins. With a similar new approach, I think that we will transform A1AT deficiency from a rare disease into a previously rarely diagnosed disease, changing completely the epidemiology of this complex and fascinating metabolic disease.

  16. Alpha 1-antitrypsin Pittsburgh (Met358-->Arg) inhibits the contact pathway of intrinsic coagulation and alters the release of human neutrophil elastase during simulated extracorporeal circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachtfogel, Y.T.; Bischoff, Rainer; Bauer, R; Hack, C.E.; Nuijens, J.H; Kucich, U.; Niewiarowski, S.; Edmunds, Jr. L.H.; Colman, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass prolongs bleeding time, increases postoperative blood loss, and triggers activation of plasma proteolytic enzyme systems and blood cells referred to as the "whole body inflammatory response". Contact of blood with synthetic surfaces leads to qualitative and quantitative altera

  17. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  18. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S;

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...

  19. The fibrinogen cleavage product Aα-Val360, a specific marker of neutrophil elastase activity in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Richard I; Mumford, Richard A; Treonze, Kelly M;

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is the only recognised genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Since A1AT is the major inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), this enzyme has become widely implicated in the p...

  20. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  1. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  2. Genetic, host, and environmental interactions in a 19 year old with severe chronic obstructive lung disease; observations regarding the pathophysiology of airflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu HB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Horiana B Grosu,1 Jonathan Killam,2 Elvina Khusainova,3 James Lozada,1 Andrew Needelman,4 Edward Eden11Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Medicine, St Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, 4Mid Hudson Medical Group, Poughkeepsie, New York, USAAbstract: A case of a 19-year-old with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is presented. This case illustrates genetic (severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and host factors (such as developmental diaphragmatic hernia and the innate response to injury, and environmental (high oxidative stress and lung injury interactions that lead to severe chronic obstructive lung disease. The development of chronic lung disease was caused by lung injury under high oxidative and inflammatory conditions in the setting of a diaphragmatic hernia. In the absence of normal alpha-1 antitrypsin levels, a pro-elastolytic environment in the early period of lung growth enhanced the development of severe hyperinflation and precocious airflow obstruction.Keywords: Swyer James Macleod syndrome, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  3. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency dwarfism isolated GH deficiency isolated HGH deficiency isolated human growth hormone deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency disorder ...

  5. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N;

    2006-01-01

    -negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients.......We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...... samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false...

  6. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  7. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  8. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  11. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic disorders ...

  12. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  13. Hereditary hemochromatosis should be considered a conformational disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Matthew W; Mankan, Arun K; Norris, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease associated with iron overload, in which individuals homozygous for the mutant C282Y HFE associated allele are at risk of developing liver disease, diabetes and arthritis. Conformational diseases are a class of disorders associated with the expression of misfolded protein and examples include conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Z alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and Huntington's diseases. HFE C282Y is a mutant protein that does not fold correctly forming aggregates and is retained in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). Consequently, we propose that HH associated with the C282Y HFE mutation should be considered a conformational disorder. PMID:17904763

  14. The fibrinogen cleavage product Aα-Val360, a specific marker of neutrophil elastase activity in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Richard I; Mumford, Richard A; Treonze, Kelly M;

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is the only recognised genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Since A1AT is the major inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), this enzyme has become widely implicated...... in the pathogenesis of COPD in general; however, there is currently no specific biomarker for its pre-inhibition activity. Such a biomarker should be a measure of elastase-specific COPD disease activity with the potential to assess early targeted therapeutic intervention, in contrast to traditional and non......-specific disease severity markers such as forced expiratory volume in 1 s....

  15. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...... exacerbators". Recently, a definition and assessment of a new phenotype comprising patients with overlapping features of asthma and COPD has been suggested and is known as "asthma COPD overlap syndrome". Several other phenotypes have been proposed, but require validation against clinical outcomes. Defining...

  16. Rare Lung Diseases I – Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM; subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  19. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  20. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar K; Bava H; Shetty J; Joshi M

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of a 3 month old child with lipoprotein lipase deficiency who presented with bronchopneumonia is reported. After noticing lipaemic serum and lipaemia retinalis, a diagnosis of hyperlipoproteinaemia was considered. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency was confirmed with post heparin lipoprotein lipase enzyme activity estimation.

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Uijterschout

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  3. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  4. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  6. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  7. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated

  8. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1991-03-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, ...

  12. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 22, 2012 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  14. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  18. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth...

  19. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  20. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  1. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  2. Medical image of the week: panloubular emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60 year old female, non-smoker with a past medical history of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps presented with an eight year history of productive cough and dyspnea. Previous treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, courses of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics provided modest improvement in her symptoms. Pulmonary function testing revealed a severe obstructive ventilatory defect without significant bronchodilator response and reduced diffusing capacity (DLCO. Chest x-ray surprisingly revealed lower lobe predominant emphysematous changes (Figure 1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin level was within normal range at 137 mg/dL. Panlobular emphysema represents permanent destruction of the entire acinus distal to the respiratory bronchioles and is more likely to affect the lower lobes compared to centrilobular emphysema (1. Panlobular emphysema is associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, intravenous drug abuse specifically with methylphenidate and methadone, Swyer-James syndrome, and obliterative bronchiolitis. Whether this pattern is seen as part of normal senescence in non-smoking individuals remains controversial (2. Panlobular emphysema may ...

  3. Iodine Deficiency and Human Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Sviridonova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is а vital microelements that are essential for the normal human development and functions. Iodine deficiency is a global problem: about 2 billion individuals worldwide suffer from a lack of iodine. Despite goiter is the most visually noticeable manifestation of iodine deficiency, the most significant consequence of the iodine deficiency is impaired neurodevelopment, particularly early in life. Moreover, moderate to severe iodine deficiency increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, low birth weight and infant mortality. Babies in utero affected by iodine deficiency are at increased risk of mental developmental disorders, cretinism is their extreme degree. In addition, moderate to severe iodine deficiency in childhood negatively affects somatic growth. Iodine deficiency compensation improves cognitive and motor function in children. Iodine prophylaxis of deficient populations is an extremely effective approach to reduce the substantial adverse effects of iodine deficiency throughout the life cycle.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  5. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  6. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  10. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  11. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  12. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  13. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  15. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  16. Phosphorus Deficiency in Ducklins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiHengmin; LuoLingping

    1995-01-01

    20 one-day-old Tianfu ducklings were fed on a natural diet deficient in phosphorus(Ca 0.80%,P 0.366%)for three weeks and examined for signs and lesions.Signs began to appear at the age of one week,and became serous at two weeks.13 ducklings died during the experiment.Morbidity was 100% and mortality was 65%.The affected ducklings mainly showed leg weakness,severe lamencess,deprssion,lack of appetite and stunted growth,The serum alkaline phosphatase activities increased markedly.The serum phosphorus concentration,tibial ash,ash calcium and phosphorus content decreased obviously.At necropsy,maxillae and ribe were soft,and the latter was crooked.Long ones were soft and broke easily.The hypertrophic zone of the growth-plate in the epiphysis of long ones was lengthened and osteoid tissue increased in the metaphyseal spongiosa histopathologically.The above mentioned symptoms and lesions could be prevented by adding phosphorus to the natural deficient diet(up to 0.65%),The relationship between lesions and signs,pathomorphological characterisation and pathogensis were also discussed in this paper.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  18. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  19. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative...

  20. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  1. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  2. Protein misfolding and degradation in genetic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Andresen, Brage S.;

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, phenylketonuria, mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies, and many others have shown that enhanced proteolytic degradation of mutant proteins is a common molecular pathological mechanism. Detailed...... studies of the fate of mutant proteins in some of these diseases have revealed that impaired or aberrant folding of mutant polypeptides typically results in prolonged interaction with molecular chaperones and degradation by intracellular proteases before the functional conformation is acquired....... This appears to be the case for many missense mutations and short in-frame deletions or insertions that represent a major fraction of the mutations detected in genetic diseases. In some diseases, or under some circumstances, the degradation system is not efficient. Instead, aberrant folding leads...

  3. Protein misfolding and degradation in genetic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Corydon, T J; Andresen, B S;

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, phenylketonuria, mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies, and many others have shown that enhanced proteolytic degradation of mutant proteins is a common molecular pathological mechanism. Detailed...... studies of the fate of mutant proteins in some of these diseases have revealed that impaired or aberrant folding of mutant polypeptides typically results in prolonged interaction with molecular chaperones and degradation by intracellular proteases before the functional conformation is acquired. This...... appears to be the case for many missense mutations and short in-frame deletions or insertions that represent a major fraction of the mutations detected in genetic diseases. In some diseases, or under some circumstances, the degradation system is not efficient. Instead, aberrant folding leads to...

  4. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Title Other Names: G6PD ... G6PD deficiency Categories: Newborn Screening Summary Summary Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  8. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: factor XIII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... InfoSearch: Factor XIII deficiency Factor XIII Registry Database: Introduction to Factor XIII Deficiency MalaCards: factor xiii deficiency ... Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions combined pituitary hormone deficiency combined pituitary hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Combined pituitary hormone deficiency is a condition that causes ...

  13. [Iodine deficiency during pregnancy ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Izaola, O

    2005-09-01

    Iodine is an essential micronutrient, it would be administered every day with our diet. The main role of this micronutrient is the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormones are related with brain development and metabolic regulation. Iodine deficit is related with goitre, and an important problem "diseases related with iodine deficiency", including high rate of neonatal mortality, decrease of intelligence, delayed of growth, high rate of aborts and congenital abnormalities.A risk group is pregnant women. Some authors have been demonstrated the utility of iodine supplementation during pregnancy. A systematic review of Cochrane group has shown that iodine supplementation during pregnancy decreased neonatal mortality RR 0.71 (0.56-0.9), and decrease the incidence of cretinism in children under 4 years RR 0.27 (0.12-0.6). As final recommendations, a program in pregnant women must be development to treat with iodine such as we make with folic acid. Pills with iron and iodine (1 mg iron and 25 ug iodine) have been demonstrated better results that pills with iodine. Tablets are the main presentation due to the role of the women in our Society and the work time. Programs of iodine enriched salt have been demonstrated a follow up of 50%. PMID:16386080

  14. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  15. Differential diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, A; Ponzone, A; Curtius, H C

    1985-01-01

    Six hundred and seventy-three children (483 newborns and 190 older selected children) were screened for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency by HPLC of urine pterins and BH4 load test. One patient with GTP cyclohydrolase I deficiency, 36 patients with dihydrobiopterin synthetase (DHBS) deficiency (of which six were in the newborn and 30 in the older children) and 14 with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency (DHPR) were found. All 37 patients with defective BH4 biosynthesis responded to a BH4 load by lowering of the elevated serum phenylalanine concentration but four of 14 patients with DHPR deficiency did not. Measurement of DHPR activity in blood spots on Guthrie cards is recommended. Since subvariants of patients with BH4 deficiency exist, homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, pterins, phenylalanine, and tyrosine in cerebrospinal fluid should be measured for diagnosis and the control of therapy. The activity of the phosphate-eliminating enzyme (a key enzyme in BH4 biosynthesis and part of "DHBS") was measured in human liver and activities of approx. 1 n U (mg protein)-1 were found. In the liver biopsy of a patient with DHBS deficiency no activity (less than 3% of controls) was demonstrated. PMID:3930839

  16. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  17. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  18. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Muscular Dystrophy Association: Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Muscle AMP deaminase deficiency ...

  19. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  20. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  1. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  2. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  3. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Heliane Guerra Serra; Carmen Sílvia Bertuzzo; Mônica Corso Pereira; Cláudio Lúcio Rossi; Walter Pinto Júnior; Ilma Aparecida Paschoal

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT) e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes i...

  4. Segmenting by risk perceptions: predicting young adults' genetic-belief profiles with health and opinion-leader covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A; Greenberg, Marisa; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2014-01-01

    With a growing interest in using genetic information to motivate young adults' health behaviors, audience segmentation is needed for effective campaign design. Using latent class analysis, this study identifies segments based on young adults' (N = 327) beliefs about genetic threats to their health and personal efficacy over genetic influences on their health. A four-class model was identified. The model indicators fit the risk perception attitude framework (Rimal & Real, 2003), but the covariates (e.g., current health behaviors) did not. In addition, opinion leader qualities covaried with one profile: Those in this profile engaged in fewer preventative behaviors and more dangerous treatment options, and also liked to persuade others, making them a particularly salient group for campaign efforts. The implications for adult-onset disorders, like alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, are discussed.

  5. [Frederic Chopin (1810-1849), and his disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Pablo; Bernaciak, Jorge M; Bruetman, Julio E; Finn, Bárbara C; Miranda, Marcelo C

    2014-04-01

    Frédéric Chopin - a great Polish composer and pianist-suffered from a chronic disease. Both during his life and after his death, physicians disagreed on Chopin's diagnosis. His contemporaries accepted the diagnosis of tuberculosis, a common disease in the 18th century. Description of new clinical entities provoked new dilemmas in the 21th century. Although other alternative diagnoses to tuberculosis have emerged, such as cystic fibrosis or alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, we still sustain that the first diagnosis is the most probable. In this paper we report F. Chopin's case history and discuss cons and pros for different diseases as the cause of F. Chopin's suffering and death.

  6. Cardiac Failure after Liver Transplantation Requiring a Biventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Jermyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased hepatic iron load in extrahepatic organs of cirrhotic patients with and without hereditary hemochromatosis portends a poorer long term prognosis after liver transplant. Hepatic as well as nonhepatic iron overload is associated with increased infectious and postoperative complications, including cardiac dysfunction. In this case report, we describe a cirrhotic patient with alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency and nonhereditary hemochromatosis (non-HFE that developed cardiogenic shock requiring mechanical circulatory support for twenty days after liver transplant. Upon further investigation, she was found to have significant iron deposition in both the liver and heart biopsies. Her heart regained complete and sustained recovery following ten days of mechanical biventricular support. This case highlights the importance of preoperatively recognizing extrahepatic iron deposition in patients referred for liver transplantation irrespective of etiology of liver disease as this may prevent postoperative complications.

  7. Long-range correlations of serial FEV1 measurements in emphysematous patients and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Madsen, F;

    1998-01-01

    autocorrelated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation structure in time series of FEV1 measurements. Nineteen patients with severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (phenotype PiZ) and moderate to severe emphysema and two subjects with normal lungs were followed for several years with daily self......-administered spirometry. FEV1 measurements fulfilling standard criteria were detrended, and the autocorrelation profile and the power spectrum were calculated. On average the subjects were followed for >3 yr and performed >1,000 acceptable spirometries. The autocorrelation of FEV1 measurements in the emphysematous...... autocorrelation function in the two normal subjects showed a similar pattern, but with a faster decay toward zero. In the patients, the power spectrum had a peak at 1 cycle/wk and showed a 1/f pattern, where f is frequency, with a slope of -0.88 at lower frequencies. We conclude that serial spirometric...

  8. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S. [Reproductive Genetics Institute, Chicage, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  9. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  10. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  11. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  12. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  13. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  14. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibiti...

  15. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  16. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  17. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  18. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    HU, Rehman

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions TH deficiency tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency ...

  20. Expression of hereditary hemochromatosis C282Y HFE protein in HEK293 cells activates specific endoplasmic reticulum stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris Suzanne

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH is a genetic disease associated with iron overload, in which individuals homozygous for the mutant C282Y HFE associated allele are at risk for the development of a range of disorders particularly liver disease. Conformational diseases are a class of disorders associated with the expression of misfolded protein. HFE C282Y is a mutant protein that does not fold correctly and consequently is retained in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER. In this context, we sought to identify ER stress signals associated with mutant C282Y HFE protein expression, which may have a role in the molecular pathogenesis of HH. Results Vector constructs of Wild type HFE and Mutant C282Y HFE were made and transfected into HEK293 cell lines. We have shown that expression of C282Y HFE protein triggers both an unfolded protein response (UPR, as revealed by the increased GRP78, ATF6 and CHOP expression, and an ER overload response (EOR, as indicated by NF-κB activation. Furthermore, C282Y HFE protein induced apoptotic responses associated with activation of ER stress. Inhibition studies demonstrated that tauroursodeoxycholic acid, an endogenous bile acid, downregulates these events. Finally, we found that the co-existence of both C282Y HFE and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin protein (the protein associated with the liver disease of Z alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency expression on ER stress responses acted as potential disease modifiers with respect to each other. Conclusion Our novel observations suggest that both the ER overload response (EOR and the unfolded protein response (UPR are activated by mutant C282Y HFE protein.

  1. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  2. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  3. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  4. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... sera. These data were combined with standardized serum 25(OH)D data from 4 previously standardized studies (for a total n = 55,844). Prevalence estimates of vitamin D deficiency [using various serum 25(OH)D thresholds] were generated on the basis of standardized 25(OH)D data. RESULTS: An overall pooled...

