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Sample records for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency pizz

  1. Survival in severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Jan-Åke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of the natural history of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency are mostly based on highly selected patients. The aim of this study was to analyse the mortality of PiZZ individuals. Methods Data from 1339 adult PiZZ individuals from the Swedish National AAT Deficiency Registry, followed from 1991 to 2008, were analysed. Forty-three percent of these individuals were identified by respiratory symptoms (respiratory cases, 32% by liver diseases and other diseases (non-respiratory cases and 25% by screening (screened cases. Smoking status was divided into two groups: smokers 737 (55% and 602 (45% never-smokers. Results During the follow-up 315 individuals (24% died. The standardised mortality rate (SMR for respiratory cases was 4.70 (95% Confidence Interval (CI 4.10-5.40, 3.0 (95%CI 2.35-3.70 for the non-respiratory cases and 2.30 (95% CI 1.46-3.46 for the screened cases. The smokers had a higher mortality risk than never-smokers, with a SMR of 4.80 (95%CI 4.20-5.50 for the smokers and 2.80(95%CI 2.30-3.40 for the never-smokers. The Rate Ratio (RR was 1.70 (95% CI 1.35-2.20. Also among the screened cases, the mortality risk for the smokers was significantly higher than in the general Swedish population (SMR 3.40 (95% CI 1.98-5.40. Conclusion Smokers with severe AAT deficiency, irrespective of mode of identification, have a significantly higher mortality risk than the general Swedish population.

  2. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency usually is diagnosed after you develop a ... related to the condition. Your doctor may suspect AAT deficiency if you have signs or symptoms of ...

  3. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  4. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  5. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  6. [Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelier, Aquiles A; Winter, Daniel Hugo; Jardim, José Roberto; Barboza, Carlos Eduardo Galvão; Cukier, Alberto; Miravitlles, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues. PMID:18695797

  7. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  8. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevented? You can't prevent alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency because the condition is inherited (passed from ... children through genes). If you inherit two faulty AAT genes, you'll have AAT deficiency. Even so, ...

  9. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy. PMID:26238635

  10. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy for treating patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease. People who smoke are more seriously affected and have a greater risk of dying from the disease.......Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease. People who smoke are more seriously affected and have a greater risk of dying from the disease....

  11. Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, I; Lipsker, D; Lara, B; Janciauskiene, S

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a very rare disease. Its estimated prevalence is 1 in 1000 subjects with severe AATD (usually white individuals with a Pi*ZZ genotype). It is manifested clinically by painful recurrent ulcerating subcutaneous nodules, and characterized histologically by dense infiltrates of neutrophils in the deep dermis and connective-tissue septae, with secondary lobular panniculitis. It may be the only clinical manifestation of AATD, although it can also occur together with the classical pulmonary or hepatic manifestations of the disease. AATD-associated panniculitis is not only very rare but may also be significantly underdiagnosed. The physician managing a case of panniculitis with a clinical presentation suggestive of AATD and a compatible skin biopsy should measure serum AAT concentration and, if low, determine the AAT phenotype by isoelectric focusing. If uncertainty remains, the SERPINA1 gene should be sequenced to identify the genotype. If AATD is diagnosed, AATD testing of first-degree family members should be performed in order to take appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures, including genetic counselling, education on inheritance, risk arising from tobacco smoke, occupational exposure to pollutants and hepatotoxic substances, and the provision of information on clinical management. Cases of panniculitis in which conventional therapy with dapsone has failed may be managed with intravenous augmentative therapy using human AAT. The current manuscript addresses the fundamental concepts of the pathogenesis of AATD-associated panniculitis and describes the clinical presentation and management of cases in order to reduce underdiagnosis and improve outcomes. PMID:26595240

  12. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  13. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  14. Familial alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency cases that are diagnosed in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayan, Y; Çağın, Y F; Erdoğan, M A; Bestas, R; Aladag, M

    2016-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder leading to severe lung and liver diseases worldwide. An accumulation of insoluble heterodimer AAT molecules in hepatocytes is the main cause of liver disorders. The most commonly detected allele worldwide is the PIMM allele, which fulfills the AAT function. The most common missing variant is PiZZ. Serum AAT level is a beneficial but not a reliable determinant for diagnosis. Liver biopsy yields more reliable results. AAT deficiency has no specific treatment. The only treatment modality in children with end stage liver disease is the hepatic transplant. We wanted to present in our article four cases from same family, diagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsindeficiency in adulthood. PMID:26852765

  15. A rare case of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent pulmonary thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT belongs to the family of serpins (serine protease inhibitors. Loop sheet polymerization is the pathology behind serpinopathies which encompasses AAT, anti-thrombin III and neuroserpin deficiency. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent pulmonary thrombosis without any concomitant use of drugs.

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: increasing awareness and improving diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus F

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary disorder that is characterized by a low serum level of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT). The loss of anti-inflammatory and antiproteolytic functions, together with pro-inflammatory effects of polymerized AAT contribute to protein degradation and increased inflammation resulting in an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema, especially in smokers. AATD is a rare disease that is significantly underdiagnosed. According to recent data that are based on extrapolations, in many countries only 5-15% of homozygous individuals have been identified. Furthermore, the diagnostic delay typically exceeds 5 years, resulting in an average age at diagnosis of about 45 years. Although the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society recommendations state that all symptomatic adults with persistent airway obstruction should be screened, these recommendations are not being followed. Potential reasons for that include missing knowledge about the disease and the appropriate tests, and the low awareness of physicians with regard to the disorder. Once the decision to initiate testing has been made, a screening test (AAT serum level or other) should be performed. Further diagnostic evaluation is based on the following techniques: polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for frequent and clinically important mutations, isoelectric focusing (IEF) with or without immunoblotting, and sequencing of the gene locus coding for AAT. Various diagnostic algorithms have been published for AATD detection (severe deficiency or carrier status). Modern laboratory approaches like the use of serum separator cards, a lateral flow assay to detect the Z-protein, and a broader availability of next-generation sequencing are recent advances, likely to alter existing algorithms. PMID:26341117

  17. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  18. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: a clinical-genetic overview

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    Abboud RT

    2011-03-01

    in patients with chronic irreversible airflow obstruction, especially in those with early onset of disease or positive family history. Testing is also recommended for immediate family members of those with AATD, asthmatics with persistent airflow obstruction, and infants and older subjects with unexplained liver disease. There are over 100 different AAT gene variants; most are rare and only some are associated with clinical disease.Keywords: AAT, AATD, ZZ, early onset emphysema, panacinar emphysema, neonatal jaundice and hepatitis, childhood liver disease, genetics of alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antitrypsin laboratory testing and phenotyping

  19. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency in Infants with Neonatal Cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Monajemzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD is the most important indication for liver transplantation in children. The gene frequencies vary in different ethnic groups. In the present study, we attempt to determine the frequencies of the most common defective alleles, Z and S, in Iranian children suffering from idiopathic neonatal cholestasis. Eighty-seven infants were typed for Z and S alleles.Methods: In a single center study, 87 consecutive liver biopsies from infants with cholestasis were reviewed and patients with neonatal cholestasis enrolled in the study and cases with confirmed biliary tract atresia excluded. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded blocks were used for DNA extraction. AAT genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and amplification of the two most common deficiency variants, S and Z alleles, and then sequencing of PCR products.Findings: There were 48 (55.2% males and 39 (44.8% females, with a median age of 60 days. Out of 87 of the study subject, 2 (2.2% were heterozygous for the S allele, and no ZZ, SS or MZ individual was found in the patients. No other polymorphism was found in the sequencing results.Conclusion: In comparison to other populations, AAT deficiency seems not to be an important etiologic factor for neonatal cholestatic liver disease in Iran; however, further studies are recommended to estimate the true mutant gene frequencies.

  20. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and its clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolk Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a genetic disorder that manifests as pulmonary emphysema, liver cirrhosis and, rarely, as the skin disease panniculitis, and is characterized by low serum levels of AAT, the main protease inhibitor (PI in human serum. The prevalence in Western Europe and in the USA is estimated at approximately 1 in 2,500 and 1 : 5,000 newborns, and is highly dependent on the Scandinavian descent within the population. The most common deficiency alleles in North Europe are PI Z and PI S, and the majority of individuals with severe AATD are PI type ZZ. The clinical manifestations may widely vary between patients, ranging from asymptomatic in some to fatal liver or lung disease in others. Type ZZ and SZ AATD are risk factors for the development of respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea, coughing, early onset emphysema, and airflow obstruction early in adult life. Environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, and dust exposure are additional risk factors and have been linked to an accelerated progression of this condition. Type ZZ AATD may also lead to the development of acute or chronic liver disease in childhood or adulthood: prolonged jaundice after birth with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and abnormal liver enzymes are characteristic clinical signs. Cirrhotic liver failure may occur around age 50. In very rare cases, necrotizing panniculitis and secondary vasculitis may occur. AATD is caused by mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding AAT, and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The diagnosis can be established by detection of low serum levels of AAT and isoelectric focusing. Differential diagnoses should exclude bleeding disorders or jaundice, viral infection, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. For treatment of lung disease, intravenous alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy, annual flu vaccination and a pneumococcal vaccine every 5 years are recommended. Relief of breathlessness

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first lung-related symptoms of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency may include shortness of breath, less ability ... and weight loss. Some people who have severe AAT deficiency develop emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma)—often ...

  2. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. METHODS: We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. RESULTS: The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  3. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2011-07-13

    Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. Methods We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. Results The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  4. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Saleh, Aarash D; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate-and therefore polymerize-more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the "breach" region and "shutter" region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care. PMID:26091018

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis and the Lung Disease Associated with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two of the commonest lethal hereditary lung diseases affecting white individuals. Although having quite different phenotypic extrapulmonary presentations, the lung disease associated with these conditions is exemplified by a neutrophil-dominated inflammation in which neutrophil elastase plays a major role. In AAT deficiency the diminution of the anti-neutrophil elastase protection, due to diminished AAT levels in the lung, predisposes the lung to an unopposed neutrophil elastase attack, whereas, in cystic fibrosis, the levels of AAT and other antiproteases are normal, but the neutrophil elastase burden is so large that it overwhelms the normal anti-neutrophil elastase protection. With this as background, it seems logical to augment the anti-neutrophil elastase defenses of the lung in both conditions using exogenous AAT. The type of AAT, the route of administration, and the physiologic, radiologic, and clinical readouts for this type of therapy are discussed, along with the similarities and differences between the two conditions and their responses to AAT therapy. PMID:27115956

  6. Risk factors for symptom onset in PI*Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Annyce S; James K. Stoller; Vedal, Sverre; Ruttenber, A James; Strand, Matt; Sandhaus, Robert A.; Newman, Lee S

    2006-01-01

    Background In an early study of highly symptomatic patients with PI*Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT), tobacco smoking was identified as a risk factor by comparing the age of symptom onset in smokers and nonsmokers. Age of symptom onset has not been well studied in relationship to other environmental exposures. Methods Environmental exposures were assessed in 313 PI*Z adults through retrospective self-administered questionnaire. Age of onset of symptoms with and without these exposures w...

  7. The parallel lives of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Trapnell, Bruce C.; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In 1963, five cases of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency were reported in the scientific literature, as well as an attempt to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by a massive washing of the lung (whole lung lavage). Now, fifty years later, it seems the ideal moment not only to commemorate these publications, but also to point out the influence both papers had in the following decades and how knowledge on these two fascinating rare respiratory disorders progressed over the years. This paper is th...

  8. Alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in deficient individuals enrolled in the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Adriano R Tonelli1, Farshid Rouhani1, Ning Li2, Pam Schreck1, Mark L Brantly11Alpha-1 Research Program, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAIntroduction: Intravenous augmentation therapy with purified intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin replaces the deficient protein and is the only currently approved treatment for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT...

  9. Prognosis of patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency on long-term oxygen therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Seersholm, Niels; Perch, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data on patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency (AATD) on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is sparse. The aim of this study was to present the incidence of patients with AATD on LTOT, and compare their characteristics, comorbidities and prognosis (lung transplantation, termination.......001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with COPD without AATD, AATD patients are younger, more often males, have a lower prevalence of cardio-vascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, and higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Moreover, they have better prognosis, partly due to greater chance of receiving a lung transplantation....

  10. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  11. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alpha 1 -antitrypsin; A1AT; AAT Formal name: Alpha 1 Antitrypsin; α1-antitrypsin Related ... know? How is it used? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) testing is used to help diagnose alpha-1 ...

  12. [Hereditary deficiency of alpha 1- antitrypsin in rats due to evolving chronic lung pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveva, N A; Grishaeva, O N; Parik, Iu Ia; Kosova, E Iu; Korolenko, T A

    1994-01-01

    W/SSM rats which are characterized by hereditary abnormal changes in the lungs, hepato- and splenomegalia and some other disturbances have also alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. A study of AAT in these rats by means of isoelectrofocusing and immunoblotting with anti-AAT antibodies labelled with peroxidase has demonstrated that deficiency of the protease inhibitor is not associated with any disturbances of its synthesis or any changes of its electrophoretic properties. A higher activity of lysosomal glycosidases and proteinases was found in the liver and leukocytes of W/SSM rats. It is suggested that AAT deficiency is due to its modification under the influence of lysosomal enzymes. The described biochemical distances seem to be associated with an increased hexose transport into the cells, which is controlled by a mutant gene. PMID:7513577

  13. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona McLean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caitriona McLean*, Catherine M Greene*, Noel G McElvaneyRespiratory Research Division, Dept. Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland; *Each of these authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys. ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and RNA interference (RNAi, which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, siRNA, peptide nucleic acid, ribozymes

  14. Emergence of a Stage-Dependent Human Liver Disease Signature with Directed Differentiation of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient iPS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Wilson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an inexhaustible source of cells for modeling disease and testing drugs. Here we develop a bioinformatic approach to detect differences between the genomic programs of iPSCs derived from diseased versus normal human cohorts as they emerge during in vitro directed differentiation. Using iPSCs generated from a cohort carrying mutations (PiZZ in the gene responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, we find that the global transcriptomes of PiZZ iPSCs diverge from normal controls upon differentiation to hepatic cells. Expression of 135 genes distinguishes PiZZ iPSC-hepatic cells, providing potential clues to liver disease pathogenesis. The disease-specific cells display intracellular accumulation of mutant AAT protein, resulting in increased autophagic flux. Furthermore, we detect beneficial responses to the drug carbamazepine, which further augments autophagic flux, but adverse responses to known hepatotoxic drugs. Our findings support the utility of iPSCs as tools for drug development or prediction of toxicity.

  15. Infected tracheal diverticulum: a rare association with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Beatriz Alves Amaral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal diverticulum, defined as a benign outpouching of the tracheal wall, is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. It can be congenital or acquired in origin, and most cases are asymptomatic, typically being diagnosed postmortem. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who was hospitalized after presenting with fever, fatigue, pleuritic chest pain, and a right neck mass complicated by dysphagia. Her medical history was significant: pulmonary emphysema (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; bronchiectasis; and thyroidectomy. On physical examination, she presented diminished breath sounds and muffled heart sounds, with a systolic murmur. Laboratory tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers, a CT scan showed an air-filled, multilocular mass in the right tracheal wall, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the CT findings. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy failed to reveal any abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal diverticulum. The treatment approach was conservative, consisting mainly of antibiotics. After showing clinical improvement, the patient was discharged.

  16. Impaired hepcidin expression in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with iron overload and progressive liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benedikt; Haschka, David; Finkenstedt, Armin; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Theurl, Igor; Henninger, Benjamin; Janecke, Andreas R; Wang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Herbert Y; Veits, Lothar; Vogel, Wolfgang; Weiss, Günter; Franke, Andre; Zoller, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    Liver disease due to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is associated with hepatic iron overload in a subgroup of patients. The underlying cause for this association is unknown. The aim of the present study was to define the genetics of this correlation and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) on the expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Full exome and candidate gene sequencing were carried out in a family with A1ATD and hepatic iron overload. Regulation of hepcidin expression by A1AT was studied in primary murine hepatocytes. Cells co-transfected with hemojuvelin (HJV) and matriptase-2 (MT-2) were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Observed familial clustering of hepatic iron overload with A1ATD suggests a genetic cause, but genotypes known to be associated with hemochromatosis were absent. Individuals homozygous for the A1AT Z-allele with environmental or genetic risk factors such as steatosis or heterozygosity for the HAMP non-sense mutation p.Arg59* presented with severe hepatic siderosis. In hepatocytes, A1AT induced hepcidin mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments in overexpressing cells show that A1AT reduces cleavage of the hepcidin inducing bone morphogenetic protein co-receptor HJV via inhibition of the membrane-bound serine protease MT-2. The acute-phase protein A1AT is an inducer of hepcidin expression. Through this mechanism, A1ATD could be a trigger of hepatic iron overload in genetically predisposed individuals or patients with environmental risk factors for hepatic siderosis. PMID:26310624

  17. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Serres Frederick

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations

  18. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    de Serres Frederick; Lara Beatriz; Blanco Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  20. Historical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in respiratory and hepatic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen

    2016-09-10

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a heritable disease that is commonly associated with complications in the respiratory and hepatic systems. AAT acts as a regulatory enzyme that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase activity thus protecting tissues from proteolytic damage after inflammation. This paper provides a historical review of the discovery, classification, phenotypic expression, and treatment of AAT deficiency. While its pattern of inheritance has been long understood, the underlying mechanism between AAT deficiency and related diseases remains to be elucidated. Most commonly, AAT deficiency is associated with the development of emphysema in the lungs as well as various liver injuries. Cigarette smoke has been shown to be particularly detrimental in AAT deficient individuals during the development of lung disease. Therefore, understanding familial history may be beneficial when educating patients regarding lifestyle choices. While numerous AAT deficient phenotypes exist in the human populations, only specific variants have been proven to markedly predispose individuals to lung and liver disorders. The exact relationship between AAT levels and the aforementioned diseases is an essential area of further research. It is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike strive to standardize diagnostic criteria and develop safe and effective therapies for this genetic disease. PMID:26768576

  1. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 modifies endoplasmic reticulum stress in Z variant alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-06-19

    Z alpha(1)-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected with the mutant form of AAT, a ZAAT transgene. We evaluated levels of NFkappaB activity as a marker of the ER overload response. To determine the effect of selenium supplementation on the function of SEPS1, we investigated glutathione peroxidase activity, grp78 promoter activity, and NFkappaB activity in the presence or absence of selenium. SEPS1 reduced levels of active ATF6. Overexpression of SEPS1 also inhibited grp78 promoter and NFkappaB activity, and this effect was enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. This finding demonstrates a role for SEPS1 in ZAAT deficiency and suggests a possible therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation.

  2. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, Caitriona

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys). ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and RNA interference (RNAi), which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.

  3. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  4. Is There a Therapeutic Role for Selenium in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel G. McElvaney

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace mineral of fundamental importance to human health. Much of its beneficial influence is attributed to its presence within selenoproteins, a group of proteins containing the rare amino acid selenocysteine. There are 25 known human selenoproteins including glutathione peroxidases, thioredoxin reductases and selenoproteins. Selenoprotein S (SEPS1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER resident selenoprotein involved in the removal of misfolded proteins from the ER. SEPS1 expression can be induced by ER stress, an event that is associated with conformational disorders and occurs due to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the ER. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, also known as genetic emphysema, is a conformational disorder in which the roles of ER stress, SEPS1 and selenium have been investigated. SEPS1 can relieve ER stress in an in vitro model of AAT deficiency by reducing levels of active ATF6 and inhibiting grp78 promoter- and NFκB activity; some of these effects are enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. Other studies examining the molecular mechanisms by which selenium mediates its anti-inflammatory effects have identified a role for prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 in targeting NFκB and PPARγ. Together these ER stress-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties suggest a therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation in genetic emphysema.

  5. Aberrant disulphide bonding contributes to the ER retention of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Riccardo; Berardelli, Romina; Medicina, Daniela; Sitia, Roberto; Gooptu, Bibek; Fra, Anna Maria

    2016-02-15

    Mutations in alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) can cause the protein to polymerise and be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. The ensuing systemic AAT deficiency leads to pulmonary emphysema, while intracellular polymers are toxic and cause chronic liver disease. The severity of this process varies considerably between individuals, suggesting the involvement of mechanistic co-factors and potential for therapeutically beneficial interventions. We show in Hepa1.6 cells that the mildly polymerogenic I (Arg39Cys) AAT mutant forms aberrant inter- and intra-molecular disulphide bonds involving the acquired Cys39 and the only cysteine residue in the wild-type (M) sequence (Cys232). Substitution of Cys39 to serine partially restores secretion, showing that disulphide bonding contributes to the intracellular retention of I AAT. Covalent homodimers mediated by inter-Cys232 bonding alone are also observed in cells expressing the common Z and other polymerising AAT variants where conformational behaviour is abnormal, but not in those expressing M AAT. Prevention of such disulphide linkage through the introduction of the Cys232Ser mutation or by treatment of cells with reducing agents increases Z AAT secretion. Our results reveal that disulphide interactions enhance intracellular accumulation of AAT mutants and implicate the oxidative ER state as a pathogenic co-factor. Redox modulation, e.g. by anti-oxidant strategies, may therefore be beneficial in AAT deficiency-associated liver disease. PMID:26647313

  6. Is PiSS Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Associated with Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn McGee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT is an inherited condition that predisposes to lung and/or liver disease. Objective. The current study examined the clinical features of the PiSS genotype. Methods. Nineteen study participants (PiSS and 29 matched control participants (PiMM were telephone interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Demographic features, cigarette smoking, vocation, medication history, and clinical diagnoses were compared. Statistical analysis was performed. Finally, a comprehensive literature review was performed by two investigators. Results. 12/19 (63.2% study participants reported the presence of lung and/or liver disease compared to 12/29 (41.4% control participants. There trended toward having a higher frequency of medication allergies in the study population (42.11% versus 20.69%. Conclusions. The PiSS genotype was associated with a similar incidence of obstructive lung disease to controls. Selective bias intrinsic in testing for AAT deficiency and the rarity of the PiSS genotype will make future study of this association dependent on population-based tests.

  7. Suspecting and Testing for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-An Allergist's and/or Immunologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary, monogenic disorder with no unique clinical features. AATD can be difficult to diagnose as patients commonly present with respiratory symptoms often mistaken for other respiratory syndromes such as asthma or smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In addition, symptoms related to AATD may also affect other organs, including the liver, vasculature, and skin. The severity of AATD varies between individuals, and in severe cases, the irreversible lung damage can develop into emphysema. Early diagnosis is critical to enable the implementation of lifestyle changes and therapeutic options that can slow further deterioration of pulmonary tissue. Once AATD is suspected, a range of tests are available (serum alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor [A1-PI] level measurement, phenotyping, genotyping, gene sequencing) for confirming AATD. Currently, intravenous infusion of A1-PI is the only therapy that directly addresses the underlying cause of AATD, and has demonstrated efficacy in a recent randomized, placebo-controlled trial. This review discusses the etiology, testing, and management of AATD from the allergist's and/or immunologist's perspective. It aims to raise awareness of the condition among physicians who care for people with obstructive lung disorders and are therefore likely to see patients with obstructive lung disease that may, in fact, prove to be AATD. PMID:26032475

  8. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chotirmall, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Sanjay H Chotirmall,1 Mazen Al-Alawi,2 Thomas McEnery,2 Noel G McElvaney2 1Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the...

  9. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles A Camelier

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que determina polimerização e acúmulo dentro dos hepatócitos. O acúmulo e a conseqüente redução dos níveis séricos de alfa-1 antitripsina determinam, respectivamente, doença hepática e pulmonar, sendo que esta se manifesta principalmente sob a forma de enfisema de aparecimento precoce, habitualmente com predomínio basal. O diagnóstico envolve a detecção de níveis séricos reduzidos de alfa-1 antitripsina e a confirmação fenotípica. Além do tratamento usual para doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, existe atualmente uma terapia específica com infusão de concentrados de alfa-1 antitripsina. Essa terapia de reposição, aparentemente segura, ainda não teve a eficácia clínica definitivamente comprovada, e o custo-efetividade também é um tema controverso e ainda pouco abordado. Apesar da sua importância, não existem dados epidemiológicos brasileiros a respeito da prevalência da doença ou da freqüência de ocorrência dos alelos deficientes. O subdiagnóstico também tem sido uma importante limitação tanto para o estudo da doença quanto para o tratamento adequado dos pacientes. Espera-se que a criação do Registro Internacional de Alfa-1 venha a resolver essas e outras importantes questões.Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical

  10. Correction: Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Berden, J.H.M.; Luisetti, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  11. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J; Veldhuisen, B; Annovazzi, L; Zanone, C; Versteeg, EM; van Kuppevelt, TH; Nieuwenhuizen, W; Iadarola, P; Luisetti, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  12. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Luisetti, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  13. Regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion has been determined of 13 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Eight patients had alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (α1ATD). Ventilation studies were carried out using xenon-133 (133Xe) and krypton-81m (sup(81m)Kr) gases. Trapping indices were determined from the wash-out part of the xenon ventilation studies. Results obtained from patients were compared with those of normal controls. Ventilation studies with sup(81m)Kr showed pulmonary changes more clearly than did 133Xe studies and the trapping of radio-xenon was more extensive in lung bases than in apices whether or not the patients had α1 ATD. The distribution of perfusion followed a pattern similar to that of ventilation, but did not differ statistically from that of the normal controls. (orig.)

