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Sample records for alpha spectrometry

  1. High resolution alpha particle spectrometry through collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle spectrometry with collimation is a useful method for identifying nuclear materials among various nuclides. A mesh type collimator reduces the low energy tail and broadened energy distribution by cutting off particles with a low incidence angle. The relation between the resolution and the counting efficiency can be investigated by changing a ratio of the mesh hole diameter and the collimator thickness. Through collimation, a target particle can be distinguished by a PIPS® detector under a mixture of various nuclides. - Highlights: • Alpha particle spectrometry with collimation a useful method for identifying nuclear materials among various radionuclides. • A collimator cut off alpha particles with low angle emitted from a source. • We confirm that that a collimator improves the resolution of alpha spectra through both simulation and experiments

  2. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  3. Alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this master thesis was preparation of samples with thorium content on the steel discs by electrodeposition for determination of natural thorium isotope by alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry and finding out their possible linear correlation between these methods. The samples with electrolytically excluded isotope of 232Th were prepared by electrodeposition from solution Th(NO3)4·12H2O on steel discs in electrodeposition cell with use of solutions Na2SO4, NaHSO4, KOH and (NH4)2(C2O4) by electric current 0.75 A. Discs were measured by alpha spectrometer. Activity was calculated from the registered impulses for 232Th and surface's weight. After alpha spectrometry measurements discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV which is installed in the International Laser Centre in Bratislava. Intensities of isotope of 232Th and ions of ThO+, ThOH+, ThO2H+, Th2O4H+, ThO2-, ThO3H-, ThH3O3- and ThN2O5H- were identified. The linear correlation is between surface's weights of Th and intensities of ions of Th+ from SIMS, however the correlation coefficient has relatively low value. We found out with SIMS method that oxidized and hydride forms of thorium are significantly represented in samples with electroplated thorium. (authors)

  4. Intercomparison of alpha particle spectrometry software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software has reached an important level as the 'logical controller' at different levels, from a single instrument to an entire computer-controlled experiment. This is also the case for software packages in nuclear instruments and experiments. In particular, because of the range of applications of alpha-particle spectrometry, software packages in this field are often used. It is the aim of this intercomparison to test and describe the abilities of four such software packages. The main objectives of the intercomparison were the ability of the programs to determine the peak areas and the peak area uncertainties, and the statistical control and stability of reported results. In this report, the task, methods and results of the intercomparison are presented in order to asist the potential users of such software and to stimulate the development of even better alpha-particle spectrum analysis software

  5. Performance Test of Alpha Spectrometry for Environmental Radioactivity Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental samples are analyzed by various methods such as, ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) TIMS (thermal ionization mass spectrometry), HRGS (high resolution gamma spectrometry) and alpha /beta particle analysis. In this study, we will described the result of performance test using alpha spectrometry for analyzing environmental samples. Measurement data of the U activity using SRM based on extraction chromatography with UTEVA resin. It should be effective way to separate of uranium isotope for the measurement of alpha spectrometry. But, the result of this measurement data is higher than another recovery data. Also concentration of U data is lack of consistency. We leave out of consideration many effect of factors about influence in the experiment process. In the future work, we will try to reduce the step of experiment process and reflect the uncertainty factors

  6. Performance Test of Alpha Spectrometry for Environmental Radioactivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Youn; Yoon, Jong-Ho; Han, Ki-Tek; Ahn, Gil Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Environmental samples are analyzed by various methods such as, ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) TIMS (thermal ionization mass spectrometry), HRGS (high resolution gamma spectrometry) and alpha /beta particle analysis. In this study, we will described the result of performance test using alpha spectrometry for analyzing environmental samples. Measurement data of the U activity using SRM based on extraction chromatography with UTEVA resin. It should be effective way to separate of uranium isotope for the measurement of alpha spectrometry. But, the result of this measurement data is higher than another recovery data. Also concentration of U data is lack of consistency. We leave out of consideration many effect of factors about influence in the experiment process. In the future work, we will try to reduce the step of experiment process and reflect the uncertainty factors.

  7. Actinides at the crossroads: ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains viewgraphs only that summarize the following: Why turn to mass spectrometry for radiochemical measurements; What might be some advantages of using ICP mass spectrometry; Sensitivity of ETV-ICP-MS relative to decay counting (versus half-life); ICP-MS instrument detection limits for dissolved actinide isotopes; Effect of dissolved solids on USN-ICP-MS analysis; Polyatomic ion interferences in ICP-MS actinide measurements; Effect of operating conditions on uranium and protonated uranium signal; ICP mass spectrometry performance in actinide determinations; Determination of actinide elements in soil; Leachable Th-230 and Pu-239 in soil as determined by ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry; Leachable U-234 and U-238 in soil by ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry; Determination of uranium isotopic composition on smears; Activity ratios (U-234/U-238) as determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry; Uranium isotopic abundances as determined by TIMS and ICP-MS; and Comparison of uranium atom percentages determined by TIMS and ICP-MS. It is concluded that isotope dilution and radiochemical preparative techniques work well in radioanalytical applications of ICP-MS; radioanalytical ICP-MS data are equivalent to data from standard methods (TIMS, alpha spectrometry); and applications in radiation protection and earth sciences are certain to expand further

  8. The 1997 IAEA test spectra for alpha-particle spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Torano, E; Woods, S; Blaauw, M; Fazinic, S

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of an IAEA intercomparison of software for alpha-particle spectrometry, a set of test spectra with reference files was produced for validation and comparison of alpha spectrum analysis programs. The considerations, the spectra and the methods employed to obtain them are presented.

  9. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs

  10. Set-up of an alpha-spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle of operation of alpha-spectrometry system is described, using a solid state detector, which allows to precisely determine sample's activity and specify alpha-emitting radionuclides. Measurements which allow to define system performances are shown, that is energy resolution and real sensitivity of spectrometer

  11. Characteristic of the new scintillators for alpha radiation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper authors present results of development of new glass scintillators for alpha radiation spectrometry. Physical and luminescence parameters of proposed scintillators are compared. Used materials and methods as well as alpha spectra of Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214 are presented. (J.K.)

  12. A method for field measurements using alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-ray spectrometry in combination with sample preparation methods are commonly performed within a laboratory. These procedures are both technically demanding and time consuming. The current work describes what information alpha spectrometry will give if it is performed in the field with a limited amount of equipment. The aim was to find a mobile method usable in the field or mounted inside a vehicle. Experiments were made on four electrodeposited samples with different nuclide mixes, measured during normal and reduced air pressure conditions. A prototype of an instrument made for mobile use is also briefly described. (author)

  13. 226Ra determination in phosphogypsum by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical method for 226Ra determination by alpha-particle spectrometry in environmental samples has been developed in our laboratory. The method has been validated by measurements in samples with known concentrations of this radionuclide and it has been applied in studies related to 226Ra behaviour in phosphogypsum (the main by-product of producing phosphoric acid from phosphate rocks). (author)

  14. Preparation and characterization of 234U for mass spectrometry and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    234U of high isotopic purity (>99 atom%) as well as of high radiochemical purity was separated from aged 238Pu prepared by neutron irradiation of 237Np. Methodologies based on ion exchange and solvent extraction procedures were used to achieve high decontamination factor from 238Pu owing to the very high α-specific activity of 238Pu (2800 times) in comparison to that of 234U. Isotopic composition of purified 234U was determined by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Alpha spectrometry was used for checking the radiochemical purity of 234U with respect to concomitant α-emitting nuclides. The separated 234U will be useful for different investigations using mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. (author)

  15. Preparation and characterisation of 234U tracer for mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    234U was milked from 15 years aged 238Pu prepared earlier by neutron irradiation of 237Np. Ion exchange procedure using Dowex 1 X 8 resin in the nitric acid medium was followed for this purpose, in a glove box. The purified 234U was characterised by alpha spectrometry and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry for its 238Pu content and the isotopic composition of uranium, respectively. Alpha activity ratio of 234U/238Pu was 0.015 and the abundance of 234U was about 99 atom percent. (author). 1 fig

  16. Simultaneous determination of U and Pu isotopes by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of actinides by alpha spectrometry is usually carried out after full separation of each of the components of the sample. The procedure presented in this paper permits U and Pu isotopes to be measured together allowing faster sample processing and measurement. The method consists in the extraction with tributyl phosphate of U and Pu isotopes from the rest of the matrix, followed by a cathodic electrodeposition to obtain alpha spectrometry suitable pieces. It can be applied to various environmental samples, such as water, filters and soil (about 0.5 g of solid sample for the described conditions). High-quality electroplated discs are essential for simultaneous processing, so a technique to achieve this requirement is also explained. (authors)

  17. Alpha spectrometry sample preparation using selectively adsorbing thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago, Switzerland introduced limits for natural radionuclides in food, e.g. 1 Bq/l for 226Ra or 10 Bq/l for the sum of 238U and 234U in drinking water. To make enforcement by regional (cantonal) laboratories more attractive, simplified analytical methods had to be offered, at least for drinking water. A first step has been the development of radium adsorbing sheets. A 20 mm x 20 mm MnO2 film on a polyamide substrate adsorbs more than 80% of the radium present in a 100 ml water sample within 6 h. The film is thin enough to allow for high resolution alpha spectrometry. A second step now under way is to produce thin films, which selectively adsorb uranium. Actually, an ion exchange resin with diphosphonic and sulfonic acid groups is used for this purpose. Although not yet very thin, these films make possible energy resolutions far better than with any liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry method. Adsorption efficiencies are more than 80% after 20 h exposition to a 100 ml water sample (20 mm x 20 mm sheet). A third step is to have a system that measures radionuclide concentrations in water on-line. A prototype is presented where radionuclides are adsorbed on a film in contact with the water. A Si-detector placed on the other side of the film support counts the alphas passing through

  18. Response of commercial photodiodes for application in alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of semiconductor detector for ionizing radiations spectrometry and dosimetry has been growing in the last years due to its characteristics of fast response, good efficiency for unit of volume and excellent resolution. Since the working principle of a semiconductor detector is identical to that of the semiconductor junctions of commercial electronic devices, a study was carried out on the PIN-photodiodes response, aiming at set up an alpha spectrometry system of low cost and easy acquisition. The tested components have the following characteristics: active area varying between 13.2 and 25 mm2, window of thickness equal or lower than 57 mg/cm2, depletion area with depth ranging from 10 to 300 μm and junction capacitance of 16 to 20 pF.Am-241, Cm-244, U-233 and Np-237 alpha sources produced by electrodeposition were used to evaluate the response of the devices as a function of the radiation energy. The results have shown a linear response of the photodiodes with the incident alpha particle energy. The resolution varied from 1.6% to 0.45% and the better detection efficiency found was about 7.2. The low cost of the photodiodes and the excellent results obtained at room temperature make such components very attractive for teaching purposes for environmental monitoring. (author)

  19. Determination of natural uranium and thorium content by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-spectrometry has been used to determine simultaneously the uranium and thorium content in solid samples as well as the equilibrium with their decay products. Samples require preparation for measurement only by milling in a disc mill, without additional chemical treatment. Instrumentation used consisted of a commercial large area Frisch grid ionisation chamber. At concentration levels of 100 ppm of U or Th, deviations from decay equilibrium were measured within ± 10%, with increasing error margins for smaller concentrations. The detection limits appear to depend primarily on the background count rates of the chamber. (author)

  20. Iterative inversion of gamma or alpha spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma - and alpha ray spectrometry data are processed by an iterative regression method (Wolberg, 1967) to obtain the activities or yields of radionuclides. This method, applied to Nuclear Geophysics Research, permits the use of either selected energy bands or of all the channels one by one. It may be easily programmed in popular microcomputers and offers many advantages such as the use of mixtures of radionuclides for the calibrations and the treatment of the uncertainties on the measurements and results. Several conclusions about the method and options of nuclear data processing are presented. (Author)

  1. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  2. Using of alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry for determination of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the determination of the natural isotope of thorium by alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry, and to identify possible linear correlation between the two methods. Preparation of the disks with electrodeposed thorium was realised according to method from Eichrom Industries, Ltd and Galanda D. Samples with isotope of 232Th were prepared by electrodeposition from solution of Th(NO3)4·12H2O on high-gloss steel wheels in electrodeposition cell using solutions of Na2SO4, NaHSO4, KOH and (NH4)2(C2O4) under a current 0.75 A. Discs were measured by alpha spectrometer. The activity was calculated from obtained number of impulses for 232Th and the basic weight was calculated from this activity. After alpha spectrometry the discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV, which is installed in the International Laser Center in Bratislava. Integral and normalized intensity of the isotope 232Th and intensity of ions ThO+, ThO2H+, Th2O4H+, ThO2H-, ThO3-, ThO3H-, ThH3O3-and-ThN2O5H- were measured. SIMS analysis method registered also thorium in chemically bound forms, which could reduce the effectiveness of electrodeposition. We assume that in a thin layer of electrodeposited thorium the reactions at the level of nanochemistry take place. (authors)

  3. Some applications of Photon/Electron-Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) spectrometry to the assay of alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of certain solvent extraction separations and a special kind of liquid scintillation detector and electronics designed for alpha spectrometry allows some highly accurate, yet simple determinations of alpha-emitting nuclides. Counting efficiency is 99.68% with backgrounds of 99.95%. The Photon/Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) equipment is described and procedures for the separation and determination of uranium, thorium, plutonium, polonium, radium, and trivalent actinides are outlined. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  4. Optimization of operating parameters for low level measurements of alpha emitters by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The members of public are exposed to both natural and anthropogenic sources of radiation. Naturally occurring radioactive materials comprises of uranium, thorium and their decay products with other radionuclides such as 40K, 3H, 22Na, 7Be, etc. Anthropogenic radionuclides comprises of 137Cs, 90Sr, 239Pu, 241Am, etc. They emit alpha, beta and gamma radiations. Measurement at low level radioactivity is challenging due to interference and other inherent uncertainties. Alpha emitters comprises of 238U and 232Th with their daughters along with those of anthropogenic origin like 239Pu, 241Am, etc. Measurement of alpha emitters is essential by considering the adverse effects of alpha radiation while inside the body. Alpha spectrometry is a sensitive and direct technique to identify and quantify the alpha emitters having detection limit, two to three order of magnitude lower than gamma spectrometry. Standardization of operating parameters is imperative prior to analysis. An attempt has been made to optimize the parameters for an Eight Chamber Alpha Spectrometer (ORTEC) with 450 mm2PIPS detector surface area, with an operating voltage of 50 volt and current of 20-30 nano amperes. Energy calibration of each chamber was done with Pu-Am mixed source and natural uranium standard source. Efficiency of each detector measured with various sources to detector distance for the standard sources was nearly same at equivalent distances, e.g. it is coming around 16% at 8 mm source to detector distance (Rack 2) of each chamber. At 4 mm source to detector distance (Rack-1) it is 25% and gradually it decreases upto 2% at 40 mm source to detector distance (Rack-10). Resolution of 241Am peak was found to 20-25 keV at 8 mm source to detector distance and varies with distance from the detector. It was found that 50% decrease in resolution i.e. FWHM value with the increase in source to detector distance. In the energy range of 4-10 MeV, 8 counts is obtained as background count per 86,000 secs

  5. Some applications of Photon/Electron-Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) spectrometry to the assay of alpha emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of certain solvent extraction separations and a special kind of liquid scintillation detector and electronics designed for alpha spectrometry allows some highly accurate, yet simple determinations of alpha-emitting nuclides. Counting efficiency is 99.68% with backgrounds of <0.02 cpm. Energy resolution and peak position are sufficient for the identification of many nuclides. Rejection of interference from ..beta.. and ..gamma.. radiation is >99.95%. The Photon/Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) equipment is described and procedures for the separation and determination of uranium, thorium, plutonium, polonium, radium, and trivalent actinides are outlined. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements heavy-ion beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, J. M.

    1984-06-01

    Starting with polonium in 1898, alpha spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, alpha spectra have proven simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the "natural" alpha decay series led to the very powerful method of "genetically" linking the decay of new elements to the well-established alpha emission of "daughter" and "granddaughter" nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements, including Z = 101, thin samples suitable for alpha spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators, new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in helium gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a helium jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for alpha spectrometry, but also for alpha and beta-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and will be covered in this paper. For the synthesis of element 106, an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In this most recent experiments, alpha spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10 -1-10 0s for helium jets and 10 1-10 3 s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyse them with These latest techniques. Again, alpha spectrometry will play a major role, since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of alpha decays followed by spontaneous fission.

  7. Experiences with large-area frisch grid chambers in low-level alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1984-06-01

    The properties of parallel-palte gridded ionization chambers with areas of 300 cm 2, developed by us for alpha spectrometry of samples with low specific alpha activity are reported. Several practical hints for optimum operating conditions are presented. The chambers can be operated routinely at atmospheric pressure for several days, without the need for purification of the gas filling (P10). The minimum detectable activity at 5 MeV is 0.01 pCi, based on 4.65 standard deviations of background and 1000 min counting time. At the GSF Research Center ionization chambers of this type are used for the analysis of natural alpha emitters, as well as of transuranium nuclides in environmental samples by: (a) direct alpha spectrometry without any previous treatment of the sample, (b) semi-direct spectrometry after removal of organic matter by low-temperature ashing and (c) spectrometry after chemical separation. Some typical examples of application are given. Furthermore the range of application of the chambers in comparison to semiconductor detectors in the field of low-level alpha spectrometry is discussed.

  8. Experiences with large-area frisch grid chambers in low-level alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of parallel-plate gridded ionization chambers with areas of 300 cm2, developed by us for alpha spectrometry of samples with low specific alpha activity are reported. Several practical hints for optimum operating conditions are presented. The chambers can be operated routinely at atmospheric pressure for several days, without the need for purification of the gas filling (P10). The minimum detectable activity at 5 MeV is 0.01 pCi, based on 4.65 standard deviations of background and 1000 min counting time. At the GSF Research Center ionization chambers of this type are used for the analysis of natural alpha emitters, as well as of transuranium nuclides in environmental samples by: a) direct alpha spectrometry without any previous treatment of the sample, b) semi-direct spectrometry after removal of organic matter by low-temperature ashing and c) spectrometry after chemical separation. Some typical example of application are given. Furthermore the range of application of the chambers in comparison to semiconductor detectors in the field of low-level alpha spectrometry is discussed. (orig.)

  9. RAPID DETERMINATION OF 237 NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.; Culligan, B.; Nichols, S.; Noyes, G.

    2010-06-23

    A new method that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in water samples was developed for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via peak tailing. The method provide enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then moving Pu to DGA resin for additional removal of uranium. The decontamination factor for uranium from Pu is almost 100,000 and the decontamination factor for U from Np is greater than 10,000. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation method. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long and short-lived Pu isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 20 samples (including QC samples) in 4 to 6 hours, and can also be used for emergency response. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  10. Speciation of surfaces of the electrodeposited thorium by methods of alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The samples with the natural thorium isotope of 232Th were prepared by electrodeposition on the stainless discs from the solution Th(NO3)4.12H2O with the use of solutions of Na2SO4, NaHSO4, KOH and (NH4)2(C2O4) by electric current of 0.75 A. The prepared discs were analyzed by two methods: alpha spectrometry a secondary ion mass spectrometry. The numbers of the registered impulses for 232Th obtained from the alpha spectrometry. Activity and surface's weight was calculated from the numbers of the registered impulses for 232Th. After that, alpha spectrometry discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV which is installed in the International Laser Centre in Bratislava. The integral and normalized intensities of isotope of 232Th and intensities of ions of ThO+, ThOH+, ThO2H+, Th2O4H+, ThO2-, ThO3H-, ThH3O3- a ThN2O5H- were measured. The linear correlation is between surface's weights of Th and intensities of ions of Th+ from SIMS, however the correlation coefficient has relatively low value. With SIMS method we found out that oxidized and hydride forms of thorium are significantly represented in samples with electroplated thorium. (author)

  11. Competence of alpha spectrometry analysis algorithms used to resolve the 241Am and 243Am alpha peak overlap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five alpha spectrometry analysis algorithms were evaluated for their ability to resolve the 241Am and 243Am peak overlap present under typical low-level counting conditions. The major factors affecting the performance of the algorithms were identified using design-of-experiment combined with statistical analysis of the results. The study showed that the accuracy of the 241Am/243Am ratios calculated by the algorithms depends greatly on the degree of peak deformation and tailing. Despite the improved data quality obtained using an algorithm that may include peak addition and tail estimation, the accurate determination of 241Am by alpha spectrometry relies primarily on reduction of peak overlap rather than on algorithm selection

  12. Laboratory of routine alpha-spectrometry based on gridded ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory of routine alpha spectrometry based on gridded ionization chambers (80 cm2, 500 cm2 and 20,000 cm2 of source area) was built for direct measurement of samples with low specific activity. They allow direct spectrometry of as low as 6.7 mBq.g-1, 2.5 mBq.g-1, and 0.18 mBq.g-1, respectively. Simple quantitative physical methods of large-area source preparation are described. The system was used to measure the concentration of alpha emitters in environmental samples. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  13. 222Rn + 220Rn monitoring by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled 222Rn + 220Rn mixed atmospheres have been realised introducing calibrated sources in a stainless steel chamber. An electrostatic alpha monitor internal to the chamber has been used for an accurate discrimination of alpha peaks due to the products of the two isotopes. In the chamber, different specific activities are achieved in order to test the response of the internal reference instrument and to evaluate the possible interferences due to contemporary presence of both radon isotopes. Results show that: (i) the atmospheres are very stable, (ii) the monitor is adequate for their control because the various alpha lines are well evaluated and (iii) using TyvekR filter, the efficiency of monitor is stable and constant vs. activity. (authors)

  14. RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

    2009-05-27

    A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred instead

  15. The 1997 IAEA intercomparison of commercially available PC-based software for alpha-particle spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauw, M; Woods, S; Fazinic, S

    1999-01-01

    Four commercially available, PC-based analysis programs for alpha-particle spectrometry were compared using the 1997 IAEA test spectra, i.e. AlphaVision 1.20 (EG and G Ortec, USA), Alps 4.21 (Westmeier GmbH, Germany), Winner Alpha 4.0f5 (Eurisys Mesures, France) and Genie-2000 (Canberra Industries Inc., USA). A systematic statistical study of the analysis results was performed based on z-scores. The results indicate that the four programs leave room for substantial improvement.

  16. Analysis of a liquid sample residue using in situ alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three in situ alpha spectrometry methods were demonstrated to rapidly detect alpha-particle emitting radionuclides from a liquid sample. The liquid containing natU and 241Am was evaporated under an infrared lamp and the residue was analyzed in a vacuum and at ambient air pressure. The residue was too thick to determine activities of individual nuclides, but their identification and activity ratio calculations were possible. U and 241Am behaved differently during the liquid dry off, which led to alpha peaks of different shape. This finding should be taken into account for preparing future spectrum unfolding programs. (author)

  17. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1984-06-15

    Starting with polonium in 1898, alpha spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, alpha spectra have proven simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the ''natural'' alpha decay series led to the very powerful method of ''genetically'' linking the decay of new elements to the well-established alpha emission of ''daughter'' and ''granddaughter'' nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements, including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for alpha spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators, new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in helium gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a helium jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for alpha spectrometry, but also for alpha and beta-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and will be covered in this paper. For the synthesis of element 106, an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In this most recent experiments, alpha spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10/sup -6/ s, while it was 10/sup -1/-10/sup 0/ s for helium jets and 10/sup 1/-10/sup 3/ s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyse them with these latest techniques. Again, alpha spectrometry will play a major role, since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of alpha decays followed by

  18. Determination of ''226Ra by Alpha Spectrometry by Using ''225Ra as Yield Tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of low-level ''226 Ra in environmental and geological samples by alpha spectrometry is described. The method is based on the use of ''225 Ra from ''229 Th as yield tracer and has been developed to analyze U, Th and Ra in the same sample. (Author) 12 refs

  19. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Wijk, Albert van der

    1987-01-01

    De Engelse titel van dit proegschrift \\"Radiometric Dating by Alpha Spectometry on Uranium Series Nuclides\\" kan in het Nederlands wellicht het best worden weergegeven door \\"ouderdomsdbepalingen door stralingsmeting aan kernen uit de uraniumreeks met behulp van alfaspectometrie\\". In dit laatste hoofdstuk wil ik proberen om op beknopte, ook voor de niet gespecialiseerde lezer, de inhoud en achtergrond van het onderzoek samen te vatten. Aan het eind van de vorige eeuw werd het verschijnsel ra...

  20. Determination of Uranium plus Plutonium by Alpha spectrometry in different matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usually, the determination of alpha emitters by alpha spectrometry is performed with a prior purification of each of the elements to be quantified. In this work, a methodology for the determination of uranium and plutonium isotopes as jointly described, in order to improve analytical processing times and measurement. The method includes purifying uranium and plutonium, and the subsequent electrodeposition for alpha spectrometry measurement. The technique is based on the use of TBP (tributyl phosphate) as extractant and easy to obtain reactants. It is applicable to various matrices, including water, filters and soils. In the conditions described, is applied to small aliquots of approximately 0.5 g of solid. The technique produces high quality electrodeposits. (authors)

  1. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion-beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Starting with polonium in 1898, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, ..cap alpha..-spectra have proved simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the natural ..cap alpha..-decay series led to the very powerful method of genetically linking the decay of new elements to the well-established ..cap alpha..-emission of daughter and granddaughter nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for ..cap alpha..-spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in He gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a He-jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy, but also for ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and are discussed. For the synthesis of element 106 an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In the most recent experiments, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10/sup -6/ s; while it was 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 0/ s for He-jets and 10/sup 1/ to 10/sup 3/ s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyze them with these latest techniques. Again, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry will play a major role since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of ..cap alpha..-decays followed by spontaneous fission.

  2. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the analytical and technical procedures that are required for routine application of both the 230Th/234U disequilibrium dating method for peat and the 210Pb dating method for lake sediments. Its principal aim is to test, refine and discuss the reliability and validity of these methods. On the other hand, the analytical procedures that were introduced open a wide range of other interesting fields of research that are not necessarily restricted to geological problems only. Chapter 5 reports an obviously not foreseen application: detection of alpha emitting nuclides released in the first weeks of May, 1986 during the accident with the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR. 128 refs.; 43 figs.; 15 tabs

  3. Application of PERALS™ alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry for analysis and investigation of environmental spills at ISL uranium mining projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysenko, A; Ostrowski, A; Bellifemine, D; Palmer, G; Haigh, P; Johnston, A

    2014-03-01

    Radiation protection and environmental monitoring in mining requires effective and reliable radionuclide analysis at all stages of the mine project-prior to mining, during operation and through to remediation and decommissioning. The approach presented in this paper was specially developed for the monitoring of radioactive waste resulting from spills during mining and mineral processing operations and uses a combination of high resolution gamma spectrometry, and PERALS™ alpha spectrometry to identify and reliably quantify the activity of the major members of the U-238 decay chain at activities down to 10 mBq g(-1) by direct radionuclide counting and by assessment of the activity of their decay products. This approach has reduced sample preparation and analysis time while providing effective analysis and quantification of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental samples. It has been successfully applied to several in situ leach (ISL) mining-related projects involving investigations of process material spill impacts and also to routine environmental monitoring. PMID:24270399

  4. Basic characterization of 233U: Determination of age and 232U content using sector field ICP-MS, gamma spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to determine the age, i.e. the time since the last chemical separation, of 233U was studied using two fundamentally different measurement techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry. Moreover, the isotope ratio 232U/233U was measured using both alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry. For the two materials analysed, all measurement results were in agreement, i.e. consistent within the combined uncertainties. One of the materials was also measured using gamma spectrometry under field conditions. This measurement was also in agreement with the other results on this material

  5. Chemically selective polymer substrate based direct isotope dilution alpha spectrometry of Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sumana, E-mail: sumana@barc.gov.in [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pandey, Ashok K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Shah, R.V. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Aggarwal, S.K., E-mail: skaggr2002@gmail.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-06-09

    Highlights: • Membrane based alpha spectrometry was developed for plutonium. • A thin bifunctional layer was grafted on a porous membrane. • UV method used for grafting is simple and highly reproducible. • This method does not require preconcentration and source preparation steps. • Isotope dilution was used to enhance analytical performance. - Abstract: Quantification of actinides in the complex environmental, biological, process and waste streams samples requires multiple steps like selective preconcentration and matrix elimination, solid source preparations generally by evaporation or electrodeposition, and finally alpha spectrometry. To minimize the sample manipulation steps, a membrane based isotope dilution alpha spectrometry method was developed for the determination of plutonium concentrations in the complex aqueous solutions. The advantages of this method are that it is Pu(IV) selective at 3 M HNO{sub 3}, high preconcentration factor can be achieved, and obviates the need of solid source preparation. For this, a thin phosphate–sulfate bifunctional polymer layer was anchored on the surface of microporous poly(ethersulfone) membrane by UV induced surface grafting. The thickness of the bifunctional layer on one surface of the poly(ethersulfone) membrane was optimized. The thickness, physical and chemical structures of the bifunctional layer were studied by secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM–EDS (energy-dispersive spectroscopy). The optimized membrane was used for preconcentration of Pu(IV) from aqueous solutions having 3–4 M HNO{sub 3}, followed by direct quantification of the preconcentrated Pu(IV) by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry using {sup 238}Pu spike. The chemical recovery efficiency of Pu(IV) was found to be 86 ± 3% below Pu(IV) loading capacity (1.08 μg in 2 × 1 cm{sup 2}) of the membrane sample. The experiments with single representative actinides indicated that Am

  6. Chemically selective polymer substrate based direct isotope dilution alpha spectrometry of Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Membrane based alpha spectrometry was developed for plutonium. • A thin bifunctional layer was grafted on a porous membrane. • UV method used for grafting is simple and highly reproducible. • This method does not require preconcentration and source preparation steps. • Isotope dilution was used to enhance analytical performance. - Abstract: Quantification of actinides in the complex environmental, biological, process and waste streams samples requires multiple steps like selective preconcentration and matrix elimination, solid source preparations generally by evaporation or electrodeposition, and finally alpha spectrometry. To minimize the sample manipulation steps, a membrane based isotope dilution alpha spectrometry method was developed for the determination of plutonium concentrations in the complex aqueous solutions. The advantages of this method are that it is Pu(IV) selective at 3 M HNO3, high preconcentration factor can be achieved, and obviates the need of solid source preparation. For this, a thin phosphate–sulfate bifunctional polymer layer was anchored on the surface of microporous poly(ethersulfone) membrane by UV induced surface grafting. The thickness of the bifunctional layer on one surface of the poly(ethersulfone) membrane was optimized. The thickness, physical and chemical structures of the bifunctional layer were studied by secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM–EDS (energy-dispersive spectroscopy). The optimized membrane was used for preconcentration of Pu(IV) from aqueous solutions having 3–4 M HNO3, followed by direct quantification of the preconcentrated Pu(IV) by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry using 238Pu spike. The chemical recovery efficiency of Pu(IV) was found to be 86 ± 3% below Pu(IV) loading capacity (1.08 μg in 2 × 1 cm2) of the membrane sample. The experiments with single representative actinides indicated that Am(III) did not sorb to

  7. Target characterization by PIXE, alpha spectrometry and X-ray absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheswa, N.Y., E-mail: kheswa@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Old Faure Road, Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Papka, P. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Old Faure Road, Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602 Matieland (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Old Faure Road, Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, C.P.U.T, Bellville (South Africa); Newman, R.T. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, Old Faure Road, Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2011-11-01

    We report on the thickness and homogeneity characterization of thin metallic targets of Zr-96 by means of alpha absorption spectrometry, Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray absorption. The target thicknesses determined by means of the above mentioned methods are critically compared. The thicknesses were determined before and after irradiation with a 70 MeV beam of {sup 14}N ions.

  8. Alpha spectrometry of thick sources. II. Application to the study of radioactive equilibria in uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determining nuclide activities in 4n + 2 uranium series using alpha spectrometry of thick sources is described. This method has been applied to several uranium ores, showing different states of radioactive equilibria. The spectra from samples prepared by cold compression show some anomalies, due to the evolution and later decay of 219Rn and daughters. This phenomenon must be taken in consideration when computing spectra line intensities. (author)

  9. Alpha spectrometry of thick sources. I. Application to alpha emitters determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determining alpha emitters by silicon surface barrier detector spectroscopy using thick sources is studied. Two types of spectra have been obtained. They have different shapes of line according to the procedure used for preparing the sources. For both spectra a computing least square programme has been developed. In this way it is possible to calculate line intensities with accuracy better than 20 percent. (author)

  10. Development and implementation of methodology for radium analysis by alpha spectrometry: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha spectrometry is one of the most sensitive techniques for radium determination and allows simultaneous measurement of different radium isotopes. The determination of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples by alpha spectrometry requires careful chemical procedures to obtain enough thin sources to provide high quality spectra in which well separated peaks appear. Therefore, determinations by α- spectrometry require radiochemical separation of the element from the matrix, followed by preparation of suitable radioactive sources to obtain high resolution α-spectra in order to minimize peak overlap, and the use of appropriate tracers to determine the chemical yields of the radiochemical sample processing. In this paper, a radiochemical procedure is been developed to 228Ra, 226Ra and 224Ra determination in geological samples, such as rocks, soils, sediments, and waters. The main aim is to include an additional and simple step for the purification of radium within general procedure commonly used in our laboratory for uranium and thorium isotope determination in geological samples. For that reason, we are making several experiments involving direct 226Ra tracer electrodeposition onto stainless steel, as well as ion-exchange chromatography using 225Ra (T1/2 = 14.9 days) as yield tracer. Results showed that chemical recovery of direct electrodeposition of ten aliquots varied between 97 ± 4 % and 104 ± 5 %, with a mean value of 100 ± 1 %, implying in a very small loss in this step. (author)

  11. A comparison of different radiochemical methods applicable for the determination of plutonium isotopes in urine via alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work was to compare the performance of four of the most widely adopted radiochemical procedures making use of different extraction methods for the determination of plutonium in urine samples via alpha spectrometry

  12. Rapid monitoring of soil, smears, and air dusts by direct large-area alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental conditions to permit rapid monitoring of soils, smears, and air dusts for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides under field conditions are described. The monitoring technique involves direct measurement of alpha emitters by alpha spectrometry using a large-area detector to identify and quantify the radionuclides present. The direct alpha spectrometry employs a circular gridded ionization chamber 35 cm in diameter which accommodates either a circular sample holder 25 cm in diameter or a rectangular one 20 by 25 cm (8 by 10 in.). Soils or settled dusts are finely ground, suspended in 30% ethanol, and sprayed onto a 25-cm stainless steel dish. Air dusts are collected with a high-volume sampler onto 20- by 25-cm membrane filters. Removable contamination is collected from surfaces onto a 20- by 25-cm filter using an 18-cm (7-in.) paint roller to hold the large filter in contact with the surface during sample collection. All three types of samples are then counted directly in the alpha spectrometer and no other sample preparation is necessary. Some results obtained are described

  13. Factors affecting the energy resolution in alpha particle spectrometry with silicon diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work are presented the studies about the response of a multi-structure guard rings silicon diode for detection and spectrometry of alpha particles. This ion-implanted diode (Al/p+/n/n+/Al) was processed out of 300 μm thick, n type substrate with a resistivity of 3 kΩ·cm and an active area of 4 mm2. In order to use this diode as a detector, the bias voltage was applied on the n+ side, the first guard ring was grounded and the electrical signals were readout from the p+ side. These signals were directly sent to a tailor made preamplifier, based on the hybrid circuit A250 (Amptek), followed by a conventional nuclear electronic. The results obtained with this system for the direct detection of alpha particles from 241Am showed an excellent response stability with a high detection efficiency (≅ 100 %). The performance of this diode for alpha particle spectrometry was studied and it was prioritized the influence of the polarization voltage, the electronic noise, the temperature and the source-diode distance on the energy resolution. The results showed that the major contribution for the deterioration of this parameter is due to the diode dead layer thickness (1 μm). However, even at room temperature, the energy resolution (FWHM = 18.8 keV) measured for the 5485.6 MeV alpha particles (241Am) is comparable to those obtained with ordinary silicon barrier detectors frequently used for these particles spectrometry. (author)

  14. The application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion beam bombardement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with polonium in 1898, alpha spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, alpha spectra have proven simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the ''natural'' alpha decay series led to the very powerful method of ''genetically'' linking the decay of new elements to the well-established alpha emission of ''daughter'' and ''granddaughter'' nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements, including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for alpha spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators, new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in helium gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a helium jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for alpha spectrometry, but also for alpha and beta-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and will be covered in this paper. For the synthesis of element 106, an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In this most recent experiments, alpha spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10-6 s, while it was 10-1-100 s for helium jets and 101-103 s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyse them with these latest techniques. Again, alpha spectrometry will play a major role, since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of alpha decays followed by spontaneous fission. (orig.)