  5. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  6. Newborn screening for MCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Davidson, A G F; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medium Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation, with potential fatal outcome. MCAD deficiency is diagnosed by acylcarnitine analysis on newborn screening blood spot cards by tandem mass spectrometry. Early diagnosis...... of MCAD and presymptomatic treatment can potentially reduce morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate incidence, clinical outcome, biochemical and molecular phenotype of MCAD cases detected in the first three years of newborn screening in British Columbia (BC). METHODS AND RESULTS: Medium chain...... is comparable to reports from other newborn screening programs. Persistence of elevated C8 levels and C8/C10 ratios in confirmed MCAD cases suggest that these are sensitive markers for newborn screening. Early detection and treatment have successfully prevented adverse health outcomes in patients with MCAD....

  7. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  8. [Iodine deficiency in cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, I; Magyari, M; Stief, L

    1998-08-30

    The thyroid hormone deficiency on cardiovascular function can be characterized with decreased myocardial contractility and increased peripheral vascular resistance as well as with the changes in lipid metabolism. 42 patients with cardiovascular disease (mean age 65 +/- 13 yr, 16 males) were investigated if iodine insufficiency can play a role as a risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases. The patients were divided in 5 subgroups on the ground of the presence of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, coronary disfunction and arrhythmia. Urine iodine concentration (5.29 +/- 4.52 micrograms/dl) was detected with Sandell-Kolthoff colorimetric reaction. The most decreased urine iodine concentration was detected in the subgroups with arrhythmia and congestive heart failure (4.7 +/- 4.94 micrograms/dl and 4.9 +/- 4.81 micrograms/dl, respectively). An elevated TSH level was found by 3 patients (5.3 +/- 1.4 mlU/l). An elevation in lipid metabolism (cholesterol, triglyceride) associated with all subgroups without arrhythmia. In conclusion, the occurrence of iodine deficiency in cardiovascular disease is frequent. Iodine supplementation might prevent the worsing effect of iodine deficiency on cardiovascular disease.

  9. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  10. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA.

  11. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  12. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  13. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejs FOMINS; Ozolinsh, Maris

    2011-01-01

    Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral...

  14. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad khalaj; Ameneh Barikani; Mozhgan Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD) is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP...

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse. We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy. Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neurops...

  16. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N; Anaissie, E J; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of P...

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency in Early Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Flood-Nichols, Shannon K.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huang, Raywin R.; Napolitano, Peter G.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes. Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singlet...

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Andıran, Nesibe; Çelik, Nurullah; AKÇA, Halise; Doğan, Güzide

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is an important health problem in both developed and developing countries. Recent reports on the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have led to increased interest in prevalence studies on states of deficiency/insufficiency of vitamin D. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children and adolescents residing in Ankara, Turkey and to investigate the factors associated with low vitamin D status. Methods: A...

  19. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...... increased, while protein oxidation decreased (P¼0003). The results show that the selective preservation of brain ascorbate and induction of DNA repair in vitamin C-deficient weanling guinea pigs is not sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. Vitamin C deficiency may therefore be particularly adverse during...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Immune System National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's ...

  1. Deficient approaches to human neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelzer, Johannes; Lohmann, Gabriele; Mueller, Karsten;

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the workhorse of imaging-based human cognitive neuroscience. The use of fMRI is ever-increasing; within the last 4 years more fMRI studies have been published than in the previous 17 years. This large body of research has mainly focused...... of the major conceptual and practical deficiencies in widely used brain-mapping approaches, and exemplify some of these issues by the use of imaging data and simulations. In particular, we discuss the inherent pitfalls and shortcomings of methodologies for statistical parametric mapping. Our critique...... emphasizes recent reports of excessively high numbers of both false positive and false negative findings in fMRI brain mapping. We outline our view regarding the broader scientific implications of these methodological considerations and briefly discuss possible solutions....

  2. B12 Deficiency with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: to rewieved the clinical and laboratory properties of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia. Clinical and laboratory findings of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia are described. İt is determined that all of the patients received little or no animal products by nutritional history. Clinically apatite, malasia, headeche, otism, and parestheia in the lower extremities and foods were present in patients. On physical examination; four patients had glossit, four had hyporeflexia, one had ataxia. Folat level was normal and B12 vitamin level was low in all patients. The MCV (mean corpuscular volume was normal in three patients. Hypersegmentation of neutrophil was observed in all patients, leukopenia in two, and trombocytopenia was observed in one patient.Conclusion: it is suggested B12 vitamin deficiency in the patients that received little or no animal products by nutritional history. However, hypersegmentation of neutrophil in peripheral blood sample is an important finding for diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia.

  3. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  4. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  6. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ...

  7. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  8. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan Saritha; Divya Gupta; Laxmisha Chandrashekar; Devinder M Thappa; Nachiappa G Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn′s disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient.

  9. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  10. Short Stature and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Matemi, Sezer

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the importance of measurements of height and weight in normal children and emphasizes the role of growth increments for the diagnosis of short stature Causes of short stature methods for diagnosis of GH hormone deficiency actions of growth hormone treatment of growth hormone deficiency and doses for biosynthetic GH treatment are described Key words: Short Stature Growth Hormone

  11. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  12. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the complement system decreases blood levels of another complement protein called C3, reducing the immune system's ability to fight infections. ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition C3 inactivator deficiency complement component 3 inactivator deficiency Related Information How are ...

  13. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  14. How Best To Utilize a Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patricia H.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the importance and meaning of the degree of spontaneity in memory strategy production. Situates the concept of utilization deficiency within current work on memory strategy heterogeneity, contextual support, and situation-specific skills. Concludes that work on utilization deficiencies helps balance the focus on early emergence of…

  15. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  16. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  17. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  18. [Comparative studies on the value of acute phase proteins and CA-125 for monitoring patients with ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölbl, H; Tatra, G; Schieder, K; Bieglmayer, C

    1988-12-01

    In a study of 71 patients with malignant ovarian tumors serum levels of CA-125, C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin and coeruloplasmin were analysed. In contrast to the tumor-free group significantly higher values of CA-125, CRP and alpha-1-antitrypsin were found in the group with recurrent disease. However, the serum-concentrations of coeruloplasmin remained unchanged in both groups. In the group with progressive disease the median values of CA-125 were greater than 65 U/ml and of CRP greater than 12 micron/ml, respectively. The median serum concentrations of alpha-1-antitrypsin (2 to 4 mg/ml) and coeruloplasmin (150 to 600 ng/ml) did not reach their cut-off levels. Beside CA-125 the analysis of CRP and alpha-1-antitrypsin is an additional helpful procedure for the monitoring of patients with malignant ovarian tumors.

  19. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products, encouraging

  20. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    that the bound THF serves to protect the FAD class of histone demethylases from the destructive effects of formaldehyde generation by formation of 5,10-methylene-THF. We present pilot data showing that decreased folate in livers as a result of dietary folate deficiency is associated with increased levels of methylated lysine 4 of histone 3. This can be a result of decreased LSD1 activity resulting from the decreased folate available to scavenge the formaldehyde produced at the active site caused by the folate deficiency. Because LSD1 can regulate gene expression this suggests that folate may play a more important role than simply serving as a carrier of one-carbon units and be a factor in other diseases associated with low folate. PMID:26880641

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions mannose-binding lectin deficiency mannose-binding lectin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is a condition that affects the immune ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  5. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This ... is the best tool for prevention of the flu, should patients with immune deficiency be given the ...

  6. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T‑treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T‑deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk.

  7. Primary Immuno-deficiencies (PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghaffari1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 6 June, 2009 ; Accepted 22 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Primary immune-deficiencies (PID are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders along with variable symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve our knowledge regarding PID from patients that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital.Materials and methods: We evaluated all of PID`s that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital from their data records. Demography, clinical and laboratory data were recorded and then analyzed.Results: In the duration of 3 years, we had 10 patients with PID (7 males and 3 females. Of these cases, 5 had hum oral (50%, 1case had phagocytic (10%, 3 cases had cellular (30% and 1 case had hyper IgE syndrome (10%. Many of them had respiratory and otitis media infections, while a few patients had adenitis, gastroenteritis, liver abscesses, bleedings and malignancy.Conclusion: PID is a diverse disorder that involves different immune systems. Knowledge from patient’s clinical symptoms and consideration in their differential diagnosis can be helpful in early diagnosis and an effective treatment.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(70: 76-80 (Persian

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  9. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  10. Treatment of zinc deficiency without zinc fortification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald OBERLEAS; Barbara F. HARLAND

    2008-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in animals became of interest until the 1950s. In this paper, progresses in researches on physi-ology of Zn deficiency in animals, phytate effect on bioavailability of Zn, and role of phytase in healing Zn deficiency of animals were reviewed. Several studies demonstrated that Zn is recycled via the pancreas; the problem of Zn deficiency was controlled by Zn homeostasis. The endogenous secretion of Zn is considered as an important factor influencing Zn deficiency, and the critical molar ratio is 10. Phytate (inositol hexaphosphate) constituted up to 90% of the organically bound phosphorus in seeds. Great improvement has been made in recent years on isolating and measuring phytate, and its structure is clear. Phytate is considered to reduce Zn bioavailability in animal. Phytase is the enzyme that hydrolyzes phytate and is present in yeast, rye bran, wheat bran, barley, triticale, and many bacteria and fungi. Zinc nutrition and bioavailability can be enhanced by addition of phytase to animal feeds. Therefore, using phytase as supplements, the most prevalent Zn deficiency in animals may be effectively corrected without the mining and smelting of several tons of zinc daily needed to correct this deficiency by fortification worldwide.

  11. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  12. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  13. C3 Deficiency – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Carreiro-Martins, P; Gaspar, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.

    2006-01-01

    O sistema do complemento é um componente essencial do sistema imunitário inato, pelo que as deficiências de proteínas da sua complexa cascata podem ter consequências mais ou menos graves, de acordo com a importância do factor afectado. As complicações mais usuais das deficiências do complemento são infecções recorrentes a bactérias encapsuladas e distúrbios autoimunes. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico de deficiência do factor C3, situação extremamente rara, discutindo a fisiopatolo...

  14. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome.

  15. The clinical spectrum of hexosaminidase deficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W G

    1981-11-01

    Hexosaminidase deficiency diseases or GM2-gangliosidoses were originally described as infantile encephalopathies. Recently, hexosaminidase deficiencies have been found with different phenotypes, including juvenile and adult encephalopathies, cerebellar ataxias, and motor neuron diseases. Individual cases have resembled Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, olivopontocerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Kugelberg-Welander disease, Fazio-Londe disease, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Tremor, dystonia, spastic paresis, and psychosis have been seen. Since few diagnosable causes for these system atrophies are known, these patients should be tested for hexosaminidase deficiency. These recessive disorders fit a multiple loci/multiple alleles genetic scheme, and a clinical genetic classification is presented.

  16. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  17. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26664847

  18. Investigation of suspected growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, R. D. G.; Burns, E C

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes views of the Health Services Human Growth Hormone Committee on how a child suspected of growth hormone deficiency should be investigated in a district general hospital or in a regional growth centre.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  20. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  1. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  2. Somatomedin C deficiency in Asian sisters.

    OpenAIRE

    McGraw, M E; Price, D A; D. J. Hill

    1986-01-01

    Two sisters of Asian origin showed typical clinical and biochemical features of primary somatomedin C (SM-C) deficiency (Laron dwarfism). Abnormalities of SM-C binding proteins were observed, one sister lacking the high molecular weight (150 Kd) protein.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or mtDNA, which is essential for the normal function of these structures. Deoxyguanosine kinase is involved in producing and maintaining the ... DNA (known as mitochondrial DNA depletion) impairs mitochondrial function ... deficiency . Learn more about the gene associated ...

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Vitamin D deficiency (Beyond the Basics) Author Marc K Drezner, ... topic last updated: Jun 09, 2015. INTRODUCTION — Vitamin D plays an important role in many places throughout ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elevated acidity in the blood and tissues (metabolic acidosis). In addition to the features present in moderate ... Kaabachi N, Hachicha M. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency. Fetal Pediatr Pathol. ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Metabolic Conditions Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Deficiency of phosphoglycerate kinase ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clark AJ, Metherell LA. ACTH resistance: genes and mechanisms. Endocr Dev. 2013;24:57-66. doi: 10. ... Metherell LA. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency: New genes and mechanisms. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2013 May 22;371(1- ...

  10. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  11. Iron Deficiency, Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin Deficiencies in Crohn's Disease: Substitute or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Phuong Nguyen, G

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammatory reactions, complications, extraintestinal manifestations and a loss of intestinal functions, for example, failures of absorption and secretion. According to intestinal dysfunction, a wide array of pathogenetic pathways is existing leading to iron deficiency and numerous vitamins as well as trace element deficiencies. Complications, symptoms and signs of those deficiencies are common in IBD with varying degrees of clinical significance. This review focuses on selected micronutrients including iron, zinc, magnesium and some vitamins. Epidemiology with respect to IBD, pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical aspects are addressed. Finally, some suggestions for treatment of deficient situations are discussed. In conclusion, some micronutrients have significant impact on complications and quality of life in IBD. Deficiencies may even influence the course of the disease. Those deficiencies should be thoroughly supplemented.

  12. Androgen deficiency and aging in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Swerdloff, R S; Wang, C

    1993-01-01

    Androgen levels decrease with age in men. Androgen deficiency in men older than 65 years leads to asthenia, a decrease in muscle mass, osteoporosis, and a decrease in sexual activity. Androgen deficiency has been reported to cause changes in mood and cognitive function. The combination of these factors results in impaired quality of life in older men. Androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal men increases bone and muscle mass, enhances muscle and cardiovascular function, and improves sexua...

  13. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  14. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Briani; Chiara Dalla Torre; Valentina Citton; Renzo Manara; Sara Pompanin; Gianni Binotto; Fausto Adami

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and...

  15. Congenital leptin deficiency and thyroid function

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Filho Gilberto; Delibasi Tuncay; Erol Halil K; Wong Ma-Li; Licinio Julio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid function is closely related to leptin's secretion by the adipose tissue. In states of leptin-deficiency, the circadian rhythm of TSH is altered, leading to central hypothyroidism in animal models. In humans, central hypothyroidism has also been described in rare cases of congenital leptin deficiency. However, the thyroid phenotype in these cases is heterogeneous, with the occurrence of central hypothyroidism in a minority of cases. Here we describe thyroid function in four l...

  16. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106Sn, high spin states in 107Sn and 107In; Yrast levels of 106Sn, 107Sn, 108Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112Xe. All these results are discussed

  17. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Inaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikoff, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the British Medical Journal boldly stated in an editorial headline, “Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Action.” 1 The urgency was clear: vitamin D deficiency was going undiagnosed and untreated in large numbers of people. Patients were at risk and suffering needlessly. A simple, extremely low-cost, low-toxicity intervention was readily available. All that was required was vitamin D advocacy.

  19. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  20. Lower limb deficient children in the Netherlands : epidemiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, LJM; Boonstra, AM; Groothoff, JW; Cornel, MC; Eisma, WH

    2000-01-01

    information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in the Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency o

  1. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported. PMID:26813501

  2. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77

  5. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18–99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30–50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50–75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients’ alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18–99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30–50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50–75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients’ alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18-99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30-50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50-75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients' alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to correct

  9. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the global level is still needed. Understanding the epidemiology of MNDs is critical to understand what intervention strategies will work best under different conditions.

  10. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    During healing of incisional skin wounds, migrating keratinocytes dissect their way under the crust to re-epithelialize the wounded area. The efficiency of this tissue remodelling process depends on the concomitant activity of several extracellular proteases, including members of the plasminogen...... activation (PA) system and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Treatment with the broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, galardin, delays wound healing in wildtype mice and completely arrest wound healing in plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice, indicating a functional overlap between plasmin- and galardin......-sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue...

  11. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs FOMINS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral data was converted to cone signals, and successive mathematics applied to provide a simple simulation of the test performance. Colorimetric data of the each pixel of the test image can be calculated and distribution of color coordinates is presented.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.259

  12. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. PMID:26433309

  13. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Joshaghani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a toxic material for mammalians. It is detoxificated and converted to urea in the urea cycle in liver. Each defect in the urea cycle cause increase in blood ammonia level. Ornithine transcarbamylase enzyme (OTC is the second enzyme in the urea cycle that exists in mitochondria. OTC deficiency is the most common hereditary disorder in the urea cycle. In this study, 45 hyper ammonia patients were selected (2-13 years old and assayed for serum OTC, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT. Four patients (n=45, 8.9% suffered from OTC deficiency. One patient was male (n=29, 3.4% and the others were female (n=16, 18.8%. About half of children (53.3 with hyper ammonia have liver disease. Further studies on OTC deficiency and OTC gene mutations in Iran are recommended.