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-α driven inflammation in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a new model of pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Killian; Reeves, Emer P; Carroll, Tomás P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has traditionally been thought of as a genetic disorder characterized by lung destruction and early emphysema in a low AAT, and high neutrophil elastase (NE) environment in the lungs of affected individuals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has emerged to support the hypothesis that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is essential in the pathogenesis of both genetic AATD and non-genetic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reports have highlighted the importance of TNF-α driven immune cell dysfunction in the development of lung disease in AATD. The authors discuss the role of AAT as a key modulator of TNF-α signaling firstly in the setting of AATD and secondly in other conditions where AAT augmentation therapy has potential utility as a novel therapy. PMID:26634397

  15. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotirmall SH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay H Chotirmall,1 Mazen Al-Alawi,2 Thomas McEnery,2 Noel G McElvaney2 1Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the natural physiological inhibitor of several proteases, most importantly neutrophil elastase (NE, it plays a key role in maintaining pulmonary protease–antiprotease balance. In deficient states, unrestrained NE activity promotes damage to the lung matrix, causing structural defects and impairing host defenses. The commonest form of AAT deficiency results in a mutated Z AAT that is abnormally folded, polymerized, and aggregated in the liver. Consequently, systemic levels are lower, resulting in diminished pulmonary concentrations. Hepatic disease occurs due to liver aggregation of the protein, while lung destruction ensues from unopposed protease-mediated damage. In this review, we will discuss AAT deficiency, its clinical manifestations, and augmentation therapy. We will address the safety and tolerability profiles of AAT replacement in the context of patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness and outline future directions for work in this field. Keywords: alpha-1, augmentation, deficiency, replacement, emphysema

  16. Relationship between alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in Jordanian lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is a secretory glycoprotein produced mainly in the liver and monocytes. It is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in human plasma. It predominantly inhibits neutrophil elastase thus, it prevents the breakdown of lung tissue. The deficiency of alpha1-AT is an inherited disorder characterized by reduced serum level of alpha1-AT. Protease inhibitors Z (PiZ) and protease inhibitors S (PiS) are the most common deficient genotypes of alpha1-AT. The aim of this study is to test the relationship between alpha1-AT deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in Jordanian lung cancer patients. We obtained the samples used in this study from 100 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of the lung cancer patients from Prince Iman Research Center and Laboratory Sciences at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan. Analyses of the Z and S genotypes of alpha1-AT were performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques at Jordan University of Science and Technology during 2003 and 2004. We demonstrated that all lung cancer patients were of M genotype, and no Z or S genotypes were detected. There is no relationship between alpha1-AT deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in patients involved in this study. (author)

  17. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; PAAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD. PMID:26522656

  18. A novel SERPINA1 mutation causing serum alpha(1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren N Saunders

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can cause deficiency in the circulating serine protease inhibitor α(1-Antitrypsin (α(1AT. α(1AT deficiency is the major contributor to pulmonary emphysema and liver disease in persons of European ancestry, with a prevalence of 1 in 2500 in the USA. We present the discovery and characterization of a novel SERPINA1 mutant from an asymptomatic Middle Eastern male with circulating α(1AT deficiency. This 49 base pair deletion mutation (T379Δ, originally mistyped by IEF, causes a frame-shift replacement of the last sixteen α(1AT residues and adds an extra twenty-four residues. Functional analysis showed that the mutant protein is not secreted and prone to intracellular aggregation.

  19. Screening for Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in Tunisian subjects with obstructive lung disease: a feasibility report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibani Jemni

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AATD is one of the most common inherited disorders in the World. However, it is generally accepted that AATD in North African populations is not a risk factor for lung and/or liver disease, based on a number of small studies. We therefore planned a screening study for detection of AATD in patients with OLD in a cohort of patients from Kairouan in central Tunisia. Methods: One hundred twenty patients with OLD (asthma, emphysema, COPD were enrolled in the screening programme. Laboratory diagnosis for AATD was performed according to current diagnostic standards. Results We found that 6/120 OLD patients carried an AAT deficient allele, 1 PI*MZ, 1 PI*MPlowel, 3 PI*MMmalton, 1 PI*MMwurzburg. Conclusion this pilot study demonstrated that alleles related to deficiency of AAT are not absent in the Tunisian population, and that rare AATD variants prevailed over commonest PI*Z variant. These results would support a larger scale screening for AATD in Tunisia.

  20. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...

  1. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Healthy Liver In the Field Call to Action - Change Tomorrow, Give Today Liver Lowdown Sept 2013 Recovery Month Path to Wellness ... Patient Story-Lynette In the Field Call to Action 5 Things About Hep Healthy Summer Tips Liver Lowdown June 2013 Liver Lowdown July/Aug 2014 ...

  2. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieuwenhuizen Willem

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longitudinal variability of these biomarkers is unknown but desirable for clinical studies with proteinase inhibitors. Methods We measured three different types of biomarkers, including desmosines, elastase-formed fibrinogen fragments and heparan sulfate epitope JM403, in plasma and urine for a period of 7 weeks in a group of 12 patients who participated in a placebo-controlled study to assess the safety of a single inhalation of hyaluronic acid. Results Effect of study medication on any of the biomarkers was not seen. Baseline desmosines in plasma and urine correlated with baseline CO diffusion capacity (R = 0.81, p = 0.01 and R = 0.65, p = 0.05. Mean coefficient of variation within patients (CVi for plasma and urine desmosines was 18.7 to 13.5%, respectively. Change in urinary desmosine levels correlated significantly with change in plasma desmosine levels (R = 0.84, p Conclusion We found acceptable variability in our study parameters, indicating the feasibility of their use in an evaluation of biochemical efficacy of alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in Pi Z subjects.

  3. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...... (difference 1.14 g/l; 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 2.14; p = 0.03) over the total course of the trials. Augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin cannot be recommended in view of the lack of evidence of clinical benefit and the cost of treatment....

  4. Relationship between frequency, length, and treatment outcome of exacerbations to baseline lung function and lung density in alpha-1 antitrypsin-deficient COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasaratha K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kesavaperumal Vijayasaratha,1 Robert A Stockley21Lung Investigation Unit, 2Research and Development, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham, UKBackground: Diary cards are useful for analyzing exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, although factors influencing the length and frequency of each episode are poorly understood. This study investigated factors that influence the features of exacerbations in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency (PiZ phenotype and COPD.Methods: Daily diary cards were collected over 2 years. Patients had emphysema visualized and quantified by computed tomography scan, and had at least one documented exacerbation in the previous year.Results: The patients (n = 23 had a mean age of 52.5 years, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 of 1.2 L (38.4% predicted, corrected gas transfer (KCO of 0.90 mmol/min/kPa/L (59.7% predicted, and 15th percentile lung density of 44.55 g/L. Two hundred and sixty-three exacerbations (164 treated were identified. The frequency of treated exacerbations correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.432; P = 0.022. Exacerbation length (determined for 17 of the patients for whom diary card data through the episode were available correlated negatively with baseline 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.361; P = 0.003, and increased the longer treatment was delayed (r = 0.503; P < 0.001. Treatment delay was shorter with higher day 1 symptom score, lower baseline FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity, and lower 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.368, 0.272, 0.461, and 0.786; P = 0.004, 0.036, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively. Time to resolution of exacerbation after treatment initiation was not affected by treatment delay, but correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.647; P = 0.007.Conclusion: In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the frequency and length of resolution of exacerbation were related to baseline gas transfer. Treatment

  5. Exploring the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry in a randomised placebo-controlled study of augmentation therapy in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parr, David G; Dirksen, Asger; Piitulainen, Eeva; Deng, Chunqin; Wencker, Marion; Stockley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    lung assessment. The EXAcerbations and CT scan as Lung Endpoints (EXACTLE) trial aimed to clarify the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry data for the assessment of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy on the progression of emphysema in AAT deficiency (AATD). METHODS: Patients with...... AATD (n = 77) were randomised to weekly infusions of 60 mg/kg human AAT (Prolastin) or placebo over 2 to 2.5 years. Lung volume was included as a covariate in an endpoint analysis and a comparison was made of different CT densitometric indices (15th percentile lung density [PD15], mean lung density...... analysis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as 'Antitrypsin (AAT) to Treat Emphysema in AAT-Deficient Patients'; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00263887....

  6. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milger K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Katrin Milger,1 Lesca Miriam Holdt,2 Daniel Teupser,2 Rudolf Maria Huber,1 Jürgen Behr,1 Nikolaus Kneidinger1 1Department of Internal Medicine V, University of Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, 2Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT, is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL. No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null. This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, bronchiectasis, SERPINA-1 mutation, pulmonary embolism

  7. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aquiles A Camelier; Daniel Hugo Winter; José Roberto Jardim; Carlos Eduardo Galvão Barboza; Alberto Cukier; Marc Miravitlles

    2008-01-01

    A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que de...

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency PI*Z and PI*S Gene Frequency Distribution Using on Maps of the World by an Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) Multivariate Interpolation Method

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Ignacio; de Serres, Frederick J; Cárcaba, Victoriano; Lara, Beatríz; Fernández-Bustillo, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    1.Background Currently, there is a remarkable lack of genetic epidemiological studies on alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency in about half of the 193 countries of the World. This fact impedes the establishment of a true prevalence pattern of this deleterious hereditary disorder in extensive regions of human population. 2.Objectives The aim of the present study was to generate detailed maps of the frequency distribution of the two most frequent AAT deficiency alleles (i.e., PI*S and PI*Z) in ...

  9. Diagnóstico tardío de déficit de α-1-antitripsina Delayed diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rodríguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El déficit de alfa-1 antitripsina (D-AAT es una enfermedad genética, relativamente frecuente en poblaciones de origen europeo. Frecuentemente está infradiagnosticada, con largos retrasos entre el inicio de los síntomas respiratorios y el diagnóstico definitivo. El D-AAT puede diagnosticarse con la determinación de los niveles séricos de esta proteína, y, cuando están por debajo del rango normal debe ser confirmado con el fenotipo. El seguimiento correcto de la progresión de la enfermedad debe realizarse en todos los casos, ya que se asocia con mejor pronóstico. Presentamos el caso de una mujer de 69 años, con infecciones respiratorias de repetición y sintomatología asmática. Los niveles de AAT estaban por debajo de la normalidad, confirmándose posteriormente el fenotipo ZZ. El retraso diagnóstico de nuestra paciente parece reforzar la necesidad de alertar a los médicos sobre esta enfermedad, frecuentemente asociada con síntomas de asma o EPOC.Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT-D is a genetic disease, relatively common in populations of European ancestry. AAT-D remains undiagnosed in many patients, and there are often long delays between the onset of respiratory symptoms and diagnosis. AAT-D can be readily diagnosed by measurement of the serum or plasma protein level, which should be confirmed by assessing the genotype or protein phenotype when AAT levels are below the normal range. Close monitoring for the development or progression of lung disease or liver disease is required, and can improve the prognosis. We show the case of a 69 year old woman with recurrent respiratory infections and asthma symptoms. The serum levels of AAT were below the normal range, and ZZ genotype was confirmed. The delayed diagnosis of our patient seems to emphasize the need to remind the doctors about AAT-D, frequently associated with asthma or COPD symptoms.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in alpha1-antitrypsin PI MZ heterozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Dahl, Morten; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S; Nordestgaard, B G; Silverman, E K

    2004-01-01

    Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial.......Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial....

  11. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin and Lung Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Karina A; Petrache, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) as the principal circulating inhibitor of neutrophil elastase was critical to the appreciation of protease/antiprotease imbalance involvement in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Additional targets of A1AT have been uncovered, along with their contribution to alveolar wall destruction induced by cigarette smoke exposure. We highlight in this report mechanisms of A1AT antiapoptotic effects on structural lung endothelial cells. This function was largely dependent on uptake of the protein from the circulation via clathrin- and, in part, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and on specific interactions with cysteine proteases such as capsase-3, -6, and -7. Exposures to cigarette smoke diminished A1AT intracellular uptake and its anticaspase action, suggesting that even in A1AT-suficient individuals, cigarette smoke may weaken the serpin's endothelial prosurvival effect. In addition, cigarette smoke exposure or genetic mutations known to induce posttranslational modifications such as oxidation or polymerization may alter A1AT bidirectional intracellular traffic in endothelial cells and thus determine its functional bioavailability in certain lung compartments. Uncovering and harnessing the A1AT canonical and noncanonical mechanisms will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of emphysema and may provide means to improve the effectiveness of therapies in both A1AT-sufficient and A1AT-deficient individuals. PMID:27115949

  13. Immunoassay of serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A K; Sarin, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured in 60 patients with endogenous uveitis, 27 patients with phacoallergic endophthalmitis, 12 patients with phacolytic glaucoma, and 58 healthy subjects. Thirty-four patients with endogenous uveitis were also followed up for 6 months after treatment, and the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured again. There was a significant rise in the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in cases of endogenous uveitis and phacoallergic endophthalmitis but no ...

  14. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He) Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavngaard, T.; Vejby Soegaard, L. (Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Batz, M. (Inst. of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)); Schreiber, L.M. (Dept. of Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Medical School, Mainz (Germany)); Dirksen, A. (Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2009-11-15

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P<0.001). Conclusion: This pilot study indicates the possible use of nonionizing HP 3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  15. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  16. Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins in end-stage COPD lungs with and without severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koczulla A-Rembert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. An important fraction of COPD cases harbor a major genetic determinant, inherited ZZ (Glu342Lys α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD. A study was undertaken to investigate gene expression patterns in end-stage COPD lungs from patients with and without AATD. Methods Explanted lungs of end-stage ZZ AATD-related (treated and non-treated with AAT augmentation therapy and “normal” MM COPD, and liver biopsies from patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with and without ZZ AATD were used for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix microarrays or RT-PCR. Results A total of 162 genes were found to be differentially expressed (p-value ≤ 0.05 and |FC| ≥ 2 between MM and ZZ COPD patients. Of those, 134 gene sets were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated in ZZ relative to MM lung tissue. A subgroup of genes, zinc finger protein 165, snail homolog 1 (Drosophila (SNAI1, and Krüppel-like transcription factors (KLFs 4 (gut, 9 and 10, perfectly segregated ZZ and MM COPD patients. The higher expression of KLF 9 and KLF10 has been verified in the replication cohort with AATD-related end-stage lung emphysema and liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, higher expression of KLF9, SNAI1 and DEFA1 was found in ZZ COPD lungs without augmentation therapy relative to MM COPD or ZZ COPD with augmentation therapy. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of transcriptional regulators of the zinc-finger family in COPD pathogenesis and provide deeper insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of COPD with and without AATD.

  17. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include flower and tree pollen, ash, allergens, air pollution, wood burning stoves, paint fumes, and fumes from ... protein foods, such as lean meats, poultry without skin, seafood, processed soy products, nuts, seeds, beans, and ...

  18. Augmentation therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockley, Robert A; Miravitlles, Marc; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    combination of age, physiological impairment, exacerbation history and rate of decline in spirometry and other measures of emphysema may be used to improve therapeutic decision making, until a reliable predictive biomarker of the evolution of lung impairment can be identified. In addition, individual...

  19. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Coverage & Reimbursement of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Human Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research ... symptoms can include repeated respiratory infections, fatigue, rapid heartbeat upon standing, vision problems and unintentional weight loss. ...

  20. Heterozygosity for the alpha1-antitrypsin Z allele may confer genetic risk of cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalache, Florentina; HÖBLINGER, AKSANA; Grünhage, Frank; Krawczyk, Marcin; Gärtner, Barbara C.; Acalovschi, Monica; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Lammert, Frank; Zimmer, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background & Aim: Alpha1-antitrypsin (?1AT) deficiency caused by Z allele homozygosity represents a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have implicated ?1AT Z heterozygosity in cholangiocarcinogenesis. We assessed the ?common? Z and S alleles as well as the promoter variant rs8004738 for association with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Patients & Methods: We genotyped 182 Caucasian patients and 350 controls for rs28929474 (Z), rs17580 (S) and the varia...

  1. DNA polymorphisms of the human alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in normal subjects and in patients with pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, I; Kalsheker, N

    1987-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency predisposes subjects to developing pulmonary emphysema and childhood liver cirrhosis. We have studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in a normal population and a group of patients with pulmonary emphysema. We have identified five RFLPs with eight restriction enzymes. The most frequent polymorphisms have been detected with the enzymes MspI, PstI, and TaqI at frequencies of 46.8%, 6.4%, and 5.0% respectively in th...

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Investigations Using Animal Models of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kevin; Serban, Karina A; Batra, Chanan; Petrache, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Animal models of disease help accelerate the translation of basic science discoveries to the bedside, because they permit experimental interrogation of mechanisms at relatively high throughput, while accounting for the complexity of an intact organism. From the groundbreaking observation of emphysema-like alveolar destruction after direct instillation of elastase in the lungs to the more clinically relevant model of airspace enlargement induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, animal models have advanced our understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) function. Experimental in vivo models that, at least in part, replicate clinical human phenotypes facilitate the translation of mechanistic findings into individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and with AAT deficiency. In addition, unexpected findings of alveolar enlargement in various transgenic mice have led to novel hypotheses of emphysema development. Previous challenges in manipulating the AAT genes in mice can now be overcome with new transgenic approaches that will likely advance our understanding of functions of this essential, lung-protective serine protease inhibitor (serpin). PMID:27564666

  3. Fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin in COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Marott, J. L.; Rode, L.;

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the hypotheses that fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin are observationally and genetically associated with exacerbations in COPD. Methods We studied 13 591 individuals with COPD from the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2013), of whom 6857 were genotyped for FGB -455...... (rs1800790, G>A) and FGB -448 (rs4220, G>A) and had plasma fibrinogen measured. Furthermore, 13 405 individuals were genotyped for the SERPINA1 S-allele (rs17580) and the Z-allele (rs28929474) and had measurements of plasma alpha(1)-antitrypsin. Exacerbations were defined as hospital admissions or...... exacerbations in instrumental variable analyses. Results Elevated fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were associated with increased risk of exacerbations in COPD, HR=1.14 (1.07 to 1.22, p...

  4. [Role of alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha-2 macroglobulin in hepatopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, L; Mian, G; Magris, D; Novello, E; D'Agnolo, B

    1979-02-18

    Two pictures of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, one associated with alpha 2-macroglobulin deficiency and one isolated case of the latter deficiency have been observed in three patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver and/or hepatoma. On the basis of these cases, the literature on the subject is reviewed. The unusually high incidence of such anti-enzymatic deficiencies (three cases in the first eleven patients studied) in severe liver pathology, calls for a reassessment of such research and suggests that these tests should be carried out on a routine basis in cases of cryptogenetic cirrhosis and probably for long-term prognosis in cases of viral hepatitis. PMID:86175

  5. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  6. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  7. Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Jefferey L; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Poplin, Gerald S;

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased respiratory disease. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protects the lung against tissue destruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether arsenic exposure is associated with changes in airway AAT concentration and whether...... selenium positively associated with sputum AAT (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). In analyses stratified by town, these relationships remained significant only in Ajo, with the higher arsenic exposure. Reduction in AAT may be a means by which arsenic induces respiratory disease, and selenium may protect...

  8. SlimQuick™ - associated hepatotoxicity in a woman with alpha-1 antitrypsin heterozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Douglas H; Twaddell, William S.; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Philosophe, Benjamin; Mindikoglu, Ayse L

    2012-01-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis)-associated hepatotoxicity is reported. However, the presence of alpha-1 antitrypsin MZ phenotype as a predisposing factor to green tea-associated drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is unknown. A previously healthy woman with alpha-1 antitrypsin MZ phenotype who took SlimQuick™, an herbal supplement containing green tea extract, developed severe hepatotoxicity requiring corticosteroid treatment. Green tea-associated hepatotoxicity is reviewed and alpha-1 antitrypsin...

  9. Fluorescent antibody studies of alpha-1-antitrypsin in adult human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of alpha-1-antitrypsin in frozen sections prepared from four specimens of human lung was determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Three of the specimens were obtained directly from surgical procedures and were peripheral tissue excised with tumors. Specific fluorescence for alpha-1-antitrypsin was observed lining the terminal airways and alveoli throughout the sections from two of the cases. In the other cases, a few focal areas of specific fluorescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that alpha-1-antitrypsin may be distributed in lung in association with pulmonary surfactant and that local tissue concentrations of alpha-1-antitrypsin are variable. (U.S.)

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a potential biomarker for hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Function exertion of specific proteins are key factors in disease progression, thus the systematical identification of those specific proteins is a prerequisite to understand various diseases. Though many proteins have been verified to impact on hepatitis, no systematical protein screening has been documented to hepatitis B virus (HBV induced hepatitis, hindering the comprehensive understanding to this severe disease. Aim To identify the major proteins in the progression of HBV infection from mild stage to severe stage. Methods We performed an integrated strategy by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF analysis, and tissue microarray techniques to screen the functional proteins and detect the localization of those proteins. Results Interestingly, MS/MS identification revealed the expression level of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT was significantly elevated in serum samples from patients with severe chronic hepatitis. Immunoblotting with a specific AAT antibody confirmed that AAT is highly expressed in serum samples from patients with hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, we observed that AAT is with highest expression in normal tissue and cells, but lowest in hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis tissues and cells, suggesting the specific secretion of AAT from tissues and cells to serum. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of AAT as a potential biomarker for hepatitis B in diagnosis.

  11. [The interaction of human alpha 1-antitrypsin with human plasmin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurama, S

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) with plasmin was investigated, and the molecular weight of the inhibitor was also re-evaluated. The value of molecular weight of alpha 1-AT determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) method showed a difference depending on the presence or absence of the reducing agent, resulting in 72,000 dalton before reduction and 59,000 dalton after reduction. Conclusively, the molecular weight of alpha 1-AT was appropriate to be 59,000 dalton from considering the molecular shape of the protein. The interaction of alpha 1-AT with plasmin was analysed by SDS-PAGE method. Unreduced analysis revealed that two kinds of complexes with different molecular weight (the major of 155,000 dalton and the minor of 140,000 dalton) were formed time dependently, suggesting that the former was a native complex and the latter was a degraded product. Reduced analysis disclosed that the light chain of plasmin involved the complex formation with the inhibitor, and a peptide of 16,000 dalton appeared during the reaction. From these observations, the mechanism of action was summarized as follows. First, alpha 1-AT inhibited all of the plasmin activities by forming a 1: 1 stoichiometric complex with the enzyme, presumably with the active center of the enzyme, whose complex is undissociable in the presence of denaturing or reducing agents or both. Secondly, the native complex broke into a degraded product and a released peptide by limited proteolysis with the free plasmin which existed in the reaction mixture even with an excess of alpha 1-AT due to the reaction of complex formation being time consuming. The clinical significance of alpha 1-AT on fibrinolysis was also subject for discussion. PMID:6232193

  12. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  13. Circulating alpha1-antitrypsin in the general population: Determinants and association with lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency associated with low AAT blood concentrations is an established genetic COPD risk factor. Less is known about the respiratory health impact of variation in AAT serum concentrations in the general population. We cross-sectionally investigated correlates of circulating AAT concentrations and its association with FEV1. Methods In 5187 adults (2669 females with high-sensitive c-reactive protein (CRP levels ≤ 10 mg/l from the population-based Swiss SAPALDIA cohort, blood was collected at the time of follow-up examination for measuring serum AAT and CRP. Results Female gender, hormone intake, systolic blood pressure, age in men and in postmenopausal women, as well as active and passive smoking were positively, whereas alcohol intake and BMI inversely correlated with serum AAT levels, independent of CRP adjustment. We observed an inverse association of AAT with FEV1 in the total study population (p Conclusion The results of this population-based study reflect a complex interrelationship between tobacco exposure, gender related factors, circulating AAT, systemic inflammatory status and lung function.

  14. New variants of alpha 1-antitrypsin: comparison of Pi typing techniques.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four new rare inherited variants (Pi types) of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-protease inhibitor) are described. Each variant has been compared with previously reported genetic variants by several techniques used for Pi typing: isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, starch gel electrophoresis, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Some variants are identical or very similar by one technique but can be clearly distinguished by another technique. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis and gel immunofixati...