  15. Isolation of Pu-isotopes from environmental samples using ion chromatography for accelerator mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical method for the isolation of plutonium-isotopes from environmental samples, based on the use of specific extraction chromatography resins for actinides (TEVA, Eichrom Industries, Inc.), has been set up in our laboratory and optimised for their posterior determination by alpha spectrometry (AS) or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The proposed radiochemical method has replaced in our lab a well-established one based on the use of a relatively un-specific anion-exchange resin (AG 1X8, Bio-rad Laboratories, Inc.), because it is clearly less time consuming, reduces the amounts and molarities of acid wastes produced, and reproducibly gives high radiochemical yields. In order to check the reliability of the proposed radiochemical method for the determination of plutonium-isotopes in different environmental matrixes, twin aliquots of a set of samples were prepared with TEVA and with AG 1X8 resins and measured by AS. Some samples prepared with TEVA resins were measured as well by AMS. As it is shown in the text, there is a comfortable agreement between AS and AMS, which adequately validates the method

  16. The determination of radium-226 in uranium ores and mill products by alpha energy spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable routine procedure for determining 226Ra by alpha energy spectrometry is described. Radium is isolated as sulphate from the sample matrix by co-precipitation with a small mass of barium and analysed using a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector. The method is capable of providing high accuracy over a large 226Ra concentration range and is applicable to materials such as uranium ores, uranium mill products and effluent streams. Samples resulting from nitric acid leach experiments with Elliot Lake ores were examined using the procedure. The distribution of 223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra between the leach products, (residue and leach liquor), is discussed. (author)

  17. Sensitivity of ICP-MS, PERALS and alpha spectrometry for the determination of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of the three most popular techniques for the determination of minor actinides at environmental levels: ICP-MS, PERALS and solid state alpha spectrometry. For each method the limit of detection and the resolution were estimated in order to study the content and isotopic composition of the actinides. The sensitivities of the three determination techniques were compared. Two international reference materials, IAEA-135 (Irish Sea sediment) and IAEA-300 (Baltic Sea sediment) were analyzed for activity concentrations of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am. (authors)

  18. Bioassay alpha spectrometry: energy resolution as a function of sample source preparation and counting geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle counting is based on the response of an electronic counting system to an incident alpha particle. Alpha spectrometry is used in our employee surveillance bioassay program to measure the concentration of isotopes of Am, Pu and U contained on sample source preparations. Nuclides of Am, Pu and U are separated from the sample matrix by anion exchange and are electroplated on a stainless steel disc. The plated source diameter is 12.7 mm. A tracer is added to the sample before anion exchange as a quality control procedure to provide a measure of chemical yield. Tracer alpha-particle emissions are recorded in a preassigned calibrated area of the energy spectrum and chemical recovery is calculated by the ratio of tracer counts per second divided by the tracer activity in becquerels (Bq). Percent tracer recovery may also be calculated by introducing the average counting efficiency factor in the denominator. Tracer yield is then used to provide a reliable estimate of the sample's analyte counts that are recorded in other preassigned energy dependent areas of the spectrum. The tracer spectrum in the presence or absence of other nuclides also provides evidence of the performance characteristics of the alpha spectrometer, for example, chamber vacuum and electronics. Electroplated samples are counted in any one of 96 detectors. The backgrounds of these detectors are maintained at less than 3 counts per 70,000 s over a 190 keV energy window to provide a limit of detection of less than 0.37 mBq per sample at the 95% confidence level. In this paper, resolution of the photopeak is shown to be a function of the source to detector distance and a function of degraded alpha energies due to Fe or other extraneous materials on the plated surface

  19. Economic alpha spectrometry using silicon microsystems and selectively adsorbing thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present first results obtained with a monitor SARAD EQF 3020 containing three alpha detector microsystems measuring radon in air, attached radon daughters and unattached radon daughters respectively. The three components are measured quasicontinuousely with a temporal resolution of 2 hours. The measuring range is 1 to 10 MBq/m3 by low detection limit of 0.1 Bq/m3 equivalent radon concentration. The system was rested in buildings, caves, mines, waterworks and other places. Using silicon microsystem integrating on a few chips an alpha detector, an ADC, a memory and logics can be produced at far lower cost than if assembled from individual components. We have also developed thin films selectively adsorbing radium and uranium from aqueous solutions, e.g. drinking waters. These films have simply to be placed into the solution to be analyzed and accumulate radium and uranium with a high efficiency. The adsorption capacity of this films is by a 20 h exposure nearly 70% for radium in the solution. The films are eventually measured by alpha spectrometry and show energy resolutions of below 50 keV. These thin films considerably reduce preparation times and thus costs. Replacing in addition the conventional alpha spectrometer by one of our silicon microsystems leads to a very economic system for the analysis of radium and uranium in drinking water. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  20. Simulation study for high resolution alpha particle spectrometry with mesh type collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alpha particle spectrometry with a mesh type collimator plays a crucial role in identifying specific radionuclide in a radioactive source collected from the atmosphere or environment. The energy resolution is degraded without collimation because particles with a high angle have a longer path to travel in the air. Therefore, collision with the background increases. The collimator can cut out particles which traveling at a high angle. As a result, an energy distribution with high resolution can be obtained. Therefore, the mesh type collimator is simulated for high resolution alpha particle spectrometry. In conclusion, the collimator can improve resolution. With collimator, the collimator is a role of cutting out particles with a high angle, so, low energy tail and broadened energy distribution can be reduced. The mesh diameter is found out as an important factor to control resolution and counting efficiency. Therefore, a target particle, for example, 235U, can be distinguished by a detector with a collimator under a mixture of various nuclides, for example: 232U, 238U, and 232Th

  1. Comparison of the radiochemical separation procedures od plutonium applied for its determination in the environmental samples using alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha spectrometry of the plutonium isotopes can be performed only after the perfect plutonium separation from other components of the matrix. So, till now numerous procedures have been elaborated and tested. The communication presents comparison of the plutonium content determination in soil, bones, eggshells and in the reference materials obtained by alpha spectrometry combined with two different separation procedures. The samples were mineralized in the concentrated HCl or HF prior to plutonium electrodeposition or coprecipitation with NdF3. Some other details were also tested in various variants. Quality of the spectra is discussed in terms of all these pre-treatment methods

  2. Alpha Spectrometry for Determination of 238U, 235U, 234U, 232Th and 230Th in Soil Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of radioactivity in soil around the nuclear power plant is important. In this study, the radioactivity of uranium and thorium isotopes in soil (NIST SRM 2709a) is analyzed by alpha spectrometry. Alpha spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool for the identification and assay of the alpha-emitting sources primarily due to its high counting efficiency, high sensitivity and low price. Another aim of this study is to present the extent of disequilibrium of 238U/234U and 238U/230Th. The soil sample was decomposed by a fusion technique, and the source for the alpha spectrometry was prepared by electrodeposition of an alpha-emitting nuclides onto a metallic substrate. In this work, uranium and thorium isotopes were chemically separated from a soil sample (NIST SRM 2709a) using chromatographic columns, and electrodeposited on a stainless steel disc to measure the radioactivity concentration of the isotopes with an alpha spectrometer. The ratio of 238U/234U for the soil sample was ca. 1 which is considered to be in secular equilibrium

  3. Radon alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry with YAP:Ce-scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The detection properties of a YAP:Ce scintillator (YAlO 3:Ce crystal) for radon and radon daughters alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry was investigated. The crystal response has been studied under severe extreme conditions to simulate environments of geophysical interest, particularly those found in geothermal and volcanic areas. Tests in water up to a temperature of 100 deg C and in acids solutions such as HCl (37%), H2SO4 (48%) and HNO3 (65%) have been performed. The experimental array consisted of a bare cylindrical crystal of YAP:Ce optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H5784 photomultiplier with standard bialkali photocatode. The crystal size was 8 mm diameter and 30 mm height. The crystal was positioned at the geometrical center of a 6 l stainless steel light- and gas-tight vessel equipped with gas input/output and a pass-through electrical connectors. Output signals were integrated with a charge preamplifier, shaped with a spectroscopy amplifier (ORTEC-450) and processed by a multichannel analyzer card (ORTEC-Trump). The collected pulse-height spectrum was managed by a suitable MCA emulation software (ORTEC-Maestro32). The device was serially connected to the radon Reference Measurement System (RMS) developed at the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (INMRI-ENEA). The RMS is routinely used for calibration and testing of radon measuring instruments and it provided the reference radon- in-air activity concentration needed for efficiency calibration of the YAP:Ce radon spectrometer. The RMS is based on a cylindrical electrostatic cell with a Si detector. It is used for the alpha spectrometry of the electrostatically collected polonium ions produced in the decay of radon. The radioactive source section consisted in a 35 cm3 glass bulb filled with about 15 kBq radon in air. The internal volume of the whole circuit was about 10 l. The energy calibration curves of the device were obtained irradiating the crystal by means of a set of

  4. Combined procedure using radiochemical separation of plutonium, americium and uranium radionuclides for alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separation of Pu, Am and U was tested from synthetic solutions and evaporator concentrate samples from nuclear power plants for isolation of each of them for alpha-spectrometry analysis. The separation was performed by anion-exchange chromatography, extraction chromatography, using TRU resin, and precipitation techniques. The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive analytical procedure for the sequential determination of 242Pu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am and 235,238U in radioactive wastes. 238Pu, 242Pu, 243Am and 232U were used as tracers. The measurements of α emitting radionuclides were performed by semiconductor detector that is used especially when spectrometric information is needed. For synthetic solutions the chemical recovery was based on associated iron concentration and was about 93%. (author)

  5. Standard practice for mounting actinides for alpha spectrometry using neodymium fluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation of separated fractions of actinides for alpha spectrometry as an alternate to electrodeposition. It is applicable to any of the actinides that can be dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid. Examples of applicable samples would be the final elution from an ion exchange separation or the final strip from a solvent extraction separation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For a specific hazard statement, see Section 9.

  6. Uranium isotopes determination in urine samples using alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of determining the concentration of uranium isotopes in biological samples, 'in vitro' bioassay, is an indirect method for evaluating the incorporation and quantification of these radionuclides internally deposited. When incorporated, these radionuclides tend to be disposed through excretion, with urine being the main source of data because it can be easily collected and analyzed. The most widely used methods for determination of uranium isotopes (234U, 235U and 238U) are Alpha Spectrometry and ICP-MS. This work presents a comparative study for the determination of uranium isotopes using these two methodologies in real samples from occupationally exposed workers. In order to validate the methodology, a sample of the intercomparison exercise organized by PROCORAD (Association pour la Promotion du Controle de Qualite des Analyses de Biologie Medicale em Radiotoxicologie) was used, and the results were statistically compared applying the Student's t-test. (author)

  7. Electrospray mass spectrometry characterization of post-translational modifications of barley alpha-amylase 1 produced in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, M; Andersen, Jens S.; Roepstorff, P;

    1993-01-01

    We have used electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) in combination with protein chemistry and genetics to delineate post-translational modifications in yeast of barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1), a 45 kD enzyme crucial for production of malt, an important starting material in the manufacture of beer and...

  8. Rapid monitoring of soil, water, and air dusts by direct large-area alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sill, C W

    1995-07-01

    During retrieval and disposition of wastes containing transuranium elements, continuous monitoring of the air, water, and soil for alpha emitters was required to ensure that safety limits were not exceeded and that the waste itself was not disturbed unknowingly. Direct measurements by alpha spectrometry were particularly promising because of their potential speed, sensitivity, and their ability to identify transuranium radionuclides under field conditions. Soil samples or settled dusts were finely ground, suspended in 80% ethanol, sprayed onto circular stainless steel pans, and dried on a hotplate. Water samples were mounted directly by spraying. Air dusts were collected with a high-volume air sampler on 20- by 25-cm membrane filters. The samples were then analyzed directly in a large pressurized gridded ionization chamber without further sample preparation. The lower limits of detection for 10-min counting times were 1.5 Bq g-1 (40 pCi g-1) for 100-mg soil samples, and 4 x 10(-2) Bq m-3 (10(-12) microCi mL-1) for a 10-min air sample taken at 0.4 m3 min-1 (14 cubic feet per minute) and counted without waiting for decay of radon progeny. PMID:7790211

  9. Synchrotron radiation study of the uranium chemical species electrodeposited for alpha spectrometry sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burciaga V, D. C.; Mendez, C. G.; Esparza P, H.; Fuentes C, L.; Fuentes M, L.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Beesley, A. M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Crespo, M. T., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Alpha spectrometry (As) with semiconductor detectors has applications in nuclear decay data measurements, environmental, geological and nuclear wastes studies and other works requiring determination of actinide and other alpha emitter contents. In order to obtain accurate measurements by producing good resolution alpha spectra, As sources must be thin and uniform. As sources produced by electrodeposition consist of a radioactive deposit onto a metallic substrate (cathode of the electrolytic cell). Natural U sources prepared by the Hallstadius method have co-deposited Pt, originated from the dissolution of the anode during the electrodeposition. A recent work published else-where has reported a study on the morphology and spatial distribution of the U/Pt deposits with the related chemical speciation of U, using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. The purpose of this work is to explain the structure of the Pt/U deposits. We have obtained new spectra of the U L III edge X-ray absorption fine structure by total electron yield at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 2-3. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (Gi-XRD) patterns were obtained at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 11-3. Gi-XRD patterns show a bimodal distribution of grain sizes of Pt, with dimensions {approx} 5 and 20 nm; schoepite diffraction signals suggest grain dimensions of {approx} 5 nm, i.e. with low crystallization. X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were fitted assuming two different structures: uranyl hydroxide and schoepite, and results were compared. U-U path shows low intensity that also may be a result of low crystallization. (Author)

  10. Determination of uranium and thorium isotopes by solid phase extraction and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to test the modified method suitable for the separation of isotopes of uranium and thorium samples of rocks, including gold ore and gold concentrate using of extraction chromatography method, after digestion of the sample, concentrating, separate the isotopes of uranium and thorium isotopes to prepare sources for the measurement of alpha spectra. Samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrate were digered in microwave decomposition in the environment of hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid. For the separation of uranium and thorium the vacuum box with cartridges DGA Resin and Resin(R) UTEVA (Triskem International, France) was used. Both sorbents allow separation of uranium from thorium. The results confirmed that the both sorbents give the same results within expanded uncertainty. The mass activity of monitored uranium and thorium radioisotopes was determined by alpha spectrometry method. The yields of separation were determined using uranium-232 as a tracer radionuclide; the activity of 232U was 0.1438 Bq. Alpha spectra were measured on the Alpha spectrometer EG and G ORTEC 576A with the software MAESTRO, MCA Emulator and Gamma Vision-32 for Windows, USA. Mass activities of radionuclides were converted to mass concentration of isotopes 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th and 228Th. The highest concentration of 238U was sampled in granodiorite (Tunnel S-XIV-2, southwards, mining of Cu ore, not working there since 1990), where m(238U) = (0.81 ± 0.09) mg kg-1 (DGA Resin) and m(238U) = (0.90 ± 0.09) mg kg-1 (UTEVA(R) Resin), as well as m(232Th) = (18.8 ± 1.7) mg kg-1 (DGA Resin) and m(232Th) = (17.8 ± 1.5) mg kg-1 (UTEVA(R) Resin). In other samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrates have specific masses of isotopes of uranium and thorium two-to ten-folds lower. It can be concluded that the rocks, gold ores and concentrates of gold from the 'Rozalia' mine contain lower concentrations of uranium several times against the mean abundance

  11. Optimization of parameters of alpha spectrometry with silicon detector for low level measurements of actinides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of actinides in environmental and biological samples is an important activity of radiation protection program at nuclear energy facilities. High resolution alpha spectrometry with passivated ion implanted Silicon detectors is widely used for the determination of actinides concentration. Low levels of activity concentrations in these samples often require long counting duration of a few days to obtain accurate and statistically significant data for further impact assessment. In alpha spectrometry, the chamber in which Si detector operated is a critical component and maintained at a desired vacuum for minimizing the alpha particle attenuation. Experimental evaluation of variations in energy resolution and tailing of alpha spectra was investigated under different chamber air pressures from about 6.7 Pa to more than 2700 Pa under the chamber hold mode and pump electrically switched off conditions. As part of validation, data collected on an IAEA inter-comparison exercise sample are presented under short and long counting durations with pump operating and switched off conditions respectively. It has been observed that the FWHM values do not significantly degrade, to impact the low and medium level concentration alpha spectra, for variations in vacuum chamber pressures from about 6.7 Pa to 2700 Pa. - Highlights: ► Several parameters relevant to low level alpha spectrometry have been investigated and appropriately optimized. ► The most important parameter has been the influence of chamber pressure on resolution when the chamber is in hold mode while the vacuum pump is electrically switched off for more than 40 h. ► Samples were counted for about 4 day for low levels of detection. Efficiency, tail length, detector size and other parameters were evaluated.

  12. Rapid determination of uranium isotopes in low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and fast method for uranium isotopes determination in low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants using extraction chromatography is described. Following sample preparation, uranium is pre-concentrated by precipitation with iron(III) hydroxide and then separated using Dowex AG 1X8, 100-200mesh, resin. The separated uranium is electrodeposited onto stainless-steel discs and then measured by alpha spectrometry and the results were analyzed using WinALPHA software. The procedure was evaluated using 232U radiotracer. USGS uranium standard and intercomparison program were used as quality tools. (author)

  13. A sequential extraction procedure to determine Ra and U isotopes by alpha-particle spectrometry in selective leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical sequential extraction procedure has been developed in our laboratory to determine 226Ra and 234,238U by alpha spectrometry in environmental samples. This method has been validated for both radionuclides by comparing in selected samples the values obtained through its application with the results obtained by applying alternative procedures. Recoveries obtained, counting periods applied and background levels found in the alpha spectra give suitable detection limits to allow the Ra and U determination in operational forms defined in riverbed contaminated sediments. Results obtained in these speciation studies show that 226Ra and 234,238U contamination tend to be associated to precipitated forms of the sediments. (author)

  14. Determination of uranium and polonium in Spa rus aura ta by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was optimizing conditions for the specific activities determination of some uranium-series radionuclides present in Spa rus aura ta by alpha spectrometry. Determinations of specific activities were conducted varying the type of digestion: acid attack on hot plate, controlled microwave digestion and acid attack after calcination of the sample. The latter procedure was applied only to the case of uranium isotopes determination. The variation in the isotope extraction method consisted of applying the techniques of liquid-liquid extracting using Tributyl phosphate or chromatographic UTEVA resin. Results depending on the type of treatment given to the samples were compared based on obtained chemical yields. The results reveal a higher bioaccumulation of polonium in the liver sample, with activities of 0.809, 2.495 and 2.439 Bq kg-1 fresh wt compared with the fillet. The best chemical yields of polonium were close to 60% for samples that were digested by microwave. In the case of uranium the best chemical yields, close to 80% for fillet, were obtained with a previous calcination of the sample and using the UTEVA resin. (Author)

  15. Determination of uranium and polonium in Spa rus aura ta by alpha spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna P, M.; Renteria, M.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Manjon C, G.; Diaz, I., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad de Sevilla, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Arquitectura, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, San Fernando No. 4, 41004 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was optimizing conditions for the specific activities determination of some uranium-series radionuclides present in Spa rus aura ta by alpha spectrometry. Determinations of specific activities were conducted varying the type of digestion: acid attack on hot plate, controlled microwave digestion and acid attack after calcination of the sample. The latter procedure was applied only to the case of uranium isotopes determination. The variation in the isotope extraction method consisted of applying the techniques of liquid-liquid extracting using Tributyl phosphate or chromatographic UTEVA resin. Results depending on the type of treatment given to the samples were compared based on obtained chemical yields. The results reveal a higher bioaccumulation of polonium in the liver sample, with activities of 0.809, 2.495 and 2.439 Bq kg{sup -1} fresh wt compared with the fillet. The best chemical yields of polonium were close to 60% for samples that were digested by microwave. In the case of uranium the best chemical yields, close to 80% for fillet, were obtained with a previous calcination of the sample and using the UTEVA resin. (Author)

  16. Aerosols in King George Island (Antarctic peninsula) using PIXE and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the airborne particles and particles deposited in the recent snow samples collected at King George Island (Admiralty Bay) in order to evaluate the possible local sources of airborne particles and the aerosol transport from South America to Antarctic at sea level. Airborne particles samples were collected using a cascade impactor and cyclones at several sampling points at Admiralty Bay. Airborne particles were also collected during the ship travel from Rio de Janeiro to Antarctica. The recent snow samples and aerosols collected at several sampling points at Admiralty Bay were analyzed by PIXE for the determination of the elemental mass concentration. Snow samples were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the 232Th, 228Th, 238U and 234U concentrations in snow. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter of airborne particles was determined. The results suggest that there is a correlation between the aerosol samples and the particles deposited in the snow, but the elemental mass distributions are not equal. The snow elemental concentration can be used as an indicator of the elements present in the aerosols. The local aerosol sources (natural and anthropogenic) have been considered to characterize the aerosol transport to Antarctic, mainly King George Island. The main aerosol sources are the marine spray, weathering of local rocks and anthropogenic sources, as the diesel burning in the island. Besides the local aerosol sources the transport of airborne particles from south Atlantic to Antarctic is an important source of airborne particles at King George Island. (author)

  17. Isotope dilution alpha spectrometry for the determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution : IDAS and R-IDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a new technique, Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (IDAS) and Reverse Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (R-IDAS) for determining the concentration of plutonium in the irradiated fuel dissolver solution. The method exploits sup(238)Pu in IDAS and sup(239)Pu in R-IDAS as a spike and provides an alternative method to Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) which requires enriched sup(242)Pu as a spike. Depending upon the burn-up of the fuel, sup(238)Pu or sup(239)Pu is used as a spike to change the sup(238)Pu/(sup(239)Pu+sup(240)Pu)α activity ratio in the sample by a factor of 10. This change is determined by α-spectrometry on electrodeposited sources using a solid state silicon surface barrier detector coupled to a multichannel analyser. The validity of a simple method based on the geometric progression (G.P.) decrease for the far tail of the spectrum to correct for the tail contribution of sup(238)Pu peak (5.50 MeV) to the low energy sup(239)Pu + sup(240)Pu peak (5.17 MeV) is established. Results for the plutonium concentration on different irradiated fuel dissolver solutions with burn-uo ranging from J,000 to 100,000 MWD/TU are presented and compared with those obtained by IDMS. The values obtained by IDAS or R-IDAS and IDMS agree within 0.5%. (auth.)

  18. Simultaneous quantitative determination of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Bernhard M; Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Wintersteiger, Reinhold; Windischhofer, Werner; Leis, Hans J

    2010-04-01

    Alpha-ketoglutaric acid (alpha-KG) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are currently under investigation as promising cancer cell damaging agents. A method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of alpha-KG and 5-HMF in human plasma was established for screening these compounds in human plasma. Plasma samples were directly treated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride to form the corresponding oximes, thus facilitating subsequent liquid-liquid extraction. After formation of the trimethylsilyl ethers, samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron ionization mass spectrometry. Stable isotope labeled standards were used, the preparation of (13)C(6)-5-HMF is described. Limits of quantitation were set to 0.938 microg/mL for alpha-KG and 0.156 microg/mL for 5-HMF. Inter-day accuracy was < or = 93.7% (alpha-KG) and < or = 92.8% (5-HMF). Inter-day precision was < or = 6.0% (alpha-KG) and < or = 4.6% (5-HMF). The method has been successfully applied to pharmacokinetic profiling of the compounds after intravenous application. PMID:20155414

  19. Evaluation of different parameters affecting the liquid scintillation spectrometry measurement of gross alpha and beta index in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry is a fast competitive technique for the simultaneous evaluation of gross alpha and beta indexes. However, the implementation of this technique should not be considered as straightforward, and the pre-concentration methods to decrease the detection limit together with quenching and alpha, and beta crossover corrections should be carefully chosen according to the needs of the laboratory. Both aspects are being approached in this work as to find an easy and robust method for alpha/beta measurement in water samples, taking into account the quenching and alpha/beta crossover interferences effects. Results showed that most of the pre-concentration methods increased the quenching in the measurement, although HNO3 0.05 M points to be the best solution for pre-concentration and re-dissolution of the sample as converges into low quenching and maximum recovery. Subsequently, in the measurement of water samples with different conductivities, the analysis of the raw counts to obtain gross alpha and beta indexes was carried out using different approaches to implement quenching and interference corrections. If quenching and salt content in the sample are relatively low, interference and quenching-efficiency corrections do not improve the accuracy of the results within the usual precision assumed for a result of gross alpha and beta index (25%). Special attention must be paid when corrections are applied to high quenched or saline samples and when alpha and beta activities values are different in several orders of magnitude. - Highlights: → Developed method for simultaneously quantifying gross alpha and gross beta indexes based on LSC was as accurate and precise as the results obtained from methods based on gas proportional counting and ZnS alpha counting. → Alpha/beta crossover and/or quenching corrections were applied and the results obtained did not improve accuracy within 25% dispersion, a widespread acceptance limit for gross alpha and

  20. Evaluation of different parameters affecting the liquid scintillation spectrometry measurement of gross alpha and beta index in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion. Servicio Radioisotopos. Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Casacuberta, N. [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals-Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. Spain (Spain); Penalver, A.; Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Aguilar, C., E-mail: carme.aguilar@urv.cat [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry is a fast competitive technique for the simultaneous evaluation of gross alpha and beta indexes. However, the implementation of this technique should not be considered as straightforward, and the pre-concentration methods to decrease the detection limit together with quenching and alpha, and beta crossover corrections should be carefully chosen according to the needs of the laboratory. Both aspects are being approached in this work as to find an easy and robust method for alpha/beta measurement in water samples, taking into account the quenching and alpha/beta crossover interferences effects. Results showed that most of the pre-concentration methods increased the quenching in the measurement, although HNO{sub 3} 0.05 M points to be the best solution for pre-concentration and re-dissolution of the sample as converges into low quenching and maximum recovery. Subsequently, in the measurement of water samples with different conductivities, the analysis of the raw counts to obtain gross alpha and beta indexes was carried out using different approaches to implement quenching and interference corrections. If quenching and salt content in the sample are relatively low, interference and quenching-efficiency corrections do not improve the accuracy of the results within the usual precision assumed for a result of gross alpha and beta index (25%). Special attention must be paid when corrections are applied to high quenched or saline samples and when alpha and beta activities values are different in several orders of magnitude. - Highlights: > Developed method for simultaneously quantifying gross alpha and gross beta indexes based on LSC was as accurate and precise as the results obtained from methods based on gas proportional counting and ZnS alpha counting. > Alpha/beta crossover and/or quenching corrections were applied and the results obtained did not improve accuracy within 25% dispersion, a widespread acceptance limit for gross alpha and

  1. Rapid identification and analysis of airborne plutonium using a combination of alpha spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Dennis E; Steed, Amber C; Sobus, Jon; Stetzenbach, Klaus; Lindley, Kaz; Hodge, Vernon F

    2003-10-01

    Recent wildland fires near two U.S. nuclear facilities point to a need to rapidly identify the presence of airborne plutonium during incidents involving the potential release of radioactive materials. Laboratory turn-around times also need to be shortened for critical samples collected in the earliest stages of radiological emergencies. This note discusses preliminary investigations designed to address both these problems. The methods under review are same day high-resolution alpha spectroscopy to screen air filter samples for the presence of plutonium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to perform sensitive plutonium analyses. Thus far, using modified alpha spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to reliably identify the approximately 5.2 MeV emission of 239Pu on surrogate samples (air filters artificially spiked with plutonium after collection) even though the primary alpha-particle emissions of plutonium are, as expected, superimposed against a natural alpha radiation background dominated by short-lived radon and thoron progeny (approximately 6-9 MeV). Several processing methods were tested to prepare samples for analysis and shorten laboratory turn-around time. The most promising technique was acid-leaching of air filter samples using a commercial open-vessel microwave digestion system. Samples prepared in this way were analyzed by both alpha spectroscopy (as a thin-layer iron hydroxide co-precipitate) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The detection levels achieved for 239Pu--approximately 1 mBq m(-3) for alpha spectroscopy screening, and, < 0.1 mBq m(-3) for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis--are consistent with derived emergency response levels based on EPA's Protective Action Guides, and samples can be evaluated in 36 to 72 h. Further, if samples can be returned to a fixed-laboratory and processed immediately, results from mass spectrometry could be available in as little as 24 h. When fully implemented

  2. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  3. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4π-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4π-α spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4π -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  4. Alpha-particle spectrometry of large-area samples using an open-flow pulse ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization chambers are established and well known detectors of ionizing radiation. Current-mode chambers are in frequent use in such fields as dosimetry, environmental surveillance and radiation protection, while pulse-mode, Frisch-grid, chambers used to be used for spectrometry and have largely been replaced by scintillation and semiconducting-diode detectors. Dealing specifically with low-level alpha-particle spectrometry, the surface-barrier or ion-implanted semiconducting detectors are the standard choice, but in some applications where radiochemical treatment and production of small electroplated samples are impossible or inconvenient, pulse-ionization chambers are still in use. For breath and air-radon samples scintillation cells dominate, but pulse ionization chambers are utilized as high-standard laboratory instruments. For continuous measurements of radon concentration in air, a multiwire-electrode ionization chamber has been described. A commercial radon-in-air system, based on a pulse ionization chamber is described. (author)

  5. Preparation of large-area sources with uniform layers for the spectrometry of alpha-emitting nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for the preparation of large-area sources with uniform layers for α-spectrometry for the large-area grid ionization chamber has been developed. It is based on the direct evaporation of a sample solution in the counting dish in the presence of an excess of a sublimable chemical compound like ammonium nitrate. In the course of evaporation this excess compound precipitates and thus avoids the formation of clusters during the further evaporation process. After dryness, the excess compound is removed from the source by sublimation. Samarium nitrate is added as an internal standard and the alpha-activity of the isotope 147Sm is chosen to measure the counting efficiency due to self-absorption. Examples are presented of the application of large-area sources for α-spectrometry for the large-area grid ionization chamber. (author)

  6. Rapid Determination of 226Ra and Uranium Isotopes in Solid Samples by Fusion with Lithium Metaborate and Alpha Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bojanowski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method has been developed to determine 226Ra in rocks, soils, and sediments. Samples are decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in a solution containing sulfates and citric acid. During the dissolution, a fine suspension of mixed barium and radium sulfates is formed. The microcrystals are collected on a membrane filter (pore size 0.1 μm and analysed in an alpha spectrometer. Application of a 133Ba tracer enables us to assess the loss of the analyte, which only rarely exceeds 10%. All analytical operations, beginning from sample decomposition to source preparation for alpha spectrometry, can be accomplished within 1 or 2 h.

  7. Trace uranium analysis in geological sample by isotope dilution-alpha spectrometry and comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of uranium determination in geological samples by alpha spectrometric isotope dilution technique using 233U tracer is described in the present work. The various steps involved in the method namely, preparation of the sample, electrodeposition, alpha spectrometry, isotope dilution, calculation of the concentration and error statistics are discussed in detail. The experimental parameters for the electrodeposition of uranium, like current density, pH concentration of the electrolyte solution, deposition time, electrode distance were all optimised based on the efficiency of the deposition. The total accuracy and precision of the IDAS using 233U tracer in the determination of uranium in mineral and granite samples were of the order of 1 to 2% for the concentration range of 50-1500 ppm of U. Our results are compared with those obtained by others workers using similar and different techniques. (author)

  8. Electrospray mass spectrometry characterization of post-translational modifications of barley alpha-amylase 1 produced in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, M; Andersen, J S; Roepstorff, P; Svensson, B

    1993-10-01

    We have used electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) in combination with protein chemistry and genetics to delineate post-translational modifications in yeast of barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1), a 45 kD enzyme crucial for production of malt, an important starting material in the manufacture of beer and whisky. In addition to signal peptide processing these modifications are: (1) removal of C-terminal Arg-Ser by Kex1p, (2) glutathionylation of Cys95, (3) O-glycosylation, and (4) additional degradation of the C-terminus. PMID:7764097

  9. A comparative study of 226Ra determination using total counting and alpha spectrometry in environmental water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quick determination of natural radionuclides is very important in emergency situations, supporting decisions of environmental contamination prevention. A quick methodology for determination of the 226Ra was applied in water samples and the results were compared to those obtained by the conventional method. The technique is based on the microprecipitation of radio barium sulfate and subsequent quantification of 226Ra by alpha spectrometry. The procedure used presented high chemical recoveries and good sensitivity. The main advantage is to obtain the results in 3 days. (author)

  10. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  11. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4{pi}-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples; Spectrometrie alpha 4{pi} de sources d'actinides realisees par electronebulisation. Developpement et optimisation d'un protocole applique au mesurage des isotopes 238 et 239+240 du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement (DPRE), 92 (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4{pi}-{alpha} spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4{pi} -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  12. Alpha spectrometry for particle size determination of mineral sands dust samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is proposed for assessing the size distribution of the radioactive particles directly from the alpha spectrum of a dust sample. The residual range distribution of alpha particles emerging from a sphere containing a monoenergetic alpha emitter is simply a quadratic function of the diameter of the sphere. The residual range distribution from a typical dust particle closely approximates that of a sphere of the same mass. For mixtures of various size particles of similar density the (multiparticle) residual range distribution can thus readily be calculated for each of the alpha emitters contained in the particles. Measurement of the composite residual range distribution can be made in a vacuum alpha spectrometer provided the dust sample has no more than a monolayer of particles. The measured energy distribution is particularly sensitive to upper particle size distributions in the diameter region of 4μm to 20μm of 5 mg/cm3 density particles, i.e. 2 to 10 mg/ch2. For dust particles containing212Po or known ratios of alpha emitters a measured alpha spectrum can be unraveled to the underlying particle size distribution. Uncertainty in the size distribution has been listed as deserving research priority in the overall radiation protection program of the mineral sands industry. The proposed method had the potential of reducing this uncertainty, thus permitting more effective radiation protection control. 2 refs., 1 tabs., 1 figs

  13. Precision and accuracy in the determination of sup(238)Pu/(sup(239)Pu + sup(240)Pu) alpha activity ratio by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were carried out for the evaluation of precision and accuracy in determining sup(238)Pu/(sup(239)Pu + sup(240)Pu) activity ratio by α spectrometry from the point of view of determining sup(238)Pu accurately in plutonium samples and in exploiting Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry (IDAS) for determining the concentration of plutonium in the irradiated fuel dissolver solutions. Synthetic mixtures with α activity ratios ranging from 0.01 to 10 were prepared using sup(238)Pu and sup(239)Pu isotopes. Different methods which can be routinely used were tried to calculate the α activity ratio from the α spectrum taken on electrodeposited sources prepared from these mixtures. An accuracy of better than 0.5% and a precision of +- 0.2% (1 sigma) is demonstrated in the determination of α activity ratios ranging from 0.01 to 10 using electrodeposited sources and the evaluation method based on the geometric progression decrease (G.P.) for the far tail of the spectrum. (auth.)

  14. Application of PERALS™ alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry for analysis and investigation of environmental spills at ISL uranium mining projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection and environmental monitoring in mining requires effective and reliable radionuclide analysis at all stages of the mine project—prior to mining, during operation and through to remediation and decommissioning. The approach presented in this paper was specially developed for the monitoring of radioactive waste resulting from spills during mining and mineral processing operations and uses a combination of high resolution gamma spectrometry, and PERALS™ alpha spectrometry to identify and reliably quantify the activity of the major members of the U-238 decay chain at activities down to 10 mBq g−1 by direct radionuclide counting and by assessment of the activity of their decay products. This approach has reduced sample preparation and analysis time while providing effective analysis and quantification of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental samples. It has been successfully applied to several in situ leach (ISL) mining-related projects involving investigations of process material spill impacts and also to routine environmental monitoring. (paper)

  15. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, D.; Immè, G.; Aranzulla, M.; Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Catalano, R.; Mangano, G.

    2011-12-01

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a 241Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  16. Rapid determination of 226Ra and uranium isotopes in solid samples by fusion with lithium metaborate and alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanowski, R; Radecki, Z; Piekoś, R

    2002-07-01

    A simple and rapid method has been developed to determine 226Ra in rocks, soils, and sediments. Samples are decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in a solution containing sulfates and citric acid. During the dissolution, a fine suspension of mixed barium and radium sulfates is formed. The microcrystals are collected on a membrane filter (pore size 0.1 microm) and analysed in an alpha spectrometer. Application of a 133Ba tracer enables us to assess the loss of the analyte, which only rarely exceeds 10%. All analytical operations, beginning from sample decomposition to source preparation for alpha spectrometry, can be accomplished within 1 or 2 h. With uranium determination, the filtrate is spiked with a 232U tracer and passed through a column loaded with a Dowex AG (1 x 4) anion-exchange resin in the sulfate form. Interfering elements are eluted with dilute sulfuric acid followed by concentrated hydrochloric acid. Uranium is eluted with water, electrodeposited on silver discs, and analysed in the alpha spectrometer. The method was tested on reference soil and sediment materials and was found to be accurate within the estimated uncertainties. PMID:12920318

  17. Optimisation and application of ICP-MS and alpha-spectrometry for determination of isotopic ratios of depleted uranium and plutonium in samples collected in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Boulyga, S. F.; Testa, C; Desideri, D.; Becker, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The determination of environmental contamination with natural and artificial actinide isotopes and evaluation of their source requires precise isotopic determination of actinides, above all uranium and plutonium. This can be achieved by alpha spectrometry or by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after chemical separation of actinides. The performance of a sector-field ICP-MS (ICP-SFMS) coupled to a low-flow micronebulizer with a membrane desolvation unit, "Aridus'', was stu...

  18. Efficient detection and spectrometry of alphas from radon daughters in polycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lexan polycarbonate is a major efficient alpha detector in passive radon diffusion chambers used worldwide for indoor radon monitoring. It has an upper detection energy of 1.8 MeV recently extended to 5 MeV using a new single electrochemical etching (ECE) process. However, by applying a process to remove a surface layer to a point close to the Bragg peak, followed by ECE, we have been able to efficiently register even 5.99 and 7.69 MeV alphas from the radon daughters Po 218 and Po 214. A full energy spectrum has also been obtained as reported in this paper. (author)

  19. Use of thin collodion films to prevent recoil-ion contamination of alpha-spectrometry detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoil ions from alpha-particle emission can contaminate surface-barrier detection systems. This contamination results in increased measurement uncertainty, and may require the replacement of expensive detectors. Disposable thin Collodion films are easily prepared and effectively retard the recoil ions when either directly applied to the surface of alpha-sources or as catcher foils between the source and the detector. The thin films are particularly effective for relatively low-level sources, but can sustain structural damage when exposed to high levels of recoil ions (tens of thousands per second) over extended periods of time. (author)

  20. Rapid determination of gross alpha and beta activity in contaminated solutions by liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) as a rapid detection method for emergency situations was studied. The application of the method to a rapid estimation of gross alpha and beta activities in spent decontamination solutions, urine and aerosol filters was tested. The applicable minimum detectable activities were derived by using the standard addition method. (orig.)

  1. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion-beam bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with polonium in 1898, α-spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, α-spectra have proved simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the natural α-decay series led to the very powerful method of genetically linking the decay of new elements to the well-established α-emission of daughter and granddaughter nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for α-spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in He gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a He-jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for α-spectroscopy, but also for α- and #betta#-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and are discussed. For the synthesis of element 106 an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In the most recent experiments, α-spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10-6 s; while it was 10-1 to 100 s for He-jets and 101 to 103 s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyze them with these latest techniques. Again, α-spectrometry will play a major role since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of α-decays followed by spontaneous fission

  2. A sensitive and accurate method for determination of radium isotopes in environmental samples by alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive and accurate method for determination of radium isotopes in water and soil samples by alpha-spectrometry has been developed. Ra-225, which is in equilibrium with its mother 229Th, was used as a yield tracer. Radium in water samples was preconcentrated by coprecipitation with BaSO4 and iron (III) hydroxide at pH 8-9 using ammonia solution, isolated from uranium, thorium and iron using a Microthene-TOPO chromatography column at 8 M HCl, separated from barium in a cation-exchange resin column using 0.05 M 1,2-cyclo hexylene- dinitrilo-tetraacetic acid monohydrate at pH 8.5 as an eluant, electrodeposited on a stainless steel disc in a medium of 0.17 M (NH4)2C2O4 at pH 2.6 and current density of 400 mA cm-2, and counted by α-spectrometry. Radium in soil samples was fused with Na2CO3 and Na2O2 at 600 degree C, leached with HNO3, HCl and HF, and. preconcentrated by coprecipitation with BaSO4 at pH 3. The procedure for further separation, purification electrodeposition and measurement of radium in soil samples was same as that for water samples.

  3. Evolution of chemical species during electrodeposition of uranium for alpha spectrometry by the Hallstadius method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beesley, A.M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Crespo, M.T. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: teresa.crespo@ciemat.es; Weiher, N.; Tsapatsaris, N. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Cozar, J.S. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Esparza, H.; Mendez, C.G. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Ind. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. CP 31109 (Mexico); Hill, P. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Schroeder, S.L.M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Montero-Cabrera, M.E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Ind. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. CP 31109 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The morphology and composition of uranium alpha sources with co-deposited platinum have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies. Combined SEM and EDX measurements reveal the effect of porous platinum on the morphology of the sources which in turn affects their alpha-spectral resolution. The XPS analysis suggests that the presence of platinum initially increases the concentration of hydroxyl species in the deposits, which then act as centres for subsequent preferential uranium precipitation. XPS and XAFS analysis also provide for first time an indication of oxidation states of uranium present in the sources prepared by the Hallstadius method. These results are in line with Hansen's theory of electrodeposition of actinides.

  4. Evolution of chemical species during electrodeposition of uranium for alpha spectrometry by the Hallstadius method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphology and composition of uranium alpha sources with co-deposited platinum have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies. Combined SEM and EDX measurements reveal the effect of porous platinum on the morphology of the sources which in turn affects their alpha-spectral resolution. The XPS analysis suggests that the presence of platinum initially increases the concentration of hydroxyl species in the deposits, which then act as centres for subsequent preferential uranium precipitation. XPS and XAFS analysis also provide for first time an indication of oxidation states of uranium present in the sources prepared by the Hallstadius method. These results are in line with Hansen's theory of electrodeposition of actinides.

  5. Separation and determination of 241Am in urine samples from radiation workers using PC88-A and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This article deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of 241Am isotope in urine samples using Extraction Chromatography (EC) and 243Am tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of americium along with calcium phosphate. This precipitate after treatment is further subjected to calcium oxalate co-precipitation. Separation of Am was carried out by EC column prepared by PC88-A (2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid 2-ethyl hexyl monoester) adsorbed on microporous resin XAD-7 (PC88A-XAD7). Am-fraction was electro-deposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Ten routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical recovery was obtained in the range 44-60% with a mean and standard deviation of 51 and 4.7% respectively. (author)

  6. Determination of plutonium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 236Pu tracer, anion exchange resin and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using anion exchange resin and 236Pu tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of Pu was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion exchange resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Twenty routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 74-96% with a mean and standard deviation of 85 and 6% respectively. (author)

  7. A method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using TEVA resin and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional method used for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples involves anion exchange resin followed by alpha spectrometry, which takes nearly one working week for complete sample analysis. Since the results of the analysis form an important input for decision making by the plant authorities, it is always preferable to reduce overall analysis time for the estimation of Pu-isotopes in bioassay samples. This paper deals with standardization of a relatively faster method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in bioassay samples using TEVA resin and 236Pu tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate and separation of Pu was carried out using TEVA resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 65-87 % with a mean and SD of 75 and 7.4 %, respectively. The standardized chromatographic technique reduces the analysis time by about 1 day as compared to conventional method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples. (author)

  8. Determination of the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in low activity environmental samples by alpha spectrometry and spectral deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a simple technique, based on commercially-available software developed for gamma spectra analysis (MicroSAMPO trademark), is described by which this complex multiplet can be resolved at the much lower activities typical of many environmental samples. In our approach, it is not necessary to make any alterations to the normal alpha spectrometric set-up (including energy dispersion), other than to improve collimation. The instrumental function is defined for each spectrum by fitting a modified gaussian with exponential tails to the comparatively well-resolved 242Pu ''doublet'' (used as tracer) and, if present, the 238Pu ''doublet''. The fitted peaks are used to create an energy calibration file with which, using published energy data, the positions (in channels) of the component peaks of the multiplet are predicted. These positions are not altered subsequently when MicroSAMPO's interactive multiplet analysis facility is used to quantify the relative spectral intensities of the components. Before calculating the 240Pu/239Pu ratio, it is advisable to correct for coincidence summing of alpha particles and conversion electrons. The technique has been applied to the determination of the 240Pu/239Pu ratio in a set of environmental samples, most of which were supplied by IAEA-MEL under their laboratory intercomparison programme. Subsequently, replicate samples were analysed independently using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. The agreement between the two sets of data was most satisfactory. Further validation of this deconvolution technique was provided by the good agreement between the measured alpha-emission probabilities for the component peaks in the 239,240Pu multiplet and published values. (orig.)

  9. Standard guide for determination of plutonium and neptunium in uranium hexafluoride by alpha spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This method covers the determination of plutonium and neptunium isotopes in uranium hexafluoride by alpha spectroscopy. The method can also be applicable to any matrix that may be converted to a nitric acid system. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  10. Separation of Ra and Th from rock matrices for alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dating rocks using 226Ra/230Th isochrons demands radiochemical purification of radium and thorium. This paper presents an improved method. Rocks are solubilised by nitric/hydrofluoric digestion followed by dissolution of insoluble fluorides by boric/nitric acids, and Th is extracted by passing the 8M nitric solution through an anion column in nitrate form. The eluant contains Ra and Ba which are precipitated as sulphate and redissolved in alkaline EDTA. Complete separation of Ba and Ra from sulphate is on an AG 1 x 8 anion column in EDTA form, which was found better than the chloride form. The Ba+Ra is separated on an AG 50W x 8 cation column, and uses CDTA as an eluant for Ba. Careful pH control is essential. Ra elutes later with EDTA or 4M HCl and is precipitated with 125μg barium as sulphate to yield a source suitable for α-spectrometry, or further treated to electroplate the Ra. The yield tracers used are 228Th and 224Ra. Because the sample contains natural 224Ra a correction must be applied, calculated from the amount of natural 232Th in the Th spectrum. Th may be precipitated with 100 μg of ferric iron and gives a spectrometry-quality source, but further purification and electrodeposition was found to be preferable. Variations on the method for the case of analysis of calcium-rich fish otoliths are described. (author) 37 refs.; 3 figs

  11. A rapid method of extraction of uranium and thorium from granite for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, M.; Larocque, J. P. A.

    1984-06-01

    The lithium metaborate fusion technique for analysis of rock samples has been adapted for the alpha spectrometric determination of uranium and thorium isotope abundances in granite. Powdered granite is spiked with a solution of a uranium-thorium isotope tracer, mixed with LiBO 2 in a 1:3 ratio and fused at 950°C in a graphite crucible. The mixture is poured into 1 M HNO 3 and stirred until dissolved. Uranium and thorium are simultaneously extracted with 10% tributylphosphate (TBP) in amyl acetate using Al(NO 3) 3 as the salting agent, and then back-extracted into 1 M H 2SO 4. Uranium is separated from thorium using anion exchange resin and, after further purification, each is plated onto steel discs for alpha counting. Overall chemical yields are adequate at present (generally 20 to 60%). Preliminary tests show the TBP extraction step to be almost quantitative for both elements, in spite of the presence of silicon and high concentrations of aluminium. This procedure is much faster than the usual acid digestion technique, and uranium and thorium discs for counting can be prepared in approximately eight hours, starting from rock powder.

  12. Comparison of acid leaching and fusion techniques to determine uranium in soil samples by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Abdullah; Şahin, Mihriban

    2016-03-01

    Dissolution of radionuclides of interest is an indispensable first step in the alpha spectrometric analysis of soil samples. In this study a uranium recovery method for the analysis of uranium isotopes in soil samples is presented. Two different soil sample dissolution techniques were used: digestion in open beaker and fusion. The results of these techniques were compared. Two proficiency test samples and one reference material prepared by the IAEA were analyzed. Better results were obtained by fusion dissolution technique but impurities were higher than with acid leaching. Results of two techniques were more or less similar within the uncertainty limits. The detection limit (a(#)) was evaluated as part of the quality control. PMID:26651172

  13. Sequential determination of U and Th isotopes and 226Ra by alpha spectrometry in phosphate fertilizer samples and phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian phosphate fertilizer is obtained by wet reaction of igneous phosphate rock with concentrated sulphuric acid, giving as final product phosphoric acid and calcium sulphate (phosphogypsum) as by-product. Phosphoric acid is the starting material for the production of the majors' phosphate fertilizers: triple superphosphate (TSP), single superphosphate (SSP), monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP). The phosphate rock used as raw material is enriched in radionuclides of the U and Th natural series. During the chemical attack these radionuclides are distributed among products and by-products. A sequential procedure was implemented to determine the content of radionuclides alpha emitters (234U, 238U, 230Th, 232Th, 228Th and 226Ra) in samples of phosphate rock, phosphogypsum and phosphate fertilizers produced by the Brazilian industries. The experimental procedure consisted of a chemical attack with strong acids, followed by sequential chromatography extractions in column with ionic resins. Depending upon the conditions of percolation U isotopes are separated, followed by Th isotopes and 226Ra. The solutions containing U and Th are electroplated on stainless steel disks and counted on a surface barrier detector for alpha spectrometry. To the Ra final solution, a BaSO4 seeding suspension was added to allow the formation of a micro precipitated of BaRaSO4. This precipitate is filtered in a polypropylene membrane and counted on the same detector. The precision and accuracy of the method were determined by analyzing reference materials: soil IAEA-326 and sediment IAEA-300. SSP and TSP, which are obtained by reacting phosphoric acid with phosphate rock in different proportions, presented higher concentrations of all studied radionuclides. Brazilian phosphate fertilizers, which are produced directly from phosphoric acid, MAP and DAP, present in their composition low concentrations of radionuclide 226Ra. As for the radionuclides U and Th, the

  14. Contribution to the study of the geophysical behaviour of lead-210 by application of alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the changes in the lead-210 contents of rain-water and of water produced by melting polar ice has required the development of a method for dosing lead-210, an α emitter. This method is 40 times more sensitive than that which measures the lead-210 by bismuth-210, a (β emitter. The first part of the report presents the study of a spectrometry using semiconductor detectors; a catalogue of a spectra shows the advantages of this method. In the second part will be found at first a new chemical separation method for polonium-210 and the results obtained with this method. The main results obtained on the geophysical behaviour of lead-210 are the following: - the monthly lead-210 and polonium-210 contents in rain water are approximately constant with time. - in the Gif-sur-Yvette region, the clean-up by 'dry fall-out' can attain 40 to 50 per cent of the total fall-out. - a study of Antarctic ice samples makes it possible to determine an annual accumulation rate equivalent to 13.8 cm of water and to show discrepancies in the periodic concentrations which correspond to the latest maxima of solar activity. - a balance is drawn up between the radon produced by the continents and the lead-210 fall-out. (author)

  15. The Determination of Thorium Contents in Urine With Neutron Activation Analysis and Alpha Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal contamination by a radionuclide that entered into body through inhalation is most conveniently determined by using urine as sample. The aim of this research was developing a fast and simple method to determine thorium content in urine. The method was based on comparison of the activities between the sample added with and without standard thorium. Urine sample was divided into two parts, one of which was added with Th-232 standard, and then both were simultaneously proceed which was consist of decomposition of organic materials, precipitation of thorium by adding ammonium hydroxide, wash with aquadest, and then dissolution in nitric acid. The solution was then activated for 15 minutes with neutron flux of 1012 ncm-2 second-1 and the activated product was co-precipitated two times with lanthanum carrier and sodium chloride by addition of ammonium hydroxide. Finally, the precipitate was dissolved in nitric acid and the gamma emission of Th-233 was analyzed with gamma spectrometry. The results of analysis showed that the concentration of four urine samples analyzed was below detection limit (BDL); 200.40; 273.88 and 22.03 pg/l, respectively. With the simple procedure, neutron activation analysis can be used in the determining the actinide contents in several types of biological sample. (author)

  16. Application of the alpha spectrometry for the study of core sediment extracted in the San Marcos dam in Chihuahua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the specific activities of 210Po and isotopic uranium by alpha spectrometry was performed in a sediment core from San Marcos Dam. The objective of this work was to analyze the vertical distribution of isotopic uranium and 210Po and the behavior of these radionuclides along sediment core collected from the San Marcos Dam. Sample was divided into 11 sections, in which 210Po and isotopic uranium were determined using liquid-liquid extraction with tributyl phosphate. Furthermore, it was made a comparison between the tributyl phosphate technique and the technique of extraction chromatography using UTEVA resins for uranium. The results of specific activities for 210Po show a trend to decrease along the core, whereas the uranium isotopic does not show a pointed trend. The results of isotopic ratios between the 234U and 238U show that they are close to secular equilibrium in each of the core sections. The comparison between the two uranium extraction techniques indicates that the chemical yield is better using the UTEVA technique than tributyl phosphate extraction. (Author)

  17. Alpha liquid-scintillation spectrometry used for the measurement of uranium/thorium-disequilibria in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurements of low-level radioactivity of natural samples. It is of interest to have a system with high counting efficiency. Alpha liquid-scintillation spectrometry is attractive, because it offers a 4 π geometry. Some chemical separation can be obtained using extractive scintillators. Due to quenching problems for natural samples, additional separation power is needed. A new sample preparation method was developed employing extraction chromatographic resin for measuring 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th, 228Th and 226Ra in soil samples, without using any uranium- or thorium-tracer for determining the chemical yields. This method was tested by analyzing the two different reference materials, IAEA-375, soil from Tschernobyl, as well as IAEA SDA-1, a deep-sea sediment with a high calcium content. For all analyzed radionuclides the recoveries were better than 90% with errors (confidence level of 95%) smaller than 5%. The minimal detectable concentration ranges between 0.2 and 0.8 Bq/kg, based on a one gram aliquot of sample and 80'000 seconds counting time. (orig.)

  18. Application of the alpha spectrometry for the study of core sediment extracted in the San Marcos dam in Chihuahua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez G, C.; Renteria V, M.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Garcia T, R., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad de Sevilla, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Arquitectura, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    The determination of the specific activities of {sup 210}Po and isotopic uranium by alpha spectrometry was performed in a sediment core from San Marcos Dam. The objective of this work was to analyze the vertical distribution of isotopic uranium and {sup 210}Po and the behavior of these radionuclides along sediment core collected from the San Marcos Dam. Sample was divided into 11 sections, in which {sup 210}Po and isotopic uranium were determined using liquid-liquid extraction with tributyl phosphate. Furthermore, it was made a comparison between the tributyl phosphate technique and the technique of extraction chromatography using UTEVA resins for uranium. The results of specific activities for {sup 210}Po show a trend to decrease along the core, whereas the uranium isotopic does not show a pointed trend. The results of isotopic ratios between the {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U show that they are close to secular equilibrium in each of the core sections. The comparison between the two uranium extraction techniques indicates that the chemical yield is better using the UTEVA technique than tributyl phosphate extraction. (Author)

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction separation and sequential determination of plutonium and americium in environmental samples by alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described by which plutonium and americium can be determined in environmental samples. The sample is leached with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the two elements are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and calcium oxalate. The calcium oxalate is incinerated at 4500 and the ash is dissolved in nitric acid. Plutonium is extracted with tri-n-octylamine solution in xylene from 4M nitric acid and stripped with ammonium iodide/hydrochloric acid. Americium is extracted with thenoyltrifluoroacetone solution in xylene at pH 4 together with rare-earth elements and stripped with 1M nitric acid. Americium and the rare-earth elements thus separated are sorbed on Dowex 1 x 4 resin from 1M nitric acid in 93% methanol, the rare-earth elements are eluted with 0.1M hydrochloric acid/0.5M ammonium thiocyanate/80% methanol and the americium is finally eluted with 1.5M hydrochloric acid in 86% methanol. Plutonium and americium in each fraction are electro-deposited and determined by alpha-spectrometry. Overall average recoveries are 81% for plutonium and 59% for americium. (author)

  20. 210Po in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, L. 1758) and sediments at Aegean Sea Turkish coast using alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the marine environment 210Po is largely produced from the decay of 210Pb deposited from the atmosphere. Although they exist everywhere in the environment at the same time, the concentration of these radionuclides in river-estuarine systems may vary widely due to geology of the watershed and chemical weathering conditions. Moreover, natural levels of these radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems increased from phosphate, fossil fuel, oil industries and use of artificial fertilizers. Several studies have demonstrated that the natural alpha emitting radionuclide 210Po is accumulated to exceptionally high levels in tissues of a variety of marine organisms, well above levels of the parent radionuclide 210Pb. The behaviour of 210Po in the ocean differs that of 210Pb, especially because of the higher affinity of 210Po for organic matter. The Turkish coastal zone of the Aegean Sea has been heavily industrialized in the last 25 years resulting in a considerable input of wastes to the coastal marine ecosystem. Fish and other edible marine organisms consumption is relatively higher at the region than at other parts of Turkey, therefore it is important to determine the additional dietary radiation dose received by population originating seafood. The information on levels and distribution of natural radionuclides is however very rare because there exists limited number of investigations conducted on this coast line. For this reason, an IAEA Research Contract Project (B5-TUR-31834) has been started by the Institute for the Turkish coast of the Aegean Sea. In this work 210Po and 210Pb measurements are realised using alpha spectrometry after radiochemical deposition techniques for which the details are given elsewhere. The sampling stations are selected at the sites where there exist intense industrial activities nearby. Canakkale (Dardanel), Ayvalik, Foca, Izmir Bay and Goekova Bay were chosen as study areas. Goekova Bay is attributed special importance because it has been

  1. Sequential extraction procedure for determination of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium radionuclides by alpha spectrometry in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequential extraction technique was developed and tested for common naturally-occurring radionuclides. This technique allows the extraction and purification of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium radionuclides from the same sample. Environmental materials such as water, soil, and biological samples can be analyzed for those radionuclides without matrix interferences in the quality of radioelement purification and in the radiochemical yield. The use of isotopic tracers (232U, 229Th, 224Ra, 209Po, and stable lead carrier) added to the sample in the beginning of the chemical procedure, enables an accurate control of the radiochemical yield for each radioelement. The ion extraction procedure, applied after either complete dissolution of the solid sample with mineral acids or co-precipitation of dissolved radionuclide with MnO2 for aqueous samples, includes the use of commercially available pre-packed columns from Eichrom(r) and ion exchange columns packed with Bio-Rad resins, in altogether three chromatography columns. All radioactive elements but one are purified and electroplated on stainless steel discs. Polonium is spontaneously plated on a silver disc. The discs are measured using high resolution silicon surface barrier detectors. 210Pb, a beta emitter, can be measured either through the beta emission of 210Bi, or stored for a few months and determined by alpha spectrometry through the in-growth of 210Po. This sequential extraction chromatography technique was tested and validated with the analysis of certified reference materials from the IAEA. Reproducibility was tested through repeated analysis of the same homogeneous material (water sample). (author)

  2. A sequential extraction procedure for determination of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium radionuclides by alpha spectrometry in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequential extraction technique was developed allowing the extraction and purification of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium radionuclides from the same sample. Environmental materials such as water, soil, biological materials, can be analyzed for those radionuclides without matrix interferences in the quality of radioelement purification and in the radiochemical yield. The use of isotopic tracers (232U, 229Th, 224Ra, 209Po and stable lead carrier) added to the sample at the beginning of the chemical procedure enables an accurate control of the radiochemical yield for each radioelement. The ion extraction procedure, applied after either complete dissolution of the solid sample with mineral acids or dissolution of MnO2 precipitate for aqueous samples, includes the use of commercially available columns from Eichrom and laboratory prepared anionic and cationic columns, in a total of three chromatography columns. All radioelements are purified and electroplated on stainless steel discs except for polonium which is spontaneously plated on a silver disc. The discs are measured using high resolution silicon surface barrier detectors. 210Pb, a beta emitter, can be measured either through the beta emission of 210Bi, or stored for a few months and determined by alpha spectrometry through the in-growth of 210Po. This sequential extraction chromatography technique was tested and validated by analysis of certified reference materials from IAEA (soil, marine sediment, and fish). Reproducibility was tested through repeated analysis of the same homogeneous material (water sample). Performance, when applied to samples with different matrix, was tested analyzing cabbage, potatoes, fish filet, meat, water, urine, soils and sediments with high yield of recovery and complete separation of radioelements. Precision was tested also through participation in analytical inter laboratory world wide comparisons analysing blind samples (round robin tests) organized by the IAEA and

  3. A sequential radiochemical procedure to determine natural radionuclides in samples from a strongly polluted river by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    River Tinto is located in the Huelva province, SW of Spain. This river has been strongly affected by anthropogenic activities in its vicinity such as mining, paper mills or phosphoric acid industries (in fact phosphogypsum deposits, so-called gyp-stacks, are located in the mouth of the Tinto River estuary). The combination of acid water from mines, different industrial effluents and fluvial and sea waters plays a determining role in the evolutionary process of the environmental characteristics of the Tinto River and its estuary. In this context several natural radionuclides as polonium, radium, thorium and uranium isotopes, could be used as markers and/or tracers of several environmental processes. Therefore, environmental matrixes (superficial sediments, waters and suspended matter) have been collected from 12 points along the Tinto River and its estuary. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides (210Po, 226,228Ra, 230,232Th, 234,238U) have been determined in these samples. Due to sampling conditions, low water volumes and suspended matter masses were collected, so radioactive activities were expected to be close to the mBq order of magnitude. As a consequence, alpha-particle spectrometry was a suitable radiometric technique to perform our wide set of measurements. Then a radiochemical scheme for polonium, radium, thorium and uranium isolation, purification and deposition from these polluted environmental samples was needed. This work will show the sequential radiochemical procedure, originally developed by CSIRO laboratories, adapted to our laboratory conditions and applied for natural radionuclides determination in environmental samples collected from the Tinto River. Hence, and after pretreatment of the sample, polonium was extracted by DDTC and deposited onto silver planchets. Then, after a co-precipitation process, uranium was found in the supernatant whereas radium and thorium were found in the precipitate. Using TBP, uranium was separated and

  4. Improved radioanalytical method for the simultaneous determination of Th, U, Np, Pu and Am(Cm) on a single TRU column by alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macsik, Z.; Groska, J.; Vajda, N. [RadAnal Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Vogt, S.; Kim, C.S.; Maddison, A.; Donohye, D. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Environmental Sample Lab.; Kis-Benedek, G. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Terrestrial Environment Lab.

    2013-05-01

    A radioanalytical method based on the use of a single TRU extraction chromatographic column and selective, on-column oxidation state adjustment of actinides was developed for the determination of Th, U, Np, Pu and Am(Cm) in environmental samples (such as sediment and swipe samples). The procedure of Vajda et al. was further investigated and optimized focusing on the separation of Th, U and Np. The improved method combines two measurement techniques - alpha spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) - which allows to obtain more reliable information on a wider range of isotopes: {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, ({sup 236}U), {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, {sup 243}Cm and {sup 244}Cm from one sample. (orig.)

  5. Improved radioanalytical method for the simultaneous determination of Th, U, Np, Pu and Am(Cm) on a single TRU column by alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioanalytical method based on the use of a single TRU extraction chromatographic column and selective, on-column oxidation state adjustment of actinides was developed for the determination of Th, U, Np, Pu and Am(Cm) in environmental samples (such as sediment and swipe samples). The procedure of Vajda et al. was further investigated and optimized focusing on the separation of Th, U and Np. The improved method combines two measurement techniques - alpha spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) - which allows to obtain more reliable information on a wider range of isotopes: 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U, (236U), 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, 243Cm and 244Cm from one sample. (orig.)

  6. Calibration of an HPGe detector and self-attenuation correction for 210Pb: Verification by alpha spectrometry of 210Po in environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdou; Bochud, François; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Buchillier, Thierry; Njock Moïse, Kwato; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2007-08-01

    In this work the calibration of an HPGe detector for 210Pb measurement is realised by a liquid standard source and the determination of this radionuclide in solid environmental samples by gamma spectrometry takes into account a correction factor for self-attenuation of its 46.5 keV line. Experimental, theoretical and Monte Carlo investigations are undertaken to evaluate self-attenuation for cylindrical sample geometry. To validate this correction factor, 210Po (at equilibrium with 210Pb) alpha spectrometry procedure using microwave acid digestion under pressure is developed and proposed. The different self-attenuation correction methods are in coherence, and corrected 210Pb activities are in good agreement with the results of 210Po. Finally, self-attenuation corrections are proposed for environmental solid samples whose density ranges between 0.8 and 1.4 g/cm 3 and whose mass attenuation coefficient is around 0.4 cm 2/g.

  7. Large area gridded ionisation chamber and electrostatic precipitator and their application to low-level alpha-spectrometry of environmental air samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution, parallel plate Frisch grid ionization chamber with an efficient area of 3000 cm2, and a large area electrostatic precipitator were developed and applied to direct alpha spectrometry of air dust. Using an argon-methane mixture (P-10 gas) at atmospheric pressure the resolution of the detector system is 22 keV FWHM at 5 MeV. After sampling for one week and decay of short-lived natural activity, the sensitivity of the procedure for long-lived alpha emitters is about 0.1 fCi/m3 taking 3 Σσ of background as the detection limit with 1000 min counting time. (author)

  8. Identification of the contamination source of plutonium in environmental samples with isotopic ratios determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of 239+249Pu in environmental samples were determined by ICP-MS and α spectrometry, showing consistent results, which suggests an applicability of ICP-MS to 239Pu and 240Pu measurement. The activity ratios of 238Pu/239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu were significantly different in samples from the general environment and near Sellafield reprocessing plants, indicating the usefulness of these ratios for identification of the Pu contamination source. (author)

  9. Boron concentration measurements by alpha spectrometry and quantitative neutron autoradiography in cells and tissues treated with different boronated formulations and administration protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to measure boron concentration with high precision in tissues that will be irradiated represents a fundamental step for a safe and effective BNCT treatment. In Pavia, two techniques have been used for this purpose, a quantitative method based on charged particles spectrometry and a boron biodistribution imaging based on neutron autoradiography. A quantitative method to determine boron concentration by neutron autoradiography has been recently set-up and calibrated for the measurement of biological samples, both solid and liquid, in the frame of the feasibility study of BNCT. This technique was calibrated and the obtained results were cross checked with those of α spectrometry, in order to validate them. The comparisons were performed using tissues taken form animals treated with different boron administration protocols. Subsequently the quantitative neutron autoradiography was employed to measure osteosarcoma cell samples treated with BPA and with new boronated formulations. - Highlights: • A method for 10B measurements in samples based on neutron autoradiography was developed. • The results were compared with those of alpha spectrometry applied on tissue and cell samples. • Boronated liposomes were developed and administered to osteosarcoma cell cultures. • Neutron autoradiography was employed to measure boron concentration due to liposomes. • Liposomes were proved to be more effective in concentrating boron in cells than BPA

  10. Geochronology of recent sediments from the Cariaco Trench (Venezuela) by Alpha Spectrometry of 210Pb (210Po)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    210Pb concentration in marine sediments of the Cariaco Trench (North-East of Venezuela) was measured through the analysis of 210Po alpha emissions, which can be assumed to be in secular equilibrium with 210Pb. The analysed sediment core has a length of 1.9 m. The results allowed to apply the CF:CS dating model (Constant Flux and Constant Supply). The sedimentation rate was estimated to be 0.25 cm/y. As far as we know this is the first α- dating carried out in the country, performed with an alpha spectrometer recently funded by the IAEA.

  11. Studies on pre-cambrian granites and sedimentary rocks by means of the fission track method and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of granites and sedimentary rock from the Kaap Valley in South Africa were studied for the microdistribution of U and Th by means of fission track mapping and α spectrometry. A Ra 226 anomaly was found which could not be explained by a strong loss of U. New findings were gained when studying U distribution patterns in the granites. (DG)

  12. Implantation of alpha spectrometry methodology for the determination of U and Th isotopes in igneous rocks: application to the study of radioactive desequilibrium in the Trindade Island, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the implementation of experimental procedures for alpha spectrometry measurement of 238U, 234U and 230Th activities in silicates. The best experimental conditions were defined using 233U, 232U and 229Th radioactive tracers and simulating the usual conditions found in processing silicates. The chemical procedures consists of the following steps: radioactive tracer addition and sample dissolution by acid digestion, U and Th pre-concentration by co-precipitation, element separation and purification by ion exchange chromatography and electrodeposition in inox steel disks. In order to evaluate its effectiveness, the procedure was applied to the Brazilian geological standards BB-1 (basalt) and GB-1 (granite). The obtained chemical yields for uranium and thorium are of about 60% and 70%, respectively, for both matrices. The described methodology furnishes activity measurements with less than 4% relative precision and accuracies of about 1%, that are essential for petrogenetic applications. The 238U and 232Th series disequilibrium conditions were investigated by alpha spectrometry, together with neutron activation analysis and natural gamma-ray spectrometry. 234U/238U, 238U/232Th and 230Th/232Th activity ratios and the 234Th, 214Pb, 214Bi, 235U, 228Ac, 212Pb, 212Bi and 208Tl specific activities were obtained. These results were interpreted with the help of additional constraints given by the larger and smaller elements concentrations, measured by X-ray fluorescence. The 232Th series is in secular radioactive equilibrium in all analysed samples. In the case of the 238U series, the equilibrium condition was verified, as expected, in the oldest rocks from the Trindade Island (Trindade Complex and Desejado Sequence). On the other hand, the results show that, in the samples from the last three volcanic episodes in the island (Morro Vermelho Formation, Valado Formation and Vulcao do Paredao), the 230Th and 238U are not in equilibrium. Furthermore the three

  13. Analysis of aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry and analysis of thorium and uranium by alpha spectrometry in the black sand of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the period of our project of end of study carried out in the Center ; main road Sciences and Nuclear Engineering's CNSTN in one is tallied took one Egypt black sand simple with an aim has of knowing the activities of the existing radio elements and especially Uranium and Thorium. In the same mining, we try to take another Egypt black sand simple an aim has knowing the mass of aluminum by using a techniques in Atomique Absorption Spectrophotometer. After the radio chemical and Spectrometry analysis of the black sand sample we found the results following: - Egypt black sand is contains isotopes of Uranium such as 234U and 238U; - The Egypt black sand is contains isotopes of Thorium such as 230Th and 232Th. - L' Aluminum is a major. (Author)

  14. Improvement of a method for the sequential determination of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, and uranium isotopes by LSC and alpha-particle spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, J.C. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Blanco Rodriguez, P. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Vera Tome, F., E-mail: fvt@unex.es [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Leal-Cidoncha, E. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    In a previous paper the authors proposed a sequential method for the determination of isotopes of uranium, thorium, radium, and lead from environmental samples using alpha-particle spectrometry and LSC techniques. Although the radiochemical yields were suitable when the assays were performed on synthetic samples, application to real environmental samples caused a major decrease in the radiochemical yield, especially for uranium in inorganic samples (soils). A modification of the procedure is described that overcomes this drawback. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential methods permit one to obtain the radionuclides from the same aliquot. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposal method enhances the radiochemical yields. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For soil samples, the yields were of (56{+-}2)%, (57{+-}6)%, and (71{+-}4)% for U, Ra, and Pb.

  15. Localization of an O-glycosylated site in the recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1 produced in yeast and correction of the amino acid sequence using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptide mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Søgaard, M; Svensson, B;

    1994-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) of peptide mixtures was used to characterize recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1, produced in yeast. Three peptide mixtures were generated by cleavage with CNBr, digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C and Asp-N, respectively, and...

  16. Determination of 234U/238U ratio: Comparison of multi-collector ICPMS and ICP-QMS for water, hair and nails samples, and comparison with alpha-spectrometry for water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 234U/238U ratio in water, hair and nails samples was determined by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and by alpha-spectrometry for the water samples only. A correlation of 0.99 was found between the two ICPMS methods and of 0.98 with alpha-spectrometry. The range of activity ratios was between 0.9 and 2.6 according to the MC-ICPMS measurements. The reproducibility of both ICPMS techniques was better than 4% for water samples containing 1μg l-1 of uranium and a 234U/238U atom ratio of 54.9 x 10-6. Sample preparation for the ICPMS consisted of dilution of water samples containing >10 μg l-1 of uranium and measurement time was ∼1 min, while alpha-spectrometry involved pre-concentration and separation of the uranium and counting times of 1000 min. (authors)

  17. Determination of uranium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 232U tracer, anion-exchange resin and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on the excretion rate of body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha-spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of U-isotopes in urine samples using anion-exchange resin and 232U tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of uranium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of U was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion-exchange resin. U-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha-spectrometer. Eight routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range of 51% to 67% with a mean and standard deviation of 60% and 5.4%, respectively. (author)

  18. Characterization of the occupational exposure and air transported particles using the techniques of PIXE 252Cf PMDS and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk for human health due to exposure to aerosols depends on the intake pattern, the mass concentration and the speciation of the elements present in airborne particles. In this work PDMS (Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry) was used as complementary technique to the PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission) technique to characterize aerosols samples collected in the environment. The PIXE technique allows the identification of the elements present in the sample and to determine their mass concentrations. The mass spectrometry (PDMS) was used to identify the speciation of these elements present in the samples. The aerosol samples were collected using a six stage cascade impactor in three sites. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) measured indicated that the airborne particulate were in the fine fraction of the aerosols. The theoretical uranium concentration in urine samples using ICRP lung model parameters suggest that the elemental mass concentration in respirable fraction of aerosol and the chemical speciation are important factors to determine the uranium concentration in urine and that the determination of specific solubility parameters for each compound is the most important factor to calculate the uranium concentration in urine. PIXE allows to identify and quantify the elements heavier than Na (Z=11) while PDMS allows to identify the organic and inorganic compounds present in the samples. As these techniques are used as complementary techniques they provide important information about the aerosols characterization. (author)

  19. Separation and activity determination of 239+240Pu, 241Am and Curium (242and244Cm) in evaporator concentrate by Alpha Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha spectrometry analysis was used for activity determinations of Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in evaporator concentrate samples from nuclear power plants. Using a sequential procedure the first step was Pu isolation by an anion exchange column followed by an Am and Cm separation of U and Fe by a co-precipitation with oxalic acid. The precipitate was used for americium and curium separation of strontium by using a TRU resin extraction chromatography column. Due to their chemical similarities and energy difference it was seen that the simultaneous determination of 241Am, 242Cm and 243,244Cm isotopes is possible using the 243Am as tracer, once they have peaks in different region of interest (ROI) in the alpha spectrum. In this work it was used tracers, 238Pu, 243Am, 244Cm and 232U, for determination and quantification of theirs isotopes, respectively. The standard deviations for replicate analysis were calculated and for 241Am it was (1,040 ± 160 mBqKg-1), relative standard deviation 15.38%, and for 239+240Pu it was (551 +- 44 mBqKg-1), relative standard deviation 7.98%. In addition, for the 242Cm isotope the standard deviation for determinations was(75 ± 23 mBqKg-1), with the relative standard deviation 30.67% higher than for 241Am and 239+240Pu. The radiometric yields ranged from 90% to 105% and the lower limit of detection was estimated as being 2.05 mBqKg-1. (author)

  20. Development of a methodology for the detection of Ra226 in large volumes of water by gamma spectrometry; modification and validation of the method for detection and quantification of Ra226 in small volumes of water by alpha spectrometry, used by the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares (CICANUM, UCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The test method has been validated for quantifying the specific activity of Ra226 in water alpha spectrometry. The CICANUM has used this method as part of the proposed harmonization of methods ARCAL (IAEA). The method is based on a first separation and preconcentration of Ra226 by coprecipitation and subsequent MnO2 micro precipitation as Ba (Ra) SO4. Samples were prepared and then was performed the counting by alpha spectrometry. A methodology of radio sampling for large volumes of water was tested in parallel, using acrylic fibers impregnated with manganese oxide (IV) to determine the amount of Ra226 present by gamma spectrometry. Small-scale tests, have determined that the best way to prepare the fiber is the reference method found in the literature and using the oven at 60 degrees Celsius. (author)

  1. Measurement of radon concentration in water by means of {alpha}, {gamma} spectrometry. Radon concentration in ground and spring water in Hiroshima Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn, T{sub 1/2}=3.8235{+-}0.0003d) is {alpha}-ray releasing nuclide, so that it can not be detected by {gamma}-ray measurement. But, the daughter nuclides {sup 214}Pb (T{sub 1/2}=26.8 min) and {sup 214}Bi (T{sub 1/2}=19.9 min) release {gamma}-ray, accordingly they are measured by Ge detector. Their radioactive equilibrium is kept in the closed vessel, because their half-lives are shorter than that of radon. We developed a measurement method of radon concentration by means of {gamma}-spectrometry. We applied this method to catch radon in the atmosphere by active carbon. The same principle can be applied to radon in water. Radon concentrations in the ground water were measured in 22 points in the Higashi-Hiroshima city and 82 points in the Hiroshima prefecture. The efficiencies of {gamma}-ray were determined. The radon concentration showed between 11 and 459 Bq/l and the average was 123 Bq/l. The high concentration of radon was distributed in the spring of granitic layer and higher concentration of radon were observed in the ground water of fault. (S.Y.)

  2. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L−1 and 0.054 μg L−1 with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L−1) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L−1. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins

  3. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin, E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L{sup −1} and 0.054 μg L{sup −1} with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L{sup −1}) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L{sup −1}. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins.

  4. Determination of 234U and 238U in seawater samples by alpha spectrometry after concentration of U(VI) onto hydrotalcite and co-precipitation with LaF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a simple and accurate method for determination of uranium isotopes (234U and 238U) in seawater samples using alpha spectrometry. Uranium is pre-concentrated from seawater samples via adsorption on hydrotalcite at pH 6.5. The absorbent is dissolved into 50 ml of 8M HNO3; then filtered through a Dowex-1 column. U(VI) in the elution solution is reduced to U(IV) using zinc metal in 4M solution of HCl and then co-precipitated with LaF3. The chemical separation efficiency is found to be 97.12 ± 2.68%, eliminating the need of using 232U tracer in other published methods. This method is validated via comparison with results obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for three seawater samples. (orig.)

  5. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the separation of conjugated and unconjugated 17{alpha}- and 17{beta}-boldenone in urine sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, Mara [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell' Emilia Romagna, ' B. Ubertini' , Via Bianchi 7, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Assini, Walter [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell' Emilia Romagna, ' B. Ubertini' , Via Bianchi 7, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Bozzoni, Eros [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell' Emilia Romagna, ' B. Ubertini' , Via Bianchi 7, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Tognoli, Nadia [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell' Emilia Romagna, ' B. Ubertini' , Via Bianchi 7, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Dusi, Guglielmo [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell' Emilia Romagna, ' B. Ubertini' , Via Bianchi 7, 25124 Brescia (Italy)]. E-mail: gdusi@bs.izs.it

    2007-03-14

    Natural occurrence or illegal treatment of boldenone (BOLD) presence in cattle urine is under debate within the European Union. Separation of conjugated and unconjugated forms of 17{alpha}-boldenone ({alpha}-BOLD) and 17{beta}-boldenone ({beta}-BOLD) and presence of related molecules as androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) appear critical points for the decision of an illegal use. The aim of this study is a new analytical approach of BOLD and ADD confirmation in cattle urine. The separation between conjugated and unconjugated forms of BOLD was obtained by a preliminary urine liquid-liquid extraction step with ethyl acetate. In this step the organic phase extracts only unconjugated BOLD and ADD, while BOLD in conjugated form remain in urine phase. Afterwards the urine phase, contains conjugated BOLD, was subjected to an enzymatic deconjugation. Solid-phase extraction (OASIS-HLB Waters) was used for the purification and concentration of analytes in organic and urine phases and liquid chromatography ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was applied for the confirmation of BOLD and ADD, using deuterium-labelled 17{beta}-boldenone (BOLD-d3) as internal standard. The method was validated as a quantitative confirmatory method according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/CE. The results obtained demonstrate that the developed method show very high specificity, precision, trueness and ruggedness. Decision limits (CC{alpha}) smaller than 0.5 ng mL{sup -1} were obtained for each analyte.

  6. Alpha and gamma spectrometry applied to the study of U and Th series radioactive disequilibrium in the phosphates from Abrolhos Archipelago (Brazil offshore)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of uranium and thorium measurements made in aluminium and iron phosphates that occur in the Abrolhos Archipelago (offshore Brazil) by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The U concentrations were also indirectly determined from the gamma-ray activity of 234 Th, 214 Pb and 214 Bi, while those of Th were obtained from the 228 Ca, 212 Pb, 212 Bi and 208 T1 gamma-ray emitters. In both cases it was assumed that 238 U and 232 Th series are in radioactive secular equilibrium. The comparison between the results obtained by neutron activation and gamma-ray spectrometry show radioactive secular equilibrium in the analysed samples. (author)

  7. SOLANG: A user-friendly code to calculate the geometry factor using Monte Carlo simulations. Application to alpha-particle spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo Diaz, N.A. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, C.P. 6195, La Habana (Cuba); Martin Sanchez, A., E-mail: ams@unex.e [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain); Torre Perez, J. de la [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Monte Carlo simulation was applied to calculate the effective solid angle (or geometry factor) presented by a plane radioactive source at a detector entrance window. A fast and user-friendly computer program SOLANG was written to perform the calculations for disk or rectangular sources and circular non-coaxial detector disks. Results can be achieved with great precision, depending on the number of simulated trajectories. Some checks and applications to the calculation of efficiencies of semiconductor detectors and gas ionization chambers used to measure alpha particles are presented. Their results were very reliable. The code is available free of charge on request to the authors.

  8. Aspects of the quantitative activity determination with low-level alpha spectrometry: peakfitting, calculation of activity with uncertainty budget and detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides using the traditional method of ''regions of interest'' integration peak areas are calculated by least-squares fitting theoretical peak functions to the spectrum. Especially the areas of small peaks are biased depending on the used Chi-square criterion. It is discussed that only the ''Poisson Maximum Likelihood Estimation'' method, realised by the Levenberg-Marquardt minimisation method, is working practically bias free. The coincident alpha electron summation effect disturbs the alpha emission probabilities known from the literature, the more the smaller the distance source to detector is. Only the method of calculating the activity by summing up the individual peak areas and in parallel their emission probabilities is nearly invariant against this effect. The activity of the sample is represented by a formula with up to 20 or more parameters. For the full uncertainty propagation a numerical algorithm is presented. From this, also the uncertainty budget is derived. The numerical algorithms are used by iterative methods to calculate decision limits and detection limits according to the German standard DIN 25482-10, which corresponds to the international standard ISO/FDIS 11929-7. (orig.)

  9. Coefficient Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Panayides

    2013-01-01

    Heavy reliance on Cronbach’s alpha has been standard practice in many validation studies. However, there seem to be two misconceptions about the interpretation of alpha. First, alpha is mistakenly considered as an indication of unidimensionality and second, that the higher the value of alpha the better. The aim of this study is to clarify these misconceptions with the use of real data from the educational setting. Results showed that high alpha values can be obtained in multidimensional scale...

  10. A Procedure for the Sequential Determination of Radionuclides in Environmental Samples. Liquid Scintillation Counting and Alpha Spectrometry for 90Sr, 241Am and Pu Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2004, IAEA activities related to the terrestrial environment have aimed at the development of a set of procedures to determine radionuclides in environmental samples. Reliable, comparable and ‘fit for purpose’ results are an essential requirement for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, tested and validated analytical procedures are extremely important tools for the production of analytical data. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available for reference to both the analyst and the customer. This publication describes a combined procedure for the sequential determination of 90Sr, 241Am and Pu radioisotopes in environmental samples. The method is based on the chemical separation of strontium, americium and plutonium using ion exchange chromatography, extraction chromatography and precipitation followed by alpha spectrometric and liquid scintillation counting detection. The method was tested and validated in terms of repeatability and trueness in accordance with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines using reference materials and proficiency test samples. Reproducibility tests were performed later at the IAEA Terrestrial Environment Laboratory. The calculations of the massic activity, uncertainty budget, decision threshold and detection limit are also described in this publication. The procedure is introduced for the determination of 90Sr, 241Am and Pu radioisotopes in environmental samples such as soil, sediment, air filter and vegetation samples. It is expected to be of general use to a wide range of laboratories, including the Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) network for routine environmental monitoring purposes

  11. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  12. Mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  13. Direct Alpha Analysis for Forensic Samples (DAAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the DAAFS project is to deliver a field deployable direct alpha sample spectrometry system. This system is designed to rectify current gaps in pure alpha emitting material detection. The system comprises, firstly, an evaluation of multiple innovative methods for rapid on-site sample collection of difficult to detect alpha RN contamination. Secondly, the incorporation of an experimental alpha spectrometry analysis software suite, 'ADAM', is provided for performing the required on-site deconvolution of the complex alpha spectra arising from the direct sample measurement. Software simulation of collected alpha spectra will be handled by 'AASI', which will simulate alpha spectra as a training and analysis verification tool. Thirdly, a Concept of Operations (ConOps) for the system implementation in RN field teams is included. This combination of the swipe methodology, advanced swipe treatment equipment, mobile field laboratories, and the state of the art analysis software suite will provide RN response teams with the capability to identify and rapidly (i.e., hours as opposed to days) quantify low activity and difficult to detect alpha emitters. Further expert analysis support is available to field teams by sharing of raw spectral data via email with off-site laboratories. The proposed system provides the solution to this identified capability gap, specifically, a field-deployable real-time alpha detection system. The system comprises: a non-destructive particle sampler, standardized swipe sampling methods, a self-contained field alpha spectrometry system and an integrated data management/communications tool allowing for real-time raw-data tracking and data sharing. This system also provides responders with the type/quantity of RN material for improved safeguards, forensics, and contamination mitigation applications. (author)

  14. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  15. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  16. The $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Day, J P; Elhanafy, M; Smith, E; Woodhouse, R; Papp, Z

    2011-01-01

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  17. Alpha One Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tested Find Support Find Doctor What Is Alpha-1? Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) is a ... results for inhaled augmentation More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website ...

  18. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alpha 1 -antitrypsin; A1AT; AAT Formal name: Alpha 1 Antitrypsin; α1-antitrypsin Related ... know? How is it used? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) testing is used to help diagnose alpha-1 ...

  19. Alpha spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Felix; Wilsenach, Heinrich; Zuber, Kai [IKTP TU-Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Alpha decays from long living isotopes are one of the limiting backgrounds for experiments searching for rare decays with stringent background constrains, such as neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. It is thus very important to accurately measure the half-lives of these decays, in order to properly model their background contribution. Therefore, it is important to be able to measure half-lives from alpha decays of the order of 1 x 10{sup 15} yr. A measurement of such a long lived decay imposes, however, a series of challenges, where the correct discrimination between background and true signal is critical. There is also a more general interest in such long living half-life measurements, as their value depends crucially on the underlying nuclear model. This work proposes a setup to measure long lived alpha decays, based on the design of the Frisch-Grid ionisation chamber. It is shown that the proposed design provides a good separation of signal and background events. It is also demonstrated that, with pulse shape analysis, it is possible to constrain the source position of the decay, further improving the quality of the data. A discussion of the characterisation of the detector is also presented as well as some results obtained with calibration sources.

  20. Alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha decays from long living isotopes are one of the limiting backgrounds for experiments searching for rare decays with stringent background constrains, such as neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. It is thus very important to accurately measure the half-lives of these decays, in order to properly model their background contribution. Therefore, it is important to be able to measure half-lives from alpha decays of the order of 1 x 1015 yr. A measurement of such a long lived decay imposes, however, a series of challenges, where the correct discrimination between background and true signal is critical. There is also a more general interest in such long living half-life measurements, as their value depends crucially on the underlying nuclear model. This work proposes a setup to measure long lived alpha decays, based on the design of the Frisch-Grid ionisation chamber. It is shown that the proposed design provides a good separation of signal and background events. It is also demonstrated that, with pulse shape analysis, it is possible to constrain the source position of the decay, further improving the quality of the data. A discussion of the characterisation of the detector is also presented as well as some results obtained with calibration sources.

  1. Measurement of radon daughters in air samples by alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of polonium 214 and polonium 218. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter (Author)

  2. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel;

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained...

  3. The effects of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyltyrosine, and alpha-methylphenylalanine on the concentrations of m-tyramine and alpha-methyl-m-tyramine in rat striatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, D. F.; Duffield, A. M.; Duffield, P. H.; Wade, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration in rat striatum of the meta and para isomers of tyramine and alpha-methyltyramine, after the administration of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) and alpha-methylphenylalanine (AMPA) has been determined using chemical ionization gas chromatography mass spectrometry (c.i.g.c.m.s.). Twenty hours after the last of 7 daily injections of (+)-amphetamine (5 mg kg-1 i.p.) the concentration of alpha-methyl-p-tyramine in striatal tissue increased twofold compared to the ...

  4. Retinoic acid receptor alpha is associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Henrik J; Sanchez, Betzabe C.; Mundt, Filip; Forshed, Jenny; Kovacs, Aniko; Panizza, Elena; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Yakhini, Zohar; Helou, Khalil; Krawiec, Kamilla; Kanter, Lena; Hjerpe, Anders

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen relapse. Here we identify the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor alpha as a marker of tamoxifen resistance. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that retinoic acid receptor alpha protein networks and levels differ in a tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF7) and a tamoxifen-resistant (LCC2) cell line. High intratumoural retinoic acid receptor alpha protein levels also correlate...

  5. Quantification of active infliximab in human serum with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a tumor necrosis factor alpha -based pre-analytical sample purification and a stable isotopic labeled infliximab bio-similar as internal standard: A target-based, sensitive and cost-effective method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amrani, Mohsin; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Göbel, Camiel; van Maarseveen, Erik M

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody Infliximab (IFX) is a widely used drug for the treatment of several inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, approximately 10% of patients develop anti-infliximab antibodies (ATIs) rendering the treatment ineffective. Early detection of underexposure to unbound IFX would result in a timely switch of therapy which could aid in the treatment of this disease. Streptavidin coated 96 well plates were used to capture biotinylated-tumor necrosis factor -alpha (b-TNF-α), which in turn was used to selectively extract the active form of IFX in human serum. After elution, IFX was digested using trypsin and one signature peptide was selected for subsequent analysis on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The internal standard used was a stable isotopic labeled IFX bio-similar. The assay was successfully validated according to European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines and was found to be linear in a range of 0.5-20μg/mL (r(2)=0.994). Lower limit of quantification for the assay (feasibility in (pre)clinical studies and in therapeutic drug monitoring. This method should be considered as first choice due to its accuracy and multiple degree of selectivity. PMID:27264745

  6. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  7. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  8. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po measurement in water by alpha spectrometry using {sup 210}Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Pedro L., E-mail: pedroluis.fernandez@unican.es [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences (Medical Physics Section), Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, 39011 Santander (Cantabria) (Spain); Gomez, Jose; Rodenas, Carmen [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences (Medical Physics Section), Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, 39011 Santander (Cantabria) (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    An easy and accurate method for the determination of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in water using {sup 210}Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk is proposed and assessed for its detection capabilities according to the ISO Guide for the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) and ISO Standard 11929-7 concerning the evaluation of the characteristic limits for ionizing radiation measurements. The method makes no assumption on the initial values of the activity concentrations of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi and {sup 210}Po in the sample to be analyzed, and is based on the alpha spectrometric measurement of {sup 210}Po in two different aliquots: the first one measured five weeks after the sampling date to ensure radioactive equilibrium between {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Bi and the second after a sufficient time for the ingrowth of {sup 210}Po from {sup 210}Pb to be significant. As shown, for a recommended time interval of seven months between {sup 210}Po measurements, the applicability of the proposed method is limited to water samples with a {sup 226}Ra to {sup 210}Pb activity ratio C{sub Ra}/C{sub Pb}{<=}4, as usual in natural waters. Using sample and background counting times of 24 h and 240 h, respectively, the detection limit of the activity concentration of each radionuclide at the sampling time for a 1 L sample typically varies between 0.7 and 16 mBq L{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb in water samples with an initial activity of {sup 210}Po in the range 0-200 mBq L{sup -1}, and between 0.6 and 8.5 mBq L{sup -1} for {sup 210}Po in water samples with an initial activity of {sup 210}Pb in the same range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po measurement in water by {sup 210}Po spontaneous deposition onto silver disks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po determination based on {sup 210}Po measurement in two different aliquots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of characteristic limits in radioactivity

  9. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  10. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of 239Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of 239Pu). (author)

  11. Review of alpha_s determinations

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge on the strong coupling is briefly summarized. The most precise determinations of alpha_s, at different energies, are reviewed and compared at the Z mass scale, using the predicted QCD running. The impressive agreement achieved between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions constitutes a beautiful and very significant test of Asymptotic Freedom, establishing QCD as the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The world average value of the strong coupling is found to be alpha_s(M_Z^2)= 0.1186 \\pm 0.0007.

  12. Review of alpha_s determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge on the strong coupling is briefly summarized. The most precise determinations of alpha_s, at different energies, are reviewed and compared at the Z mass scale, using the predicted QCD running. The impressive agreement achieved between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions constitutes a beautiful and very significant test of Asymptotic Freedom, establishing QCD as the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The world average value of the strong coupl...

  13. World Summary of $\\alpha_s$ (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, Siegfried; Salam, Gavin P

    2015-01-01

    This is a preliminary update of the measurements of α s and the determination of the world average value of α s (M Z 2 ) presented in the 2013/2014 edition of the Review of Particle Properties [1]. A number of studies which became available since late 2013 provide new results for each of the (previously 5, now) 6 subclasses of measurements for which pre-average values of $\\alpha_s (M_Z^2)$ are determined.

  14. [Obtaining and characteristics of domestic preparation interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokholenko, Ia A; Porubleva, L V; Dubeĭ, I Ia; Rebriev, A V; Sutugina, L P; Gromovoĭ, T Iu; Pokrovskiĭ, V A; Obolenskaia, M Iu; Chernykh, S I

    2008-01-01

    Pegylated interferon alpha-2b (PEG-IFN alpha-2b) is a domestic preparation of a modified recombinant interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect. The preparation was obtained by N-terminal pegylation of IFN alpha-2b with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This paper presents the method of PEG-IFN alpha-2b synthesis and characteristics of the obtained product. PAAG electrophoresis, Western blot analysis and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry confirm that the preparation is an N-terminal pegylated IFN alpha-2b that contains no more than 10% of dipegylated IFN alpha-2b. The comparison of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with its foreign analogue has revealed the similarity of their biological activity and pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:19351063

  15. Identification of multiple post-translational modifications in the porcine brain specific p25alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J; Hedegaard, Claus; Lundvig, Ditte; Sundbye, Sabrina; Issinger, Olaf Georg; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Jensen, Poul Henning

    2008-01-01

    -synuclein and is a potent stimulator of alpha-synuclein aggregation. P25alpha is a phosphoprotein and post-translational modifications (PTMs) may play a role in its disease-related abnormalities. To investigate the spectrum of PTMs on p25alpha we cloned porcine p25alpha and isolated the protein from porcine...... brain. Using several complementary tandem mass spectrometry techniques for peptide mass analysis and amino acid sequencing, a comprehensive analysis of the PTMs on porcine p25alpha was performed. It was found that porcine p25alpha is heavily modified with a variety of modifications: phosphorylation, di......- and trimethylation, citrullination and a HexNAc group. The modifications are localized within p25alpha's unfolded terminal domains and suggest that their functional states are regulated. This comprehensive mapping of p25alpha's PTMs will form the basis for future functional studies and investigations...

  16. Application of Micro-coprecipitation Method to Alpha Source Preparation for Measuring Alpha Nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the source preparations, an electrodeposition is a commonly used method for the preparation of sources for an alpha spectrometry, because this technique is simple and produces a very thin deposit, which is essential for a high resolution of the alpha peak. Recently, micro-coprecipitation with rare earths have been used to yield sources for -spectrometry. In this work, the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were purified from hindrance nuclides and elements with an a TRU resin in radioactive waste samples, and the activity concentrations of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were determined by radiation counting methods after alpha source preparation like micro coprecipitation. After the Pu isotopes in the radioactive waste samples were separated from the other nuclides with an anion exchange resin, the Am isotopes were purified with a TRU resin and an anion exchange resin or a TRU resin. Activity concentrations and chemical recoveries of 241Am purified with the TRU resin were similar to those with the TRU resin and anion exchange resin. In this study, to save on the analytical time and cost, the Am isotopes were purified with the TRU resin without using an additional anion exchange resin. After comparing the electrodeposition method with the micro-coprecipitation method, the micro-coprecipitation method was used for the alpha source preparation, because the micro-coprecipitation method is simple and more reliable for source preparation of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes

  17. Preliminary studies for the determination of alpha emitters using the gross alpha coprecipitation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological quality of drinking water in Spain is regulated by Nuclear Security Guideline No, 7.7 (Rev.1) of the Nuclear Security Council (NSC). this guideline establishes the protocol to follow when the radiological level exceeds 0,1 Bq.l''1. When this level is passed, the responsible alpha emitter must be identified; ''210 Po, ''226Ra, ''230Th, ''239Pu, ''224Ra, ''234 U and ''138 U. Activity due to these isotopes is usually determined using alpha spectrometry with semiconductor detectors. This method allows the activity of the alpha emitters to be determined with a good sensitivity. however, it requires long radiochemical isolations and long counting times, so the method is not suitable for rough estimate radiological analysis. In this preliminary work, we present the conditioning of the sample-precipitate that is essential for further radiochemical isolations. (Author) 9 refs

  18. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  19. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  20. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  1. Targeted Alpha Therapy: From Alpha to Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review covers the broad spectrum of Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT) research in Australia; from in vitro and in vivo studies to clinical trials. The principle of tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT) is discussed in terms of its validation by Monte Carlo calculations of vascular models and the potential role of biological dosimetry is examined. Summmary of this review is as follows: 1. The essence of TAT 2. Therapeutic objectives 3. TAVAT and Monte Carlo microdosimetry 4. Biological dosimetry 5. Preclinical studies 6. Clinical trials 7. What next? 8. Obstacles. (author)

  2. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  3. Nanocrystalline alpha-Fe Layer Examined by Mossbauer Spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    David, Bohumil; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Pizúrová, Naděžda; Rek, Antonín; Kudrle, V.; Jašek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 1 (2014), s. 94-95. ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /15./. Košice, 17.06.2013-21.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : nanostructured pure iron * microwave plasma * Mossbauer spectroscopy * TEM * SEM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2014 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/PDF/126/a126z1p043.pdf

  4. Technical Equivalency Documentation for a Newly Acquired Alpha Spectroscopy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a recently acquired Canberra(trademark) Alpha Analyst 'Blue' system (Chamber Number's 173-208) used by the Hazards Control, Radiation Safety Section, WBC/Spectroscopy Team has been studied with respect to an existing Canberra system. The existing Canberra system consists of thirty Alpha Analyst dual chambers Model XXXX comprising a total of sixty detectors (Chambers Number's 101-124 and 137-172). The existing chambers were previously compared to an older system consisting of thirty-six Model 7401 alpha spectrometry chambers (Chamber Number's 1-36) Chambers 101-124 and 137-172 are DOELAP accredited. The older system was previously DOELAP accredited for the routine Alpha Spectroscopy program used in LLNL's in vitro bioassay program. The newly acquired Alpha Analyst system operates on a network with software that controls and performs analysis of the current Alpha Analyst system (Chamber Number's 101-124 and 137-172). This exact same software is used for the current system and the newly acquired system and is DOELAP accredited. This document compares results from the existing Alpha System with the newer Alpha Analyst system

  5. The AS-76 interlaboratory experiment on the alpha spectrometric determinaion of Pu-238. Part 3: Preparation and characterization of samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four plutonium samples containing 0.2, 0.8, 1.6 and 0.9 atom % of 238Pu have been prepared for the Interlaboratory Experiment AS-76. Of these three were input solutions from a reprocessing plant. The fourth sample was from a plutonium product solution. These samples have been characterized by two alpha spectrometry laboratories and two mass spectrometry laboratories to certify the ratio of alpha activities 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) and the isotopic composition, respectively

  6. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Imaging alpha particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  8. The alpha channeling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  9. Local versus nonlocal $\\alpha\\alpha$ interactions in $3\\alpha$ description of $^{12}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Y; Descouvemont, P; Fujiwara, Y; Matsumura, H; Orabi, M; Theeten, M

    2008-01-01

    Local $\\alpha \\alpha$ potentials fail to describe $^{12}$C as a $3\\alpha$ system. Nonlocal $\\alpha \\alpha$ potentials that renormalize the energy-dependent kernel of the resonating group method allow interpreting simultaneously the ground state and $0^+_2$ resonance of $^{12}$C as $3\\alpha$ states. A comparison with fully microscopic calculations provides a measure of the importance of three-cluster exchanges in those states.

  10. Bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, N; Hagino, K; Ono, A; Brink, D M

    1999-01-01

    A quantum mechanical analysis of the bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ decay of $^{210}$Po is performed in close reference to a semiclassical theory. We clarify the contribution from the tunneling, mixed, outside barrier regions and from the wall of the inner potential well to the final spectral distribution, and discuss their interplay. We also comment on the validity of semiclassical calculations, and the possibility to eliminate the ambiguity in the nuclear potential between the alpha particle and daughter nucleus using the bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  11. Unified model for alpha-decay and alpha-capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified model for alpha-decay and alpha-capture is discussed. Simultaneously the half-lives for alpha-transition between ground states as well as ground and excited states and alpha-capture cross-sections by spherical magic or near-magic nuclei are well described in the framework of this model. Using these data the alpha-nucleus potential is obtained. The simple empirical relations for handy evaluation of the half-lives for alpha-transition, which take into account both the angular momentum and parity of alpha-transition, are presented

  12. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  13. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  14. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Wenya eNan; Feng eWan; Mang I eVai; Agostinho eRosa

    2014-01-01

    Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the tr...

  15. Alpha particles in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of 39 (mostly view graph) presentations addresses various aspects of alpha particle physics in thermonuclear fusion research, including energy balance and alpha particle losses, transport, the influence of alpha particles on plasma stability, helium ash, the transition to and sustainment of a burning fusion plasma, as well as alpha particle diagnostics. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Development and evaluation of an alpha spectrometer for precise measurement of activity ratio of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In reprocessing plants, alpha spectrometry is used for the determination of plutonium concentration by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry. 238Pu content and for isotope correlations to calculate the specific activity and isotope composition of plutonium. All these studies involve the use of an alpha spectrometer to measure the activity ratio of 238Pu/(239Pu+240Pu) precisely. Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division (TPPED) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, India has recently developed an alpha spectrometer, performance evaluation of which has been carried out by employing it to determine the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. Comparison of its performance with a commercially available system demonstrates that the indigenously developed instrument does provide acceptable levels of precision and accuracy for the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. (author)

  17. The AS-76 interlaboratory experiment on the alpha spectrometric determination of Pu-238. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four plutonium samples containing 0.2, 0.8, 1.6 and 0.9 Atom% of 238Pu have been prepared for the Interlaboratory Experiment AS-76. Of these, three were input solutions from a reprocessing plant. The fourth sample was from a plutonium product solution. These samples have been characterized by two alpha spectrometry laboratories and two mass spectrometry laboratories to certify the ratio of alpha activities 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) and the isotopic composition, respectively. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO

  18. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  19. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with [3H] ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major [3H]ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release [3H]ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues

  20. A novel technique for the rapid identification of alpha emitters released during a radiological incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbeck, George A; Taylor, Bud; Leitch, Jerrold; Silverstone, Marina; Moore, Brian; Honsa, Patricia

    2006-10-01

    Before the May 2003 TOPOFF II exercise in Seattle, the U.S. EPA's Laboratory in Las Vegas prepared five spiked samples to be analyzed by the Washington State Department of Health's (WSDOH) Radiation Laboratory. Two of these were simulated deposition samples prepared on packaging tape. Laboratories throughout the world are investigating rapid methods for analyzing plume-borne radioactive materials. While measuring gamma emitters in environmental samples is fairly straightforward, the potential presence of alpha emitters adds complexity. The short range of alpha particles and the high degree of energy interference between nuclides usually require chemical separations and very thin mounts for alpha spectrometry. Work published on Frisch-Grid alpha counting of transuranics in soil and the commercial development of radon-rejection for air filters indicate that alpha spectrometry can be used directly on some media with success. This suggests that plume-borne material sampled from air or freshly deposited surface layers may be counted directly by alpha spectrometry, making it possible to identify both alpha and gamma emitters and determine their relative concentrations. The long-range objective is to propose a sampling method that can be used for rapid qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses using conventional radioanalytical instruments, with minimal preparation. This paper describes experimentation with this approach during a real-time exercise. All samples were prepared by spiking with (137)Cs, (241)Am, (238)Pu, and (239)Pu and presented to the WSDOH's Radiation Laboratory for analysis during TOPOFF II. The laboratory quickly identified and determined the ratios of all four contaminants on the tape samples using sequential alpha spectrometry and gamma-ray spectroscopy without chemical separations. PMID:16966874

  1. Alpha radiation measurement - Recommendations dossier for measurements optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    - alpha radiations - emissions and interactions: alpha particles emission, alpha particles/matter interaction; 4 - sources preparation: objectives and specificity of coatings, direct coating, direct coating of organic solutions, spontaneous coating - the polonium case, alpha sources fabrication by co-precipitation, electrodeposition, alpha sources for liquid scintillation; 5 - measurement of alpha radiation: alpha detection, calibration and background noise measurement, global alpha counting, spectrometry, liquid scintillation and PERALS scintillation, PERALS technique, synthesis of alpha measurement techniques; 6 - treatment of results: metrology definitions, peaks search and identification, energy drift control, spectra analysis, interpretation of results, analysis report; 7 - comparison between non-radiometric techniques: secondary ionization mass spectroscopy, resonant ionization mass spectroscopy - RIMS, thermo-ionization mass spectroscopy - TIMS, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy - ICP-MS, accelerator mass spectroscopy - AMS; 8 - quality assurance and alpha spectroscopy: materials and equipments, environmental conditions, test and calibration methods, validation; Appendix 1: example of a device fitted with a semi-conductor detector: defined solid angle measurement (principle, electronics, uncertainties on full spectrum and on the extrapolation); Appendix 2: cryogenic detectors for alpha spectroscopy; Appendix 3: activity metrology - method of triple to double coincidences ratio; Glossary. (J.S.)

  2. Software for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Software for Nuclear Spectrometry was dedicated to review the present status of software for nuclear spectrometry and to advise on future activities in this field. Because similar AGM and consultant's meetings had been held in the past; together with an attempt to get more streamlined, this AGM was devoted to the specific field of software for gamma ray spectrometry. Nevertheless, many of the issues discussed and the recommendations made are of general concern for any software on nuclear spectrometry. The report is organized by sections. The 'Summary' gives conclusions and recommendations adopted at the AGM. These conclusions and recommendations resulted from the discussions held during and after presentations of the scientific and technical papers. These papers are reported here in their integral form in the following Sections

  3. Alpha and evangelical conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Stout, A.; Dein, S.

    2013-01-01

    A semi-structured interview study was conducted among 11 ‘Born Again’ Christians eliciting their conversion narratives. Informants emphasised the importance of embodying the Holy Spirit and developing a personal relationship with Christ in the process of conversion. The Alpha Course played an important role in this process.

  4. Alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line; Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad Riise; Olsen, Klaus Juul;

    2015-01-01

    the three subgroups of genotype/subcellular localisation and the clinical and biochemical data were done to investigate the potential relationship between genotype and phenotype in alpha-mannosidosis. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software. Analyses of covariance were performed to...

  5. The $\\alpha_S$ Dependence of Parton Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A. D.; Stirling, W. J.; Roberts, R G

    1995-01-01

    We perform next-to-leading order global analyses of deep inelastic and related data for different fixed values of $\\alpha_S (M_Z^2)$. We present sets of parton distributions for six values of $\\alpha_S$ in the range 0.105 to 0.130. We display the $(x, Q^2)$ domains with the largest parton uncertainty and we discuss how forthcoming data may be able to improve the determination of the parton densities.

  6. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  7. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cooley's Anemia Foundation: Fact sheet about alpha thalassemia Disease InfoSearch: Alpha-Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) Information Center for Sickle Cell and ...

  8. Selection and generation of waveforms for differential mobility spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Krylov, Evgeny V.; Coy, Stephen L.; Vandermey, John; Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2010-01-01

    Devices based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) are used in a number of ways, including applications as ion prefilters for API-MS systems, as detectors or selectors in hybrid instruments (GC-DMS, DMS-IMS), and in standalone systems for chemical detection and identification. DMS ion separation is based on the relative difference between high field and low field ion mobility known as the alpha dependence, and requires the application of an intense asymmetric electric field known as th...

  9. $\\alpha$-minimal Banach spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Rosendal, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A Banach space with a Schauder basis is said to be $\\alpha$-minimal for some countable ordinal $\\alpha$ if, for any two block subspaces, the Bourgain embeddability index of one into the other is at least $\\alpha$. We prove a dichotomy that characterises when a Banach space has an $\\alpha$-minimal subspace, which contributes to the ongoing project, initiated by W. T. Gowers, of classifying separable Banach spaces by identifying characteristic subspaces.

  10. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya eNan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the training parameter changes between two periods, within a short period and across the whole training time. It was found that the resting alpha amplitude measured before training had significant positive correlations with all learning indices and could be used as a predictor for the learning ability prediction. This finding would help the researchers in not only predicting the training efficacy in individuals but also gaining further insight into the mechanisms of alpha neurofeedback.

  11. Alpha scintillation radon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon counting chambers which utilize the alpha-scintillation properties of silver activated zinc sulfide are simple to construct, have a high efficiency, and, with proper design, may be relatively insensitive to variations in the pressure or purity of the counter filling. Chambers which were constructed from glass, metal, or plastic in a wide variety of shapes and sizes were evaluated for the accuracy and the precision of the radon counting. The principles affecting the alpha-scintillation radon counting chamber design and an analytic system suitable for a large scale study of the 222Rn and 226Ra content of either air or other environmental samples are described. Particular note is taken of those factors which affect the accuracy and the precision of the method for monitoring radioactivity around uranium mines

  12. Rossi Alpha Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rossi Alpha Method has proved to be valuable for the determination of prompt neutron lifetimes in fissile assemblies having known reproduction numbers at or near delayed critical. This workshop report emphasizes the pioneering applications of the method by Dr. John D. Orndoff to fast-neutron critical assemblies at Los Alamos. The value of the method appears to disappear for subcritical systems where the Rossi-α is no longer an α-eigenvalue

  13. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  14. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  15. Alpha-globin loci in homozygous beta-thalassemia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadou, P; Lapoumeroulie, C; Girot, R; Labie, D

    1983-01-01

    Homozygous beta-thalassemia intermediate (TI) differs from thalassemia major (TM) in being less severe clinically. Associated alpha-thalassemia could account for the TI phenotype by reducing the alpha/non-alpha chain imbalance. We have analyzed the alpha loci of 9 TI and 11 TM patients by restriction endonuclease mapping. All the TM and 7 of the TI patients have the normal complement of four alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha). One TI patient has three alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/-alpha), and another TI patient has five alpha genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha alpha). PMID:6305827

  16. Fragmentation of alpha- and beta-alanine molecules by ions at Bragg-peak energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bari, S.; Sobocinski, P.; Postma, J.; Alvarado, F.; Hoekstra, R.; Bernigaud, V.; Manil, B.; Rangama, J.; Huber, B.; Schlathoelter, T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of keV He(+), He(2+), and O(5+) ions with isolated alpha and beta isomers of the amino acid alanine was studied by means of high resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We observed a strong isomer dependence of characteristic fragmentation channels which manifests in

  17. alpha-particle radioactivity from LR 115 by two methods of analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Azkour, K; Adloff, J C; Pape, A

    1999-01-01

    LR115 track detectors were exposed to samples of Moroccan phosphate and phosphogypsum to measure their alpha-particle radioactivity. Then two formalisms were used for the dosimetry: simulation by a Monte Carlo method and determination of concentrations from a numerically integrated track registration equation. The results were compared with those deduced gamma-ray spectrometry.

  18. Mössbauer Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Fultz, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Mössbauer spectrometry gives electronic, magnetic, and structural information from within materials. A Mössbauer spectrum is an intensity of γ-ray absorption versus energy for a specific resonant nucleus such as ^(57)Fe or ^(119)Sn. For one nucleus to emit a γ-ray and a second nucleus to absorb it with efficiency, both nuclei must be embedded in solids, a phenomenon known as the “Mössbauer effect.” Mössbauer spectrometry looks at materials from the “inside out,” where “inside” ...

  19. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of {sup 240}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibbens, G., E-mail: goedele.sibbens@ec.europa.e [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Pomme, S.; Altzitzoglou, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Garcia-Torano, E. [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Janssen, H.; Dersch, R.; Ott, O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Martin Sanchez, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, E-06071 (Spain); Rubio Montero, M.P. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Merida, Badajoz, E-06800 (Spain); Loidl, M. [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, LNE/CEA-LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Coron, N.; Marcillac, P. de [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Semkow, T.M. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Sources of enriched {sup 240}Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of {sup 240}Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from {gamma}-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while {gamma}-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature.

  20. Nuclear track detector characterization for alpha-particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), CR-39™ type, are usually adopted in many applications in which it could be necessary to select tracks according to the incident alpha-particle energy; so several authors have argued that track parameters such as the major/minor axis being the most often reported, can be used to determine the alpha-particle’s energy. However, the use of these parameters only do an univocal result, for example the same axis length can be obtained for different combinations of incident angles and energies. We report on a track analysis performed by a semiautomatic system that classifies tracks according to two parameters, diameter length and mean grey level. This kind of analysis can give information about the track depth, that increases monotonically with the incident energy and angle of the alpha particle. Combining the information on the two parameters it is possible to determine univocally the incident alpha-particle energy values. In order to characterize CR-39 detectors according to the physical track parameters, detectors were irradiated, inside a vacuum chamber, by alpha particles at thirteen energy values, obtained by different mylar layers in front of a 241Am source. After the exposure the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks and then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system, consisting on an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer for image storage. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: diameter and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha-particle energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks, when nuclear track detectors are applied in radon surveys. - Highlights: ► CR-39. ► Geometric and optical parameter. ► α spectrometry. ► Calibration

  1. Unfolding domains of recombinant fusion alpha alpha-tropomyosin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Y; Hitchcock-DeGregori, S.; Mabuchi, K; Lehrer, S S

    1992-01-01

    The thermal unfolding of the coiled-coil alpha-helix of recombinant alpha alpha-tropomyosin from rat striated muscle containing an additional 80-residue peptide of influenza virus NS1 protein at the N-terminus (fusion-tropomyosin) was studied with circular dichroism and fluorescence techniques. Fusion-tropomyosin unfolded in four cooperative transitions: (1) a pretransition starting at 35 degrees C involving the middle of the molecule; (2) a major transition at 46 degrees C involving no more ...

  2. Separation and estimation of 229Th and 233U by alpha and gamma ray spectrometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual estimation of 233U and 229Th in a plancheted source made out of liquid sample were done by using an alpha and γ-ray spectrometric techniques. Estimation of 229Th in the plancheted source was done by γ-ray spectrometry and 233U by alpha spectrometry after subtracting the estimated amount of 229Th. In spite of the same alpha energy of 4.8 MeV, the individual estimation of 233U and 229Th based on present technique is superior to conventional techniques and important in the 232Th-233U fuel reprocessing cycle of AHWR and ADSs. The activity of 229Th was also radiochemically separated from its parent activity of 233U by using an ion exchange resin and the purity was checked by the above mentioned technique. (author)

  3. Bi209 alpha activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study for measuring Bi209 alpha activity is presented. Ilford L4 nuclear emulsion pellicles loaded with bismuth citrate to obtain a load of 100 mg/cm3 of dry emulsion, were prepared. Other pellicles were prepared with the same. Ilford L4 gel to estimate the background radiation. To observe 'fading' effect, pellicles loaded with bismuth were submitted to neutrons of high energy, aiming to record recoil proton tracks. The pellicles were confined in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature lower than -100C. The Bi209 experimental half-life was obtained and compared with the estimated theoretical data. (M.C.K.)

  4. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  5. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  6. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs

  7. Alpha activity measurement with lsc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we showed that the alpha activity in liquid samples can be measured using a liquid scintillation analyzer without alpha/beta discrimination capability. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the performances of the method and to optimize the procedure of the sample preparation. A series of tests was performed to validate the procedure of alpha emitting radionuclides extraction in aqueous samples with Actinide Resin, especially regarding to the contact time required to extract all alpha nuclides. The main conclusions were that a minimum 18 hours stirring time is needed to achieve a percent recovery of the alpha nuclides grater than 90% and that the counting efficiency of alphas measurements with LSC is nearly 100%. (authors)

  8. Robust Estimation of Cronbach's Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Christmann, A.; Van Aelst, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Cronbach’s alpha is a popular method to measure reliability, e.g. in quantifying the reliability of a score to summarize the information of several items in question- naires. The alpha coefficient is known to be non-robust. We study the behavior of this coefficient in different settings to identify situations, which can easily occur in practice, but under which the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient is extremely sensitive to violations of the classical model assumptions. Furthermore,...

  9. Liquid scintillation counting techniques for the determination of some alpha emitting actinides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report is a review of the work on liquid scintillation counting techniques, for the determination of alpha emitting actinides like uranium, plutonium, americium etc; for the last three decades (1970-1999). It covers the progress that has taken place in conventional liquid scintillation counting employing various solvents, scintillators and extractants. There is gradual development in instrumentation from integral counting of alpha emitters to alpha liquid scintillation spectrometry to resolve and identify different alpha emitters. These advancements have led to Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) and Photon Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry (PERALS) techniques for the determination of the alpha emitters in the presence of beta and gamma activity. These techniques allow the determination of actinides at very low levels which has increased their applications to almost all the fields of chemistry; be it biomedical, environmental, geological or process chemistry of nuclear fuels. The development of biphasic technique using various extractants to separate different elements and counting in presence of one another has been made possible. Inorganic scintillators have been recently developed which have the advantage of eliminating effects of quenching and presence of beta/gamma emitting actinides. This review will serve as a reference to those who want to carry out work in the field of determination of actinides using liquid scintillation counting techniques. (author)

  10. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPAR{alpha} potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wei; Wan, Yan-Jian [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Wang, Xianliang [Division of Environmental Pollution and Human Health, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Chun-Xiang [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Xu, Shun-qing, E-mail: shunqing@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We develop a sensitive and high throughput method to screen PPAR{alpha} ligands. {yields} This method is based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. {yields} The sensitivity is increased through sliver enhancement on captured gold nanoparticle probes. {yields} There is a significant correlation between the bioassay and LC-MS for water spiked samples. - Abstract: There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPAR{alpha}. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPAR{alpha} ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPAR{alpha}, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}), were activated by PPAR{alpha} ligands to form ligands-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPAR{alpha} antibody. The PPAR{alpha} responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 {mu}M and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection

  11. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action. Working to delay carbohydrate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, they control postprandial hyperglycaemia and provide unquestioned cardiovascular benefit. Specially suited for a traditional Pakistani carbohydrate-rich diet, AGIs have been termed the 'untapped diamonds' of diabetology. The use of these oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) that target pathophysiology in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, notably to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia will inevitably increase with time. This review describes the history of their development, mechanism of action, basic and clinical pharmacology, and suggests practical, evidence-based guidance for their optimal use. PMID:24864650

  12. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  13. Alpha liquid scintillation counting: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta liquid scintillation counting has been used for about 30 years, and its effectiveness for alpha particles has been known for almost that long; however, the technique has not been widely applied to alpha particle detection because of poor energy resolution, high background, and variable interference from beta and gamma radiation. Beginning with the work of Horrocks in the early 1960s, improvements in energy resolution and background rejection have been made. Further developments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory over the past 10 to 12 years have resulted in improved methods of sample preparation (using liquid-liquid extraction methods to isolate the sample and introduce it into the scintillator) and better instrumentation, including electronic rejection of beta and gamma pulses. Energy resolutions of 200- to 300-keV FWHM and background counts of 0.01 cpm are now routine. Alpha liquid scintillation spectrometry is now suitable for a wide range of applications, from the accurate quantitative determination of relatively large amounts of known nuclides in laboratory-generated samples to the detection and identification of very small, subpicocurie amounts of alpha emitters in environmental-type samples. Suitable nuclide separation procedures, sample preparation methods, and instrument configurations are outlined for a variety of analyses

  14. Insurance - Piper Alpha ''et al''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper opens with some brief information about the Piper Alpha loss, how the loss was handled and its final cost. More importantly, it discusses the effect of the Piper Alpha loss on the world insurance market including the oil insurance captives such as O.I.L Limited. Finally, the insurance market current status and prognosis for the future are considered. (Author)

  15. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  16. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 (211At) and natural bismuth-212 (212Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 (223Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  17. The Lyman alpha reference sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.; Mas-Hesse, J.M.; Adamo, A.; Atek, H.; Cannon, J.M.; Duval, F.; Guaita, L.; Herenz, E.C.; Kunth, D.; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, J.; Orlitová, I.; Otí-Floranes, H.; Sandberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028

  18. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry; Determinacion de plutonio en orina por tecnicas de espectrometria de masas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, H. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Yllera de Ll, A., E-mail: hector.hernandez520@gmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of {sup 239}Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of {sup 239}Pu). (author)

  19. Complementarity of nuclear spectrometry and multi-elements techniques for radio-toxicological analysis. Application to urine and faeces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementarity of nuclear spectrometry and multi-element techniques for radio-toxicological analysis. Application to urine and faeces. The method routinely used to determine a possible contamination by actinides, alpha emitters, is the measurement of the fraction transferred to the excreta (urine and/or faeces). The first step of the procedure commonly used consists in a radiochemical specific separation of each element. In the second step an electroplated source is prepared to allow the measurement of its activity by alpha spectrometry. In order to simplify this procedure, the performance of the analysis of actinides by mass spectrometry is estimated based o two analytical tools, the ICP-MS and the SIMS. The use of the three techniques (α spectrometry, ICP-MS, SIMS) is investigated based on recent results published in the literature or research work carried out in the laboratory. The results reported in this study allow to compare assess the advantages of each technique. (authors)

  20. Characterization of the occupational exposure and air transported particles using the techniques of PIXE {sup 252}Cf PMDS and alpha spectrometry; Caracterizacao da exposicao ocupacional e particulas transportadas pelo ar utilizando as tecnicas de PIXE {sup 252}Cf PDMS e espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Luana Gomes

    2008-07-01

    The risk for human health due to exposure to aerosols depends on the intake pattern, the mass concentration and the speciation of the elements present in airborne particles. In this work PDMS (Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry) was used as complementary technique to the PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission) technique to characterize aerosols samples collected in the environment. The PIXE technique allows the identification of the elements present in the sample and to determine their mass concentrations. The mass spectrometry (PDMS) was used to identify the speciation of these elements present in the samples. The aerosol samples were collected using a six stage cascade impactor in three sites. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) measured indicated that the airborne particulate were in the fine fraction of the aerosols. The theoretical uranium concentration in urine samples using ICRP lung model parameters suggest that the elemental mass concentration in respirable fraction of aerosol and the chemical speciation are important factors to determine the uranium concentration in urine and that the determination of specific solubility parameters for each compound is the most important factor to calculate the uranium concentration in urine. PIXE allows to identify and quantify the elements heavier than Na (Z=11) while PDMS allows to identify the organic and inorganic compounds present in the samples. As these techniques are used as complementary techniques they provide important information about the aerosols characterization. (author)

  1. Alpha Schottky junction energy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc S.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Carroll, James J.; Bayne, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Isotope batteries offer solutions for long-lived low-power sensor requirements. Alpha emitting isotopes have energy per decay 103 times that of beta emitters. Alpha particles are absorbed within 20 μm of most materials reducing shielding mitigation. However, damage to materials from the alphas limits their practical use. A Schottky Barrier Diode (SBD) geometry is considered with an alpha emitting contact-layer on a diamond-like crystal semiconductor region. The radiation tolerance of diamond, the safety of alpha particles, combined with the internal field of the SBD is expected to generate current useful for low-power electronic devices over decades. Device design parameters and calculations of the expected current are described.

  2. Determination of ultratrace amounts of plutonium-239 in bioassay samples for alpha dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential alpha contamination in PHWRs is of concern when working with materials which may contain fuel debris, such as around fueling machines and feeders which are cut open. Traditional screening methods use alpha spectrometry of fecal samples. It is highly desirable to use less invasive methods. Screening of urine samples is well accepted in the industry for a variety of purposes. However, various solubility models and known biological throughputs indicate that it is only practical to measure 239Pu/240Pu in urine and that these must be measured at very low concentrations in order to be a practical screening tool. It is necessary to achieve a detection limit of about 5 uBq in a daily urine output to correspond to a dose of 0.1 mSv/annum. This corresponds to about 2 femtograms (10-15 g) of 239Pu and 0.5 fg 240Pu in daily urine output. If the daily urine output is concentrated to 1 g, then the desired detection limit is 2 fg/g or 2 pg/kg for 239Pu, for example. Although alpha spectrometry would provide information on multiple isotopes of interest, its practical detection limit is about 100 to 300 uBq. The currently available methods for measuring uBq amounts of 239Pu/240Pu (the only alpha emitters in urine suitable for screening measurements) are all mass spectrometry based and vary in the means by which the analyte is presented to the mass spectrometer

  3. HB Les Andelys [alpha83(F4)LEU-->PRO]: a new moderately unstable variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajcman, H; Promé, D; Préhu, C; Déon, C; Riou, J; Bouanga, J C; Papassotiriou, I; Lahary, A; Galactéros, F

    1998-03-01

    Hb Les Andelys [alpha83(F4)Leu-->Pro] is a mildly unstable variant that was found during glycated hemoglobin measurement in a French family. In this hemoglobin molecule the affected site, in the alpha chain, and the amino acid substitution are identical to those of Hb Santa Ana, an unstable beta chain variant. The structural abnormality was demonstrated by protein chemistry methods, involving, in addition to the classical techniques, a selective precipitation of the abnormal hemoglobin by isopropanol and a mass spectrometry analysis of the alphaT-9 peptide following carboxypeptidase digestion. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the mutation was CTG-->CCG at codon 83 of the alpha2 gene. PMID:9576330

  4. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cairns, Warren R. L.; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the 27th annual review published in Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2010 and August 2011 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis1 that should be read in conjunction with other related ASU reviews in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and be...

  5. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Warren R. L. Cairns; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    This is the 28th annual review published in JAAS on the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2011 and August 2012 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis1 that should be read in conjunction with other related ASUs in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and beverages2; advances in atomic spectrometry an...

  6. Alpha and gamma spectrometry applied to the study of U and Th series radioactive disequilibrium in the phosphates from Abrolhos Archipelago (Brazil offshore); Aplicacao dos metodos de espectrometria alfa e gama ao estudo do desequilibrio radioativo das series do U e Th nos fosfatos do Arquipelago de Abrolhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Paulo Sergio Cardoso da; Marques, Leila Soares [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. Astronomico e Geofisico

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents the results of uranium and thorium measurements made in aluminium and iron phosphates that occur in the Abrolhos Archipelago (offshore Brazil) by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The U concentrations were also indirectly determined from the gamma-ray activity of {sup 234} Th, {sup 214} Pb and {sup 214} Bi, while those of Th were obtained from the {sup 228} Ca, {sup 212} Pb, {sup 212} Bi and {sup 208} T1 gamma-ray emitters. In both cases it was assumed that {sup 238} U and {sup 232} Th series are in radioactive secular equilibrium. The comparison between the results obtained by neutron activation and gamma-ray spectrometry show radioactive secular equilibrium in the analysed samples. (author) 12 refs., 5 figs.; e-mail: pscarsil e leila at iag.usp.br

  7. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  8. Synthesis of a precursor for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from 11 beta-hydroxytestosterone, the synthesis of a strategic precursor, C-9 (11) unsaturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide (9a), for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide has been achieved. The authors optimized the reaction conditions for catalytic reduction employing hydrogen and subsequent base hydrolysis followed by purification on Amberlite XAD-2 resin to obtain the saturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide

  9. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ with Radiative Hadronic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkays, A Jr; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schiecks, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2008-01-01

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z0 boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling alpha S is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of alpha S is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of alpha S as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z0 decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives alpha S (Mz)=0.1182 pm 0.0015(stat.) pm 0.0101(syst.).

  10. What Powers Lyman alpha Blobs?

    OpenAIRE

    Ao, Y.; Matsuda, Y; Beelen, A.; Henkel, C.; Cen, R.; De Breuck, C.; Francis, P; Kovacs, A.; Lagache, G.; Lehnert, M.; Mao, M; Menten, K. M.; Norris, R; Omont, A.; Tatemastu, K.

    2015-01-01

    Lyman alpha blobs (LABs) are spatially extended lyman alpha nebulae seen at high redshift. The origin of Lyman alpha emission in the LABs is still unclear and under debate. To study their heating mechanism(s), we present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the 20 cm radio emission and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) emission towards the four LABs in the protocluster J2143-4423 at z=2.38. Among the four LABs, B6 and B7 are detected in the rad...

  11. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan Shahrian; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-01-01

    Existing color sampling based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from pairs of foreground (F) and background (B) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected (F,B) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measur...

  12. Determination of Pu and total alpha activity in spent TBP/kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of the activity of total Pu and total a in the spent TBP/kerosene is essential to the research on spent TBP/kerosene treatment and disposal of industrialization. Accordingly, a reliable procedure for determining of the activities of total Pu and alpha in spent TBP/kerosene was developed. It is well known that the large area grid ionization chamber alpha spectrometry is a suitable technique to determine the trace-level alpha emitters such as 238U, 237Np, 239+240Pu, 238Pu and 241Am present in samples. However, the spent TBP/kerosene sample cannot be prepared for the source because of the diffusion when it is heated. So the digestion of the spent TBP/ kerosene is needed in this work. Before the digestion, the kerosene in the sample was distilled out for pre-concentration because of the low-level alpha-emitters, which also conduce to the digestion of the sample. After the distillation, the residual TBP was digested with HNO3 and HClO4. For the determination of the total Pu, ion-exchange chromatography was used for chemical separation of Pu, and then the large area grid ionization chamber alpha spectrometry was used for the measurement. The RSD of the Pu measurement was less than 2%. Two recovery experiments were undergone for the test of effect of the ion-exchange separation, and the results of recovery rate was 97.9% and 102%. The spent TBP/kerosene sample was digested with HNO3. After the digestion, the source was prepared for the total alpha-activity measurement. The result of this measurement was not satisfied because the sample cannot be digested entirely with HNO3, some alpha particles were shielded for detection because of self-absorption. However the alpha particle spectrum taken indicated that the percentages of the activities of alpha-emitters were similar in every measurement because of the similar shielding. So the total activities of alpha-emitters were corrected by a factor, which was the ratio of the accurate 239+240Pu activity measured

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  15. Dynamic fibrils in Ly alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, J; Vourlidas, A

    2008-01-01

    The solar chromosphere and transition region are highly structured regimes of large complexity. A recent breakthrough concerns the identification of dynamic fibrils seen in Halpha. An aim is to find out whether dynamic fibrils are also observable in Ly alpha. We use a brief sequence of four high-resolution Ly alpha filtergrams of the solar limb taken by the Very high Angular resolution ULtraviolet Telescope (VAULT) to identify 50 dynamic fibrils, measure their top trajectories, and fit these with parabolas. Most fibril tops move supersonically. Their decelerations vary from sub- to superballistic. About half show outward acceleration, which may be an artifact from the poor sampling. The similarity between these dynamic fibrils observed in Ly alpha and the ones observed in Halpha suggests that the magnetoacoustic shock excitation proposed for the Halpha dynamic fibrils is also valid for the Ly alpha ones.

  16. Almost Redundant Components in the 3 alpha Faddeev Equation for the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M

    2004-01-01

    The 3 alpha orthogonality condition model using the Pauli-forbidden bound states of the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha potential can yield a compact 3 alpha ground state with a large binding energy, in which a small admixture of the redundant components can never be eliminated.

  17. Alpha thalassaemia in British people.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, D R; Ayyub, H.; Clegg, J B; Hill, A V; Nicholls, R D; Teal, H; Wainscoat, J.S. (James S.); Weatherall, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although alpha thalassaemia is rare in north Europeans, it has been identified in British people with no known foreign ancestry. Twelve such patients were studied, of whom eight shared a distinctive molecular defect, which was clearly different from defects seen in subjects of Mediterranean or South East Asian origin. A rare but specific form of alpha thalassaemia is therefore present in the British population. In addition, two patients from families of mixed racial origin were encountered wh...

  18. Alpha Particle Emission in Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon after it was discovered that alpha particles are occasionally emitted in fission, it was concluded, on the basis of the energy and angular distributions of these particles, that they are emitted from the space between the fragments at times close to that of the snapping of the neck that connects them. It is shown that, independent of any (still unknown) dynamic features of the alpha-particle ejection process, the energy required to emit alpha particles from between the fragments at the indicated time is barely available. Presumably the rareness of alpha particles in fission, and the apparent absence of still heavier ''third'' particles, is associated with the marginal energy supply at the time of actual fragment division. The fact that the total kinetic energy release in so-called ternary fission is roughly equal to that in normal binary fission instead of being about 20 MeV larger is shown to imply that the mean fragment separation at the division time is larger in ternary fission. This is interpreted to indicate that alpha particles are emitted with greatest probability n those fissions where ample energy happens to be provided through the stretching of an abnormally long neck between the fragments before they actually divide. It is suggested that the release of the alpha particles is a sudden rather than adiabatic process. (author)

  19. Alpha particle physics for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of a variety of physical processes which, in the ITER EDA configuration, determine the nature of alpha particle heating in the plasma interior and alpha particle losses to the first wall. The paper consists of results from the alpha particle toroidal field (TF) ripple loss calculations and an analysis of alpha particle collective effects including Alfven modes, sawtooth stabilization, etc. It is shown that the ripple loss in the present ITER configuration is only a few per cent, which cannot directly affect the achievement of ignition. In spite of the up-down asymmetry, the loss fraction does not strongly depend on the toroidal drift direction. However, the heat load is highly localized and can be as high as 1 MW/m2 on the top of the protective limiters. Preliminary calculations of toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) stability indicate that high n numbers may be unstable, but the computational tools, needed for reliable quantitative predictions, are still in a state of development. The likelihood of appreciable alpha particle loss will depend on whether TAE modes produce stochastic alpha particle diffusion or not. The effect of fast particles on the m = 1 mode is also discussed. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  20. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes some aspects of Negative Chemical Ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The reasons for the growing interest in NCI are: (i) to extend the basic knowledge of negative ions and their reactions in the gas phase; (ii) to investigate whether or not this knowledge of negative ions can be used successfully to elucidate the structure of molecules by mass spectrometry. (Auth.)

  1. Prospects in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bolshakov, A A; Nemets, V M

    2006-01-01

    Tendencies in five main branches of atomic spectrometry (absorption, emission, mass, fluorescence and ionization spectrometry) are considered. The first three techniques are the most widespread and universal, with the best sensitivity attributed to atomic mass spectrometry. In the direct elemental analysis of solid samples, the leading roles are now conquered by laser-induced breakdown and laser ablation mass spectrometry, and the related techniques with transfer of the laser ablation products into inductively-coupled plasma. Advances in design of diode lasers and optical parametric oscillators promote developments in fluorescence and ionization spectrometry and also in absorption techniques where uses of optical cavities for increased effective absorption pathlength are expected to expand. Prospects for analytical instrumentation are seen in higher productivity, portability, miniaturization, incorporation of advanced software, automated sample preparation and transition to the multifunctional modular archite...

  2. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  3. Systematics of Alpha-Radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlman, I.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1949-09-12

    Correlations of alpha-decay energies in terms of mass number and atomic number have been made for all of the alpha-emitting species now numbering over 100. For each element isotopes show increase in alpha-energy with decrease in mass number except in the region of 126 neutrons where there is an explainable reversal. This reversal has the effect of creating a region of relatively low alpha-energy and long half-life at low mass numbers for such elements as astatine, emanation, francium, and possibly higher elements as had been noted already for bismuth and polonium. Methods and examples of using alpha-decay data to define the energy surface in the heavy element region are discussed. The regularities in alpha-decay are used for predictions of nuclear properties including prediction of the beta-stable nuclides among the heavy elements. The half-life vs. energy correlations show that the even-even nuclides conform well with existing alpha-decay theory, but all nuclear types with odd nucleons show prohibited decay. The reason for this prohibition is not found in spin changes in the alpha-emission but in the assembly of the components of the alpha particle, and this theory is discussed further in terms of observations made on nuclides having two or more alpha-groups. Using most of the even-even nuclei to define 'normal nuclear radius' calculations are now able to show the shrinkage in the regions of lead and of 126 neutrons to amount to about 10%. The much greater change in 'effective radius' for bismuth isotopes can be dissociated into the effects of odd nucleons superimposed on the actual decrease in nuclear radius. The simple expression r = 1.48 A{sup 1/3} {center_dot} 10{sup -13} cm seems to fit the data for the even-even nuclei outside of the region of 126 neutrons better than more complex functions.

  4. Biotemplated synthesis of metallic nanoparticle chains on an alpha-synuclein fiber scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, R; Hulleman, J; Padalkar, S; Rochet, J C; Stanciu, L A

    2008-02-01

    Biomolecular templates provide an excellent potential tool for bottom-up device fabrication. Self-assembling alpha-synuclein protein fibrils, the formation of which has been linked to Parkinson's disease, have yet to be explored for potential device fabrication. In this paper, alpha-synuclein fibrils were used as a template for palladium (Pd), gold (Au) and copper (Cu) nanoparticle chains synthesis. Deposition over a range of conditions resulted in metal-coated fibers with reproducible average diameters between 50 and 200 nm. Active elemental palladium deposited on the protein fibrils is used as a catalyst for the electroless deposition of Au and Cu. Nanoparticle chains were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS), and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). PMID:18464436

  5. $\\alpha $ -Skew $\\pi $ -McCoy Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Areej M. Abduldaim; Chen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    As a generalization of $\\alpha $ -skew McCoy rings, we introduce the concept of $\\alpha $ -skew $\\pi $ -McCoy rings, and we study the relationships with another two new generalizations, $\\alpha $ -skew ${\\pi }_{1}$ -McCoy rings and $\\alpha $ -skew ${\\pi }_{2}$ -McCoy rings, observing the relations with $\\alpha $ -skew McCoy rings, $\\pi $ -McCoy rings, $\\alpha $ -skew Armendariz rings, $\\pi $ -regular rings, and other kinds of rings. Also, we investigate conditions such that $\\alpha $ -skew ${...

  6. Single event mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  7. Acidity-controlled selective oxidation of alpha-pinene, isolated from Indonesian pine's turpentine oils (pinus merkusii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masruri; Farid Rahman, Mohamad; Nurkam Ramadhan, Bagus

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-pinene was isolated in high purity from turpentine oil harvested from Pinus merkusii plantation. The recent investigation on selective oxidation of alpha-pinene using potassium permanganate was undertaken under acidic conditions. The result taught the selective oxidation of alpha-pinene in acidic using potassium permanganate lead to the formation of 2-(3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutyl)acetaldehyde or pinon aldehyde. The study method applied reaction in various different buffer conditions i.e. pH 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively, and each reaction product was monitored using TLC every hour. Product determination was undertaken on spectrometry basis such as infrared, ultra violet-visible, gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  8. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  9. Investigation of advanced materials for fusion alpha particle diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonheure, G., E-mail: g.bonheure@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Van Wassenhove, G. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Strivay, D. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Vermaercke, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Delvigne, T. [DSI SPRL, 3 rue Mont d’Orcq, Froyennes B-7503 (Belgium); Chene, G.; Delhalle, R. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.; Neubauer, O. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We examine the feasibility of alpha particle measurements in ITER. ► We test advanced material detectors borrowed from the GERDA neutrino experiment. ► We compare experimental results on TEXTOR tokamak with our detector response model. ► We investigate the detector response in ITER full power D–T plasmas. ► Advanced materials show good signal to noise ratio and alpha particle selectivity. -- Abstract: Fusion alpha particle diagnostics for ITER remain a challenging task. Standard escaping alpha particle detectors in present tokamaks are not applicable to ITER and techniques suitable for fusion reactor conditions need further research and development [1,2]. The activation technique is widely used for the characterization of high fluence rates inside neutron reactors. Tokamak applications of the neutron activation technique are already well developed [3] whereas measuring escaping ions using this technique is a novel fusion plasma diagnostic development. Despite low alpha particle fluence levels in present tokamaks, promising results using activation technique combined with ultra-low level gamma-ray spectrometry [4] were achieved before in JET [5,6]. In this research work, we use new advanced detector materials. The material properties beneficial for alpha induced activation are (i) moderate neutron cross-sections (ii) ultra-high purity which reduces neutron-induced background activation and (iii) isotopic tailoring which increases the activation yield of the measured activation product. Two samples were obtained from GERDA[7], an experiment aimed at measuring the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. These samples, made of highly pure (9 N) germanium highly enriched to 87% in isotope Ge-76, were irradiated in real D–D fusion plasma conditions inside the TEXTOR tokamak. Comparison of the calculated and the experimentally measured activity shows good agreement. Compared to previously investigated high temperature ceramic material [8

  10. Gaseous alpha emitter diffusion studies using alpha track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a very accurate and sensitive analysis method such as alpha track method, the SSNTD group was able to undertake studies on the atomic and molecular processes taking place at low speed and/or very low concentrations, such as diffusion of gaseous alpha radionuclides in gaseous media. For practical application reasons, we began to study the diffusion in air for gaseous alpha radionuclides and aerosols carrying solid alpha radionuclides. The used alpha radionuclides were: Rn-222, as gaseous radionuclide and its solid descendants genetically related, attached to different particles from air, as radioactive aerosols. The source was included into an air tight device with a very well known volume. After 40 days, the radioactive equilibrium was established for all descendants, so that in the device there were the Rn-222 and its descendants, each of them having the same activity. The relative amount/activity ratio of each decay product, at any duration, for any initial mass of Ra-226 parent radionuclide, were calculated using the code UURASE, based on the Bateman general equations, for computing the U-238 radioactive series gamma accumulation. This was adapted for alpha accumulation as ALFAURASE programme. The device which contains the Ra-226 source can be coupled to the calibration system or to the diffusion system, without destroying the radioactive equilibrium. At this coupling, only the radioactive concentration is changed due to the variation of the volume. First of all the device was used for calibrating the CR-39 track detectors for both Rn-222 gaseous radionuclide and aerosol concentration measurements using, in the coupled calibration system, a special 'detector-container' equipped/or not with a filter used for radioactive aerosol stopping. The track detectors CR-39 were etched in NaOH 30%, for 7 hours at 70 deg. C and their studies were performed by optical microscopy using a stereo-microscope Wild M7S and a binocular Zeiss Jena microscope. (authors)

  11. Contribution to the study of the alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new variable energy cyclotron at Berkeley that can accelerate an alpha beam up to an energy of 130 MeV and the mass production of lithium diffused junctions have enabled us to perform 2 series of measurement, in the first one we use alpha beams with an energy ranging between 50 and 120 MeV to study alpha-alpha forces in the second one we use the flexibility of the variable energy cyclotron the resonances around 40 MeV, region that can not yet be reached by tandem accelerators. This work is divided into 6 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to the formalism of partial wave analysis and the theory of the compound nucleus. In the second chapter the author presents the 88 cyclotron at Berkeley and the diffusion chamber, the alpha detectors are lithium diffused junctions made of silicon. The third chapter deals with the experimental methods used and the issue of the reduction of the volume of data. In the fourth chapter the results obtained in the upper part of the energy range are described in terms of complex shifts that allow the description of the α-α interaction at high energy. The very low impact parameter has enabled us to find 2 new components (l=6 and l=8) of the rotational spectrum and to define a more accurate phenomenological potential. The fifth chapter is dedicated to the narrow resonances we have found between 12 and 27 MeV. We present in the last chapter a calculation of the binding energy of C12 in which we have considered the 12C nucleus as formed by 3 alpha particles interacting with each other through the phenomenological potential defined above

  12. Neptunium determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of neptunium-237 (237Np) traditionally has been performed by alpha spectrometry or neutron activation analysis. These methods are labor intensive and require several days for completion. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a possible alternative for 237Np determinations. This paper describes the analytical method developed for samples that have significant levels of uranium present. The lower reporting limits achievable by ICP-MS are competitive with the counting methods, but the real advantage for this laboratory lies in the lower cost and faster turnaround time provided by ICP-MS. (author)

  13. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  14. Determination of the brominated flame retardant, hexabroomcyclodocane in sediments and biota by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, S.; Bersuder, P.; Allchin, C.R.; Zegers, B.; Boon, J.P.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Boer, de J.

    2006-01-01

    A method involving reversed-phase, liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for separation, detection and quantitation of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-diastereoisomers of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). To address the lack of environmental da

  15. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  16. ALPHA: antihydrogen and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Niels

    2014-02-01

    Detailed comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen promise to be a fruitful test bed of fundamental symmetries such as the CPT theorem for quantum field theory or studies of gravitational influence on antimatter. With a string of recent successes, starting with the first trapped antihydrogen and recently resulting in the first measurement of a quantum transition in anti-hydrogen, the ALPHA collaboration is well on its way to perform such precision comparisons. We will discuss the key innovative steps that have made these results possible and in particular focus on the detailed work on positron and antiproton preparation to achieve antihydrogen cold enough to trap as well as the unique features of the ALPHA apparatus that has allowed the first quantum transitions in anti-hydrogen to be measured with only a single trapped antihydrogen atom per experiment. We will also look at how ALPHA plans to step from here towards more precise comparisons of matter and antimatter.

  17. Conditioning of alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha bearing wastes are generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel, mixed oxide fuel fabrication, decommissioning and other activities. The safe and effective management of these wastes is of particular importance owing to the radiotoxicity and long lived characteristics of certain transuranic (TRU) elements. The management of alpha bearing wastes involves a number of stages which include collection, characterization, segregation, treatment, conditioning, transport, storage and disposal. This report describes the currently available matrices and technologies for the conditioning of alpha wastes and relates them to their compatibility with the other stages of the waste management process. The selection of a specific immobilization process is dependent on the waste treatment state and the subsequent handling, transport, storage and disposal requirements. The overall objectives of immobilization are similar for all waste producers and processors, which are to produce: (a) Waste forms with sufficient mechanical, physical and chemical stability to satisfy all stages of handling, transport and storage (referred to as the short term requirements), and (b) Waste forms which will satisfy disposal requirements and inhibit the release of radionuclides to the biosphere (referred to as the long term requirements). Cement and bitumen processes have already been successfully applied to alpha waste conditioning on the industrial scale in many of the IAEA Member States. Cement systems based on BFS and pozzolanic cements have emerged as the principal encapsulation matrices for the full range of alpha bearing wastes. Alternative technologies, such as polymers and ceramics, are being developed for specific waste streams but are unlikely to meet widespread application owing to cost and process complexity. The merits of alpha waste conditioning are improved performance in transport, storage and disposal combined with enhanced public perception of waste management operations. These

  18. Alpha decay of At-194

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, Andrei; Antalic, S; Ackermann, D.; Bianco, L.; Franchoo, S.; S. Heinz; F. P. Hessberger; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, Marc; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Nishio, K; R.D.Page

    2009-01-01

    Detailed alpha-decay studies of the neutron-deficient isotope At-194 have been performed in the complete fusion reaction Fe-56+Pr-141 -> At-194+3n at the velocity filter SHIP. Two alpha-decaying isomeric states with half-lives of T-1/2(At-194(m1))=310(8) ms and T-1/2(At-194(m2))=253(10) ms were identified in this nucleus. Their complex decays to the states in the daughter nucleus Bi-190 are discussed in the article. We propose that similar to the case of the neighboring At-191,At-192,At-193,A...

  19. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.;

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  20. Functional genomics by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2000-01-01

    function, mass spectrometry is the method of choice. Mass spectrometry can now identify proteins with very high sensitivity and medium to high throughput. New instrumentation for the analysis of the proteome has been developed including a MALDI hybrid quadrupole time of flight instrument which combines...... advantages of the mass finger printing and peptide sequencing methods for protein identification. New approaches include the isotopic labeling of proteins to obtain accurate quantitative data by mass spectrometry, methods to analyze peptides derived from crude protein mixtures and approaches to analyze large...... numbers of intact proteins by mass spectrometry directly. Examples from this laboratory illustrate biological problem solving by modern mass spectrometric techniques. These include the analysis of the structure and function of the nucleolus and the analysis of signaling complexes....

  1. Influence of the repulsive coefficient {alpha} and approximate corresponding states in Mie {alpha}-6 and exponential {alpha}-6 fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galliero, Guillaume [Universite de Marne-la-Vallee, Laboratoire d' Etude des Transferts d' Energie et de Matiere (EA 2546), Bat. Lavoisier, Cite Descartes, Champs-sur-Marne, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: galliero@univ-mlv.fr; Boned, Christian; Baylaucq, Antoine [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes (UMR-5150), BP 1155, F-64013 Pau Cedex (France); Montel, Francois [TOTAL, CSTJF, Avenue Larribau, F-64018 Pau (France)

    2007-03-30

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of the Mie {alpha}-6 and the exponential {alpha}-6 (exp {alpha}-6) fluids have been carried out for 42 thermodynamic states. Various repulsive coefficients have been studied, {alpha} ranging from 9 to 14 for the Mie {alpha}-6 potentials and from 11 to 16 for the exp {alpha}-6 ones, which corresponds to a total of 603 points of simulation of stable phases. The simulations have shown that, for a given set of reduced temperature and density (using an appropriate scaling procedure), the reduced pressure varies linearly with {radical}({alpha}-6) for the Mie {alpha}-6 potentials and with {radical}({alpha}-7) for the exp {alpha}-6 potentials. Concerning the viscosity, it is shown that, for both potential families, the variation is linear with {alpha}. Thus, an approximate corresponding states scheme exists on pressure and on viscosity for fluids modelled by both potentials families, but only for each property separately. In addition, it appears that, approximate corresponding states exist between fluids modelled by a Mie {alpha}-6 potential and an exp ({alpha} + 2)-6 one for pressure, and between fluids modelled by a Mie {alpha}-6 potential and an exp ({alpha} + 2.5)-6 one for viscosity. So, despite obvious similarities, the influence of the shape of the potential on pressure and on viscosity is not strictly the same. Hence, a complete perfect corresponding states scheme (including both the pressure and the viscosity) seems hardly feasible between fluids modelled by the Mie {alpha}-6 and the exp {alpha}-6 potential families.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    radionuclides of interest from the water sample. The new instrument permits extremely sensitive counting of alpha-emitters in water, and it also provides high-resolution alpha spectrometry so that individual radionuclides can be identified and assayed simultaneously, based on their different alpha energies. The specialized film captures a broad (or narrow by choice of film) range of alpha-emitting radionuclide ions dissolved in the liquid. The radionuclides are captured on or near the film's surface, forming a very thin source for high resolution spectrometry

  3. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  4. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  5. Methods for Neutron Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1961-01-09

    The appropriate theories and the general philosophy of methods of measurement and treatment of data neutron spectrometry are discussed. Methods of analysis of results for liquids using the Van Hove formulation, and for crystals using the Born-von Karman theory, are reviewed. The most useful of the available methods of measurement are considered to be the crystal spectrometer methods and the pulsed monoenergetic beam/time-of-flight method. Pulsed-beam spectrometers have the advantage of higher counting rates than crystal spectrometers, especially in view of the fact that simultaneous measurements in several counters at different angles of scattering are possible in pulsed-beam spectrometers. The crystal spectrometer permits several valuable new types of specialized experiments to be performed, especially energy distribution measurements at constant momentum transfer. The Chalk River triple-axis crystal-spectrometer is discussed, with reference to its use in making the specialized experiments. The Chalk River rotating crystal (pulsed-beam) spectrometer is described, and a comparison of this type instrument with other pulsed-beam spectrometers is made. A partial outline of the theory of operation of rotating-crystal spectrometers is presented. The use of quartz-crystal filters for fast neutron elimination and for order elimination is discussed. (auth)

  6. Alpha emitters in nuclear waste. Extension of the procedure for low and medium level activity waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes a separative method for the determination of U, Pu, Am, Np, Th and Cm as alpha emitters and 3H, Sr, and Ni as beta emitters, when present in aqueous samples of nuclear waste, by using chromatographic separations, liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry. The main separation is performed in one step by coprecipitation of the alpha emitters with yttrium hydroxide at pH = 9-10 after distillation of tritium until dryness and dissolution of the residue in 2M HCI. Actinides are precipitated while strontium and nickel remain in supernatant. Nickel is separated by precipitation with dimetyglioxime in the supernatant and measured by LSC. Strontium is separated by chromatography after conditioning the supernatant (which also contained nickel) and measured by LSC. The actinides fraction is re dissolved in nitric acid and percolated through three chromatographic columns (TEVA, U-TEVA and TRU-SPEC) conditioning the different fractions for measuring by alpha spectrometry. The spectra of the different fractions are presented together with the detection limits and the recoveries obtained on spiked samples. (author)

  7. Assessment of Base Line Concentrations for Trace Elements and Total Alpha, Beta Gross for Some Herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five marked brands of drinking herbs, commonly consumed by Egyptian population were collected from local market. Concentration of essential and toxic elements have been measured by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Also, the total alpha and beta gross activities in all samples were measured using ultra low level liquid scintillation counting system (LSC). Cinnamon was found to contain relatively high amounts of essential as well as toxic elements but the measurement using LSC revealed no detection for both alpha and beta gross activity. The annual effective doses for different herbs were also calculated referring to the dose conversion factor (dose per unit intake) for both alpha and beta gross activity when dealing with naturally occurring radionuclides. The study also shows that these herbs are additional source of trace heavy elements intake

  8. Uptake of plutonium on a novel thin film for use in spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion-exchange polymer thin films (∼150 nm) were coated onto silicon substrates and utilized for rapid concentration and radioanalytical analyses of actinide complexes (PuCl62-, Pu(NO3)62-). Batch uptake studies were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting, and alpha spectroscopy. The thin film yielded rapid Pu uptake kinetics and an equilibrium constant (Kd) of approximately 9060 L kg-1. The anion-exchange capacity of the films was determined to be 1.3 x 10-4 ± 1.1 x 10-5 eq g-1 using 36Cl uptake studies. Results indicated that the polymer films have great potential for utilization as a substrate for thermal ionization mass spectrometry and alpha spectroscopy. (author)

  9. Laser-induced electron capture mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang; Giese

    2000-02-15

    Two techniques are reported for detection of electrophorederivatized compounds by laser-induced electron capture time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-EC-TOF-MS). In both cases, a nitrogen laser is used to induce the electron capture. The analyte is deposited in a matrix consisting of a compound with a low ionization potential such as benzo[ghi]perylene in the first technique, where the electron for electron capture apparently comes from this matrix. In the second technique, the analyte is deposited on a silver surface in the absence of matrix. It seems that "monoenergetic" ions instantly desorb from the target surface in the latter case, since the peak width in the continuous extraction mode essentially matches the pulse width of the laser (4 ns). Ten picomoles of 3-O-(pentafluorobenzyl)-alpha-estradiol were detected at a S/N > or = 50, where the spot size of the laser was approximately 0.25% of the sample spot. It is attractive that simple conditions can enable sensitive detection of electrophores on routine TOF-MS equipment. The technique can be anticipated to broaden the range of analytes in both polarity and size that can be detected by EC-MS relative to the range for GC/EC-MS. PMID:10701262

  10. What Powers Lyman alpha Blobs?

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Y; Beelen, A; Henkel, C; Cen, R; De Breuck, C; Francis, P; Kovacs, A; Lagache, G; Lehnert, M; Mao, M; Menten, K M; Norris, R; Omont, A; Tatemastu, K; Weiss, A; Zheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    Lyman alpha blobs (LABs) are spatially extended lyman alpha nebulae seen at high redshift. The origin of Lyman alpha emission in the LABs is still unclear and under debate. To study their heating mechanism(s), we present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the 20 cm radio emission and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) emission towards the four LABs in the protocluster J2143-4423 at z=2.38. Among the four LABs, B6 and B7 are detected in the radio with fluxes of 67+/-17 microJy and 77+/-16 microJy, respectively, and B5 is marginally detected at 3 sigma (51+/-16 microJy). For all detected sources, their radio positions are consistent with the central positions of the LABs. B6 and B7 are obviously also detected in the FIR. By fitting the data with different templates, we obtained redshifts of 2.20$^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ for B6 and 2.20$^{+0.45}_{-0.30}$ for B7 which are consistent with the redshift of the lyman alpha emission within uncertainties, indicating that both ...

  11. Alcoholism, Alpha Production, and Biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frances W.; Holmes, David S.

    1976-01-01

    Electroencephalograms of 20 alcoholics and 20 nonalcoholics were obtained. Data indicated that alcoholics produced less alpha than nonalcoholics. In one training condition subjects were given accurate biofeedback, whereas in the other condition subjects were given random (noncontingent) feedback. Accurate biofeedback did not result in greater…

  12. Alpha Testing Escape from Diab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha testing was conducted of sessions 2 and 3 from Diab to assess whether the activities worked as expected, and whether children in the target ages enjoyed it. Data include both RA observations of child performance while playing the games and cognitive interview responses from the players after t...

  13. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  14. Decreased levels of genuine large free hCG alpha in men presenting with abnormal semen analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plas Eugen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and its free subunits (hCG alpha, hCG beta are produced in the male reproductive tract and found in high concentrations in seminal fluid, in particular hCG alpha. This study aimed to elucidate changes in peptide hormone profiles in patients showing abnormal semen analyses and to determine the genuineness of the highly abundant hCG alpha. Methods Seminal plasma was obtained from 45 male patients undergoing semen analysis during infertility workups. Comprehensive peptide hormone profiles were established by a panel of immunofluorometric assays for hCG, hCG alpha, hCG beta and its metabolite hCG beta core fragment, placental lactogen, growth hormone and prolactin in seminal plasma of patients with abnormal semen analysis results (n = 29 versus normozoospermic men (n = 16. The molecular identity of large hyperglycosylated hCG alpha was analyzed by mass-spectrometry and selective deglycosylation. Results hCG alpha levels were found to be significantly lower in men with impaired semen quality (1346 +/- 191 vs. 2753 +/- 533 ng/ml, P = 0.022. Moreover, patients with reduced sperm count had reduced intact hCG levels compared with normozoospermic men (0.097 +/- 0.022 vs. 0.203 +/- 0.040 ng/ml, P = 0.028. Using mass-spectrometry, the biochemical identity of hCG alpha purified from seminal plasma was verified. Under non-reducing conditions in SDS-PAGE, hCG alpha isolated from seminal plasma migrated in a manner comparable with large free hCG alpha with an apparent molecular mass (Mr, app of 24 kDa, while hCG alpha dissociated from pregnancy-derived holo-hCG migrated at approximately 22 kDa. After deglycosylation with PNGase F under denaturing conditions, all hCG alpha variants showed an Mr, app of 15 kDa, indicating identical amino acid backbones. Conclusions The findings indicate a pathophysiological relevance of hCG, particularly its free alpha subunit, in spermatogenesis. The

  15. Selection and generation of waveforms for differential mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devices based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) are used in a number of ways, including applications as ion prefilters for API-MS systems, as detectors or selectors in hybrid instruments (GC-DMS, DMS-IMS), and in standalone systems for chemical detection and identification. DMS ion separation is based on the relative difference between high field and low field ion mobility known as the alpha dependence, and requires the application of an intense asymmetric electric field known as the DMS separation field, typically in the megahertz frequency range. DMS performance depends on the waveform and on the magnitude of this separation field. In this paper, we analyze the relationship between separation waveform and DMS resolution and consider feasible separation field generators. We examine ideal and practical DMS separation field waveforms and discuss separation field generator circuit types and their implementations. To facilitate optimization of the generator designs, we present a set of relations that connect ion alpha dependence to DMS separation fields. Using these relationships we evaluate the DMS separation power of common generator types as a function of their waveform parameters. Optimal waveforms for the major types of DMS separation generators are determined for ions with various alpha dependences. These calculations are validated by comparison with experimental data.

  16. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency usually is diagnosed after you develop a ... related to the condition. Your doctor may suspect AAT deficiency if you have signs or symptoms of ...

  17. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  18. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  19. Calibration of sources for alpha spectroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the calibration methodology for measuring the total alpha activity of plane and thin sources with the Alpha Spectrometer for Silicon Detector in the Nuclear Measures and Dosimetry laboratory at IEAv/CTA. (author)

  20. Monitor for alpha beta contamination of hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following specifications of hands alpha beta contamination monitor are presented: the position of the hands, the detection and separation of alpha and beta, the information processing, the programming, the results presentation and general characteristics. (A.L.B.)

  1. \\alpha $ $^m $ Continuous Maps in Topological Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Milby; Parimelazhagan, R.; S Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the present paper is to introduce new classes of functions called $ \\alpha $ $^m $ continuous maps and $ \\alpha $ $^m $ irresolute maps. We obtain some characterizations of these classes and properties are studied.

  2. Measurement of 226Ra in soil from oil field: Advantages of γ-ray spectrometry and application to the IAEA-448 CRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical performance of gamma-ray spectrometry for the measurement of 226Ra in TENORM (Technically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) soil was investigated by the IAEA. Fast results were obtained for characterization and certification of a new TENORM Certified Reference Material (CRM), identified as IAEA-448 (soil from oil field). The combined standard uncertainty of the gamma-ray spectrometry results is of the order of 2–3% for massic activity measurement values ranging from 16500 Bq kg−1 to 21500 Bq kg−1. Methodologies used for the production and certification of the IAEA-448 CRM are presented. Analytical results were confirmed by alpha spectrometry. The “t” test showed agreement between alpha and gamma results at 95% confidence level. - Highlights: • Accurate and fast determination of 226Ra in TENORM soil by gamma-ray spectrometry. • Production of a new Certified Reference Material, IAEA-448, soil from oil field. • Characterization campaign by gamma-ray spectrometry for determination of 226Ra. • Assignment of certified property value and associated uncertainty for 226Ra. • Confirmation of 226Ra certified value by alpha spectrometry

  3. The use of secondary ion mass spectrometry for uranium analysis in bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today many researches are performed to use mass spectrometry as complementary methods to the alpha spectrometry. In this study performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are evaluated for traces of uranium analysis in biological tissues and more particularly in urine. A special attention is done for the samples preparation, using thin polymers. the SIMS method feasibility is presented. The second part of the thesis deals with the use of a tracer to quantify the urinary uranium, the 233U. The isotopic ratio are obtained with a detection limit of 10-6 Bq in 238U per urine litre. Other biological samples are studied to illustrate the adaptability of the SIMS method to internal dosimetry. (A.L.B.)

  4. Burn-up determination of irradiated thoria samples by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for two samples from ThO2 bundles irradiated in KAPS-2. This involved quantitative dissolution of the irradiated fuel samples followed by separation and determination of Th, U and a stable fission product burn-up monitor in the dissolved fuel solution. Stable fission product 148Nd was used as a burn-up monitor for determining the number of fissions. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using natural U, 229Th and enriched 142Nd as spikes was employed for the determination of U, Th and Nd, respectively. Atom % fission values of 1.25 ± 0.03 were obtained for both the samples. 232U content in 233U determined by alpha spectrometry was about 500 ppm and this was higher by a factor of 5 compared to the theoretically predicted value by ORIGEN-2 code. (author)

  5. Enzyme replacement therapy for alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Dali, Christine I.; Fogh, J;

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Manifestations include intellectual disabilities, facial characteristics and hearing impairment. A recombinant human alpha-mannosidase (rhLAMAN) has been developed for weekly intrave...... intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We present the preliminary data after 12 months of treatment....

  6. Development of thin foil Faraday collector as a lost alpha particle diagnostic for high yield D-T tokamak fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Cecil, F.E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Alpha particle confinement is necessary for ignition of a D-T tokamak fusion plasma and for first wall protection. Due to high radiation backgrounds and temperatures, scintillators and semiconductor detectors may not be used to study alpha particles which are lost to the first wall during the D-T programs on JET and ITER. An alternative method of charged particle spectrometry capable of operation in these harsh environments, is proposed: it consists of thin foils of electrically isolated conductors with the flux of alpha particles determined by the positive current flowing from the foils. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Determination of U, Fe, V in uranium ore and gross alpha beta through the exploitation, processing and handling of radioactive ore on the portable XRF Si-PIN detector and device of alpha beta MPC-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of some elements such as U, Fe, and V in uranium ore was determined by using Si-PIN detector fluorescence spectrometry. The technical parameters of Si-PIN spectrometry were investigated. The fundamental parameters in QXAS software were used for calculating analytical results. The gross alpha beta from the liquid radioactive liquid was also determined by MPC-2000 instrument based on the dependence of the signal received ability of detector on thickness of analysis samples. The precision and accuracy of quantitative analysis were tested by references material standard and comparative analysis with different analytical methods. (author)

  8. Synthesis of novel 21-trifluoropregnane steroids: inhibitors of 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (17 alpha-lyase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njar, V C; Klus, G T; Johnson, H H; Brodie, A M

    1997-06-01

    Novel 21-trifluoropregnenolone (6), 21-trifluoroprogesterone (7) and related compounds 4a and 8 have been synthesized in high yields from 3 beta-acetoxyandrost-5-ene-17 beta-carbaldehyde (3). The key reaction was the conversion of 3 into the 21-trifluoromethyl-20-alcohol as a diastereomeric mixture (4) by trifluoromethyltrimethylsilane (TMS-CF3) in the presence of tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF). All compounds, including 6 and 7, were unambiguously characterized by IR, 1H and 19F NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), and elemental analysis. On this basis, we concluded that the only report of an earlier synthesis of 6 and 7 is erroneous. Enzyme inhibition studies showed that 20 xi-hydroxy-21-trifluoropregn-4-en-3-one (8) is a potent inhibitor (IC50 value = 0.6 microM) of rat 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase. PMID:9185294

  9. Damped Lyman-Alpha Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Turnshek, D A; Lane, W; Monier, E M; Nestor, D; Bergeron, J; Briggs, F; Smette, A

    2000-01-01

    Some results from an imaging program to identify low-redshift (0.09alpha (DLA) galaxies are presented. The standard paradigm that was widely accepted a decade ago, that DLA galaxies are the progenitors of luminous disk galaxies, is now being seriously challenged. The indisputable conclusion from imaging studies at low redshift is that the morphological types of DLA galaxies are mixed and that they span a range in luminosities and surface brightnesses.

  10. Diabetes and alpha lipoic acid

    OpenAIRE

    IssyLaher

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complicatio...

  11. Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complicatio...

  12. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  13. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  14. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  15. $Gamma(H\\to b\\bar{b})$ to order $\\alpha\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, Luminita; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We compute the decay rate of the Standard Model Higgs boson to bottom quarks to order $\\alpha\\alpha_s$. We apply the optical theorem and calculate the imaginary part of three-loop corrections to the Higgs boson propagator using asymptotic expansions in appropriately chosen mass ratios. The corrections of order $\\alpha\\alpha_s$ are of the same order of magnitude as the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s^3)$ QCD corrections but have the opposite sign.

  16. Alpha voltaic batteries and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor); Wilt, David (Inventor); Scheiman, David (Inventor); Chubb, Donald (Inventor); Castro, Stephanie (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An alpha voltaic battery includes at least one layer of a semiconductor material comprising at least one p/n junction, at least one absorption and conversion layer on the at least one layer of semiconductor layer, and at least one alpha particle emitter. The absorption and conversion layer prevents at least a portion of alpha particles from the alpha particle emitter from damaging the p/n junction in the layer of semiconductor material. The absorption and conversion layer also converts at least a portion of energy from the alpha particles into electron-hole pairs for collection by the one p/n junction in the layer of semiconductor material.

  17. Innovations in Los Alamos alpha box design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destructive examinations of irradiated fuel pins containing plutonium fuel must be performed in shielded hot cells with strict provisions for containing the plutonium. Alpha boxes provide containment for the plutonium, toxic fission products, and other hazardous highly radioactive materials. The alpha box contains windows for viewing and a variety of transfer systems specially designed to allow transfers in and out of the alpha box without spread of the hazardous materials that are contained in the box. Alpha boxes have been in use in the Wing 9 hot cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 20 years. Features of the newly designed alpha boxes are presented

  18. Innovations in Los Alamos alpha box design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Destructive examinations of irradiated fuel pins containing plutonium fuel must be performed in shielded hot cells with strict provisions for containing the plutonium. Alpha boxes provide containment for the plutonium, toxic fission products, and other hazardous highly radioactive materials. The alpha box contains windows for viewing and a variety of transfer systems specially designed to allow transfers in and out of the alpha box without spread of the hazardous materials that are contained in the box. Alpha boxes have been in use in the Wing 9 hot cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 20 years. Features of the newly designed alpha boxes are presented.

  19. Alpha particles detection in nitrocellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the manufacturing of the detection films follows these steps: preparation of the mass which includes nitrocellulose in the form of cotton as raw material ethyl acetate, cellosolve acetate, isopropyl and butyl alcohols as solvents and dioctyl phtalate as plasticiser; dilution of the paste; pouring of the diluted mass; and drying of the detection films. The results obtained experimentally are: The determination of the development times of the different thicknesses of the manufactured films. Response linearity of the detectors, variation of the number of tracks according to the distance of the source to the detector. Sizes of the diameter of the tracks depending of the distance detector-alpha emmission source. As a conclusion we can say the the nitrocellulose detectors are specific for alpha radiation; the more effective thicknesses in uranium prospecting works were those of 60 microns, since for the laboratory works the thicknesses of 30 to 40 microns were the ideal; the development technique of the detection films is simple and cheap and can be realized even in another place than the laboratory; this way of the manufacturing of nitrocellulose detection film sensitive to alpha nuclear radiation is open to future research. (author)

  20. Application of ion-exchange chromatography to eliminate the curium from americium by his determination by the method of liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to eliminate curium in determining of americium by the method of liquid scintillation spectrometry. The paper introduces a method that has been done to eliminate curium from americium by determining of americium with liquid scintillation spectrometry method. In the research we used ion-exchange chromatography and ion-exchange sorbents DOWEX. We also observed the effect of geometry organization of column on the separation course. Resources for alpha spectrometry were prepared by micro-precipitation with neodymium chloride. High radiochemical yields were achieved, but separation did not take place according to a pre-separation scheme. (authors)

  1. A Feasibility Study of a Portable Alpha Particle Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha spectroscopy is widely used for detecting undeclared nuclear facilities, activities, and materials. Due to the heavy equipment required to carry out this technique, its applications is limited. With the goal of quickly and efficiently responding to undeclared nuclear facilities, activities, and materials, the present authors have designed and built a portable α-particle spectrometer. This study was conducted in order to develop a new portable α-particle spectrometer with the purpose of detecting undeclared nuclear facilities, activities, and materials on site quickly and efficiently. All heavy and large components, which are typically required for a laboratory such as a αparticle spectrometry system, were minimized and placed in a small container with a weight of 14 kg and a size of 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm. In the feasibility study, the calculated enrichment values of 235U obtained from the portable α-particle spectrometer were 1.868 % and 3.083 %, similar to the results from a commercial spectrometry system used in laboratories, 2.049 % and 3.253 %. These differences were possibly caused by different channel setups for each system

  2. Gaussian amplifier for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major goals of nuclear spectrometry is the determination of the energy spectrum of a radioactive source. To measure this spectrum with electronic instrumentation one need to use a nuclear spectrometry chain of which the amplifier is part of, and whose filter shaping considerably influences the final energy resolution achieved. The amplifier released accomplishes a 7th order Gaussian filter shape with Taylor series approximation synthesized by the Shifted Companion Form and mounted using only electronic components availablein Brazil. The final version has been tested and the results showed a very good performance and the energy resolution achieved was equivalent to the imported models. (Author)

  3. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  4. The Behaviour of Varying-Alpha Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Magueijo, J

    2002-01-01

    We determine the behaviour of a time-varying fine structure 'constant' $\\alpha (t)$ during the early and late phases of universes dominated by the kinetic energy of changing $\\alpha (t)$, radiation, dust, curvature, and lambda, respectively. We show that after leaving an initial vacuum-dominated phase during which $\\alpha$ increases, $\\alpha$ remains constant in universes like our own during the radiation era, and then increases slowly, proportional to a logarithm of cosmic time, during the dust era. If the universe becomes dominated by negative curvature or a positive cosmological constant then $\\alpha$ tends rapidly to a constant value. The effect of an early period of de Sitter or power-law inflation is to drive $\\alpha$ to a constant value. Various cosmological consequences of these results are discussed with reference to recent observational studies of the value of $\\alpha$ from quasar absorption spectra and to the existence of life in expanding universes.

  5. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.; Smith, D.F.; Jungmann, JH; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyat

  6. Development of optical monitor of alpha radiations based on CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima accident has highlighted the need to intensify efforts to develop sensitive detectors to monitor the release of alpha emitting radionuclides in the environment caused by the meltdown of the discharged spent fuel. Conventionally, proportional counting, scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry are employed to assay the alpha emitting radionuclides but these techniques are difficult to be configured for online operations. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) offer an alternative off line sensitive technique to measure alpha emitters as well as fissile radionuclides at ultra-trace level in the environment. Recently, our group has reported the first ever attempt to use reflectance based fiber optic sensor (FOS) to quantify the alpha radiations emitted from 232Th. In the present work, an effort has been made to develop an online FOS to monitor alpha radiations emitted from 241Am source employing CR-39 as detector. Here, we report the optical response of CR-39 (on exposure to alpha radiations) employing techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflectance Spectroscopy. In the present work GEANT4 simulation of transport of alpha particles in the detector has also been carried out. Simulation includes validation test wherein the projected ranges of alpha particles in the air, polystyrene and CR-39 were calculated and were found to agree with the literature values. An attempt has been further made to compute the fluence as a function of the incidence angle and incidence energy of alphas. There was an excellent correlation in experimentally observed track density with the simulated fluence. The present work offers a novel approach to design an online CR-39 based fiber optic sensor (CRFOS) to measure the release of nanogram quantity of 241Am in the environment. - Highlights: • Fiber Optics Reflectance Sensor based on CR-39 was employed to monitor online low level alpha radiations emitted from 241Am. • Change in reflectance was found to be

  7. Determination of substraces of alpha emitter elements in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine alpha emitter elements in water by alpha spectrometry, it is necessary to use large volumes of samples, concentration techniq-ues and to separate the elements of interest. In this report a study is presented about two concentration techniques and the process of analysis. Firstly, the stages of concentration method by iron hydroxide coprecipitation were studied in order to improve the results. The combination of liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange techniques was the best way. Secondly, the technique by adsorption on manganese dioxide was studied. To apply this technique it was necessary to develop analysis methods to separate uranium, thorium, plutonium, americium and radium. These methods were designed combining several techniques of separation: liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, ionic exchange and coprecipitation. After the analysis methods were developped the adsorption on manganese dioxide with artificial samples was studied in the laboratory. Finally, the method of adsorption on manganese dioxide was studied to determine uranium, thorium and radium in the drinking water of Madrid. (Author)

  8. Identification of noncollagenous sites encoding specific interactions and quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen: implications for Alport gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Suk; Colon, Selene; Hellmark, Thomas; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2008-12-12

    Defective assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane causes Alport syndrome, a hereditary glomerulonephritis progressing to end-stage kidney failure. Assembly of collagen IV chains into heterotrimeric molecules and networks is driven by their noncollagenous (NC1) domains, but the sites encoding the specificity of these interactions are not known. To identify the sites directing quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen, correctly folded NC1 chimeras were produced, and their interactions with other NC1 monomers were evaluated. All alpha1/alpha 5 chimeras containing alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 replicated the ability of alpha 5 NC1 to bind to alpha3NC1 and co-assemble into NC1 hexamers. Conversely, substitution of alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 by alpha1NC1 abolished these quaternary interactions. The amino-terminal 58 residues of alpha3NC1 encoded binding to alpha 5 NC1, but this interaction was not sufficient for hexamer co-assembly. Because alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 are necessary and sufficient for assembly into alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5 NC1 hexamers, whereas the immunodominant alloantigenic sites of alpha 5 NC1 do not encode specific quaternary interactions, the findings provide a basis for the rational design of less immunogenic alpha 5(IV) collagen constructs for the gene therapy of X-linked Alport patients. PMID:18930919

  9. $\\alpha_s$ extractions from CMS (status and plans)

    CERN Document Server

    Rabbertz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Numerous extractions of the strong coupling constant have been performed at hadron colliders, in particular from jet cross sections. The latest results achieved by the experiments at the $ep$ collider HERA, at the $p\\bar{p}$ collider Tevatron, and at the $pp$ collider LHC are reported with emphasis on the CMS experiment for the latter. Future prospects for precision determinations of $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ and for testing the running of the strong coupling beyond the TeV range are discussed.

  10. Folding model study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Ngo Hai; Khoa, Dao T

    2014-01-01

    The folding model analysis of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at the incident energies below the reaction threshold of 34.7 MeV (in the lab system) has been done using the well-tested density dependent versions of the M3Y interaction and realistic choices for the $^4$He density. Because the absorption is negligible at the energies below the reaction threshold, we were able to probe the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ optical potential at low energies quite unambiguously and found that the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ overlap density used to construct the density dependence of the M3Y interaction is strongly distorted by the Pauli blocking. This result gives possible explanation of a long-standing inconsistency of the double-folding model in its study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ and $\\alpha$-nucleus scattering at low energies using the same realistic density dependent M3Y interaction.

  11. Gamma and X 93 spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Meetings of Gamma and X 93 Spectrometry were held on 12-14 October 1993. The symposium was organized into six sessions: Instrumentation development, Nuclear matter measurement, Method and calibration, Medical applications, Environment survey (radioactive traces measurement), other applications (spent fuels analysis, various techniques). Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  13. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  14. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  15. The 2009 Wolrd Average of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, Siegfried

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of $\\alpha_s$, the coupling strength of the Strong Interaction between quarks and gluons, are summarised and an updated value of the world average of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ is derived. Building up on previous reviews, special emphasis is laid on the most recent determinations of $\\alpha_s$. These are obtained from $\\tau$-decays, from global fits of electroweak precision data and from measurements of the proton structure function $\\F_2$, which are based on perturbative QCD calculations up to $O(\\alpha_s^4)$; from hadronic event shapes and jet production in $\\epem$ annihilation, based on $O(\\alpha_s^3) $ QCD; from jet production in deep inelastic scattering and from $\\Upsilon$ decays, based on $O(\\alpha_s^2) $ QCD; and from heavy quarkonia based on unquenched QCD lattice calculations. Applying pragmatic methods to deal with possibly underestimated errors and/or unknown correlations, the world average value of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ results in $\\alpha_s (M_Z) = 0.1184 \\pm 0.0007$. The measured values of $\\alpha...

  16. Recoil-alpha-fission and recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events observed in the reaction Ca-48 + Am-243

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, U; Andersson, L -L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Golubev, P; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Herzberg, R -D; Hessberger, F P; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Sarmiento, L G; Schädel, M; Yakushev, A; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Dobaczewski, J; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nazarewicz, W; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Shi, Y; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2015-01-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction Ca-48 + Am-243 were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f\\"ur Schwerionenforschung. Amongst the detected thirty correlated alpha-decay chains associated with the production of element Z=115, two recoil-alpha-fission and five recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events were observed. The latter are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator. Contrary to their interpretation, we propose an alternative view, namely to assign eight of these eleven decay chains of recoil-alpha(-alpha)-fission type to start from the 3n-evaporation channel 115-288. The other three decay chains remain viable candidates for the 2n-evaporation channel 115-289.

  17. Simultaneous determination of gross alpha, gross beta and 226Ra in natural water by liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of gross alpha, gross beta and 226Ra activity in natural waters is useful in a wide range of environmental studies. Furthermore, gross alpha and gross beta parameters are included in international legislation on the quality of drinking water [Council Directive 98/83/EC]. In this work, a low-background liquid scintillation counter (Wallac, Quantulus 1220) was used to simultaneously determine gross alpha, gross beta and 226Ra activity in natural water samples. Sample preparation involved evaporation to remove 222Rn and its short-lived decay daughters. The evaporation process concentrated the sample ten-fold. Afterwards, a sample aliquot of 8 mL was mixed with 12 mL of Ultima Gold AB scintillation cocktail in low-diffusion vials. In this study, a theoretical mathematical model based on secular equilibrium conditions between 226Ra and its short-lived decay daughters is presented. The proposed model makes it possible to determine 226Ra activity from two measurements. These measurements also allow determining gross alpha and gross beta simultaneously. To validate the proposed model, spiked samples with different activity levels for each parameter were analysed. Additionally, to evaluate the model's applicability in natural water, eight natural water samples from different parts of Spain were analysed. The eight natural water samples were also characterised by alpha spectrometry for the naturally occurring isotopes of uranium (234U, 235U and 238U), radium (224Ra and 226Ra), 210Po and 232Th. The results for gross alpha and 226Ra activity were compared with alpha spectrometry characterization, and an acceptable concordance was obtained

  18. Application of isotopic dillution techniques by alpha and mass spechometry for determining uranium and evaluated its distributIon in geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of uranium in the concentration range of 2 to 4000 ppm in nuclear raw materials by mass spectrometric (MSID) and alpha spectrometric isotope dilution techniques (ASID), using the isotope tracer enriched in 233U, is presented. An investigation on the nature of the thermoionic emission in various types of filament arrangements like, single plane rhenium, single boat and double, are carried out for the isotope analysis by mass spectrometry. In the preparation of the sources for alpha spectrometry by electrodeposition the experimental parameters such as: current density, pH of the mixed solution containing sample and electrolyte, concentration of the electrolyte solution, time of deposition and distance between electrodes are optimised. The accuracy of the technique is discussed based on the determination of uranium in the same samples by other research workers employing various analytical techniques including mass spectrometric and alpha spectrometric isotope dilution techniques (MSID and ASID). (author)

  19. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J.; Raja, Chand; Rizvi, Syed; Li, Yong; Tsui, Wendy; Zhang, David; Song, Emma; Qu, Chang Fa; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Thompson, John

    2004-08-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human

  20. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cecchi, C; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, J P D; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; Dantone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mourao, A; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Sartorelli, G; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Gunten, H V; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m sup 2) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  1. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m2) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS

  2. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Azzarello, P.; Babucci, E.; Baldini, L.; Basile, M.; Barancourt, D.; Barao, F.; Barbier, G.; Barreira, G.; Battiston, R.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bene, P.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Bizzaglia, S.; Blasko, S.; Boella, G.; Boschini, M.; Bourquin, M.; Brocco, L.; Bruni, G.; Buenerd, M.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Camps, C.; Cannarsa, P.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cecchi, C.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, Z.G.; Chernoplekov, N.A.; Chiueh, T.H.; Chuang, Y.L.; Cindolo, F.; Commichau, V.; Contin, A. E-mail: contin@bo.infn.it; Crespo, P.; Cristinziani, M.; Cunha, J.P. da; Dai, T.S.; Deus, J.D.; Dinu, N.; Djambazov, L.; DAntone, I.; Dong, Z.R.; Emonet, P.; Engelberg, J.; Eppling, F.J.; Eronen, T.; Esposito, G.; Extermann, P.; Favier, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fisher, P.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gervasi, M.; Giusti, P.; Grandi, D.; Grimm, O.; Gu, W.Q.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hermel, V.; Hofer, H.; Huang, M.A.; Hungerford, W.; Ionica, M.; Ionica, R.; Jongmanns, M.; Karlamaa, K.; Karpinski, W.; Kenney, G.; Kenny, J.; Kim, W.; Klimentov, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Laborie, G.; Laitinen, T.; Lamanna, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.C.; Levi, G.; Levtchenko, P.; Liu, C.L.; Liu, H.T.; Lopes, I.; Lu, G.; Lu, Y.S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luckey, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mana, C.; Margotti, A.; Mayet, F.; McNeil, R.R.; Meillon, B.; Menichelli, M.; Mihul, A.; Mourao, A.; Mujunen, A.; Palmonari, F.; Papi, A.; Park, I.H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, E.; Pesci, A.; Pevsner, A.; Pimenta, M.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Postolache, V.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rapin, D.; Raupach, F.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Ribordy, M.; Richeux, J.P.; Riihonen, E.; Ritakari, J.; Roeser, U.; Roissin, C.; Sagdeev, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E.S.; Shoutko, V.

    2002-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m{sup 2}) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  3. Genomic organization of the bovine alpha-S1 casein gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Koczan, D; Hobom, G.; Seyfert, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    We report the sequence of the complete bovine alpha-s1 casein gene eludicating for the first time the genomic organization of an alpha-s type casein gene. Extending over 17508 bp the gene is split into 19 exons, ranging in size from 24 bp to 385 bp. Except for the translational stop codon not a single coding triplet of the alpha-s1 reading frame is disrupted by any of the splice junctions, which all confirm to known splice consensus sequences. Nine out of 16 coding exons begin with a 'GAX' co...

  4. Ninth ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass spectrometry has wide-ranging applications in such diverse areas as nuclear industry, agriculture, drugs, environment, petroleum and lentils. There is an urgent need to absorb and assimilate state-of-the-art technological developments in the field. Emerging trends in atomic mass spectrometry, advances in organic mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in oceanography are some of the areas that need to be expeditiously examined and are covered in this volume. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Nanodosimetry of radon alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is currently accepted that energy deposition at the nanometer level (rather than conventional microdosimetry) determines the biological effects of ionizing radiation. Many previously established experimental techniques (e.g., the Rossi proportional counter) or theoretical methods (e.g., simplified calculations using the continuous slowing-down approximation (CSDA)) are inapplicable to the study of nanodosimetry. The peculiarities of the geometry of exposure to radon progeny further complicate the problem. This is because the conditions under which several open-quotes classicalclose quotes models of radiation action are obtained (e.g., the alpha-beta formulation of the Theory of Dual Radiation Action, which is built on microdosimetry) are no longer valid. It thus becomes clear that not only new techniques but new concepts are required to describe the effects of radon alpha particles. In this paper we discuss a number of computational aspects specific to radon nanodosimetry. In particular, we describe the novel concept of open-quotes associated surfaceclose quotes (AS) which is necessary for efficiently converting Monte-Carlo-generated particle tracks to nanodosimetric spectra. The AS is the analog of Lea's associated volume, applied to radiation sources subject to the geometrical restrictions of internal exposure. We systematically analyze factors affecting the nanodosimetry of radon progeny, such as the distance between the radioactive source and the sensitive volume, the size of the sensitive volume, and CSDA versus full Monte-Carlo track generation

  6. Nanodosimetry of radon alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M. [Columbia Univ. New York, NY (United States); Varma, M.N. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-12-31

    It is currently accepted that energy deposition at the nanometer level (rather than conventional microdosimetry) determines the biological effects of ionizing radiation. Many previously established experimental techniques (e.g., the Rossi proportional counter) or theoretical methods (e.g., simplified calculations using the continuous slowing-down approximation (CSDA)) are inapplicable to the study of nanodosimetry. The peculiarities of the geometry of exposure to radon progeny further complicate the problem. This is because the conditions under which several {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} models of radiation action are obtained (e.g., the alpha-beta formulation of the Theory of Dual Radiation Action, which is built on microdosimetry) are no longer valid. It thus becomes clear that not only new techniques but new concepts are required to describe the effects of radon alpha particles. In this paper we discuss a number of computational aspects specific to radon nanodosimetry. In particular, we describe the novel concept of {open_quotes}associated surface{close_quotes} (AS) which is necessary for efficiently converting Monte-Carlo-generated particle tracks to nanodosimetric spectra. The AS is the analog of Lea`s associated volume, applied to radiation sources subject to the geometrical restrictions of internal exposure. We systematically analyze factors affecting the nanodosimetry of radon progeny, such as the distance between the radioactive source and the sensitive volume, the size of the sensitive volume, and CSDA versus full Monte-Carlo track generation.

  7. Confidence Intervals for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha Values

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, Alex; Franses, Philip Hans

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCoefficient Alpha, which is widely used in empirical research, estimates the reliability of a test consisting of parallel items. In practice it is difficult to compare values of alpha across studies as it depends on the number of items used. In this paper we provide a simple solution, which amounts to computing the confidence intervals of an alpha, as these intervals automatically account for differences across the numbers of items. We also give appropriate statistics to test for ...

  8. Confidence Intervals for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha Values

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, A. J.; Franses, Ph.H.B.F.

    2003-01-01

    Coefficient Alpha, which is widely used in empirical research, estimates the reliability of a test consisting of parallel items. In practice it is difficult to compare values of alpha across studies as it depends on the number of items used. In this paper we provide a simple solution, which amounts to computing the confidence intervals of an alpha, as these intervals automatically account for differences across the numbers of items. We also give appropriate statistics to test for significant ...

  9. Conformons in alpha-helical proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Atanasov, Victor

    2009-01-01

    We propose the conformon as a quantum of conformational change for energy transfer in alpha-helical proteins. The underlying mechanism of interaction between the quantum of excitation and the conformational degrees of freedom is nonlinear and leads to solitary wave packets of conformational energy. The phenomenon is specific to alpha-helices and not to beta-sheets in proteins due to the three strands of hydrogen bonds constituting the alpha-helical backbone.

  10. Increased Circulating Levels of Alpha-Ketoglutarate in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Armengol, Sandra; Sabench, Fàtima; Ras, Rosa; Hernandez, Mercè; Aguilar, Carmen; Colom, Josep; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) causes a wide spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple steatosis to cirrhosis. However, simple steatosis (SS) and steatohepatitis (NASH) cannot yet be distinguished by clinical or laboratory features. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between alpha-ketoglutarate and the degrees of NAFLD in morbidly obese patients. Materials and Methods We used a gas chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight-mass spectrometry analysis to quantify alpha-ketoglutarate in serum from normal-weight subjects (n = 30) and morbidly obese women (n = 97) with or without NAFLD. Results We found that serum levels of alpha-ketoglutarate were significantly higher in morbidly obese women than in normal-weight women. We showed that circulating levels of alpha-ketoglutarate were lower in lean controls and morbidly obese patients without NAFLD. We also found that alpha-ketoglutarate serum levels were higher in both SS and NASH than in normal liver of morbidly obese patients. However, there was no difference between SS and NASH. Moreover, we observed that circulating levels of alpha-ketoglutarate were associated with glucose metabolism parameters, lipid profile, hepatic enzymes and steatosis degree. In addition, diagnostic performance of alpha-ketoglutarate has been analyzed in NAFLD patients. The AUROC curves from patients with liver steatosis exhibited an acceptable clinical utility. Finally, we showed that the combination of biomarkers (AST, ALT and alpha-ketoglutarate) had the highest accuracy in diagnosing liver steatosis. Conclusion These findings suggest that alpha-ketoglutarate can determine the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver in morbidly obese patients but it is not valid a biomarker for NASH. PMID:27123846

  11. Quantum time scales in alpha tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of alpha decay by Gamow is revisited by investigating the quantum time scales in tunneling. The time spent by an alpha particle in front of the barrier and traversing it before escape is evaluated using microscopic alpha nucleus potentials. The half-life of a nucleus is shown to correspond to the time spent by the alpha knocking in front of the barrier. Calculations for medium and super heavy nuclei show that from a multitude of available tunneling time definitions, the transmission dwell time gives the bulk of the lifetime of the decaying state, in most cases.

  12. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q ≅ 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation

  13. [Alpha-linolenic acid and cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Ristić, Gordana; Tepsić, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANCE AND METABOLISM OF ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID: Alpha-linolenic acid is an essential fatty acid which cannot be produced in the body and must be taken by food. Both in animals and humans, alpha-linolenic acid is desaturated and elongated into eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. It is also incorporated into plasma and tissue lipids and its conversion is affected by levels of linoleic acid. POTENTIAL ROLE IN PATHOGENESIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: Diet enriched in n-3 fatty acids, especially alpha-linolenic acid, reduces the incidence of cardiac death. Studies have shown that alpha linolenic acid prevents ventricular fibrillation which is the main cause of cardiac death. Studies in rats suggest that alpha-linolenic acid may be more effective in preventing ventricular fibrillations than eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Furthermore, alpha-linolenic acid is the main fatty acid decreasing platalet aggregation which is an important step in thrombosis i.e. non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke. DIETARY SOURCES AND NUTRITION RECOMMENDATIONS: Dietary sources include flaxseed and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybean and soybean oil, pumpkin seed and pumpkin oil, walnuts and walnut oil. Strong evidence supports beneficial effects of alpha-linolenic acid and its dietary sources should be incorporated into balanced diet for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The recommended daily intake is 2 g with a ratio of 5/1 for linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid. PMID:15510909

  14. Alpha particle problems in shielded support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle confinement is considered in the case of internal conductor systems with magnetically shielded supports. The treatment includes problems of energy transfer to the background plasma, the balance between radiation losses and alpha particle heating, mirror confinement in the main poloidal field, the cut-off and shielding conditions at the supports, ambipolar electric fields, wall interaction, and support location. With a proper and technically realizable choice of parameter values, it should become possible to achieve alpha particle heating as well as to manage the reactor technological problems due to alpha particle interaction with the supports. (Auth.)

  15. Quantum Estimates of Alpha Emitter Life Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Santoso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum estimates of several alpha radioactive life time have been made using the probability of quantum tunneling through the nuclear potential barrier. It is assumed that for a given nucleus with mass number A and isotopic number Z, there exists an alpha particle moving freely back and forth in the nucleus with mass and isotopic numbers A -4 and Z-2. If the probability of penetrating the nuclear potential barrier is Τ, then after N times (N=1/Τ hitting the barrier an alpha particle is emitted. To obtain the elapsed time for emitting an alpha particle requires N times τ0, where τ0 is the time travel for alpha across the nuclear diameter, which is dependent on alpha energy. It is assumed here that this kinetic energy is the same as the emitted energy. The emitting alpha kinetic energies here are calculated by the difference of the masses of the parent and daughter nuclei and the alpha particles. They are in closed agreement with the experimental observations. While the alpha radioactive life time are not the same order of magnitudes but give the same linearity on the logarithmic scale as function of the inverse square root of energy.

  16. Detection of monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and F2-isoprostanes in microdialysis samples of human UV-irradiated skin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, J-U; Wiswedel, I; Hirsch, D; Gollnick, H P M

    2004-01-01

    UV irradiation of the human skin leads to induction of oxidative stress and inflammation mediated by reactive oxygen radicals, lipid peroxidation, liberation of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and formation of prostaglandins and leucotrienes. We investigated "lipid mediators", such as F(2)-isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF(2alpha), 9alpha,11alpha-PGF(2alpha)) and monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) in the dermal interstitial fluid obtained by a cutaneous microdialysis technique. Defined areas on the volar forearm of 10 healthy volunteers were exposed to UVB irradiation (20-60 mJ/cm(2)). Microdialysis membranes were cutaneously inserted beneath the irradiated area. The probes were perfused with isotonic saline solution, and microdialysate samples were collected at 20-min intervals up to 4-5 h. Oxidized arachidonic acid derivatives (2-, 3-, 5-, 8-12- and 15-HETEs, 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) and 9alpha,11alpha-PGF(2alpha)) could be detected and quantified in microdialysates of normal skin in the picomole (HETEs) and femtomole (isoprostanes) range and after UVB irradiation using sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/negative ion chemical ionization. UVB irradiation enhanced the levels of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) after 24 h significantly, whereas the HETE levels were slightly increased within shorter time intervals (3 h after UVB irradiation). Further investigations have to show whether these new findings are relevant to validate therapeutic strategies for topical and systemic UV prevention agents or for monitoring of specific therapeutic strategies in inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:14755126

  17. $\\alpha_{s}$ from the (revised) ALEPH data for $\\tau$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis of $\\alpha_s$ from hadronic $\\tau$ decays based on the recently revised ALEPH data. The analysis is based on a strategy which we previously applied to the OPAL data. We critically compare our strategy to the one traditionally used and comment on the main differences. Our analysis yields the values $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.296\\pm 0.010$ using fixed-order perturbation theory, and $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.310\\pm 0.014$ using contour-improved perturbation theory. Averaging these values with our previously obtained values from the OPAL data, we find $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.303\\pm 0.009$, respectively, $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)=0.319\\pm 0.012$, as the most reliable results for $\\alpha_s$ from $\\tau$ decays currently available.

  18. Determination of the isotopic composition of natural and slightly enriched uranium by alpha-spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar

    1968-01-01

    Determinations of the isotope contents of 238U, 235U and 234U in five uranium samples containing 0–5 at% 235U were carried out on the basis of a least-squares fit of the α-spectra from the samples, measured with a semiconductor detector, to the theoretically expected α-spectra. With a simple source...

  19. A procedure for the determination of Po-210 in water samples by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable, comparable and 'fit for purpose' results are an essential requirement for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, the availability of tested and validated analytical procedures is a extremely important tool for production of such analytical measurements. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated, and readily available to both the analyst and the customer for reference. Since 2004 the Environment programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at the development of a set of procedures for the determination of radionuclides in terrestrial environmental samples. In the case of 210Po, this started with the collection and review of about 130 papers from the scientific literature. Based on this review, two candidate methods for the chemical separation of 210Po from water samples were selected for testing, refinement and validation in accordance with ISO guidelines. A comprehensive methodology for calculation of results including quantification of measurement uncertainty was also developed. This report presents the final procedure which was developed based on that work

  20. Fully automated system for Pu measurement by gamma spectrometry of alpha contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of a fully automated system developed at Comb/Mepis Laboratories which is based on the detection of specific gamma signatures of Pu isotopes for monitoring Pu content in 15-25 l containers of low density (0.1 g/cm3) wastes. The methodological approach is discussed; based on experimental data, an evaluation of the achievable performances (detection limit, precision, accuracy, etc.) is also given

  1. Standard test method for radiochemical determination of uranium isotopes in urine by alpha spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of uranium in urine at levels of detection dependent on sample size, count time, detector background, and tracer yield. It is designed as a screening tool for detection of possible exposure of occupational workers. 1.2 This test method is designed for 50 mL of urine. This test method does not address the sampling protocol or sample preservation methods associated with its use. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Automatic gamma spectrometry analytical apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention falls within the area of quantitative or semi-quantitative analysis by gamma spectrometry and particularly refers to a device for bringing the samples into the counting position. The purpose of this invention is precisely to provide an automatic apparatus specifically adapted to the analysis of hard gamma radiations. To this effect, the invention relates to a gamma spectrometry analytical device comprising a lead containment, a detector of which the sensitive part is located inside the containment and additionally comprising a transfer system for bringing the analyzed samples in succession to a counting position inside the containment above the detector. A feed compartment enables the samples to be brought in turn one by one on to the transfer system through a duct connecting the compartment to the transfer system. Sequential systems for the coordinated forward feed of the samples in the compartment and the transfer system complete this device

  3. $\\alpha$-curvatures and $\\alpha$-flows on low dimensional triangulated manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Huabin; Xu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce two discrete curvature flows, which are called $\\alpha$-flows on two and three dimensional triangulated manifolds. For triangulated surface $M$, we introduce a new normalization of combinatorial Ricci flow (first introduced by Bennett Chow and Feng Luo \\cite{CL1}), aiming at evolving $\\alpha$ order discrete Gauss curvature to a constant. When $\\alpha\\chi(M)\\leq0$, we prove that the convergence of the flow is equivalent to the existence of constant $\\alpha$-curvatur...

  4. alpha-nucleus potentials, alpha-decay half-lives, and shell closures for superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Systematic alpha-nucleus folding potentials are used to analyze alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei. Preformation factors of about several per cent are found for all nuclei under study. The systematic behavior of the preformation factors and the volume integrals of the potentials allows to predict alpha-decay energies and half-lives for unknown nuclei. Shell closures can be determined from measured alpha-decay energies using the discontinuity of the volume integral at shell closures. ...

  5. Assessment of gamma, beta and alpha-particle-emitting nuclides in marine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the physical properties of radionuclides different systems must be used for their measurement. Most convenient is if gamma spectrometry can be used by germanium, Silicon or Scintillation detectors (eg. NaI). If, however, the main emission consists of beta or alpha particles or low-energy photons as is the case for radionuclides decaying by electron capture, radiochemical separation and specific source preparations must be undertaken. In such cases also the radiochemical yield must be determined. The radiochemical part mainly follows the lines presented by prof. T. Jaakkola, Department of Radiochemistry, Helsinki, Finland, at a course in radioecology in Lurid, 1991. For very long-lived radionuclides other methods such as mass spectrometry are superior although often associated with sophisticated expensive instrumentation. (author)

  6. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cook, Jennifer; Davidson, Christine M.; Harrington, Chris F.; Miles, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This is the twenty-forth annual review published in JAAS of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2007 and August 2008. In the analysis of air, work is focused on the need to collect and characterise ultrafines, i.e. particles below 100 nm in size, and such research is being facilitated through the development of air sampler technologies for subsequent off-line analysis o...

  7. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, O.T.; Cook, Jennifer; Harrington, C.F.; Hill, S. J.; Rieuwerts, J.; Miles, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    This is the twenty-second annual review published in JAAS of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. In the analysis of air, there is ongoing use of XRF techniques for the measurement of particles collected on filters. There is continuing interest in the determination of trace levels of mercury species in the atmosphere. Isotope ratio measurement protocols are attracting wider interest as a potential tool for source apport...

  8. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cairns, Warren; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth annual review published in JAAS on the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2008 and August 2009. In the analysis of air, work has focused on: the need to collect and characterise ultrafines; determination of elements such as Be, Hg and PGEs in air samples; application of SRXRF techniques and advances in the development of field deployable aerosol ma...

  9. Open Mass Spectrometry Search Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Geer, L Y; Kowalak, J A; Wagner, L; Xu, M; Maynard, D M; Yang, X; Shi, W; Bryant, S H; Geer, Lewis Y.; Markey, Sanford P.; Kowalak, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Lukas; Xu, Ming; Maynard, Dawn M.; Yang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Wenyao; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2004-01-01

    Large numbers of MS/MS peptide spectra generated in proteomics experiments require efficient, sensitive and specific algorithms for peptide identification. In the Open Mass Spectrometry Search Algorithm [OMSSA], specificity is calculated by a classic probability score using an explicit model for matching experimental spectra to sequences. At default thresholds, OMSSA matches more spectra from a standard protein cocktail than a comparable algorithm. OMSSA is designed to be faster than published algorithms in searching large MS/MS datasets.

  10. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  11. Expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor in human alcoholic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewohl, J M; Crane, D I; Dodd, P R

    1997-03-14

    The expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor was studied in the superior frontal and motor cortices of 10 control, 10 uncomplicated alcoholic and 7 cirrhotic alcoholic cases matched for age and post-mortem delay. The assay was based on competitive RT/PCR using a single set of primers specific to the alpha class of isoform mRNA species, and was normalized against a synthetic cRNA internal standard. The assay was shown to be quantitative for all three isoform mRNA species. Neither the patient's age nor the post-mortem interval significantly affected the expression of any isoform in either cortical area. The profile of expression was shown to be significantly different between the case groups, particularly because alpha 1 expression was raised in both groups of alcoholics of controls. The two groups of alcoholics could be differentiated on the basis of regional variations in alpha 1 expression. In frontal cortex, alpha 1 mRNA expression was significantly increased when uncomplicated alcoholics were compared with control cases whereas alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were not significantly different from either controls or uncomplicated alcoholic cases. In the motor cortex, alpha 1 expression was elevated only when alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were compared with control cases. There was no significant difference between case groups or areas for any other isoform. PMID:9098573

  12. Resting-State Alpha in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alpha Associations with Thalamic Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D.; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M.; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha…

  13. Alpha-Synuclein Binds to the Inner Membrane of Mitochondria in an alpha-Helical Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robotta, M.; Gerding, H.R.; Vogel, A.; Hauser, K.; Schildknecht, S.; Karreman, C.; Leist, M.; Subramaniam, V.; Drescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    The human alpha-Synuclein (alphaS) protein is of significant interest because of its association with Parkinson's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. The intrinsically disordered protein (140 amino acids) is characterized by the absence of a well-defined structure in solution. It displa

  14. Matching coefficients for alpha_s and m_b to O(alpha_s^2) in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, A; Salomon, J

    2009-01-01

    We compute the exact two-loop matching coefficients for the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the bottom-quark mass m_b within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), taking into account O(alpha_s^2) contributions from Supersymmetric Quantum Chromodynamics (SQCD). We find that the explicit mass pattern of the supersymmetric particles has a significant impact on the predictions of alpha_s and m_b at high energies. Further on, the three-loop corrections exceed the uncertainty due to the current experimental accuracy. In case of the the running bottom-quark mass, they can reach in the large tan(beta) regime up to 30% from the tree-level value.

  15. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein.

    OpenAIRE

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P. F.; Healy, A.

    1996-01-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The time course of peptide formation indicated that His-8-Gln-9, Ser-161-Gly-162, and eithe...

  16. Local Varying-Alpha Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper we demonstrated how the simplest model for varying alpha may be interpreted as the effect of a dielectric material, generalized to be consistent with Lorentz invariance. Unlike normal dielectrics, such a medium cannot change the speed of light, and its dynamics obey a Klein-Gordon equation. This work immediately suggests an extension of the standard theory, even if we require compliance with Lorentz invariance. Instead of a wave equation, the dynamics may satisfy a local algebraic relation involving the permittivity and the properties of the electromagnetic field, in analogy with more conventional dielectric (but still preserving Lorentz invariance). We develop the formalism for such theories and investigate some phenomenological implications. The problem of the divergence of the classical self-energy can be solved, or at least softened, in this framework. Some interesting new cosmological solutions for the very early universe are found, including the possibility of a bounce, inflation and e...

  17. Urban gamma spectrometry. Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Kuukankorpi, S.; Moring, M.; Smolander, P.; Toivonen, H. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-06-15

    Urban gamma spectrometry has been given only minor attention with the focus being on rural gamma spectrometry. However, in recent years the Nordic emergency management authorities have turned focus towards border control and lost or stolen sources. Gamma spectra measured in urban areas are characterized by a wide variety of spectrum shapes and very fast changes in environmental background. In 2004 a Danish CGS (Carborne Gamma Spectrometry) survey took place in Copenhagen. It was found that gamma spectrometry in urban areas is far more complicated to interpret than had previously been thought and a new method 'Fitting with Spectral Components', FSC, based on NASVD, was tested with some success. In Finland, a database 'LINSSI' has been developed for spectral data management. In CGS search mode a 'peak hypothesis test' is applied to the measured spectra. This system was tested during the Helsinki 2005 Athletics World Championship and it provides fast and reliable automated alarms for intermediate and high level signals. In Sweden mobile detector systems are used for border controls and problems are encountered when making measurement in harbour, container areas. The methods for handling data and for interpretation of urban gamma spectrometry measurements were compared and tested on the same data sets from Copenhagen and Helsinki. Software tools were developed for converting data between the Finnish LINSSI database and the binary file formats used in Denmark and Sweden. The Processing methods used at DTU and STUK have different goals. The ASSS and FSC methods are designed to optimize the overall detection capability of the system, while sacrificing speed, usability and to a certain level robustness. These methods cannot always be used for real time analysis. The Peak Significance method is designed to give robust alarms in real time, while sacrificing some of the detection capability. Thus these methods are not interchangeable, but rather

  18. Confidence Intervals for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Koning (Alex); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCoefficient Alpha, which is widely used in empirical research, estimates the reliability of a test consisting of parallel items. In practice it is difficult to compare values of alpha across studies as it depends on the number of items used. In this paper we provide a simple solution, wh

  19. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  20. DT results of TFTR's alpha collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy ∼30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations

  1. ALPHA experiment facility and Prof. Jeffrey Hangst.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Picture 01-07: General views of the ALPHA experiment Picture 5: Andrea Gutierrez, a PhD student from UBC, transfers liquid helium from a storage dewar into the cryostat containing the superconducting magnetic trap used by the ALPHA experiment.Picture 08-11: Jeffery Hangst, spokesperson for ALPHA Picture 12: The ALPHA silicon detector, which surrounds the trapping resion and is used for imaging antiproton annihilations (Credit University of Liverpool) Picture 13: Untrapped antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the inner surface of the ALPHA trap. These are measured by the ALPHA annihilation detector. The events are concentrated at the electrode radius of about 22.3 mm. The coordinates are defined in the Nature article, Figure 1b. Picture 14: The electrodes (gold) for the ALPHA Penning trap being inserted into the vacuum chamber and cryostat assembly. This is the trap used to combine or "mix" positrons and antiprotons to make antihydrogen. (Credit: Niels Madsen ALPHA/Swansea.) Picture 15: Top, a diagram of the...

  2. Single-field $\\alpha$-attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    I describe a simple class of $\\alpha$-attractors, generalizing the single-field GL model of inflation in supergravity. The new class of models is defined for $0<\\alpha \\lesssim 1$, providing a good match to the present cosmological data. I also present a generalized version of these models which can describe not only inflation but also dark energy and supersymmetry breaking.

  3. Sensitivity of alpha-decay to the real alpha-nucleus potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information which can be obtained from studies of low energy alpha-particle scattering from heavy nuclei and from alpha-decay is discussed. The sensitivity of calculated widths and lifetimes for alpha-decay to the real nuclear potential is examined in detail using a formalism based on the unified theory of nuclear reactions. It is shown that a combined study of alpha-decay and alpha-particle scattering at energies near the Coulomb barrier should give a very precise determination of the barrier height and radius, although there is a more uniquely defined separation distance some way beyond the barrier. (orig.)

  4. A low-energy determination of $\\alpha_s$ at three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Vairo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We review one of the most accurate low-energy determinations of $\\alpha_s$. Comparing at short distances the QCD static energy at three loops and resummation of the next-to-next-to leading logarithms with its determination in 2+1-flavor lattice QCD, we obtain $\\alpha_s(1.5~{\\rm GeV})=0.336^{+0.012}_{-0.008}$, which corresponds to $\\alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1166^{+0.0012}_{-0.0008}$. We discuss future perspectives.

  5. Practical alpha detectors for site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have and are developing a series of practical alpha detectors for alpha characterization. These include soil surface monitors, pipe and duct monitors, air quality and radon monitors, tool monitors, and sample monitors. Two types of these monitors have been transferred to industry thus far for commercialization. Several of these systems have been fully field tested: for example, the soil surface monitor has been used to characterize 11 sites for 7 customers at 3 DOE facilities. Using a new but simple technology, these alpha detectors can be put to use in many areas where conventional alpha probes are impractical or insufficiently sensitive. Use of these alpha detectors in site characterization at the Uranium in Soil Integrated Demonstration at Fernald, at Los Alamos, and elsewhere will be discussed as well as their commercialization and possible further applications

  6. An Alpha Schottky Junction Power Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc; Carroll, James; Henriquez, Stan

    2011-10-01

    Isotope batteries present solutions for long-lived low power sources. Compact sensors, and electronic circuit boards can be powered for the lifetime of infrastructure. Alpha sources are practical for safety reasons because of the limited distance before energy absorption in materials, and the high energy (~5MeV) per particle. Damage to materials from the alphas limits the practical use. A Schottky diode geometry is created from an alpha foil on a diamond-like crystal. A power source is proposed that takes advantage of the radiation damage tolerance of diamond, combined with the short range of the alpha radiation. The internal field of the Schottky barrier creates a current through the diode from electron-hole pairs created by alpha bombardment in the gap. Calculations of the expected current, circuit model results, and design parameters for a device are described.

  7. Folding model analysis of alpha radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, D N

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive decay of nuclei via emission of $\\alpha$ particles has been studied theoretically in the framework of a superasymmetric fission model using the double folding (DF) procedure for obtaining the $\\alpha$-nucleus interaction potential. The DF nuclear potential has been obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the $\\alpha$ nucleus and the daughter nucleus with a realistic effective interaction. The M3Y effective interaction has been used for calculating the nuclear interaction potential which has been supplemented by a zero-range pseudo-potential for exchange along with the density dependence. The nuclear microscopic $\\alpha$-nucleus potential thus obtained has been used along with the Coulomb interaction potential to calculate the action integral within the WKB approximation. This subsequently yields microscopic calculations for the half lives of $\\alpha$ decays of nuclei. The density dependence and the exchange effects have not been found to be very significant. These calculations...

  8. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  9. Catalytic Mechanism of Human Alpha-galactosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guce, A.; Clark, N; Salgado, E; Ivanen, D; Kulinskaya, A; Brumer, H; Garman, S

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, also known as {alpha}-GAL A; E.C. 3.2.1.22) is responsible for the breakdown of {alpha}-galactosides in the lysosome. Defects in human {alpha}-GAL lead to the development of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the buildup of {alpha}-galactosylated substrates in the tissues. {alpha}-GAL is an active target of clinical research: there are currently two treatment options for Fabry disease, recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (approved in the United States in 2003) and pharmacological chaperone therapy (currently in clinical trials). Previously, we have reported the structure of human {alpha}-GAL, which revealed the overall structure of the enzyme and established the locations of hundreds of mutations that lead to the development of Fabry disease. Here, we describe the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme derived from x-ray crystal structures of each of the four stages of the double displacement reaction mechanism. Use of a difluoro-{alpha}-galactopyranoside allowed trapping of a covalent intermediate. The ensemble of structures reveals distortion of the ligand into a {sup 1}S{sub 3} skew (or twist) boat conformation in the middle of the reaction cycle. The high resolution structures of each step in the catalytic cycle will allow for improved drug design efforts on {alpha}-GAL and other glycoside hydrolase family 27 enzymes by developing ligands that specifically target different states of the catalytic cycle. Additionally, the structures revealed a second ligand-binding site suitable for targeting by novel pharmacological chaperones.

  10. Human podocytes adhere to the KRGDS motif of the alpha3alpha4alpha5 collagen IV network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Pedchenko, Vadim; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Heather M; Pozzi, Ambra; Saus, Juan; Abrahamson, Dale R; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G

    2008-04-01

    Podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is required for proper function of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the mechanism whereby podocytes adhere to collagen IV networks, a major component of the glomerular basement membrane, is poorly understood. The predominant collagen IV network is composed of triple helical protomers containing the alpha3alpha4alpha5 chains. The protomers connect via the trimeric noncollagenous (NC1) domains to form hexamers at the interface. Because the NC1 domains of this network can potentially support integrin-dependent cell adhesion, it was determined whether individual NC1 monomers or alpha3alpha4alpha5 hexamers support podocyte adhesion. It was found that, although human podocytes did not adhere to NC1 domains proper, they did adhere via integrin alphavbeta3 to a KRGDS motif located adjacent to alpha3NC1 domains. Because the KRGDS motif is a site of phosphorylation, its interactions with integrin alphavbeta3 may play a critical role in cell signaling in physiologic and pathologic states. PMID:18235087

  11. Hepatic transformation of prostaglandin D2 to a new prostanoid, 9 alpha,11 beta-prostaglandin F2, that inhibits platelet aggregation and constricts blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolic transformation of tritium-labeled prostaglandin D2 ([3H]PGD2) was investigated in the isolated Tyrode's-perfused rabbit liver. One major product was isolated and identified in the perfusate as a new prostanoid. The structure of this metabolite was further confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemical methods to be 9 alpha,11 beta,15-L-trihydroxyprosta-5-cis, 13-trans-dienoic acid, namely (9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2). This new prostanoid was found to be an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and to cause constriction of canine coronary artery strips. These results suggested that on passage through the hepatic circulation exogenous PGD2 is converted to 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2, the latter having a biological profile which differs from that of PGD2 and PGF2 alpha

  12. The resonance triplet at E_alpha = 4.5 MeV in the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Konrad; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Boretzky, Konstanze; Caciolli, Antonio; Degering, Detlev; Dietz, Mirco; Dressler, Rugard; Elekes, Zoltán; Fülöp, Zsolt; Gyürky, György; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R; Marta, Michele; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Munnik, Frans; Schumann, Dorothea; Schwengner, Ronald; Szücs, Tamás; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry; Zuber, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction is believed to be the main production channel for the radioactive nuclide 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Radiation from decaying 44Ti has been observed so far for two supernova remnants, and a precise knowledge of the 44Ti production rate may help improve supernova models. The 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti astrophysical reaction rate is determined by a number of narrow resonances. Here, the resonance triplet at E_alpha = 4497, 4510, and 4523 keV is studied both by activation, using an underground laboratory for the gamma counting, and by in-beam gamma spectrometry. The target properties are determined by elastic recoil detection analysis and by nuclear reactions. The strengths of the three resonances are determined to omega gamma = (0.92+-0.20), (6.2+-0.5), and (1.32+-0.24) eV, respectively, a factor of two more precise than before. The strengths of this resonance triplet may be used in future works as a point of reference. In addition, the present new data directly affect the as...

  13. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode. PMID:22867547

  14. Mass Spectrometry in Polymer Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Falkenhagen, Jana; Weidner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Combining an up-to-date insight into mass-spectrometric polymer analysis beyond MALDI with application details of the instrumentation, this is a balanced and thorough presentation of the most important and widely used mass-spectrometric methods.Written by the world's most proficient experts in the field, the book focuses on the latest developments, covering such technologies and applications as ionization protocols, tandem and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, gas-phase ion-separation techniques and automated data processing. Chapters on sample preparation, polymer degradation and the u

  15. Lucid dreaming and alpha activity: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, R D; Hunt, H T; Tyson, P D; Lucescu, M L; Jeakins, D B

    1982-12-01

    10 good dream recallers spent 2 nights in the sleep lab during which they were awakened 4 times per night from REM sleep, twice during their highest alpha activity in REM, and twice during low REM alpha. 5 were given alpha feedback training prior to sleep onset. Arousals from high alpha REM sleep yielded significantly higher lucidity ratings. Alpha feedback had no effect upon lucidity or REM alpha levels. Similarities between lucid dreams and meditative phenomena are discussed. PMID:7162915

  16. Osmotic fragility test in heterozygotes for alpha and beta thalassaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Maccioni, L; Cao, A

    1985-01-01

    This study shows that the combination of heterozygous beta thalassaemia and deletion heterozygous (-alpha/alpha alpha) or homozygous (-alpha/-alpha) alpha+ thalassaemia may result in the production of erythrocytes which have normal mean volume and haemoglobinisation but decreased osmotic fragility. Based on this finding and previous studies, which have shown that beta thalassaemia screening by the osmotic fragility test may miss a significant proportion of beta thalassaemia heterozygotes, we ...

  17. Lyman alpha radiation in external galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    The Ly alpha line of atomic hydrogen is often a luminous component of the radiation emitted by distant galaxies. Except for those galaxies which have a substantial central source of non-stellar ionizing radiation, most of the Ly alpha radiation emitted by galaxies is generated within regions of the interstellar medium which are photoionized by starlight. Conversely, much of the energy radiated by photoionized regions is carried by the Ly alpha line. Only hot, massive stars are capable of ionizing hydrogen in the interstellar medium which surrounds them, and because such stars are necessarily short-lived, Ly alpha emission traces regions of active star formation. Researchers argue that the strength of the Ly alpha emission observed from external galaxies may be used to estimate quantitatively the dust content of the emitting region, while the Ly alpha line profile is sensitive to the presence of shock waves. Interstellar dust particles and shock waves are intimately associated with the process of star formation in two senses. First, both dust particles and shock waves owe their existence to stellar activity; second, they may both serve as agents which facilitate the formation of stars, shocks by triggering gravitational instabilities in the interstellar gas that they compress, and dust by shielding star-forming molecular clouds from the ionizing and dissociative effects of external UV radiation. By using Ly alpha observations as a probe of the dust content in diffuse gas at high redshift, we might hope to learn about the earliest epochs of star formation.

  18. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  19. Naturally-occurring alpha activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the difficulties of assessing the significance of man-made radioactivity it is important to study for comparison the background of natural radioactivity against which the human race has evolved and lives. It is also important to define the present levels of activity so that it will be possible to detect and study as quickly as possible any changes which may occur owing to the release into the environment of new radioactive materials. Moreover, by the study of the behaviour of natural radioactivity light may be shed upon that of the artificially produced isotopes and a number of analogies traced between the two groups. These concepts have led to studies of naturally-occurring radioactive materials alongside a programme of research into fission products in food, water and air, as well as studies of the metabolism of both sets of materials in the human body. Since the last report there has been a useful increase in our knowledge of natural radioactivity in the biosphere, and its levels relative to the new man-made activities. These studies have necessitated technical developments, particularly in the methods of measuring and identifying alpha-ray emitters, to which group many of the more important natural radioactive materials belong

  20. Diabetes and alpha lipoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IssyLaher

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that a lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10 years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  1. Diagnostics for PLX-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner eXperiment PLX-alpha at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to establish the viability of creating a spherically imploding plasma liner for MIF and HED applications, using a spherical array of supersonic plasma jets launched by innovative contoured-gap coaxial plasma guns. PLX- α experiments will focus in particular on establishing the ram pressure and uniformity scalings of partial and fully spherical plasma liners. In order to characterize these parameters experimentally, a suite of diagnostics is planned, including multi-camera fast imaging, a 16-channel visible interferometer (upgraded from 8 channels) with reconfigurable, fiber-coupled front end, and visible and VUV high-resolution and survey spectroscopy. Tomographic reconstruction and data fusion techniques will be used in conjunction with interferometry, imaging, and synthetic diagnostics from modeling to characterize liner uniformity in 3D. Diagnostic and data analysis design, implementation, and status will be presented. Supported by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy - U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Growth behaviors in the range $e^{r^\\alpha}$

    OpenAIRE

    Brieussel, Jérémie

    2011-01-01

    For every $\\alpha \\leq \\beta$ in a left neighborhood $[\\alpha_0,1]$ of 1, a group $G(\\alpha,\\beta)$ is constructed, the growth function of which satisfies $\\limsup \\frac{\\log \\log b_{G(\\alpha,\\beta)}(r)}{\\log r}=\\alpha$ and $\\liminf \\frac{\\log \\log b_{G(\\alpha,\\beta)}(r)}{\\log r}=\\beta$. When $\\alpha=\\beta$, this provides an explicit uncountable collection of groups with growth functions strictly comparable. On the other hand, oscillation in the case $\\alpha < \\beta$ explains the existence of...

  3. $\\alpha_s$ from the updated ALEPH data for hadronic $\\tau$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    We extract the strong coupling $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ from the recently updated ALEPH non-strange spectral functions obtained from hadronic $\\tau$ decays. We apply a self-consistent analysis method, first tested in the analysis of OPAL data, to extract $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$ and non-perturbative contributions. The analysis yields $\\alpha_s^{\\rm FO}(m_\\tau^2)=0.296\\pm0.010 $, using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory (FOPT), and $\\alpha^{\\rm CI}_s(m_\\tau^2)= 0.310\\pm0.014$, using Contour Improved Perturbation Theory (CIPT). The weighted average of these results with those previously obtained from OPAL data give $\\alpha_s^{\\rm FO}(m_\\tau^2)=0.303\\pm 0.009$ and $\\alpha_s^{\\rm CI}(m_\\tau^2)=0.319\\pm 0.012$, which gives, after evolution to the $Z$ boson mass scale, $\\alpha^{\\rm FO}_s(m_Z^2)=0.1165\\pm0.0012 $ and $\\alpha_s^{\\rm CI}(m_Z^2)=0.1185\\pm0.0015 $, respectively. We observe that non-perturbative effects limit the accuracy with which $\\alpha_s$ can be extracted from $\\tau$ decay data.

  4. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  5. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Troyer, G.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system.

  6. Lyman alpha airglow observations from SORCE SOLSTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinar, E.; Snow, M.; Holsclaw, G.; Thomas, G. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument on board the Solar Radiation Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft in low Earth orbit observes stars every orbit for in-flight calibration. It also observes several star-free regions of the sky near the wavelength of Lyman alpha to correct for airglow emission in the stellar measurements. Although the airglow measurements are only taken during the eclipse portion of the orbit, the look directions cover nearly the entire anti-sunward hemisphere. This seven-year record of Lyman alpha airglow observations (2003-2010) shows the response of the Hydrogen geocorona to changes in the solar Lyman alpha irradiance over the solar cycle.

  7. Alpha particle confinement in tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms leading to loss of alpha particles from non-axisymmetric tandem mirrors are considered. Stochastic diffusion due to bounce-drift resonances, which can cause rapid radial losses of high-energy alpha particles, can be suppressed by imposing a 20% rise in axisymmetric fields before the quadrupole transition sections. Alpha particles should then be well-confined until thermal energies when they enter the resonant plateau require. A fast code for computation of drift behavior in reactors is described. Sample calculations are presented for resonant particles in a proposed coil set for the Tandem Mirror Next Step

  8. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system

  9. Enzymatic synthesis of l-menthyl alpha-maltoside and l-menthyl alpha-maltooligosides from l-menthyl alpha-glucoside by cyclodextrin glucanotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hiroyuki; Sato, Toshiyuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kino, Kuniki; Usami, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    l-Menthyl alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-d-glucopyranoside (alpha-MenG2), a novel glycoside of l-menthol, was synthesized enzymatically and its physicochemical properties were characterized. Production of alpha-MenG2 from l-menthyl alpha-d-glucopyranoside (alpha-MenG) was attempted since we had already succeeded in the high-yield production of alpha-MenG using a Xanthomonas campestris enzyme (Nakagawa H., et al. J. Biosci. Bioeng., 89, 138-144, 2000). Through production tests on enzymes, it was confirmed that cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) from Bacillus macerans produced l-menthyl alpha-D-maltooligosides (alpha-MenG(n)), containing alpha-MenG2, from alpha-MenG and soluble starch. When 10 ml of a 10 mM citrate-10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 150 mg of alpha-MenG, 3 g of soluble starch and CGTase was shaken at 70 degrees C for 24 h, a total of 81.8% alpha-MenG was reacted. The molar conversion yields of alpha-MenG2 and alpha-MenG(n) with alpha-glucose degrees of polymerization of 3-18, based on the amount of alpha-MenG supplied, reached 16.1% and 65.7%, respectively. For efficient production of alpha-MenG2, the reaction mixture was treated with alpha-amylase of Aspergillus oryzae, and alpha-MenG(n) were mainly converted into alpha-MenG2: finally, the molar conversion yield of alpha-MenG2 reached 74.2% based on the amount of alpha-MenG supplied. alpha-MenG2 was purified and its molecular structure was confirmed by 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR and two-dimensional HMBC (heteronuclear multiple-bond coherence). alpha-MenG2 and its aqueous solution tasted bitter and a little sweet at first, but in a few minutes, a refreshing flavor and sweetness spread. At 20 degrees C the solubility of alpha-MenG2 in pure water was 29.6 g/100 ml, approximately 1570-fold that of alpha-MenG. PMID:16233280

  10. Determination of alpha_s and W boson leptonic branching ratio from the W and Z cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Weichen

    2016-01-01

    We try to determine the strong coupling alpha_s and the W boson leptonic branching ratio from the W and Z boson production cross section through pp collisions in the LHC. We run the MCFM program together with LHAPDF or HERAPDF les to extract the theoretical prediction of cross sections at different alpha_s in different experiments. We compare the predicted values and the experimental results to do a precise measurement of alpha_s and the branching ratio.

  11. Isolated Photons at Hadron Colliders at O($\\alpha alpha_s^2$) (I): Spin Averaged Case

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    The cross sections for isolated and non-isolated prompt photon production with unpolarized hadron beams are studied at order $\\alpha\\alpha_s^2$. Two methods of performing the calculations are compared. One uses purely analytic techniques and the second uses a combination of analytic and Monte Carlo techniques to perform the phase-space integrations. The results of the analytic and Monte Carlo methods are compared both before and after isolation cuts are placed on the photon. Fragmentation con...

  12. Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials derived from the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2006-01-01

    We calculate Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials from the nuclear-matter G-matrices of the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The alpha-cluster wave function is assumed to be a simple harmonic-oscillator shell-model wave function. A new method is proposed to derive the direct and knock-on terms of the interaction Born kernel from the hyperon-nucleon G-matrices, with explicit treatments of the nonlocality and the center-of-mass motion between the hyperon and alpha. We find that the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interactions, FSS and fss2, yield a reasonable bound-state energy for 5 He Lambda, -3.18 -- -3.62 MeV, in spite of the fact that they give relatively large depths for the Lambda single-particle potentials, 46 -- 48 MeV, in symmetric nuclear matter. An equivalent local potential derived from the Wigner transform of the nonlocal Lambda alpha kernel shows a strong energy dependence for the incident Lambda-particle, indicating the importance of the strangeness-exchange process in the o...

  13. Project and construction of a spectrometer for alpha particles using surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project, construction, tests and some applications of a system for alpha and beta spectrometry, using surface barrier detector are described. The device includes a solid state detector ORTEC-Series F coupled to a system for amplifying the charges produced by passage of an ionizing particle through the detector. The amplifying system is composed by a charge sensitive pre-amplifier, which employs an operational amplifier CA 3140, and a low noise linear amplifier, which is based on the operational amplifiers CA 3140 and LM 301. The pre-amplifier stage input impedance is on the order of TΩ and produces output pulses which heights are proportional to total charge produced by passage of particle through the detector sensitive volume. The main advantage to use charge sensitive system lies in obtention of independent pulse heights of the distributed capacity of connecting cable between the detector and the pre-amplifier. The total system amplification ca reach a maximum of 50.000 in the linear region. Pulses are analysed in a multichannel system ORTEC, model 6240. The amplifier system is easily constructed and low cost using components available in the national market, and it can be employed with ionization chambers, proportional counters, scitillation counters and semiconductor detectors. The results of spectrometer application for alpha spectrometry of AM241 source were compared to systems made with imported stages. (Author)

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  15. Lattice measurement of \\alpha_s with a realistic charm quark

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, B; Brinet, M; De Soto, F; Du, X; Morenas, V; Pene, O; Petrov, K; Rodriguez-Quintero, J

    2012-01-01

    We report on an estimate of \\alpha_s, renormalised in the MSbar scheme at the tau and Z^0 mass scales, by means of lattice QCD. Our major improvement compared to previous lattice calculations is that, for the first time, no perturbative treatment at the charm threshold has been required since we have used statistical samples of gluon fields built by incorporating the vacuum polarisation effects of u/d, s and c sea quarks. Extracting \\alpha_s in the Taylor scheme from the lattice measurement of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex, we obtain \\alpha_s^{MSbar}(m^2_Z)=0.1200(14) and \\alpha_s^{MSbar}(m^2_tau)=0.339(13).

  16. An alpha-omega-dynamo with an alpha-effect due to magnetostrophic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of the latitude dependence of the dynamic alpha-effect on the solution of equations of alpha-omega-dynamos are investigated. The equations of kinematic rotationally symmetric alpha-omega-dynamos are evaluated using the spherical solar dynamo model of Deinzer and Stix (1971), in which the induction effects, differential rotation, and alpha-effect act in two separate infinitesimal thin shells. Butterfly diagrams are derived and analyzed. It is observed that the diagram has two branches: the ordinary sunspot branch, migrating from midlatitudes toward the equator during the cycle, and the polar branch, which migrates from the midlatitudes toward the pole. It is also found that, in order to obtain the correct propagation direction of the two dynamos, the alpha of the magnetostrophic waves requires a rotation decreasing with depth. The influence of various locations of the induction layers of alpha- and omega-effect are examined.

  17. Energy dependence of event shapes and of $\\alpha_s$ at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Infrared and collinear safe event shape distributions and their mean values are determined using the data taken at ve di erent centre of mass energies above $M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP. From the event shapes, the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$ is extracted in $O(\\alpha^2_s)$, NLLA and a combined scheme using hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as using an analytical power ansatz. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at MZ, the energy dependence (running) of $\\alpha_s$ is accessible. The logarithmic energy slope of the inverse strong coupling is measured to be $d\\alpha_{s}^{-1}/d log(E_{cm}) = 1.39 \\pm 0.34(stat) \\pm 0.17(syst)$, in good agreement with the QCD expectation of 1.27.

  18. Perturbative expansion of tau hadronic spectral function moments and alpha_s extractions

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin; Jamin, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Various moments of the hadronic spectral functions have been employed in the determination of the strong coupling alpha_s from tau decays. In this work we study the behaviour of their perturbative series under different assumptions for the large-order behaviour of the Adler function, extending previous work on the tau hadronic width. We find that the moments can be divided into a small number of classes, whose characteristics depend only on generic features of the moment weight function and Adler function series. Some moments that are commonly employed in alpha_s analyses from tau decays should be avoided because of their perturbative instability. This conclusion is corroborated by a simplified alpha_s extraction from individual moments. Furthermore, under reasonable assumptions for the higher-order behaviour of the perturbative series, fixed-order perturbation theory (FOPT) provides the preferred framework for the renormalization group improvement of all moments that show good perturbative behaviour. Finally...

  19. On Cronbach’s Alpha as the Mean of All Possible k-Split Alphas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs J. Warrens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coefficient alpha is the most commonly used internal consistency reliability coefficient. Alpha is the mean of all possible k-split alphas if the items are divided into k parts of equal size. This result gives proper interpretations of alpha: interpretations that also hold if (some of its assumptions are not valid. Here we consider the cases where the items cannot be split into parts of equal size. It is shown that if a k-split is made such that the items are divided as evenly as possible, the difference between alpha and the mean of all possible k-split alphas can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of items.

  20. Gamma spectrometry of infinite 4Π geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the weak absorption og gamma radiation by matter, gamma-ray spectrometry may be applied to samples of great volume. A very interesting case is that of the gamma-ray spectrometry applied with 4Π geometry around the detector on a sample assumed to be of infinite extension. The determination of suitable efficiencies allows this method to be quantitative. (author)

  1. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  2. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    -phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  3. T-branes and $\\alpha'$-corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesano, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We study $\\alpha'$-corrections in multiple D7-brane configurations with non-commuting profiles for their transverse position fields. We focus on T-brane systems, crucial in F-theory GUT model building. There $\\alpha'$-corrections modify the D-term piece of the BPS equations which, already at leading order, require a non-primitive Abelian worldvolume flux background. We find that $\\alpha'$-corrections may either i) leave this flux background invariant, ii) modify the Abelian non-primitive flux profile, or iii) deform it to a non-Abelian profile. The last case typically occurs when primitive fluxes, a necessary ingredient to build 4d chiral models, are added to the system. We illustrate these three cases by solving the $\\alpha'$-corrected D-term equations in explicit examples, and describe their appearance in more general T-brane backgrounds. Finally, we discuss implications of our findings for F-theory GUT local models.

  4. Alpha decay property of Pb parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the half-lives of alpha decay have been calculated from 182-210Pb nuclei, both in two sphere approximation and taking care the deformation effects and compared with the available theoretical and experimental data

  5. Alpha particles spectrometer with photodiode PIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation propagates in form of electromagnetic waves or corpuscular radiation; if the radiation energy causes ionization in environment that crosses it is considered ionizing radiation. To detect radiation several detectors types are used, if the radiation are alpha particles are used detectors proportional type or trace elements. In this work the design results, construction and tests of an alpha particles spectrometer are presented, which was designed starting from a photodiode PIN type. The system design was simulated with a code for electronic circuits. With results of simulation phase was constructed the electronic phase that is coupled to a multichannel analyzer. The resulting electronic is evaluated analyzing the electronic circuit performance before an alphas triple source and alpha radiation that produce two smoke detectors of domestic use. On the tests phase we find that the system allows obtain, in a multichannel, the pulses height spectrum, with which we calibrate the system. (Author)

  6. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - H-Alpha

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of H-alpha photographic datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. Solar...

  7. Neutron-induced alpha radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiography technique to inspect thin samples was developed. Low energy alpha particles, generated by a boron based screen under thermal neutron irradiation, are used as penetrating radiation. The solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 has been used to register the image. The interaction of the α - particles with the CR-39 gives rise to damages which under an adequate chemical etching became tracks the basic units forming the image. A digital system was developed for data acquisition and data analysis as well as for image processing. The irradiation and etching conditions to obtain the best radiography are 1,3 hours and 25 minutes at 70 deg C respectively. For such conditions samples having 10 μm in thickness can be inspected with a spatial resolution of 32 μm. The use of the digital system has reduced the time spent for data acquisition and data analysis and has improved the radiography image visualization. Furthermore, by using the digital system, it was possible to study several new parameters regarding the tracks which are very important to understand and study the image formation theory in solid state nuclear track detectors, the one used in this thesis. Some radiography images are also shown which demonstrate the potential of the proposed radiography technique. When compared with the other radiography techniques already in use to inspect thin samples, the present one developed in the present paper allows a smaller time to obtain the image, it is not necessary to handle liquid radioactive substances, the detector is insensitive to β, γ, X-ray and visible light. (author)

  8. Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons Richard

    2006-01-01

    Abstract X-linked alpha thalassaemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome in males is associated with profound developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, genital abnormalities and alpha thalassaemia. Female carriers are usually physically and intellectually normal. So far, 168 patients have been reported. Language is usually very limited. Seizures occur in about one third of the cases. While many patients are affectionate with their caregivers, some exhibit autistic-like behaviour. Patients pres...

  9. Alpha particle spectroscopy by gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber has been constructed with the aim of determining its ultimate energy resolution in alpha spectroscopy, utilizing a cooled FET pre-amplifier of the type normally employed with semiconductor detectors. With suitable mechanical collimation of the alpha particles, their fine structure has been measured with an energy resolution of -11.5 keV (fwhm), achieved using an Ar + 0.75% C2H2 mixture as the filling gas. (orig.)

  10. Abundances in Damped Ly-alpha Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Molaro, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Damped Ly_alpha galaxies provide a sample of young galaxies where chemical abundances can be derived throughout the whole universe with an accuracy comparable to that for the local universe. Despite a large spread in redshift, HI column density and metallicity, DLA galaxies show a remarkable uniformity in the elemental ratios rather suggestive of similar chemical evolution if not of an unique population. These galaxies are characterized by a moderate, if any, enhancement of alpha-elements ove...

  11. Alpha emitters in Chernobyl hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alpha radioactive component of hot particles from the Chernobyl fallout was analysed for cases studied previously by gamma spectroscopy. Correlations established from the absolute alpha activity determination and high resolution analysis provided information on actinides release during accident and on some aspects of the Chernobyl reactor fuel composition. Unexpected features revealed during the analysis of one specific particle are presented. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  12. Processing. alpha. -mercuric iodide by zone refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.H.; Henderson, D.O.; Biao, Y.; Zhang, K.; Silberman, E. (Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Nason, D.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale-Baccash, C.; Cross, E. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted on zone refining {alpha}-mercuric iodide. Analytical studies using differential scanning calorimetry and anion chromatography indicate that impurities are segregated mainly at the end where zone travel terminates. Early results indicate that single crystals can be readily grown from zone refined material, and the effects of the process on the performance of radiation detectors fabricated from {alpha}-mercuric iodide are being evaluated.

  13. Phototransferred thermoluminescence and exoemission in alpha alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacconi, P.; Lapraz, D.; Alessandri-Fraccaro, M.F.; Addi, D. (Univ. de Nice-Sophia Antipolis (France). Lab. d' Emission Electronique et de Luminescence)

    1990-01-01

    {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, irradiated by ionising radiation and submitted to UV illumination, presents a phototransfer phenomenon that is characterised by thermoluminescence (TL) and by thermostimulated exoelectronic emission (TSEE). The TL and the TSEE glow curves of {alpha}-alumina from -196 to 700{sup 0}C are compared, to parallel one phototransfer observation with another and to draw various conclusions concerning the stability of the traps involved in dosimetric applications. (author).

  14. ON An Infra-\\(\\alpha\\)-Open Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Hakeem Othman; Md Hanif Page

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new class of set in general topology called an infra- \\(\\alpha\\) open set and we investigate fundamental properties by using this new class. The relation between infra-\\(\\alpha\\)-open set and other topological sets are studied. Moreover, In the light of this new definition, we also define some generalization of continuous mappings and discuss the relations between these new classes of mappings and other continuous mappings. Basic properties of these new mappings...

  15. Neurophysiological assessment of alpha pattern coma.

    OpenAIRE

    Obeso, J A; Iragui, M I; Marti-Masso, J. F.; Maravi, E; Teijeira, J M; Carrera, N; Teijeria, J

    1980-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials, blink reflexes, and H wave reflexes, were recorded on several days from three patients with alpha pattern coma. Coma was secondary to cardiac arrest in two cases and to brainstem infarction in one. Results are compatible with damage to the brainstem reticular formation with sparing of thalamo-cortical circuits as the main physiopathological characteristic of alpha pattern coma. This condition should not be regarded as a discrete entity when establishing the pr...

  16. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  17. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on ''Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy'' was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference

  18. Remote Associates Test and Alpha Brain Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Haarmann, Henk J.; George, Timothy; Smaliy, Alexei; Dien, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies found that performance on the remote associates test (RAT) improves after a period of incubation and that increased alpha brain waves over the right posterior brain predict the emergence of RAT insight solutions. We report an experiment that tested whether increased alpha brain waves during incubation improve RAT performance. Participants received two blocks of RAT items (RAT1 and RAT2), with the second block consisting of items that were not solved during the first block. Pa...

  19. Self-assembling, dynamic alphaPNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    In the recent report published in Science, Ghadiri and coworkers describe dynamic tPNAs, alphaPNA derivatives with a nucleobase attached via a thioester bond that are a step forward toward self-repairing and replicating molecules.......In the recent report published in Science, Ghadiri and coworkers describe dynamic tPNAs, alphaPNA derivatives with a nucleobase attached via a thioester bond that are a step forward toward self-repairing and replicating molecules....

  20. Alpha emitters in Chernobyl hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, R.; Kubica, B.; Szeglowski, Z.; Zuber, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland))

    1989-01-01

    The alpha radioactive component of hot particles from the Chernobyl fallout was analyzed for cases studied previously by gamma spectroscopy. Correlations established from the absolute alpha activity determination and high resolution analysis provided information on the release of actinides during the accident and on some aspects of the Chernobyl reactor fuel composition. Unexpected features revealed during the analysis of one specific particle are presented. (orig.).

  1. Effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C

    OpenAIRE

    Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C, we investigate $^{12}$C using a hybrid model that combines the Brink-Bloch cluster model with the $p_{3/2}$ subshell closure wave function. We have found that $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by spin-orbit force significantly changes cluster structures of excited $0^{+}$ states through orthogonality to lower states. Spatially developed cluster components of the $0^{+}_{2}$ state are reduced. The $...

  2. Probing surface distributions of $\\alpha$ clusters in $^{20}$Ne via $\\alpha$-transfer reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Tokuro; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of the $\\alpha$-cluster manifestation in bound states has not been obtained yet, although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of $\\alpha$-transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. We aim to verify the development of the $\\alpha$-cluster structure from observables. As the fi...

  3. Cytokine vaccination: neutralising IL-1alpha autoantibodies induced by immunisation with homologous IL-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, M; Hansen, M B; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Diamant, M; Nansen, A; Rieneck, K; Otterness, I G; Bendtzen, K

    High-affinity IgG autoantibodies (aAb) to IL-1alpha are among the most frequently found aAb to cytokines in humans. To establish an animal model with aAb to IL-1alpha, we immunised mice with recombinant murine IL-1alpha. Unprimed and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed BALB/cA mice were vaccinat...

  4. Phosphoglycerylethanolamine posttranslational modification of plant eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1alpha (eEF-1A) is a multifunctional protein. There are three known posttranslational modifications of eEF-1A that could potentially affect its function. Except for phosphorylation, the other posttranslational modifications have not been demonstrated in plants. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping, we show that carrot (Daucus carota L.) eEF-1A contains a phosphoglycerylethanolamine (PGE) posttranslational modification. eEF-1A was the only protein labeled with [14C]ethanolamine in carrot cells and was the predominant ethanolamine-labeled protein in Arabidopsis seedlings and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cell cultures. In vivo-labeling studies using [3H]glycerol, [32P][Pi,[14C]myristic acid, and [14C]linoleic acid indicated that the entire phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine is covalently attached to the protein. The PGE lipid modification did not affect the partitioning of eEF-1A in Triton X-114 or its actin-binding activity in in vitro assays. Our in vitro data indicate that this newly characterized posttranslational modification alone does not affect the function of eEF-1A. Therefore, the PGE lipid modification may work in combination with other posttranslational modifications to affect the distribution and the function of eEF-1A within the cell

  5. Expression and Hydroxylamine Cleavage of Thymosin Alpha 1 Concatemer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Teng Lai

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Human thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1 is an important peptide in the development and senescence of immunological competence in human, and many studies have reported the expression of this peptide. In this study, we designed and synthesized the Tα1 gene according to the E. coli codon usage preference and constructed a 6×Tα1 concatemer. The latter was inserted into an E. coli expression vector pET-22b (+, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3. After induction with IPTG, the concatemer protein was successfully expressed in E. coli then cleaved by hydroxylamine to release the Tα1 monomer. Gly-SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry confirmed that the recombinant protein was cleaved as intended. The bioactivity of the Tα1 monomer was analyzed by lymphocyte proliferation and by mitochondrial activity in two different tumor cell lines. This study provides a description of the preparation of a bioactive Tα1, which may prove useful in future biomedical research.

  6. Alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behavior of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants has been investigated since 2005. The main source of alpha nuclides is core contamination with fissile material (so called tramp uranium or tramp fuel) which deposits on fuel rod surfaces and leads to the build-up of transuranium nuclides. Such alpha-nuclides are of special interest for health physics due to their high biological effectiveness. Having very high dose factors they lead to high dose weighting in case of incorporation. At NPC 2008 first results of the joint research project were presented concerning tramp fuel and its impact to alpha nuclides. The present publication will cover the ongoing results of this research project. A special focus is taken to deduce recommendations which allow plant operation personal to recognize situations in advance which can lead to enhanced appearance of alpha nuclides. Depending on the fuel conditions in the core and the activity level of fission products of the reactor coolant a better prediction of the alpha situation at the following outage and maintenance can be deduced. (author)

  7. Alpha-emitting radioisotopes production for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institutet of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    This review discusses the production of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy labeled with alpha-particle is expected to be very useful for the treatment of monocellular cancer (e.g. leukemia) and micrometastasis at an early stage, residual tumor remained in tissues after chemotherapy and tumor resection, due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of alpha particle. Despite of the expected effectiveness of alpha-particle in radioimmunotherapy, its clinical research has not been activated by the several reasons, shortage of a suitable a-particle development and a reliable radionuclide production and supply system, appropriate antibody and chelator development. Among them, the establishment of radionuclide development and supply system is a key factor to make an alpha-immunotherapy more popular in clinical trial. Alpha-emitter can be produced by several methods, natural radionuclides, reactor irradiation, cyclotron irradiation, generator system and elution. Due to the sharply increasing demand of {sup 213}Bi, which is a most promising radionuclide in radioimmunotherapy and now has been produced with reactor, the cyclotron production system should be developed urgently to meet the demand.

  8. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  9. [Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelier, Aquiles A; Winter, Daniel Hugo; Jardim, José Roberto; Barboza, Carlos Eduardo Galvão; Cukier, Alberto; Miravitlles, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues. PMID:18695797

  10. Lorentz alpha orbit calculation in search of position suitable for escaping alpha particle diagnostics in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lorentz orbit code is developed to understand escaping alpha particle orbits and to contribute to the design of an escaping alpha particle probe in ITER. The code follows the full gyromotion of an alpha particle in ITER equilibrium, considering the toroidal field magnetic field ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils as well as full three-dimensional first wall panels placed at the outboard side of the torus. It is shown that alpha particles that exist in the peripheral region and have banana orbits intersect the first wall placed at the outboard side on the lower plane. (author)

  11. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VII. Spatially resolved H$\\alpha$ kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Orlitova, Ivana; Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Cannon, John M; Roth, Martin M; Bik, Arjan; Pardy, Stephen; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, Jens; Puschnig, Johannes; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger E; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We present integral field spectroscopic observations with the Potsdam Multi Aperture Spectrophotometer of all 14 galaxies in the $z\\sim 0.1$ Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS). We produce 2D line of sight velocity maps and velocity dispersion maps from the Balmer $\\alpha$ (H$\\alpha$) emission in our data cubes. These maps trace the spectral and spatial properties of the LARS galaxies' intrinsic Ly$\\alpha$ radiation field. We show our kinematic maps spatially registered onto the Hubble Space Telescope H$\\alpha$ and Lyman $\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) images. Only for individual galaxies a causal connection between spatially resolved H$\\alpha$ kinematics and Ly$\\alpha$ photometry can be conjectured. However, no general trend can be established for the whole sample. Furthermore, we compute non-parametric global kinematical statistics -- intrinsic velocity dispersion $\\sigma_0$, shearing velocity $v_\\mathrm{shear}$, and the $v_\\mathrm{shear}/\\sigma_0$ ratio -- from our kinematic maps. In general LARS galaxies are charac...

  12. On Cronbach’s Alpha as the Mean of All Possible k-Split Alphas

    OpenAIRE

    Matthijs J. Warrens

    2014-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is the most commonly used internal consistency reliability coefficient. Alpha is the mean of all possible k-split alphas if the items are divided into k parts of equal size. This result gives proper interpretations of alpha: interpretations that also hold if (some of) its assumptions are not valid. Here we consider the cases where the items cannot be split into parts of equal size. It is shown that if a k-split is made such that the items are divided as evenly as possible, t...

  13. Cytokine vaccination: neutralising IL-1alpha autoantibodies induced by immunisation with homologous IL-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, M; Hansen, M B; Thomsen, A R; Diamant, Marcus; Nansen, A; Rieneck, K; Otterness, I G; Bendtzen, K

    High-affinity IgG autoantibodies (aAb) to IL-1alpha are among the most frequently found aAb to cytokines in humans. To establish an animal model with aAb to IL-1alpha, we immunised mice with recombinant murine IL-1alpha. Unprimed and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed BALB/cA mice were vaccinated...... with IL-1alpha coupled to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD). Both unprimed and primed animals developed IgG aAb to IL-1alpha. These aAb persisted at high levels more than 100 days after vaccination and did not cross-react with murine IL-1beta. The induced anti-IL-1alpha aAb inhibited...... induced in mice by vaccination with recombinant murine IL-1alpha conjugated to PPD. Studies of the effects of IL-1alpha aAb in such animals may help clarify the importance of naturally occurring IL-1alpha aAb in humans and permit the evaluation of future therapies with cytokine aAb in patients with...

  14. Synthesis of tritiated 1-alpha-methadol and 1-alpha-acetylmethadol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, D.C.; Nam, N.H.; Pontikis, R. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital Fernand Widal, 75 - Paris (France)); Pichat, L. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service des Molecules Marquees)

    1982-04-01

    dl-Methadone was resolved by crystallization of its ammonium d- ..cap alpha.. -bromocamphor-..pi..-sulfonate salt to give d-methadone. The latter in ethyl acetate solution was reduced with tritium gas to 1-..cap alpha..-methadol /sup 3/H in presence of Adams platinum oxide at normal temperature and pressure. Acetylation of 1-..cap alpha..-carbinol hydrochloride by means of acetyl chloride afforded 1-..cap alpha..-acetylmethadol /sup 3/H, specific activity: 20 Ci/mMole. The positions and extent of tritium labelling were determined by /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy.

  15. H-alpha features with hot onsets III. Fibrils in Lyman-alpha and with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Rutten, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    In H-alpha most of the solar surface is covered by a dense canopy of long opaque fibrils, but predictions for quiet-Sun observations with ALMA have ignored this fact. Comparison with Ly-alpha suggests that the large opacity of H-alpha fibrils is caused by hot precursor events. Application of a recipe that assumes momentary Saha-Boltzmann extinction during their hot onset to millimeter wavelengths suggests that ALMA will observe the H-alpha fibril canopy, not acoustic shocks underneath, and will yield data more interesting than if this canopy were transparent.

  16. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  18. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  19. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E., E-mail: rerusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKay, Christopher P. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method - LAMIS - can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  20. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  1. Physical-chemical characterization and stability study of alpha-trypsin at ph 3.0 by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.M.C.; Santana, M.A.; Gomide, F.T.F.; Oliveira, J.S.; Vilas Boas, F.A.S.; Santoro, M.M.; Teixera, K.N. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas (ICB). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Miranda, A.A.C.; Biondi, I. [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Vasconcelos, A.B.; Bemquerer, M.P. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Parque Estacao Biologica (PqEB)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: {alpha}-Trypsin is a serine-protease with a polypeptide chain of 223 amino acid residues and six disulfide bridges. It is a globular protein with predominance of antiparallel {beta}-sheet secondary structure and it has two domains with similar structures. In the present work, a stability study of {alpha}-trypsin in the acid pH range was performed and physical-chemical denaturation parameters were measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The {alpha}-trypsin has a shelf-life (t{sub 95%}) of about ten months at pH 3.0 and 4 deg C and its hydrolysis into the {psi}-trypsin isoform is negligible during six months as monitored by mass spectrometry (Micromass Q-ToF). The observed {delta}H{sub cal}/{delta}H{sub vH} ratio is close to unity for {alpha}-trypsin denaturation, which suggests the occurrence of a two-state transition, devoid of molten-globule intermediates. At pH 3.0, {alpha}-trypsin unfolded with T{sub m} 325.9 K and {delta}H= 99.10 kcal mol{sup -1}, and the change in heat capacity between the native and unfolded forms of the protein was estimated to be 1.96 {+-} 0.18 kcal mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. The stability of {alpha}-trypsin calculated at 298 K and at pH 3.0 was {delta}G{sub U} = 6.10 kcal mol{sup -1}. These values are in the range expected for a small globular protein. These results show that the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding of {beta}-trypsin do not change substantially after its conversion to {alpha}-trypsin.

  2. Protective effects of plasma alpha-tocopherols on the risk of inorganic arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic plays an important role in producing oxidative stress in cultured cells. To investigate the interaction between high oxidative stress and low arsenic methylation capacity on arsenic carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the indices of oxidative stress, such as urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyquanine (8-OHdG), as well as plasma micronutrients and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma micronutrient levels were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The present study showed a significant protective effect of plasma alpha-tocopherol on UC risk. Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to urinary total arsenic concentrations and inorganic arsenic percentage (InAs%), and significantly positively related to dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%). There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. Study participants with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher urinary total arsenic, higher InAs%, higher MMA%, and lower DMA% had a higher UC risk than those with higher alpha-tocopherol and lower urinary total arsenic, lower InAs%, lower MMA%, and higher DMA%. These results suggest that plasma alpha-tocopherol might modify the risk of inorganic arsenic-related UC. - Research Highlights: → Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to UC risk. → There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. → People with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher total arsenic had increased UC risk.

  3. alpha-hydroxybutyrate is an early biomarker of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in a nondiabetic population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E Gall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease progression. Current diagnostic tests, such as glycemic indicators, have limitations in the early detection of insulin resistant individuals. We searched for novel biomarkers identifying these at-risk subjects. METHODS: Using mass spectrometry, non-targeted biochemical profiling was conducted in a cohort of 399 nondiabetic subjects representing a broad spectrum of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance (based on the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and oral glucose tolerance testing, respectively. RESULTS: Random forest statistical analysis selected alpha-hydroxybutyrate (alpha-HB as the top-ranked biochemical for separating insulin resistant (lower third of the clamp-derived M(FFM = 33 [12] micromol x min(-1 x kg(FFM (-1, median [interquartile range], n = 140 from insulin sensitive subjects (M(FFM = 66 [23] micromol x min(-1 x kg(FFM (-1 with a 76% accuracy. By targeted isotope dilution assay, plasma alpha-HB concentrations were reciprocally related to M(FFM; and by partition analysis, an alpha-HB value of 5 microg/ml was found to best separate insulin resistant from insulin sensitive subjects. alpha-HB also separated subjects with normal glucose tolerance from those with impaired fasting glycemia or impaired glucose tolerance independently of, and in an additive fashion to, insulin resistance. These associations were also independent of sex, age and BMI. Other metabolites from this global analysis that significantly correlated to insulin sensitivity included certain organic acid, amino acid, lysophospholipid, acylcarnitine and fatty acid species. Several metabolites are intermediates related to alpha-HB metabolism and biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS: alpha-hydroxybutyrate is an early marker for both insulin resistance and impaired glucose regulation. The underlying biochemical mechanisms may involve increased lipid oxidation and oxidative stress.

  4. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M;

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Alpha Com eclipse observing campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-12-01

    Drs. Matthew W. Muterspaugh and Gregory W. Henry (Tennessee State University) have requested AAVSO observers' ssistance in monitoring the possible Algol-like binary star alpha Com before, during, and after the eclipse they have predicted for mid-to-late January 2015. The PIs will be using the Fairborn Observatory automated photometric telescopes on Mt. Hopkins, but they are requesting additional observations not only to supplement theirs but also specifically to have good coverage in the event of bad weather at Mt. Hopkins. Alf Com has a 26-year period and is 4.32V at maximum. The expected amplitude of the eclipse is about 0.8 magnitude and the duration somewhere between 28 and 45 hours. The eclipse is predicted for January 25 ± three days (JD 2457047 ± 3). Muterspaugh at al. first calculated the possibility of a 2015 eclipse in 2010 (AJ). Muterspaugh and Henry recently published an article with updated information (arXiv 2014). V and/or R photometry (other bands welcome) is requested, with a minimal cadence of one measurement/2 hours, to make sure the eclipse is caught right as it begins and to ensure having multiple data points on any unseen objects that might eclipse as well. During eclipse, continuous observations are important. Infrared (H-band) observations could be interesting, should the CHARA array image the event. The precision photometry in the weeks before and after the eclipse is requested in order to catch possible evidence for planets or other materials around the eclipsing star. Updated astrometry from the current epoch would greatly improve the eclipse preductions. Charts with comparison star sequence for alf Com may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). The PIs recommend using the comparison stars HD 113848 (39 Com, HR 4946, HIP 63948, V=5.990, B-V=0.39, F4V) and HD 114520 (HIP 64312, V=6.820, B-V=0.46,F2II). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See AAVSO Alert Notice 506

  6. Mapping the X(+1) binding site of the Grb2-SH2 domain with alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Echeverría, C; Gay, B; Rahuel, J; Furet, P

    1999-10-18

    A series of phosphopeptides containing alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids (Ac(n)c, 3 activity as antagonists of the Grb2-SH2 domain has been determined in competitive binding assays. The SAR data obtained have been interpreted by using models constructed from the X-ray structure of the ligand-bound Grb2-SH2 domain. The used of alpha,alpha-disubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids to map the binding pockets of proteins expands the classical alanine scan concept and takes advantage of the known conformational preferences of these amino acids. PMID:10571147

  7. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of new steroidal antedrugs: [16alpha,17alpha-d] Isoxazoline and [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxy-iminoformyl isoxazoline derivatives of prednisolone and 9alpha-fluoroprednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan-K; Ko, Dong-H; You, Z; Khan, M Omar F; Lee, Henry J

    2006-03-01

    A series of new anti-inflammatory steroidal antedrugs with C-16,17-isoxazoline ring system were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were evaluated. We reported earlier that these compounds are promising antedrugs based on the results of 5-day rat croton oil ear edema assay. In the present study, most of these compounds showed high binding affinities to the glucocorticoid receptor of liver cytosol. 21-acetyloxy-9alpha-fluoro-11beta-hydroxy-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d] isoxazoline (FP-ISO-21AC) and 11beta,21-dihydroxy-9alpha-fluoro-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d] isoxazoline (FP-ISO-21OH) were found 5.0-, 5.3-fold more potent than prednisolone, respectively. Inhibitory effects of the antedrugs on the nitric oxide (NO) production were assessed using LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. All these steroidal antedrugs exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of NO production, but their relative potencies were lower than prednisolone. In vitro metabolism study in rat plasma showed that FP-ISO-21AC and 21-acetyloxy-9alpha-fluoro-11beta-hydroxy-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxyiminoformyl isoxazoline (FP-OXIM-21AC) were hydrolyzed rapidly, with the half-lives of 2.1 and 4.2 min, respectively. The half-lives of FP-ISO-21OH and 11beta,21-dihydroxy-9alpha-fluoro-3,20-dioxo-1,4-pregnadieno [16alpha,17alpha-d]-3'-hydroxyiminoformyl isoxazoline (FP-OXIM-21OH) were 92.2 and 110.2 min, respectively. PMID:16309722

  8. The role of mass spectrometry in medicinal plant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héthelyi, E; Tétényi, P; Dabi, E; Dános, B

    1987-11-01

    In phytochemical and chemotaxonomic research work mass spectrometry plays an outstandingly important role. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we established the chemotaxa of Tanacetum vulgare L. Chemotypes with essential oils containing 60-90% of artemisia ketone, carveol, dihydrocarvone, myrtenol, umbellulone, terpinen-4-ol, davanone, and Tagetes species containing various essential oils can be clearly distinguished by their spectra; we examined many variations of Tagetes erecta, T. lucida, T. minuta, T. patula and T. tenuifolia. We have identified alpha-beta-pinene-, 1,8-cineol-, linalool-, camphor-, nerol-, geraniol- and gamma-gurjonene as components of Achillea distans L. Injecting the essential oil direct from the oil-secreting organs of T. minuta plants we identified using GC/MS 6-10 and 16% eugenol from the involucral bract and hypsophyll, respectively, as well as beta-ocimene, dihydrotagetone, tagetone, Z- and E-ocimenones. In the course of studies on essential fatty acids Borago officinalis and Lappula squarrosa were selected from 70 species of the family Boraginaceae to obtain seed oil as a source of gamma-linolenic acid, and for the PG synthesis we isolated several grams of gamma-linolenic acid, as well as C18:4, i.e. octadecatetraenic acid, from L. squarrosa on the basis of the mass spectra. From the seed oil of Aquilegia vulgaris C18:3 (5) from the oil of Limnanthes dougloasii C20:1 (5) and from the seed oils of Delphinium consolida and of Tropaeolum species (T. majus, T. minus, T. peregrinum) C20:1 (11) fatty acids were identified on the basis of spectra. PMID:2962668

  9. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  10. The Lyman-alpha signature of the first galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Aaron; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    We present the Cosmic Lyman-$\\alpha$ Transfer code (COLT), a massively parallel Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, to simulate Lyman-$\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) resonant scattering through neutral hydrogen as a probe of the first galaxies. We explore the interaction of centrally produced Ly$\\alpha$ radiation with the host galactic environment. Ly$\\alpha$ photons emitted from the luminous starburst region escape with characteristic features in the line profile depending on the density distribution...

  11. ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst gives a tour of the new ALPHA-2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.

  12. Crystallization and melt behaviour of isotactic poly((4-alpha,alpha-dimethyl-benzyl)phenyl methacrylate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanEkenstein, GORA; Tan, YY

    1997-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behaviour of practically 100% isotactic poly((4-alpha,alpha-dimethylbenzyl) phenyl methacrylate) has been studied by d.s.c. and light microscopy. Crystallization from the melt seemed to be non-spherulitic. The maximum crystallization rate, which could only be determin

  13. Alpha particle radiography of ants using a 244Cm alpha source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particles emitted from a radioisotope 244Cm were used for the radiography of ants. Cellulose nitrate films, LR-115 from Kodak Pathe, were used as solid state nuclear track detectors to make the radiographs. Alpha particles of energies from 3.5 to 5.5 MeV were obtained by varying the air spacing between the 244Cm and the sample with stainless steel spacers of thickness from 2.4 to 0.5 cm to slow the 5.81 MeV alpha particles from the 244Cm by air. The resulting radiographs of the ants put on the LR-115 films and irradiated by alpha particles of different energies show that only the profiles of the ants were obtained when the ants were exposed to alpha particles of energies lower than 3.5 MeV, and almost all parts of the ant except a portion in the head were penetrated by alpha particles of energies higher than 5.0 MeV to register high density alpha tracks on the LR-115. The details of the internal organs of the ant can be shown clearly by radiography with alpha particles of energies between 4.0 and 5.0 MeV. (author)

  14. On the Diffuse Lyman-alpha Halo Around Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Ethan; Cen, Renyue; Sadoun, Raphael; Momose, Rieko; Ouchi, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Ly$\\alpha$ photons scattered by neutral hydrogen atoms in the circumgalactic media or produced in the halos of star-forming galaxies are expected to lead to extended Ly$\\alpha$ emission around galaxies. Such low surface brightness Ly$\\alpha$ halos (LAHs) have been detected by stacking Ly$\\alpha$ images of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We study the origin of LAHs by performing radiative transfer modeling of nine $z=3.1$ Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) in a high resolution hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation. We develop a method of computing the mean Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile of each LAE by effectively integrating over many different observing directions. Without adjusting any parameters, our model yields an average Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile in remarkable agreement with observations. We find that observed LAHs can not be accounted for solely by photons originating from the central LAE and scattered to large radii by hydrogen atoms in the circumgalactic gas. Instead, Ly$\\alpha$ em...

  15. Consistent Measurements of $\\alpha_{s}$ from Precise Oriented Event Shape Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Rodrigo, Germán; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    2000-01-01

    An updated analysis using about 1.5 million events recorded at $\\sqrt{s} =M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector in 1994 is presented. Eighteen infrared and collinear safe event shape observables are measured as a function of the polar angle of the thrust axis. The data are compared to theoretical calculations in${\\cal O} (\\alpha_s^2)$ including the event orientation. A combined fit of $\\alpha_s$ and of the renormalization scale $x_{\\mu}$ in $\\cal O(\\alpha_s^2$)yields an excellent description of the high statistics data. The weighted average from 18 observables including quark mass effects and correlations is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = 0.1174 \\pm 0.0026$. The final result, derived from the jet cone energy fraction, the observable with the smallest theoretical and experimental uncertainty, is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = =0:1180 0:0006(exp:) 0:0013(hadr:) 0:0008(scale) 0:0007(mass). Further studies include an s determination using theoretical predictions in the next-to-leading log approximation (NLLA), matched NLLA and O(\\alpha^{2}_{s})...

  16. Peculiarities of the modern neutron spectrometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu P Popov

    2001-08-01

    Neutron spectrometry provides many branches of science and technology with the necessary data. Usually the main part of the data is supplied by powerful neutron time-of-flight spectrometers. Nevertheless there are many other very effective but simpler and cheaper neutron spectroscopy methods on accelerators, suitable for solution of plenty of scientific and applied problems (for example, in astrophysics and radioactive waste transmutation). The methods of slowing-down spectrometry in lead and graphite, generating of neutron spectra, characteristic for nucleosynthesis in the stars, and neutron spectrometry by means of primary -transition shift are discussed in the report.

  17. Syntheses of alpha-tocopheryl glycosides by glucosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Charles, Rajachristu Einstein; Sivakumar, Ramaiah; Divakar, Soundar

    2008-08-01

    Enzymatic syntheses of water-soluble alpha-tocopheryl glycosides were carried out in di-isopropyl ether using amyloglucosidase from Rhizopus mold or beta-glucosidase isolated from sweet almond. Optimum conditions for the amyloglucosidase were: alpha-tocopherol 0.5 mmol, D-glucose 0.5 mmol, 400 activity unit (AU) amyloglucosidase, 0.2 mM pH 7 phosphate buffer and 72 h; and for the beta-glucosidase: alpha-tocopherol 0.5 mmol, D: -glucose 0.5 mmol, 110 AU beta-glucosidase, 0.1 mM pH 6 phosphate buffer and 72 h. Out of 11 carbohydrates employed, amyloglucosidase reacted only with D-glucose to give 50% of 6-O-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol. However, the beta-glucosidase gave 6-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol, 6-O-(alpha-D-galactopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol, 6-O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol, 6-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol and 6-O-(beta-D-mannopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol in yields ranging from 10-25%. Water solubility of 6-O-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)alpha-tocopherol was 26 g/l at 25 degrees C. alpha-Tocopheryl glycosides showed antioxidant activities with IC(50) values from 0.5 to 1 mM and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with IC(50) values from 1.3 to 2.6 mM. PMID:18368294

  18. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  19. Alpha decay favoured isotopes of some superheavy nuclei: Spontaneous fission versus alpha decay

    CERN Document Server

    Kiren, O V; Bubbly, S G

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fission and alpha decay are the main decay modes for superheavy nuclei. The superheavy nuclei which have small alpha decay half-life compared to spontaneous fission half-life will survive fission and can be detected in the laboratory through alpha decay. We have studied the alpha decay half-life and spontaneous half-life of some superheavy elements in the atomic range Z = 100-130. Spontaneous fission half-lives of superheavy nuclei have been calculated using the phenomenological formula and the alpha decay half-lives using Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski formula (Sobiczewski et al. 1989), semi empirical relation of Brown (1992) and formula based on generalized liquid drop model proposed by Dasgupta-Schubert and Reyes (2007). The results are reported here.

  20. Measurements of $\\alpha_{s}$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Flagmeyer, U

    2000-01-01

    The data collected with DELPHI during the LEP1 period is used to perform a simultaneous fit to the strong coupling constant alpha /sub s/ in 2/sup nd/ order perturbation theory and to the renormalisation scale x/sub mu /. The results are compared to alpha /sub s/ fits in 2 /sup nd/ order perturbation theory with fixed scale x/sub mu / and to other theoretically motivated scale setting methods. To determine the energy dependence of alpha /sub s/, event shape distributions and their mean values are measured for square root (s)=48 GeV to 189 GeV. The strong coupling alpha /sub s/ is extracted in O( alpha /sub s //sup 2/). Next to leading log approximation (NLLA) and in a combined scheme using - evaluated with fragmentation model generators, and an analytical power ansatz. (16 refs).

  1. Non-adiabatic dynamics in 10Be with the microscopic alpha+alpha+n+n model

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, M

    2006-01-01

    The alpha+6He low-energy reactions and the structural changes of 10Be in the microscopic alpha+alpha+n+n model are studied by the generalized two-center cluster model with the Kohn-Hulthen-Kato variation method. It is found that, in the inelastic scattering to the alpha+6He(2+) channel, characteristic enhancements are expected as the results of the parity-dependent non-adiabatic dynamics. In the positive parity state, the enhancement originates from the no-adiabatic eigenstate generated by the radial excitation of the relative motion between two alpha-cores. On the other hand, the enhancement in the negative parity state is induced by the Landau-Zener level-crossing. These non-adiabatic processes are discussed in connection to the formation of the inversion doublet in the compound system of 10Be.

  2. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  3. H-alpha Observations of MKW10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Harold; Coble, Kimberly A.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project looking at clusters and groups of galaxies to investigate the effects of environment on star formation, we analyzed H-alpha and R-band observations of the group MKW10 from the WIYN 0.9-m telescope with MOSAIC camera at Kitt Peak. We continuum-subtract the H-alpha images by scaling and subtracting the broadband R images. This process includes: determining the seeing of each image by calculating the FWHM values of several stars in the image; convolving all images to the worst seeing; stacking images for each filter; subtracting sky background; scaling the R image to H-alpha; and subtracting the scaled R from H-alpha. We then use the H-alpha-continuum-subtracted image to perform surface photometry of individual galaxies in MKW10. The data will be used to determine star formation rates and distributions of galaxies in this group environment and will be compared to results for galaxies in other UAT group and cluster environments. Analysis is ongoing.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and the Illinois Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Alpha methyldopa induced hepatotoxicity in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmasri Ramalingappa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of gestational hepatitis due to alpha-methyldopa and briefly review the literature on alpha-methyldopa-induced hepatotoxicity in pregnancy. A 32 year old woman, primigravida with 34 weeks of gestation with pre eclampsia, presented with symptoms of nausea, dark coloured urine and jaundice. She was on alpha methyldopa (Aldomet 250 mg thrice a day since the last five weeks. Laboratory investigations revealed raised bilirubin, serum aspartate transaminases and serum alanine transaminases. Platelets were normal. Peripheral smear did not show haemolysis. With the exclusion of viral, haemolytic and obstructive causes, drug induced jaundice was considered as a differential diagnosis. Alpha methyldopa was withdrawn and replaced with nifedipine for her pre eclampsia treatment. Her repeat bilirubin level done two weeks later showed a drop. She went into labour at 38 weeks and delivered vaginally. In postpartum follow up her liver tests returned to normal in two weeks, about six weeks after stopping methyldopa. Hepatotoxicity should be considered as one of the adverse drug reaction of alpha methyldopa. It is not possible at present to predict which patients will develop liver disease following the administration of this drug. An awareness of the possibility of methyldopa induced hepatotoxicity should be present in the clinician's mind and liver function tests should be done at regular intervals. The occasional occurrence of this harmful side effect is not a contraindication to the use of this antihypertensive agent. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 805-807

  5. Ultratrace analysis of uranium and plutonium by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Uranium and plutonium have traditionally been analyzed using alpha energy spectrometry. Both isotopic compositions and elemental abundances can be characterized on samples containing microgram to milligram quantities of uranium and nanogram to microgram quantities of plutonium. In the past ten years or so, considerable interest has developed in measuring nanograms quantities of uranium and sub-picogram quantities of plutonium in environmental samples. Such measurements require high sensitivity and as a consequence, sensitive mass spectrometric-based methods have been developed. Thus, the analysis of uranium and plutonium have gone from counting decays to counting atoms, with considerable increases in both sensitivity and precision for isotopic measurements. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we have developed highly sensitive methods to analyze uranium and plutonium in environmental samples. The development of an ultratrace analysis capability for measuring uranium and plutonium has arisen from a need to detect and characterize environmental samples for signatures associated with nuclear industry processes. Our most sensitive well-developed methodologies employ thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), however, recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have shown considerable promise for use in detecting uranium and plutonium at ultratrace levels. The work at PNNL has included the development of both chemical separation and purification techniques, as well as the development of mass spectrometric instrumentation and techniques. At the heart of our methodology for TIMS analysis is a procedure that utilizes 100-microliter-volumes of analyte for chemical processing to purify, separate, and load actinide elements into resin beads for subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The resin bead technique has been combined with a thorough knowledge of the physicochemistry of thermal ion emission to achieve

  6. L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine inhibits the transfer function of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hiroaki; Westerman, Jan; Snoek, Gerry T; Taraschi, Theodore F; Janes, Nathan

    2003-12-30

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PITP-alpha) is a bifunctional phospholipid transfer protein that is highly selective for phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho). Polar lipid metabolites, including L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GroPCho), increasingly have been linked to changes in cellular function and to disease. In this study, polar lipid metabolites of PtdIns and PtdCho were tested for their ability to influence PITP-alpha activity. GroPCho inhibited the ability of PITP-alpha to transfer PtdIns or PtdCho between liposomes. The IC(50) of both processes was dependent on membrane composition. D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate and glycerylphosphorylinositol modestly enhanced PITP-alpha-mediated phospholipid transfer. Choline, phosphorylcholine (PCho), CDP-choline, glyceryl-3-phosphate, myo-inositol and D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate had little effect. Membrane surface charge was a strong determinant of the GroPCho inhibition with the inhibition being greatest for highly anionic membranes. GroPCho was shown to enhance the binding of PITP-alpha to anionic vesicles. In membranes of low surface charge, phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) was a determinant enabling the GroPCho inhibition. Anionic charge and PtdEtn content appeared to increase the strength of PITP-alpha-membrane interactions. The GroPCho-enhanced PITP-alpha-membrane binding was sufficient to cause inhibition, but not sufficient to account for the extent of inhibition observed. Processes associated with strengthened PITP-alpha-membrane binding in the presence of GroPCho appeared to impair the phospholipid insertion/extraction process. PMID:14729069

  7. The Story of Alpha - In Three Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautecoeur, Jean-Paul

    2001-09-01

    The article presents a retrospective history of the ALPHA series of publications. This action-research project (later called "cooperative research") on literacy and basic education is divided into three periods of seven years each. The first one, "Construction", involved assisting the nascent literacy movement in Québec and Canada by given it a theoretical, critical and ideological basis. In the second period, "Ruptures", the project distanced itself somewhat from the literacy movement, whose success, according to the author, was dubious. During the same period ALPHA systematised its critical function and internationalised its field of research. The third phase, "Wanderings", involved a different research paradigm, in which the project explored basic education at community level in connection with local development initiatives. This biographical/autobiographical account ends with the last publication ALPHA 2000, evincing an ecological vision for alternative education and sustainable communities, partly documented in the Arab countries.

  8. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  9. Relativistic effects in Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z = 2 - 5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar- Lyman-$\\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects can be as large as 30% at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale, which is much larger than anticipated and mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross- correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considerin...

  10. Iron modulates the alpha chain of fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Jacobsen, Wayne K

    2016-04-01

    Iron-bound fibrinogen has been noted to accelerate plasmatic coagulation in patients with divergent conditions involving upregulation of heme oxygenase activity, including hemodialysis, Alzheimer's disease, sickle cell anemia, and chronic migraine. Our goal was to determine if a site of iron-fibrinogen interaction was on the alpha chain. Using thrombelastography, we compared the coagulation kinetic profiles of plasma exposed to 0-10 µM ferric chloride after activation of coagulation with thrombin generated by contact activation of plasma with the plastic sample cup or by exposure to 1 µg/ml of Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (rich in ancrod activity), which causes coagulation via polymerization of alpha chain monomers. Venom mediated coagulation always occurred before thrombin activated thrombus formation, and ferric chloride always diminished the time of onset of coagulation and increased the velocity of clot growth. Iron enhances plasmatic coagulation kinetics by modulating the alpha chain of fibrinogen. PMID:26782808

  11. Calculation of nuclear radius using alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a Quantum Theory approach for the Alpha-Decay process, a formula is deduced for determination of the nuclear radius of the s-state, that is, a nuclear model with a spherical shell. The hypothesis that it is possible to individualize the alpha particle and the daughter nucleus at the moment of the alpha particle emission is considered. In considered in these conditions, the treatment of a two body problem considered as point particles, repelling each other by Coulomb's Law. Using the new values of the fundamental physical constants, experimentally determinated, by substitution of their numerical values in the proposed, new values of nuclear radii are obtained. These values are compared with those found in the literature. (author)

  12. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  13. Review on alpha sub s at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Wicke, D

    2000-01-01

    To measure the strong coupling alpha sub s from event shape observables two ingredients are necessary: a perturbative prediction containing the dependence of observables on alpha sub s and a description of the hadronisation process to match the perturbative prediction with the hadronic data. As perturbative prediction O(alpha sup 2 sub s), NLLA and combined calculations are available. Beside the well known Monte-Carlo based models also analytical predictions, so called power corrections, exist to describe the hadronisation. Advantages and disadvantages of the different resulting methods for determining the strong coupling and its energy dependence will be discussed, the newest DELPHI results will be presented, and an overview of the LEP results will be included.

  14. Anomalous atomic volume of alpha-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollar, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have performed full charge-density calculations for the equilibrium atomic volumes of the alpha-phase light actinide metals using the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The average deviation between the experimental and the GGA atomic radii is 1.......3%. The comparison between the LDA and GGA results show that the anomalously large atomic volume of alpha-Pu relative to alpha-Np can be ascribed to exchange-correlation effects connected with the presence of low coordinated sites in the structure where the f electrons are close to the onset of...... localization. This effect is correctly described in the GGA but not in the LDA....

  15. NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility was created under the auspices of the Office of the Scientific Director to provide high-end mass-spectrometric...

  16. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information...... from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene...... for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  17. Photon spectrometry utilizing neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having in mind the time spent on the uneventful work of characterization of the radiation beams used in a ionizing radiation metrology laboratory, the Metrology Service of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste - CRCN-NE verified the applicability of artificial intelligence (artificial neural networks) to perform the spectrometry in photon fields. For this, was developed a multilayer neural network, as an application for the classification of patterns in energy, associated with a thermoluminescent dosimetric system (TLD-700 and TLD-600). A set of dosimeters was initially exposed to various well known medium energies, between 40 keV and 1.2 MeV, coinciding with the beams determined by ISO 4037 standard, for the dose of 10 mSv in the quantity Hp(10), on a chest phantom (ISO slab phantom) with the purpose of generating a set of training data for the neural network. Subsequently, a new set of dosimeters irradiated in unknown energies was presented to the network with the purpose to test the method. The methodology used in this work was suitable for application in the classification of energy beams, having obtained 100% of the classification performed. (authors)

  18. Proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a low detection threshold and a fast response time. Commercially available set-ups are usually based on quadrupole analysers but recently new instruments based on time-of-flight (PTR-ToF-MS) analysers have been proposed and commercialized. PTR-MS has been successfully applied to a variety of fields including environmental science, food science and technology, plant physiology and medical science. Many new challenges arise from the newly available PTR-ToF-MS instruments, ranging from mass calibration and absolute VOC concentration determination to data mining and sample classification. This thesis addresses some of these problems in a coherent framework. Moreover, relevant applications in food science and technology are presented. It includes twelve papers published in peer reviewed journals. Some of them address methodological issues regarding PTR-ToF-MS; the others contain applicative studies of PTR-ToF-MS to food science and technology. Among them, there are the first two published applications of PTR-ToF-MS in this field. (author)

  19. Alpha activity measurements in Anarak copper mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha radiations in the ground arises from the decay of naturally occurring uranium and thorium, which are widely distributed in soils and rocks. According to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports, the highest of alpha activity is found in locations near copper mines. In this study, the amounts of natural activity of alpha emitters for 31 samples of surface soil of Talmesi Anarak mine, located in center of Iran, are measured by Nuclear Track method. Having virtually zero background and exposure time, are advantages of this method. After sampling, all of the 31 samples were transferred to laboratory to place CR-39 detectors vertically in them. In next step, CR-39 detectors were etched in NaOH 6 M, aqueous solution at 70 °C for 4 h. Then, number of tracks per area unit was counted by an optical microscope. The amounts of alpha activity were calculated in all samples and range of minimum 1.40E + 04 to maximum 3.03E + 05 Bq/kg .And also the activity of Th-232 and U-238 are measured by alpha-track method. Moreover “equivalent uranium” (eU) and “equivalent thorium” (eTh) by Hp-Ge detector, were calculated. - Highlights: ► We studied measuring the alpha activity in soils samples near copper mine by CR-39. ► According to experiments and mechanism of track formation, 2 formulas have introduced. ► We studied the accuracy of 2 formulas and present the optimal formula. ► Our results show these formulas are the same. ► Also we could calculate the concentration of U-238 and Th-232 by results of CR-39

  20. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to prese...