  14. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency and association of Vitamin D deficiency in patients with tuberculosis. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Department, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian, from July 2010 to June 2012. Methodology: One hundred and five outdoor patients of tuberculosis were selected with 255 gender matched controls. Tuberculosis was diagnosed by presence of acid fast bacilli in sputum smears, positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or demonstration of chronic caseating granulomatous inflammation in tissue specimens. Controls were drawn randomly from general population. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25 (OH) D3] levels < 25 ng/ml was considered Vitamin D deficiency. The results were analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: Mean Vitamin D levels were 23.23 A+- 6.81 ng/ml in cases, 29.27 A+- 8.89 ng/ml in controls (p < 0.0001). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57% of cases and 33% controls (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in females with tuberculosis (20.84 ng/ml) as compared to males (25.03 ng/ml, p = 0.002). Mean BMI in patients of tuberculosis with Vitamin D deficiency were 19.51 A+- 1.77 kg/m2 and in patients with normal Vitamin D were 21.65 A+- 1.79 kg/m2 (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis was lower to a mean of 15.41 A+- 4.67 ng/ml (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: There is significant deficiency of Vitamin D in patients with tuberculosis as compared to controls. This deficiency is more pronounced in females, individuals with low BMI, extra pulmonary and MDR tuberculosis. (author)

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K Flood-Nichols

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes.This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singleton gestations without significant medical problems. Competitive enzymatic vitamin D assays were performed on banked plasma specimens and pregnancy outcomes were collected after delivery. Logistic regression was performed on patients stratified by plasma vitamin D concentration and the following combined clinical outcomes: preeclampsia, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion.Vitamin D concentrations were obtained from 235 patients (mean age 24.3 years, range 18-40 years. Seventy percent of our study population was vitamin D insufficient with a serum concentration less than 30 ng/mL (mean serum concentration 27.6 ng/mL, range 13-71.6 ng/mL. Logistic regression was performed adjusting for age, race, body mass index, tobacco use, and time of year. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included preeclampsia, growth restriction, preterm delivery, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion. There was no association between vitamin D deficiency and composite adverse pregnancy outcomes with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.01 (p value 0.738, 95% confidence intervals 0.961-1.057.Vitamin D deficiency did not associate with adverse pregnancy outcomes in this study population. However, the high percentage of affected individuals highlights the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young, reproductive-aged women.

  17. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency: diagnosis and management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Jerry; Andersson, Hans C; Antshel, Kevin M; Braverman, Nancy E; Burton, Barbara K; Frazier, Dianne M; Mitchell, John; Smith, Wendy E; Thompson, Barry H; Berry, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, traditionally known as phenylketonuria, results in the accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood of affected individuals and was the first inborn error of metabolism to be identified through population screening. Early identification and treatment prevent the most dramatic clinical sequelae of the disorder, but new neurodevelopmental and psychological problems have emerged in individuals treated from birth. The additional unanticipated recognition of a toxic effect of elevated maternal phenylalanine on fetal development has added to a general call in the field for treatment for life. Two major conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health held >10 years apart reviewed the state of knowledge in the field of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, but there are no generally accepted recommendations for therapy. The purpose of this guideline is to review the strength of the medical literature relative to the treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and to develop recommendations for diagnosis and therapy of this disorder. Evidence review from the original National Institutes of Health consensus conference and a recent update by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used to address key questions in the diagnosis and treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency by a working group established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. The group met by phone and in person over the course of a year to review these reports, develop recommendations, and identify key gaps in our knowledge of this disorder. Above all, treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency must be life long, with a goal of maintaining blood phenylalanine in the range of 120-360 µmol/l. Treatment has predominantly been dietary manipulation, and use of low protein and phenylalanine medical foods is likely to remain a major component of therapy for the immediate future. Pharmacotherapy for phenylalanine

  18. Serum thymulin in human zinc deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, A S; Meftah, S; J. Abdallah; Kaplan, J.; Brewer, G J; Bach, J F; Dardenne, M

    1988-01-01

    The activity of thymulin (a thymic hormone) is dependent on the presence of zinc in the molecule. We assayed serum thymulin activity in three models of mildly zinc-deficient (ZD) human subjects before and after zinc supplementation: (a) two human volunteers in whom a specific and mild zinc deficiency was induced by dietary means; (b) six mildly ZD adult sickle cell anemia (SCA) subjects; and (c) six mildly ZD adult non-SCA subjects. Their plasma zinc levels were normal and they showed no over...

  19. Rickets-vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sahay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal.

  20. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency: diagnosis and management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Jerry; Andersson, Hans C; Antshel, Kevin M; Braverman, Nancy E; Burton, Barbara K; Frazier, Dianne M; Mitchell, John; Smith, Wendy E; Thompson, Barry H; Berry, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, traditionally known as phenylketonuria, results in the accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood of affected individuals and was the first inborn error of metabolism to be identified through population screening. Early identification and treatment prevent the most dramatic clinical sequelae of the disorder, but new neurodevelopmental and psychological problems have emerged in individuals treated from birth. The additional unanticipated recognition of a toxic effect of elevated maternal phenylalanine on fetal development has added to a general call in the field for treatment for life. Two major conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health held >10 years apart reviewed the state of knowledge in the field of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, but there are no generally accepted recommendations for therapy. The purpose of this guideline is to review the strength of the medical literature relative to the treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and to develop recommendations for diagnosis and therapy of this disorder. Evidence review from the original National Institutes of Health consensus conference and a recent update by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used to address key questions in the diagnosis and treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency by a working group established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. The group met by phone and in person over the course of a year to review these reports, develop recommendations, and identify key gaps in our knowledge of this disorder. Above all, treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency must be life long, with a goal of maintaining blood phenylalanine in the range of 120-360 µmol/l. Treatment has predominantly been dietary manipulation, and use of low protein and phenylalanine medical foods is likely to remain a major component of therapy for the immediate future. Pharmacotherapy for phenylalanine

  1. Tumoral calcinosis with vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with recurrent calcified mass in the left gluteal region. The clinical, radiological, and biochemical profile confirmed the diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. She also had associated vitamin D deficiency. The patient underwent surgical removal of the mass to relieve the sciatic nerve compression and was managed with acetazolamide, calcium carbonate, and aluminium hydroxide gel with which she showed significant improve-ment. The management implications and effect of vitamin D deficiency on phosphate metabolism in the setting of tumoral calcinosis is discussed.

  2. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light......-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night....

  3. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain......'s sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype....

  4. Iron Deficiency in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, William L.; Risser, Jan M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence, natural history, causes, impact on performance, diagnosis, and treatment of iron deficiency in adolescent and young adult athletes. All athletes should be screened and treated. The best diagnosis involves determining serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. Treatment requires therapeutic doses of oral ferrous iron for several…

  5. Iron and Folate-Deficiency Anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, Serge

    1990-01-01

    Nutritional anemia is believed to be the most widespread nutritional disorder in the world. While it generally affects developing countries, developed countries are also affected to an extent sufficient to justify the implementation of preventive measures at a national level. This report focuses on iron and folate deficiencies, which are by far…

  6. Treatment of Vitamin D deficient states

    Science.gov (United States)

    UpToDate performs a continuous review of over 330 journals and other resources to synthesize and provide the latest medical information for clinicians. Updates are added as important new information is published. This document reviews the prevalence and treatment of vitamin D deficient states. Sever...

  7. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Hundahl

    Full Text Available Neuroglobin (Ngb, a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1 and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  8. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  9. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  10. Sequential growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Heffernan, A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a pituitary tumour presenting initially with growth hormone deficiency and requiring treatment with human growth hormone. Eight years later he represented with acromegaly. This sequence of events has not to my knowledge been reported previously.

  11. Color Vision Deficiencies in Children. United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Presented are prevalence data on color vision deficiencies (color blindness) in noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States, as estimated from the Health Examination Survey findings on a representative sample of over 7,400 children. Described are the two color vision tests used in the survey, the Ishihara Test for Color…

  12. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Briani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD, is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established.

  13. Periodic fever and mevalonate kinase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, Joost

    2002-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MK) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the MVK-gene on chromosome 12q24. The affected enzyme catalyzes an early step in isoprenoid biosynthesis, the pathway that produces cholesterol and several non-sterol isoprenoids. The clinical spectrum inclu

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commonest cause of nutritional anaemia in the Sri Lankan population is iron deficiency. The diets of the population belonging to the lower socio-economic groups contain little food of animal origin. Thus, their diets are deficient in easily absorbable (haem) iron; and are also heavily cereal-based. Therefore interference in the absorption of dietary iron also occurs. Iron-deficiency anaemia is not restricted to the so-called ''vulnerable groups'' in Sri Lanka, however, their greater demands make the problem not only commoner but also more severe. Among pregnant and lactating women anaemia is often associated with folate deficiency. It must also be noted that the low availability of dietary iron is compounded in large population groups. Malaria, presently raging on an epidemic scale is also a major contributory factor to the incidence of anaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the iron status of pre-school children and pregnant women; to establish normal levels of biochemical indices at different trimesters; to record the effect of iron supplementation during pregnancy; and to record the bioavailability of iron from weaning foods and common adult diets. 6 figs, 14 tabs

  15. Vitamin D deficiency and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is present in the vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and correcting a poor vitamin D status is recommended as a treatment of CKD-mineral and bone disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular and clinical data on the role of vitamin D status for

  16. DEFICIENT FUNCTIONS OF RANDOM DIRICHLET SERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the uniqueness theorem of Dirichlet series is proved. Then the random Dirichlet series in the right half plane is studied, and the result that the random Dirichlet series of finite order has almost surely(a.s.) no deficient functions is proved.

  17. Farber's disease (lysosomal acid ceramidase deficiency).

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, R. A.; Holt, P.J.; Keen, J H

    1987-01-01

    The patient presented with progressive joint deformity, a hoarse voice, subsequent cachexia, and myoclonic seizures. She was first seen aged 22 months and died aged 6 years. A diagnosis of Farber's disease was made by demonstrating a deficiency of acid ceramidase both in leucocytes and fibroblasts.

  18. Patient reported outcome in posttraumatic pituitary deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Stochholm, Kirstine; Janukonyté, Jurgita;

    2015-01-01

    with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in relation to deficiencies identified upon pituitary assessment. DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Participants were Danish patients with a head trauma diagnosis recorded in the Danish Board of Health diagnostic code registry; 439...

  19. Colour Vision Deficiency and Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of "colourblindness" most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision…

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, J J; Hollis, B W; Zasloff, M; Heaney, R P

    2008-01-01

    The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable. PMID

  1. From isolated GH deficiency to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: an evolving continuum - a KIMS analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M.; Jonsson, B.; Abs, R.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe baseline clinical presentation, treatment effects and evolution of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) in adult-onset (AO) GHD. DESIGN: Observational prospective study. METHODS: Baseline characteristics were recorded in 4110 patients...... with organic AO-GHD, who were GH naive prior to entry into the Pfizer International Metabolic Database (KIMS; 283 (7%) IGHD, 3827 MPHD). The effect of GH replacement after 2 years was assessed in those with available follow-up data (133 IGHD, 2207 MPHD), and development of new deficiencies in those...... with available data on concomitant medication (165 IGHD, 3006 MPHD). RESULTS: IGHD and MPHD patients had similar baseline clinical presentation, and both groups responded similarly to 2 years of GH therapy, with favourable changes in lipid profile and improved quality of life. New deficiencies were observed...

  2. [The frequency and development of tissue iron deficiency in 6 iron deficiency anemia patients with plummer-vinson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T; Matsuno, M; Ide, M; Kawachi, Y

    1998-11-01

    The physical signs of tissue iron deficiency include smooth and red tongue, angular stomatitis, koilonychia, and pica. The incidence of these conditions is unknown in Japan. We evaluated the frequency and development of tissue iron deficiency in 353 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The frequency of tissue iron deficiency was 6.8%; papillary atrophy of the tongue, 5.4%; abnormal nails, 5.4%; angular stomatitis, 1.1%; Plummer-Vinson syndrome, 1.7%; and pica, 0.06%. These findings were compared with the date collected by Wintrobe and Beveridge. The development and incidence of tissue iron deficiency correlated significantly with the severity of iron deficiency anemia.

  3. Nebulisation of IVT mRNA Complexes for Intrapulmonary Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Johler

    Full Text Available During the last years the potential role of in vitro transcribed (IVT mRNA as a vehicle to deliver genetic information has come into focus. IVT mRNA could be used for anti-cancer therapies, vaccination purposes, generation of pluripotent stem cells and also for genome engineering or protein replacement. However, the administration of IVT mRNA into the target organ is still challenging. The lung with its large surface area is not only of interest for delivery of genetic information for treatment of e.g. for cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, but also for vaccination purposes. Administration of IVT mRNA to the lung can be performed by direct intratracheal instillation or by aerosol inhalation/nebulisation. The latter approach shows a non-invasive tool, although it is not known, if IVT mRNA is resistant during the process of nebulisation. Therefore, we investigated the transfection efficiency of non-nebulised and nebulised IVT mRNA polyplexes and lipoplexes in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE. A slight reduction in transfection efficiency was observed for lipoplexes (Lipofectamine 2000 in the nebulised part compared to the non-nebulised which can be overcome by increasing the amount of Lipofectamine. However, Lipofectamine was more than three times more efficient in transfecting 16HBE than DMRIE and linear PEI performed almost 10 times better than its branched derivative. By contrast, the nebulisation process did not affect the cationic polymer complexes. Furthermore, aerosolisation of IVT mRNA complexes did neither affect the protein duration nor the toxicity of the cationic complexes. Taken together, these data show that aerosolisation of cationic IVT mRNA complexes constitute a potentially powerful means to transfect cells in the lung with the purpose of protein replacement for genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency or for infectious disease vaccines, while bringing along the advantages

  4. Diagnóstico diferencial da deficiência de ferro Differential diagnosis of iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Vicari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é considerada a patologia hematológica mais prevalente no homem. Assim, é fundamental a adequada identificação de suas causas, bem como a diferenciação com outras patologias distintas para adequada abordagem da deficiência de ferro. Neste artigo são brevemente descritas outras condições que podem cursar com anemia microcítica, tais como: talassemias, anemia de doença crônica, anemia sideroblástica e envenenamento por chumbo, patologias estas que devem ser afastadas durante investigação de anemia ferropriva.Iron deficiency is considered to be the commonest hematological pathology in humans. Thus, the essential steps in an adequate approach of iron deficiency include: the proper identification of its causes and the differentiation between iron deficiency and other conditions. This article briefly describes other conditions that may present with microcytic anemia such as thalassemia, anemia of chronic diseases, sideroblastic anemia and lead intoxication. These diseases should be considered during the investigation of iron deficiency anemia.

  5. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Cambodian Women: A Common Deficiency in a Sunny Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffry; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Laillou, Arnaud; Sophonneary, Prak; Un, Samoeurn; Hong, Rathavuth; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Chamnan, Chhoun; De Los Reyes, Francisco N; Wieringa, Frank T

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in spite of being generally close to the equator; vitamin D deficiency is common in South East Asian countries. In order to quantify micronutrient status for women and children in Cambodia; a nationally-representative survey was conducted in 2014 linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. The countrywide median of 25(OH)D was, respectively, 64.9 and 91.1 nmol/L for mothers and children. Based on The Endocrine Society cutoffs (>50children had plasma vitamin D concentrations indicating insufficiency or deficiency. For deficiency alone, 29% of the mothers were found to be vitamin D deficient, but only 13.4% of children. Children who live in urban areas had a 43% higher rate of vitamin D insufficiency versus those who live in rural areas (OR; 1.434; 95% CI: 1.007; 2.041). However, such differences were not observed in their mothers. The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is likely in part due to lifestyle choices, including sun avoidance, increasingly predominant indoor work, and covered transport. These survey findings support the need for a broader national Cambodian study incorporating testing of adult men, adolescents and the elderly, and encompassing other parameters such as skeletal health. However, the data presented in this study already show significant deficiencies which need to be addressed and we discuss the benefit of establishing nationally-mandated food fortification programs to enhance the intake of vitamin D. PMID:27187456

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women with pelvic floor disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Raja Navaneethan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings suggest association of vitamin D deficiency and PFD in postmenopausal women. In addition, postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency indicating a need to evaluate vitamin D levels in these women.

  7. Allergic disease as an association of steroid sulphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakura, N; Nishimura, S; Matsumoto, T; Ohsaki, M; Ogata, T

    1997-11-01

    Ten of 31 patients with steroid sulphatase (STS) deficiency were found to have an allergic disease (bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, or atopic dermatitis). STS deficiency may predispose patients to allergic disease.

  8. Absorption of plutonium in the iron-deficient rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency did not enhance absorption of plutonium following intragastric gavage of rats. Absorption of plutonium citrate in both control and iron-deficient rats was about 0.03% of the administered dose

  9. Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases: Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Talking to Your Doctor Take Action: When Your ... repeat infections in the future. People with primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDDs), however, have defects in one or more ...

  10. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool Deficiencies Home About Bleeding Disorders What is combined deficiency of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors? Inherited combined deficiency of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors ( ...

  11. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    controls (n = 8), which indicates a slow turnover rate of carbohydrate deficient transferrin. Food ingestion did not affect the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin, and the analysis of carbohydrate deficient transferrin was almost unaffected by the presence of ethanol in plasma within...... alcohol intake, but the overlap is substantial in patients with cirrhosis. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has a low turnover rate in both patients with cirrhosis and normals....