  15. C3, factor B, alpha-1-antitrypsin in neonatal septicaemia with sclerema.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelet, B

    1980-01-01

    C3, factor B, and alpha-1-antitrypsin were determined in newborn infants with septicaemia and sclerema, associated with suspected infections, ABO or Rh incompatibility, and hyperbilirubinaemia of unknown origin, during and after treatment with exchange transfusion. Activation products from C3 and factor B, the clearance of the transfused C3, and its synthesis by the recipient were determined also. Infected newborn infants had low levels of C3 and factor B, but a normal amount of alpha-1-antit...

  16. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    OpenAIRE

    AL-Bayaty, Fouad H.; NorAdinar Baharuddin; Mahmood A. Abdulla; Hapipah Mohd Ali; Arkilla, Magaji B.; ALBayaty, Mustafa F.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at alpha < 0.05. ...

  17. Serum concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin is significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently controversial. The present study compares AAT serum concentrations and gene frequencies between a group of CRC patients and a control group of healthy unrelated people (HUP). 267 CRC subjects (63% males, 72 ± 10 years old) were enlisted from a Hospital Clinic setting in Asturias, Spain. The HUP group comprised 327 subjects (67% males, mean age 70 ± 7.5 years old) from the same geographical region. Outcome measures were AAT serum concentrations measured by nephelometry, and AAT phenotyping characterization by isoelectric focusing. Significantly higher serum concentrations were found among CRC (208 ± 60) than in HUP individuals (144 ± 20.5) (p = 0.0001). No differences were found in the phenotypic distribution of the Pi*S and Pi*Z allelic frequencies (p = 0.639), although the frequency of Pi*Z was higher in CRC (21%) than in HUP subjects (15%). The only statistically significant finding in this study was the markedly higher AAT serum concentrations found in CRC subjects compared with HUP controls, irrespective of whether their Pi* phenotype was normal (Pi*MM) or deficient (Pi*MS, Pi*MZ and Pi*SZ). Although there was a trend towards the more deficient Pi* phenotype the more advanced the tumor, the results were inconclusive due to the small sample size. Consequently, more powerful studies are needed to reach firmer conclusions on this matter

  18. A protein structural approach to the solution of biological problems: alpha 1-antitrypsin as a recent example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, D A; Carrell, R W

    1993-09-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin is a circulating serine proteinase inhibitor that protects the lungs against proteolysis by the enzyme neutrophil elastase. Most northern Europeans have only the normal M form, but some 4% are heterozygotes for the Z deficiency mutant. This mutant is characterized by the substitution of a positively charged lysine residue for a negatively charged glutamic acid at position 342 and results in normal gene translation but reduced protein secretion into the plasma. The plasma levels of antitrypsin in homozygotes are only 15% of normal, the other 85% being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. This review describes the effect of the Z mutation on the structure and function of antitrypsin and illustrates the importance of understanding protein structure in solving the mechanism of Z antitrypsin retention within the liver. We demonstrate that antitrypsin accumulation in the liver results from a unique interaction between antitrypsin molecules. The Z mutation perturbs the gap between the third and fifth strands of the A sheet, allowing the reactive center loop of one molecule to insert into the A sheet of a second. This loop-sheet polymerization results in the formation of chains of protein which form insoluble inclusions in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in hepatocellular damage and cirrhosis. In addition, the Z mutation results in a distortion of the circular dichroic spectrum, a rearrangement of the reactive center loop with respect to the A sheet, and a reduction in association rate constant with the cognate proteinase neutrophil elastase. PMID:8214081

  19. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

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    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  20. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  1. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and alpha-1 antitrypsin gene variants in Serbian pediatric arterial ischemic stroke patients

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    Đorđević Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS in children is complex, and different from that in adults. Although rare, stroke in children is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. There is increasing evidence that genetic factors, including inflammation mediators, have a role in occurrence and outcome of stroke. We have chosen to assess the role of polymorphism -308G/A in the promoter of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα gene and S and Z mutations in alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT gene in the etiology of stroke in children. TNFα polymorphism affects plasma levels of this proinflamatory cytokine, and this could contribute to stroke pathology. It has been shown that increased AAT concentration may present a risk for AIS in children. Since S and Z mutations in AAT gene reduce its levels in plasma they could have a protective role in pediatric stroke. In this study twenty six children with AIS and 100 unrelated individuals from Serbian general population were investigated by PCR/RFLP for these gene variations. No statistically significant difference was observed between patients and general population in distribution of genotypes for -308G/A TNFα polymorphism, so its contributory role in the etiology of stroke was not evident in our group of patients. None of the tested AAT gene mutations were found in patients, which is in concordance with the proposed protective role of deficient AAT variants. AIS is a multifactorial disease, with many genes having a modest role in its pathophysiology, so further analyses of their combined effect are needed to elucidate genetic risk factors in the etiology and outcome of stroke in pediatric patients.

  3. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene polymorphism in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Denden

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT plays an important role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, the pathological lesion underlying the majority of the manifestations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that common AAT polymorphisms influence the risk of developing COPDs. We investigated PiM1 (Ala213Val, PiM2 (Arg101His, PiM3 (Glu376Asp, PiS (Glu264Val and PiZ (Glu342Lys SERPINA1 alleles in 100 COPD patients and 200 healthy controls. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between COPD patients and controls, neither did haplotype analysis show significant differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional study revealed no significant relationship between common SERPINA1 polymorphisms (PiM1, PiM2, PiM3 and the emphysematous type of COPD. In addition, FEV1 annual decline, determined during a two-year follow up period, revealed no difference among carriers of the tested polymorphisms.

  4. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27028823

  5. Intestinal apoprotein biosynthesis: alpha-1-antitrypsin identified as a constituent of rat lymph chylomicrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apolipoproteins synthesized in the intestine can serve as a source of constituents for plasma lipoproteins and play an important role in the pathways of lipoprotein formation, interconversion, and catabolism. In the present study, apolipoproteins synthesized by the intestine were identified in mesenteric lymph following intraduodenal administration of lipid and [14C]-leucine to rats. The study was undertaken to assess differences in the rate of appearance of newly synthesized apolipoproteins into chylomicron and VLDL particles of rat mesenteric lymph and to determine if there is a sex-related influence on this process. Examination of qualitative and quantitative differences in apolipoprotein profiles, [14C]-leucine labeling patterns, and the specific activities of the individual apolipoproteins secreted with either chylomicrons or VLDL distinguish the two particles and their pathways of assembly. A protein of molecular weight 54,000 daltons was recovered with the chylomicrons. The protein was shown to be synthesized by rat liver hepatocytes, and immunoprecipitation studies with rat intestinal cells incubated with 35S-methionine included this organ as a source of alpha-1-antitrypsin

  6. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin prevents the development of preeclampsia through suppression of oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling eFeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  8. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Blaurock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis.

  9. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, R F; Li, Y.; Sifers, R N; Wang, H.; Hardick, C; Tsai, S. Y.; Woo, S L

    1987-01-01

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientati...

  10. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Aleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Stanković Marija; Dinić Jelena; Lukić Snežana; Anđelić-Jelić Marina; Popović Dragan; Radojković Dragica

    2010-01-01

    One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT...

  11. The influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of haptoglobin and alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad H; Baharuddin, Noradinar; Abdulla, Mahmood A; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Arkilla, Magaji B; ALBayaty, Mustafa F

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α ≤ 0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39 ± 5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03 ± 8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05 ± 1.48) and moderate plaque indexes (51.35 ± 11.27) were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9 ± 30.71 ng/dL), haptoglobin (76.04 ± 52.48 mg/dL), and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90 ± 18.40 mg/dL) were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years) and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers. PMID:24286083

  12. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad H. Al-Bayaty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP, and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α≤0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39±5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03±8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05±1.48 and moderate plaque indexes (51.35±11.27 were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9±30.71 ng/dL, haptoglobin (76.04±52.48 mg/dL, and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90±18.40 mg/dL were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers.

  13. Oxidized alpha-1 antitrypsin as a predictive risk marker of opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Techasen, Anchalee; Thanan, Raynoo; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Mairiang, Eimorn; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2013-04-01

    The oxidized alpha-1 antitrypsin (ox-A1AT) is one modified form of A1AT, generated via oxidation at its active site by free radicals released from inflammatory cells which subsequently are unable to inhibit protease enzymes. The presence of ox-A1AT in human serum has been used as oxidative stress indicator in many diseases. As oxidative/nitrative damage is one major contributor in opisthorchiasis-driven cholangiocarcinogenesis, we determined A1AT and ox-A1AT expression in human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) tissue using immunohistochemical staining and measured serum ox-A1AT levels by ELISA. A1AT and ox-A1AT were found to be expressed in the tumor of CCA patients. The group with high expression has a significant poor prognosis. Serum levels of ox-A1AT were also significantly higher in groups of patients with heavy Opisthorchis viverrini infection, advanced periductal fibrosis (APF) and CCA when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001). Odds ratio (OR) analysis implicated high ox-A1AT levels as a risk predictor for APF and CCA (P < 0.001; OR = 140.5 and 22.0, respectively). In conclusion, as APF may lead to hepatobiliary diseases and an increased risk of CCA development, our results identified ox-A1AT as a potential risk indicator for opisthorchiasis-associated CCA. This marker could now be explored for screening of subjects living in endemic areas where the prevalence of opisthorchiasis still remains high. PMID:23188705

  14. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  15. Therapy with Plasma Purified Alpha1-Antitrypsin (Prolastin®) Induces Time-Dependent Changes in Plasma Levels of MMP-9 and MPO

    OpenAIRE

    Koepke, Janine; Dresel, Marc; Schmid, Severin; Greulich, Timm; Beutel, Björn; Schmeck, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus Franz; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert

    2015-01-01

    The common Z mutation (Glu342Lys) of α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) results in the polymerization and intracellular retention of A1AT protein. The concomitant deficiency of functional A1AT predisposes PiZZ subjects to early onset emphysema. Clinical studies have implied that, among the biomarkers associated with emphysema, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is of particular importance. Increased plasma MMP-9 levels are proposed to predict the decline of lung function as well as greater COPD exacerbati...

  16. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD

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    Laura Russo Zillmer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency.

  17. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara;

    2011-01-01

    stimulation. A1AT is produced at all stages of myeloid maturation in the bone marrow. The production increases as neutrophils enter circulation and increases further upon migration to tissues as observed in skin windows and when blood neutrophils are incubated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor......Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associated...... with azurophile granules in neutrophils indicative of A1AT expression being restricted to the promyelocyte stage. We examined the localization and production of A1AT in healthy donor neutrophils and found A1AT to be a constituent of all granule subtypes and to be released from neutrophils following...

  18. Therapeutic efficacy of alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy on the loss of lung tissue: an integrated analysis of 2 randomised clinical trials using computed tomography densitometry

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    Stolk Jan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have investigated the efficacy of IV alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT augmentation therapy on emphysema progression using CT densitometry. Methods Data from these similar trials, a 2-center Danish-Dutch study (n = 54 and the 3-center EXAcerbations and CT scan as Lung Endpoints (EXACTLE study (n = 65, were pooled to increase the statistical power. The change in 15th percentile of lung density (PD15 measured by CT scan was obtained from both trials. All subjects had 1 CT scan at baseline and at least 1 CT scan after treatment. Densitometric data from 119 patients (AAT [Alfalastin® or Prolastin®], n = 60; placebo, n = 59 were analysed by a statistical/endpoint analysis method. To adjust for lung volume, volume correction was made by including the change in log-transformed total lung volume as a covariate in the statistical model. Results Mean follow-up was approximately 2.5 years. The mean change in lung density from baseline to last CT scan was -4.082 g/L for AAT and -6.379 g/L for placebo with a treatment difference of 2.297 (95% CI, 0.669 to 3.926; p = 0.006. The corresponding annual declines were -1.73 and -2.74 g/L/yr, respectively. Conclusions The overall results of the combined analysis of 2 separate trials of comparable design, and the only 2 controlled clinical trials completed to date, has confirmed that IV AAT augmentation therapy significantly reduces the decline in lung density and may therefore reduce the future risk of mortality in patients with AAT deficiency-related emphysema. Trial registration The EXACTLE study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as 'Antitrypsin (AAT to Treat Emphysema in AAT-Deficient Patients'; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00263887.

  19. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R F; Li, Y; Sifers, R N; Wang, H; Hardick, C; Tsai, S Y; Woo, S L

    1987-10-26

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientations when complemented by the proximal region in the sense orientation. The results strongly suggest that there are multiple cis-acting elements in the human AAT gene that confer cell specificity for its expression. Nuclear proteins prepared from the hepatoma cells bound specifically to the proximal region in a band-shifting assay that was resistant to competition by the globin promoter DNA. Foot-printing analysis showed a protected domain within the proximal region that contains a nearly perfect palindromic sequence TGGTTAATATTCACCA, which may be important in the regulation of AAT expression in the liver. PMID:2823229

  20. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

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    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT mutations Z and S was analyzed in 160 patients with pancreatic diseases (50 patients with pancreatic cancer, 50 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 129 healthy individuals by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis (PSM method. One patient with pancreatic cancer was found to be a carrier of Z mutation, as well as one patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One patient with chronic pancreatitis was found to be a carrier of S mutation. The common AAT mutations were statistically significantly over-represented in patients with pancreatic diseases (3 of 160 patients, allelic frequency 0.9% than in the control group (1 of 129 individuals, allelic frequency 0.4%. The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that common AAT mutations Z and S may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to the development of pancreatic disease.

  1. Alpha 1-antitrypsin Siiyama (Ser53-->Phe). Further evidence for intracellular loop-sheet polymerization.

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Lomas; Finch, J. T.; Seyama, K.; Nukiwa, T; Carrell, R W

    1993-01-01

    Antitrypsin Siiyama is a rare example of the deficiency variants of antitrypsin that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. The common example is Z antitrypsin, which has a mutation (Glu342-->Lys) at the junction of the head of the fifth strand of the A sheet and the base of the reactive center loop. It was previously shown that Z antitrypsin spontaneously polymerizes due to the insertion of the reactive center loop of one molecule into the A sheet of a second. The mutatio...

  2. Polymorphisms in the HPC/ELAC-2 and alpha 1-antitrypsin genes that correlate with human diseases in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, Ranbir C; Thakur, Hitender; Gupta, Lipsy; Janmeja, Ashok K; Seth, Amlesh; Singh, Sharwan K

    2011-06-01

    Two genes HPC/ELAC-2 and AAT were studied in north Indian population. HPC/ELAC-2 was studied in prostate cancer cases and AAT was studied in COPD patients. HPC/ELAC-2 is considered as an important cancer-susceptibility gene in prostate cancer. There are two common polymorphisms of this gene, i.e., Ser217Leu and Ala541Thr. Alpha 1 antitrypsin is a highly polymorphic anti-elastase enzyme, especially active in the protection of alveoli and liver. In the present study, we observed the distribution of two deficient alleles PiZ and Pi S in COPD patients. We extracted the DNA from 157 prostate cancer cases, 200 COPD patients, 170 BPH and 370 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were studied by PCR-RFLP technique. The mutant genotype (Leu/Leu) of HPC/ELAC-2 was present in 9.6, 7.6 and 5.9% of BPH, cancer cases and healthy controls, respectively. Higher risk of Ser/Leu as well as Leu/Leu had shown when compared to healthy controls. That was about 1.5 and 1.7-fold (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 0.96-2.51; OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 0.74-3.92), respectively. Risk was found to be increased in smokers and those consuming non-vegetarian diet. Our results suggest that the HPC/ELAC-2 polymorphisms, especially in localized cases, could help to predict prostate cancer risk and confirm its high prevalence of the leu/leu allele in north Indian population. Considering heterozygous PiZ genotype, we obtained an OR of 3.82 (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis adjusted by age sex and drinking habit showed 4.15-fold increased risk for COPD in PiZ heterozygous individuals. No increased risk was observed in the individuals carrying PiS alleles. PMID:20119870

  3. Therapy with plasma purified alpha1-antitrypsin (Prolastin® induces time-dependent changes in plasma levels of MMP-9 and MPO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Koepke

    Full Text Available The common Z mutation (Glu342Lys of α1-antitrypsin (A1AT results in the polymerization and intracellular retention of A1AT protein. The concomitant deficiency of functional A1AT predisposes PiZZ subjects to early onset emphysema. Clinical studies have implied that, among the biomarkers associated with emphysema, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 is of particular importance. Increased plasma MMP-9 levels are proposed to predict the decline of lung function as well as greater COPD exacerbations in A1AT deficiency-associated emphysema. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of A1AT therapy (Prolastin on plasma MMP-9 and myeloperoxidase (MPO levels. In total 34 PiZZ emphysema patients were recruited: 12 patients without and 22 with weekly intravenous (60 mg/kg body weight A1AT therapy. The quantitative analysis of A1AT, MMP-9 and MPO was performed in serum and in supernatants of blood neutrophils isolated from patients before and after therapy. Patients with Prolastin therapy showed significantly lower serum MMP-9 and MPO levels than those without therapy. However, parallel analysis revealed that a rapid infusion of Prolastin is accompanied by a transient elevation of plasma MMP-9 and MPO levels. Experiments with freshly isolated blood neutrophils confirmed that therapy with Prolastin causes transient MMP-9 and MPO release. Prolastin induced the rapid release of MMP-9 and MPO when added directly to neutrophil cultures and this reaction was associated with the presence of IgA in A1AT preparation. Our data support the conclusion that changes in plasma levels of MMP-9 and MPO mirror the effect of Prolastin on blood neutrophils.

  4. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

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    Pirooznia Nazanin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide (PLGA is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release

  5. The clinical significance of determination of serum leptin, c-reactive protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin levels in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum leptin, C-reactive protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin (α1-AT)levels in patients with breast cancer. Methods: Serum leptin(with radioimmunoassay)and CRP, α1-AT (with ELISA)levels were determined in 79 patients with breast cancer and 60 controls. Results: Serum levels of leptin, CRP and α1-AT in breast cancer patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (all P1-AT levels patients with breast cancer might be related with progression of the disease, each played independent biological roles. (authors)

  6. Exploring the role of CT densitometry: a randomised study of augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Piitulainen, E; Parr, D G;

    2009-01-01

    than other measures of emphysema progression, and the changes in CT and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were correlated. All methods of densitometric analysis concordantly showed a trend suggestive of treatment benefit (p-values for Prolastin versus placebo ranged 0.049-0.084). Exacerbation frequency......Assessment of emphysema-modifying therapy is difficult, but newer outcome measures offer advantages over traditional methods. The EXAcerbations and Computed Tomography scan as Lung End-points (EXACTLE) trial explored the use of computed tomography (CT) densitometry and exacerbations for the......-point was change in CT lung density, and an exploratory approach was adopted to identify optimal methodology, including two methods of adjustment for lung volume variability and two statistical approaches. Other end-points were exacerbations, health status and physiological indices. CT was more sensitive...

  7. Targeted screening programmes in COPD: how to identify individuals with α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Chorostowska-Wynimko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a significantly under-recognised autosomal genetic disorder with <10% of affected individuals being clinically diagnosed. Moreover, rigorous genetic epidemiological data regarding AATD are lacking. The majority of findings come from the USA and Western Europe, and no information is available for many countries. To address this concern, an α1-antitrypsin (AAT laboratory was set up in 2009 at the National Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (Warsaw, Poland. In 2010, an AATD screening programme targeting patients with respiratory disorders was initiated in Poland. This targeted survey has provided valuable information regarding AAT-deficient genotypes, clinical disease and levels of expertise at the physician level. After 4 years, almost 2500 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders have been screened and, in this cohort, ∼13% had AATD alleles. In these patients, the detection frequency for S and Z alleles was four times greater, and the frequency of homozygous PI*ZZ was 16 times greater than that of the general population. These results highlight the need to build awareness in the medical community, and the project is currently being extended to cover central Eastern Europe, with the creation of the Central Eastern European Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Network.

  8. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  9. Inhibitory effect of a mixture containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate, zinc and alpha-1-antitrypsin on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene in mice

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    Ahmed Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was aimed to evaluate protective and therapeutic effects of a specific mixture, containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate and zinc, as well as alpha-1-antitrypsin protein on lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene [B(aP] in mice. Materials and Methods: Swiss albino mice were divided into two main experiments, experiment (1 the mice were injected with 100 mg/kg B(aP and lasted for 28 weeks, while experiment (2 the mice were injected with 8 doses each of 50 mg/kg B(aP and lasted for 16 weeks. Each experiment (1 and 2 divided into five groups, group (I received vehicle, group (II received the protector mixture, group (III received the carcinogen B(aP, group (IV received the protector together with the carcinogen (simultaneously and group (V received the carcinogen then the protector (consecutively. Results: Total sialic acid, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, vascular epithelial growth factor, hydroxyproline levels, as well as elastase and gelatinase activities showed significant elevation in group (III in the two experiments comparing to control group (P < 0.001. These biochemical alterations were associated with histopathological changes. Administration of the protector in group IV and group V causes significant decrease in such parameters with improvement in histopathological alterations with improvement in histopathological alterations when compared with group III in the two experiments (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The present protector mixture has the ability to suppress neoplastic alteration and restore the biochemical and histopathological parameters towards normal on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene in mice. Furthermore, the present mixture have more protective rather than therapeutic action.

  10. Altered glycosylation, expression of serum haptoglobin and alpha-1-antitrypsin in chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis C induced liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Gautam; Saroha, Ashish; Bose, Partha Pratim; Chatterjee, B P

    2016-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis with hepatitis C viral infection (HCV-LC) causes high risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Besides diagnosis of liver cirrhosis by biochemical test, imaging techniques, assessment of structural liver damage by biopsy shows several disadvantages. Our aim was to monitor the changes in the expression level of serum proteins and their glycosylation pattern among chronic hepatitis C (HCV-CH), HCV-LC and HCC patients with respect to controls. 2D gel electrophoresis of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC patients' sera showed several protein spots, which were identified by LC-MS. The change in the expression of two prominent protein spots, haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) was evaluated by western blot and ELISA. The changes in glycosylation pattern of these serum proteins were assayed using different lectins. Increased level of Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group whereas those were found to be present less in HCV-CH patient groups with respect to control as determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies. Decreased level of sialylation in both Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCV-CH patients' group whereas increased level of sialylation was observed in HCC patient groups by ELISA using Sambucus nigra agglutinin. On the other hand increased level of fucosylation in two serum glycoproteins was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group using Lens culinarris agglutinin. High glycan branching was found in HCV-LC and HCC patient groups in Hp but not in HCV-CH as determined by Datura stramonium agglutinin. However, there was no such change observed in glycan branching in AAT of HCV-CH and HCV-LC patients' groups, to the contrary high glycan branching was observed in HCC patients' group. Increased level of exposed galactose in both serum proteins was observed in both HCC patients' group as determined by Ricinus communis agglutinin. The present glycoproteomics study could predict the progression of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC

  11. Two novel nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction-based assays of dried blood spots, genomic DNA, or whole cells for fast, reliable detection of Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Knudsen, I; Jensen, P K;

    1992-01-01

    Two new nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for the Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene are presented. The assays take advantage of PCR-mediated mutagenesis, creating new diagnostic restriction enzyme sites for unambiguous discrimination between test samples...... from individuals who are normal, heterozygous, or homozygous for the mutations. We show that the two assays can be performed with purified genomic DNA as well as with boiled blood spots. The new assays were validated by parallel testing with a technique in which PCR is combined with allele......-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probes. In all cases tested the results obtained by the different techniques were in accordance. The new assays can be used for prenatal diagnostics and can be performed directly with boiled tissue samples. Because the new assays are easy to perform and reliable, we conclude that they are...