  12. Lower limb deficient children in the Netherlands: epidemiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Rijnders, LJM; Boonstra, AM; Groothoff, JW; Cornel, MC; Eisma, WH

    2000-01-01

    information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in the Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency or amputation and male/female ratios. Data were obtained from a regional birth defects registry for the northern parr. of the Netherlands (EUROCAT-NNL) and from a national survey, inclusion criteria...

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitamin D [(25(OHD] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. 25(OHD has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity, Gurgaon. 25(OHD levels were measured with radioimmunoassay (Diasorin method and parathyroid hormone (PTH was measured using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay (ECLIA. Results : The mean age of patients was 55 ± 13 years. 32/45 (71% were males. 23/45 (51% were diabetics. The median duration of hemodialysis was 5.5 months (range 1-74 months. 33/45 (74% patients were on thrice weekly hemodialysis. The mean level of vitamin D was 10.14 ± 8.7 ng/ml. Majority of the patients [43/45 (95.5%] were either vitamin D deficient or had insufficient levels. 40/45 (88.9% were vitamin D deficient (levels <20 ng/ml; of these, 29/40 (64.4% had severe vitamin D deficiency (levels <10 ng/ml and 3/45 (6.7% had insufficient levels (20-30 ng/ml of vitamin D. Only 2/45 (4.4% patients had normal levels of vitamin D. 23/45 (51% of patients were receiving calcitriol. The mean levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and albumin were 8.8 ± 0.64 mg/dl, 5.0 ± 0.7 mg/dl, 126 ± 10.3 IU/l and 3.6 ± 0.62 g/dl, respectively. PTH levels ranged from 37 to 1066 pg/ml, and the median was 195.8 pg/ml. There was a weak correlation between 25(OHD levels and weight, sex, hemoglobin, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and presence of diabetes. There was, however, no correlation with duration of dialysis or PTH levels. Conclusion : Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are universal in our hemodialysis patients, with severe vitamin D deficiency in two-third of patients.

  14. To study prevalence of incipient iron deficiency in primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer Hassan Banday

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Iron deficiency was present in a significant portion of patients with primary hypothyroidism. It also concluded that frequency of iron deficiency (with or without anemia was higher than iron deficiency anemia. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 472-475

  15. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    of the disorder are becoming clear, the molecular effects are not well defined. Therefore, for further elucidating the effects of ETHE1-deficiency, we performed a large scale quantitative proteomics study on liver tissue from ETHE1-deficient mice. Our results demonstrated a clear link between ETHE1-deficiency...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics of iron deficiency in soybean leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is an important agricultural concern leading to lower yields and crop quality. A better understanding of the condition, at the metabolome level, could contribute to the design of strategies to ameliorate Fe deficiency problems. Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soybean leaf extract...

  17. Solemnity: A Clinical Risk Index for Iron Deficient Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Oski, Frank A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies four groups of infants with iron deficiency but without anemia in an attempt to discover behavioral signs that can be used to index high-risk probability for iron deficiency. Solemnity in well-attached infants is suggested as a clinical sign to indicate the need for biochemical screening for iron deficiency. (AS)

  18. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  19. 30 CFR 57.8527 - Oxygen-deficiency testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen-deficiency testing. 57.8527 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.8527 Oxygen-deficiency testing. Flame safety lamps or other suitable devices shall be used to test for acute oxygen deficiency....

  20. Obsessive compulsive disorder as early manifestation of b12 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Valizadeh; Nasim Valizadeh

    2011-01-01

    B12 acts as a cofactor in synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thus B12 deficiency affects mood, emotions and sleeping and can lead to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric manifestations of B12 deficiency are varied. They seldom precede anemia. We want to present a case of B12 deficiency which was presented with obsessive compulsive disorder.

  1. 41 CFR 101-26.803-2 - Reporting quality deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.8-Discrepancies or Deficiencies in GSA or DOD Shipments, Material, or Billings... Form (SF) 368, Quality Deficiency Report, or a message in the format of the Standard Form 368, is used to report quality deficiencies. (c) Standard Form 368 (including SF's 368 submitted in...

  2. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  3. Compressed Sensing with Rank Deficient Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Johansen, Daniel Højrup; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn;

    2012-01-01

    In compressed sensing it is generally assumed that the dictionary matrix constitutes a (possibly overcomplete) basis of the signal space. In this paper we consider dictionaries that do not span the signal space, i.e. rank deficient dictionaries. We show that in this case the signal-to-noise ratio...... (SNR) in the compressed samples can be increased by selecting the rows of the measurement matrix from the column space of the dictionary. As an example application of compressed sensing with a rank deficient dictionary, we present a case study of compressed sensing applied to the Coarse Acquisition (C....../A) step in a GPS receiver. Simulations show that for this application the proposed choice of measurement matrix yields an increase in SNR performance of up to 5 − 10 dB, compared to the conventional choice of a fully random measurement matrix. Furthermore, the compressed sensing based C/A step is compared...

  4. Testosterone Deficiency, Cardiac Health, and Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hackett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of testosterone are manifested by erectile dysfunction, reduced sexual desire, and loss of morning erections with increasing numbers of men are being diagnosed and require treatment. The prevalence rates of testosterone deficiency vary according to different studies but may be as high as 40% in populations of patients with type 2 diabetes. There is increasing evidence that testosterone deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Screening for low testosterone is recommended in a number of high risk groups including those with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. There are recent data to suggest that testosterone replacement therapy may reduce cardiovascular mortality as well as improving multiple surrogate markers for cardiovascular events. Specific clinical trials of testosterone replacement therapy are needed in selected populations but in the meantime we must treat patients based on the best current evidence.

  5. Biotinidase deficiency and our champagne legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-09-10

    Biotinidase is the enzyme that is necessary for the recycling of the vitamin, biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder. If untreated, individuals with biotinidase deficiency usually develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms that can result in coma or death. Symptomatic individuals can be markedly improved by treating them with pharmacological doses of biotin; however, some clinical features may be irreversible. Fortunately, essentially all symptoms can be prevented if treatment is initiated at birth or before the symptoms develop. Because of this, the disorder is currently screened for in newborns in all states in the United States and in many countries around the world. This is the story of one laboratory's work in bringing basic science research from the discovery of the disorder to its translation into clinical medicine and its impact on the individuals with the disorder and their families. PMID:26456103

  6. Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting as primary infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, S L; Masson, E A; White, M C

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old female presented with primary infertility and gave a two year history of amenorrhea without symptoms or signs of endocrine dysfunction. Examination was normal and investigation showed low oestradiol and progesterone levels with decreased LH pulsatility. The cortisol responses were impaired following hypoglycaemic stress and a short synacthen test, but the cortisol response to a prolonged synacthen test was normal. An inadequate ACTH response to CRF testing confirmed the diagnosis of isolated ACTH deficiency. Hydrocortisone therapy was followed by an ovulatory menstrual cycle. Amenorrhea again ensued following the reduction of the steroid dose and normal menses resumed on normal steroid replacement therapy. Six hourly gonadotrophin pulsatility showed a significant increase in both pulse amplitude and mean LH and FSH levels following steroid treatment. Isolated ACTH deficiency is a rare but treatable cause of hypogonadism and infertility, and this case gives further insight on the role of cortisol on the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis.

  7. Insomnia and sleep deficiency in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichner, Cristina A

    2015-12-01

    Insomnia and sleep deficiency in pregnancy are very common with most women reporting sleep disturbances during pregnancy. Insomnia and sleep deficiency are also more prevalent as pregnancy progresses, possibly related to pregnancy-related physical symptoms or discomfort. There is increasing evidence indicating that these sleep problems may be associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes such as depressive symptoms, increased pain during labor, more Caesarean sections, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Treatment of insomnia remains challenging as some of the more commonly used sleep inducing medications such as benzodiazepines and hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists may be associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. Nonpharmacological treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy are available but the data in pregnancy is often lacking. PMID:27512475

  8. Vitamin K Deficiency Embryopathy from Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Lane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old primigravida had a pregnancy complicated by hyperemesis gravidarum (HG beginning at 7-week gestation. Despite medical therapy, she lost 18% of her prepregnancy weight. Early ultrasound at 14 weeks demonstrated a flattened facial profile with nasal hypoplasia (Binder phenotype consistent with vitamin K deficiency from HG. She had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy tube placed for enteral feeding at 15-week gestation. At repeated anatomy ultrasound at 21-week gestation, delivery, and postnatal pediatric genetics exam, nasal hypoplasia was consistent with vitamin K deficiency embryopathy from HG. Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy is a common condition. HG, the most severe form, has many maternal and fetal effects. Evaluation of vitamin K status could potentially prevent this rare and disfiguring embryopathy.

  9. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M;

    2000-01-01

    in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...... disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Nov...

  10. Primary Carnitine deficiency in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Køber, Lars; Lund, Allan M;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carnitine deficiency can cause cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence in the Faroe Islands is the highest reported in the world (1:300). A nationwide screening program identified 76 Faroese adult patients (15-80 years) with Primary Carnitine Deficiency (PCD). We describe...... prior and current health status and symptoms in these patients, especially focusing on cardiac characteristics. METHODS: Upon identification, patients were immediately admitted for physical examination, ECG, blood tests and initiation of L-carnitine supplementation. Medical records were reviewed...... and patients were interviewed. Echocardiography and blood tests were performed in 35 patients before and after L-carnitine supplementation. RESULTS: All patients were either asymptomatic or had minor symptoms when diagnosed. Echocardiography including LVEF, global longitudinal strain and dimensions were normal...

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, an...

  12. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown CJ; Akaichi F

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PS...

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Bansal; Shyam Bansal; Ambrish Mithal; Vijay Kher; Raman Marwaha

    2012-01-01

    Background : Vitamin D [(25(OH)D] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). 25(OH)D has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity,...

  14. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  15. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Cuddy, Lola L.; Sylvie Hébert

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, ...

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran B. Hebbar, MD, FCCM; Michael Wittkamp, MD, FAAP; Jessica A. Alvarez, PhD, RD; Courtney E. McCracken, PhD; Vin Tangpricha, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The potential role for vitamin D in infection has been well described in adults. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D status and markers of innate immunity and infection in critically ill children. Hypothesis: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in children with critical illness and correlates with the severity of illness and dysfunction in innate immunity. Methods: We ...

  17. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  18. An interactive app for color deficient viewers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl; Perdu, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Pardo, Carlos E.; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Color deficient individuals have trouble seeing color contrasts that could be very apparent to individuals with normal color vision. For example, for some color deficient individuals, red and green apples do not have the striking contrast they have for those with normal color vision, or the abundance of red cherries in a tree is not immediately clear due to a lack of perceived contrast. We present a smartphone app that enables color deficient users to visualize such problematic color contrasts in order to help them with daily tasks. The user interacts with the app through the touchscreen. As the user traces a path around the touchscreen, the colors in the image change continuously via a transform that enhances contrasts that are weak or imperceptible for the user under native viewing conditions. Specifically, we propose a transform that shears the data along lines parallel to the dimension corresponding to the affected cone sensitivity of the user. The amount and direction of shear are controlled by the user's finger movement over the touchscreen allowing them to visualize these contrasts. Using the GPU, this simple transformation, consisting of a linear shear and translation, is performed efficiently on each pixel and in real-time with the changing position of the user's finger. The user can use the app to aid daily tasks such as distinguishing between red and green apples or picking out ripe bananas.

  19. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  20. Palmoplantar keratoderma in Slurp2-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Christopher M.; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B.; Young, Lorraine C.; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2015-01-01

    SLURP1, a member of the Ly6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. Another secreted Ly6 protein, SLURP2, is encoded by a gene located ~20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2–3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2−/− mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., PPK), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are very similar to those of Slurp1−/− mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and PPK and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2−/− mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X−/−) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X−/− mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes. PMID:26967477

  1. Sertraline-induced pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit ZencirciMOSTAS Private Health Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Kahramanmaras, TurkeyAbstract: A 47-year-old Turkish male was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. The patient had 2 operations 28 and 19 years ago under general anesthesia. It was learned that the patient was administered succinylcholine during both of these previous operations and that he did not have a history of prolonged recovery or postoperative apnea. The patient had been using sertraline for 3 years before the operation. Pseudocholinesterase is a drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the muscle-relaxant drugs mivacurium and succinylcholine. Deficiency of this enzyme from any cause can lead to prolonged apnea and paralysis following administration of mivacurium and succinylcholine. The diagnosis of pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency can be made after careful clinic supervision and peripheral nerve stimulator monitoring. A decrease in the activity of pseudocholinesterase enzyme and a decline in the block effect over time will help verify the diagnosis. Our patient’s plasma cholinesterase was found to have low activity. Instead of pharmacological interventions that may further complicate the situation in such cases, the preferred course of action should be to wait until the block effect declines with the help of sedation and mechanical ventilation. In our case, the prolonged block deteriorated in the course of time before any complications developed.Keywords: mivacurium, pseudocholinesterase deficiency, sertraline

  2. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND THE CLINICAL CONSEQUENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesanu, Corina; Mocanu, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is important for good health, growth and strong bones. Vitamin D is mostly made in the skin by exposure to sunlight. Most foods contain very little vitamin D naturally, though some are fortified with added vitamin D. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer as well as with increased mortality. Further, Vitamin D deficiency is related to depression and impaired cognitive function. Increasing age and elevated body fat mass contribute to an increased risk of Vitamin D deficiency. A mild lack of vitamin D may not cause symptoms but can cause tiredness and general aches and pains. A more severe lack can cause s rious problems such as rickets (in children) and osteomalacia in adults). During menopause, the decline of estrogens results in increased bone turnover, a decrease in bone mineral density and elevated fracture risk. Treatment is with vitamin D supplements. Some people are more at risk of vitamin D deficiency, and so are recommended to take vitamin D supplements routinely. These include all pregnant and breastfeeding women, all infants (babies) and young children aged 6 months to 5 years, people aged 65 and over, and people who are not exposed to much sun. There are precise recommendations regarding a sufficient Vitamin D intake in order to prevent bone loss in peri- and postmenopausal women. It is also recommend routine supplements for certain people with darker skin, and for people with certain gut, liver or kidney diseases. PMID:26204630

  3. In HepG2 Cells, Coexisting Carnitine Deficiency Masks Important Indicators of Marginal Biotin Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Background: A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  5. Diagnostic challenges of bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Cuartin, Guillermo; Chalmers, James D; Sibila, Oriol

    2016-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is a condition of increasing incidence and prevalence around the world. Many different diseases have been associated with bronchiectasis, and their treatment can differ widely. Recent guidelines have helped to approach aetiological diagnosis but it is still a complex process. Identifying the cause of the bronchiectasis may determine a change in the treatment of a large group of subjects. That is one of the main reasons why the aetiological diagnosis is crucial in the proper management of bronchiectasis patients. Postinfectious bronchiectasis is the most frequent entity among different studies, but a high percentage of cases still remain without a clear aetiology. Bronchiectasis related to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), immunodeficiencies with antibody production deficiency, primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, among others, require a specific management that may improve quality of life and prognosis in a large group of individuals. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the main bronchiectasis related diseases and to simplify the aetiological diagnosis, in order to improve the management of bronchiectasis patients, especially in those where a specific treatment is available. PMID:27296824

  6. Cirrhosis in children and adolescents: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel Borges Pinto; Ana Claudia Reis Schneider; Themis Reverbel da Silveira

    2015-01-01

    Several conditions, especially chronic liver diseases,can lead to cirrhosis in children and adolescents. Mostcases in clinical practice are caused by similar etiologies.In infants, cirrhosis is most often caused by biliaryatresia and genetic-metabolic diseases, while in olderchildren, it tends to result from autoimmune hepatitis,Wilson's disease, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency andprimary sclerosingcholangitis. The symptoms of cirrhosisin children and adolescents are similar to those ofadults. However, in pediatric patients, the first sign ofcirrhosis is often poor weight gain. The complications ofpediatric cirrhosis are similar to those observed in adultpatients, and include gastrointestinal bleeding causedby gastroesophageal varices, ascites and spontaneousbacterial peritonitis. In pediatric patients, specialattention should be paid to the nutritional alterationscaused by cirrhosis, since children and adolescentshave higher nutritional requirements for growth anddevelopment. Children and adolescents with chroniccholestasis are at risk for several nutritional deficiencies.Malnutrition can have severe consequences for bothpre- and post-liver transplant patients. The treatmentof cirrhosis-induced portal hypertension in children andadolescents is mostly based on methods developed foradults. The present article will review the diagnostic anddifferential diagnostic aspects of end-stage liver diseasein children, as well as the major treatment options forthis condition.

  7. Hepatic Differentiation of Murine Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Allows Disease Modelling In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Eggenschwiler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells by retrovirus-mediated expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C-MYC is a promising approach to derive disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In this study, we focused on three murine models for metabolic liver disorders: the copper storage disorder Wilson's disease (toxic-milk mice, tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate-hydrolase deficiency, FAH−/− mice, and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ mice. Colonies of iPSCs emerged 2-3 weeks after transduction of fibroblasts, prepared from each mouse strain, and were maintained as individual iPSC lines. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated the expression of endogenous pluripotency markers. Hepatic precursor cells could be derived from these disease-specific iPSCs applying an in vitro differentiation protocol and could be visualized after transduction of a lentiviral albumin-GFP reporter construct. Functional characterization of these cells allowed the recapitulation of the disease phenotype for further studies of underlying molecular mechanisms of the respective disease.

  8. PiZ mouse liver accumulates polyubiquitin conjugates that associate with catalytically active 26S proteasomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Haddock

    Full Text Available Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S

  9. Deficiência de ferro na adolescência Iron deficiency in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene P. Garanito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é o distúrbio nutricional mais comum no mundo e constitui a maior causa de anemia associada às condições onde há erro alimentar, perda crônica de sangue ou quando ocorre o crescimento rápido, como na infância, na gravidez e na adolescência. Esta deficiência acarreta prejuízos no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, na capacidade de aprendizagem, no apetite, no crescimento e na resposta do sistema imunológico. Na adolescência, além de com frequência observarmos hábitos alimentares inadequados, estão presentes intensas mudanças fisiológicas e psicossociais que, em associação, podem comprometer o crescimento e aumentar o risco do desenvolvimento de deficiência de ferro e outras carências nutricionais, sobretudo na fase púbere. Desta forma, o diagnóstico de deficiência de ferro entre os adolescentes deve ser lembrado a fim de que medidas possam ser tomadas para diminuir a incidência de anemia, do comprometimento do rendimento escolar e do sistema imunológico, neste período da vida.Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world and is a major cause of anemia associated with situations involving chronic blood loss or rapid growth such as during infancy, pregnancy and adolescence. This deficiency leads to impairment in psychomotor development, learning ability, appetite, growth and immune response. In adolescence, inadequate dietary habits are often observed and intensive physiological and psychological changes are seen that when combined can impair growth and increase the risk of developing iron deficiency or other nutritional disorders, especially during puberty. Thus, the diagnosis of iron deficiency among adolescents should always be considered so that measures can be taken to reduce the incidence of anemia, impairment of the immune system and improve school performance.

  10. Vitamin B12 And Folate Deficiency In a Hospital Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadia RS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of B12 and folate deficiency in a hospital population. We studied the incidence of their deficiency by evaluating blood levels in every tenth hospital admission. Among the 450 patients chosen, 417 had normal levels of both, 2 had deficiency of folate alone (folate < 3ng.ml, 3 had B12 deficiency alone (B12<200pg/mland 11 had deficiency of both (total 3.5%. In addition 12 had borderline b12 level(200-300pg/ml, 2 had borderline folate level (3-4ng/ml(0.44%and 3 had borderline levels for both (0.66% . Thus 33% had definite or borderline deficiency. This deficiency was more common in the elderly and in patients on vegetarian diet (5.7% definite deficiency, 8.8% borderline levels compared to those on a non-vegetarian diet. During the 2 1/2 years of the study a total of 99 definite deficiency and 69 borderline deficiency were seen. In the definite deficiency group, 22.3% had neuropathy, 6.1% had evidence of myelopathy, 18.2% had neuropsychiatric changes (memory defect, dementia, behavioural abnormalities, depression and 4.1% had cerebellar signs. The neurologic findings in the borderline group were almost similar (neuropathy 29%, myelopathy 8.6% and neuropsychiatric changes 18.4%. High mean corpuscular volume (MCV> 95 was seen in 69% of those with both B12 and folate deficiency, 43.4% with B12 deficiency and 61.15 with folate deficiency. Hypersegmented polymorphs were seen in 21.7% with B12 deficiency, 27.5% with folate both B12 and folate deficiency had either megaloblastosis or dimorphic picture. It is to be noted that B12 and folate deficiency in this population was more frequent than we previously considered and reliance on haematologic parameters will miss half to one third of all cases. As expected B12 deficiency is more frequent in vegetarians than non-vegetarians.

  11. Pica in iron deficiency: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisman Glenn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pica is an unusual condition where patients develop cravings for non-nutritive substances that can cause significant health risks. We report three patients with pica, two of them showing evolutionary changes associated with pica and the third demonstrating a peculiar nature of pica, which has yet to be reported. Case presentation We describe three patients who presented with symptoms of pica. The first patient is a 36-year-old Caucasian woman who had dysfunctional uterine bleeding associated with daily ingestion of two super-sized cups of ice as iced tea. The second patient is a 62-year-old Caucasian man who presented with bleeding from colonic polyps associated with drinking partially frozen bottled water. Lastly, the third patient, a 37-year-old Hispanic woman, presented with dysfunctional uterine bleeding and habitually chewed rubber bands. All three patients presented with hematological parameters diagnostic for iron deficiency anemia. Conclusion Pica has been practiced for centuries without a clear etiology. We have noticed that the younger community of academic and community physicians are not aware of the importance of complaints related to pica. None of our patients we describe here, as well as their primary care physicians, were aware of the importance of their pica related symptoms. Pica symptoms abated in one of our patients upon iron supplementation, while the other two are currently under treatment as of this writing. We believe pica is an important sign of iron deficiency that should never be ignored, and the craving for any unusual substance should compel clinicians to search for occult blood loss with secondary iron deficiency.

  12. Molecular basis of hereditary C3 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Botto, M.; Fong, K. Y.; So, A K; Rudge, A; Walport, M.J. (Mark J.)

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of complement component C3 in a 10-yr-old boy was studied. C3 could not be detected by RIA of serum from the patient. Segregation of C3 S and C3 F allotypes within the family confirmed the presence of a null gene for C3, for which the patient was homozygous. 30 exons have been characterized, spanning the entire beta chain of C3 and the alpha chain as far as the C3d region. Sequence analysis of the exons derived from the C3 null gene showed no abnormalities in the coding ...

  13. Selective deficiency of immunoglobulin A2.

    OpenAIRE

    van Loghem, E; Zegers, B J; Bast, E J; KATER, L

    1983-01-01

    A case of familial selective IgA2 deficiency is described. The mother had no detectable IgA2, but a low level of IgA1. She had anti-alpha 2 antibodies of the IgG class. One of her daughters also lacked IgA2 with a normal level of IgA1. The analysis of the immunoglobulin haplotypes of the family suggested the deletion of the alpha 2-gene. In addition, the analysis of B lymphocytes of mother and daughter showed the absence of IgA2-bearing cells. Upon stimulation with pokeweed mitogen, the B cel...

  14. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola L. Cuddy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, we propose that the results of brain damage studies can contribute to the development of a model of normal music reading.

  15. Morbidity and GH deficiency: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, K.; Laursen, T.; Green, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Design: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...... identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. Method: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO...

  16. Repair deficient and hypersensitive diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many diseases are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents but only xeroderma pigmentosum is consistently DNA repair deficient. Groups A to G exhibit reduction in excision of pyrimidine dimers and other lesions, the variant and alteration in polymerization or ligation. Pulse chase experiments indicate that excision defective and variant cells suffer increased blocking of replication forks during semiconservative replication after irradiation; but later bypass of such blocks is completely normal in all cell types. Thus, the variant is not defective in ''post-replication repair,'' and even the definition of such a system comes under question. (author)

  17. Symptomatic zinc deficiency in experimental zinc deprivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C M; Goode, H F; Aggett, P J; Bremner, I; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of indices of poor zinc status was undertaken in five male subjects in whom dietary zinc intake was reduced from 85 mumol d-1 in an initial phase of the study to 14 mumol d-1. One of the subjects developed features consistent with zinc deficiency after receiving the low zinc diet for 12 days. These features included retroauricular acneform macullo-papular lesions on the face, neck, and shoulders and reductions in plasma zinc, red blood cell zinc, neutrophil zinc and plasma alkal...

  18. Deficiência de ferro na mulher adulta The iron deficiency in adult woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian P. Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A anemia ferropriva é a doença nutricional de maior prevalência no mundo, atingindo 20% a 30% da população. As mulheres, gestantes ou não, fazem parte dos grupos considerados vulneráveis. Entre as possíveis causas da anemia por deficiência de ferro, as perdas sanguíneas menstruais constituem o principal fator de anemia ferropriva da mulher adulta. A proposta deste estudo é rever as causas da anemia na mulher adulta, principalmente decorrente de sangramentos uterinos, assim como o diagnóstico e adoção de medidas preventivas.Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional disease in the world, affecting from 20 to 30% of the population. Women, both pregnant and otherwise, are included as groups considered vulnerable. Among the possible causes of iron-deficiency anemia, menstruation blood loss is the main cause of iron-deficiency anemia in adult women. The purpose of this study was to review the causes of anemia in adult women, in particular in relation to uterine blood loss including the diagnosis and the adoption of preventive measures.

  19. Vitamin D/dietary calcium deficiency rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Francis H; Pettifor, John M

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and biochemical perturbations found in privational (nutritional) rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets (PDDR), an autosomal recessive condition with loss of function mutations in CYP27B1. It may seem strange to combine a discussion on privational rickets and PDDR as a single topic, but privational rickets and PDDR present with similar clinical signs and symptoms and with similar perturbations in bone and mineral metabolism. Of interest is the characteristic lack of features of rickets at birth in infants with PDDR, a finding which has also been reported in infants born to vitamin D-deficient mothers. This highlights the independence of the fetus and neonate from the need for vitamin D to maintain calcium homeostasis during this period. The variable roles of vitamin D deficiency and dietary calcium deficiency in the pathogenesis of privational rickets are discussed and the associated alterations in vitamin D metabolism highlighted. Although PDDR is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, results of long-term follow-up are now available on the effect of treatment with calcitriol, and these are discussed. Areas of uncertainty, such as should affected mothers breastfeed their infants, are emphasized.

  20. Iodine and Iron Deficiency in Mild Iodine Deficiency Region Under Iodine Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Suplotova

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studying epidemiological criteria deficiency of iron and iodine at the population of Tyumen, on a background of iodine preventive maintenance. Methods: Because iron deficiency may impair the efficacy of iodine supplementation, the aim of this study was to determine the relation between serum ferritin and goiter, urinary iodine following iodized salt supplementation. Schoolboys are included in conformity to recommendations the WHO (1997 in 9—12 years old children (n = 435.. Results: On a background of preventive actions at the Tyumen schoolboys sufficient iodine maintenance (frequency of a craw is determined according to ultrasonic — 1.9%, a median urinary iodine — 113 mkg/l. The average level serum iron has made 13 ± 6.2 mg/dl, serum ferritin — 38.6 ± 30.9 mg/dl. At 30 % of schoolboys deficiency of iron is determined. Conclusion: In conditions compensated endemic goiter authentic correlation between criteria of an exchange of iron and parameters of iodine maintenance it is not established. Key words: iodine deficience, thyroid, goiter, iron, anemia.

  1. Pannexin 1 deficiency can induce hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin

    Gap junctions play a critical role in hearing. Connexin gap junction gene mutations can induce a high incidence of hearing loss. Pannexin (Panx) gene also encodes gap junction proteins in vertebrates. Panx1 is a predominant pannexin isoform and has extensive expression in the cochlea. Here, we report that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlea could produce a progressive hearing loss. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording showed that hearing loss was moderate to severe and severe at high-frequencies. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), which reflects the activity of active cochlear mechanics that can amply acoustic stimulation to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity, was also reduced. We further found that Panx1 deficiency could activate Caspase-3 cell apoptotic pathway in the cochlea to cause hair cells and other types of cells degeneration. These data indicate that like connexins Panx1 deficiency can also induce hearing loss. These data also suggest that pannexins play important rather than redundant roles in the cochlea and hearing.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Masoud; Tavakol, Marzieh; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Tavakol, Zahra; Momenzadeh, Kaveh; Nabavi, Mohammad; Dabbaghzade, Abbas; Mosallanejad, Asieh; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is the most common skin diseases, characterized by chronic cutaneous lesions which severely debilitates patients in several aspects of their everyday life. Vitamin D is known to exert several actions in the immune system and to influence function and differentiation of mast cells, central role players in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. One hundred and fourteen patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria were recruited in this study along with one hundred and eighty seven sex-matched and age-matched healthy volunteers as the control group. For each patient, urticaria activity score was calculated and autologous serum skin test was done. Vitamin D metabolic statue was measured in serum as 25 hydroxyvitamin D using enzyme immunoassay method. Patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria significantly showed lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. There was a significant positive correlation between vitamin D levels and urticaria activity score. This study showed that patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria had reduced levels of vitamin D, while vitamin D deficiency could increase susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  4. Calcium And Zinc Deficiency In Preeclamptic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Ferdousi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-eclampsia is the most common medical complication of pregnancy associated withincreased maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. Reduced serum calcium and zinc levels arefound associated with elevated blood pressure in preeclampsia. Objective: To observe serum calciumand zinc levels in preeclamptic women. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in theDepartment of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Shahbag, Dhaka betweenJuly 2009 to June 2010. In this study, 60 pregnant women of preeclampsia, aged 18-39 years withgestational period more than 20th weeks were included as the study (group B. For comparison ageand gestational period matched 30 normotensive pregnant women control (group A were also studied.All the subjects were selected from Obstetric and Gynae In and Out patient Department of BSMMUand Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Serum calcium was measured by Colorimetric method and serumzinc was measured by Spectrophotometric method. Data were analysed by independent sample t testand Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Results: Mean serum calcium and zinc levels weresignificantly (p<0.001 lower in study group than those of control group. Again, serum calcium andzinc showed significant negative correlation with SBP and DBP in preeclamptic women. Conclusion:This study concludes that serum calcium and zinc deficiency may be one of the risk factor ofpreeclampsia. Therefore, early detection and supplementation to treat this deficiency may reduce theincidence of preeclampsia.

  5. Non haematological effects of iron deficiency - A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Kanjaksha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a continuum beginning from lowering of tissue stores to the phase of exhausted tissue stores, interference with iron driven biochemical reactions in the body, microcytosis, hypochromia, increasing severity of anaemia with all its attendant consequences. Iron deficiency anaemia is a very well known concept but what is often not appreciated is the effect of broad canvas of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems in our body in addition to iron deficiency anaemia leading to concept of "Iron deficiency disease". In this condition not only tissue delivery of oxygen is compromised but proliferation, growth, differentiation, myelinogenesis, immunofunction, energy metabolism, absorption and biotransformation are compromised leading to abnormal growth and behaviour, mental retardation, reduced cardiac performance and work efficiency, infection etc which ultimately leads to the concept that "iron deficiency not only breaks the machine but also wrecks the machinery."

  6. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency.

  7. CORD SERUM FERRITIN AS BIOCHEMICAL MARKER IN IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sherin; Jyothy

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is by far the most frequent type of anemia seen in pregnancy, accounting for 90% or more of all cases. Iron deficiency anemia has adverse consequences on infant development. Therefore maternal anemia should be prevented and treated. Serum ferritin is the single best non-invasive test and is a very useful and reliable index of iron stores especially during pregnancy, with low levels indicating iron deficiency. While infants born to anemic mother are ...

  8. Neuro-regression in vitamin B12 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Sanwar; Nathani, Shweta

    2009-01-01

    Neuroregression in infants has varied aetiology and vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the uncommon causes. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency is encountered in malnourished infants or in offspring of strict vegan mothers. We present two cases, both infants of 10 and 8 months of age, whose mothers had vitamin B12 deficiency. On admission, the patients were apathic, hypotonic and lethargic. Serum vitamin B12 levels were below normal limits. On cranial MRI, T2-weighted images revealed frontoparieta...

  9. Index formulas and charge deficiencies on the Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffeng, Magnus

    2010-02-01

    The notion of charge deficiency by Avron et al. ["Charge deficiency, charge transport and comparison of dimensions," Commun. Math. Phys. 159, 399 (1994)] is studied from the view of K-theory of operator algebras and is applied to the Landau levels in R2n. We calculate the charge deficiencies at the higher Landau levels in R2n by means of an Atiyah-Singer-type index theorem.

  10. Relative nutritional deficiencies associated with centrally acting monoamines

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz M; Stein A; Uncini T

    2012-01-01

    Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Two primary categories of nutritional deficiency exist. An absolute nutritional deficiency occurs when nutrient intake is not sufficient to meet the normal needs of the system, and a relative nutritional deficiency exists when nutrient intake and systemic levels of nutrients are normal, while a change occurs in ...

  11. Iron deficiency anemia: current strategies for the diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the commonest nutritional deficiencies in the world. It is multifactorial and may be caused by lack of intake, blood loss and intestinal causes. Clinical features are highly variable, and most patients are asymptomatic. Typical laboratory features of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include a hypochromic microcytic anemia, low serum iron level, high total iron binding capacity, low serum ferritin level. Usefulness of monitoring serum transferrin receptor level (sTf...

  12. Carbonic Anhydrase II Deficiency in a Saudi Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Alhuzaim, Omar N; Almohareb, Ohoud M; Safiya M. Sherbeeni

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbonic anhydrase (CA) II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the CA II gene that leads to osteopetrosis, renal tubular acidosis (RTA), and cerebral calcification. Our aim is to present a patient with the classic triad of CA II deficiency syndrome to enhance the awareness about this rare syndrome. METHODS We describe the clinical and radiological findings of a Saudi woman patient with CA II deficiency syndrome. RESULTS A Saudi woman in her 20s pr...