  12. Evaluación del efecto de la ingesta de una alta carga de ácidos grasos saturados sobre los niveles séricos de la proteína C reactiva, alfa1-antitripsina, fibrinógeno y alfa1-glicoproteína ácida en mujeres obesas Effect of a high saturated fatty acids load on serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen and alpha1-acid glycoprotein in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª M. Ramírez Alvarado

    2010-02-01

    en mujeres obesas. Los niveles séricos de PCR y fibrinógeno están incrementados en mujeres obesas y se correlacionan positivamente con el IMC.Obesity is associated with increased inflammation. Creactive protein (CRP and inflammation-sensitive plasma protein (ISPs are inflammatory markers. Proinflammatory process may be influenced by high saturated fatty acid intake. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of saturated fatty acids load on postprandial circulating levels of PCR and ISPs (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen in obese women. Design: A total of 15 obese women (age = 31,7 ± 4,5 years, BMI = 37,9 ± 7,3 kg/m² and 15 lean controls women (age = 30,6 ± 4,6 years, BMI = 20,6 ± 2,6 kg/m² were recruited for this study. After and overnight fast subjects ate the fat load consisted of 75 g of fat (100% saturated fatty acid, 0% cholesterol, 5 g of carbohydrates, and 6 g of protein per m2 body surface area. Postprandial serum levels of CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen were measured. Anthropometry and blood biochemical parameters were measured in both groups. Results: The obese women had fasting serum PCR levels higher (p = 0,013 and fibrinogen (p = 0,04 than those of control women. Serum CRP and fibrinogen levels was positively related to body mass index (BMI in obese group. There weren't differences in fasting serum alpha1- antitrypsin levels (p = 0,40, and alpha1-acid glucoprotein (p = 0,28 levels in obese group in comparison to lean control group. Serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen did not change postprandially (p = > 0,05 difference to fasting levels. Conclusion: A high-saturated fatty acids load is not associated with serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen levels increase. Serum alpha1-antitripsin and alpha1-acid glucoprotein levels are not increased in obese women. Serum PCR and fibrinogen levels are

  13. A 32 year old male with idiopathic hepatic encephalopathy and necrotic lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz ED

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old with undiagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency had an unusual initial presentation of acute liver failure, septic shock; adult respiratory distress syndrome and what appeared to be a left lower extremity soft tissue infection. Skin biopsy revealed panniculitis. Because of the diagnosis of panniculitis, an alpha-1 antitrypsin level was ordered and demonstrated alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with a ZZ phenotype. The patient recovered with antibiotics and supportive therapy. This case illustrates that alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can present other that the more usual adult presentation of progressive emphysema. Unexplained panniculitis should prompt investigation of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in the adult patient.

  14. Assessment of regional progression of pulmonary emphysema with CT densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, M Els; Putter, Hein; Stolk, Jan;

    2008-01-01

    with general emphysema (general emphysema without phenotype PiZZ [non-PiZ] group) were scanned with CT at baseline and after 30 months. Densitometry was performed in 12 axial partitions of equal volumes. To indicate predominant location, craniocaudal locality was defined as the slope in the plot of densities......BACKGROUND: Lung densitometry is an effective method to assess overall progression of emphysema, but generally the location of the progression is not estimated. We hypothesized that progression of emphysema is the result of extension from affected areas toward less affected areas in the lung....... To test this hypothesis, a method was developed to assess emphysema severity at different levels in the lungs in order to estimate regional changes. METHODS: Fifty subjects with emphysema due to alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) [AATD deficiency of phenotype PiZZ (PiZ) group] and 16 subjects...

  15. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Guerra Serra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes incluídos no estudo (44 mulheres; idade média, 51,3 ± 18,2 anos, os alelos S e Z foram detectados em 33,3% e 5,7%, respectivamente, com freqüência gênica dos alelos S e Z de 0,16 e 0,028. Dois pacientes tinham genótipo SZ (AAT 141 mg/dL (normal, Grupo 2, n = 57. A freqüência de fumantes foi igual nos dois grupos, com carga tabágica maior no Grupo 2. O alelo S estava presente em 13 e 14 pacientes dos Grupos 1 e 2, respectivamente, enquanto que o alelo Z estava presente em 2 e 1 paciente dos mesmos grupos. Não houve diferença nos testes de função pulmonar, nem na freqüência de bronquiectasias ou enfisema entre os dois grupos. Os valores espirométricos e as concentrações de AAT foram similares entre fumantes e não-fumantes. Bronquiectasias foram mais freqüentes entre os não fumantes, e enfisema foi mais freqüente entre os fumantes. CONCLUSÕES: Trinta pacientes apresentaram níveis de AAT abaixo da média esperada para os genótipos MM e MS, e este fato não pode ser explicado por uma freqüência maior dos alelos S e Z.OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT and the presence of S and Z alleles in patients with chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Patients with chronic cough and dyspnea were submitted to clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, nephelometric determination of AAT and determination of S and Z alleles by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking

  16. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P AAT levels were significantly lower (P AAT levels (r = -0.85, P AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  17. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  18. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 predicts pulmonary status declines in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rames Alexis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 may be important in the progression of emphysema, but there have been few longitudinal clinical studies of MMP-9 including pulmonary status and COPD exacerbation outcomes. Methods We utilized data from the placebo arm (n = 126 of a clinical trial of patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD and emphysema to examine the links between plasma MMP-9 levels, pulmonary status, and COPD exacerbations over a one year observation period. Pulmonary function, computed tomography lung density, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT, and COPD exacerbations were assessed at regular intervals over 12 months. Prospective analyses used generalized estimating equations to incorporate repeated longitudinal measurements of MMP-9 and all endpoints, controlling for age, gender, race-ethnicity, leukocyte count, and tobacco history. A secondary analysis also incorporated highly-sensitive C-reactive protein levels in predictive models. Results At baseline, higher plasma MMP-9 levels were cross-sectionally associated with lower FEV1 (p = 0.03, FVC (p Conclusions Increased plasma MMP-9 levels generally predicted pulmonary status declines, including worsening transfer factor and lung density as well as greater COPD exacerbations in AATD-associated emphysema.

  20. Modeling the influence of vitamin D deficiency on cigarette smoke-induced emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardi A. Crane-Godreau

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the primary risk factor for COPD is cigarette smoke exposure, vitamin D deficiency has been epidemiologically implicated as a factor in the progressive development of COPD-associated emphysema. Because of difficulties inherent to studies involving multiple risk factors in the progression of COPD in humans, we developed a murine model in which to study the separate and combined effects of vitamin D deficiency and cigarette smoke exposure. During a 16 week period, mice were exposed to one of four conditions, control diet breathing room air (CD-NS, control diet with cigarette smoke exposure (CD-CSE, vitamin D deficient diet breathing room air (VDD-NS or vitamin D deficient diet with cigarette smoke exposure (VDD-CSE. At the end of the exposure period, the lungs were examined by a pathologist and separately by morphometric analysis. In parallel experiments, mice were anesthetized for pulmonary function testing followed by sacrifice and analysis. Emphysema (determined by an increase in alveolar mean linear intercept length was more severe in the VDD-CSE mice compared to control animals and animals exposed to VDD or CSE alone. The VDD-CSE and the CD-CSE mice had increased total lung capacity and increased static lung compliance. There was also a significant increase in the matrix metalloproteinase-9: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 ratio in VDD-CSE mice compared with all controls. Alpha-1 antitrypsin expression was reduced in VDD-CSE mice as well. In summary, vitamin D deficiency, when combined with cigarette smoke exposure, seemed to accelerate the appearance of emphysemas, perhaps by virtue of an increased protease-antiprotease ratio in the combined VDD-CSE animals. These results support the value of our mouse model in the study of COPD.

  1. Alpha One Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tested Find Support Find Doctor What Is Alpha-1? Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) is a ... results for inhaled augmentation More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website ...

  2. Specific Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links from the National Institutes of Health. Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  3. Reactivity of alpha 1-antitrypsin mutants against proteolytic enzymes of the kallikrein-kinin, complement, and fibrinolytic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patston, P.A.; Roodi, N.; Schifferli, J.A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Schapira, M.

    1990-01-01

    Increased extracellular proteolysis because of unregulated activation of blood coagulation, complement, and fibrinolysis is observed in thrombosis, shock, and inflammation. In the present study, we have examined whether the plasma kallikrein-kinin system, the classical pathway of complement, and the

  4. Rosuvastatin Alters the Proteome of High Density Lipoproteins: Generation of alpha-1-antitrypsin Enriched Particles with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Scott M; McKenzie, Benjamin; Kemeh, Georgina; Sampson, Maureen; Perl, Shira; Young, Neal S; Fessler, Michael B; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-12-01

    Statins lower plasma cholesterol by as much as 50%, thus reducing future cardiovascular events. However, the physiological effects of statins are diverse and not all are related to low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. We performed a small clinical pilot study to assess the impact of statins on lipoprotein-associated proteins in healthy individuals (n = 10) with normal LDL-C (J774 macrophages, demonstrated that the association of A1AT with HDL enhances its antiprotease activity, preventing elastase induced production of tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, we show that statins can significantly alter the protein composition of both LDL and HDL and our studies reveal a novel functional relationship between A1AT and HDL. The up-regulation of A1AT on HDL enhances its anti-inflammatory functionality, which may contribute to the non-lipid lowering beneficial effects of statins. PMID:26483418

  5. Alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as serum biomarkers of disease severity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Kvist, Peter Helding; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten

    2015-01-01

    (Mayo score) and from 40 healthy controls were analyzed by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for 78 potential disease biomarkers. Using the statistical software SIMCA-P+ and GraphPad Prism, multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to identify a limited number of biomarkers to assess...

  6. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria;

    2013-01-01

    estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12)). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare...... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a...

  7. Alpha-1-antitripsin deficiency: the need of a new diagnostic algorithm for improving the diagnostic ability of perinatologists and pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavino Faa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Caution should be taken in considering immunoelectrofocusing (IEF as the best method for the diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT deficiency, particularly in some population, including Sardinians, in which a M-like variant represents the most frequent pathological A1AT variant. Regarding the future, my opinion is that the algorithm generally suggested for reaching a proper diagnosis of this disease should be completely changed. The cut-off of the A1AT serum values should be reconsidered, not to avoid the diagnosis of a number of heterozygous subjects who may be affected by liver and/or lung disease. Given that the two A1AT alleles are co-dominant, and since A1AT is a phase acute protein, in all heterozygous PiMZ or PiM/M-Cagliari subjects carrying an inflammation, the M allele is induced to produce high quantities of A1AT, whose serum levels may reach normal values. In these cases, PCR serum levels should be evaluated and, when increased, the diagnosis of A1AT deficiency should not be excluded even in the presence of serum A1AT levels within the normal range. Gene sequencing should be included, on the basis of our experience, in all neonates and pediatric patients with liver or lung disease of unknown origin, including asthma, avoiding IEF. Finally, for a screening in the perinatal period, I suggest the accurate examination of the electrophoresis of serum proteins. With a similar new approach, I think that we will transform A1AT deficiency from a rare disease into a previously rarely diagnosed disease, changing completely the epidemiology of this complex and fascinating metabolic disease.

  8. Plasminogen-independent initiation of the pro-urokinase activation cascade in vivo. Activation of pro-urokinase by glandular kallikrein (mGK-6) in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Jensen, O N; Bugge, T H;

    2000-01-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin. We suggest that mouse glandular kallikrein mGK-6 is an activator of pro-uPA in the mouse urinary tract in vivo. Since this kallikrein is expressed in a number of tissues and also occurs in plasma, it can also be considered a candidate for a physiological pro-uPA activator in other...

  9. Role of α-1-antitrypsin and oxidative stress in emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Raut, Suryakar AN, Smita D Mhaisekar, Dilip Mhaisekar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the lungs, deficiency of alpha-1antitrypsin can lead to the development of emphysema. Emphysema involves destruction of the lung’s air sacs (alveoli, where oxygen from the air is exchanged for carbon dioxide in the blood. Alpha 1-antitrypsin is a protein produced by the liver and that circulates in the blood. Among other functions, the protein protects the lungs so they can function properly. In people with the disorder, the liver produces too little or no alpha 1 -antitrypsin. Without enough alpha-1 antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase is free to destroy air sac tissue. 60 emphysema patients were included in the study. 100 healthy non-smokers’ were served as controls. Their baseline clinical examination, Alpha 1- antitrysin (AAT, malondialdehyde (MDA and vitamin E were measured. The mean levels of Alpha 1 antitrysin and vitamin E in the patients at baseline were lower (P< 0.001 than the controls. The malondialdehyde were high (P<0.001 in the emphysema patients compared to controls. We found decreased levels of Alpha 1- antitrysin and vitamin E and increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA. Thus the present study confirmed the existence of oxidative stress and altered levels of alpha 1- antitrypsin in emphysema patients.

  10. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  11. The fibrinogen cleavage product Aα-Val360, a specific marker of neutrophil elastase activity in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Richard I; Mumford, Richard A; Treonze, Kelly M;

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is the only recognised genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Since A1AT is the major inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), this enzyme has become widely implicated in the p...

  12. Does Protease-Antiprotease Imbalance Explain Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, David A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually progressive and is associated with the inhalation of noxious gases, typically cigarette smoke. The protease-antiprotease paradigm suggests that the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema is the result of an imbalance between enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix within the lung and proteins that oppose this proteolytic activity. This review assesses the genetic evidence in support of protease-antiprotease imbalance in the pathogenesis of COPD. It also articulates why suppression of protease activity in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may be insufficient to prevent the progression of COPD. Rather, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may be better treated by small-molecules so reads molecules, RNA-silencing, and other strategies that target the protein misfolding and polymerization that cause the disease. PMID:27115947

  13. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and br...

  14. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  15. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N; Ibrahim, M; Tzanakos, N; Peters, H; Yaplito-Lee, J; Pitt, J J

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  16. Unusual Acute Sequelae of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Myriad of Symptoms With One Common Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Alessandro N; McCarthy, Cormac; Carroll, Tomas P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-11-01

    Panniculitis associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is well documented but rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of successful induction of clinical remission of AATD-related panniculitis following a single 120-mg/kg dose administration of plasma-purified α1-antitrypsin (AAT). A 23-year-old man with known PiZZ AATD presented to the hospital with a diffusely swollen and tender right upper limb. This was associated with subcutaneous induration, and a discrepancy of 5 cm in upper limb circumference at the mid arm was noted. There was no convincing precipitant for cellulitis or an infectious cause, and inflammatory markers were raised, with a C-reactive protein (CRP) level of 93.9 mg/L and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 71 mm/h. Doppler ultrasonography ruled out DVT. No antimicrobials or antiinflammatory medications were administered during or prior to admission. Biopsy specimens of the right upper limb revealed extensive panniculitis with neutrophils, foamy macrophages, and fat necrosis. A diagnosis of AATD-associated panniculitis was made. Following this, a single IV dose of 120 mg/kg of plasma-purified AAT was administered. By day 7 post AAT infusion, CRP level had normalized to 4.6 mg/L and ESR had dropped to 22 mm/h. Limb circumference discrepancy on day 7 was 1 cm. There was no tenderness to palpation or induration, and a clinical remission of panniculitis was observed. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of clinical remission following a single treatment with IV AAT at a dose of 120 mg/kg. This opens avenues to more timely and effective treatment of the more severe presentations of AAT-associated panniculitis. PMID:26527439

  17. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency dwarfism isolated GH deficiency isolated HGH deficiency isolated human growth hormone deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency disorder ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  19. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  20. Rare Lung Diseases I – Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM; subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia.

  1. Iatrogenic “buffalo chest” bilateral pneumothoraces following unilateral transbronchial lung biopsies in a bilateral lung transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith Sawalha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 54 year old male patient who had a bilateral lung transplant sixteen years ago for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-related emphysema. He was referred for flexible bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies to evaluate new mild exertional dyspnea and worsening of his FEV1. Eight transbronchial biopsies were done from the right middle lobe and the right lower lobe. Post procedure he developed bilateral pneumothoces that required emergent bilateral pleural ‘pigtail’ catheters. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral pneumothoraces that developed after a unilateral procedure in a bilateral lung transplant recipient relatively late after the transplant.

  2. Disease: H01103 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is a genetic disorder characterized by low plasma levels of A1AT. The condition is associated with emphysematous lung disea...se and also with liver disease. A1AT is the archetype of the serine protease inhibitor. Mutat...e-antiprotease imbalance at the lung surface and emphysema ensues. Inherited metabolic disease; Lung disea...se; Liver disease hsa04610(5265) Complement and coagulation cascades SERPINA1 [HSA:...aggart CC, McElvaney NG Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a conformational disease associated with lung and li

  3. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  4. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  5. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  7. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor V deficiency is a condition that is passed down through families, which affects the ability of the blood ... These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a lack of Factor ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  10. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic disorders ...

  11. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  15. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  16. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  18. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  19. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  1. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A; Laforet, P; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, E; Doutreleau, S; Geny, B; Akman, H O; Dimauro, S; Vissing, J

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  2. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar K; Bava H; Shetty J; Joshi M

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of a 3 month old child with lipoprotein lipase deficiency who presented with bronchopneumonia is reported. After noticing lipaemic serum and lipaemia retinalis, a diagnosis of hyperlipoproteinaemia was considered. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency was confirmed with post heparin lipoprotein lipase enzyme activity estimation.

  3. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  4. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.A.; Glenny, R.W.; Godwin, J.D.; Hampson, N.B.; Cantino, M.E.; Reichenbach, D.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1991-03-01

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  5. Panlobular emphysema in young intravenous Ritalin abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied a distinctive group of young intravenous Ritalin abusers with profound obstructive lung disease. Clinically, they seemed to have severe emphysema, but the pathologic basis of their symptoms had not been investigated previously. Seven patients have died and been autopsied: in four, the lungs were fixed, inflated, dried, and examined in detail radiologically, grossly, microscopically, and by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. All seven patients had severe panlobular (panacinar) emphysema that tended to be more severe in the lower lung zones and that was associated with microscopic talc granulomas. Vascular involvement by talc granulomas was variable, but significant interstitial fibrosis was not present. Five patients were tested for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and found to be normal, as were six similar living patients. These findings indicate that some intravenous drug abusers develop emphysema that clinically, radiologically, and pathologically resembles that caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but which must have a different pathogenesis. Talc from the Ritalin tablets may be important, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, ...

  8. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  9. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 22, 2012 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact Us FAQs Home » ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  17. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  18. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth...

  19. Iron deficiency anemia Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, İnci

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron deficient nutrition blood loss and malabsorption Children may have paleness cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia pica epithelial changes as koilonychia glossitis angular stomatitis Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: ...

  20. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... G6PD deficiency occurs when a person is missing or doesn't have enough of an enzyme called glucose- ...

  2. Medical image of the week: panloubular emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60 year old female, non-smoker with a past medical history of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps presented with an eight year history of productive cough and dyspnea. Previous treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, courses of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics provided modest improvement in her symptoms. Pulmonary function testing revealed a severe obstructive ventilatory defect without significant bronchodilator response and reduced diffusing capacity (DLCO. Chest x-ray surprisingly revealed lower lobe predominant emphysematous changes (Figure 1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin level was within normal range at 137 mg/dL. Panlobular emphysema represents permanent destruction of the entire acinus distal to the respiratory bronchioles and is more likely to affect the lower lobes compared to centrilobular emphysema (1. Panlobular emphysema is associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, intravenous drug abuse specifically with methylphenidate and methadone, Swyer-James syndrome, and obliterative bronchiolitis. Whether this pattern is seen as part of normal senescence in non-smoking individuals remains controversial (2. Panlobular emphysema may ...

  3. [A case report of hereditary angioedema and studies on the serum components of complement, C1-inactivator and proteinase inhibitors during edema attack].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, A; Kohno, M

    1987-05-01

    Sixteen years old girl was admitted because of for the past ten years' frequent edema attack and abdominal pain. Laboratory examination revealed hypocomplementemia, marked depletion of the fourth component of complement and low level of C1-inactivator. Familial studies revealed that her mother was also hypocomplementemic and in low level of C1-inactivator. Serial studies performed on the alterlation of components of complement, C1-inactivator, alpha 1-antitrypsin, antithrombin III, and alpha 2-macroglobulin during edema attack. The fourth component of complement and C1-inactivator were markedly depleted in remission and attack. Remarkable depletion was found in antithrombin III and esterase inhibition activity of C1-inactivator during attack. In contrast, alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 2-macroglobulin did not change. The present study may explain that Hageman factor fragments, activated by C1s, promotes kinin generation via kalikrein activation. And the condition that complete functional deficiency of C1-inactivator was main role in this circuit. Fibrynolysis and late components of complement was less influence on edema attack. PMID:3610041

  4. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  8. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael; Christensen, Ernst; Gahrn, Birthe; Christensen, Mette; Bross, Peter; Vested, Anne; Simonsen, Henrik; Skogstrand, Kristin; Olpin, Simon; Brandt, Niels Jacob; Skovby, Flemming; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Gregersen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/M...

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  10. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  11. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  12. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I.; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  13. Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahari

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to draw attention to iron deficiency anemia which is the most common nutritional disturbance in infants and children. Iron deficiency anemia constitutes the most prevalent form of anemia in this age group. The records of infants and children admitted to the Pediatric Department of Tehran University Puhlavi Hospital for various ailments during a one year period (Mnrch l!l63 - HHi-t were analyzed. 262 infants and children out of a total number of an5, or 7t•/., showed iron deficiency anemia detect cd by blood film studies and hemoglobin determination, The majority, 123 or 4{.!t•/., of these patients were infants and children between six months and two years of age. The etiology indicates that faulty feeding is the main cause. Infections, parnsitcs, and hemorrhage were among other causes observed. ,'('itll regard to treatment, parenteral iron was preferred because cf its ef., Icctivcncss in short periods of hospital stay. In conclusion, the routine study of blood films and hemoglobin determiualion, especially in the low socio _ economic group of medically less organized countries is advised

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  15. Protein misfolding and degradation in genetic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Andresen, Brage S.;

    1999-01-01

    in which proteins fold. Within the context of genetic diseases, we review knowledge on the molecular processes underlying protein quality control in the various subcellular compartments. The important impact of such systems for variability of the expression of genetic deficiencies is emphasised.......Investigations of genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, phenylketonuria, mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies, and many others have shown that enhanced proteolytic degradation of mutant proteins is a common molecular pathological mechanism. Detailed...... appears to be the case for many missense mutations and short in-frame deletions or insertions that represent a major fraction of the mutations detected in genetic diseases. In some diseases, or under some circumstances, the degradation system is not efficient. Instead, aberrant folding leads to...

  16. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  18. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  19. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  20. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  1. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  2. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative...

  3. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  4. Protein misfolding and degradation in genetic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Corydon, T J; Andresen, B S;

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, phenylketonuria, mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies, and many others have shown that enhanced proteolytic degradation of mutant proteins is a common molecular pathological mechanism. Detailed...... studies of the fate of mutant proteins in some of these diseases have revealed that impaired or aberrant folding of mutant polypeptides typically results in prolonged interaction with molecular chaperones and degradation by intracellular proteases before the functional conformation is acquired. This...... appears to be the case for many missense mutations and short in-frame deletions or insertions that represent a major fraction of the mutations detected in genetic diseases. In some diseases, or under some circumstances, the degradation system is not efficient. Instead, aberrant folding leads to...

  5. Cleft palate and gonadotrophin deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillis, P H; Peeters, R.

    1984-01-01

    A boy who had previously had a cleft lip and palate repaired and bilateral orchiopexies presented at 16 years of age with delayed puberty. Isolated gonadotrophin deficiency and testicular hyporesponsiveness to human chorionic gonadotrophin were found. The possibility of bilateral cryptorchidism due to gonadotrophin deficiency should be considered in boys with either cleft lip or palate, or both.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  7. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Title Other Names: G6PD ... G6PD deficiency Categories: Newborn Screening Summary Summary Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  10. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CPT I deficiency carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency is a condition ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: factor XIII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... InfoSearch: Factor XIII deficiency Factor XIII Registry Database: Introduction to Factor XIII Deficiency MalaCards: factor xiii deficiency ... Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions combined pituitary hormone deficiency combined pituitary hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Combined pituitary hormone deficiency is a condition that causes ...

  16. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into...... childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cutoff below or above 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Data on death were identified in national registries. Sex- and cause-specific mortalities were identified in CO and AO GHD when compared with controls. RESULTS: Mortality was increased...... in CO and AO GHD in both genders, when compared with controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for CO males was 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5-15.1) and for females 9.4 (CI 4.6-19.4). For AO males, HR was 1.9 (CI 1.7-2.2) and for females 3.4 (CI 2.9-4.0). We found a significantly higher HR in AO females...

  17. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  18. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  19. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  20. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  1. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Muscular Dystrophy Association: Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Muscle AMP deaminase deficiency ...

  2. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  3. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  4. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  5. Health Consequences of Iodine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-01-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in ...

  6. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme...

  7. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  8. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    COPD is now widely recognized as a complex heterogeneous syndrome, having both pulmonary and extrapulmonary features. In clinical practice, the diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation, as assessed by post-bronchodilator spirometry. The severity of the airflow...... limitation, as measured by percent predicted FEV1, provides important information to the physician to enable optimization of management. However, in order to accurately assess the complexity of COPD, there need to be other measures made beyond FEV1. At present, there is a lack of reliable and simple blood...... biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...

  9. Long-range correlations of serial FEV1 measurements in emphysematous patients and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Madsen, F;

    1998-01-01

    autocorrelated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation structure in time series of FEV1 measurements. Nineteen patients with severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (phenotype PiZ) and moderate to severe emphysema and two subjects with normal lungs were followed for several years with daily self......-administered spirometry. FEV1 measurements fulfilling standard criteria were detrended, and the autocorrelation profile and the power spectrum were calculated. On average the subjects were followed for >3 yr and performed >1,000 acceptable spirometries. The autocorrelation of FEV1 measurements in the emphysematous...... autocorrelation function in the two normal subjects showed a similar pattern, but with a faster decay toward zero. In the patients, the power spectrum had a peak at 1 cycle/wk and showed a 1/f pattern, where f is frequency, with a slope of -0.88 at lower frequencies. We conclude that serial spirometric...

  10. Cardiac Failure after Liver Transplantation Requiring a Biventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Jermyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased hepatic iron load in extrahepatic organs of cirrhotic patients with and without hereditary hemochromatosis portends a poorer long term prognosis after liver transplant. Hepatic as well as nonhepatic iron overload is associated with increased infectious and postoperative complications, including cardiac dysfunction. In this case report, we describe a cirrhotic patient with alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency and nonhereditary hemochromatosis (non-HFE that developed cardiogenic shock requiring mechanical circulatory support for twenty days after liver transplant. Upon further investigation, she was found to have significant iron deposition in both the liver and heart biopsies. Her heart regained complete and sustained recovery following ten days of mechanical biventricular support. This case highlights the importance of preoperatively recognizing extrahepatic iron deposition in patients referred for liver transplantation irrespective of etiology of liver disease as this may prevent postoperative complications.

  11. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  12. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S. [Reproductive Genetics Institute, Chicage, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  13. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Heliane Guerra Serra; Carmen Sílvia Bertuzzo; Mônica Corso Pereira; Cláudio Lúcio Rossi; Walter Pinto Júnior; Ilma Aparecida Paschoal

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT) e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes i...

  14. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  15. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  16. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  17. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  18. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    HU, Rehman

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  19. Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    HU, Rehman

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions TH deficiency tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency ...

  1. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause ... National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary condition in ...

  2. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  3. G6PD Deficiency in Turkish Cypriots

    OpenAIRE

    SÖZÜÖZ, Ayşe

    1998-01-01

    1108 Turkish Cypriot men and 318 male labourers from mainland Turkey were screened for G6PD deficiency and haemoglobinopathy traits. The results revealed a 6.7% G6PD deficiency rate in the Turkish Cypriot men and a 1.6% prevalance rate in the Turkish men. The mean haemoglobin level of the G6PD deficient males was approximately 1g/dl lower than that of the non-deficient males.

  4. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, D. A.; Loder, R T; Crandall, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) we...

  5. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  6. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  7. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  9. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Vissing, John; Akman, Hasan O; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency (glycogen storage disease type X) has been reported in 12 patients of whom 9 were African American. OBJECTIVE: To describe 2 patients, 1 of Pakistani and 1 of Italian ethnic origin, with typical clinical and biochemical changes of glycogen...... type X is not confined to the African American population, is often associated with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proliferation, and is genetically heterogeneous....

  10. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  11. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  12. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  13. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  14. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  15. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are benefit in genetic or acquired disorders of energy production to improve fatty acid oxidation, to remove accumulated toxic fatty acyl-CoA metabolites, or to restore the balance between free and acyl-CoA. Two disorders have been described in children where the supply of carnitine becomes limiting for fatty acid oxidation: (1) A recessive defect of the muscle/kidney sodium-dependent, plasma membrane carnitine symporter, which presents in infancy with cardiomyopathy or hypoketotic hypoglycemia; treatment with oral carnitine is required for survival. (2) Chronic administration of pivalate-conjugated antibiotics in which excretion of pivaloyl-carnitine can lead to carnitine depletion; tissue levels may become low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation, although no cases of illness due to carnitine deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal

  16. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  17. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse. We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy. Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neurops...

  18. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N; Anaissie, E J; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of P...

  19. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejs FOMINS; Ozolinsh, Maris

    2011-01-01

    Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral...

  20. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad khalaj; Ameneh Barikani; Mozhgan Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD) is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP...

  1. SEAWEED SUPPLEMENTATION TO PREVENT IODINE DEFICIENCY

    OpenAIRE

    Juhi Agarwal; Sirimavo Nair

    2012-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the essential elements for the proper functioning of the hormones of human and animal thyroid glands. In many parts of the world iodine deficiency disorders develop because of deficiency of iodine in water and food supply. An iodine deficient goitrous mother may give birth to a cretinous baby because the fetus requires an adequate secretion of thyroxine during the later stages of pregnancy. Seaweed has such a large proportion of iodine compared to dietary minimu...

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Aysel Milanlıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse.We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy.Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neuropsychiatric ...

  3. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Breymann, C; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that le...

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency in Early Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Flood-Nichols, Shannon K.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huang, Raywin R.; Napolitano, Peter G.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes. Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singlet...

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Andıran, Nesibe; Çelik, Nurullah; AKÇA, Halise; Doğan, Güzide

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is an important health problem in both developed and developing countries. Recent reports on the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have led to increased interest in prevalence studies on states of deficiency/insufficiency of vitamin D. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children and adolescents residing in Ankara, Turkey and to investigate the factors associated with low vitamin D status. Methods: A...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Immune System National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's ...

  7. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, D A; Loder, R T; Crandall, R C

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) were treated by foot ablation. Prosthetic problems relating to proximal or distal tibiofibular instability may necessitate additional surgical intervention. PMID:12879290

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Malaria: Cytochemical Detection of Heterozygous G6PD Deficiency in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Anna L.; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a X-chromosomally transmitted disorder of the erythrocyte that affects 400 million people worldwide. Diagnosis of heterozygously-deficient women is complicated: as a result of lyonization, these women have a normal and a G6PD-deficient population of erythrocytes. The cytochemical assay is the only reliable assay to discriminate between heterozygously-deficient women and non-deficient women or homozygously-deficient women. G6PD deficiency ...

  9. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Mueller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A. [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. ({gamma}, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained. (orig.)

  10. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A.

    2006-03-01

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. (γ, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained.

  11. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  12. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  13. Short Stature and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Matemi, Sezer

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the importance of measurements of height and weight in normal children and emphasizes the role of growth increments for the diagnosis of short stature Causes of short stature methods for diagnosis of GH hormone deficiency actions of growth hormone treatment of growth hormone deficiency and doses for biosynthetic GH treatment are described Key words: Short Stature Growth Hormone

  14. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  15. Genetics Home Reference: beta-ketothiolase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Genetic Testing Registry: Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... Testing Registry (1 link) Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase ACT Sheets (1 link) Elevated C5-OH Acylcarnitine ...

  16. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan Saritha; Divya Gupta; Laxmisha Chandrashekar; Devinder M Thappa; Nachiappa G Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn′s disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common cause of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency , accounting for approximately 80 percent of cases. These mutations ... deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (5 links) ...

  19. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  20. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the complement system decreases blood levels of another complement protein called C3, reducing the immune system's ability to fight infections. ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition C3 inactivator deficiency complement component 3 inactivator deficiency Related Information How are ...

  1. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  2. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  3. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ...

  4. UniProt search blastx result: AK287588 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287588 J065045K19 P01010|A1AT_PAPAN Alpha-1-antitrypsin precursor (Alpha-1 protease inhibitor) ... 1-antiproteinase) (AAT) (Fragment) - Papio anubis (Olive ... baboon) 1.00E-17 ...

  5. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  6. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  7. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    that the bound THF serves to protect the FAD class of histone demethylases from the destructive effects of formaldehyde generation by formation of 5,10-methylene-THF. We present pilot data showing that decreased folate in livers as a result of dietary folate deficiency is associated with increased levels of methylated lysine 4 of histone 3. This can be a result of decreased LSD1 activity resulting from the decreased folate available to scavenge the formaldehyde produced at the active site caused by the folate deficiency. Because LSD1 can regulate gene expression this suggests that folate may play a more important role than simply serving as a carrier of one-carbon units and be a factor in other diseases associated with low folate. PMID:26880641

  8. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Dopamine beta (β)-hydroxylase deficiency is a condition that ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions mannose-binding lectin deficiency mannose-binding lectin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is a condition that affects the immune ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  12. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This ... is the best tool for prevention of the flu, should patients with immune deficiency be given the ...

  13. Primary Immuno-deficiencies (PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghaffari1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 6 June, 2009 ; Accepted 22 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Primary immune-deficiencies (PID are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders along with variable symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve our knowledge regarding PID from patients that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital.Materials and methods: We evaluated all of PID`s that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital from their data records. Demography, clinical and laboratory data were recorded and then analyzed.Results: In the duration of 3 years, we had 10 patients with PID (7 males and 3 females. Of these cases, 5 had hum oral (50%, 1case had phagocytic (10%, 3 cases had cellular (30% and 1 case had hyper IgE syndrome (10%. Many of them had respiratory and otitis media infections, while a few patients had adenitis, gastroenteritis, liver abscesses, bleedings and malignancy.Conclusion: PID is a diverse disorder that involves different immune systems. Knowledge from patient’s clinical symptoms and consideration in their differential diagnosis can be helpful in early diagnosis and an effective treatment.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(70: 76-80 (Persian

  14. Cernunnos deficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turul, T; Tezcan, I; Sanal, O

    2011-01-01

    B cell-negative severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by molecules involved in the variable (diversity) joining (V[D]J) recombination process. Four genes involved in the nonhomologous end joining pathway--Artemis, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase 4, and Cernunnos--are involved in B cell-negative radiosensitive SCID. Deficiencies in DNA ligase 4 and the recently described Cernunnos gene result in microcephaly, growth retardation, and typical bird-like facies. Lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels indicate a defect in V(D)J recombination. We present a case with recurrent postnatal pulmonary infections leading to chronic lung disease, disseminated molluscum contagiosum, lymphopenia, low IgG, IgA and normal IgM levels. Our patient had phenotypic features such as microcephaly and severe growth retardation. Clinical presentation in patients with the B cell-negative subtype ranges from SCID to atypical combined immunodeficiency, occasionally associated with autoimmune manifestations and cytomegalovirus infection. Our patient survived beyond infancy with combined immunodeficiency and no autoimmune manifestations. PMID:21721379

  15. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  16. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  17. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of 3H-leucine and Na35SO4 into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions

  18. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    OpenAIRE

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  19. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID

    OpenAIRE

    Schuetz, Catharina; Neven, Benedicte; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J.; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A.; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    No difference in survival, early toxicity, or occurrence of tumors between ARTEMIS and RAG-deficient SCID.ARTEMIS-deficient patients develop late toxicity following HCT: growth retardation, endocrinologic deficiencies, and dental abnormalities.

  20. C3 Deficiency – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Carreiro-Martins, P; Gaspar, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.

    2006-01-01

    O sistema do complemento é um componente essencial do sistema imunitário inato, pelo que as deficiências de proteínas da sua complexa cascata podem ter consequências mais ou menos graves, de acordo com a importância do factor afectado. As complicações mais usuais das deficiências do complemento são infecções recorrentes a bactérias encapsuladas e distúrbios autoimunes. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico de deficiência do factor C3, situação extremamente rara, discutindo a fisiopatolo...

  1. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  2. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26664847

  3. Investigation of suspected growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, R. D. G.; Burns, E C

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes views of the Health Services Human Growth Hormone Committee on how a child suspected of growth hormone deficiency should be investigated in a district general hospital or in a regional growth centre.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elevated acidity in the blood and tissues (metabolic acidosis). In addition to the features present in moderate ... Kaabachi N, Hachicha M. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency. Fetal Pediatr Pathol. ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Metabolic Conditions Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Deficiency of phosphoglycerate kinase ...

  6. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Vitamin D deficiency (Beyond the Basics) Author Marc K Drezner, ... topic last updated: Jun 09, 2015. INTRODUCTION — Vitamin D plays an important role in many places throughout ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body is unable to use the vitamin biotin effectively. This disorder is classified as a multiple ... impaired activity of certain enzymes that depend on biotin. The signs and symptoms of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clark AJ, Metherell LA. ACTH resistance: genes and mechanisms. Endocr Dev. 2013;24:57-66. doi: 10. ... Metherell LA. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency: New genes and mechanisms. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2013 May 22;371(1- ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... net Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Hyper ... Haas D, Hoffmann GF. Mevalonate kinase deficiency and autoinflammatory disorders. N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 28; ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in a shortage of red blood cells ( anemia ). Chronic hemolytic anemia can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing ... ducts (gallstones) may also occur in this disorder. Hemolytic anemia in GPI deficiency can range from mild to ...

  14. Somatomedin C deficiency in Asian sisters.

    OpenAIRE

    McGraw, M E; Price, D A; D. J. Hill

    1986-01-01

    Two sisters of Asian origin showed typical clinical and biochemical features of primary somatomedin C (SM-C) deficiency (Laron dwarfism). Abnormalities of SM-C binding proteins were observed, one sister lacking the high molecular weight (150 Kd) protein.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or mtDNA, which is essential for the normal function of these structures. Deoxyguanosine kinase is involved in producing and maintaining the ... DNA (known as mitochondrial DNA depletion) impairs mitochondrial function ... deficiency . Learn more about the gene associated ...

  16. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  17. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    -deficiency may be at risk for developing hyperthermia. To pursue this, we performed a controlled study on sweating and body temperature regulation during exercise in the heat in 16 GH-treated GH-deficient patients with normalized insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor/binding protein-3 serum...... levels [11 with multiple pituitary deficiency (MPD) and 5 with isolated GH deficiency] and in 10 healthy subjects as controls (CTs). Each subject exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 60 min at a workload corresponding to 45% of their individual maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), in a room maintained at...... 35 C. GH serum concentrations increased significantly after approximately 10 min of exercise in the CTs (P <0.001) but remained low in the patients. Body heat storage was significantly higher in the patients compared with the CTs [89 (SE +/- 10) watts (MPD) vs. 37 (SE +/- 8) watts (CTs), P <0...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  19. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  20. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  1. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Review

    OpenAIRE

    Şaşmaz, İlgen

    2009-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway providing reducing power to all cells in the form of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect being present in more than 400 million people worldwide G6PD deficiency is an X linked hereditary genetic defect caused by mutations in the G6PD gene Clinical presentations include acute hemolytic anemia chronic hemolytic anemia neonatal...

  2. Androgen deficiency and aging in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Swerdloff, R S; Wang, C

    1993-01-01

    Androgen levels decrease with age in men. Androgen deficiency in men older than 65 years leads to asthenia, a decrease in muscle mass, osteoporosis, and a decrease in sexual activity. Androgen deficiency has been reported to cause changes in mood and cognitive function. The combination of these factors results in impaired quality of life in older men. Androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal men increases bone and muscle mass, enhances muscle and cardiovascular function, and improves sexua...

  3. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Briani; Chiara Dalla Torre; Valentina Citton; Renzo Manara; Sara Pompanin; Gianni Binotto; Fausto Adami

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and...

  4. Congenital leptin deficiency and thyroid function

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Filho Gilberto; Delibasi Tuncay; Erol Halil K; Wong Ma-Li; Licinio Julio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid function is closely related to leptin's secretion by the adipose tissue. In states of leptin-deficiency, the circadian rhythm of TSH is altered, leading to central hypothyroidism in animal models. In humans, central hypothyroidism has also been described in rare cases of congenital leptin deficiency. However, the thyroid phenotype in these cases is heterogeneous, with the occurrence of central hypothyroidism in a minority of cases. Here we describe thyroid function in four l...

  5. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106Sn, high spin states in 107Sn and 107In; Yrast levels of 106Sn, 107Sn, 108Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112Xe. All these results are discussed

  6. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF. PMID:26657161

  7. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  8. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  9. Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Inaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikoff, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the British Medical Journal boldly stated in an editorial headline, “Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Action.” 1 The urgency was clear: vitamin D deficiency was going undiagnosed and untreated in large numbers of people. Patients were at risk and suffering needlessly. A simple, extremely low-cost, low-toxicity intervention was readily available. All that was required was vitamin D advocacy.

  10. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in adults presented with anemia. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen months admission data was reviewed for G6PD deficiency as a cause of anemia. Anemia was defined by world health organization (WHO) criteria as haemoglobin less than 11.3 gm%. G6PD activity was measured by Sigma dye decolorisation method. All patients were screened for complications of hemolysis and its possible cause. Patients with more than 13 years of age were included in the study. Results: Out of 3600 patients admitted, 1440 were found anaemic and 49 as G6PD deficient. So the frequency of G6PD deficiency in anaemic patients was 3.4% and the overall frequency is 1.36%. G6PD deficiency among males and females was three and six percent respectively. Antimalarials and antibiotics containing sulphonamide group were the most common precipitating factors for hemolysis. Anemia and jaundice were the most common presentations while malaria was the most common associated disease. Acute renal failure was the most severe complication occurring in five patients with two deaths. Conclusion: G6PD deficiency is a fairly common cause of anemia with medicine as common precipitating factor for hemolysis. Such complications can be avoided with early recognition of the disease and avoiding indiscriminate use of medicine. (author)

  11. Iron deficiency: from diagnosis to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Vanessa; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Abitbol, Vered; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of anaemia worldwide. It impairs quality of life, increases asthenia and can lead to clinical worsening of patients. In addition, iron deficiency has a complex mechanism whose pathologic pathway is recently becoming better understood. The discovery of hepcidin has allowed a better clarification of iron metabolism regulation. Furthermore, the ratio of concentration of soluble transferrin receptor to the log of the ferritin level, has been developed as a tool to detect iron deficiency in most situations. The cause of iron deficiency should always be sought because the underlying condition can be serious. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding diagnostic algorithms for iron deficiency anaemia. The majority of aetiologies occur in the digestive tract, in men and postmenopausal women, and justify morphological examination of the gut. First line investigations are upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy, and when negative, the small bowel should be explored; newer tools such as video capsule endoscopy have also been developed. The treatment of iron deficiency is aetiological if possible and iron supplementation whether in oral or in parenteral form. New parenteral formulations are available and seem to have promising results in terms of efficacy and safety. PMID:23582772

  12. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions. PMID:22217304

  13. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  14. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported. PMID:26813501

  15. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77

  17. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  18. Clinical implications of vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common medical problem worldwide and its prevalence rises along with latitude, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, limited sunlight exposure and aging. A great body of evidence has shown that patients with vitamin D deficiency have increased cardiovascular risks and total mortality. Conversely, the presence of comorbidities progressive with age such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension places the patients at an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The multidirectional effect of vitamin D deficiency is present in different phases of the aging process. Based on the literature review, the risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency most often found in post-menopausal women include limited sun exposure and time spent outdoors, inadequate dietary vitamin D intake, winter season and increased age. Vitamin D supplementation in this group might offer prevention of falls and fractures and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, what may be especially important in osteoporotic and elderly populations. Prevention and treatment processes involve education regarding sunlight exposure and pharmacological cholecalciferol supplementation according to the recommendations for Central Europe. This manuscript reviews the role of vitamin D and its deficiency and considers their clinical implications, with particular regard to peri- and postmenopausal women.

  19. Patient reported outcome in posttraumatic pituitary deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Stochholm, Kirstine; Janukonyté, Jurgita;

    2015-01-01

    with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in relation to deficiencies identified upon pituitary assessment. DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Participants were Danish patients with a head trauma diagnosis recorded in the Danish Board of Health diagnostic code registry...... were observed with declining total testosterone concentrations (men), but not free testosterone concentrations or any other hormone concentrations. Total testosterone was not independently related to impaired QoL and fatigue, after adjustment for demographics, and treatment with antidiabetics, opioids......, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. CONCLUSIONS: Only a very limited relationship between pituitary hormone deficiencies and QoL/fatigue was demonstrated. Due to the dominating influence of concurrent comorbidities, pituitary deficiencies were not independently related to QoL/fatigue. Causality is still to be...

  20. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs FOMINS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral data was converted to cone signals, and successive mathematics applied to provide a simple simulation of the test performance. Colorimetric data of the each pixel of the test image can be calculated and distribution of color coordinates is presented.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.259

  1. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Joshaghani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a toxic material for mammalians. It is detoxificated and converted to urea in the urea cycle in liver. Each defect in the urea cycle cause increase in blood ammonia level. Ornithine transcarbamylase enzyme (OTC is the second enzyme in the urea cycle that exists in mitochondria. OTC deficiency is the most common hereditary disorder in the urea cycle. In this study, 45 hyper ammonia patients were selected (2-13 years old and assayed for serum OTC, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT. Four patients (n=45, 8.9% suffered from OTC deficiency. One patient was male (n=29, 3.4% and the others were female (n=16, 18.8%. About half of children (53.3 with hyper ammonia have liver disease. Further studies on OTC deficiency and OTC gene mutations in Iran are recommended.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K Flood-Nichols

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes.This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singleton gestations without significant medical problems. Competitive enzymatic vitamin D assays were performed on banked plasma specimens and pregnancy outcomes were collected after delivery. Logistic regression was performed on patients stratified by plasma vitamin D concentration and the following combined clinical outcomes: preeclampsia, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion.Vitamin D concentrations were obtained from 235 patients (mean age 24.3 years, range 18-40 years. Seventy percent of our study population was vitamin D insufficient with a serum concentration less than 30 ng/mL (mean serum concentration 27.6 ng/mL, range 13-71.6 ng/mL. Logistic regression was performed adjusting for age, race, body mass index, tobacco use, and time of year. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included preeclampsia, growth restriction, preterm delivery, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion. There was no association between vitamin D deficiency and composite adverse pregnancy outcomes with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.01 (p value 0.738, 95% confidence intervals 0.961-1.057.Vitamin D deficiency did not associate with adverse pregnancy outcomes in this study population. However, the high percentage of affected individuals highlights the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young, reproductive-aged women.

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency and association of Vitamin D deficiency in patients with tuberculosis. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Department, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian, from July 2010 to June 2012. Methodology: One hundred and five outdoor patients of tuberculosis were selected with 255 gender matched controls. Tuberculosis was diagnosed by presence of acid fast bacilli in sputum smears, positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or demonstration of chronic caseating granulomatous inflammation in tissue specimens. Controls were drawn randomly from general population. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25 (OH) D3] levels < 25 ng/ml was considered Vitamin D deficiency. The results were analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: Mean Vitamin D levels were 23.23 A+- 6.81 ng/ml in cases, 29.27 A+- 8.89 ng/ml in controls (p < 0.0001). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57% of cases and 33% controls (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in females with tuberculosis (20.84 ng/ml) as compared to males (25.03 ng/ml, p = 0.002). Mean BMI in patients of tuberculosis with Vitamin D deficiency were 19.51 A+- 1.77 kg/m2 and in patients with normal Vitamin D were 21.65 A+- 1.79 kg/m2 (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis was lower to a mean of 15.41 A+- 4.67 ng/ml (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: There is significant deficiency of Vitamin D in patients with tuberculosis as compared to controls. This deficiency is more pronounced in females, individuals with low BMI, extra pulmonary and MDR tuberculosis. (author)

  4. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency: diagnosis and management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Jerry; Andersson, Hans C; Antshel, Kevin M; Braverman, Nancy E; Burton, Barbara K; Frazier, Dianne M; Mitchell, John; Smith, Wendy E; Thompson, Barry H; Berry, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, traditionally known as phenylketonuria, results in the accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood of affected individuals and was the first inborn error of metabolism to be identified through population screening. Early identification and treatment prevent the most dramatic clinical sequelae of the disorder, but new neurodevelopmental and psychological problems have emerged in individuals treated from birth. The additional unanticipated recognition of a toxic effect of elevated maternal phenylalanine on fetal development has added to a general call in the field for treatment for life. Two major conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health held >10 years apart reviewed the state of knowledge in the field of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, but there are no generally accepted recommendations for therapy. The purpose of this guideline is to review the strength of the medical literature relative to the treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and to develop recommendations for diagnosis and therapy of this disorder. Evidence review from the original National Institutes of Health consensus conference and a recent update by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used to address key questions in the diagnosis and treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency by a working group established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. The group met by phone and in person over the course of a year to review these reports, develop recommendations, and identify key gaps in our knowledge of this disorder. Above all, treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency must be life long, with a goal of maintaining blood phenylalanine in the range of 120-360 µmol/l. Treatment has predominantly been dietary manipulation, and use of low protein and phenylalanine medical foods is likely to remain a major component of therapy for the immediate future. Pharmacotherapy for phenylalanine

  5. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain......'s sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype....

  6. Serum thymulin in human zinc deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, A S; Meftah, S; J. Abdallah; Kaplan, J.; Brewer, G J; Bach, J F; Dardenne, M

    1988-01-01

    The activity of thymulin (a thymic hormone) is dependent on the presence of zinc in the molecule. We assayed serum thymulin activity in three models of mildly zinc-deficient (ZD) human subjects before and after zinc supplementation: (a) two human volunteers in whom a specific and mild zinc deficiency was induced by dietary means; (b) six mildly ZD adult sickle cell anemia (SCA) subjects; and (c) six mildly ZD adult non-SCA subjects. Their plasma zinc levels were normal and they showed no over...