  13. GH Replacement Therapy in GH-Deficient Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Luger A

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency represents an indication for substitution therapy not only in children but also in adults. In the last twenty years, numerous studies have shown that GH deficiency in adults is characterized by a clearly defined syndrome which is associated with a doubleincreased mortality rate. GH deficiency in adults can be diagnosed only by dynamic tests. While the insulin tolerance test (ITT) has been the standard test in the past, the combined arginine-GH releasing hormon...

  14. Clinical management of salivary deficiency: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical, chemical and antibacterial properties of saliva provide protection to human dentition against dental diseases, Therefore, salivary deficiency has to be managed carefully. The causes of saliva deficiency are many and varied. It is worth mentioning that saliva flow rate is normally affected by physiologic condition, such as eating, resting, sleeping, cold or hot season etc. In this paper the protective role of saliva, etiologiy of saliva deficiency and its clinical management are discussed. (author

  15. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Nigerian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Olatundun Williams; Daniel Gbadero; Grace Edowhorhu; Ann Brearley; Tina Slusher; Lund, Troy C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (...

  16. Review of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy: who is affected?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Schroth; Lavelle, Christopher L. B.; Moffatt, Michael E.K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiencies have been documented in several populations, including aboriginal Canadians from isolated northern communities. Such deficiencies can impact the health of both the mother and her infant. This review was performed to determine how widespread vitamin D deficiency is during pregnancy. Study design. Electronic literature search. Methods. A Medline search was conducted using the Mesh terms "pregnancy" and "vitamin D". Those studies meeting the inclusion criteria ...

  17. [Vegetarians are at high risk of vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Parva; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Since vegetarians have a lower intake of vitamin B12 (B12) than non-vegetarians, they are at increased risk of developing B12 deficiency. The less animal products the food contains the worse the B12 status. However, even lacto-ovo-vegetarians run the risk of becoming deficient in B12. Vegetarians are recommended regularly to take supplements of B12, and they should be informed of the lacking content of B12 of plant products and the hazards of B12 deficiency. Furthermore, vegetarians should routinely be checked for possible B12 deficiency. PMID:26750191

  18. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age......-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies....

  19. [Treatable Dementia due to Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin deficiency is one of the major causes of treatable dementia. Specifically, patients suffering from dementia frequentry display low serum levels of vitamin B(12). There is a close metabolic interaction between folate and vitamin B(12). Folate deficiency causes various neuropsychiatric symptoms, which resemble those observed in vitamin B(12) deficiency. This review summarizes, the basic pathophysiology of vitamin B(12) and folate deficiency, its clinical diagnosis, associated neuropsychiatric symptoms such as subacute combined degeneration and dementia, and epidemiological studies of cognitive decline and brain atrophy. PMID:27056859

  20. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  1. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients (MN are the nutrients that are needed by the body in small quantities which play leading roles in the production of enzymes, hormones and other substances that help to regulate growth activity, development and functioning of the immune and reproductive systems. Children, adolescent boys & girls and expectant mothers form a vulnerable group in developing countries where economic stress and food security are issues of concern. MNs deficiencies, which have been considered as major risk factors in child survival are the leading cause of mental retardation, preventable blindness, morbidity, birth defects, morbidity and mortality. Micronutrient malnutrition has many adverse effects on human health, not all of which are clinically evident. Even moderate levels of deficiency (which can be detected by biochemical or clinical measurements can have serious detrimental effects on human function. Thus, in addition to the obvious and direct health effects, the existence of MN deficiency has profound implications for economic development and productivity, particularly in terms of the potentially huge public health costs and the loss of human capital formation.According to WHO mortality data, around 0.8 million deaths (1.5% of the total can be attributed to iron deficiency each year, and a similar number to vitamin A deficiency. In terms of the loss of healthy life, expressed in  disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, iron-deficiency anaemia results in  25 million DALYs lost (or 2.4% of the global total, vitamin A deficiency  in 18 million DALYs lost (or 1.8% of the global total and iodine deficiency  in 2.5 million DALYs lost (or 0.2% of the global total [1].A child belonging to low socio-economic families residing in poor environmental and sanitation settings consume low quantity of foods which deficient not only in 2-3 MNs Deficiencies but also in macronutrients. These children also suffer from recurrent episodes of morbidities which

  2. Pancreatic SEC23B deficiency is sufficient to explain the perinatal lethality of germline SEC23B deficiency in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Khoriaty; Lesley Everett; Jennifer Chase; Guojing Zhu; Mark Hoenerhoff; Brooke McKnight; Matthew P. Vasievich; Bin Zhang; Kärt Tomberg; John (Jack) Williams; Ivan Maillard; David Ginsburg

    2016-01-01

    In humans, loss of function mutations in SEC23B result in Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type II (CDAII), a disease limited to defective erythroid development. Patients with two nonsense SEC23B mutations have not been reported, suggesting that complete SEC23B deficiency might be lethal. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration and that mice with hematopoietic SEC23B deficiency do not exhibit CDAII. We now show that SEC2...

  3. Screening For Vitamin D Deficiency In Females In Madina Region; Saudi Arabia. Vitamin D Deficiency In A Sunny Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Nagib(1) , and Mahmoud A. Abulmagd

    2012-01-01

    Background And Objective: Poor sunlight exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency even in the sunniest places. So screening for vitamin D deficiency in outpatient clinics and inhospital setting in King Fahad Hospital , Al Madina Al Monwara. METHODS: Screening for vitamin D deficiency by assessment of serum 25(OH)D with radioimmunoassay in 60 female patients aged 18 – 40 years. Serum calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase were assessed, too. Results: 6 female patients (10%) showed signi...

  4. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  5. DISTANCE EDUCATION FOR PEOPLE WITH VISUAL DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Gregory Trentin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present work had as basic objective, to analyze the isotropic ways used by students with Visuals deficiencies in the Distance Education. This analysis was relative to the conditions of accessibility in the Virtual Learning Environment, for the accomplishment of the course of Assistive Technology, offered for the Unesp of Presidente Prudente. To reach this objective, a analytical – exploratory type research was performed, by means of observation and application of questionnaires to one student, with blindness. This student was selected to participate of the fourth edition of the course, carried through in the year of 2011. The analysis of the use of the isotropic ways for the student with blindness was based on the theory of Vygotski and the concepts of the zone of proximal development and the social constructivism theory.

  6. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Marzullo, Paolo; Doga, Mauro; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of the adult is characterized by reduced quality of life (QoL) and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, and increased weight and cardiovascular risk. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, but an exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain owing to limited awareness and the scarce and conflicting data available on this topic. Because acromegaly and GHD may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of acromegaly may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. However, it is still largely unknown whether patients with post-acromegaly GHD may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adult patients treated for acromegaly.

  7. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  8. Identification of BRCA1-deficient ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Anne-Bine; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann;

    2011-01-01

    . Design. BRCA1-immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and methylation analyses were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian cancer tissue. Sample: 54 ovarian cancers; 15 BRCA1 cancers, 4 BRCA2 cancers, 10 cancers from patients with a family history...... but no mutation detected, and 25 ovarian cancers with unknown BRCA1 status. Results. Abnormal BRCA1 IHC was found to indicate BRCA mutations with a sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 93%, and an estimated positive predictive value of 73%. FISH analyses supported the diagnosis in most cases. Methylation analyses...... could indicate BRCA deficiency in combination with one of the other methods. Conclusions. BRCA1 IHC is a promising screening method for BRCA1 mutation detection....

  9. Laser Spectroscopy of neutron deficient Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the ground state properties of neutron-deficient tin isotopes towards the doubly-magic nucleus $^{100}$Sn. Nuclear spins, changes in the rms charge radii and electromagnetic moments of $^{101-121}$Sn will be measured by laser spectroscopy using the CRIS experimental beam line. These ground-state properties will help to clarify the evolution of nuclear structure properties approaching the $\\textit{N = Z =}$ 50 shell closures. The tin isotopic chain is currently the frontier for the application of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations. Our knowledge of the nuclear structure of the Sn isotopes will set a benchmark for the advances of many-body methods, and will provide an important test for modern descriptions of the nuclear force.

  10. Boron in Plants: Deficiency and Toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan J. Camacho-Crist6bal; Jesus Rexach; Agustin González-Fontess

    2008-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for normal growth of higher plants, and B availability in soil and irrigation water is an important determinant of agricultural production. To date, a primordial function of B is undoubtedly its structural role in the cell wall; however, there is increasing evidence for a possible role of B in other processes such as the maintenance of plasma membrane function and several metabolic pathways. In recent years, the knowledge of the molecular basis of B deficiency and toxicity responses in plants has advanced greatly. The aim of this review is to provide an update on recent findings related to these topics, which can contribute to a better understanding of the role of B in plants.

  11. Relative nutritional deficiencies associated with centrally acting monoamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Two primary categories of nutritional deficiency exist. An absolute nutritional deficiency occurs when nutrient intake is not sufficient to meet the normal needs of the system, and a relative nutritional deficiency exists when nutrient intake and systemic levels of nutrients are normal, while a change occurs in the system that induces a nutrient intake requirement that cannot be supplied from diet alone. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the primary component of chronic centrally acting monoamine (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine disease is a relative nutritional deficiency induced by postsynaptic neuron damage.Materials and methods: Monoamine transporter optimization results were investigated, re-evaluated, and correlated with previous publications by the authors under the relative nutritional deficiency hypothesis. Most of those previous publications did not discuss the concept of a relative nutritional deficiency. It is the purpose of this paper to redefine the etiology expressed in these previous writings into the realm of relative nutritional deficiency, as demonstrated by monoamine transporter optimization. The novel and broad range of amino acid precursor dosing values required to address centrally acting monoamine relative nutritional deficiency properly is also discussed.Results: Four primary etiologies are described for postsynaptic neuron damage leading to a centrally acting monoamine relative nutritional deficiency, all of which require monoamine transporter optimization to define the proper amino acid dosing values of serotonin and dopamine precursors.Conclusion: Humans suffering from chronic centrally acting monoamine-related disease are not suffering from a drug deficiency; they are suffering from a relative

  12. Lower limb deficient children in The Netherlands: epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, L J; Boonstra, A M; Groothoff, J W; Cornel, M C; Eisma, W H

    2000-04-01

    Information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in The Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency or amputation and male/female ratios. Data were obtained from a regional birth defects registry for the northern part of The Netherlands (EUROCAT-NNL) and from a national survey. Inclusion criteria for the selection of the EUROCAT data were: children/foetuses with lower leg deficiencies born in 1981-1986. Inclusion criteria for the survey data were: children aged 1-18 years with congenital deficiencies or acquired amputations of the leg, excluding toe deficiencies/amputations. Both the regional birth defects registry and the national survey only yielded small numbers of children, which limits the validity of the authors' findings. The Eurocat data show a prevalence of lower leg deficiencies at birth of 2.07/10,000. Fifty-five (55) children/foetuses were included in the present study. The male/female ratio was 1:1. Of the live-born children, 30% also had defects of the upper limbs, while 38% had bilateral lower limb deficiencies. The national survey included 89 children, of whom 73% had congenital deficiencies, while the others had undergone amputations: of which 37% were due to malignancies, 29% to traumata, 13% to infections and 21% to other pathology. The male/female ratio was 7:3 for the children with congenital deficiencies versus 6:4 for the children with acquired amputations. In the group of congenital deficiencies, fibula deficiency was most frequently seen (36%), while in the group with acquired amputations trans-femoral amputation, knee disarticulation and trans-tibial amputation were seen with equal frequency (21%). In 40% of the children with congenital deficiency and in 8% of the children with acquired amputations the arm was also affected. Both legs were

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency and gastric histopathology in older patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KR Dholakia; TS Dharmarajan; D Yadav; S Oiseth; EP Norkus; CS Pitchumoni

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare upper gastric endoscopic and histopathologic findings in older adults in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency.METHODS: A prospective analysis of upper gastric endoscopic and gastric histopathologic findings from 30 newly identified B12-deficient patients (11 males,19 females) and 16 controls with normal B12 status (6males, 10 females) was performed. For all subjects, the indication for upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy were unrelated to B12 status. A single pathologist, blinded to B12 status, processed and interpreted the biopsy samples. Endoscopic and histopathologic findings were correlated with age, gender, hematocrit (Hct), MCV and B12 status.RESULTS: The B12-deficient group had significantly lower mean serum B12 levels compared to the controls (P<0.00005) while their mean Hct, MCV and serum albumin levels were similar. Iron deficiency (ferritinbased) was present in 21% of B12-deficient patients and intrinsic factor antibodies were present in29% (5/17) of B12-deficient patients. The endoscopic findings revealed significantly different rates of gastritis and atrophy between the B12-deficient and control groups (P= 0.017).B12-deficient patients had significantly less superficial gastritis (62% vs 94%) and significantly more atrophic gastritis (28% vs 0%) as compared to the controls (P= 0.039). Intestinal metaplasia was similar in both groups. Helicobacter pyloriinfection rates were similar in the B12-deficient patients and controls (40% vs31%).CONCLUSION: Significantly different endoscopic findings and types of gastritis could often be observed in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency. Atrophy,based on endoscopy, and atrophic gastritis, based on histopathology, suggest the presence of B12 deficiency.Gastric histopathology is not influenced by the age,gender, Hct or MCV of the patients.

  14. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in common variable immune deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorechovsky, Igor (Karolinska Institute, Center for BioTechnology, Huddinge (Sweden)); Scott, David (Cancer Research Campaign Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)); Haeney, Mansel R. (Department of Immunology, Hope Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)); Webster, David A.B. (Clinical Research Centre, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom))

    1993-12-01

    From more than 500 tumours reported in human primary immune deficiencies a majority has been observed in two disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and common variable immune deficiency (CVID). Since both diseases have an increased risk of lymphomas/leukaemias and gastrointestinal tumours, suggesting a common risk factor, and the cells derived from A-T patients exhibit an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity we analysed chromosome damage in the G[sub 2] lymphocytes of 24 CVID patients and 21 controls after X-irradiation in vitro. There was a significant difference in mean aberration yields between patients and controls. Three CVID patients had yields higher than the mean+3SD of the controls. Six patients but only one control had yields higher than the mean+2SD of controls. The patient with the highest chromosomal radiosensitivity subsequently developed a lymphoma. Repeat assays on the same blood sample, with a 24-h delay in setting up the second culture, showed as much variability for control donors as the variation between control donors although for CVID patients inter-individual variation was greater than the difference between results of repeat samples. There was a weak positive correlation between radiosensitivity and age of donor. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of five patients with X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia was not different from healthy donors. The mean mitotic index (MI) for unirradiated samples from CVID patients was significantly lower than for controls and there was an inverse relationship between MI and aberration yields in the patients, but not in controls. We suggest that the defect in CVID patients that reduces response to mitogenic stimuli may have mechanism(s) in common with those involved in cellular repair processes.

  15. Premature aging in telomerase-deficient zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Anchelin

    2013-09-01

    The study of telomere biology is crucial to the understanding of aging and cancer. In the pursuit of greater knowledge in the field of human telomere biology, the mouse has been used extensively as a model. However, there are fundamental differences between mouse and human cells. Therefore, additional models are required. In light of this, we have characterized telomerase-deficient zebrafish (Danio rerio as the second vertebrate model for human telomerase-driven diseases. We found that telomerase-deficient zebrafish show p53-dependent premature aging and reduced lifespan in the first generation, as occurs in humans but not in mice, probably reflecting the similar telomere length in fish and humans. Among these aging symptoms, spinal curvature, liver and retina degeneration, and infertility were the most remarkable. Although the second-generation embryos died in early developmental stages, restoration of telomerase activity rescued telomere length and survival, indicating that telomerase dosage is crucial. Importantly, this model also reproduces the disease anticipation observed in humans with dyskeratosis congenita (DC. Thus, telomerase haploinsufficiency leads to anticipation phenomenon in longevity, which is related to telomere shortening and, specifically, with the proportion of short telomeres. Furthermore, p53 was induced by telomere attrition, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Importantly, genetic inhibition of p53 rescued the adverse effects of telomere loss, indicating that the molecular mechanisms induced by telomere shortening are conserved from fish to mammals. The partial rescue of telomere length and longevity by restoration of telomerase activity, together with the feasibility of the zebrafish for high-throughput chemical screening, both point to the usefulness of this model for the discovery of new drugs able to reactivate telomerase in individuals with DC.

  16. Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Elliott, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    Opioid therapy is one of the most effective forms of analgesia currently in use. In the past few decades, the use of opioids as a long-term treatment for chronic pain has increased dramatically. Accompanying this upsurge in the use of long-term opioid therapy has been an increase in the occurrence of opioid associated endocrinopathy, most commonly manifested as an androgen deficiency and therefore referred to as opioid associated androgen deficiency (OPIAD). This syndrome is characterized by the presence of inappropriately low levels of gonadotropins (follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone) leading to inadequate production of sex hormones, particularly testosterone. Symptoms that may manifest in patients with OPIAD include reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, hot flashes, and depression. Physical findings may include reduced facial and body hair, anemia, decreased muscle mass, weight gain, and osteopenia or osteoporosis. Additionally, both men and women with OPIAD may suffer from infertility. While the literature regarding OPIAD remains limited, it is apparent that OPIAD is becoming increasingly prevalent among chronic opioid consumers but often goes unrecognized. OPIAD can have a significant negative impact on the the quality of life of opioid users, and clinicians should anticipate the potential for its occurrence whenever long-term opioid prescribing is undertaken. Once diagnosed, treatment for OPIAD may be offered utilizing a number of androgen replacement therapy options including a variety of testosterone preparations and, for female patients with OPIAD, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplementation. Follow-up evaluation of patients receiving androgen replacement therapy should include a review of any unresolved symptoms of hypogonadism, laboratory evaluation, and surveillance for potential adverse effects of androgen replacement therapy including prostate disease in males.: PMID:22786453

  17. Mitochondrial Energy-Deficient Endophenotype in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Gargus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available While evidence points to a multigenic etiology of most autism, the pathophysiology of the disorder has yet to be defined and the underlying genes and biochemical pathways they subserve remain unknown. Autism is considered to be influenced by a combination of various genetic, environmental and immunological factors; more recently, evidence has suggested that increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may be involved in the etiology of this multifactorial disorder. Furthermore, recent studies have pointed to a subset of autism associated with the biochemical endophenotype of mitochondrial energy deficiency, identified as a subtle impairment in fat and carbohydrate oxidation. This phenotype is similar, but more subtle than those seen in classic mitochondrial defects. In some cases the beginnings of the genetic underpinnings of these mitochondrial defects are emerging, such as mild mitochondrial dysfunction and secondary carnitine deficiency observed in the subset of autistic patients with an inverted duplication of chromosome 15q11-q13. In addition, rare cases of familial autism associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS or associated with abnormalities in cellular calcium homeostasis, such as malignant hyperthermia or cardiac arrhythmia, are beginning to emerge. Such special cases suggest that the pathophysiology of autism may comprise pathways that are directly or indirectly involved in mitochondrial energy production and to further probe this connection three new avenues seem worthy of exploration: 1 metabolomic clinical studies provoking controlled aerobic exercise stress to expand the biochemical phenotype, 2 high-throughput expression arrays to directly survey activity of the genes underlying these biochemical pathways and 3 model systems, either based upon neuronal stem cells or model genetic organisms, to discover novel genetic and environmental inputs into these pathways.

  18. Intrapleural 'outside-in' gene therapy: therapeutics for organs of the chest via gene transfer to the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heguy, Adriana; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-10-01

    The pleural space is an attractive site for using viral vectors to deliver gene products to the lung parenchyma, other thoracic structures and the systemic circulation. The advantages of intrapleural gene transfer using viral vectors include: (i) easy accessibility; (ii) large surface area; (iii) ability to provide high concentrations of secreted gene products to chest structures; (iv) low risk of detrimental effects of possible vector-induced inflammation compared with intravascular delivery; and (v) because it is local, lower vector doses can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to thoracic structures than less efficient systemic routes. Examples of pleural gene transfer include the use of adenovirus vectors to treat mesothelioma by transiently expressing genes that encode toxic proteins, immunomodulatory molecules or anti-angiogenesis factors. Intrapleural delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors represents an efficient strategy to treat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, achieving high lung and systemic therapeutic levels of alpha1AT. Intrapleural delivery of gene transfer vectors holds promise for the treatment of diseases requiring transient, localized gene expression, as well as sustained expression of genes to correct hereditary disorders requiring localized or systemic expression of the therapeutic protein. PMID:16248279

  19. Mechanisms of protein misfolding in conformational lung diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McElvaney, N G

    2012-08-01

    Genetic or environmentally-induced alterations in protein structure interfere with the correct folding, assembly and trafficking of proteins. In the lung the expression of misfolded proteins can induce a variety of pathogenetic effects. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two major clinically relevant pulmonary disorders associated with protein misfolding. Both are genetic diseases the primary causes of which are expression of mutant alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and SERPINA1, respectively. The most common and best studied mutant forms of CFTR and AAT are ΔF508 CFTR and the Glu342Lys mutant of AAT called ZAAT, respectively. Non-genetic mechanisms can also damage protein structure and induce protein misfolding in the lung. Cigarette-smoke contains oxidants and other factors that can modify a protein\\'s structure, and is one of the most significant environmental causes of protein damage within the lung. Herein we describe the mechanisms controlling the folding of wild type and mutant versions of CFTR and AAT proteins, and explore the consequences of cigarette-smoke-induced effects on the protein folding machinery in the lung.

  20. Quantification and evaluation of the role of antielastin autoantibodies in the emphysematous lung.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Low, Teck Boon

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be an autoimmune disease. Smoking causes an imbalance of proteases and antiproteases in the lung resulting in the generation of elastin peptides that can potentially act as autoantigens. Similar to COPD, Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Z-A1ATD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) are associated with impaired pulmonary antiprotease defences leading to unopposed protease activity. Here, we show that there is a trend towards higher bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) antielastin antibody levels in COPD and Z-A1ATD and significantly lower levels in CF compared to control BALF; the lower levels in CF are due to the degradation of these antibodies by neutrophil elastase. We also provide evidence that these autoantibodies have the potential to induce T cell proliferation in the emphysematous lung. This study highlights that antielastin antibodies are tissue specific, can be detected at elevated levels in COPD and Z-A1ATD BALF despite their being no differences in their levels in plasma compared to controls, and suggests a therapeutic role for agents targeting these autoantibodies in the lungs.

  1. Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a Biomarker in COPD and Related Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Malerba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is defined as a disease characterized by persistent, progressive airflow limitation. Recent studies have underlined that COPD is correlated to many systemic manifestations, probably due to an underlying pattern of systemic inflammation. In COPD fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO levels are related to smoking habits and disease severity, showing a positive relationship with respiratory functional parameters. Moreover FeNO is increased in patients with COPD exacerbation, compared with stable ones. In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a possible cause of COPD, FeNO levels may be monitored to early detect a disease progression. FeNO measurements may be useful in clinical setting to identify the level of airway inflammation, per se and in relation to comorbidities, such as pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, either in basal conditions or during treatment. Finally, some systemic inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, have been associated with higher FeNO levels and potentially with an increased risk of developing COPD. In these systemic inflammatory diseases, FeNO monitoring may be a useful biomarker for early diagnosis of COPD development.

  2. FBG1 Is the Final Arbitrator of A1AT-Z Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, John H; Wen, Hsiang; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Glenn, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the leading cause of childhood liver failure and one of the most common lethal genetic diseases. The disease-causing mutant A1AT-Z fails to fold correctly and accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the liver, resulting in hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in a subset of patients. Furthermore, A1AT-Z sequestration in hepatocytes leads to a reduction in A1AT secretion into the serum, causing panacinar emphysema in adults. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the details by which A1AT-Z is degraded in hepatic cell lines. We identified the ubiquitin ligase FBG1, which has been previously shown to degrade proteins by both the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and autophagy, as being key to A1AT-Z degradation. Using chemical and genetic approaches we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through both the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy. Overexpression of FBG1 decreases the half-life of A1AT-Z and knocking down FBG1 in a hepatic cell line, and in mice results in an increase in ATAT. Finally, we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through a Beclin1-dependent arm of autophagy. In our model, FBG1 acts as a safety ubiquitin ligase, whose function is to re-ubiquitinate ER proteins that have previously undergone de-ubiquitination to ensure they are degraded.

  3. FBG1 Is the Final Arbitrator of A1AT-Z Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Wen

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the leading cause of childhood liver failure and one of the most common lethal genetic diseases. The disease-causing mutant A1AT-Z fails to fold correctly and accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of the liver, resulting in hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in a subset of patients. Furthermore, A1AT-Z sequestration in hepatocytes leads to a reduction in A1AT secretion into the serum, causing panacinar emphysema in adults. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the details by which A1AT-Z is degraded in hepatic cell lines. We identified the ubiquitin ligase FBG1, which has been previously shown to degrade proteins by both the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and autophagy, as being key to A1AT-Z degradation. Using chemical and genetic approaches we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through both the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy. Overexpression of FBG1 decreases the half-life of A1AT-Z and knocking down FBG1 in a hepatic cell line, and in mice results in an increase in ATAT. Finally, we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through a Beclin1-dependent arm of autophagy. In our model, FBG1 acts as a safety ubiquitin ligase, whose function is to re-ubiquitinate ER proteins that have previously undergone de-ubiquitination to ensure they are degraded.

  4. Lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane CR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available C Randall Lane, Adriano R Tonelli Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Lung transplantation is one of the few treatments available for end-stage COPD with the potential to improve survival and quality of life. The selection of candidates and timing of listing present challenges, as COPD tends to progress fairly slowly, and survival after lung transplantation remains limited. Though the natural course of COPD is difficult to predict, the use of assessments of functional status and multivariable indices such as the BODE index can help identify which patients with COPD are at increased risk for mortality, and hence which are more likely to benefit from lung transplantation. Patients with COPD can undergo either single or bilateral lung transplantation. Although many studies suggest better long-term survival with bilateral lung transplant, especially in younger patients, this continues to be debated, and definitive recommendations about this cannot be made. Patients may be more susceptible to particular complications of transplant for COPD, including native lung hyperinflation, and development of lung cancer. Keywords: emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, mortality, prognosis, outcomes, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

  5. May 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Ms. Georgann VanderJagt, RN, MSN gave an update on clinical trials at Dignity Health including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. To contact Ms. VanderJagt call her office at 602-406-3825, her cell at 602-615-2377 or by email at georgann.vaderjagt@digniftyhealth.org. Dr. Michael Smith, the surgical director for the lung transplant program at Dignity Health, gave an overview of their lung transplant program. They are currently the fifth busiest transplant program in the US. They have done 46 lung transplants so far this year. They are on a par with UCLA in number of transplants and survival has been at the National average. Average wait time ...

  6. Rare lung diseases I--Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM); subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia. LAM is a rare, progressive and (without intervention) often fatal interstitial lung disease that predominantly affects women of childbearing age. LAM is characterized by progressive interstitial infiltration of the lung by smooth muscle cells, resulting in diffuse cystic changes of the lung parenchyma. The molecular basis of this disorder has been delineated over the past five years and LAM is now known to be a consequence of mutations in the tuberous sclerosis genes. This knowledge, combined with advances in our understanding of the signalling pathways regulated by these genes, has given rise to potential molecular therapies that hold great promise for treating this devastating disease. PMID:17036091

  7. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I; Balch, William E

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

  8. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Martino Roth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cystic fibrosis (CF. Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR, through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease.

  9. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  10. Deficiência de vitamina A: relato de caso Vitamin A deficiency: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth N. Martins; Lênio Souza Alvarenga; Fábio Ancona Lopes; Gomes, José Álvaro P.; Denise de Freitas

    1999-01-01

    Relatamos um caso de deficiência primária de vitamina A com apresentação inicial ocular tratado tópica e sistemicamente com vitamina A 100.000 UI por dia via oral e colírio de 5.000 UI/ml, quatro vezes ao dia. Com o tratamento houve total resolução das manifestações oftalmológicas.We describe a case of primary vitamin A deficiency presenting with ocular manifestations, treated with 100,000 IU vitamin A oral dose and 5,000 UI vitamin A eyedrops evolving to complete resolution of the ocular fin...

  11. Deficiência de ferro na criança Iron deficiency in infants and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina A. P. Braga

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Estima-se que dois bilhões de indivíduos sejam anêmicos e que a deficiência de ferro ocorra em cerca de quatro bilhões de indivíduos, afetando a população de países desenvolvidos e, com mais intensidade, a dos países em desenvolvimento. No Brasil, estudos apontam elevada prevalência de anemia ferropriva em crianças dependendo da região e da faixa etária. A velocidade de crescimento aumentada, determinando maior necessidade de ferro, aliada a dieta inadequada em ferro e ao desmame precoce, contribuem para a elevada prevalência de anemia, principalmente nos dois primeiros anos de vida. Outros fatores de risco são apontados, como a prematuridade, o baixo peso ao nascer, a ligadura precoce do cordão umbilical e o abandono do aleitamento materno exclusivo. O impacto da deficiência de ferro no crescimento permanece controverso, uma vez que inúmeras outras variáveis poderiam contribuir para melhora ou piora do estado nutricional. Alterações no desenvolvimento psicomotor e neurocognitivo, nos lactentes deficientes com ferro, têm sido relatadas em diversos estudos, sendo controversa a recuperação após o tratamento. Há trabalhos que demonstram queda no rendimento intelectual e nas aquisições cognitivas também no período escolar e adolescência, com reversão após a terapia marcial. Entre as medidas preventivas, a educação nutricional é a forma ideal; entretanto, frente à elevada prevalência, outras formas de prevenção devem ser também utilizadas, como a suplementação com ferro e a fortificação de alimentos com ferro.Iron deficiency anemia afflicts an estimated two billion people and iron deficiency approximately 4 billion people in developed countries and is even more common in developing countries. In Brazil, depending on the region and age, studies point to high prevalences of iron-deficiency anemia in children. The high growth speed, which requires a greater amount of iron, connected with an inadequate iron

  12. Zinc deficiency potentiates induction and progression of lingual and esophageal tumors in p53-deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Louise Y.Y.; Jiang, Yubao; Farber, John L.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide;analysis;Animals;biosynthesis;chemically induced;Carcinogens;Cyclooxygenase 2;deficiency;Disease Models,Animal;Esophageal Neoplasms;Female;genetics;Gene Expression;Genetic Predisposition to Disease;Immunohistochemistry;Keratin-14;Keratins;Male;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Metallothionein;Mice;Mice,Mutant Strains;pathology;Precancerous Conditions;Research;toxicity;Tongue Neoplasms;Tumor Markers,Biological;Tumor Suppressor Protein p53;Zinc. U...

  13. Addressing Perceived Skill Deficiencies in Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jay; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.; Eckerle, Kayle; Martin, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    This article explores existing literature on perceived skill deficiencies among entry-level student affairs practitioners. Through a review of recent literature, seven perceived skill deficiencies were identified, including budgeting and financial management, strategic planning, research and assessment, legal knowledge and standards, supervision,…

  14. Chronic zinc deficiency alters chick gut microbiota composition and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under co...

  15. Functional consequences of iron deficiency in Chinese female workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, R.

    1993-01-01

    Women of the reproductive age in China play a very important role in the labour force. Information on anaemia prevalence in this group is hardly available, notwithstanding the fact that iron deficiency anaemia is considered to be a major public health problem in China. Iron deficiency may cause adve

  16. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored.

  17. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  18. Hair Loss Observed in Women and Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Dicle

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Being a common state in the society, iron deficiency might lead to an increase in the dermatological problems associated with it. Alopecia is an important finding among the patients referring to dermatology clinics but studies on different types of alopecia and their relationship with iron deficiency states are controversial and the present data are not sufficient to draw definite conclusions.

  19. Thyroid ultrasonography in congenital isolated thyroid stimulating hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamoto, H; Miyazaki, M.; Tatsumi, K; Amino, N

    1995-01-01

    The effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiency on thyroid development was examined using ultrasonography in a child with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Ultrasound revealed the thyroid gland was one sixth normal volume, suggesting that TSH plays an important part in thyroid growth, but not a critical role in differentiation.

  20. Growth hormone deficiency in a girl with the Cohen syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, G.; Dooms, L.; Vanderschueren-Lodeweyckx, M

    1991-01-01

    A girl with the Cohen syndrome and isolated growth hormone deficiency is described. Treatment with biosynthetic human growth hormone resulted in marked catch up growth to normal stature. It is concluded that growth hormone deficiency should be ruled out in patients with the Cohen syndrome and small stature.

  1. Essential fatty acid deficiency in mice impairs lactose digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovac, S.; Los, E. L.; Stellaard, F.; Rings, E. H. H. M.; Verkade, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency in mice induces fat malabsorption. We previously reported indications that the underlying mechanism is located at the level of the intestinal mucosa. We have investigated the effects of EFA deficiency on small intestinal morphology and function. Mice were fed an

  2. Clinical manifestations of mannan-binding lectin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Steffen; Frederiksen, Pernille Dorthea; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2006-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a plasma protein of the innate immune system with the ability to initiate antimicrobial and inflammatory actions. MBL deficiency is common. More than 10% of the general population may, depending on definition, be classified as MBL deficient, underlining the redundancy...

  3. Acute Psychosis: A Presentation of Cyanocobalamin Deficiency Megaloblastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. TRIPATHI; Verma, S P; Himanshu, D.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanocobalamin deficiency is not rare in India. Patients present with megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia and sometimes neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subacute combined degeneration of the cord, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychotic depression and paranoid schizophrenia are well reported. We are reporting a case of cyanocobalamine deficiency anemia who presented with acute psychosis which readily reversed on cyanocobalamin replacement.

  4. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft;

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta...