  7. Tumoral calcinosis with vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with recurrent calcified mass in the left gluteal region. The clinical, radiological, and biochemical profile confirmed the diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. She also had associated vitamin D deficiency. The patient underwent surgical removal of the mass to relieve the sciatic nerve compression and was managed with acetazolamide, calcium carbonate, and aluminium hydroxide gel with which she showed significant improve-ment. The management implications and effect of vitamin D deficiency on phosphate metabolism in the setting of tumoral calcinosis is discussed.

  8. Hyperaldosteronism in Klotho-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Stephanie S.; Kempe, Daniela S.; Leibrock, Christina B.; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Siraskar, Balasaheb; Boini, Krishna M.; Ackermann, Teresa F.; Föller, Michael; Hocher, Berthold; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Klotho is a membrane protein participating in the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on the formation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. It participates in the regulation of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption and stimulates renal tubular Ca2+ reabsorption. Klotho hypomorphic mice (klothohm) suffer from severe growth deficit, rapid aging, and early death, events largely reversed by a vitamin D-deficient diet. The present study explored the role of Klotho deficiency in mineral and electrolyte...

  9. Sequential growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Heffernan, A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a pituitary tumour presenting initially with growth hormone deficiency and requiring treatment with human growth hormone. Eight years later he represented with acromegaly. This sequence of events has not to my knowledge been reported previously.

  10. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Briani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD, is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established.

  11. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-05-15

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode proteins not directly involved in COX assembly can also cause LS. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates mRNA stability, polyadenylation and coordinates mitochondrial translation. In humans, mutations in Lrpprc cause the French Canadian type of LS. Despite the finding that LRPPRC deficiency affects the stability of most mitochondrial mRNAs, its pathophysiological effect has mainly been attributed to COX deficiency. Surprisingly, we show here that the impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production observed in Lrpprc conditional knockout mouse hearts is caused by an ATP synthase deficiency. Furthermore, the appearance of inactive subassembled ATP synthase complexes causes hyperpolarization and increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our findings shed important new light on the bioenergetic consequences of the loss of LRPPRC in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:24399447

  12. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  13. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a ...

  14. Hyperglucagonemia during insulin deficiency accelerates protein catabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperglucagonemia coexists with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance in many conditions where urinary nitrogen excretion is increased, but the precise role of glucagon in these conditions is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperglucagonemia on protein metabolism in insulin-deficient subjects. The authors used the stable isotope of an essential amino acid (L-[1-13C]leucine) as a tracer of in vivo protein metabolism. A combined deficiency of insulin and glucagon was induced by intravenous infusion of somatostatin. Hyperglucagonemia and hypoinsulinemia were induced by infusions of somatostatin and glucagon. When somatostatin alone was infused leucine flux increased, indicating a 6-17% increase in proteolysis. When somatostatin and glucagon were infused, leucine flux increased, indicating a 12-32% increase in proteolysis. The increase in leucine flux during the infusion of somatostatin and glucagon was higher than the increase during infusion of somatostatin alone. Somatostatin alone did not change leucine oxidation, whereas the somatostatin plus glucagon increased leucine oxidation 100%. They conclude that hyperglucagonemia accelerated proteolysis and leucine oxidation in insulin-deficient humans

  15. SEAWEED SUPPLEMENTATION TO PREVENT IODINE DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Agarwal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is considered as one of the essential elements for the proper functioning of the hormones of human and animal thyroid glands. In many parts of the world iodine deficiency disorders develop because of deficiency of iodine in water and food supply. An iodine deficient goitrous mother may give birth to a cretinous baby because the fetus requires an adequate secretion of thyroxine during the later stages of pregnancy. Seaweed has such a large proportion of iodine compared to dietary minimum requirements, that it is primarily known as a source of this nutrient. A trial study on supplementation of iodine rich seaweed Caulerpa racemosa availed from Gujarat coast was conducted on iodine-deficient or thyroid-insufficient (n=10 pregnant women. They were supplemented daily with 0.17 g of algae in 20 g wheat flour ladoo for one month so as to provide 50μg/day of iodine and 0.343 mg/day of iron. A slight non-significant increase (104.75 to 121.05 μg/L in median urinary iodine concentration (UIC was observed after one month of supplementation. No significant effect of supplementation was observed on thyroid function parameters of the subjects. They also showed slight increase in hemoglobin level. Prolonged supplementation needs to be carried out further to opine on the impact of algae.

  16. DEFICIENT FUNCTIONS OF RANDOM DIRICHLET SERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the uniqueness theorem of Dirichlet series is proved. Then the random Dirichlet series in the right half plane is studied, and the result that the random Dirichlet series of finite order has almost surely(a.s.) no deficient functions is proved.

  17. Fitzgerald factor deficiency in an Australian aborigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, T; Barber, S; Naujalis, J

    1987-05-18

    This case reports the first description of Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) deficiency in Australia. Since this homozygous abnormality was found in an Aborigine it is suggested that the defective gene may be prevalent in some tribes and that abnormal results of clotting tests in Aborigines should be investigated carefully. PMID:3574180

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commonest cause of nutritional anaemia in the Sri Lankan population is iron deficiency. The diets of the population belonging to the lower socio-economic groups contain little food of animal origin. Thus, their diets are deficient in easily absorbable (haem) iron; and are also heavily cereal-based. Therefore interference in the absorption of dietary iron also occurs. Iron-deficiency anaemia is not restricted to the so-called ''vulnerable groups'' in Sri Lanka, however, their greater demands make the problem not only commoner but also more severe. Among pregnant and lactating women anaemia is often associated with folate deficiency. It must also be noted that the low availability of dietary iron is compounded in large population groups. Malaria, presently raging on an epidemic scale is also a major contributory factor to the incidence of anaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the iron status of pre-school children and pregnant women; to establish normal levels of biochemical indices at different trimesters; to record the effect of iron supplementation during pregnancy; and to record the bioavailability of iron from weaning foods and common adult diets. 6 figs, 14 tabs

  19. Color Vision Deficiencies in Children. United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Presented are prevalence data on color vision deficiencies (color blindness) in noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States, as estimated from the Health Examination Survey findings on a representative sample of over 7,400 children. Described are the two color vision tests used in the survey, the Ishihara Test for Color…

  20. Iron Deficiency in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, William L.; Risser, Jan M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence, natural history, causes, impact on performance, diagnosis, and treatment of iron deficiency in adolescent and young adult athletes. All athletes should be screened and treated. The best diagnosis involves determining serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. Treatment requires therapeutic doses of oral ferrous iron for several…

  1. Farber's disease (lysosomal acid ceramidase deficiency).

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, R. A.; Holt, P.J.; Keen, J H

    1987-01-01

    The patient presented with progressive joint deformity, a hoarse voice, subsequent cachexia, and myoclonic seizures. She was first seen aged 22 months and died aged 6 years. A diagnosis of Farber's disease was made by demonstrating a deficiency of acid ceramidase both in leucocytes and fibroblasts.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, J J; Hollis, B W; Zasloff, M; Heaney, R P

    2008-01-01

    The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable. PMID

  3. Iodine deficiency in pregnant women of Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To know extent of iodine deficiency (ID), role of thyroid enlargement (goiter) as marker of ID and current status of iodized salt intake in pregnant women of Lahore. A cross sectional study was carried out at Institute of Chemistry, University of the Punjab, during March 2002 to September 2005. Pregnant women (n = 254) during first trimester attending antenatal clinic participated voluntarily. Iodine intake status was determined by urinary iodine (UI) excretion. UI excretion ranged from 34 to 142 >g/L and median value was 67>g/L. According to international criteria, 202 (79.5%) pregnant women were iodine deficient (UI <100 mu g/L) mostly (68.8%) of mild (UI: 50-99 mu g/L) degree. Moderate iodine deficiency (MID; UI <50 mu g/L) was found in 63 (24.8%) pregnant women. Among all pregnant women 80 (31.5%) had slightly visible goiter and only 87(34.2%) were currently taking iodized salt. The difference in UI excretion between goitrous and non-goitrous pregnant women was not significant. Among iodized salt users percentage of women with MID was less, though not significant, as compared to non-users (20.7% Vs 26.9%). About one-fourth of pregnant women screened in this study are moderately iodine deficient in Lahore. These women and their neonates are at increased risk of iodine deficiency disorders. Goiter is not a good indicator of low iodine intake while iodized salt consumption is beneficial in this regard (JPMA 59:741; 2009). (author)

  4. Nebulisation of IVT mRNA Complexes for Intrapulmonary Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Johler

    Full Text Available During the last years the potential role of in vitro transcribed (IVT mRNA as a vehicle to deliver genetic information has come into focus. IVT mRNA could be used for anti-cancer therapies, vaccination purposes, generation of pluripotent stem cells and also for genome engineering or protein replacement. However, the administration of IVT mRNA into the target organ is still challenging. The lung with its large surface area is not only of interest for delivery of genetic information for treatment of e.g. for cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, but also for vaccination purposes. Administration of IVT mRNA to the lung can be performed by direct intratracheal instillation or by aerosol inhalation/nebulisation. The latter approach shows a non-invasive tool, although it is not known, if IVT mRNA is resistant during the process of nebulisation. Therefore, we investigated the transfection efficiency of non-nebulised and nebulised IVT mRNA polyplexes and lipoplexes in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE. A slight reduction in transfection efficiency was observed for lipoplexes (Lipofectamine 2000 in the nebulised part compared to the non-nebulised which can be overcome by increasing the amount of Lipofectamine. However, Lipofectamine was more than three times more efficient in transfecting 16HBE than DMRIE and linear PEI performed almost 10 times better than its branched derivative. By contrast, the nebulisation process did not affect the cationic polymer complexes. Furthermore, aerosolisation of IVT mRNA complexes did neither affect the protein duration nor the toxicity of the cationic complexes. Taken together, these data show that aerosolisation of cationic IVT mRNA complexes constitute a potentially powerful means to transfect cells in the lung with the purpose of protein replacement for genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency or for infectious disease vaccines, while bringing along the advantages

  5. From isolated GH deficiency to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: an evolving continuum - a KIMS analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M.; Jonsson, B.; Abs, R.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe baseline clinical presentation, treatment effects and evolution of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) in adult-onset (AO) GHD. DESIGN: Observational prospective study. METHODS: Baseline characteristics were recorded in 4110 patients...... with organic AO-GHD, who were GH naive prior to entry into the Pfizer International Metabolic Database (KIMS; 283 (7%) IGHD, 3827 MPHD). The effect of GH replacement after 2 years was assessed in those with available follow-up data (133 IGHD, 2207 MPHD), and development of new deficiencies in those...... with available data on concomitant medication (165 IGHD, 3006 MPHD). RESULTS: IGHD and MPHD patients had similar baseline clinical presentation, and both groups responded similarly to 2 years of GH therapy, with favourable changes in lipid profile and improved quality of life. New deficiencies were...

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in children with iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Won Yoon; Sung Woo Kim; Eun Gyong Yoo; Moon Kyu Kim

    2012-01-01

    &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; The increasing prevalence of breast feeding has led to concerns about vitamin D deficiency (VDD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. We evaluated the prevalence of VDD in a population of Korean children with IDA and assessed the risk factors for VDD in these children. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; A total of 79 children who...

  7. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool Deficiencies Home About Bleeding Disorders What is combined deficiency of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors? Inherited combined deficiency of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors ( ...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women with pelvic floor disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Raja Navaneethan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings suggest association of vitamin D deficiency and PFD in postmenopausal women. In addition, postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency indicating a need to evaluate vitamin D levels in these women.

  9. Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases: Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Talking to Your Doctor Take Action: When Your ... repeat infections in the future. People with primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDDs), however, have defects in one or more ...

  10. Absorption of plutonium in the iron-deficient rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency did not enhance absorption of plutonium following intragastric gavage of rats. Absorption of plutonium citrate in both control and iron-deficient rats was about 0.03% of the administered dose

  11. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Cambodian Women: A Common Deficiency in a Sunny Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffry; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Laillou, Arnaud; Sophonneary, Prak; Un, Samoeurn; Hong, Rathavuth; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Chamnan, Chhoun; De Los Reyes, Francisco N; Wieringa, Frank T

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in spite of being generally close to the equator; vitamin D deficiency is common in South East Asian countries. In order to quantify micronutrient status for women and children in Cambodia; a nationally-representative survey was conducted in 2014 linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. The countrywide median of 25(OH)D was, respectively, 64.9 and 91.1 nmol/L for mothers and children. Based on The Endocrine Society cutoffs (>50children had plasma vitamin D concentrations indicating insufficiency or deficiency. For deficiency alone, 29% of the mothers were found to be vitamin D deficient, but only 13.4% of children. Children who live in urban areas had a 43% higher rate of vitamin D insufficiency versus those who live in rural areas (OR; 1.434; 95% CI: 1.007; 2.041). However, such differences were not observed in their mothers. The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is likely in part due to lifestyle choices, including sun avoidance, increasingly predominant indoor work, and covered transport. These survey findings support the need for a broader national Cambodian study incorporating testing of adult men, adolescents and the elderly, and encompassing other parameters such as skeletal health. However, the data presented in this study already show significant deficiencies which need to be addressed and we discuss the benefit of establishing nationally-mandated food fortification programs to enhance the intake of vitamin D. PMID:27187456

  12. Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: sex distribution.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, M.; Hammerman, C; Kvit, R; Rudensky, B; Abramov, A.

    1994-01-01

    Eight hundred and six newborn infants at high risk for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were screened; 30.2% of the boys and 10.4% of the girls had severe G-6-PD deficiency. Surprisingly, 14% of the enzyme deficient girls had a father from a low risk ethnic group. Girls of high risk mothers should be screened for G-6-PD deficiency regardless of paternal origin.

  13. Hypothalamic signaling in anorexia induced by indispensable amino acid deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xinxia; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Roth-Carter, Quinn R.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Braun, Theodore P.; Grossberg, Aaron J.; Marks, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Animals exhibit a rapid and sustained anorexia when fed a diet that is deficient in a single indispensable amino acid (IAA). The chemosensor for IAA deficiency resides within the anterior piriform cortex (APC). Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the APC detects IAA deficiency are well established, the efferent neural pathways that reduce feeding in response to an IAA-deficient diet remain to be fully characterized. In the present work, we investigated whether 1) central m...

  14. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    controls (n = 8), which indicates a slow turnover rate of carbohydrate deficient transferrin. Food ingestion did not affect the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin, and the analysis of carbohydrate deficient transferrin was almost unaffected by the presence of ethanol in plasma within...... alcohol intake, but the overlap is substantial in patients with cirrhosis. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has a low turnover rate in both patients with cirrhosis and normals....

  15. How I treat cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    The challenges in medical management of cobalamin deficiency lie in attention to the unique pathophysiology that underlies cobalamin deficiency, more than in the mechanics of therapy. The central physiologic principles are that clinically important deficiency is more likely to occur (and progress) when intrinsic factor–driven absorption fails than when diet is poor and that most causes take years to produce clinically obvious deficiency. Transient defects have little clinical impact. The key ...

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitamin D [(25(OHD] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. 25(OHD has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity, Gurgaon. 25(OHD levels were measured with radioimmunoassay (Diasorin method and parathyroid hormone (PTH was measured using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay (ECLIA. Results : The mean age of patients was 55 ± 13 years. 32/45 (71% were males. 23/45 (51% were diabetics. The median duration of hemodialysis was 5.5 months (range 1-74 months. 33/45 (74% patients were on thrice weekly hemodialysis. The mean level of vitamin D was 10.14 ± 8.7 ng/ml. Majority of the patients [43/45 (95.5%] were either vitamin D deficient or had insufficient levels. 40/45 (88.9% were vitamin D deficient (levels <20 ng/ml; of these, 29/40 (64.4% had severe vitamin D deficiency (levels <10 ng/ml and 3/45 (6.7% had insufficient levels (20-30 ng/ml of vitamin D. Only 2/45 (4.4% patients had normal levels of vitamin D. 23/45 (51% of patients were receiving calcitriol. The mean levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and albumin were 8.8 ± 0.64 mg/dl, 5.0 ± 0.7 mg/dl, 126 ± 10.3 IU/l and 3.6 ± 0.62 g/dl, respectively. PTH levels ranged from 37 to 1066 pg/ml, and the median was 195.8 pg/ml. There was a weak correlation between 25(OHD levels and weight, sex, hemoglobin, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and presence of diabetes. There was, however, no correlation with duration of dialysis or PTH levels. Conclusion : Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are universal in our hemodialysis patients, with severe vitamin D deficiency in two-third of patients.

  17. Purpura fulminans due to acquired protein C deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF.

  18. Obsessive compulsive disorder as early manifestation of b12 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Valizadeh; Nasim Valizadeh

    2011-01-01

    B12 acts as a cofactor in synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thus B12 deficiency affects mood, emotions and sleeping and can lead to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric manifestations of B12 deficiency are varied. They seldom precede anemia. We want to present a case of B12 deficiency which was presented with obsessive compulsive disorder.

  19. 30 CFR 57.8527 - Oxygen-deficiency testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen-deficiency testing. 57.8527 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.8527 Oxygen-deficiency testing. Flame safety lamps or other suitable devices shall be used to test for acute oxygen deficiency....

  20. To study prevalence of incipient iron deficiency in primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer Hassan Banday

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Iron deficiency was present in a significant portion of patients with primary hypothyroidism. It also concluded that frequency of iron deficiency (with or without anemia was higher than iron deficiency anemia. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 472-475

  1. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  2. Primary Carnitine deficiency in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Køber, Lars; Lund, Allan M; Nielsen, Olav W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carnitine deficiency can cause cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence in the Faroe Islands is the highest reported in the world (1:300). A nationwide screening program identified 76 Faroese adult patients (15-80 years) with Primary Carnitine Deficiency (PCD). We describe...... prior and current health status and symptoms in these patients, especially focusing on cardiac characteristics. METHODS: Upon identification, patients were immediately admitted for physical examination, ECG, blood tests and initiation of L-carnitine supplementation. Medical records were reviewed and...... patients were interviewed. Echocardiography and blood tests were performed in 35 patients before and after L-carnitine supplementation. RESULTS: All patients were either asymptomatic or had minor symptoms when diagnosed. Echocardiography including LVEF, global longitudinal strain and dimensions were normal...

  3. Biotinidase deficiency and our champagne legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-09-10

    Biotinidase is the enzyme that is necessary for the recycling of the vitamin, biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder. If untreated, individuals with biotinidase deficiency usually develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms that can result in coma or death. Symptomatic individuals can be markedly improved by treating them with pharmacological doses of biotin; however, some clinical features may be irreversible. Fortunately, essentially all symptoms can be prevented if treatment is initiated at birth or before the symptoms develop. Because of this, the disorder is currently screened for in newborns in all states in the United States and in many countries around the world. This is the story of one laboratory's work in bringing basic science research from the discovery of the disorder to its translation into clinical medicine and its impact on the individuals with the disorder and their families. PMID:26456103

  4. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assuncao, Ana G.L.; Persson, Daniel Olof; Husted, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order to...... develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency....... They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we...

  5. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  6. A Case of Idiopathic Thyrotropin (TSH) Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Ichida, Tatsuya; Kajita, Yoshihiro

    1997-01-01

    The first case of idiopathic thyrotropin (TSH) deficiency in an old woman with thyroid functioning adenoma was reported. She got subtotal thyroidectomy before about four years of her admission to our hospital because of fatigability, puffy face and leg edema. At that time, she had low TSH and free T4 levels despite replacement therapy with desiccated thyroid. No response of only serum TSH after adminstration of combined stimulant containing TRH and repeated TRH suggested the failure of TSH se...

  7. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode...

  8. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: a urea cycle defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The symptoms and signs of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency are discussed. When the condition occurs among males in the neonatal period it is likely to be lethal. Pathological findings are non-specific. The diagnosis should be considered if coma with cerebral oedema and respiratory alkalosis occurs for no obvious reason. When hyperammonaemia is found, enzyme assay on a liver biopsy should be considered. A useful clue in an asymptomatic patient is a voluntary adoption of a vegetarian diet. Provocative tests, such as the allopurinol test can be used, but the method most frequently applied is mutation analysis. In the case of prenatal diagnosis this is possible on a chorionic villus sample. The prognosis of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is better for those with an onset after infancy, but morbidity from brain damage does not appear to be linked to the number of episodes of hyperammonaemia that have occurred. The syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase which catalyses the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrulline. The gene responsible for this enzyme is located on Xp21.1, and is expressed in the liver and gut. Mutations can be divided into two groups: those with neonatal onset with all enzyme activity abolished, and those with later onset with partial and varying enzyme deficiency. There can be a variety of precipitating causes, for example sodium valproate. Treatment can be given with a low protein diet, and with alternate pathway drugs such as sodium benzoate and phenylbutyrate. Liver transplant can be considered when symptoms are life-threatening, although there may be severe complications.Gene replacement therapy is the hope of the future. PMID:12788037

  9. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  10. CRIMINALITY AT MINORS WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Kitkanj

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present, from penological aspect, the involvement and structure of recidivism at minors with mental deficiency within the whole area of juvenile criminality in Macedonia. The research covers 62 subjects who pay the penalty in juvenile penitentiary or institutional measure directing to correctional institution for minors. Of the total number of minors who hold one of the above-mentioned sanctions, minors with lower average IQ are presented with 56.4%. The shown invo...

  11. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Cuddy, Lola L.; Sylvie Hébert

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, ...

  12. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  13. #614962 LEPTIN DEFICIENCY OR DYSFUNCTION; LEPD [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 614962 FIELD TI #614962 LEPTIN DEFICIENCY OR DYSFUNCTION; LEPD ;;OBESITY, MORBID, NONSY ... at a test meal was reduced from 152 to 64 kJ/kg of lean ... mass and from 169 to 98 kJ/kg of lean ... mass in subj ... and 2, respectively. Normal was 54 +/- 12 kJ/kg of lean ... mass in age-related controls. Farooqi et al. (2007 ...

  14. Deficiency tracking system, conceptual business process requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to describe the conceptual business process requirements of a single, site-wide, consolidated, automated, deficiency management tracking, trending, and reporting system. This description will be used as the basis for the determination of the automated system acquisition strategy including the further definition of specific requirements, a ''make or buy'' determination and the development of specific software design details

  15. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Y; Clewell, D B

    1980-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  16. Lessons from Loricrin-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Peter J.; de Viragh, Pierre A.; Scharer, Elisabeth; Bundman, Donnie; Longley, Mary Ann; Bickenbach, Jackie; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Suga, Yasushi; Zhou, Zhijian,; Huber, Marcel; Hohl, Daniel; Kartasova, Tonja; Jarnik, Michal; Steven, Alasdair C.; Roop, Dennis R.

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal cornified cell envelope (CE) is a complex protein–lipid composite that replaces the plasma membrane of terminally differentiated keratinocytes. This lamellar structure is essential for the barrier function of the skin and has the ability to prevent the loss of water and ions and to protect from environmental hazards. The major protein of the epidermal CE is loricrin, contributing ∼70% by mass. We have generated mice that are deficient for this protein. These mice showed a delay ...

  17. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, an...

  18. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown CJ; Akaichi F

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PS...

  19. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Bansal; Shyam Bansal; Ambrish Mithal; Vijay Kher; Raman Marwaha

    2012-01-01

    Background : Vitamin D [(25(OH)D] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). 25(OH)D has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity,...

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran B. Hebbar, MD, FCCM; Michael Wittkamp, MD, FAAP; Jessica A. Alvarez, PhD, RD; Courtney E. McCracken, PhD; Vin Tangpricha, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The potential role for vitamin D in infection has been well described in adults. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D status and markers of innate immunity and infection in critically ill children. Hypothesis: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in children with critical illness and correlates with the severity of illness and dysfunction in innate immunity. Methods: We ...

  1. In HepG2 Cells, Coexisting Carnitine Deficiency Masks Important Indicators of Marginal Biotin Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Background: A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy.

  2. An interactive app for color deficient viewers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl; Perdu, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Pardo, Carlos E.; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Color deficient individuals have trouble seeing color contrasts that could be very apparent to individuals with normal color vision. For example, for some color deficient individuals, red and green apples do not have the striking contrast they have for those with normal color vision, or the abundance of red cherries in a tree is not immediately clear due to a lack of perceived contrast. We present a smartphone app that enables color deficient users to visualize such problematic color contrasts in order to help them with daily tasks. The user interacts with the app through the touchscreen. As the user traces a path around the touchscreen, the colors in the image change continuously via a transform that enhances contrasts that are weak or imperceptible for the user under native viewing conditions. Specifically, we propose a transform that shears the data along lines parallel to the dimension corresponding to the affected cone sensitivity of the user. The amount and direction of shear are controlled by the user's finger movement over the touchscreen allowing them to visualize these contrasts. Using the GPU, this simple transformation, consisting of a linear shear and translation, is performed efficiently on each pixel and in real-time with the changing position of the user's finger. The user can use the app to aid daily tasks such as distinguishing between red and green apples or picking out ripe bananas.

  3. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  4. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  5. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND THE CLINICAL CONSEQUENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesanu, Corina; Mocanu, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is important for good health, growth and strong bones. Vitamin D is mostly made in the skin by exposure to sunlight. Most foods contain very little vitamin D naturally, though some are fortified with added vitamin D. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer as well as with increased mortality. Further, Vitamin D deficiency is related to depression and impaired cognitive function. Increasing age and elevated body fat mass contribute to an increased risk of Vitamin D deficiency. A mild lack of vitamin D may not cause symptoms but can cause tiredness and general aches and pains. A more severe lack can cause s rious problems such as rickets (in children) and osteomalacia in adults). During menopause, the decline of estrogens results in increased bone turnover, a decrease in bone mineral density and elevated fracture risk. Treatment is with vitamin D supplements. Some people are more at risk of vitamin D deficiency, and so are recommended to take vitamin D supplements routinely. These include all pregnant and breastfeeding women, all infants (babies) and young children aged 6 months to 5 years, people aged 65 and over, and people who are not exposed to much sun. There are precise recommendations regarding a sufficient Vitamin D intake in order to prevent bone loss in peri- and postmenopausal women. It is also recommend routine supplements for certain people with darker skin, and for people with certain gut, liver or kidney diseases. PMID:26204630

  6. Sertraline-induced pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit ZencirciMOSTAS Private Health Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Kahramanmaras, TurkeyAbstract: A 47-year-old Turkish male was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. The patient had 2 operations 28 and 19 years ago under general anesthesia. It was learned that the patient was administered succinylcholine during both of these previous operations and that he did not have a history of prolonged recovery or postoperative apnea. The patient had been using sertraline for 3 years before the operation. Pseudocholinesterase is a drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the muscle-relaxant drugs mivacurium and succinylcholine. Deficiency of this enzyme from any cause can lead to prolonged apnea and paralysis following administration of mivacurium and succinylcholine. The diagnosis of pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency can be made after careful clinic supervision and peripheral nerve stimulator monitoring. A decrease in the activity of pseudocholinesterase enzyme and a decline in the block effect over time will help verify the diagnosis. Our patient’s plasma cholinesterase was found to have low activity. Instead of pharmacological interventions that may further complicate the situation in such cases, the preferred course of action should be to wait until the block effect declines with the help of sedation and mechanical ventilation. In our case, the prolonged block deteriorated in the course of time before any complications developed.Keywords: mivacurium, pseudocholinesterase deficiency, sertraline

  7. Congenital factor XI deficiency in a domestic shorthair cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark T; Brooks, Marjory B; Esterline, Meredith L

    2002-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female, domestic shorthair cat was examined after onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy because of bleeding from the paws. Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time was discovered, Coagulation factor analyses revealed deficiency of factor XI coagulant activity. Plasma mixing studies indicated factor deficiency or dysfunction rather than factor inhibition. Feline factor XI deficiency in one adult cat has been previously reported but was attributed to factor XI inhibitors. The signalment, lack of primary disease, and the finding of persistent factor XI deficiency in the absence of coagulation inhibitors were considered compatible with congenital factor XI deficiency in the cat of this report. PMID:12428887

  8. Diagnostic challenges of bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Cuartin, Guillermo; Chalmers, James D; Sibila, Oriol

    2016-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is a condition of increasing incidence and prevalence around the world. Many different diseases have been associated with bronchiectasis, and their treatment can differ widely. Recent guidelines have helped to approach aetiological diagnosis but it is still a complex process. Identifying the cause of the bronchiectasis may determine a change in the treatment of a large group of subjects. That is one of the main reasons why the aetiological diagnosis is crucial in the proper management of bronchiectasis patients. Postinfectious bronchiectasis is the most frequent entity among different studies, but a high percentage of cases still remain without a clear aetiology. Bronchiectasis related to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), immunodeficiencies with antibody production deficiency, primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, among others, require a specific management that may improve quality of life and prognosis in a large group of individuals. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the main bronchiectasis related diseases and to simplify the aetiological diagnosis, in order to improve the management of bronchiectasis patients, especially in those where a specific treatment is available. PMID:27296824

  9. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  10. Investigation of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide were grown on single crystal r-cut and c-cut sapphire by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. RF-activated oxygen was used for the in situ oxidation of hafnium oxide thin films. Oxidation conditions were varied substantially in order to create oxygen deficiency in hafnium oxide films intentionally. The films were characterized by X-ray and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction studies show an increase in lattice parameter with increasing oxygen deficiency. Oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films also showed a decreasing bandgap with increase in oxygen deficiency. The magnetisation studies carried out with SQUID did not show any sign of ferromagnetism in the whole oxygen deficiency range. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements also confirmed the absence of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

  11. Deficiência de ferro na adolescência Iron deficiency in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene P. Garanito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é o distúrbio nutricional mais comum no mundo e constitui a maior causa de anemia associada às condições onde há erro alimentar, perda crônica de sangue ou quando ocorre o crescimento rápido, como na infância, na gravidez e na adolescência. Esta deficiência acarreta prejuízos no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, na capacidade de aprendizagem, no apetite, no crescimento e na resposta do sistema imunológico. Na adolescência, além de com frequência observarmos hábitos alimentares inadequados, estão presentes intensas mudanças fisiológicas e psicossociais que, em associação, podem comprometer o crescimento e aumentar o risco do desenvolvimento de deficiência de ferro e outras carências nutricionais, sobretudo na fase púbere. Desta forma, o diagnóstico de deficiência de ferro entre os adolescentes deve ser lembrado a fim de que medidas possam ser tomadas para diminuir a incidência de anemia, do comprometimento do rendimento escolar e do sistema imunológico, neste período da vida.Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world and is a major cause of anemia associated with situations involving chronic blood loss or rapid growth such as during infancy, pregnancy and adolescence. This deficiency leads to impairment in psychomotor development, learning ability, appetite, growth and immune response. In adolescence, inadequate dietary habits are often observed and intensive physiological and psychological changes are seen that when combined can impair growth and increase the risk of developing iron deficiency or other nutritional disorders, especially during puberty. Thus, the diagnosis of iron deficiency among adolescents should always be considered so that measures can be taken to reduce the incidence of anemia, impairment of the immune system and improve school performance.

  12. Vitamin B12 And Folate Deficiency In a Hospital Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadia RS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of B12 and folate deficiency in a hospital population. We studied the incidence of their deficiency by evaluating blood levels in every tenth hospital admission. Among the 450 patients chosen, 417 had normal levels of both, 2 had deficiency of folate alone (folate < 3ng.ml, 3 had B12 deficiency alone (B12<200pg/mland 11 had deficiency of both (total 3.5%. In addition 12 had borderline b12 level(200-300pg/ml, 2 had borderline folate level (3-4ng/ml(0.44%and 3 had borderline levels for both (0.66% . Thus 33% had definite or borderline deficiency. This deficiency was more common in the elderly and in patients on vegetarian diet (5.7% definite deficiency, 8.8% borderline levels compared to those on a non-vegetarian diet. During the 2 1/2 years of the study a total of 99 definite deficiency and 69 borderline deficiency were seen. In the definite deficiency group, 22.3% had neuropathy, 6.1% had evidence of myelopathy, 18.2% had neuropsychiatric changes (memory defect, dementia, behavioural abnormalities, depression and 4.1% had cerebellar signs. The neurologic findings in the borderline group were almost similar (neuropathy 29%, myelopathy 8.6% and neuropsychiatric changes 18.4%. High mean corpuscular volume (MCV> 95 was seen in 69% of those with both B12 and folate deficiency, 43.4% with B12 deficiency and 61.15 with folate deficiency. Hypersegmented polymorphs were seen in 21.7% with B12 deficiency, 27.5% with folate both B12 and folate deficiency had either megaloblastosis or dimorphic picture. It is to be noted that B12 and folate deficiency in this population was more frequent than we previously considered and reliance on haematologic parameters will miss half to one third of all cases. As expected B12 deficiency is more frequent in vegetarians than non-vegetarians.

  13. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  14. Molecular basis of hereditary C3 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Botto, M.; Fong, K. Y.; So, A K; Rudge, A; Walport, M.J. (Mark J.)

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of complement component C3 in a 10-yr-old boy was studied. C3 could not be detected by RIA of serum from the patient. Segregation of C3 S and C3 F allotypes within the family confirmed the presence of a null gene for C3, for which the patient was homozygous. 30 exons have been characterized, spanning the entire beta chain of C3 and the alpha chain as far as the C3d region. Sequence analysis of the exons derived from the C3 null gene showed no abnormalities in the coding ...

  15. Selective deficiency of immunoglobulin A2.

    OpenAIRE

    van Loghem, E; Zegers, B J; Bast, E J; KATER, L

    1983-01-01

    A case of familial selective IgA2 deficiency is described. The mother had no detectable IgA2, but a low level of IgA1. She had anti-alpha 2 antibodies of the IgG class. One of her daughters also lacked IgA2 with a normal level of IgA1. The analysis of the immunoglobulin haplotypes of the family suggested the deletion of the alpha 2-gene. In addition, the analysis of B lymphocytes of mother and daughter showed the absence of IgA2-bearing cells. Upon stimulation with pokeweed mitogen, the B cel...

  16. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  17. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola L. Cuddy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, we propose that the results of brain damage studies can contribute to the development of a model of normal music reading.

  18. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event

  19. Morbidity and GH deficiency: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, K.; Laursen, T.; Green, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Design: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...... identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. Method: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO...

  20. Iron Deficiency Anemia and School Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo J Bobonis

    2004-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is among the worldç—´ most widespread health problems, especially for children, but it is rarely studied by economists. This paper evaluates the impact of a health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to 2-6 year old children through an existing pre-school network in the slums of Delhi, India. At baseline 69 percent of sample children were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Sample pre-schools were randomly divided into grou...

  1. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common hematologic condition, affecting a substantial proportion of the world's women and young children. Optimal management of IDA requires an accurate diagnosis, identification and correction of the underlying cause, provision of medicinal iron therapy, and confirmation of treatment success. There are limited data to support current treatment approaches regarding oral iron preparation, dosing, monitoring, and duration of therapy. New intravenous iron agents have improved safety profiles, which may foster their increased utilization in the treatment of patients with IDA. Clinical trials focused on improving current treatment standards for IDA are sorely needed. PMID:25064710

  2. Repair deficient and hypersensitive diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many diseases are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents but only xeroderma pigmentosum is consistently DNA repair deficient. Groups A to G exhibit reduction in excision of pyrimidine dimers and other lesions, the variant and alteration in polymerization or ligation. Pulse chase experiments indicate that excision defective and variant cells suffer increased blocking of replication forks during semiconservative replication after irradiation; but later bypass of such blocks is completely normal in all cell types. Thus, the variant is not defective in ''post-replication repair,'' and even the definition of such a system comes under question. (author)

  3. Symptomatic zinc deficiency in experimental zinc deprivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C M; Goode, H F; Aggett, P J; Bremner, I; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of indices of poor zinc status was undertaken in five male subjects in whom dietary zinc intake was reduced from 85 mumol d-1 in an initial phase of the study to 14 mumol d-1. One of the subjects developed features consistent with zinc deficiency after receiving the low zinc diet for 12 days. These features included retroauricular acneform macullo-papular lesions on the face, neck, and shoulders and reductions in plasma zinc, red blood cell zinc, neutrophil zinc and plasma alkal...

  4. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M;

    2000-01-01

    elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...

  5. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on......-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night....

  6. The Role of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Deficiency in Iron Deficient Children of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shikha; Jain, Rahul; Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Extensive data from animal and human studies indicate a role of vitamin D in erythropoiesis. Iron and vitamin D deficiencies are implicated with adverse health effects in children even if they are asymptomatic. The potential relationship between the two remains poorly understood. A cross-sectional study was performed in the period from 1st May 2012 through 30th April 2013 and subjects were classified into vitamin D deficiency (VDD), vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and vitamin D sufficiency (VDS) groups according to their 25(OH) D levels. A total of 263 children were included in the analysis. Anaemia was present in 66 % of 25(OH) D deficient subjects compared with 35 % in vitamin D sufficient individuals (p < 0.0001). The association of breast feeding and development of VDD was also significant (p < 0.05). Serum levels of 25(OH) D were found lower in female sex and if the analysis was performed in the winter/spring season. Physicians should therefore assess vitamin D levels in all anaemic children and ensure adequate supplementation to prevent deficiencies. PMID:26089618

  7. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency. PMID:12037034

  8. Non haematological effects of iron deficiency - A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Kanjaksha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a continuum beginning from lowering of tissue stores to the phase of exhausted tissue stores, interference with iron driven biochemical reactions in the body, microcytosis, hypochromia, increasing severity of anaemia with all its attendant consequences. Iron deficiency anaemia is a very well known concept but what is often not appreciated is the effect of broad canvas of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems in our body in addition to iron deficiency anaemia leading to concept of "Iron deficiency disease". In this condition not only tissue delivery of oxygen is compromised but proliferation, growth, differentiation, myelinogenesis, immunofunction, energy metabolism, absorption and biotransformation are compromised leading to abnormal growth and behaviour, mental retardation, reduced cardiac performance and work efficiency, infection etc which ultimately leads to the concept that "iron deficiency not only breaks the machine but also wrecks the machinery."

  9. Genetic disorders coupled to ROS deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sharon; Brault, Julie; Stasia, Marie-Jose; Knaus, Ulla G

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining the redox balance between generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for health. Disturbances such as continuously elevated ROS levels will result in oxidative stress and development of disease, but likewise, insufficient ROS production will be detrimental to health. Reduced or even complete loss of ROS generation originates mainly from inactivating variants in genes encoding for NADPH oxidase complexes. In particular, deficiency in phagocyte Nox2 oxidase function due to genetic variants (CYBB, CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, NCF4) has been recognized as a direct cause of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immune disorder. More recently, additional diseases have been linked to functionally altered variants in genes encoding for other NADPH oxidases, such as for DUOX2/DUOXA2 in congenital hypothyroidism, or for the Nox2 complex, NOX1 and DUOX2 as risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive overview of novel developments in terms of Nox/Duox-deficiency disorders is presented, combined with insights gained from structure-function studies that will aid in predicting functional defects of clinical variants. PMID:26210446

  10. Iodine deficiency in vegetarians and vegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Bucková, K; Klimes, I; Seboková, E

    2003-01-01

    Iodine content in food of plant origin is lower in comparison with that of animal origin due to a low iodine concentration in soil. Urinary iodine excretion was assessed in 15 vegans, 31 lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians and 35 adults on a mixed diet. Iodine excretion was significantly lower in alternative nutrition groups - 172 microg/l in vegetarians and 78 microg/l in vegans compared to 216 microg/l in subjects on a mixed diet. One fourth of the vegetarians and 80% of the vegans suffer from iodine deficiency (iodine excretion value below 100 microg/l) compared to 9% in the persons on a mixed nutrition. The results show that under conditions of alternative nutrition, there is a higher prevalence of iodine deficiency, which might be a consequence of exclusive or prevailing consumption of food of plant origin, no intake of fish and other sea products, as well as reduced iodine intake in the form of sea salt. PMID:12748410

  11. Renalase deficiency aggravates ischemic myocardial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanling; Xu, Jianchao; Velazquez, Heino; Wang, Peili; Li, Guoyong; Liu, Dinggang; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Russell, Kerry; Russell, Raymond; Flavell, Richard A; Pestana, Manuel; Giordano, Frank; Desir, Gary V

    2011-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to an 18-fold increase in cardiovascular complications not fully explained by traditional risk factors. Levels of renalase, a recently discovered oxidase that metabolizes catecholamines, are decreased in CKD. Here we show that renalase deficiency in a mouse knockout model causes increased plasma catecholamine levels and hypertension. Plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and aldosterone were unaffected. However, knockout mice had normal systolic function and mild ventricular hypertrophy but tolerated cardiac ischemia poorly and developed myocardial necrosis threefold more severe than that found in wild-type mice. Treatment with recombinant renalase completely rescued the cardiac phenotype. To gain insight into the mechanisms mediating this cardioprotective effect, we tested if gene deletion affected nitrate and glutathione metabolism, but found no differences between hearts of knockout and wild-type mice. The ratio of oxidized (NAD) to reduced (NADH) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cardiac tissue, however, was significantly decreased in the hearts of renalase knockout mice, as was plasma NADH oxidase activity. In vitro studies confirmed that renalase metabolizes NADH and catecholamines. Thus, renalase plays an important role in cardiovascular pathology and its replacement may reduce cardiac complications in renalase-deficient states such as CKD. PMID:21178975

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  14. TWO RELATED CASES OF PRIMARY COMPLEMENT DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Farhoudi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary complement deficiencies are rare and two related patients are reported here. The first patient is a 41- year- old man with eighteen episodes of pneumo¬coccal meningitis and other purulent infections. The serum C3 level was checked at three separate times, showing that this was a primary C3 deficient case; other immunological tests were however normal. This patient now takes prophylactic antibiotics and the meningitis has not recurred, but he does have glomerulone¬phritis. The second case is a 40 - year-old woman with repeated episodes of orofacial and laryngeal edema and dyspnea. The serum C1INH levels were 4.3 to 7 mg/dL which were very low compared with normal healthy subjects (C,INH was 40-50 mg/dL in ten normal controls and C4 was lower than normal but other immunological tests were normal. Other causes of angioedema such as lymphoproliferative disorders were excluded. She had hereditary angioedema with¬out a family background. The condition may be due to genetic mutation. The angioedema was controlled with Danazol and Stanasol. As our patients are re¬lated, this may suggest a genetic relationship between these two disorders.

  15. Calcium And Zinc Deficiency In Preeclamptic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Ferdousi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-eclampsia is the most common medical complication of pregnancy associated withincreased maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. Reduced serum calcium and zinc levels arefound associated with elevated blood pressure in preeclampsia. Objective: To observe serum calciumand zinc levels in preeclamptic women. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in theDepartment of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Shahbag, Dhaka betweenJuly 2009 to June 2010. In this study, 60 pregnant women of preeclampsia, aged 18-39 years withgestational period more than 20th weeks were included as the study (group B. For comparison ageand gestational period matched 30 normotensive pregnant women control (group A were also studied.All the subjects were selected from Obstetric and Gynae In and Out patient Department of BSMMUand Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Serum calcium was measured by Colorimetric method and serumzinc was measured by Spectrophotometric method. Data were analysed by independent sample t testand Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Results: Mean serum calcium and zinc levels weresignificantly (p<0.001 lower in study group than those of control group. Again, serum calcium andzinc showed significant negative correlation with SBP and DBP in preeclamptic women. Conclusion:This study concludes that serum calcium and zinc deficiency may be one of the risk factor ofpreeclampsia. Therefore, early detection and supplementation to treat this deficiency may reduce theincidence of preeclampsia.

  16. A Sexualidade na Deficiência Mental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camelo Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A questão da sexualidade na deficiência mental é pouco discutida e permeada de preconceitos, mitos e tabus. Aspessoas com deficiência mental possuem conhecimentos precários a respeito da sua sexualidade, experiênciaslimitadas e são, muitas vezes, privadas de um acesso efectivo a uma educação sexual adequada. O objectivo desteartigo é perceber quais são os conhecimentos, necessidades e sentimentos de pessoas com deficiência mental,diante da sua sexualidade. Da análise qualitativa dos dados das entrevistas realizadas a alunos com deficiênciamental concluímos que os seus conhecimentos em matéria de sexualidade são insuficientes e incorrectos. Por estarazão apresentamos uma proposta de um programa de Educação Sexual para ser implementado no ensino regulara alunos com Deficiência Mental.The issue of sexuality in the mental retardation is rarely discussed and full of prejudices, myths and taboos.People with intellectual disabilities have poor knowledge about their sexuality, limited experience and are oftendeprived of effective access to adequate sex education. The aim of this paper is to understand what are theknowledge, needs and feelings of people with mental disability towards their sexuality. The qualitative analysis ofdata from interviews with students with mental Disability concluded that their knowledge in matters of sexualityis inadequate and inaccurate. For this reason we present a proposal of a sexual education program to beimplemented in regular education for students with intellectual disabilities.La Sexualité dans la déficience mentaleLa question de la sexualité dans la déficience mentale est peu discutée et lourde de préjugés, mythes et tabous. Lespersonnes ayant une déficience mentale ont une mauvaise connaissance de leur sexualité, des expériences limitéeset sont souvent privés d’un accès effectif à une éducation sexuelle appropriée. Le but de cette étude est decomprendre quelles sont les

  17. Neuro-regression in vitamin B12 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Sanwar; Nathani, Shweta

    2009-01-01

    Neuroregression in infants has varied aetiology and vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the uncommon causes. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency is encountered in malnourished infants or in offspring of strict vegan mothers. We present two cases, both infants of 10 and 8 months of age, whose mothers had vitamin B12 deficiency. On admission, the patients were apathic, hypotonic and lethargic. Serum vitamin B12 levels were below normal limits. On cranial MRI, T2-weighted images revealed frontoparieta...

  18. GH Replacement Therapy in GH-Deficient Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Luger A

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency represents an indication for substitution therapy not only in children but also in adults. In the last twenty years, numerous studies have shown that GH deficiency in adults is characterized by a clearly defined syndrome which is associated with a doubleincreased mortality rate. GH deficiency in adults can be diagnosed only by dynamic tests. While the insulin tolerance test (ITT) has been the standard test in the past, the combined arginine-GH releasing hormon...

  19. Controlling iodine deficiency disorders through salt iodation in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Assey, Vincent Didas

    2009-01-01

    Background: Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) is a major public health problem worldwide, in which more than two billion people have insufficient iodine intake, including 285 million school-age children. In Tanzania, 41% of the population is at risk of IDD and 30% of perinatal mortality is estimated to be attributable to iodine deficiency. Iodine deficiency is the number one cause of preventable brain damage in children and an important cause of infant deaths. The most cost-eff...

  20. Iron deficiency anemia: current strategies for the diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the commonest nutritional deficiencies in the world. It is multifactorial and may be caused by lack of intake, blood loss and intestinal causes. Clinical features are highly variable, and most patients are asymptomatic. Typical laboratory features of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include a hypochromic microcytic anemia, low serum iron level, high total iron binding capacity, low serum ferritin level. Usefulness of monitoring serum transferrin receptor level (sTf...

  1. Cholestatic Jaundice Associated with Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase IA Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, A A M; Olpin, S E; Bennett, M. J.; Santani, A; Stahlschmidt, J; McClean, P

    2012-01-01

    Liver dysfunction usually accompanies metabolic decompensation in fatty acid oxidation disorders, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) Ia deficiency. Typically, the liver is enlarged with raised plasma transaminase activities and steatosis on histological examination. In contrast, cholestatic jaundice is rare, having only been reported in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency. We report a 3-year-old boy with CPT Ia deficiency who developed hepatomegaly and ch...

  2. Relative nutritional deficiencies associated with centrally acting monoamines

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz M; Stein A; Uncini T

    2012-01-01

    Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Two primary categories of nutritional deficiency exist. An absolute nutritional deficiency occurs when nutrient intake is not sufficient to meet the normal needs of the system, and a relative nutritional deficiency exists when nutrient intake and systemic levels of nutrients are normal, while a change occurs in ...

  3. Elevated Serum S-Adenosylhomocysteine in Cobalamin Deficient Megaloblastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M.; Morita, Olga E.; Regina A. Pagliusi; Blaia-d’Avila, Vera L.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired methylation due to accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) may contribute to the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficient anemia. We assayed serum S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), SAH, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 15 subjects with cobalamin deficient megaloblastic anemia and compared results to 19 subjects with anemia/pancytopenia due to other causes. Cobalamin deficient subjects had a median hematocrit of 20% and mean cell volume of 111.7 fL. The median s...

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in adolescents: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Romilda Castro de Andrade Cairo; Luciana Rodrigues Silva; Nadya Carneiro Bustani; Cibele Dantas Ferreira Marques

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anemia is one of the most important nutritional deficiencies affecting various social and socioeconomic strata. It is more common in developing countries, with children and adolescents being at a significantly higher risk for the condition. Objective: To perform a literature review on iron deficiency anemia in adolescence as a public health issue and on the risk factors that may contribute towards nutritional deficiencies, stunted growth and development in this age group, emphas...

  5. Index formulas and charge deficiencies on the Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffeng, Magnus

    2010-02-01

    The notion of charge deficiency by Avron et al. ["Charge deficiency, charge transport and comparison of dimensions," Commun. Math. Phys. 159, 399 (1994)] is studied from the view of K-theory of operator algebras and is applied to the Landau levels in R2n. We calculate the charge deficiencies at the higher Landau levels in R2n by means of an Atiyah-Singer-type index theorem.