  5. Overview of Inherited Zinc Deficiency in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Taiho; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Riko; Miyazaki, Shiho

    2015-01-01

    Zinc nutrition is of special practical importance in infants and children. Poor zinc absorption causes zinc deficiency, which leads to a broad range of consequences such as alopecia, diarrhea, skin lesions, taste disorders, loss of appetite, impaired immune function and neuropsychiatric changes and growth retardation, thus potentially threatening life in infants and children. In addition to dietary zinc deficiency, inherited zinc deficiency, which rarely occurs, is found during the infant stage and early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have identified responsible genes for two inherited zinc deficiency disorders, acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) and transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD), clarifying the pathological mechanisms. Both of these zinc deficiencies are caused by mutations of zinc transporters, although the mechanisms are completely different. AE is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the ZIP4 gene, consequently resulting in defective absorption of zinc in the small intestine. In contrast, TNZD is a disorder caused by mutations of the ZnT2 gene, which results in low zinc breast milk in the mother, consequently causing zinc deficiency in the breast-fed infant. In both cases, zinc deficiency symptoms are ameliorated by a daily oral zinc supplementation for the patients. Zinc is definitely one of the key factors for the healthy growth of infants and children, and thus zinc nutrition should receive much attention. PMID:26598882

  6. Iodine deficiency, thyroid function and hearing deficit: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.; MacKenzie, I.

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency affects an estimated 241 million school-aged children in the world. Little is known about iodine deficiency in relation to auditory function, except for the fact that deaf-mutism is one of the features of cretinism. In the present review, we documented the scientific knowledge on t

  7. Iron deficiency predicts poor maternal thyroid status during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Burgi, H.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Pregnant women are often iron deficient, and iron deficiency has adverse effects on thyroid metabolism. Impaired maternal thyroid function during pregnancy may cause neurodevelopmental delays in the offspring. Objective: Our objective was to investigate whether maternal iron status is a det

  8. Hypocretin deficiency develops during onset of human narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savvidou, Andri; Knudsen, Stine; Olsson-Engman, Mia;

    2013-01-01

    Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans.......Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans....

  9. Vitamin B12 deficiency: issues in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Meiner, Sue E

    2004-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is a relatively common occurrence with potentially devastating consequences. The wide range of etiologies and symptoms makes it imperative for the nurse to use a comprehensive approach to assessing and managing the patient with vitamin B12 deficiency.

  10. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  11. Biglycan deficiency interferes with ovariectomy-induced bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina L; Allen, Matthew R; Bloomfield, Susan A;

    2003-01-01

    Biglycan is a matrix proteoglycan with a possible role in bone turnover. In a 4-week study with sham-operated or OVX biglycan-deficient or wildtype mice, we show that biglycan-deficient mice are resistant to OVX-induced trabecular bone loss and that there is a gender difference in the response to...

  12. A Rare Case of β-Ketothiolase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Modh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of β-ketothiolase deficiency, a rare disorder of amino acid metabolism. A 10 month old child presented with complaints of vomiting, convulsions, fever and altered sensorium that on investigations showed metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia and ketosis. Gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopic examination was suggestive of β-ketothiolase deficiency.

  13. Target Prolactin Range in Treatment of Tetrahydrobiopterin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Francesco; Ponzone, Alberto; Spada, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dopamine agonists for treating tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency imposes the evaluation of peripheral prolactin as the sole reliable biochemical marker of dopaminergic homeostasis. Here we provide the clinical interpretation of the previously described short prolactin profile, based on the longitudinal monitoring of 8 patients with tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency.

  14. Nutrient deficiencies of agricultural crops in Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; Bourke, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea the population is growing faster than the area under cultivation. As a result, land use is being intensified and soil nutrient depletion may occur, resulting in nutrient deficiencies of agricultural crops. This paper reviews nutrient deficiencies in the agricultural crops of Papu

  15. [Iron deficiency in elderly patients: use of biomarkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Petitcorps, Hélène; Monti, Alexandra; Pautas, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency, due to blood loss or malabsorption, is commonly observed in geriatric practice. In elderly people, association of inflammatory diseases to iron loss makes diagnosis of absolute iron deficiency sometimes difficult. In case of inflammation, the interpretation of usual biomarkers of iron deficiency (serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum iron) may be difficult. The recent discovery of the role of hepcidine in the iron homeostasis, in physiological and pathological situation, contributes to better understanding of the iron regulation. The aim of this short paper is to underline some specificities of elderly iron physiology, to explain hepcidine's role in physiological and pathological situations and to propose a diagnostic approach for a better interpretation of usual biomarkers, in order to differentiate absolute iron deficiency and functional iron deficiency.

  16. Causas genéticas de deficiência de ferro Genetic causes for iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Teresinha O. Saad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As causas genéticas de deficiência de ferro, real ou funcional, ocorrem por defeitos em muitas proteínas envolvidas na absorção e metabolismo de ferro. Neste capítulo descreveremos sucintamente causas genéticas de carência de ferro para a síntese de hemoglobina, que cursa então com anemia microcítica e hipocrômica. Ressalto que estas são alterações raras, com poucas descrições na literatura. Em alguns casos, o ferro funcional não está disponível para os eritroblastos sintetizarem hemoglobina, ou o eritroblasto é incapaz de captar ferro da circulação, mas o ferro está acumulado em tecidos ou nas mitocôndrias. Nos últimos anos, várias descobertas, principalmente oriundas de descrições em humanos ou de modelos animais, ajudaram a elucidar a implicação dos componentes do metabolismo do ferro na deficiência de ferro hereditária, que afetam desde a absorção intestinal até sua inclusão final no heme.The genetic causes of iron deficiency, real or functional, occur due to defects in many proteins involved in the absorption and metabolism of iron. In this chapter we briefly describe the genetic causes of iron deficiency in the synthesis of hemoglobin, resulting in hypochromic or microcytic anemia. These alterations are rare with few descriptions in the literature. In some cases, functional iron is not available for erythroblasts to synthesis hemoglobin, or erythroblasts may be incapable of capturing iron from the circulation although iron is accumulated in tissues and mitochondrias. Many discoveries have been made over the last few years, mainly resulting from the description of human or animal models, which have elucidated the implications of the components in iron metabolism in hereditary iron deficiency involving all processes from intestinal absorption to the final inclusion into heme.

  17. A combined marginal deficiency of copper and zinc does not exacerbate oxidant stress asssociated with copper or zinc deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both copper deficiency (Cu-def) and zinc deficiency (Zn-def) result in oxidative stress. Thus, an experiment was conducted to determine whether a marginal Zn-def amplified oxidative stress responses to a marginal Cu-def, or vice versa. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 10 ...

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula; Iruzubieta; lvaro; Terán; Javier; Crespo; Emilio; Fábrega

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis,but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation,has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties.Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)and chronic hepatitis C(CHC)virus infection.The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known,but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases.Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease.Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required.

  19. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  20. Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta synthase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A two year-old male child presented with cutis marmorata congenita universalis, brittle hair, mild mental retardation, and finger spasms. Biochemical findings include increased levels of homocysteine in the blood-106.62 µmol/L (normal levels: 5.90-16µmol/L. Biochemical tests such as the silver nitroprusside and nitroprusside tests were positive suggesting homocystinuria. The patient was treated with oral pyridoxine therapy for three months. The child responded well to this therapy and the muscle spasms as well as skin manifestations such as cutis marmorata subsided. The treatment is being continued; the case is reported here because of its rarity. Homocysteinuria arising due to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of methionine metabolism that produces increased levels of urinary homocysteine and methionine It manifests itself in vascular, central nervous system, cutaneous, and connective tissue disturbances and phenotypically resembles Marfan′s syndrome. Skin manifestations include malar flush, thin hair, and cutis reticulata / marmorata.

  1. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  2. The management of cochlear nerve deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S R; Stivaros, S M; Ramsden, R T; O'Driscoll, M P; Nichani, J R; Bruce, I A; Green, K M; Henderson, L A; Rutherford, S A; King, A T; Lloyd, S K

    2013-11-01

    The assessment process is critical in deciding whether a profoundly deaf child with cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) will be suitable for a cochlear or auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using submillimetric T2 weighted gradient echo or turbo spin echo sequences is mandatory for all profoundly deaf children to diagnose CND. Evidence of audition on behavioural or electrophysiological tests following both auditory and electrical stimulation sometimes allows identification of significant auditory tissue not visible on MRI. In particular electric auditory brainstem response (EABR) testing may allow some quantification of auditory tissue and help decide whether a cochlear implant will be beneficial. Age and cognitive development are the most critical factors in determining ABI benefit. Hearing outcomes from both cochlear implants and ABIs are variable and likely to be limited in children with CND. A proportion of children will get no benefit. Usually the implants would be expected to provide recognition of environmental sounds and understanding of simple phonetics. Most children will not develop normal speech and they will often need to learn to communicate with sign language. The ABI involves a major neurosurgical procedure and at present the long term outcomes are unknown. It is therefore essential that parents who are considering this intervention have plenty of time to consider all aspects and the opportunity for in depth discussion. PMID:24533760

  3. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Mao

    Full Text Available Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3 activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50% of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%, and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations. In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  4. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C; Minshall, Richard D; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  5. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22894609

  6. Magnesium deficiency in plants: An urgent problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although magnesium (Mg is one of the most important nutrients, involved in many enzyme activities and the structural stabilization of tissues, its importance as a macronutrient ion has been overlooked in recent decades by botanists and agriculturists, who did not regard Mg deficiency (MGD in plants as a severe health problem. However, recent studies have shown, surprisingly, that Mg contents in historical cereal seeds have markedly declined over time, and two thirds of people surveyed in developed countries received less than their minimum daily Mg requirement. Thus, the mechanisms of response to MGD and ways to increase Mg contents in plants are two urgent practical problems. In this review, we discuss several aspects of MGD in plants, including phenotypic and physiological changes, cell Mg2 + homeostasis control by Mg2 + transporters, MGD signaling, interactions between Mg2 + and other ions, and roles of Mg2 + in plant secondary metabolism. Our aim is to improve understanding of the influence of MGD on plant growth and development and to advance crop breeding for Mg enrichment.

  7. PRIMARY IMMUNE DEFICIENCIES – PRINCIPLES OF CARE

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    Helen eChapel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary Immune Deficiencies (PIDs are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components (mainly cells and proteins. Once recognised, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness and facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialised centres, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organisations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin (Ig therapies and HSCT, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients world-wide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services.

  8. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  9. The epidemic of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shazia; Panunti, Brandy; Andrews, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was referred to our endocrine clinic for management of her long-standing hypothyroidism. Her main complaints were muscle aches and pains that started about a year ago. The symptoms progressed to generalized muscle weakness. She described difficulty in getting out of her chair and in climbing stairs. She had an extensive work-up done by her neurologist and rheumatologist, including nerve-conduction studies and a muscle biopsy. The evaluation was normal, and she was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. She had gastric bypass surgery in 1998 and lost 150 pounds since the operation. She also has had lactose intolerance and a compression fracture without trauma. Her weight was 314 pounds. She had proximal muscle weakness. The rest of her physical examination was normal. Serum laboratory values are listed in Table 1. Based on the laboratory values, she was diagnosed as having severe vitamin D deficiency. She was started on 50,000 IU of vitamin D2 (Ergocalciferol) once a week for 6 months. Now her 25 hydroxyvitamin D level is 40 ng/mL, and her muscle strength has improved. PMID:17396471

  10. Primary immune deficiencies - principles of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Helen; Prevot, Johan; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Español, Teresa; Bonilla, Francisco A; Solis, Leire; Drabwell, Josina

    2014-01-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components, mainly cells and proteins. Once recognized, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious, or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness or facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialized centers, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organizations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin therapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients worldwide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services. PMID:25566243

  11. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  12. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  13. Correction of Iron Deficiency in the Cardiorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald S. Silverberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired energy metabolism is a feature of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF. Iron deficiency has been shown to reduce energy production in the cell in animals and humans. Iron deficiency is common in both Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD and in CHF. Recent studies suggest that iron deficiency is an independent risk factor for mortality in CHF. Studies of correction of the anemia with intravenous (IV iron in both CKD and CHF have shown an improvement in the anemia and, in some cases, in the renal function as well. Some CHF studies of correction of the iron deficiency have shown an improvement in cardiac function and structure as well as in exercise capacity and quality of life. This occurred independent of whether or not they had anemia, suggesting that the iron deficiency itself may be independently contributing to the worsening of the CHF and CKD. If future long-term studies confirm the safety and efficacy of IV iron in the treatment of iron deficiency in CKD and CHF, this will become a new addition to the therapeutic armamentarium of the cardiorenal syndrome, and parameters of iron deficiency will become part of the routine measurements performed in both CKD and CHF whether or not the patient is anemic.

  14. Zinc deficiency among a healthy population in Baghdad, Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence of zinc deficiency and the current zinc status among a sample selected from the healthy population in Baghdad, Iraq. We carried out a community-based study in Baghdad City, Iraq from November through June 2002. We selected a sample of 2090 healthy subjects (aged 1 month to 85 years). We used a pre-tested questionnaire, designed to obtain information on gender, birth dates, height, weight, residence, habitual food consumption patterns, and social status. We performed laboratory assessment of serum zinc level, dietary assessment of food frequency and usual zinc intake. We considered subjects with serum zinc concentration of /-7.7 to 12.3 umol/l mild to moderately zinc deficient. The prevalence of zinc deficiency among the studied sample was 2.7%. We found mild to moderate zinc deficiency among 55.7% of the study sample. Dietary zinc intake assessment showed that 74.8% of the studied sample consumed less than the recommended intake, and in 62.3%, the intakes were deficient and grossly deficient. Mean daily zinc ranged from 5.2 mg in children to 8.5 mg in adults. We observed a high prevalence of mild to moderate zinc deficiency, with inadequate dietary zinc intake among a considerable proportion of the studied sample. Zinc supplementation may be an effective public health intervention means to improve the zinc status of the population. (author)

  15. On Potassium Deficiency in Cotton– Disorder, Cause and Tissue Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhong Dong

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available As modern cotton varieties including Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis transgenic cotton are adopted and yield per unit area continues to increase, potassium deficiency is occurring with rising frequency in many cotton-growing countries. Symptoms of K deficiencies used to occur at the bottom of the plant on the older or mature leaves, but more recently described symptoms show up on young leaves near the top of the plant. Potassium deficiency induces numerous disorders in cotton, including decreased leaf area index, photosynthesis and plant biomass, but enhances specific leaf weight and earliness of maturity. Low supply and uptake of K, adoption of modern cotton varieties particularly Bt transgenic cotton, and environmental stress are obvious contributors to potassium deficiency. Single leaf photosynthesis (Pn reduction results mainly from decreased stomatal conductance, low chlorophyl content, poor chloroplast ultrastructure, restricted saccharide translocation, and decreased synthesis of RuBP carboxylase under K deficient conditions. Canopy photosynthesis reduction in K-deficient plants is mainly attributed to both inhibited single leaf Pn rate and decreased leaf area index. Potassium concentrations in both blade and petiole of top fully expanded leaves on main stem are good indicators of K deficiency.

  16. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  17. INCIDENCE OF ERYTHROCYTE GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE- DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY

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    Sh. Rahbar

    1974-06-01

    The fluorescent spot technique was used for screening and qualitative determination of G-6-PD in erythrocytes. This technique was compared with other methods of G-6-PD enzyme assay and proved to be very reliable. Qualitative enzyme estimation was carried out with spectrophotometer methods. A total of 738 specimens tested and some degree of enzyme deficiencies were detected. In 20 specimens there was a complete enzyme deficiency and in 5 cases the enzyme activity was between 15 to 50 percent of normal subject. The data suggests, the blood bank should be warned of transfusion of enzyme deficient bloods to the patients with fauvism.

  18. Deficiencies of readily plant available water in Gleyic Chernozems (Pachic)

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Kozłowski; Jolanta Komisarek

    2013-01-01

    The study presents the results of research on the deficiencies of water content in the Gleyic Chernozems (Pachic) of the central part of Wielkopolska during 2009-2011. The objective was to determine the soil water deficiencies in relation to the lower limit of plant available water (LLPAW) calculated at matric potential of –31 kPa (LLPAW31), –49 kPa (LLPAW49), –59 kPa (LLPAW59) and –88 kPa (LLPAW88). The research results indicate that the crop water deficiency and the ...

  19. GPI Mount Scopus--a variant of glucosephosphate isomerase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, O; Shalev, R S; Forman, L; Beutler, E

    1993-10-01

    Glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an unusual cause of hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. The disease, inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder, is most often manifested by symptoms and signs of chronic hemolysis, ameliorated by splenectomy. We recently diagnosed GPI deficiency in a 23-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish man who displayed the typical clinical course of this disorder. The biophysical characteristics of the GPI variant are slow electrophoretic mobility, presence of only one of the two bands normally present, and extreme thermolability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of GPI deficiency in a patient of Jewish descent, and we propose to designate this enzyme variant "GPI Mount Scopus".

  20. Sleep Deficiency and Deprivation Leading to Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kohansieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays a vital role in an individual’s mental, emotional, and physiological well-being. Not only does sleep deficiency lead to neurological and psychological disorders, but also the literature has explored the adverse effects of sleep deficiency on the cardiovascular system. Decreased quantity and quality of sleep have been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We explore the literature correlating primary sleep deficiency and deprivation as a cause for cardiovascular disease and cite endothelial dysfunction as a common underlying mechanism.