  6. CORD SERUM FERRITIN AS BIOCHEMICAL MARKER IN IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sherin; Jyothy

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is by far the most frequent type of anemia seen in pregnancy, accounting for 90% or more of all cases. Iron deficiency anemia has adverse consequences on infant development. Therefore maternal anemia should be prevented and treated. Serum ferritin is the single best non-invasive test and is a very useful and reliable index of iron stores especially during pregnancy, with low levels indicating iron deficiency. While infants born to anemic mother are ...

  7. Clinical management of salivary deficiency: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical, chemical and antibacterial properties of saliva provide protection to human dentition against dental diseases, Therefore, salivary deficiency has to be managed carefully. The causes of saliva deficiency are many and varied. It is worth mentioning that saliva flow rate is normally affected by physiologic condition, such as eating, resting, sleeping, cold or hot season etc. In this paper the protective role of saliva, etiologiy of saliva deficiency and its clinical management are discussed. (author

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Nigerian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Olatundun Williams; Daniel Gbadero; Grace Edowhorhu; Ann Brearley; Tina Slusher; Lund, Troy C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (...

  9. Vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiency in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkhuizen, M. A.; Wieringa, F.T.

    2001-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was concerned with vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiency in pregnant and lactating women and in infants. The effects of supplementation withβ-carotene, iron and zinc on micronutrient status, growth, pregnancy outcome and immune function, and interactions between micronutrients were investigated.Deficiencies of vitamin A, iron and zinc are prevalent worldwide. Vitamin A deficiency leads to increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and vitamin A supplementat...

  10. Review of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy: who is affected?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Schroth; Lavelle, Christopher L. B.; Moffatt, Michael E.K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiencies have been documented in several populations, including aboriginal Canadians from isolated northern communities. Such deficiencies can impact the health of both the mother and her infant. This review was performed to determine how widespread vitamin D deficiency is during pregnancy. Study design. Electronic literature search. Methods. A Medline search was conducted using the Mesh terms "pregnancy" and "vitamin D". Those studies meeting the inclusion criteria ...

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    DD Farhud"; L Yazdanpanah

    2008-01-01

    "nGlucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency is the most prevalent enzymopathy in mankind. It has sex-linked in­heritance. This enzyme exists in all cells.  G6PD deficiency increases the sensitivity of red blood cells to oxidative dam­age. G6PD deficiency was discovered in 1950 when some people suffered hemolytic anemia as a result of taking antimalar­ial drugs (primaquin). Most people with G6PD deficiency do not have any symptoms, till they are ...

  12. [Treatable Dementia due to Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin deficiency is one of the major causes of treatable dementia. Specifically, patients suffering from dementia frequentry display low serum levels of vitamin B(12). There is a close metabolic interaction between folate and vitamin B(12). Folate deficiency causes various neuropsychiatric symptoms, which resemble those observed in vitamin B(12) deficiency. This review summarizes, the basic pathophysiology of vitamin B(12) and folate deficiency, its clinical diagnosis, associated neuropsychiatric symptoms such as subacute combined degeneration and dementia, and epidemiological studies of cognitive decline and brain atrophy. PMID:27056859

  13. [Vegetarians are at high risk of vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Parva; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Since vegetarians have a lower intake of vitamin B12 (B12) than non-vegetarians, they are at increased risk of developing B12 deficiency. The less animal products the food contains the worse the B12 status. However, even lacto-ovo-vegetarians run the risk of becoming deficient in B12. Vegetarians are recommended regularly to take supplements of B12, and they should be informed of the lacking content of B12 of plant products and the hazards of B12 deficiency. Furthermore, vegetarians should routinely be checked for possible B12 deficiency. PMID:26750191

  14. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  15. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: A Possible Risk Factor for Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Lakshmi; Scaglia, Fernando; McLin, Valerie; Hertel, Paula; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Karpen, Saul; Mahoney, Donald; Yee, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle defect. Thromboembolic complications have not heretofore been linked with this diagnosis. We describe four patients with neonatal-onset OTC deficiency who developed vascular thromboses. One patient had arterial thrombosis; the rest developed venous thromboses. Multiple pro-thrombotic risk factors were identified. Low plasma arginine levels were observed in all patients at the time of thrombosis. Arginine deficiency and the resultant nitric oxide insufficiency may contribute to thrombotic risk. Careful normalization of plasma arginine and citrulline levels and increased surveillance for thrombotic complications should be considered in patients with OTC deficiency. PMID:19343772

  16. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients (MN are the nutrients that are needed by the body in small quantities which play leading roles in the production of enzymes, hormones and other substances that help to regulate growth activity, development and functioning of the immune and reproductive systems. Children, adolescent boys & girls and expectant mothers form a vulnerable group in developing countries where economic stress and food security are issues of concern. MNs deficiencies, which have been considered as major risk factors in child survival are the leading cause of mental retardation, preventable blindness, morbidity, birth defects, morbidity and mortality. Micronutrient malnutrition has many adverse effects on human health, not all of which are clinically evident. Even moderate levels of deficiency (which can be detected by biochemical or clinical measurements can have serious detrimental effects on human function. Thus, in addition to the obvious and direct health effects, the existence of MN deficiency has profound implications for economic development and productivity, particularly in terms of the potentially huge public health costs and the loss of human capital formation.According to WHO mortality data, around 0.8 million deaths (1.5% of the total can be attributed to iron deficiency each year, and a similar number to vitamin A deficiency. In terms of the loss of healthy life, expressed in  disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, iron-deficiency anaemia results in  25 million DALYs lost (or 2.4% of the global total, vitamin A deficiency  in 18 million DALYs lost (or 1.8% of the global total and iodine deficiency  in 2.5 million DALYs lost (or 0.2% of the global total [1].A child belonging to low socio-economic families residing in poor environmental and sanitation settings consume low quantity of foods which deficient not only in 2-3 MNs Deficiencies but also in macronutrients. These children also suffer from recurrent episodes of morbidities which

  17. Pancreatic SEC23B deficiency is sufficient to explain the perinatal lethality of germline SEC23B deficiency in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Khoriaty; Lesley Everett; Jennifer Chase; Guojing Zhu; Mark Hoenerhoff; Brooke McKnight; Matthew P. Vasievich; Bin Zhang; Kärt Tomberg; John (Jack) Williams; Ivan Maillard; David Ginsburg

    2016-01-01

    In humans, loss of function mutations in SEC23B result in Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type II (CDAII), a disease limited to defective erythroid development. Patients with two nonsense SEC23B mutations have not been reported, suggesting that complete SEC23B deficiency might be lethal. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration and that mice with hematopoietic SEC23B deficiency do not exhibit CDAII. We now show that SEC2...

  18. Screening For Vitamin D Deficiency In Females In Madina Region; Saudi Arabia. Vitamin D Deficiency In A Sunny Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Nagib(1) , and Mahmoud A. Abulmagd

    2012-01-01

    Background And Objective: Poor sunlight exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency even in the sunniest places. So screening for vitamin D deficiency in outpatient clinics and inhospital setting in King Fahad Hospital , Al Madina Al Monwara. METHODS: Screening for vitamin D deficiency by assessment of serum 25(OH)D with radioimmunoassay in 60 female patients aged 18 – 40 years. Serum calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase were assessed, too. Results: 6 female patients (10%) showed signi...

  19. Thiamine and magnesium deficiencies: keys to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, D

    2015-02-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) is accepted as the cause of beriberi because of its action in the metabolism of simple carbohydrates, mainly as the rate limiting cofactor for the dehydrogenases of pyruvate and alpha-ketoglutarate, both being critical to the action of the citric acid cycle. Transketolase, dependent on thiamine and magnesium, occurs twice in the oxidative pentose pathway, important in production of reducing equivalents. Thiamine is also a cofactor in the dehydrogenase complex in the degradation of the branched chain amino acids, leucine, isoleucine and valine. In spite of these well accepted facts, the overall clinical effects of TD are still poorly understood. Because of the discovery of 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) as the first peroxisomal enzyme in mammals found to be dependent on thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and the ability of thiamine to bind with prion protein, these factors should improve our clinical approach to TD. HACL1 has two important roles in alpha oxidation, the degradation of phytanic acid and shortening of 2-hydroxy long-chain fatty acids so that they can be degraded further by beta oxidation. The downstream effects of a lack of efficiency in this enzyme would be expected to be critical in normal brain metabolism. Although TD has been shown experimentally to produce reversible damage to mitochondria and there are many other causes of mitochondrial dysfunction, finding TD as the potential biochemical lesion would help in differential diagnosis. Stresses imposed by infection, head injury or inoculation can initiate intermittent cerebellar ataxia in thiamine deficiency/dependency. Medication or vaccine reactions appear to be more easily initiated in the more intelligent individuals when asymptomatic marginal malnutrition exists. Erythrocyte transketolase testing has shown that thiamine deficiency is widespread. It is hypothesized that the massive consumption of empty calories, particularly those derived from carbohydrate and fat, results in

  20. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Martino Roth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cystic fibrosis (CF. Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR, through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease.

  1. Quantification and evaluation of the role of antielastin autoantibodies in the emphysematous lung.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Low, Teck Boon

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be an autoimmune disease. Smoking causes an imbalance of proteases and antiproteases in the lung resulting in the generation of elastin peptides that can potentially act as autoantigens. Similar to COPD, Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Z-A1ATD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) are associated with impaired pulmonary antiprotease defences leading to unopposed protease activity. Here, we show that there is a trend towards higher bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) antielastin antibody levels in COPD and Z-A1ATD and significantly lower levels in CF compared to control BALF; the lower levels in CF are due to the degradation of these antibodies by neutrophil elastase. We also provide evidence that these autoantibodies have the potential to induce T cell proliferation in the emphysematous lung. This study highlights that antielastin antibodies are tissue specific, can be detected at elevated levels in COPD and Z-A1ATD BALF despite their being no differences in their levels in plasma compared to controls, and suggests a therapeutic role for agents targeting these autoantibodies in the lungs.

  2. Mechanisms of protein misfolding in conformational lung diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McElvaney, N G

    2012-08-01

    Genetic or environmentally-induced alterations in protein structure interfere with the correct folding, assembly and trafficking of proteins. In the lung the expression of misfolded proteins can induce a variety of pathogenetic effects. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two major clinically relevant pulmonary disorders associated with protein misfolding. Both are genetic diseases the primary causes of which are expression of mutant alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and SERPINA1, respectively. The most common and best studied mutant forms of CFTR and AAT are ΔF508 CFTR and the Glu342Lys mutant of AAT called ZAAT, respectively. Non-genetic mechanisms can also damage protein structure and induce protein misfolding in the lung. Cigarette-smoke contains oxidants and other factors that can modify a protein\\'s structure, and is one of the most significant environmental causes of protein damage within the lung. Herein we describe the mechanisms controlling the folding of wild type and mutant versions of CFTR and AAT proteins, and explore the consequences of cigarette-smoke-induced effects on the protein folding machinery in the lung.

  3. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes Take the Form of Long-Lived, Transcriptionally Competent Episomes in Human Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Ye, Guo-Jie; Flotte, Terence R; Trapnell, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Gene augmentation therapy as a strategy to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has reached phase 2 clinical testing in humans. Sustained serum levels of AAT have been observed beyond one year after intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the AAT gene. In this study, sequential muscle biopsies obtained at 3 and 12 months after vector injection were examined for the presence of rAAV vector genomes. Each biopsy sample contained readily detectable vector DNA, the majority of which existed as double-stranded supercoiled and open circular episomes. Episomes persisted through 12 months, although at slightly lower levels than observed at 3 months. There was a clear dose response when comparing the low- and mid-vector-dose groups to the high-dose group. The highest absolute copy numbers were found in a high-dose subject, and serum AAT levels at 12 months confirmed that the high-dose group also had the highest sustained serum AAT levels. Sequence analysis revealed that the vast majority of episomes contained double-D inverted terminal repeats ranging from fully intact to severely deleted. Molecular clones of vector genomes derived directly from the biopsies were transcriptionally active, potentially identifying them as the source of serum AAT in the trial subjects. PMID:26650966

  4. Microbial cell wall agents as an occupational hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic dusts cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues exposed. The lung and the cells lining the surface of the respiratory tract are a primary target. Many receptors have been shown to react specifically on the presence of microorganisms that are ubiquitous elements in organic dusts. There is a great variability in the individual response to organic dusts. Almost 50% of Caucasians are hyporesponders to LPS exposure, and people with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency are hyperresponsive to organic dust exposure. The diseases resulting from organic dust exposures include asthma, allergy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and toxic pneumonitis (organic dust toxic syndrome).This paper deals with inflammation and the subsequent mechanism of disease as it is encountered in industries with these exposures. Toxicological studies including human experimental exposures and ex vivo studies of cells are described. Cellular reactions are mediated through the attachment of, e.g. LPS and β (1,3)-D-glucan to lipopolysaccharide binding protein, CD14 and Toll-like receptors. The relation between protein release and the gene activation is described. Furthermore, studies of the individual susceptibility will be reviewed

  5. [Place of genotyping in addition to the phenotype and the assay of serum α-1 antitrypsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Philippe; Francina, Alain; Lacan, Philippe; Heraut, Jessica; Chapuis-Cellier, Colette

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is based on isoelectric focusing of serum proteins and the extent of serum. However, the focusing is technically difficult and a greatly reduced concentration in abnormal A1AT tapeless does not differentiate an unstable variant of a variant called 'null' (that is to say without any phenotypic expression) to 'heterozygous' state. In this study, we compared the results of the assay, the phenotype and genotype of A1AT in 50 patients. Normal A1AT alleles (Pi*M1 to Pi*M4) or loss of the most common (Pi*S and Pi*Z) were clearly identified in phenotyping. However, genotyping was necessary to characterize: (i) certain alleles rarer A1AT (S-Munich, X-Christchurch); (ii) a null allele and; (iii) two new alleles A1AT not yet described in the literature. In conclusion, although the A1AT genotyping is generally not necessary, it is necessary to resolve complex cases and to obtain witnesses validated for isoelectric focusing. PMID:22008137

  6. Support Seeking or Familial Obligation: An Investigation of Motives for Disclosing Genetic Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marisa; Smith, Rachel A

    2016-06-01

    Genetic test results reveal not only personal information about a person's likelihood of certain medical conditions but also information about the person's genetic relatives. Given the familial nature of genetic information, one's obligation to protect family members may be a motive for disclosing genetic test results, but this claim has not been methodically tested. Existing models of disclosure decision making presume self-interested motives, such as seeking social support, instead of other-interested motives, like familial obligation. This study investigated young adults' (N = 173) motives to share a genetic-based health condition, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, after reading a hypothetical vignette. Results show that social support and familial obligation were both reported as motives for disclosure. In fact, some participants reported familial obligation as their primary motivator for disclosure. Finally, stronger familial obligation predicted increased likelihood of disclosing hypothetical genetic test results. Implications of these results were discussed in reference to theories of disclosure decision-making models and the practice of genetic disclosures. PMID:26507777

  7. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S; Silverman, E K; Nordestgaard, B G; Dahl, Morten; Dahl, M

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  8. Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry. The REPAIR study: study design, methodology and quality control of study assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jan; Cooper, Brendan G; Stoel, Berend; Rames, Alexis; Rutman, Olga; Soliman, Sherif; Stockley, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction of alveolar wall and enlargement of alveolar airspaces, resulting in a reduction of the total lung gas exchange area, loss of lung elastic recoil and hyperinflation. The REPAIR study (Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry) is the first proof-of-concept study of a new potential disease-modifying drug, Palovarotene©, an orally active, gamma selective retinoid agonist in patients with emphysema secondary to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) as a model population for the general smoke-induced emphysema population. This article describes the study design as well as the effectiveness of the quality control that was implemented on the key efficacy endpoints, based on data derived from the placebo-treated subjects. In this multicentre, multinational study the implementation of standardized procedures included: careful site selection, use of trained staff, regular monitoring and machine calibration, use of biological controls and regular feedback to sites by an independent quality control centre. All of these procedures resulted in high-quality measurements of lung density, spirometry, static lung volumes and gas transfer. It was also confirmed that CT lung density was the most sensitive endpoint followed by TLco, FEV(1) and RV measured by body box. PMID:20926506

  9. Lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane CR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available C Randall Lane, Adriano R Tonelli Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Lung transplantation is one of the few treatments available for end-stage COPD with the potential to improve survival and quality of life. The selection of candidates and timing of listing present challenges, as COPD tends to progress fairly slowly, and survival after lung transplantation remains limited. Though the natural course of COPD is difficult to predict, the use of assessments of functional status and multivariable indices such as the BODE index can help identify which patients with COPD are at increased risk for mortality, and hence which are more likely to benefit from lung transplantation. Patients with COPD can undergo either single or bilateral lung transplantation. Although many studies suggest better long-term survival with bilateral lung transplant, especially in younger patients, this continues to be debated, and definitive recommendations about this cannot be made. Patients may be more susceptible to particular complications of transplant for COPD, including native lung hyperinflation, and development of lung cancer. Keywords: emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, mortality, prognosis, outcomes, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

  10. Rare lung diseases I--Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM); subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia. LAM is a rare, progressive and (without intervention) often fatal interstitial lung disease that predominantly affects women of childbearing age. LAM is characterized by progressive interstitial infiltration of the lung by smooth muscle cells, resulting in diffuse cystic changes of the lung parenchyma. The molecular basis of this disorder has been delineated over the past five years and LAM is now known to be a consequence of mutations in the tuberous sclerosis genes. This knowledge, combined with advances in our understanding of the signalling pathways regulated by these genes, has given rise to potential molecular therapies that hold great promise for treating this devastating disease. PMID:17036091

  11. May 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Ms. Georgann VanderJagt, RN, MSN gave an update on clinical trials at Dignity Health including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. To contact Ms. VanderJagt call her office at 602-406-3825, her cell at 602-615-2377 or by email at georgann.vaderjagt@digniftyhealth.org. Dr. Michael Smith, the surgical director for the lung transplant program at Dignity Health, gave an overview of their lung transplant program. They are currently the fifth busiest transplant program in the US. They have done 46 lung transplants so far this year. They are on a par with UCLA in number of transplants and survival has been at the National average. Average wait time ...

  12. Relative nutritional deficiencies associated with centrally acting monoamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics Inc, Cape Coral, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USABackground: Two primary categories of nutritional deficiency exist. An absolute nutritional deficiency occurs when nutrient intake is not sufficient to meet the normal needs of the system, and a relative nutritional deficiency exists when nutrient intake and systemic levels of nutrients are normal, while a change occurs in the system that induces a nutrient intake requirement that cannot be supplied from diet alone. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the primary component of chronic centrally acting monoamine (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine disease is a relative nutritional deficiency induced by postsynaptic neuron damage.Materials and methods: Monoamine transporter optimization results were investigated, re-evaluated, and correlated with previous publications by the authors under the relative nutritional deficiency hypothesis. Most of those previous publications did not discuss the concept of a relative nutritional deficiency. It is the purpose of this paper to redefine the etiology expressed in these previous writings into the realm of relative nutritional deficiency, as demonstrated by monoamine transporter optimization. The novel and broad range of amino acid precursor dosing values required to address centrally acting monoamine relative nutritional deficiency properly is also discussed.Results: Four primary etiologies are described for postsynaptic neuron damage leading to a centrally acting monoamine relative nutritional deficiency, all of which require monoamine transporter optimization to define the proper amino acid dosing values of serotonin and dopamine precursors.Conclusion: Humans suffering from chronic centrally acting monoamine-related disease are not suffering from a drug deficiency; they are suffering from a relative

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency and gastric histopathology in older patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KR Dholakia; TS Dharmarajan; D Yadav; S Oiseth; EP Norkus; CS Pitchumoni

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare upper gastric endoscopic and histopathologic findings in older adults in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency.METHODS: A prospective analysis of upper gastric endoscopic and gastric histopathologic findings from 30 newly identified B12-deficient patients (11 males,19 females) and 16 controls with normal B12 status (6males, 10 females) was performed. For all subjects, the indication for upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy were unrelated to B12 status. A single pathologist, blinded to B12 status, processed and interpreted the biopsy samples. Endoscopic and histopathologic findings were correlated with age, gender, hematocrit (Hct), MCV and B12 status.RESULTS: The B12-deficient group had significantly lower mean serum B12 levels compared to the controls (P<0.00005) while their mean Hct, MCV and serum albumin levels were similar. Iron deficiency (ferritinbased) was present in 21% of B12-deficient patients and intrinsic factor antibodies were present in29% (5/17) of B12-deficient patients. The endoscopic findings revealed significantly different rates of gastritis and atrophy between the B12-deficient and control groups (P= 0.017).B12-deficient patients had significantly less superficial gastritis (62% vs 94%) and significantly more atrophic gastritis (28% vs 0%) as compared to the controls (P= 0.039). Intestinal metaplasia was similar in both groups. Helicobacter pyloriinfection rates were similar in the B12-deficient patients and controls (40% vs31%).CONCLUSION: Significantly different endoscopic findings and types of gastritis could often be observed in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency. Atrophy,based on endoscopy, and atrophic gastritis, based on histopathology, suggest the presence of B12 deficiency.Gastric histopathology is not influenced by the age,gender, Hct or MCV of the patients.

  14. Laser Spectroscopy of neutron deficient Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the ground state properties of neutron-deficient tin isotopes towards the doubly-magic nucleus $^{100}$Sn. Nuclear spins, changes in the rms charge radii and electromagnetic moments of $^{101-121}$Sn will be measured by laser spectroscopy using the CRIS experimental beam line. These ground-state properties will help to clarify the evolution of nuclear structure properties approaching the $\\textit{N = Z =}$ 50 shell closures. The tin isotopic chain is currently the frontier for the application of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations. Our knowledge of the nuclear structure of the Sn isotopes will set a benchmark for the advances of many-body methods, and will provide an important test for modern descriptions of the nuclear force.

  15. V(D)J recombination deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    V(D)J recombination not only comprises the molecular mechanism that insures diversity of the immune system but also constitutes a critical checkpoint in the developmental program of B- and T-lymphocytes. The analysis of human patients with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) has contributed to the understanding of the biochemistry of the V(D)J recombination reaction. The molecular study V(D)J recombination settings in humans, mice and in cellular mutants has allowed to unravel the process of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), one of the key pathway that insure proper repair of DNA double strand breaks (dsb), whether they occur during V(D)J recombination or secondary to other DNA injuries. Two NHEJ factors, Artemis and Cernunnos, were indeed discovered through the study of human V(D)J recombination defective human SCID patients. PMID:19731800

  16. Geothermal energy: option for energy deficient countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan is one of the energy deficient countries. Our resources of fossil fuels are limited and cannot be depended upon, as these are not of good quality except natural gas. The latter can be better used for other purposes rather than burning it straightaway. To meet the energy shortfall Pakistan has to make use of alternate sources of energy and consequently the work in this direction needs to be emphasized in Pakistan. Geothermal energy is being utilized in many developed countries. An attempt has been made in this article to increase awareness, introduce the topic and draw attention of scientists and appropriate agencies of the country to probe the potential of this valuable source in Pakistan which lies on the seismic belt. (author)

  17. NAD metabolism in HPRT-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomelli, Gabriella; Di Marcello, Federica; Notarantonio, Laura; Sestini, Silvia; Cerboni, Barbara; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is virtually absent in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by uric acid accumulation and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The biochemical basis for the neurological and behavioral abnormalities have not yet been completely explained. Prior studies of cells from affected patients have shown abnormalities of NAD metabolism. In the current studies, NAD metabolism was evaluated in HPRT gene knock-out mice. NAD content and the activities of the enzymes required for synthesis and breakdown of this coenzyme were investigated in blood, brain and liver of HPRT− and control mice. NAD concentration and enzyme activities were found to be significantly increased in liver, but not in brain or blood of the HPRT− mice. These results demonstrate that changes in NAD metabolism occur in response to HPRT deficiency depending on both species and tissue type. PMID:19319672

  18. Boron in Plants: Deficiency and Toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan J. Camacho-Crist6bal; Jesus Rexach; Agustin González-Fontess

    2008-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for normal growth of higher plants, and B availability in soil and irrigation water is an important determinant of agricultural production. To date, a primordial function of B is undoubtedly its structural role in the cell wall; however, there is increasing evidence for a possible role of B in other processes such as the maintenance of plasma membrane function and several metabolic pathways. In recent years, the knowledge of the molecular basis of B deficiency and toxicity responses in plants has advanced greatly. The aim of this review is to provide an update on recent findings related to these topics, which can contribute to a better understanding of the role of B in plants.

  19. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  20. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, 242Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, αxn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,αxn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z1 + Z2 = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,αxn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of 228Pu, 230Pu, 232Cm, or 238Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes