WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha radioactivity measurement

  1. Ion current prediction model considering columnar recombination in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Susumu; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Aoyama, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    We present a reinforced ion current prediction model in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation. Although our previous model explained the qualitative trend of the measured ion current values, the absolute values of the theoretical curves were about two times as large as the measured values. In order to accurately predict the measured values, we reinforced our model by considering columnar recombination and turbulent diffusion, which affects columnar recombination. Our new model explained the considerable ion loss in the early stage of ion diffusion and narrowed the gap between the theoretical and measured values. The model also predicted suppression of ion loss due to columnar recombination by spraying a high-speed air flow near a contaminated surface. This suppression was experimentally investigated and confirmed. In conclusion, we quantitatively clarified the theoretical relation between alpha radioactivity and ion current in laminar flow and turbulent pipe flow. (author)

  2. Measurement of Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Radioactivity of River Yobe, North Eastern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abba, H. T.; Sadiq, U.; Adeyemo, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity of River Yobe has been carried out. Fifteen samples of the river water were collected from the farming, fishing, domestic/livestock and control areas along the river and were analyzed using desktop alpha/beta (MPC 2000- DP) counting system. The count results show the average alpha activities in farming, fishing, domestic/livestock and control areas are 0.207±0.082, 0.257±0.13, 0.437±0.315 and 0.237±0.10 Bq L -1 , respectively. The average beta activities in the four areas are 0.813±0.122, 0.308±0.0145, 0.563±0.230 and 0.225±0.0096 Bq L -1 , respectively. The overall results show that the alpha and beta activities in the four areas are far below the practical screening level of radioactivity in drinking water of 0.5 Bq L -1 for alpha and 1 Bq L -1 for beta recommended by CEC-FAO and WHO and therefore may not pose any serious detrimental health side-effects to the public users of the river.

  3. Measurement of natural radioactivity in chemical fertilizer and agricultural soil: evidence of high alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radiation from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Radionuclides in phosphate fertilizer belonging to 232Th and 238U series as well as radioisotope of potassium (40K) are the major contributors of outdoor terrestrial natural radiation. The study of alpha activity in fertilizers, which is the first ever in West Bengal, has been performed in order to determine the effect of the use of phosphate fertilizers on human health. The data have been compared with the alpha activity of different types of chemical fertilizers. The measurement of alpha activity in surface soil samples collected from the cultivated land was also performed. The sampling sites were randomly selected in the cultivated land in the Midnapore district, which is the largest district in West Bengal. The phosphate fertilizer is widely used for large agricultural production, mainly potatoes. The alpha activities have been measured using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The results show that alpha activity of those fertilizer and soil samples varies from 141 Bq/kg to 2,589 Bq/kg and from 109 Bq/kg to 660 Bq/kg, respectively. These results were used to estimate environmental radiation exposure on human health contributed by the direct application of fertilizers.

  4. Suma-alpha software description. Study of its applications to detection problems and environmental radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Perez, C.

    2010-01-01

    Software named suma-espectros has been developed by TECNASA/CIEMAT for adding counts automatically from the alpha spectra, energy to energy, with the purpose of: evaluating real background of alpha spectrometers, studying its temporal variations, increasing the possibilities of isotopes detection -where it has been impossible to detect due elapsed time of the measurement- and implementing other applications. The programme is written in Visual-Basic and it can export data to Excel spreadsheets for later treatment. The software has established by default a channels range for adding the counts energy by energy but it can be adapted to the analysis of different isotopes and backgrounds simply changing a text file that is incorporated to the programme. The description of the programme management is described for whoever can realise its applications immediately. This software has the advantage of emitting an add-spectrum in cnf format that is used by alpha analyst (Genie 2K) for de convoluting spectra or doing calculations. (Author) 3 refs.

  5. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  6. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.C. de.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author) [pt

  7. Measurement of alpha radioactive air pollutants in fly ash brick dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.P.; Kant, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    The exposure of population to high concentrations of radon and its daughters for a long period lead to pathological effects like the respiratory functional changes and the occurrence of lung cancer. In the present study indoor radon monitoring has been carried out in fly ash brick dwellings in some villages/towns of district Faridabad, Haryana (India) using alpha sensitive LR-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors. The radon concentration levels in fly ash brick dwellings varied from 197 to 448 Bq m -3 with an average of 277±13 Bq m -3 while annual effective dose received by the occupants varied from 3.4 to 7.7 mSv with an average of 4.8±0.2 mSv. These results have been compared with the radon levels found in cemented and mud dwellings taken from our studies for these dwellings. These studies were also made simultaneously along with fly ash dwellings using same technique and in the same regions

  8. Alpha radioactivity in cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.; Eisenbud, M.; Harley, N.H.

    1980-01-01

    The α activity of cigarette smoke tar deposited onto membrane filters was found to be associated with the relatively insoluble fraction. Perfusion of the tar with physiological saline resulted in no change in the mean measured activity, but there was more variability in the measured values for the perfused tar than for the initial tar samples. Analysis of cigarette smoke condensate shows that radium and thorium are present, but over 99% of the α activity results from 210 Po. Repeat measurements after a time lapse of 2 1/2 years indicate that the initial 210 Pb content of the tar is roughly 30 to 40% of the original 210 Po content for both unprocessed and perfused samples. An increase in the α activity concentration of smoke deposited in lung tissue may result from the lack of solubility of the radioactive material compared with other smoke constituents

  9. Alpha radioactivity in Indian cement samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nain, M.; Chauhan, R. P.; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    The essential constituents of radioactive and each of cements like lime, silica and alumina are derived from earth's crust in which radioactive elements like uranium, thorium etc are also present in varying amounts almost everywhere. These two elements are considered as the parent elements of uranium and thorium radioactive decay series in which radon and thoron are produced respectively as decay products. In the present study the samples of ordinary Portland cement , Portland pozzolana cement and some other cementious finishing materials like white cement, Plaster of Paris , cement putty etc were collected and analysed for radium and radon concentrations along with radon exhalation rates. Materials and Methods: Alpha sensitive LR-115 Type II plastic track detectors commonly known as S olid State Nuclear Track Detectors w ere used to measure the radium and radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The Chemical etching in NaOH at 60 C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon and radium concentrations along with exhalation rate of radon, were determined using required formulae. Results: The radon and radium concentration in various brands of cements found to vary from 333±9.9 to 506±13.3 Bq m-3 and from 3.7±0.1 to 5.6±0.2 Bq k g-1 while in various cementious finishing materials used in the construction, these were found to vary from 378±19.7 to 550±9.8 Bq m-3 and from 4.2±0.2 to 6.1±0.1 Bq Kg-1, respectively. Based on the data the mass and surface exhalation rates were also calculated Conclusion: The measurements indicate that there is marginal variation of the concentration of radium and radon in various brands of cements in India with lower levels in the cement samples having red oxide and higher levels in fly ash based cement

  10. Radioactive measurements in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsa, S.

    1979-01-01

    The book reviews the industrial applications of radioactive isotopes. The introduction refreshes the reader's knowledge of radioactive decay, radioactive radiations and measuring techniques. Then the special problems of threshold detection, level indication, thickness measurements, measurements of layer thickness applying beta-reflexion, density measurements, humidity measurements, and the determination of the composition of different materials are detailed. In each chapter the principle of a given technique, the available equipment, the possibilities of controlling systems and results of concrete measurements are discussed. The last chapter deals with the practical aspects of the industrial installation of radioactive measuring systems. (L.E.)

  11. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  12. Gross alpha radioactivity of drinking water in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Gomez, J.; Greaves, E.D.; Herrera, O.; Salazar, V.; Smith, A.

    1997-01-01

    Bottled mineral water is consumed by a large population in Venezuela. The alpha emitters concentration was measured in samples of bottled water and water springs collected near the surface. Approximately 30% of the total mineral water suppliers was monitored. a database on natural and artificial radioactivity in drinking water was produced. Results indicate that 54% of the waters sampled contain a total alpha radioactivity of less than 0.185 Bql -1 and only 12% above 0.37 Bql -1 . Our results revealed a total annual dose of 2.3 mSv year -1 . (author)

  13. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  14. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  15. Measurement of radioactivity in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, L.

    1990-01-01

    Public concern about the levels of radioactivity release to the environment whether authorised discharges or resulting from nuclear accident, has increased in recent years. Consequently there is increasing pressure for reliable data on the distribution of radioactivity and the extent of its intrusion into food chains and water supplies. As a result a number of laboratories not experienced in radioactivity measurements have acquired nucleonic counting equipment. These notes explore the underlying basics and indicate sources of essential data and information which are required for a better understanding of radioactivity measurements. Particular attention is directed to the screening tests which are usually designated ''gross'' alpha and ''gross'' beta activity measurement. (author)

  16. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near backgr...

  17. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  18. Rapid quantification of alpha emitters in low- and intermediate-level dry radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae-Hong Park; Eul-Hye Jeon; Yong Sul Choi; Jong-Ho Park; Hong Joo Ahn; Yong Jun Park

    2016-01-01

    We developed a rapid quantification method of Pu, Am, and Cm in low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste using TRU resin, alpha spectrometry, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry for radioactive waste disposal. In particular, we focused on the optimization of sample preparation methods for alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry to reduce the analysis time. The optimized method used Am and Pu stripping solutions for micro-coprecipitation and showed good recovery and alpha spectrum resolution for alpha counting. In addition, appropriate selection of Pu elution solution decreased the sample preparation time for thermal ionization mass spectrometry measurements. (author)

  19. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  20. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  1. Environmental radioactivity intercomparison measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the context of the North Cotentin radioecological group set up in 1997 by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Secretariat d'Etat a la Sante, the Swiss Federal Office of Public health, a national organization of independent status with respect to nuclear energy, conducted a series of measurements in the north Cotentin in 1998. Some sites proposed by local association 'Angry mothers' were examined in particular. This association has now taken the initiative to organize a large scale international intercomparison, ' North Cotentin 2000', in the vicinity of local nuclear installations. Besides the scientific aspect of the intercomparison, a specific aim of this intercomparison consists in providing to the local population with a real opportunity for direct exchange with participating international teams. The primary concern of the workshop is the determination, by in situ gamma spectrometry, of both natural and artificial concentrations and resulting ambient dose rates at selected marine ( beach) and terrestrial sites. A particular aim of the workshop also is to test the capacity of mobile teams to produce reliable results in the field of low level measurements on trace of special radionuclides (I 129 , Sr 90 , H 3 , C 14 , and alpha emitters) from environmental samples, using both direct ( in situ) and differed ( laboratory methods). an overview of the results obtained will be prepared for the benefit of the public. (N.C.)

  2. Radioactivity measurements principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Spernol, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors have addressed the basic need for internationally consistent standards and methods demanded by the new and increasing use of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds. Particular emphasis is given to the basic and practical problems that may be encountered in measuring radioactivity. The text provides information and recommendations in the areas of radiation protection, focusing on quality control and the precautions necessary for the preparation and handling of radioactive substances. New information is also presented on the applications of both traditiona

  3. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perot, B.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author)

  4. Alpha activity measurement with lsc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, R. I.; Dulama, C. N.; Ciocirlan, C. N.; Toma, A.; Stoica, S. M.; Valeca, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we showed that the alpha activity in liquid samples can be measured using a liquid scintillation analyzer without alpha/beta discrimination capability. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the performances of the method and to optimize the procedure of the sample preparation. A series of tests was performed to validate the procedure of alpha emitting radionuclides extraction in aqueous samples with Actinide Resin, especially regarding to the contact time required to extract all alpha nuclides. The main conclusions were that a minimum 18 hours stirring time is needed to achieve a percent recovery of the alpha nuclides grater than 90% and that the counting efficiency of alphas measurements with LSC is nearly 100%. (authors)

  5. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Half-lives for alpha radioactivity from proton-rich even Pb isotopes in the range A = 182–202 have been calculated using the unified fission-like approach. The geometrical shape of the potential barrier is parametrized in terms of a highly versatile, asymmetric and analytically solvable form of potential based on ...

  6. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Half-lives for alpha radioactivity from proton-rich even Pb isotopes in the range = 182–202 have been calculated using the unified fission-like approach. The geometrical shape of the potential barrier is parametrized in terms of a highly versatile, asymmetric and analytically solvable form of potential based on Ginnochio's ...

  7. Determination of specific alpha-radioactivity of flora samples from semipalatinsk test site (STS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blekhman, A.M.; Dujsenbaev, A.; Orazova, A.O.

    1999-01-01

    For further rehabilitation of soil earlier contaminated with radioactive fallout, the method of radionuclide absorption by plants is vital. The last updating of electronic system of the facility meant to analyze impulse shape /2/ helped to enlarge dynamical range of registration and reduction of identification threshold for alpha particles up to 50 keV. We have developed methods for STS flora samples preparation and performed first measurements of their specific alpha activity. Measurement results are in table 1. Measurement results analysis shows that STS flora samples can accumulate considerable concentrations of alpha active nuclides

  8. Investigation of (alpha, p) reactions using a radioactive beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bradfield-Smith, W; Di Pietro, A; Laird, A M; Ostrowski, A N; Shotter, A C; Woods, P J; Cherubini, S; Galster, W; Graulich, J S; Leleux, P; Michel, L; Ninane, A; Vervier, J; Görres, J; Wiescher, M; Rahighi, J; Hinnefeld, J

    1999-01-01

    Reactions such as sup 1 sup 8 Ne(alpha, p) sup 2 sup 1 Na of importance to Nuclear Astrophysics may be studied directly through the use of a radioactive beam and a gaseous helium target. A system to study such reactions has been developed and tested using the sup 1 sup 3 N beam available at the Radioactive Ion Beam facility (RIB) at Louvain-la-Neuve. This (alpha, p) reaction was chosen as previous studies of the inverse reaction sup 1 sup 6 O(p, alpha) sup 1 sup 3 N allowed the resonance strength of a strong resonance at 8.07 MeV (Tilley et al., Nucl. Phys. A 564 (1993) 139) in the compound nucleus sup 1 sup 7 F to be calculated and compared with that obtained through experiment. These resonance strengths showed good agreement and so validated the technique for further work.

  9. Cross section measurements on radioactive samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, P.E.; O' Brien, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a system over the past few years at the Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) for making (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) measurements on (mainly) radioactive nuclei. Measurements have included {sup 7}Be(n,p){sup 7}Li, {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C, {sup 17}O(n,{alpha}){sup 14}C, {sup 22}Na(n,p){sup 22}Ne, {sup 22}Na(n,{alpha}){sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl(n,p){sup 35}S and {sup 36}Cl(n,p){sup 36}S. The major basic physics motivation for these measurements has been the nuclear astrophysics to be learned. Currently, we are assembling a 4{pi} detector of barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) for making (n,{gamma}) measurements on radioactive nuclei with relatively short half lives. Once operational, this new detector should allow us to expand our measurements to many more nuclei, and to a broader range of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics issues addressed. Results of recent measurements are given and future plans are discussed. 38 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Assessment of alpha radioactivity in lipstick, nailpolish, toothpaste and vermilion using CR-39 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Maiti, Sunil; Haldar, Subrata; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Bhaitacharyya, Rini

    2010-04-01

    Human beings are always exposed to radiation from chemical cosmetics. In order to collect information regarding the radioactivity of chemical cosmetics used in our daily life, we studied the alpha radioactivity in different cosmetics samples, such as lipsticks, nail-polish, toothpaste and vermilion. The significant accumulation ofradionuclide in and on the tissues, directly or indirectly exposed due to the lipsticks, toothpaste, vermilion, may cause health hazards. Different samples of these cosmetic materials (Indian and foreign brands) were collected from the local markets of Kolkata, India. CR-39--a useful solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) was used to detect alpha radioactivity of these samples. Such exhaustive measurement of radioactivity in lipsticks, nail-polish, toothpaste and vermilion has not been reported so far.

  11. Applications of the Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Garner, S.E.; Johnson, J.P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) systems are designed to monitor alpha contamination by measuring the number of ions in the air. Alpha particles are a form of ionizing radiation and a typical 5-MeV alpha particle will create about 150,000 ion pairs in air. Field tests at various DOE sites have shown that LRAD Surface Soil Monitors (SSM), Sample Monitors, and Object Monitors are faster and more sensitive than traditional alpha detectors for measuring alpha contamination. This paper discusses the various applications of LRAD technology to low-level radioactive waste management

  12. Environmental radioactivity measurement. Ispra 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.; Risposi, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1990 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are give on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, HTO and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  13. alpha-particle radioactivity from LR 115 by two methods of analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Azkour, K; Adloff, J C; Pape, A

    1999-01-01

    LR115 track detectors were exposed to samples of Moroccan phosphate and phosphogypsum to measure their alpha-particle radioactivity. Then two formalisms were used for the dosimetry: simulation by a Monte Carlo method and determination of concentrations from a numerically integrated track registration equation. The results were compared with those deduced gamma-ray spectrometry.

  14. Measurement of radium micro-precipitates using alpha spectrometry and total alpha counting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, T.; Fathivand, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study consists of two parts. The first part deals with both qualitative and quantitative analysis of 226 Ra suing alpha spectrometry measurement method. In the second part, the percentage of radioactive equilibrium between 226 Radium and its daughter products were determined by alpha spectrometry and total alpha measurement system after elapsed time of 15 days from precipitation. Materials and methods: Twelve 226 Radium samples as Barium-Radium Sulfate in form of micro-precipitates on millipore and What man 42 filters were prepared. An alpha spectrometer with surface barrier detector and a total alpha measurement system consists of scintillation crystal assembly Zinc Silver were used for counting. Results: The minimum detection limit of alpha spectrometry and total alpha counting for 226 Radium measurements in samples for counting time equal to 10000 seconds, were found to be 3.7 mBq and 15.8 mBq respectively. Results from total alpha counting showed that radioactive equilibrium between 226 Radium and its daughter products reached to about 92%± 3.5, where as, in the case of alpha spectrometry radioactive equilibrium, it was destroyed due to vacuum during counting the sample. Also in case of alpha spectrometry, the optimum sample to detector distance, was found to be 0.5 centimeter. Conclusion: From this study it was concluded that micro-precipitation can be used as a proper method for sample preparation and alpha spectrometry due to its lower detection limit to measure low concentration of 224 Radium and 226 Radium in these precipitates, prepared from different samples. Besides it is not time consuming and sources can be measured immediately after sample preparation

  15. Measurement of radioactivity in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtendonk, H.-J. von; Luengen, S.; Wilke, N.

    1999-01-01

    Even after the control of scrap deliveries, there remains a small risk that the radioactive contaminated scrap passes the detecting devices. Therefore, the chemical laboratory takes a role to measure each heat for the absence of artificial radioactive nuclides with a gamma spectrometer equipped with NaI-detector. As the measurement must be performed in sequence with the steel production process, the allowable time for the measurement is quite limited. On the other hand, there could be still some possibility that background radiation might be present as the samples may contain some natural radioactivity. The task is how to differentiate the nature of radioactivity between naturally remaining radioactivity within safe limit and artificial nuclides present in the sample at a low level even though a very small amount of radioactivity could be detected in short time in both cases. We have set the alarm limit to 0.1 Bq/g for Co-60 as indicating nuclide. This limit is set more than 4 s (s = standard deviation) from the average background radiation. Therefore, false alarms are quite improbable. Strategy: The NaI gamma spectrometer performs a gross gamma measurement but it can not differentiate the nature of the nuclides present. If the alarm limit is hurt, the sample is measured on a high resolution gamma spectrometer with Ge-detector for identification of the gamma emitting nuclides. Calibration: Even though no appropriate international standards are adapted and no commercial measuring equipment is commercially available, the desired standard should contain Co-60 in the order of 1 to 100 Bq/g. The presence of other gamma emitting nuclides is desirable. In the Workshop we will present how to surmount this difficulty. (author)

  16. Assessment of alpha radioactivity in Indian tobacco leaf-a detailed study with SSNTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, K.K.; Halder, S.; Maiti, S.

    2009-01-01

    People who inhale tobacco smoke are exposed to higher concentrations of radioactivity since tobacco contains polonium ( 210 Po) and lead ( 210 Pb) both of which are radioactive elements of radon decay series. Among these 210 Po emits damaging type of radiation-alpha radiation is 1000 times more carcinogenic than gamma radiation (DiFranza and Winters, 1982). It generates the localized radiation dose and the health of common people gets affected seriously. In view of this a detail measurement of radioactivity of tobacco leaf is essential. This paper presents a detail investigation on the measurement of alpha radioactivity in raw tobacco leaves, in a few commonly used Indian brand cigarettes and in packed chewing tobacco materials with solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). The study reveals the presence of pronounced alpha activity in cigarette tobacco and chewing tobacco samples ranging from 60-75 mBq/gm and 60- 75 mBq/gm. The alpha activity value is comparatively lower in raw tobacco leaves (9-50 mBq/gm). The annual committed effective dose of the smokers of these branded cigarettes has estimated to be 50-700 (μSv/y), whereas the effective dose value in raw tobacco leaves and chewing tobacco samples is 54-201 μSv/y and 230-290 μSv/y, respectively which are within the range found in cigarette samples. (author)

  17. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, T G

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near background to about four orders of magnitude higher. Almost every nuclide identification test demonstrated some radioactivity content from one or more of the naturally occurring radionuclide series of thorium or uranium. The glazes seemed to contribute most of the activity, although a sample of unglazed pottery greenware showed some activity. Samples of glazing paints and samples of deliberately doped glass from the World War II era were included in the test, as was a section of foam filled poster board. A glass disc with known (232)Th radioactivity concentration was cast for use as a calibration source. The results from the two assay methods are compared, and a projection of sensitivity from larger electret ion chamber devices is presented.

  18. Statistical aspects in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.

    1979-10-01

    This report contains a summary of basic concepts and formulae important for the treatment of errors and for calculating lower limits of detection in radioactivity measurements. Special attention has been paid to practical application and examples which are of interest for scientists working in this field. (orig./HP) [de

  19. A PLS-Based Weighted Artificial Neural Network Approach for Alpha Radioactivity Prediction inside Contaminated Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianguo Tuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range alpha detection (LRAD has been used to measure alpha particles emitting contamination inside decommissioned steel pipes. There exists a complex nonlinear relationship between input parameters and measuring results. The input parameters, for example, pipe diameter, pipe length, distance to radioactive source, radioactive source strength, wind speed, and flux, exhibit different contributions to the measuring results. To reflect these characteristics and estimate alpha radioactivity as exactly as possible, a hybrid partial least square back propagation (PLSBP neural network approach is presented in this paper. In this model, each node in the input layer is weighted, which indicates that different input nodes have different contributions on the system and this finding has been little reported. The weights are determined by the PLS. After this modification, a variety of normal three-layered BP networks are developed. The comparison of computational results of the proposed approach with traditional BP model and experiments confirms its clear advantage for dealing with this complex nonlinear estimation. Thus, an integrated picture of alpha particle activity inside contaminated pipes can be obtained.

  20. Measuring radioactivity in the body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    Techniques of measuring the total amount of radioactivity in the body of a living person as well as the principal applications of such measurements were reviewed at a Symposium on Whole Body Counting held in Vienna from 12 to 16 June 1961. The whole body counters can be divided into two broad groups: (a) counters for the radiation protection surveillance of the general public and radiation workers, capable of detecting extremely low levels of radioactivity in the human body, and (b) counters for medical research and diagnosis, designed to check the retention and excretion of radioactive substances administered to patients for metabolic and pathological studies. In both cases, the primary requirement is that the counter must be able to measure the total activity in the body. In recent years, there has been a remarkable development of the instruments and techniques for such measurements. One of the main purposes of the symposium in Vienna was to discuss how best to use these highly sophisticated instruments

  1. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, T.C.

    1990-08-01

    A nation-wide network of 11 monitoring stations for continous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network, collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and experiences in connection with its operation are described. Results from measurements in 1989 are presented. 18 figs

  2. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, T.C.

    1988-05-01

    A nation-wide network of seven monitoring stations for continuous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network, collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels will trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and field experiences in connection with its operation are described. NILU's directions in the event of radiation alarm are specified and radiation measurements for 1987 are presented

  3. Performance Test of Alpha Spectrometry for Environmental Radioactivity Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Youn; Yoon, Jong-Ho; Han, Ki-Tek; Ahn, Gil Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Environmental samples are analyzed by various methods such as, ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) TIMS (thermal ionization mass spectrometry), HRGS (high resolution gamma spectrometry) and alpha /beta particle analysis. In this study, we will described the result of performance test using alpha spectrometry for analyzing environmental samples. Measurement data of the U activity using SRM based on extraction chromatography with UTEVA resin. It should be effective way to separate of uranium isotope for the measurement of alpha spectrometry. But, the result of this measurement data is higher than another recovery data. Also concentration of U data is lack of consistency. We leave out of consideration many effect of factors about influence in the experiment process. In the future work, we will try to reduce the step of experiment process and reflect the uncertainty factors

  4. Measurement of total alpha activity of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in highly radioactive Hanford waste by iron hydroxide precipitation and 2-heptanone solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    An improved method has been developed to concentrate the major alpha-emitting actinide elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium from samples with high salt content such as those resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements are concentrated by coprecipitation of their hydroxides using iron carrier. The iron is removed by extraction from 8M HCI with 2-heptanone. The actinide elements remain in the aqueous phase free from salts, iron, and long-lived fission products. Recoveries averaged 98 percent

  5. Radioactivity measurements and control solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, D.; Ciobanu, M.; Constantin, F.; Petcu, M.; Rusu, Al.

    2003-01-01

    In our department, in the last years, a new line of production has been developed devoted to the radioactivity measurements (portal monitor, gamma source detector, neutron monitor). Instruments of different design (hand-held, portals or steady-state) are intended for detection and locating of radioactive sources. Monitors are intended to detect radioactive and special nuclear materials in vehicles, pedestrians, luggage, as well as for illegal traffic prevention of radioactive sources. Monitors provide audio and visual alarm signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. Neutron dosimeters are designed for the determination of dose equivalent rate around neutron generators or sources. All devices can be recommended for use to officers of customs, border guard and emergency services, civil defense, fire brigades, police and military departments, nuclear research or power facilities. Incorporating micro controllers and new design, our products span almost all the spectra of radioactivity detection (gamma, beta, X and neutrons). No special knowledge is needed to operate these instruments as all service functions are performed automatically (self-tests, background updating and threshold calculation). The Portal monitor is intended to be a checkpoint in contamination control or in unauthorized traffic of radioactive materials. The portal monitor can be installed both in open, unprotected to environmental conditions areas or in enclosed areas. It may be used at pedestrian cross border points, at check points of Nuclear Power Plants, enterprises of nuclear industry, weapons manufacturing and storage plants, nuclear waste disposal and storage sites, at the entrances to steel plants, the post-offices and airports, the governmental offices, banks, private companies etc. The monitor provides audio alarming signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. The monitor consists in a portal frame, which sustains 5 detectors. Each

  6. Measurement of liquid radioactive materials for monitoring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    This draft regulation applies to measuring equipment for liquid radioactive materials for the monitoring of the radioactive discharges from stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR reactors. Demands made on the measuring procedure, methods of concentration determination, balancing, indication of limiting values, and inspections are layed down. The draft regulation deals with: 1) Monitoring liquid radioactive discharges: Water and similar systems; radionuclides and their detection limits, radioactively contaminated water (waste water); secondary cooling water; power house cooling water; primary cooling water; flooding water; 2) Layout of the measuring and sampling equipment and demands made on continuous and discontinuous measuring equipment; demands made on discontinuous α and β measuring equipment; 3) Maintenance and repair work; inspections; repair of defects; 4) Demands made on documentation; reports to authorities; 5) Supplement: List of general and reference regulations. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Elemental analysis of fertilizers using X-ray fluorescence and their impact on alpha radioactivity of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooja Chauhan; Chauhan, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The fertilizers used for plantation contain different elements including some natural radionuclides with their daughter decay products. The radiological impact of the use of fertilizers may be due to internal irradiation of the lung by the alpha particles, short lived radon-thoron progeny and the external irradiation of the body by gamma ray emitted from the radionuclides. The aim of this study was to estimate the enhanced alpha radioactivity in different parts of plants due to fertilizers and to measure the concentration of different elements present in the fertilizers. A control study was carried out on round gourd plants using different fertilizers. Fertilizers were added to the soil just before the plantation of seeds in the pots. For the measurement of alpha track densities in different parts of plants we used α-sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The alpha-track density (T cm -2 days -1 ) was measured in leaves of plants at different interval of time. The variation in alpha track densities was also observed in root, stem leaf and grain parts of the plants. In case of the plants grown using some phosphate fertilizers the alpha radioactivity was found to be more compared with others. A positive correlation between alpha track densities and mass exhalation rates of radon from different fertilizers has been observed. The concentration of major elements (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K) along with other elements present in fertilizer samples was measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis. (author)

  8. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  9. Measurement of Gross Alpha and Beta Emission Rates from Ceramic Tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wudthicharoonpun, Piyasak; Chankow, Nares

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Ceramic tiles normally used to cover floors and walls contain naturally occurring radioactive elements i.e. potassium-40, uranium, thorium and their daughters from raw materials. Thus, radioactivity was dependent upon source of raw materials and the amount used. The objective of this research was to measure gross alpha and beta emission rates to be used as a database for safety assessment and for selection of rooms to measure radioactive radon-222 gas

  10. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Kim, T.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO 3 ) 4 ⋅ 5H 2 O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  11. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Bak, M. S.; Kim, T.

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ṡ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  12. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, S. [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V. [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  13. Radioactive Mapping Contaminant of Alpha on The Air in Space of Repair of Hot Cell and Medium Radioactivity Laboratory in Radio metallurgy Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf-Nampira; Endang-Sukesi; S-Wahyuningsih; R-Budi-Santoso

    2007-01-01

    Hot cell and space of acid laboratory medium activity in Radio metallurgy Installation are used for the examination preparation of fuel nuclear post irradiation. The sample examined is dangerous radioactive material representing which can disseminate passing air stream. The dangerous material spreading can be pursued by arranging air stream from laboratory space to examination space. To know the performance the air stream arrangement is hence conducted by radioactive mapping contaminant of alpha in laboratory / space of activity place, for example, medium activity laboratory and repair space. This mapping radioactivity contaminant is executed with the measurement level of the radioactivity from sample air taken at various height with the distance of 1 m, various distance and from potential source as contaminant spreading access. The mapping result indicate that a little spreading of radioactive material happened from acid cupboard locker to laboratory activity up to distance of 3 m from acid cupboard locker and spreading of radioactive contaminant from goods access door of the hot cell 104 to repair space reach the distance of 2 m from goods door access. Level of the radioactive contamination in the space was far under maximum limitation allowed (20 Bq / m 3 ). (author)

  14. Measurement of environmental radioactivity. Ispra 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1977-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1976 by the site survey group of the Protection Division of the Euratom Joint Research Centre - Ispra Establisment. Data are given on the concentrations of 90 Sr, 137 Cs and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly world-wide fall out

  15. Measurement of environmental radioactivity. Ispra 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1979-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1977 by the site survey group of the Protection Division of the Euratom joint Research Centre - Ispra Establishement. Data are given on the concentrations of 90 Sr, 137 Cs and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly world-wide fall out

  16. Measurements of environmental radioactivity, Ispra 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1989-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1988 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  17. Alpha emitters activity measurement using the defined solid angle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchis, P.

    1983-01-01

    The defined solid angle counting method can reach a very high accuracy, specially for heavy ions as alpha particles emitted by a radioactive source. The activity measurement of such sources with a relative uncertainty of the order of 0.01% is investigated. Such an accuracy is available only under suitable conditions: the radiation emitted by the source must be isotropic and all the particles emitted in the effective solid angle must be detected. The efficiency detection value must be equal to unity and phenomena such as absorption or scattering must be null. It is shown that corrections often become necessary. All parameters which can influence the measurements are studied [fr

  18. Measurement and analysis of $\\alpha$ particle induced reactions on yttrium

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, N L; Chintalapudi, S N

    2000-01-01

    Excitation functions for /sup 89/Y[( alpha ,3n); ( alpha ,4n); ( alpha , p3n); ( alpha , alpha n); ( alpha , alpha 2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ( alpha , xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ( alpha , alpha xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ( alpha ,4n), ( alpha , p3n), ( alpha , alpha n) and ( alpha , alpha 2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (23 refs).

  19. Measurement and analysis of alpha particle induced reactions on yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N.L.; Gadkari, M.S. [Baroda Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Chintalapudi, S.N. [IUC-DAEF Calcutta Centre, Calcutta (India)

    2000-05-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 89}Y[({alpha},3n);({alpha},4n);({alpha},p3n);({alpha},{alpha}n);({alpha},{alpha}2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ({alpha},xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ({alpha},{alpha}xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ({alpha},4n), ({alpha},p3n), ({alpha},{alpha}n) and ({alpha},{alpha}2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (orig.)

  20. Determination of the concentration of {alpha} emitting radioactive aerosols; Mesure de la concentration des aerosols radioactifs emetteurs {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labeyrie, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-06-15

    In the first part of this work the techniques used for the quantitative measurement of the concentrations of aerosols carrying short lived (radon or thoron daughters) or long lived (uranium) {alpha} radioactive emitters are described. In the second part the author investigates the problem of the determination of radon concentration in air by means of activity determinations on airborne dusts. Special reference is made to the measurement of the radon active deposit on two types of dusts (iron oxide (yellow) and uranium oxide) in small chambers (6 liters). In the third part are given data resulting from determinations of radon and thoron concentrations in atmospheric air in the south of Paris area using this method. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie de ce travail on expose les techniques utilisees pour la mesure quantitative des concentrations d'aerosols contenant des emetteurs radioactifs {alpha}, tant pour ceux a vie courte (derives du radon ou du thoron) que pour ceux a vie longue (uranium). Dans la seconde partie on traite le probleme de la determination de la concentration de l'air en radon par la mesure de l'activite des poussieres ayant sejourne dans cet air. En particulier, on indique pour de petits volumes (6 litres) la proportion de depot actif du radon qui est fixee sur deux types de poussieres (limonite et oxyde d'uranium) en fonction de la concentration de celles-ci. Dans la troisieme partie on donne quelques exemples de mesure par cette methode de la concentration en radon et en thoron de l'atmosphere de la region parisienne. (auteur)

  1. Human skeletal uptake of natural alpha radioactivity from {sup 210}Pb-supported {sup 210}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyedepo, A.C

    1998-06-01

    This thesis contributes to increasing knowledge on the dosimetry of natural alpha-particle radiation in skeletal tissues, particularly in utero, and associated risks of malignancy. Alpha-particle radiation is an established aetiological factor of cancer. In the human body, polonium-210 decayed from skeletal lead-210 ({sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po) is the predominant natural alpha-emitter. {sup 210}Pb displaces calcium (Ca) in mineral hydroxyapatite, especially during periods of rapid bone growth and remodelling when Ca is laid down. It was therefore necessary to study alpha activity uptake and calcification concurrently within bone. Human studies were undertaken on: fetal vertebrae, 17 - 42 weeks of gestation, 74 samples; adult vertebrae, 40 - 95 years, 40 samples; and adult ribs, 20 - 95 years, 51 samples. Specimens were unconcentrated and weighed <5 g each. TASTRAK alpha-particle autoradiography was used to assess the bone activity concentration and spatial microdistribution of {sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po. Alpha track data were resolved by specially written software named SPATS (Selection Program for Analysing Track Structures). Ca and phosphorus (P) were biochemically determined. Results were examined for trends in bone type, gender and chronological ageing in humans. The main research findings were: 1) The Ca content of fetal vertebrae increased linearly at a weekly rate of 0.2g Ca 100 g{sup -1} wet bone (typical values of 2, 4, 6 g 100 g{sup -1} at 16, 26 and 36 weeks). 2) The P concentration also increased with advancing fetal age. 3) The Ca:P bone weight ratio rose from 1.7 to 2.2 by 32 gestational weeks. 4) The overall range in bone {sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po alpha activity was 0.25 - 1.1 Bq kg{sup -1} with correlation between activity concentration and fetal age (0.47 {+-} 0.05 Bq kg{sup -1} for 17 - 26 weeks, 0.67 {+-} 0.04 Bq kg{sup -1} for 32 - 42 weeks). 5) The correlation between increased alpha radioactivity and increased Ca concentration approximating to 0

  2. Measurement of the angle alpha at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, A.; /Orsay, LAL

    2009-06-25

    The authors present recent measurements of the CKM angle {alpha} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They present constraints on {alpha} from B {yields} {pi}{pi}, B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B {yields} {rho}{pi} decays.

  3. Human skeletal uptake of natural alpha radioactivity from 210Pb-supported 210Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyedepo, A.C.

    1998-06-01

    This thesis contributes to increasing knowledge on the dosimetry of natural alpha-particle radiation in skeletal tissues, particularly in utero, and associated risks of malignancy. Alpha-particle radiation is an established aetiological factor of cancer. In the human body, polonium-210 decayed from skeletal lead-210 ( 210 Pb/ 210 Po) is the predominant natural alpha-emitter. 210 Pb displaces calcium (Ca) in mineral hydroxyapatite, especially during periods of rapid bone growth and remodelling when Ca is laid down. It was therefore necessary to study alpha activity uptake and calcification concurrently within bone. Human studies were undertaken on: fetal vertebrae, 17 - 42 weeks of gestation, 74 samples; adult vertebrae, 40 - 95 years, 40 samples; and adult ribs, 20 - 95 years, 51 samples. Specimens were unconcentrated and weighed 210 Pb/ 210 Po. Alpha track data were resolved by specially written software named SPATS (Selection Program for Analysing Track Structures). Ca and phosphorus (P) were biochemically determined. Results were examined for trends in bone type, gender and chronological ageing in humans. The main research findings were: 1) The Ca content of fetal vertebrae increased linearly at a weekly rate of 0.2g Ca 100 g -1 wet bone (typical values of 2, 4, 6 g 100 g -1 at 16, 26 and 36 weeks). 2) The P concentration also increased with advancing fetal age. 3) The Ca:P bone weight ratio rose from 1.7 to 2.2 by 32 gestational weeks. 4) The overall range in bone 210 Pb/ 210 Po alpha activity was 0.25 - 1.1 Bq kg -1 with correlation between activity concentration and fetal age (0.47 ± 0.05 Bq kg -1 for 17 - 26 weeks, 0.67 ± 0.04 Bq kg -1 for 32 - 42 weeks). 5) The correlation between increased alpha radioactivity and increased Ca concentration approximating to 0.0046 Bq g -1 of Ca. 6) A decreasing Ca content of adult vertebrae with increasing age from 40 - 95 years, from ∼ 14 to 5 g 100 g-1, but no correlation with age for adult rib Ca content of 10 - 30 g

  4. Incineration technology for alpha-bearing radioactive waste in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirks, Friedlich; Pfeiffer, Reinhard

    1997-01-01

    Since 1971 the Karlsruhe Research Center has developed and operated plants for the incineration of radioactive waste. Three incineration plants for pure β/γ solid, α-bearing solid and radioactive liquid waste have been successfully utilized during last two decades. Recently more than 20 year-old β/γ plant was shut down with the economic point of view, mainly due to the recently reduced volume of burnable β/γ waste. Burnable β/γ solid waste is now being treated with α-bearing waste in a α solid incineration plant. The status of incineration technology for α-bearing waste and other radioactive waste treatment technologies, which are now utilized in Karlsruhe Research Center, such as conditioning of incineration ash, supercompaction, scrapping, and decontamination of solid radioactive waste, etc. are introduced in this presentation. Additionally, operational results of the recently installed new dioxin adsorber and fluidized-bed drier for scrubber liquid in α incineration plant are also described in this presentation. (author) 1 tab., 13 figs

  5. Alpha radioactivity for proton-rich even Pb isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In choosing the model parameters we are guided by the following considerations: In naive calculations barrier height should correspond to Coulomb plus centrifu- gal potentials, but earlier studies have shown that various renormalization effects tend to lower this value. Royer [8] has modified the alpha decay barrier height.

  6. Radioactivity monitoring network: Measurements 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Four papers are presented: radionuclide concentration measurement in aerosols, surface water and the wastes of the Vienna Central Clarification Plant respectively, and on tritium in Austrian lakes and rivers. (qui)

  7. Environmental radioactivity measurement intercomparison exercise 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, S.M.

    1991-05-01

    In a recent national intercomparison exercise, 49 laboratories involved in making environmental radioactivity measurements took part in the analysis of samples supplied by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the United Kingdom. There were two sets of samples; one containing pure β-emitters and one containing β/γ-emitters. Two thirds of the participants measured the β/γ-emitter sample only, the remainder measured both. The results are presented. (author)

  8. Radioactivity measurements on live Bewick's Swans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.; Wollam, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements made on 46 live swans at Slimbridge using portable high resolution hyperpure germanium gamma ray spectrometry equipment are described. Laboratory measurements are also reported on two swans which died of natural causes or of flying accidents. The implications of the measured radioactivity levels are discussed in relation to the suggestion that they might have been affected by the Chernobyl accident on their migration. (UK)

  9. Artificial and Natural Radioactivity Measurements and Radiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in soil samples and water sources around the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) and the immediate surroundings have been measured using gamma spectrometry. The primary aim of the study was to ...

  10. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiba Shuntaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days, Cs-134 (2.1 years, Cs-137 (30 years, Sr-89 (51 days, and Sr-90 (29 years. We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  11. System for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, V.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising: a set of containers adapted for receiving aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers which are subsequently precipitated in said containers on particles of diatomite in the presence of a coprecipitator, then filtered, dissolved, and mixed with a scintillator; radioactivity measuring means including a detection chamber to which is fed the mixture produced in said set of containers; an electric drive for moving said set of containers in a stepwise manner; means for proportional feeding of said coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to said containers which contain the biological sample for forming an acid precipitation of biopolymers; means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers; precipitated biopolymer filtering means for successively filtering the precipitate, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers mixed with said scintillator for feeding of the mixture to said detection chamber; a system of pipelines interconnecting said above-recited means; and said means for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers including, a measuring cell arranged in a detection chamber and communicating with said means for filtering precipitated biopolymers through one pipeline of said system of pipelines; a program unit electrically connected to said electric drive, said means for acid precipatation of biopolymers, said means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers, said filtering means, and said radioactivity measuring device; said program unit adapted to periodically switch on and off the above-recited means and check the sequence of the radioactivity measuring operations; and a control unit for controlling the initiation of the system and for selecting programs

  12. Suma-alpha software description. Study of its applications to detection problems and environmental radioactivity measurements; Descripcion del Programa Suma-Alfas. Estudio de sus Aplicaciones a Problemas de Deteccion y Medida de la Radiactividad Ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Perez, C.

    2010-05-01

    Software named suma-espectros has been developed by TECNASA/CIEMAT for adding counts automatically from the alpha spectra, energy to energy, with the purpose of: evaluating real background of alpha spectrometers, studying its temporal variations, increasing the possibilities of isotopes detection -where it has been impossible to detect due elapsed time of the measurement- and implementing other applications. The programme is written in Visual-Basic and it can export data to Excel spreadsheets for later treatment. The software has established by default a channels range for adding the counts energy by energy but it can be adapted to the analysis of different isotopes and backgrounds simply changing a text file that is incorporated to the programme. The description of the programme management is described for whoever can realise its applications immediately. This software has the advantage of emitting an add-spectrum in cnf format that is used by alpha analyst (Genie 2K) for de convoluting spectra or doing calculations. (Author) 3 refs.

  13. Survey of Gross Alpha Radioactivity in Bore Hole and Well Water in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the gross alpha radioactivity in drinking water from wells and bore holes in Sokoto city was carried out. Forty samples were drawn at random from locally dug wells and bore holes in Sokoto city, Northern Nigeria. The samples were analyzed using the Eurysis system- eight channel gas filled proportional counter.

  14. Portable laboratories for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damljanovic, D.; Smelcerovic, M.; Koturovic, A.; Drndarevic, V.; Sobajic, M.

    1989-01-01

    The portable radiometric laboratories LARA-10, LARA-GS, LARA-86 and ALARA-10 designed, developed and produced at the Boris Kidric Institute are described. Earlier models (LARA-1, LARA-1D, LARA-2 and LARA-5) are presented in brief. The basic characteristics of the devices and methods of measurements are given. All the instruments are battery operated and almost all can also use 220V/50Hz supply. They are a very suitable facility for radiological monitoring of soil, water, food, clothes etc., when working in field conditions (author)

  15. Measurement of environmental radioactivity in Toki district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    When the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, expressed the hope to move into Toki district, the environmental problems accompanying the movement were discussed. The effect of the radioactivity leaking from the nuclear facility on human bodies must be far smaller than that of natural radiation, and for the purpose, the amount and fluctuation range of the natural radiation in the district must be known. The initial objectives of this cooperative research were to study on environmental radiation and to make a Geiger counter for the measurement. In 1981, a scintillation counter will be completed, and using a multi-channel pulse height analyzer, the nuclides which are the source of environmental radiation emission will be identified, and the tritium in natural water will be detected. Thus, the evaluation of environmental radiation can be carried out, and the situation before the movement of the research facility can be grasped. In this paper, the natural radioactivity in earth, atmosphere and water and cosmic ray, artificial radioactivity, and environmental radiation exposure dose are reported. Also, the manufacture of a GM counter measuring instrument and the measurements of cosmic ray background, typical earth samples and environmental radioactivity with the GM counter are reported. The related data are attached. (Kako, I.)

  16. Measurements with radioactive beams at ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-08-06

    Reactions of interest to nuclear astrophysics have been studied with radioactive beams at the ATLAS accelerator. Using a modified ISOL technique, beams of {sup 18}F (T{sub 1/2} = 110 min) and {sup 56}Ni (T{sub 1/2} = 6.1d) were produced and the reactions {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O, {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne, and {sup 56}Ni(d,p){sup 57}Ni have been investigated. The results indicate that the {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}) route is a small contributor to the breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process, while the {sup 56}Ni(p,{gamma}){sup 57}Cu rate is about ten times larger than previously assumed.

  17. Measurements of natural radioactivity in phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, K.G.; Mertzimekis, T.J.; Papachristodoulou, C.A.; Tzialla, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The natural radioactivity, mainly due to radium ( 226 Ra), in phosphate fertilizers used in north-western Greece has been measured by γ-spectroscopy. Also radioactivity measurements were performed in soil samples and were compared to samples from undisturbed soils. 226 Ra belongs to the 238 U chain and is the precursor of radon gas ( 222 Rn). The radon concentrations in warehouses, where large quantities of fertilizers are kept, were measured with CR-39 SSNTDs. The radium concentrations in the fertilizers ranged from 0 to 4584 Bq kg -1 and the radon concentrations in warehouses were measured 540-3320 Bq m -3 . The results are discussed from the radiation protection point of view

  18. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopics of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by measuring the coincidence of the alpha particle during radioactive decay with the conversion electron (or Auger) emitted during the relaxation of the daughter isotope. This presents a unique signature to allow the deconvolution of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector. A passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector provided measurements of alpha spectroscopy. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information to aid in the coincident measurement approach.

  19. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  20. Error calculations statistics in radioactive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, Silvia

    1994-01-01

    Basic approach and procedures frequently used in the practice of radioactive measurements.Statistical principles applied are part of Good radiopharmaceutical Practices and quality assurance.Concept of error, classification as systematic and random errors.Statistic fundamentals,probability theories, populations distributions, Bernoulli, Poisson,Gauss, t-test distribution,Ξ2 test, error propagation based on analysis of variance.Bibliography.z table,t-test table, Poisson index ,Ξ2 test

  1. National network of radioactivity measurement in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document constitutes the report of management for the year 2006 of the national network of measurement of radioactivity in environment, instituted by the article R.1333-11 of the Public Health code. According to the 5. of the decree of 27. june 2005, the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (I.R.S.N.) has for mission to write every year a report of management of the national network of radioactivity measurement in environment. This report has for principal objectives: to do an evaluation on organisation and functioning of the piloting committee; to realize a synthesis on the different tasks lead by the working groups; as well as on the human and financial resources devoted to this project; to debrief on the development project of the national network information system. This report must allow to the network actors, as to the professional people and the public, to understand the functioning of the national network and the process implemented for the development of centralization, management and public diffusion tools, of the radioactivity data in environment. The year 2006 was marked by the opening of an Internet gate of the national network. (N.C.)

  2. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ with Radiative Hadronic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkays, A Jr; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schiecks, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2008-01-01

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z0 boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling alpha S is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of alpha S is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of alpha S as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z0 decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives alpha S (Mz)=0.1182 pm 0.0015(stat.) pm 0.0101(syst.).

  3. Determining the level of gross alpha and beta radioactivity of water from Marilao river using liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, J.; Magtaka, J.; Balisi, R.; Castaneda, Soledad; De Vero, J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to determine the level of gross alpha- and beta- radioactivity present in the Marilao River. Liquid Scintillation Counter was used to detect samples radioactivity. Water samples were taken along the different spots of Marilao River. The results showed that the radioactivity are below the Philippine National Standard for Drinking Water (PNSDW) which is 0.1 Bq/L for gross alpha activity and 1.0 Bq/L for gross beta activity set by the Dept. of Health. Hence water samples from Marilao River, is safe in terms of the level of radioactivity levels.(author)

  4. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  5. Alpha spectrometry of thick sources. II. Application to the study of radioactive equilibria in uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena Barrenechea, M.L.; Tormo Ferrero, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining nuclide activities in 4n + 2 uranium series using alpha spectrometry of thick sources is described. This method has been applied to several uranium ores, showing different states of radioactive equilibria. The spectra from samples prepared by cold compression show some anomalies, due to the evolution and later decay of 219 Rn and daughters. This phenomenon must be taken in consideration when computing spectra line intensities. (author) [es

  6. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M.; Mariotti, F.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of 218 Po, 214 Pb and 214 Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated [it

  7. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  8. Determination of total alpha activity index in samples of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia C, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a methodology of preparation and quantification of samples containing radionuclides beta and/or alpha emitters, to determine the rates of alpha and beta total activity of radioactive waste samples. For this, a device of planchettes preparer was designed, to assist the planchettes preparation in a controlled environment and free of corrosive vapors. Planchettes were prepared in three means: nitrate, carbonate and sulfate, to different mass thickness, natural uranium (alpha and beta emitter) and in case of Sr-90 (beta emitter pure) only in half nitrate; and these planchettes were quantified in an alpha/beta counter, in order to construct the self-absorption curves for alpha and beta particles. These curves are necessary to determine the rate of alpha-beta activity of any sample because they provide the self-absorption correction factor to be applied in calculating the index. Samples with U were prepared with the help of the device of planchettes preparer and subsequently were analyzed in the proportional counter Mpc-100 Pic brand. Samples with Sr-90 were prepared without the device to see if there was a different behavior with respect to obtaining mass thickness. Similarly they were calcined and carried out count in the Mpc-100. To perform the count, first the parameters of counter operating were determined: operating voltages for alpha and beta particles 630 and 1500 V respectively, a count routine was generated where the time and count type were adjusted, and counting efficiencies for alpha and beta particles, with the aid of calibration sources of 210 Po for alphas and 90 Sr for betas. According to the results, the counts per minute will decrease as increasing the mass thickness of the sample (self-absorption curve), adjusting this behavior to an exponential function in all cases studied. The minor self-absorption of alpha and beta particles in the case of U was obtained in sulfate medium. The self-absorption curves of Sr-90 follow the

  9. Measurement of Radioactivity in the Human Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, I.Oe.; Nilsson, I.

    1960-12-01

    A body counter with a steel room and a 4-inch-diameter by 4-inch thick Nal scintillation counter has been in operation since February 1958. It is used to control the internal contamination in people working with radioactive materials. Measurements have also been made on the natural activity in the human body. The average cesium-137/potassium ratio in a group of Swedish males was in May 1959 73 μμc per gram of body potassium and in June 1960 55 μμc per gram of body potassium. The cessation of the nuclear bomb tests has caused a decrease in the cesium level in people. This gives some information of how cesium is entering the biosphere

  10. Covariation of spectral and nonlinear EEG measures with alpha biofeedback.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fell, J.; Elfadil, H.; Klaver, P.; Roschke, J.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated how different spectral and nonlinear EEG measures covaried with alpha power during auditory alpha biofeedback training, performed by 13 healthy subjects. We found a significant positive correlation of alpha power with the largest Lyapunov-exponent, pointing to an increased

  11. Bolus injections of measured amounts of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, C.A.; Hogendoorn, P.; Vandierendonck, R.; Driedger, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Many time-based radionuclide techniques, such as glomerular filtration rate measurement (GFR), require prompt intravenous delivery of and accurately measured tracer bolus with minimal residual tracer retention at the injection site. The quality assurance aspects of two antecubital vein, quantitative injection techniques were investigated. A flush bolus technique using a tuberculin syringe piggybacked onto a 10-ml saline flush was compared to a single blood pressure cuff injection technique. Scintillation camera data for each technique were compared for bolus duration in the abdominal aorta and for residual activity at the injection site at 5 min. Bolus times were measured as the FWHM of the gamma variate fit to the abdominal aortic regional time-activity curves. Relatively little focal activity was seen in the antecubital injection site following the flush bolus: marked residual activity was seen following the blood pressure cuff injections. The injection site/arm background ratios averaged 1.3 for the flush bolus and 30.1 for the cuff technique. Although both methods allowed accurate in vitro determination of administered radioactivity, only the tuberculin syringe flush bolus technique was acceptable for time-based quantitation because of its superior in vivo characteristics

  12. The measurement of the radioactive materials in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Kitauchi, Nobuhiro; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Since food contained radioactive materials released from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident initiated by Great East Japan earthquake disaster, new reference values of radioactive materials corresponding to 1 mSv/year was set up in April 2012 based on food hygiene law so as to ensure food safety and security for the people. As the request of development of continuous measurement of radioactive materials in food as it is with satisfying this criteria, continuous radioactive cesium measuring device had been developed for screening radioactive materials in food with measurement lower limit of 25 Bq/kg corresponding one fourth of new reference values. The device used CsI detector with CsI scintillator and Si photodiode (multi-pixel photo counter) combined. This article described outlines of the device, measurement examples (powdered food, powdered milk and tea leaves) and future perspective of device development (position sensitive detection of radioactive materials in complex shape food). (T. Tanaka)

  13. Measurement of fertilizers induced radioactivity in tobacco plants and elemental analysis using ICAP–AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that tobacco smoke is the leading cause of lung cancer worldwide. The alpha radioactive content present in tobacco smoke and increasing number of lung cancer cases explain the importance of investigation. The use of different fertilizers may cause alteration in the metabolism of plants causing different response towards uptake of different element and radionuclides. In the present study, the estimation of alpha radioactivity induced by use of different fertilizers in tobacco leaves was made using solid state nuclear track detector (LR-115) to identify the relative presence of radionuclides in the plants. The radon exhalation rates from the tobacco plant were carried out to confirm the presence of radium or emission of radon from plant. The elemental analysis of tobacco plant by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry provides a way to understand the difference occurred in metabolism caused by the use of fertilizers. The alpha track densities were found to vary with nature of fertilizers added to the soil and an increase was also observed with time. The radon mass exhalation rates in various tobacco plants were found to vary with type of fertilizers used. - Highlights: • The study is related to alpha radioactivity measurements in tobacco plants. • The radon mass exhalation rates in various tobacco plants were also measured. • Study is related to analysis of chemical elements in different fertilized tobacco samples

  14. Measurements of $\\alpha_s$ in $pp$ Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Warburton, Andreas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of the strong force, $\\alpha_s$, is deemed to be a fundamental parameter of Nature, and, beyond the quark masses, constitutes the only free parameter in the QCD Lagrangian. Provided is an overview of CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ evaluated at the $Z$-boson mass and of the running of $\\alpha_s(Q)$ as a function of energy-momentum transfer $Q$. The measurements were performed by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations using proton-proton ($pp$) collisions with centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and data samples with time-integrated luminosities of up to 5 fb$^{-1}$. Four different categories of observable were used in the described extractions of $\\alpha_s$: inclusive jet cross sections, 3-jet to 2-jet inclusive cross-section ratios, 3-jet mass cross sections, and top-quark pair production cross sections. These results, which include the first NNLO measurement of $\\alpha_s$ at a hadron collider and the first determinations of $\\alpha_s$ at energy scales above 1 TeV, are co...

  15. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  16. Internal radiation burden of coal and uranium miners. Radioactivity measurement of pathological tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobor, J.

    1994-01-01

    The components of natural radioactivity exposure of miners are the external gamma radiation, inhalation of 222 Rn and its short-halflife daughter products, and exposure to long isotope radiation ( 238 U to 226 Ra, 232 Th, 210 Pb to 210 Po). Pathological tissue samples were examined by alpha and beta radioactivity measurements to determine the contribution of radiation burden from incorporated long-halflife natural isotopes, and to determine the possible fluctuations at various populations of miners. (N.T.) 19 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Application of Micro-coprecipitation Method to Alpha Source Preparation for Measuring Alpha Nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Ho; Park, Jong Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Song, Byung Chul; Song, Kyuseok

    2011-01-01

    Among the source preparations, an electrodeposition is a commonly used method for the preparation of sources for an alpha spectrometry, because this technique is simple and produces a very thin deposit, which is essential for a high resolution of the alpha peak. Recently, micro-coprecipitation with rare earths have been used to yield sources for -spectrometry. In this work, the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were purified from hindrance nuclides and elements with an a TRU resin in radioactive waste samples, and the activity concentrations of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were determined by radiation counting methods after alpha source preparation like micro coprecipitation. After the Pu isotopes in the radioactive waste samples were separated from the other nuclides with an anion exchange resin, the Am isotopes were purified with a TRU resin and an anion exchange resin or a TRU resin. Activity concentrations and chemical recoveries of 241 Am purified with the TRU resin were similar to those with the TRU resin and anion exchange resin. In this study, to save on the analytical time and cost, the Am isotopes were purified with the TRU resin without using an additional anion exchange resin. After comparing the electrodeposition method with the micro-coprecipitation method, the micro-coprecipitation method was used for the alpha source preparation, because the micro-coprecipitation method is simple and more reliable for source preparation of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes

  18. Distribution measurement of 60Co target radioactive specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingyan; Chen Zigen; Ren Min

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive specific activity distribution of cobalt 60 target by irradiation in HFETR is a key parameter. With the collimate principle, the under water measurement device and conversion coefficient which is get by experiments, and the radioactive specific activity distribution is obtained. The uncertainty of measurement is less than 10%

  19. Radioactivity concentration measuring device for radiation waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tetsuo.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can precisely and accurately measure a radioactive concentration of radioactive wastes irrespective of the radioactivity concentration distribution. Namely, a Ge detector having a collimator and a plurality of radiation detectors are placed at the outside of the radioactive waste containing vessel in such a way that it can rotate and move vertically relative to the vessel. The plurality of radiation detectors detect radiation coefficient signals at an assumed segment unit of a predetermined length in vertical direction and for every predetermined angle unit in the rotational direction. A weight measuring device determines the weight of the vessel. A computer calculates an average density of radioactivity for the region filled with radioactivity based on the determined net weight and radiation coefficient signals assuming that the volume of the radioactivity is constant. In addition, the computer calculates the amount of radioactivity in the assumed segment by conducting γ -ray absorption compensation calculation for the material in the vessel. Each of the amount of radioactivity is integrated to determine the amount of radioactivity in the vessel. (I.S.)

  20. Measurement of total alpha activity in water; Messung der Gesamt-Alpha-Aktivitaet in Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikenberg, Jost [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Strahlenschutz und Sicherheit; Florschuetz, Bernd [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt und Geologie, Kassel (Germany). Dezernat 15 - Strahlenschutz; Salvamoser, Josef [Institut fuer Angewandte Isotopen-, Gas- und Umweltuntersuchungen, Woerthsee (Germany); Steinkopff, Thomas [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Wilhelm, Christoph [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Sicherheitsmanagement - Analytische Labore; Wisser, Sascha [FCI, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    The article describes the measurement of the total alpha activity in an (evaporated) liquid sample, and the various sample preparation methods for measurements with proportional counters or LSC. (orig.)

  1. International conventions for measuring radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2004-01-01

    In buildings, whether civil or industrial, natural radioactivity always occurs at different degrees in the materials (main building materials, decorative materials). Concerns on radioactivity from building materials is unavoidable for human living and developing. As a member of WTO, China's measuring method of radioactivity for building materials, including radionuclides limitation for building materials, hazard evaluation system etc, should keep accordance with the international rules and conventions. (author)

  2. Preliminary results of natural radioactivity measurements in the southern part of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollel Tiruneh, Getachew; Wodaje Kebede, Worku

    2008-11-01

    The paper presents the first results of natural radioactivity measurements in the Southern part of Ethiopia (Bale Zone-Oromiya Regional State). The preliminary results indicate that radiation levels in the mining areas of Kallido Mountain are elevated compared with those in the town of Negele Borena (background area). Both external gamma radiation and alpha surface contamination levels are significantly elevated above local background levels.

  3. Calibration method based on direct radioactivity measurement for radioactive gas monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ohi, Yoshihiro; Chida, Tohru; Wu, Youyang.

    1993-01-01

    A calibration method for radioactive gas monitoring instruments was studied. In the method, gaseous radioactivity standards were provided on the basis of the direct radioactivity measurement by the diffusion-in long proportional counter method (DLPC method). The radioactivity concentration of the gas mixture through a monitoring instrument was determined by sampling the known volume of the gas mixture into the proportional counter used for the DLPC method. Since oxygen in the gas mixture decreased the counting efficiency in a proportional counter, the influence on calibration was experimentally estimated. It was not serious and able to be easily corrected. By the present method, the relation between radioactivity concentration and ionization current was determined for a gas-flow ionization chamber with 1.5 l effective volume. It showed good agreement with the results in other works. (author)

  4. Measurement of radon daughters in air samples by alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Crespo, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of polonium 214 and polonium 218. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter (Author)

  5. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Sensitivity curve measurement and application of radioactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Shunhe; Wang Jianqing; Guo Xiaoqing; Yao Yanling; Li Jingxiu

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the sensitivity curve measurements and applications for radioactivity meter. The energy-dependent sensitivity curve is established with the activity of standard sources and their corresponding current by constructing functions sub-section. Thus the current-activity ratio is acquired from the sensitivity curve and the calibration of radioactivity meter is solved satisfactorily. (authors)

  7. Generalized liquid drop model and fission, fusion, alpha and cluster radioactivity and superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.

    2012-01-01

    A particular version of the liquid drop model taking into account both the mass and charge asymmetries, the proximity energy, the rotational energy, the shell and pairing energies and the temperature has been developed to describe smoothly the transition between one and two-body shapes in entrance and exit channels of nuclear reactions. In the quasi-molecular shape valley where the proximity energy is optimized, the calculated l-dependent fusion and fission barriers, alpha and cluster radioactivity half-lives as well as actinide half-lives are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In this particular deformation path, double-humped potential barriers begin to appear even macroscopically for heavy nuclear systems due to the influence of the proximity forces and, consequently, quasi-molecular isomeric states can survive in the second minimum of the potential barriers in a large angular momentum range

  8. Measurement of environmental radioactivity with photo-diode and Imaging Plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, C.; Sumi, T.; Gotoh, S.; Saze, T.; Nishizawa, K.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of environmental radioactivity with photo-diode (PD) and Imaging Plate (IP) was tired. Commercially available Si PIN type PD's generally have depletion layer thickness more than a few hundred micrometer, which is enough for alpha particle measurement. PD's have various features: being usable in normal temperature, high energy resolution and low cost. Radon daughter nuclides positively charged in atmosphere were collected on the PD surface with negative electric potential and measured the pulse height spectra of alpha-particles from the daughter nuclides of Radon in thorium oxide, uranium ore, granite, and concrete. Counting of alpha-particles with IP was tired. Lead plates usually contain Pb-210 (RaD) and emit alpha-particles from Po-210. The alpha-particles from the plate were counted with PD and the plate was exposed to IP. By adjusting the gradation level on the reading out of the latent image, it was possible to count alpha-particle incident image one by one, and the number per 1 cm 2 was compared with the number of count with PD. (author)

  9. Results of radioactivity measurements on foodstuffs in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, O.; Cojocariu, T.

    1996-01-01

    There are presented the results of gamma-spectrometric measurements performed between 1986-1995 on: milk and dairy products; meat and meat products; fish; wheat flour; fresh fruits and vegetables. The foodstuffs are sampled from some representative areas like: Bucharest, Bechet (affected by Kozloduj NPP, Bulgaria), Cernavoda, middle of Transylvania, Neamt. The radioactivity measurements are performed by high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. There are identified and analysed mainly 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 40 K and, sometimes, other radionuclides. There are pointed out: the constancy of natural radionuclides amounts; the drastic increasing in radioactive concentration in May 1986; the seasonal variation of radioactivity in some food items; the time - exponential diminution of radioactivity in 1991-1995; and the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs following a nuclear accident. (author)

  10. A state of the art on the measurement of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, B. K.; Lee, K. W.; Oh, W. Z.; Woo, Z. H.; Kim, G. H

    2004-11-15

    Many radioactive wastes are produced during the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. Their radiological characterization must be estimated for disposal and reuse. Especially, it is very difficult to measure the in-pipe surface contamination, because of the difficulty of access. So, it is necessary to develop the measurement technology for the in-pipe surface contamination. In the developed counties of the decommissioning technology such as America, Japan etc. they developed the measuring device for the in-pipe radioactive contamination and performed the capacity estimation. In this report, the state of the art on the measurement of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe and radiation detector for measuring the each radiation(alpha, beta, and gamma) proceeding around the world was analyzed. By means of such technology analysis, we will develop the measuring technology of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe and apply to the decommissioning sites.

  11. 210Po in Nevada groundwater and its relation to gross alpha radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Polonium-210 (210Po) is a highly toxic alpha emitter that is rarely found in groundwater at activities exceeding 1 pCi/L. 210Po activities in 63 domestic and public-supply wells in Lahontan Valley in Churchill County in northern Nevada, United States, ranged from 0.01 ± 0.005 to 178 ± 16 pCi/L with a median activity of 2.88 pCi/L. Wells with high 210Po activities had low dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 0.1 mg/L) and commonly had pH greater than 9. Lead-210 activities are low and aqueous 210Po is unsupported by 210Pb, indicating that the 210Po is mobilized from aquifer sediments. The only significant contributors to alpha particle activity in Lahontan Valley groundwater are 234/238U, 222Rn, and 210Po. Radon-222 activities were below 1000 pCi/L and were uncorrelated with 210Po activity. The only applicable drinking water standard for 210Po in the United States is the adjusted gross alpha radioactivity (GAR) standard of 15 pCi/L. 210Po was not volatile in a Nevada well, but volatile 210Po has been reported in a Florida well. Additional information on the volatility of 210Po is needed because GAR is an inappropriate method to screen for volatile radionuclides. About 25% of the samples had 210Po activities that exceed the level associated with a lifetime total cancer risk of 1× 10−4 (1.1 pCi/L) without exceeding the GAR standard. In cases where the 72-h GAR exceeds the uranium activity by more than 5 to 10 pCi/L, an analysis to rule out the presence of 210Po may be justified to protect human health even though the maximum contaminant level for adjusted GAR is not exceeded.

  12. Consistent Measurements of $\\alpha_{s}$ from Precise Oriented Event Shape Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertini, D.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenke, T.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burgsmuller, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Chaussard, L.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Cowell, J.H.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Deghorain, A.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Erzen, B.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Green, C.; Grimm, H.J.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Gunther, M.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Koratzinos, M.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Langefeld, P.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Nemecek, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Normand, A.; Nygren, A.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Rodrigo, German; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schneider, H.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Schyns, M.A.E.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Sheridan, A.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Sponholz, P.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Apeldoorn, G.W.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Vollmer, C.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    An updated analysis using about 1.5 million events recorded at $\\sqrt{s} =M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector in 1994 is presented. Eighteen infrared and collinear safe event shape observables are measured as a function of the polar angle of the thrust axis. The data are compared to theoretical calculations in${\\cal O} (\\alpha_s^2)$ including the event orientation. A combined fit of $\\alpha_s$ and of the renormalization scale $x_{\\mu}$ in $\\cal O(\\alpha_s^2$)yields an excellent description of the high statistics data. The weighted average from 18 observables including quark mass effects and correlations is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = 0.1174 \\pm 0.0026$. The final result, derived from the jet cone energy fraction, the observable with the smallest theoretical and experimental uncertainty, is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = =0:1180 0:0006(exp:) 0:0013(hadr:) 0:0008(scale) 0:0007(mass). Further studies include an s determination using theoretical predictions in the next-to-leading log approximation (NLLA), matched NLLA and O(\\alpha^{2}_{s})...

  13. NPL support for environmental radioactivity measurements in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The United Kingdom was one of the first nations to initiate a civil nuclear power programme in the 1950s, with the first commercial generation of electricity being achieved in 1957. As the civil nuclear programme grew in size, an ongoing programme of environmental monitoring was instituted by central government that placed the responsibility for monitoring radioactivity in the local environment and the measurement of discharges of radioactive gases and liquids with the site operator, the Environment Agency, the Environment and Heritage Service, the Food Standards Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (or their predecessors). This presentation will discuss the sources of radioactivity in the UK environment from the nuclear industry, natural and other sources, focussing on how these sources of radioactivity are monitored and what future trends may be, taking the Windscale fire of 1957, the Chernobyl accident and the Litvinenko incident of 2006 as examples of how unexpected events have been addressed in the UK. As the national metrology institute for the UK, the NPL is required to provide support to the National Measurement System infrastructure of the UK, including the measurement of radioactivity. The presentation will also describe the absolute standardisation of radioactivity at the NPL, and how this is disseminated to organisations measuring environmental radioactivity in the UK by means of directly traceable standards of radioactivity and through the provision of an ongoing series of proficiency test exercises. The outcomes of some recent proficiency tests will be discussed, with emphasis on how the general performance of laboratories participating in these proficiency tests has matured over the years since their inception in 1989. In addition, the data treatment of such proficiency tests will also be examined in order to illustrate that statutory regulatory bodies, laboratory accreditation organisations and customers are able to

  14. Innovative alpha radioactivity monitor for clearance level inspection based on ionized air transport technology (2). CFD-simulated and experimental ion transport efficiencies for uranium-attached pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yosuke; Nakahara, Katsuhiko; Sano, Akira; Sato, Mitsuyoshi; Aoyama, Yoshio; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Nanbu, Kenichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Akinori

    2007-01-01

    An innovative alpha radioactivity monitor for clearance level inspection has been developed. This apparatus measures an ion current resulting from air ionization by alpha particles. Ions generated in the measurement chamber of about 1 m 3 in volume are transported by airflow to a sensor and measured. This paper presents computational estimation of ion transport efficiencies for two pipes with different lengths, the inner surfaces of which were covered with a thin layer of uranium. These ion transport efficiencies were compared with those experimentally obtained for the purpose of our model validation. Good agreement was observed between transport efficiencies from simulations and those experimentally estimated. Dependence of the transport efficiencies on the region of uranium coating was also examined, based on which anticipated errors arising from unclear positions of contamination are also discussed. (author)

  15. Manual for target thickness measurement by alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, J.F.; Martins, M.N.

    1990-04-01

    A system is described for thin-target thickness measurement through the alpha particle energy loss when them traverse the target. It is also described the program used in the analysis of the target thickness. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Thermochemical Stability of alpha-Amino-alpha-carbonylmethyl Radicals and Their Resonance As Measured by ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Frank M.; Beckhaus, Hans-Dieter; Rüchardt, Christoph

    1997-02-07

    ESR spectra of the captodative alpha-amino-alpha-carbonylmethyl radicals 8 have been recorded. No coalescence temperature for the rotation of the two NMe groups was found at temperatures below the decomposition temperature of the radicals. From known coalescence temperatures and rotational barriers of substituted methyl radicals the rotational barrier of >/=17 kcal mol(-)(1) was estimated for the (*)C-N bond in the radicals 8. Enthalpies DeltaH(diss) and entropies DeltaS(diss) of the homolytic dissociation of 7a,c,d into 8a,c,d have been obtained from equilibrium measurements by ESR. By correcting for substituent interaction enthalpies in 7 (steric and geminal), a radical stabilization enthalpy RSE = -20.7 +/- 1.0 kcal mol(-)(1) was obtained for 8. By addition of the known RSEs of dialkylamino- and carbonyl groups, a RSE = -9.9 kcal mol(-)(1) is predicted for 8. The difference between the experimental and predicted values of 10.8 kcal mol(-)(1) is attributed to a synergistic captodative substituent effect. A linear correlation between the radical stabilization enthalpies of the radicals 8 and of other mono- and disubstituted alkyl radicals and their ESR aH(alpha) coupling constants was found. According to this correlation the reduction of aH(alpha) by 1 G corresponds to an increase in RSE of 1.57 kcal mol(-)(1). The large resonance of the captodative alpha-amino-alpha-carbonylmethyl radicals 3, expressed by their high RSE, their small aH(alpha) coupling constant, and their high rotational barrier, can be rationalized by a strong interaction between the alpha-amino and the alpha-carbonyl groups similar to that in amides and expressed in the resonance structures 6.

  17. Natural radioactivity measurements at the proposed nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojuangco, J.G.; Salomon, A.Ph.

    1976-01-01

    Natural radioactivity measurement in the Philippines aims to establish baseline radioactivity levels in the environment of items essential to man. In this article, results of the environmental surveillance conducted in Bagac, Bataan from 1973 to 1974 are presented. Analyses were made on air parti-culates, sea and fresh water, grass, and soil samples for gross beta-gamma activities. Results obtained showed activity levels below the maximum permissible concentration recommended by the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP)

  18. Measurement of total body radioactivity in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naversten, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of whole-body radioactivity in man using uncollimated NaI(Tl) detectors have been studied. Geometrical effects and photon attenuation effects due to the different shapes of humans as well as due to varying in-vivo radioactivity distributions have been evaluated particularly for scanning-bed geometries and the chair geometry. Theoretically it is shown that the attenuation effects are generally dominating, for full-energy-peak pulse-range methods. For the application in radiation protection a cheap and simple chair-geometry unit has been constructed and used at various places distantly from the home-laboratory, for studies of body activity of Cs-137 in northern Sweden. High body activities were found particularly in reindeer-breeding Lapps. The elimination rate of Cs-137 in man was studied in the stationary whole-body counter in Lund as well as with the field-system. For the study of the performances at low and high photon energies clinical applications of methods for gastro-intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 (Co-57; 122 keV) and total body potassium determination (K-40; 1.46 MeV, K-42; 1.52 MeV) have been evaluated. Theoretical and experimental results as well as experiences of applications in radiation protection and medicine show that the scanning-bed geometry effectively evens out redistributional effects. For optimum results, however, scatter-energy pulse-ranges rather than full-energy-peak ranges should be used. (Auth.)

  19. 210Po in nevada groundwater and its relation to gross alpha radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ralph L

    2011-01-01

    Polonium-210 ((210) Po) is a highly toxic alpha emitter that is rarely found in groundwater at activities exceeding 1 pCi/L. (210) Po activities in 63 domestic and public-supply wells in Lahontan Valley in Churchill County in northern Nevada, United States, ranged from 0.01 ± 0.005 to 178 ± 16 pCi/L with a median activity of 2.88 pCi/L. Wells with high (210) Po activities had low dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 0.1 mg/L) and commonly had pH greater than 9. Lead-210 activities are low and aqueous (210) Po is unsupported by (210) Pb, indicating that the (210) Po is mobilized from aquifer sediments. The only significant contributors to alpha particle activity in Lahontan Valley groundwater are (234/238) U, (222) Rn, and (210) Po. Radon-222 activities were below 1000 pCi/L and were uncorrelated with (210) Po activity. The only applicable drinking water standard for (210) Po in the United States is the adjusted gross alpha radioactivity (GAR) standard of 15 pCi/L. (210) Po was not volatile in a Nevada well, but volatile (210) Po has been reported in a Florida well. Additional information on the volatility of (210) Po is needed because GAR is an inappropriate method to screen for volatile radionuclides. About 25% of the samples had (210) Po activities that exceed the level associated with a lifetime total cancer risk of 1× 10(-4) (1.1 pCi/L) without exceeding the GAR standard. In cases where the 72-h GAR exceeds the uranium activity by more than 5 to 10 pCi/L, an analysis to rule out the presence of (210) Po may be justified to protect human health even though the maximum contaminant level for adjusted GAR is not exceeded. Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  20. The used epoxy matrix in immobilization sludge process of alpha emitter radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walman, E.; Salimin, Z.; Johan, B.

    1998-01-01

    Immobilization of alpha emitter radioactive waste containing of ion complex of uranyl carbonate on uranium concentration ≤ 50 mg/l has been carried out using epoxy matrix. The first step of process is the coagulation of uranium with 1.3 mole/l of Ca(OH) 2 coagulant concentration on pH 8 to precipitate the calcium uranyl carbonate on uranium concentration ≤ g/l. The immobilization of calcium uranyl carbonate with epoxy matrix was done on variation of the ratio of resin epoxy and hardener of 1 : 1 (giving the maximum value of density and compressive strength), the increasing of precipitate loading capacity give the decreasing of compressive strength of embedded waste. The test of compressive strength and leaching was done for the embedded waste after its curing time using Paul Weber equipment and 7 days immersion of samples in normal water. On the precipitate loading capacity of 70%, the quality of embedded waste still conform to the standard quality value i.e. density 1.2 g/cm 3 , compressive strength 10 kN/cm 2 and there is not any release of radionuclide during leaching test (undetectable).. (author)

  1. The measurement of $\\alpha_s$ from event shapes with the DELPHI detector at the highest LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    Hadronic event shape distributions are determined from data in e+e- collisions between 183 and 207 GeV. From these the strong coupling alpha_s is extracted in O(alpha_s^2), NLLA and matched O(alpha_s^2)+NLLA theory. Hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as an analytical power ansatz are applied. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at and around M_Z allows a combined measurement of alpha_s from all DELPHI data and a test of the energy dependence of the strong coupling.

  2. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David [CERN; Skands, Peter Z. [Monash U.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  3. Baseline Radioactivity Measurements In The Vicinity Of A Gold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Western Region, Ghana) to obtain baseline radioactivity data prior to the installation of Cs-137 nuclear density gauges for quality control measure-ment of the density of slurry in the pipelines at the plant. A survey meter, gamma spectrometry and ...

  4. Measurement methodology of natural radioactivity in the thermal establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameon, R.; Robe, M.C.

    2004-11-01

    The thermal baths have been identified as an activity susceptible to expose to ionizing radiations the workers through the natural sources of radon and radon 220. The new regulation obliges these facilities to realize radioactivity measurements. The principal ways of exposure are radon and its daughters inhalation,, exposure to gamma radiation, ingestion of radioelements in thermal waters. I.R.S.N. proposes two methods of measurements of the natural radioactivity in application to the regulation relative to the protection of persons and workers. Some principles to reduce exposure to radon are reminded. (N.C.)

  5. Krypton-85 and other airborne radioactivity measurements throughout Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Murray, M.; Wong, J.; Sequeira, S.; Long, S.C.; Rafferty, B.

    2004-01-01

    In compliance with articles 35 and 36 of the EURATOM Treaty, the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) undertakes a comprehensive programme of radioactivity monitoring in the Irish terrestrial environment. Radioactivity is present in the terrestrial environment due to natural processes, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, accidents such as the Chernobyl accident and the routine discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. The RPII monitors airborne radioactivity concentrations at ten stations throughout Ireland, of which, nine are equipped with low volume particulate samplers and one, in Dublin, with a high volume particulate sampler. The low volume particulate samples are assessed for total beta activity and high volume samples for gamma emitting radionuclides such as caesium-137 and beryllium-7. In addition, air sampled at the RPII laboratory in Dublin, is monitored for krypton-85, a radioactive noble gas, released into the environment primarily as a result of the reprocessing of nuclear fuel at installations such as Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France. Since the inception of the krypton measurements in 1993 a trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations has been observed. The results of the krypton-85 monitoring, as well as the airborne radioactivity concentration measurements, will be presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  6. Measurement of very low alpha activity in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, M. T.; Acena, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of very low levels of alpha-emitting nuclides in water needs substantial improvements. A system based on the adsorbing properties manganese dioxide eliminates the need for transporting very large volumes of water and increases the sensitivity of the measurement. (Author) 21 refs

  7. Alpha radiation gauge for the measurement of gas density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lech, M.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha gauge for the measurement of gas density with thick alfa source, has been developed. The gauge is based on radiation transmission through a space filled with gas and total-count principle. Air density can be measured in the range 1,2 - 1,27 kg m -3 with a maximum standard deviation of 2 x 10 -3 kg m -3 . (author)

  8. Measurement of the angle alpha at BABAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present recent measurements of the CKM angle α using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e + e - collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operating at the Υ(4S) resonance. They present constraints on α from B → ππ, B → ρρ and B → ρπ decays.

  9. Marine radioactivity measurements with liquid scintillation spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liong Wee Kwong, L.; Povinec, P.P.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry (LSS) has now become the most widespread method for quantitative analytical measurement of low levels of β-emitting radionuclides like 3 H and 14 C. The high efficiency resulting from the latest development in LSS makes this technique not only appropriate but also enables direct measurement in environmental samples without excessive preparation. The introduction of several new cocktails based on solvents with a high flashpoint containing surfactants and having a high degree of aqueous sample compatibility has also contributed to the simplification of procedures

  10. arXiv Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, S.; Kluth, S.; Schieck, J.; Stewart, I.W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Erler, J.; Forte, S.; Gehrmann, T.; Glasman, C.; Golterman, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Kronfeld, A.; Kuhn, J.; Lepage, P.; Martin, A.; Mateu, V.; Menke, S.; Nomura, Y.; Pahl, C.; Petriello, F.; Pich, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Salam, G.; Schulz, H.; Sommer, R.; Steinhauser, M.; Webber, B.; Yuan, CP.; Zanderighi, G.

    2011-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas" held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of alphas(mZ) in the MS-bar scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, tau-decays, electroweak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  11. IAEA-MEL's AQCS programme for marine radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Gastaud, J.; Pham, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    The main objectives of the IAEA-MEL's Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) for marine radioactivity measurements are discussed and future plans for the organization of intercomparison exercises and the production of certified reference materials are presented. The new developments should also include implementation of quality assurance programmes in Member States' laboratories, training in quality management and accreditation programmes. (author)

  12. Natural radioactivity measurements in building materials used in Samsun, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, M Çagatay; Disci, Tugba

    2013-01-01

    In this study, radioactivity levels of 35 different samples of 11 commonly used building materials in Samsun were measured by using a gamma spectrometry system. The analysis carried out with the high purity Germanium gamma spectrometry system. Radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K range from 6 to 54 Bq kg(-1), 5 to 88 Bq kg(-1) and 6 to 1070 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From these results, radium equivalent activities, gamma indexes, absorbed dose rates and annual effective doses were calculated for all samples. Obtained results were compared with the available data, and it was concluded that all the investigated materials did not have radiological risk.

  13. Workshop on High-precision $\\alpha_s$ measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    S. Alekhin; d'Enterria, David; A. Banfi; S. Bethke; J. Blümlein; K.G. Chetyrkin; D. d’Enterria; G. Dissertori; X. Garcia i Tormo; A. H. Hoang; M. Klasen; T. Klijnsma; S. Kluth; J.-L. Kneur; B.A. Kniehl; D. W. Kolodrubetz; J. Kühn; P. Mackenzie; B. Malaescu; V. Mateu; L. Mihaila; S. Moch; K. Mönig; R. Pérez-Ramos; A. Pich; J. Pires; K. Rabbertz; G. P. Salam; F. Sannino; J. Soto i Riera; M. Srebre; I. W. Stewart

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experiment...

  14. Gamma, radon, natural radioactivity measurements in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuardo, E.

    1997-01-01

    Different natural radiation measurements, performed since 1983, are analysed and discussed regarding the average effective population dose. A decade of absorbed gamma dose measurements in air (1983-93), were carried out using compensated TLD detectors, during long periods of integration time and with a network of 11 stations, along the country, from Arica to the Antarctic territory. An indoor Rn -222 and gamma survey dwellings, in high background zones, underground mines and drinking water was started in 1988 using different kind of detectors, including electret radon chambers. The methods, dose assessments and results are presented and discussed in the frame of worldwide average effective population doses. None of the average effective doses found over the evaluated areas, exceed the comparison levels. (author)

  15. ROKO-Database of the environmental radioactivity measurements in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.; Mitic, D.

    2005-01-01

    ROKO is the acronym of the Environmental Radioactivity in Slovenian language R adioaktivnost v OKOlju . Computer database ROKO contains data of all measurements of the radioactivity in the environment in Slovenia. Data about radioactivity in the environment have been collected in Slovenia more or less regularly since 1961 on. Most results are gathered in the form of paper reports. Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has initiated the project of transfer of all those data into the electronic form and making it available for easy research. The database is designed so, that it contains all records, relevant for any kind of analyses and for the transfer to the international data systems. By the end of the summer 2005 a major part of data from previous years have already been transferred into the database and the user interface software is under development. It will allow the users to examine individual data records, to plot time history graphs or geographical contour plots. (author)

  16. Research on the reliability of measurement of natural radioactive nuclide concentration of U-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seok Ki; Kim, Gee Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear engineering, Univ. of SeJong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sun Dong; Lee, Hoon [KoFONS, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Naturally occurred radioactive materials (NORM) can be found all around us and people are exposed to this no matter what they do or where they live. In this study, two indirect measurement methods of NORM U-238 has been reviewed; one that has used HPGe on the basis of the maintenance, and the other is disequilibrium theory of radioactive equilibrium relationships of mother and daughter nuclide at Decay-chain of NORM U-238. For this review, complicated pre-processing process (Breaking->Fusion->Chromatography->Electron deposit) has been used , and then carried out a comparative research with direct measurement method that makes use of and measures Alpha spectrometer. Through the experiment as above, we could infer the daughter nuclide whose radioactive equilibrium has been maintained with U-238. Therefore, we could find out that the daughter nuclide suitable to be applied to Gamma indirect measurement method was Th-234. Due to Pearson Correlation statistics, we could find out the reliability of the result value that has been analyzed by using Th-234.

  17. Research on the reliability of measurement of natural radioactive nuclide concentration of U-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seok Ki; Kim, Gee Hyun; Joo, Sun Dong; Lee, Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurred radioactive materials (NORM) can be found all around us and people are exposed to this no matter what they do or where they live. In this study, two indirect measurement methods of NORM U-238 has been reviewed; one that has used HPGe on the basis of the maintenance, and the other is disequilibrium theory of radioactive equilibrium relationships of mother and daughter nuclide at Decay-chain of NORM U-238. For this review, complicated pre-processing process (Breaking->Fusion->Chromatography->Electron deposit) has been used , and then carried out a comparative research with direct measurement method that makes use of and measures Alpha spectrometer. Through the experiment as above, we could infer the daughter nuclide whose radioactive equilibrium has been maintained with U-238. Therefore, we could find out that the daughter nuclide suitable to be applied to Gamma indirect measurement method was Th-234. Due to Pearson Correlation statistics, we could find out the reliability of the result value that has been analyzed by using Th-234.

  18. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances; Mesure et analyse de substances radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  19. The Australian national standard of measurement for radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    This contribution outlines the activities of the Radiation Standards Group at Ansto which is responsible, under the National Measurement Act 1960, for Australia's national standard of radioactivity measurement. The Group can make absolute measurements of radioactivity using a 4π β-γ coincidence counting system, Solutions standardised by this technique are then used to calibrate a TPA ionisation chamber, this chamber being the national working standard of activity measurement. All of the calibration factors determined for this chamber by direct measurement have been compared internationally through the Bureau International de Poids et Mesures (BIPM). These comparisons were performed either by participating in international intercomparisons organised by the BIPM or by submitting a standardised solution to the Systeme International de Reference. 11 refs

  20. Perfusion measurements with radioactively labelled microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schosser, R.

    1980-01-01

    The technique and the evaluation of the microsphere-method are comprehensively represented in theory and practice. Some changes and new concepts are discussed, besides the known foundations and techniques, that assure an essential methodic improvement resp. practical simplifications. Two new formulas are derived within the frame of the theoretical principles, by which the absolute flux of shorts can be calculated, i.e. on the one hand in the case of known and on the other hand in the case of unknown applied amount of indicator. The determination of the optimal indicator dose is defined and formulated mathematically with respect to the experimental conditions to be expected. The matrix method was designed for the analysis of complex gamma spectra. Hereby there is no selective error accumulation in the case of low energy radio nuclids contrary to the so far exclusively used stripping technique. The number of possible error quantities was reduced by one resp. two variables. The error of particular radio nuclid components is quantitatively computed as standard deviation by means of the theory of approximated systems of linear equations. The external measurement of distance was developed. This technique is less susceptible for errors as the aliquota i.e. whole body measurement technique. Additionally less measurement time is needed. A flexible computer program for a desk top computer was developped for the evaluation. The data from the gamma spectrometer are recorded on tipe and automatically read in by the computer. The manual input are limited to the weights of the organs and some control parameter. The output is made by a clearly arranged table by means of a lineprinter. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Characterization of large area ZnS(Ag) detector for gross alpha and beta activity measurements in tap water plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunardon, M.; Cester, D.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Schotanus, P.; Bodewits, E. [SCIONIX Holland BV, (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present the characterization of a large area 200 x 200 mm{sup 2} EJ-444 scintillation detector to be used for monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in tap water plants. Specific tests were performed to determine the best setup to readout the light from the detector side in order to have the possibility to stack many detectors and get a compact device with total active area of the order of 1 m{sup 2}. Alpha/Beta discrimination, efficiency and homogeneity tests were carried out with alpha and beta sources. Background from ambient radioactivity was measured as well. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in drinking water is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  2. Radioactivity measurements in Egyptian Phosphate Mines and Their Significance As a Source of Hazardous Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Hussein, M.I.; Abdel Hady, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphate mines that may contain radioactive traces in the composition of their ores represent source of hazardous radioactive waste in the environment. Radioactivity measurements have been conducted in nine underground phosphate mines in the Egyptian Eastern Desert in order to estimate the occupational radiation exposure of mine workers in those mining sites. Measurements were carried out of airborne radon and its short- lived decay products (progeny) and thoron progeny, as well as radiation from mines walls, ceilings and floors. Conventional, well established techniques, methods and instrumentation were used to make these measurements. Comparison of experimental data and theoretical predictions showed partial agreement between these two sets of data. This result is partly attributed to the complex layout of these mines, which causes undesirable ventilation conditions, such as recirculation airflow patterns, which could not be adequately identified or quantified. The radiation data obtained were used to estimate the maximum Annual Dose (MAD), and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. These calculations indicate that in eight out of the nine mines surveyed, the MAD exceeded (by a factor of up to 7) the maximum recommended level by ICRP 60. Numbers of suggestions are made in order to reduce the MAD in the affected mines. This study could help in the estimation of the environmental impact of these mine operations on the environment

  3. Vertical oceanic transport of alpha-radioactive nuclides by zooplankton fecal pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Cherry, R.D.; Heyraud, M.; Fowler, S.W.; Beasley, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives the results of research to explain the role played by marine plankton metabolism in the vertical oceanic transport of the alpha-emitting nuclides. The common Mediterranean euphausiid, Meganyctiphanes norvegica, was selected as the typical zooplanktonic species that is the focus of this work. Measurements of 239 240 Pu, 238 U, 232 Th, and 210 Po are reported in whole euphausiids and in euphausiid fecal pellets and molts. The resulting data are inserted into a simple model that describes the flux of an element through a zooplanktonic animal. Concentrations of the nuclides concerned are high in fecal pellets, at levels which are typical of geological rather than biological material. It is suggested that zooplanktonic fecal pellets play a significant role in the vertical oceanic transport of plutonium, thorium, and polonium

  4. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Remote measurements of radioactivity distribution with BROKK robotic system - 16147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Danilovich, Alexey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Potapov, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Robotic system for the remote measurement of radioactivity in the reactor areas was developed. The BROKK robotic system replaces hand-held radiation measuring tools. The system consists of a collimated gamma detector, a standard gamma detector, color CCD video camera and searchlights, all mounted on a robotic platform (BROKK). The signals from the detectors are coupled with the video signals and are transferred to an operator's console via a radio channel or a cable. Operator works at a safe position. The video image of the object with imposed exposure dose rate from the detectors generates an image on the monitor screen, and the images are recorded for subsequent analysis. Preliminary work has started for the decommissioning of a research reactor at the RRC 'Kurchatov Institute'. Results of the remote radioactivity measurements with new system during radiation inspection waste storage of this reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty associated with the assessment of the radioactive content of any sample depends on the net counting rate registered during the measuring process and on the different weighting factors needed to transform this counting rate into activity, activity per unit mass or activity concentration. This work analyses the standard uncertainties in these weighting factors as well as their contribution to the uncertainty in the activity reported for three typical determinations for environmental radioactivity measurements in the laboratory. It also studies the corresponding characteristic limits and their dependence on the standard uncertainty related to those weighting factors, offering an analysis of the effectiveness of the simplified characteristic limits as evaluated by various measuring software and laboratories

  7. Chemical analysis of radioactive mixed liquid wastes by Alpha/Gamma Spectrometry, ICP-OES and Arsenazo III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eduardo G.A.; Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Araujo, Leandro G.; Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Taddei, Maria Helena Tirollo, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste characterization is a very important step in radioactive waste management because it can influence subsequent stages, as waste conditioning, storage and disposal. This characterization must provide reliable information in order to satisfy some quality requirements based on chemical analysis of representative waste samples. This paper presents procedures adopted for characterization of thirteen different mixed liquid wastes stored at Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP. The first action was the sampling of representative samples of each liquid storage package, followed by the alpha and gamma spectrometry, Arsenazo III and ICP-OES analysis. It was identified the radionuclides U, Pu, Cs and Am and others seven chemical elements. The results obtained will be used to perform the treatment of these wastes. (author)

  8. Design of automatic control and measurement software for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yong; Li Aiwu

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive aerosol continuity measurement is very important for the development of nuclear industry, and it is the major method to measure and find out the leakage of radioactive material. Radioactive aerosol continuity monitor is the advanced method for the radioactive aerosol continuity measurement. With the development of nuclear industry and nuclear power station, it is necessary to design and automatic continuity measurement device. Because of this reason, the authors developed the first unit of radioactive aerosol continuity monitor and adopted the ministry appraisal. The design idea and method of automatic control and measurement for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor are discussed

  9. Validation of radioactivity measurements under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, Abraham S.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactivity measurements are made under the Safe Drinking Water Act to obtain information on the potential radiological hazard of water and to institute regulatory action when water quality does not meet requirements. Measurements must be both precise and accurate if these goals are to be met. Regulations issued under the act require that analyses be performed by approved (certified) laboratories, which must carry out quality assurance programs. This paper briefly describes the certification requirements and discusses the components of an effective quality assurance program. The Environmental Protection Agency has established procedures for the certification of laboratories making radioactivity measurements of drinking water. These procedures recommend minimum laboratory qualifications for personnel, facilities, equipment, and procedures; proficiency testing by analysis of samples provided by the Agency; and operation of a quality assurance program. A major function of a quality assurance program is to provide the Laboratory Director an ongoing flow of information on laboratory analytical performance. A properly designed and conducted program provides this information in a timely manner, indicates areas where discrepancies exist, and often suggests ways of correcting the discrepancies. Pertinent aspects of radioactivity measurements for drinking water are discussed, including how analyses of blanks, blind duplicates, and reference samples contribute needed information, and evaluations by control charts and statistical analyses. Examples of the usefulness of quality control in correcting both procedural and background problems are given. (author)

  10. Measurements of residual radioactivity in neutron transmutation doped thermistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Camin, D.V.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Zanotti, L.

    1994-01-01

    Germanium wafers exposed to intense neutron beams from a nuclear reactor to produce neutron transmutation doped thermistors have been analysed for residual radioactivity in view of their application in experiments on rare decays. Measurements have been routinely carried out for more than three years with germanium spectrometers of low intrinsic radioactivity operating in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in order to suppress the background due to cosmic rays. Four long lived nuclei produced during the irradiation by the fast neutron component of the flux have been identified. It is shown that two of them will contribute considerably to the background in experiments on rare events carried out with thermal detectors, especially in the direct search of dark matter. These measurements also enable investigation of the presence of contaminants in the germanium wafer before irradiation. The sensitivity can be as low as 10 -14 g/g for some elements. ((orig.))

  11. Radioactivity measurement in imported food and food related items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombrito, E.Z.; Santos, F.L.; Rosa, A.M. de la; Tangonan, M.C.; Bulos, A.D.; Nuguid, Z.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), formerly Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) undertook the radioactivity monitoring of imported food and food-related products after the Chernobyl Plant accident in April 1986. Food samples were analyzed for 137 Cs and 134 Cs by gamma spectral method of analysis. This report deals with the measurement process and gives the result of the activity covering the period June 1986 to December 1987. (Auth.). 9 tabs., 7 figs., 4 refs

  12. Alpha Recoil Flux of Radon in Groundwater and its Experimental Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, N.; Harvey, C. F.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater Radon (Rn222) activity is primarily controlled by alpha recoil process (radioactive decay), however, evaluating the rate and extent of this process, and its impact on porewater radioactivity, remains uncertain. Numerous factors contribute to this uncertainty, including the spatial distribution of parent radionuclides (e.g. U238, Th232 , Ra226 and Ra228) within native materials, differences in nuclide recoil length in host matrix and the physical structure of the rock strata (pore size distribution and porosity). Here, we experimentally measure Radon activities within porewater contributed through alpha recoil, and analyze its variations as a function of pore structure and parent nuclide distribution within host matrices, including Marcellus shale rock and Serrie-Copper Pegmatite. The shale cores originate from the Marcellus formation in Mckean, Pennsylvania collected at depths ranging from 1000-7000 feet, and the U-Th-rich Pegmatite is obtained from South Platte District, Colorado. Columns are packed with granulated rock of varying surface area (30,000-60,000 cm2/g) and subjected to low salinity sodium chloride solution in a close loop configuration. The activity of Radon (Rn222) and radium (Ra226) in the saline fluid is measured over time to determine recoil supply rates. Mineralogical and trace element data for rock specimens are characterized using XRD and XRF, and detailed geochemical profiles are constructed through total dissolution and analysis using ICP-MS and ICP-OES. Naturally occurring Radium nuclides and its daughters are quantified using a low-energy Germanium detector. The parent nuclide (U238 and Th232) distribution in the host rock is studied using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Our study elucidates the contribution of alpha recoil on the appearance and distribution of Radon (Rn222) within porewater of representative rock matrices. Further, we illustrate the effects of chemical and physical heterogeneity on the rate of this process

  13. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.

    2018-03-01

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10-10. This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10-4. The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  14. National network of environment radioactivity measurements. Press kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document first presents the objectives, challenges, context, operation and actors of the French national network of environment radioactivity measurements. It discusses the reasons for these measurements, the way they are performed, who perform them and how they are transmitted to the national network. It describes the quality policy for these measurements, and how this network is at the service of authorities, experts and population. It outlines the originality of the French approach within the European Union, and how this network takes the population expectations and their evolution into account

  15. Our experience of blood flow measurements using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danet, Bernard.

    1974-01-01

    A critical study of blood flow measuring methods is proposed. After a review of the various diffusible and non-diffusible radioactive tracers and the corresponding detector systems, the principles which allow to measure blood flow from the data so obtained, are studied. There is a different principle of flow measurement for each type of tracer. The theory of flow measurement using non-diffusible tracers (human serum albumin labelled with 131 I or sup(99m)Tc, 113 In-labelled siderophiline) and its application to cardiac flow measurement are described first. Then the theory of flow measurement using diffusible tracers ( 133 Xe, 85 Kr) and its application to measurement of blood flow through tissues (muscles and kidney particularly) are described. A personal experience of this various flow measurements is reported. The results obtained, the difficulties encountered and the improvments proposed are developed [fr

  16. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  17. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Tables are presented of trends in annual emissions of radioactive gaseous effluents at sites of civil establishments in the U.K. Trends in the discharge to surface and coastal water sites in the U.K. and trends in the radioactivity of solid wastes dumped in the N.E. Atlantic and in the volume and activity level of wastes disposed at sites in the U.K. are presented. Tables of radioactivity in samples of fish and shellfish at selected sites are presented. Radioactivity from global fallout and the annual mean ratio of 90 Sr to calcium, and concentrations of 137 Cs in milk are given. Trends in estimated collective doses from the consumption of fish and shellfish in the U.K. and Europe are presented. (U.K.)

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and

  19. Collective Thomson Scattering diagnostic for fusion product alpha particle measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kondoh, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    In JT-60U, a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (10.6 {mu}m 10 MW) have been developed to measure ion temperature and velocity distribution of fast ions to demonstrate feasibility of measurements of confined alpha particles in ITER. High power pulsed CO{sub 2} laser and heterodyne receiver system (a quantum-well infrared photodetector, QWIP) has been developed and installed in the diagnostic room (in collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory team). We describe the present states of the JT-60U CTS (Collective Thomson Scattering) system and also present a calculation of the scattered spectrum associated with the density and velocity distribution of energetic fusion produced alpha particles. Scattering of CO{sub 2} radiation is evaluated for the plasma condition for both ITER and JT-60U. (author)

  20. Determination of the gross alpha and beta radioactivity levels in Emendere Village (Sindirgi-Balikesir) drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogru, M.; Canbazoglu, C.; Baykara, O.; Kuelahci, F.; Boz, A.

    2001-01-01

    Over 40 years old 600-700 years old people in good condition live in about 300 houses in Emendere village. Most of drinking and usage water, and 70% of Sindirgi's (Balikesir) drinking water are supplied by two main natural sources from Emendere. Apart of those sources, restorative water source near the village settlement place is commonly used for bathing. The gross alpha and beta radioactivity levels in Sindirgi's drinking water are firstly determined by CNAEM (Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre) in 1999. Determined levels were both higher than the limits accepted by WHO (World Health Organisation) and TSE (Turkish Standards Institute) in drinking water. In this study, the gross alpha and beta radioactivity levels in usage and drinking water in the same place are determined by using more sample collected over the village and obtained results are conclude according to the standards determined by WHO and TSE. Ca and Mg concentrations, temperatures and pH are also determined and conclude. A health team from Balikesir State Hospital is also searched through the most of the village population. None of the radiation caused sickness was found during this search

  1. An overview on measurements of natural radioactivity in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are always exposed during their lives to ionizing radiation arising outside and within the earth. The exposure to these radiation occurs from natural sources such as radioactive elements in rocks and soil, internal exposure form radioactive elements through water, food and air and cosmic rays entering from outer space to earth's atmosphere. About 87% of the radiation dose received by human beings is due to natural radiation, it is essential to assess the radiation doses in order to control possible health effects from such natural sources. In this regard, a number of articles have been appeared for Malaysia in international research journals, which have been reviewed and complied in this article. Most of these articles are about the measurement of activity concentrations of primordial (238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K and anthropogenic (137Cs radionuclide's and gamma dose rate in environmental samples using HPGe and NaI (Tl survey meter.

  2. GEMS: Underwater spectrometer for long-term radioactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartini, Ludovica, E-mail: ludovica.sartini@ingv.i [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Genoa University, Genoa (Italy); Simeone, Francesco; Pani, Priscilla [' Sapienza' University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sect.Roma, Roma (Italy); Lo Bue, Nadia; Marinaro, Giuditta [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Grubich, Andry; Lobko, Alexander [Institute for Nuclear Problems (INP), Belarus State University, Minsk (Belarus); Etiope, Giuseppe [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Capone, Antonio [' Sapienza' University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sect.Roma, Roma (Italy); Favali, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Gasparoni, Francesco; Bruni, Federico [Tecnomare S.p.A., Venice (Italy)

    2011-01-21

    GEMS (Gamma Energy Marine Spectrometer) is a prototype of an autonomous radioactivity sensor for underwater measurements, developed in the framework for a development of a submarine telescope for neutrino detection (KM3NeT Design Study Project). The spectrometer is highly sensitive to gamma rays produced by {sup 40}K decays but it can detect other natural (e.g., {sup 238}U,{sup 232}Th) and anthropogenic radio-nuclides (e.g., {sup 137}Cs). GEMS was firstly tested and calibrated in the laboratory using known sources and it was successfully deployed for a long-term (6 months) monitoring at a depth of 3200 m in the Ionian Sea (Capo Passero, offshore Eastern Sicily). The instrument recorded data for the whole deployment period within the expected specifications. This monitoring provided, for the first time, a continuous time-series of radioactivity in deep-sea.

  3. Hair radioactivity as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, W. H.; Pories, W. J.; Fratianne, R. B.; Flynn, A.

    1972-01-01

    Since many radioisotopes accumulate in hair, this tropism was investigated by comparing the radioactivity of shaved with plucked hair collected from rats at various time intervals up to 24 hrs after intravenous injection of the ecologically important radioisotopes, iodine-131, manganese-54, strontium-85, and zinc-65. The plucked hair includes the hair follicles where biochemical transformations are taking place. The data indicate a slight surge of each radioisotpe into the hair immediately after injection, a variation of content of each radionuclide in the hair, and a greater accumulation of radioactivity in plucked than in shaved hair. These results have application not only to hair as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes, but also to tissue damage and repair at the hair follicle.

  4. Alpha and gamma spectrometry for natural radioactive nuclides around uranium mines and nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, A.M.; Tome, F.V.; Bejarano, J.D.; Aparicio, A.G. (Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1992-01-01

    Concentration of uranium and [sup 234]U/[sup 238]U and [sup 235]U/[sup 238]U activity ratios were studied in water samples taken in the neighbourhood of two uranium mines ('El Lobo' and 'El Pedregal', Badajoz, Spain), and around two nuclear power plants and their cooling reservoirs (the Central Nuclear de Almaraz, which is working today, and the Central Nuclear de Valdecaballeros, which is in the construction phase), using alpha spectrometry with semiconductor detectors. The Valdecaballeros data were taken to check for comparison with those of the Central Nuclear de Almaraz and with future values after the start of operation. Measurements were also made of all soluble gamma emitting nuclides using a shielded coaxial high purity germanium detector. The data suggest that the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the concentrations and in the [sup 234]U/[sup 238]U activity ratios in surface waters are principally dilution and leaching. (author).

  5. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, Z. E., E-mail: zjguevaram@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  6. Development of radioactive methods for direct measurement of steel machinability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovich, B.; Teofilovski, Ch.; Bek-Uzarov, Dzh.; Drashkovich, R.

    1976-01-01

    A review of direct methods for measuring and evaluation of stability of cutting tools has been given. These methods using radioactive isotope techniques are being developed at Trybology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kraguevets, and Radioisotope Laboratory, Boris Kidric Institute, Yugoslavia. Direct measuring of wear is being planned for tools used in cutting of alloys, steels and other metals, in order to determine machinability of various structural materials. The experimental method is generally used for the tools with the surface irradiated by proton and neutron particles in an accelerator. The tools of high-speed steel, and tungsten carbide, titanium carbide, etc. were investigated during cutting, milling, and drilling of metals

  7. Radioactive Sources in Medicine: Impact of Additional Security Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic, K. L.; Vetter, R. J.; Nelson, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, medical centers and hospitals have utilized appropriate security measures to prevent theft or unauthorized use of radioactive materials. Recent anxiety about orphan sources and terrorism has heightened concern about diversion of radioactive sources for purposes of constructing a radiological dispersion device. Some medical centers and hospitals may have responded by conducting threat assessments and incorporating additional measures into their security plans, but uniform recommendations or regulations have not been promulgated by regulatory agencies. The International Atomic Energy Agency drafted interim guidance for the purpose of assisting member states in deciding what security measures should be taken for various radioactive sources. The recommendations are aimed at regulators, but suppliers and users also may find the recommendations to be helpful. The purpose of this paper is to describe threat assessments and additional security actions that were taken by one large and one medium-sized medical center and the impact these measures had on operations. Both medical centers possess blood bank irradiators, low-dose-rate therapy sources, and Mo-99/Tc-99m generators that are common to many health care organizations. Other medical devices that were evaluated include high-dose-rate after loaders, intravascular brachytherapy sources, a Co-60 stereotactic surgery unit, and self-shielded irradiators used in biomedical research. This paper will discuss the impact additional security has had on practices that utilize these sources, cost of various security alternatives, and the importance of a security culture in assuring the integrity of security measures without negatively impacting beneficial use of these sources. (Author) 10 refs

  8. Evaluation of the uncertainty of environmental measurements of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydorn, K.

    2004-01-01

    Results obtained by measurement of radioactivity have traditionally been associated with an expression of their uncertainty, based on the so-called counting statistics. This is calculated together with the actual result on the assumption that the number of counts observed has a Poisson distribution with equal mean and variance. Most of the nuclear scientific community has, therefore, assumed that it already complied with the latest ISO 17025 requirements. Counting statistics, however, express only the variability observed among repeated measurements of the same sample under the same counting conditions, which is equivalent to the term repeatability used in quantitative analysis. Many other sources of uncertainty need to be taken into account before a statement of the uncertainty of the actual result can be made. As the first link in the traceability chain calibration is always an important uncertainty component in any kind of measurement. For radioactivity measurements in particular counting geometry assumes the greatest importance, because it is often not possible to measure a standard and a control sample under exactly the same conditions. In the case of large samples there are additional uncertainty components associated with sample heterogeneity and its influence on self-absorption and counting efficiency. An uncertainty budget is prepared for existing data for 137 Cs in Danish soil, which is shown to account adequately for all sources of uncertainty. (author)

  9. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of 82 Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million 82 Rb(t 1/2 =75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of 82 Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements

  10. Automation of a measurement systems of waste drum alpha activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labarre, S.; Bardy, N.

    1985-10-01

    The alpha radiator activity in the two-hundred liter waste drums is found by an IN96, computerized analyzer of the society Intertechnique, from data delivered by a gamma detector (GeHP) and by neutron detection blocks (He counter). This computerized analyzer manages not only the drum rotation and position in front of the detector, but also the experimental data monitoring and their processing from specific programs (background noise, calibration, drum measurements). Thanks to this automation, the measurement number and their reliability are optimized [fr

  11. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S

    2018-03-28

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10 -10 This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10 -4 The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  12. Effect of radioactive isotope 32P upon alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraljevic, P.; Emanovic, D.; Simpraga, M.; Nejedli, S.; Stojevic, Z.

    1996-01-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate whether alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in blood plasma can serve as the help in establishing on early diagnosis of organic or functional damage caused by ionizing radiation in chickens. Fifty day old hybrid chickens of heavy 'Jata' breeds of both sexes, were treated by 32 P administered intramusculary as sodium orthophosphate in a single dose of 333 MBq per kilogram of body weight. Blood samples was taken from the wing vein on day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration of 32 P. Alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration were determined spectrophotometrically using kits produced by 'Radonja', Sisak. Alpha amylase activity was decreased and glucose concentration was increased during investigated period. Yet, the further investigations are needed to find out whether these two parameters can be used for early diagnosis of injury in chicken organism by ionizing radiation. (author)

  13. A Measurement of $\\alpha_s$ from the Scaling Violation in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    The hadronic fragmentation functions of the various quark flavours and of gluons are measured in a study of the inclusive hadron production from $\\zz$ decays with the DELPHI detector and are compared with the fragmentation functions measured elsewhere at energies between 14 GeV and 91 GeV. A large scaling violation is observed, which is used to extract the strong coupling constant from a fit using a numerical integration of the second order DGLAP evolution equations. The result is \\begin{displaymath} \\alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.124^{+0.006}_{-0.007}(exp)\\pm 0.009 (theory) \\end{displaymath} where the first error represents the experimental uncertainty and the second error is due to the factorization and renormalization scale dependence.

  14. Radioactive ion implantation as a tool for wear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagger, C.; Soerensen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with ion implantation of radioactive krypton ions in surfaces with aim of measuring wear of different magnetic materials in sound-heads. The technique is especially suited for a relatively fast comparison of wear-characteristics of materials of varying composition in small inaccessible areas. In the present case utilisation of a 60 KeV accelerator allows determination of a total wear as small as 0.05 μm with an accuracy of 10%. Further the technique yields information of the time dependence of the wear process with an accuracy less than 0.001 μm. (author)

  15. Standard cartridges used in gamma spectrometry measurements of radioactive halogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepy, M.C.; Etcheverry, M.; Morel, J.; Chauvenet, B.

    1988-10-01

    Activated charcoal cartridges are used to trap radioactive halogens contained in gaseous effluents of nuclear facilities. Two types of standard cartridges, with barium 133 or europium 152 are available. One of the models simulates a volumic distribution, and the other a surface distribution of the radionuclides inside the cartridge. They are characterized in terms of activity with an uncertainty lower than 5 %. The standard cartridges utilization conditions are specified and the main measurement error causes are analyzed. The proper routine use of these standards should allow us to get results with an accuracy better than 10 % [fr

  16. Radioactivity measurements of soil samples from Raichur of Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, S.; Kerur, B.R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiations present in environment comprise the terrestrial and extraterrestrial radiations. Natural radioactivity measurement, radiation monitoring of the region, dose assessment and interpretation of radiological related parameters are crucial aspects from the public awareness and environmental safety point of view. It is found that values of the radiological parameters obtained for samples in the study area were found within acceptable or permissible limits. The estimated gamma absorbed dose rate was found to be in the range 32 - 162 nGy h -1 . Higher dose rate than that of the normal dose rate were observed in the regions where granitic, granitic gneiss and schist outcrops were prominent area

  17. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almayahi, B A; Tajuddin, A A; Jaafar, M S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm(-2) and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm(-2), whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm(-2) and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm(-2), respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2), whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm(-2). The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey Of Gross Alpha And Beta Radioactivity In Well Water From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty –two samples of well water were drawn at random from wells in and aound Zaria Township, Kaduna State. Two drops of concentrated nitric acid were added in two liters of the sampled water for preservation. The samples were later evaporated and counted for gross alpha and beta in an eight-channel-gas-filled ...

  19. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ''collective'' alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed

  20. Measuring Salivary Alpha-Amylase in the Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, Maria S; Musleh, Aya; Olson, Lisa E

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate courses in biopsychology, neuroscience, and physiology often include laboratory exercises that examine responses to stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system with measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, or galvanic skin levels (sweat response). A newer bioindicator of the sympathetic nervous system is salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) measured with a colorimetic enzyme assay. Undergraduate students successfully measured a rise in sAA due to the stress of giving a class presentation (n=13). Students were enthusiastic to measure a physiological response to a real-life anxiety-producing situation. We describe potential difficulties in the assay and our adaptations to the manufacturer's protocol to make it more feasible in the undergraduate setting.

  1. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A.; Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V MAS /WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, τ c is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 10 τ c [S] 10 (τ/τ c ) > -17.0, where τ is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  2. Implantation of alpha spectrometry methodology for the determination of U and Th isotopes in igneous rocks: application to the study of radioactive desequilibrium in the Trindade Island, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rosana Nunes dos

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the implementation of experimental procedures for alpha spectrometry measurement of 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th activities in silicates. The best experimental conditions were defined using 233 U, 232 U and 229 Th radioactive tracers and simulating the usual conditions found in processing silicates. The chemical procedures consists of the following steps: radioactive tracer addition and sample dissolution by acid digestion, U and Th pre-concentration by co-precipitation, element separation and purification by ion exchange chromatography and electrodeposition in inox steel disks. In order to evaluate its effectiveness, the procedure was applied to the Brazilian geological standards BB-1 (basalt) and GB-1 (granite). The obtained chemical yields for uranium and thorium are of about 60% and 70%, respectively, for both matrices. The described methodology furnishes activity measurements with less than 4% relative precision and accuracies of about 1%, that are essential for petrogenetic applications. The 238 U and 232 Th series disequilibrium conditions were investigated by alpha spectrometry, together with neutron activation analysis and natural gamma-ray spectrometry. 234 U/ 238 U, 238 U/ 232 Th and 230 Th/ 232 Th activity ratios and the 234 Th, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 235 U, 228 Ac, 212 Pb, 212 Bi and 208 Tl specific activities were obtained. These results were interpreted with the help of additional constraints given by the larger and smaller elements concentrations, measured by X-ray fluorescence. The 232 Th series is in secular radioactive equilibrium in all analysed samples. In the case of the 238 U series, the equilibrium condition was verified, as expected, in the oldest rocks from the Trindade Island (Trindade Complex and Desejado Sequence). On the other hand, the results show that, in the samples from the last three volcanic episodes in the island (Morro Vermelho Formation, Valado Formation and Vulcao do Paredao), the 230 Th and 238 U are not in

  3. Estimating the mean and variance of measurements from serial radioactive decay schemes with emphasis on 222Rn and its short-lived progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkret, W.C.; Borak, T.B.; Boes, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Classically, the mean and variance of radioactivity measurements are estimated from poisson distributions. However, the random distribution of observed events is not poisson when the half-life is short compared with the interval of observation or when more than one event can be associated with a single initial atom. Procedures were developed to estimate the mean and variance of single measurements of serial radioactive processes. Results revealed that observations from the three consecutive alpha emissions beginning with 222 Rn are positively correlated. Since the poisson estimator ignores covariance terms, it underestimates the true variance of the measurement. The reverse is true for mixtures of radon daughters only. (author)

  4. Measurement of radioactive soil contamination from the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loman, A.C.; Kuile, C.R. ter; Slaper, H.

    1990-09-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry can be used to determine the qualitative and quantitative deposition of radioactive materials on the ground surface. By applying the in-situ spectrometry method using either a helicopter or an airplane, large areas can be scanned in a short period of time. In this report the results of in-situ gamma spectroscopic measurements taken from a helicopter are described. Measurements were carried out using a single point source, a field of 36 point sources, and using the present ground contamination due to fall-out from the Chernobyl accident and atom bombs. The results of these measurements were used to determine calibration factors, which were in agreement with a calibration obtained using more simple (and less expensive) laboratory measurements in combination with flux calculations. Detection limits for the measurement of surface contamination were determined. At a height of 50 meters above the surface and using a measurement time of 2 minutes, the minimally detectable surface contamination was 1.1 kBqm -2 for a Cs-137 contamination and 2.1 kBqm -2 for I-131 contamination. Fall-out determinations based on measurements taken at a height of 50 meters were in agreement with determinations taken at a height of 1 meter, and with the results obtained measuring soil samples. The in-situ gamma spectroscopy, using helicopter or airplane, is a fast and powerful method for mapping surface contamination. (author). 13 refs.; 18 figs.; 13 tabs

  5. Value of continuous leakage monitoring with radioactive iodine-131-labeled human serum albumin during hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha and melphalan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, RJ; Limburg, PC; Piers, DA; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the value of continuous leakage monitoring with radioactive iodine-131-labeled human serum albumin (RISA) in patients treated with hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and melphalan. Methods: Forty-eight

  6. A low-cost miniaturised detector for environmental radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen; Briggs, Aaron; Hastings, Peter; Harrison, R. Giles; Marlton, Graeme; Baird, Adam

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a low-cost (£ few hundred), low-power (40mA), low-mass (30g) detector for environmental radioactivity measurements, using scintillator and solid state technology. The detector can measure energy and therefore has the capability to distinguish between different types of energetic particle. Results from recent tests, when our detector was integrated with a meteorological radiosonde system, and flew on a balloon up to 25km, identified the transition region between energetic particles near the surface, dominated by terrestrial gamma emissions, and higher-energy particles in the free troposphere from cosmic rays. The detector can be used with Bluetooth technology for remote monitoring, which is particularly useful for hazardous areas. It is also small and cheap enough to be used in sensor networks for a wide range of applications, from atmospheric science to disaster monitoring.

  7. (n, {alpha}) cross section measurement of light nuclei using gridded ionization chamber and gaseous sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Sato, Jun; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a measuring method of (n, {alpha}) cross section by using gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber. In this study, we measured the {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) and the {sup 16}O(n, {alpha}{sub 0}), (n, {alpha}{sub 123}) cross sections for En=11.5 and 12.8 MeV neutrons. We also deduced the {sup 12}C(n, x{alpha}) spectrum and analyzed the data by a kinematic calculation combined with the reaction data of the {sup 12}C(n, n`3{alpha}). (author)

  8. Situation of radioactive wastes and their prevention and treatment measures in China's uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Renjie.

    1988-01-01

    The sorts of radioactive wastes produced in uranium mining and metallurgy and their hazards are discribed in this paper. The characteristics of the radioactive wastes are discussed. The measurements and results are introduced for treatment and disposal of the radioactive wastes. The way to deal with prevention and treatment of radioactive wastes is presented in the stages of engineering design, construction, production and decommission of uranium mines and plants

  9. Changing methodology for measuring airborne radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-05-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requires that measurements of airborne radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities be performed following outdated methods contained in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1-1969 Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities. Improved methods are being introduced via two paths. First, the ANSI standard is being revised, and second, EPA's equivalency granting process is being used to implement new technology on a case-by-case or broad basis. The ANSI standard is being revised by a working group under the auspices of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The revised standard includes updated methods based on current technology and a performance-based approach to design. The performance-based standard will present new challenges, especially in the area of performance validation. Progress in revising the standard is discussed. The US Department of Energy recently received approval from the USEPA for an alternate approach to complying with air-sampling regulations. The alternate approach is similar to the revised ANSI standard. New design tools include new types of sample extraction probes and a model for estimating line-losses for particles and radioiodine. Wind tunnel tests are being performed on various sample extraction probes for use at small stacks. The data show that single-point sampling probes are superior to ANSI-Nl3.1-1969 style multiple-point sample extraction probes

  10. Measurements of natural radioactivity concentrations in decorative commercial stones in dwellings of Mosul City, Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Badrani, M. W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural stone finds its way into homes as part of the bricks, cement, floor and wall tiles, as well as our beautiful heavy countertops. This stone is mined from the earth's crust in quarries, and then made available to home builders, throughout the world. The earth's crust contains elements that were originally produced in the (supernova). Some of these elements are radioactive, and therefore any building materials extracted from the earth's crust can potentially be radioactive too. These rocks have characteristics that enable them to be used in decoration as, able to be polished and have low water absorption. A knowledge of radioactivity present in these natural rock samples helps to assess the possible radiological hazards to human health and necessary. So the natural stone could potentially be dangerous. The potential dangers of radioactive elements in homes are two-fold: one is 'radiation' and the other is 'radon.' Radioactive elements, where Radon is a natural radioactive element in the gaseous form. It is a decay product of radium, which is present in all rocks and building materials. Radon escapes from them via diffusion and convection. For many years the geologists have been exploiting the emanation effect for the purposes of the radioactive deposit prospecting and of general geology survey by their very nature, where all radioactive sources seek stability by decaying into lighter elements via the emission of radiation. This radiation comes in the form of energetic light particles - namely, 'gamma-rays', 'beta particles.', and 'alpha particles.' These can enter the body from the outside and cause damage to cells and DNA, potentially causing cancer. Also, naturally occurring Uranium nuclei decay into an element called Radium, which produces an unstable gas called Radon. Breathing air that contains radon thus deposits radioactive elements directly into the soft-tissues of the lungs and can cause lung cancer. The natural sources include radon emanating from

  11. Quality assurance for radioactive measurement in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine continues to grow around the world, owing in part to a number of successful programmes carried out by the IAEA to enhance the use of nuclear medicine techniques in Member States. The implementation of quality assurance (QA) programmes to ensure the safe application of radiopharmaceuticals has, however, been variable in many Member States. One possible reason is the lack of a unified set of principles regarding the establishment of such programmes. This publication addresses the issue of QA programmes for radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine. A group of experts consulted by the IAEA recommended in 2002 that unified principles concerning QA and quality control (QC) procedures for the measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine be developed because of its importance in controlling the safety and effectiveness of the use of radiopharmaceuticals. This publication is the result of advice provided to the IAEA by experts in the fields of radionuclide metrology, medical physics and radiopharmacy. This report can be considered to be a more detailed and updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-602, Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments, published in 1991. Advances in the field of nuclear instrumentation since that report was published, particularly in imaging, and the increased emphasis on QA and QC prompted the need for an update. Moreover, it was realized that the activity measurement and imaging aspects had each become so specialized as to be better treated in separate publications. The present report focuses on the factors affecting radioactivity measurement and the implementation of QA and QC programmes to ensure accurate and consistent results. The IAEA has developed a safety standard on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3), which replaces the IAEA publications on QA issued as Safety Series No. 50-C/SG-Q (1996). In GS-R-3, the management system is described as a set of

  12. Experimental and numerical study of the degradation of radioactive measurements in the filters of airborne radioactive surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geryes, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of radioactivity in the filters of airborne radioactive surveillance systems is a major metrology difficulty due to the fact that the absorption of a radiation in the filter media and the mass of aerosols accumulated distort the nuclear counting response. This thesis focuses on the determination of correction factors for the radioactivity loss in the survey filters. In a first step, radioactive filters representing the atmospheric samples have been prepared using the nuclear test bench ICARE. The experimental study on reference filters provided a database to determine correction factors for various filtration conditions. The second part proposes a new numerical method developed to determine the correction factors. It consists of coupling GeoDict for particles filtration simulations and MCNPX simulations for a transport in matter. The good agreement obtained by comparing the numerical and experimental correction factors has permitted to validate the numerical model

  13. Preparation of radioactive ''mixed'' waste samples for measurement of RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.A.; Caton, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A radioactive ''mixed'' waste typically contains alpha-, beta-, or gamma-emitting radionuclides and varying quantities of semivolatile or volatile organic species, some or all of which may be named specifically by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because there are no acceptable means available currently for disposing of these mixed wastes, they are presently stored above-ground in sealed drums. For this reason, analytical procedures which can determine RCRA organics in radioactive waste are necessary for deciding the proper approach for disposal. An important goal of this work is the development of methods for preparing mixed waste samples in a manner which allows the RCRA organics to be measured in conventional organic analysis laboratories without special precautions. Analytical procedures developed for handling mixed waste samples must satisfy not only the usual constraints present in any trace-level organic chemical determination, but also those needed to insure the protection of the operator from radioactive contamination. Consequently, procedures should be designed to use the least amount of radioactive sample commensurate with achieving acceptable sensitivity with the RCRA analytical methods. Furthermore, the unusual laboratory glassware which would normally be used should be replaced with disposable materials wherever possible, in order to reduce the ''clean-up'' time required, and thereby reduce the operator's exposure to radioactivity. Actual sample handling should be reduced to the absolute minimum. Finally, the final isolate must exhibit a sufficiently low level of alpha, beta, or gamma activity to permit detailed characterization in a conventional organic analysis laboratory. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  14. Radiobiological significance of radioactive contamination - summary assessment based on great number of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, V.; Bonchev, Ts.; Mavrodiev, V.; Kyrdzhilov, N.

    1995-01-01

    In order to facilitate quantitative and qualitative characterisation of radioactive contamination the authors introduce a relative estimate of radionuclide activity by setting as a reference the most abundant element -Co-60 in the case of the Kozloduy NPP. The ratio η i of the mean annual permissible concentration in air for each radionuclide (RPC-92) to that of Co-60 is calculated. It is found that η i has the same or close values for groups of radionuclides, e.g. η i = 2.10 -4 for 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm; η i = 5 for 89 Sr, 91 Y; 93 Nb, 134 Cs, 137 Cs; η i = 50 for 55 Fe, 63 Ni, 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 140 Ba, 140 La. Then it is compared to the experimentally measured values of the same quantity η iexp , derived from surface contamination data. The ratio η iexp /η i is plotted against log η i . The resulting nomograms give graphic representation of the radiobiological significance of various radionuclide groups. Data from different locations at the Kozloduy NPP are presented. It is found that the alpha emitter contamination has highest values in the Unit 1 (WWER-440) control rooms after repair. The Unit 5 (WWER-1000) has lower alpha contamination compared to WWER-440 units. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Proton Radioactivity Measurements at HRIBF: Ho, Lu, and Tm Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akovali, Y.; Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Davinson, T.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J.H.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Kim, S.H.; MacDonald, B.D.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.J.; Rykaczewski, K.; Slinger, R.C.; Szerypo, J.; Toth, K.S.; Weintraub, W.; Woods, P.J.; Yu, C.-H.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1998-01-01

    Two new isotopes, 145 Tm and 140 Ho and three isomers in previously known isotopes, 141m Ho, 150m Lu and 151m Lu have been discovered and studied via their decay by proton emission. These proton emitters were produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) by heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions, separated in A/Q with a recoil mass spectrometer (RMS), and detected in a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). The decay energy and half-life was measured for each new emitter. An analysis in terms of a spherical shell model is applied to the Tm and Lu nuclei, but Ho is considerably deformed and requires a collective model interpretation

  16. The NIST radioactivity measurement assurance program for the radiopharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cessna, Jeffrey T.; Golas, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) maintains a program for the establishment and dissemination of activity measurement standards in nuclear medicine. These standards are disseminated through Standard Reference Materials (SRMs), Calibration Services, radionuclide calibrator settings, and the NIST Radioactivity Measurement Assurance Program (NRMAP, formerly the NEI/NIST MAP). The MAP for the radiopharmaceutical industry is described here. Consolidated results show that, for over 3600 comparisons, 96% of the participants' results differed from that of NIST by less than 10%, with 98% being less than 20%. Individual radionuclide results are presented from 214 to 439 comparisons, per radionuclide, for 67 Ga, 90 Y, 99m Tc, 99 Mo, 111 In, 125 I, 131 I, and 201 Tl. The percentage of participants results within 10% of NIST ranges from 88% to 98%. - Research highlights: ► NIST has maintained an MAP for the radiopharmaceutical industry since 1975. ► Participants measure sources with known, but blinded, activity and submit results. ► The schedule is chosen by a steering committee made up of participants and NIST. ► Participants submit calibrated sources for measurement by NIST during open months. ► Results are presented for over 3600 measurements of distributed sources.

  17. Evaluation of the uncertainty of environmental measurements of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydorn, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The almost universal acceptance of the concept of uncertainty has led to its introduction into the ISO 17025 standard for general requirements to testing and calibration laboratories. This means that not only scientists, but also legislators, politicians, the general population - and perhaps even the press - expect to see all future results associated with an expression of their uncertainty. Results obtained by measurement of radioactivity have routinely been associated with an expression of their uncertainty, based on the so-called counting statistics. This is calculated together with the actual result on the assumption that the number of counts observed has a Poisson distribution with equal mean and variance. Most of the nuclear scientific community has therefore assumed that it already complied with the latest ISO 17025 requirements. Counting statistics, however, express only the variability observed among repeated measurements of the same sample under the same counting conditions, which is equivalent to the term repeatability used in quantitative analysis. Many other sources of uncertainty need to be taken into account before a statement of the uncertainty of the actual result can be made. As the first link in the traceability chain calibration is always an important uncertainty component in any kind of measurement. For radioactivity measurements in particular we find that counting geometry assumes the greatest importance, because it is often not possible to measure a standard and a control sample under exactly the same conditions. In the case of large samples we have additional uncertainty components associated with sample heterogeneity and its influence on self-absorption and counting efficiency. In low-level environmental measurements we have an additional risk of sample contamination, but the most important contribution to uncertainty is usually the representativity of the sample being analysed. For uniform materials this can be expressed by the

  18. Practice and experience in traceability of radioactivity measurements of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhijian

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects on radioactivity measurement traceability and summarizes the work on quality assurance of radioactivity measurements of environmental samples in the laboratory, including transfer of standards, preparation of reference materials, and calibration of efficiency for volumse surces with Ge(Li) spectrometer. Some practical activitis regarding intercomparison of radioactivity measurements and other traceabillity-related activities are also described. Some sugestions relating to performing quality assurance are made

  19. Measurements of whole-body radioactivity in the UK population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, J.D.; Boddy, K.; McKenzie, A.L.; Oxby, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    A national survey of whole-body radioactivity was undertaken. A mobile whole-body counter visited collaborating Medical Physics Departments and Hospitals in England and Wales. Data were also obtained from an installed whole-body counter at the West Cumberland Hospital, Whitehaven, and from a control site at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. 1657 volunteer members of the public were measured, including 162 children. 36% of volunteers had been measured in a similar survey 2 years earlier, and showed between a two and five fold reduction in body radiocaesium. No radiocaesium was detected in 54% of people measured. Measurements showed a progressive fall over the course of the study, reaching a baseline of 0.3 Bq 137 Cs/gK. In 1989, the additional radiation dose incurred from radiocaesium varied from a maximum of 4.1 μSv in Cumbria to 1.5 μSv in the South East, compared with the average annual radiation dose of 2500 μSv due to all other causes. No other gamma-emitting radionuclides were found. Results are consistent with Chernobyl as the source of the radiocaesium detected. (author)

  20. The methods of measuring radioactive xenon isotopes activity for CTBT noble xenon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun; Zhao Yungang; Wang Jun

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive xenon isotopes ( 131m Xe, 133 Xe, 133m Xe, 135 Xe) are some key important detecting objects for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring. Currently the most important difficulties are xenon sampling, purring and radioactive xenon isotopes measuring. It describes in detail the methods of HPGe γ spectrometer and β-γ coincidence method measuring radioactive xenon isotopes. The Lab simultaneously adopted two methods to measure the noble gas sample spiked 133 Xe, and the result difference of two methods is 8%. In the end, the method of improving radioactive xenon isotopes measuring accuracy is put forward. (authors)

  1. A Characterization of BMO^\\alpha-martingale spaces by fractional Carleson measures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wei; Liu, Peide

    2014-01-01

    We give a characterization of $BMO^\\alpha$-martingale spaces by using fractional Carleson measures. We get the boudedness of martingale transform and square function on $BMO^\\alpha$-martingale spaces easily by using this characterization. We also proved the martingale version of Carleson's inequality related with $BMO^\\alpha$-martingales.

  2. The measurement of radioactive microspheres in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Spiers, E.W.; Adiseshiah, M.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the distribution of radioactive microspheres are used in investigations of regional coronary blood flow, but the size and shape of the heart varies for different test animals, and the organ is frequently divided into smaller pieces for studies of regional perfusion. Errors are introduced by variations in the distribution of the radioactive source and the amount of Compton scatter in different samples. A technique has therefore been developed to allow the counting of these tissue samples in their original form, and correction factors have been derived to inter-relate the various counting geometries thus encountered. Dogs were injected with microspheres labelled with 141 Ce, 51 Cr or 85 Sr. The tissue samples did not require remodelling to fit a standard container, and allowance was made for the inhomogeneous distribution in the blood samples. The activities in the centrifuged blood samples were correlated with those from the tissue samples by a calibration procedure involving comparisons of the counts from samples of microspheres embedded in sachets of gelatine, and similar samples mixed with blood and then centrifuged. The calibration data have indicated that 51 Cr behaves anomalously, and its use as a label for microspheres may introduce unwarranted errors. A plane cylindrical 10 x 20 cm NaI detector was used, and a 'worst case' correction of 20% was found to be necessary for geometry effects. The accuracy of this method of correlating different geometries was tested by remodelling the same tissue sample into different sizes and comparing the results, and the validity of the technique was supported by agreement of the final results with previously published data. (U.K.)

  3. Radioactivity measurement in Austria 1992 and 1993. Data and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Ministry of Health and Consumer Protection is responsible for the large scale surveillance of radioactive contaminations of the Austrian territory. For this purpose on one hand an on-line measurement system has been set up, using gamma dose rate measuring devices situated in 336 locations. On the other hand, various media e.g. aerosols, precipitation, surface water and foodstuffs are being collected. Their radionuclide content is analysed in several laboratories. Additional special projects have been set up to improve the knowledge of the time dependence respectively of regional aspects of the contamination situation. The report covers the results of this surveillance for the years 1992 and 1993. The evaluation of these measurements and of other data concerning the average exposure of the Austrian population for the year 1993 is summarized in the following figure. It can be seen that the main contributions to the radiation dose are due to natural exposure pathways, among which the inhalation of indoor radon is of main importance. (Compared to the data in earlier reports due to a new evaluation of the radon risk by ICRP this dose contribution is significantly lower.) In comparison, the component due to the consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident in 1986 onto Austrian territory during 1992 and 1993 was marginal. (author)

  4. Measurements of Radioactivity in Body Organs. Report of a Panel of Experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of radioactivity in body organs in vivo entail physical and other problems which do not arise in measurements of radioactivity in vitro. From 8-12 December 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna a panel of experts to review the existing status of techniques for such measurements

  5. Measurement of natural radioactivity of the leaf Nefza (Oued belif)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourati Sofiane

    2009-01-01

    Nefza region, specifically Oued Belif, has a unique geological diversity in Tunisia. That's why it was chosen to be a study of natural radioactivity. The results were encouraging and have allowed us to draw conclusions about the origin of the high natural radioactivity found in certain rocks.

  6. Measurements of neutron cross sections of radioactive waste nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio [Gifu College of Medical Technology, Seki, Gifu (Japan); Harada, Hideo; Nakamura, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu; Hatsukawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction cross sections of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements are required for research on nuclear transmutation methods in nuclear waste management. Important fission products in the nuclear waste management are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I because of their large fission yields and long half-lives. The present authors have measured the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 99}Tc. The purpose of this study is to measure the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of nuclides, {sup 129}I and {sup 135}Cs accurately. Preliminary experiments were performed by using Rikkyo University Reactor and JRR-3 reactor at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Then, it was decided to measure the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs by using the JRR-3 Reactor because this measurement required a high flux reactor. On the other hand, those of {sup 129}I were measured at the Rikkyo Reactor because the product nuclides, {sup 130}I and {sup 130m}I, have short half-lives and this reactor is suitable for the study of short lived nuclide. In this report, the measurements of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs are described. To obtain reliable values of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs(n, {gamma}){sup 136}Cs reaction, a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for the mass analysis of nuclide in the sample. A progress report on the cross section of {sup 134}Cs, a neighbour of {sup 135}Cs, is included in this report. A report on {sup 129}I will be presented in the Report on the Joint-Use of Rikkyo University Reactor. (author)

  7. Localization of pig Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunit genes to chromosome 4 by radioactive in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Y.; Yerle, M.; Dalens, M.; Chevalet, C.; Gellin, J. (Centre de Recherches de Toulouse (France))

    1993-01-01

    Two genes coding for Na[sup +],K[sup +] -ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunits are localized on pig chromosome 4, to the q1.6[yields]q2.3 and 1.3[yields]q2.1 regions, respectively, by radioactive in situ hybridization. According to nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons with different human isoforms of Na[sup +] ,K[sup +]-ATPase, these pig [alpha] and [beta] ATPase genes show strong homologies with human [alpha]1 and [beta] subunit ATPase genes, respectively. These results are discussed with respect to comparative mapping data of conserved genes in mammalian species. We showed that the pig cDNA probes encoding ATPase [alpha] and, [beta] genes reveal DNA polymorphism in Meishan an Large White pigs. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Radionuclide, scintillation cocktail and chemical/color quench influence on discriminator setting in gross alpha/beta measurements by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Ivana; Tenjović, Branislava; Nikolov, Jovana; Todorović, Nataša

    2015-06-01

    Gross alpha/beta measurements in drinking waters enable radiochemical composition analysis in environmental studies providing efficient screening method that can indicate whether water contains elevated levels of any radionuclide. Routine gross alpha/beta activity monitoring in drinking waters has been carried out for a few years in laboratory for low-level radioactivity measurements in Novi Sad according to ASTM method, performing measurements on liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220 which can simultaneously generate alpha/beta spectra of samples by Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA circuit). In this paper, PSA discriminator impact was investigated to ensure obtaining of accurate and reliable alpha/beta activities. One novelty of presented work is PSA parameter setup with two combinations of radionuclides ((241)Am, (226)Ra and (90)Sr/(90)Y) with varying activity concentrations. Performed experiments also make contribution to investigations on the manner in which chemical and color quench affect optimal PSA parameter setting and further on, their altogether influence on gross alpha/beta activity measurements. Nitromethane, 15.8 M nitric acid and water, as well as yellow and yellow-orange dye, were used as quenching agents in order to test PSA/interference factor behavior in the presence of quenchers with different quenching strengths. Variation of PSA setting in quenched samples with two different commercially available cocktails (Ultima Gold LLT and OptiPhase HiSafe 3) was also tested. Lastly, application i.e. assessment of obtained PSA-SQP(E) correlation on the obtained results of activity concentrations of few artesian well water samples and colored spiked samples, based on the measured SQP(E) value of samples, has been demonstrated. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. ICP-MS measurement of natural radioactivity at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisi, S.; Copia, L.; Dafinei, I.; di Vacri, M. L.

    2017-10-01

    Rare events search experiments, like those dedicated to the direct evidence of dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, are among the most exciting challenges of modern physics. The sensitivity of such experiments is driven by the background, which depends substantially on the radiopurity of the materials used for the experimental apparatus. Cutting edge measurement techniques are needed for a fast, sensitive and efficient screening of these materials and the certification of their production. Trace element measurements of high sensitivity and quick execution are mandatory also in other fields like tracing the geographical origin of food, temporal and geographical assignment of cultural heritage or monitoring environmental radioactivity. This work is an overview of the inorganic mass spectrometry facility available at Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) for radiopure material screening and is especially focused on its ICP-MS instrumentation. Analytical methods developed to achieve lowest detection limits in different types of matrix, like metals, polymers, crystals and composite materials, are also indicated. Detection limits of 10-18gg-1 for 226Ra, 10-14gg-1 for U and Th and 10-12gg-1 for K are attained through dedicated operation conditions of the instrumentation. Details are given on the results obtained for different experiments ongoing or under construction at LNGS.

  10. Synchronous Measurements of Alpha-Decay of 239-Pu Carried out at North Pole, Antarctic, and in Puschino Confirm that the Shapes of the Respective Histograms Depend on the Diurnal Rotation of the Earth and on the Direction of the Alpha-Particle Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dependence of histogram shapes from Earth diurnal rotation, and from direction of alpha-particles issue at 239 Pu radioactive decay is confirmed by simultaneous measure- ments of fluctuation amplitude spectra — shapes of corresponding histograms. The measurements were made with various methods and in different places: at the North Pole, in Antarctic (Novolazarevskaya station, and in Puschino.

  11. Characterization of a Large Area ZnS(Ag) Detector for Gross Alpha and Beta Activity Measurements in Tap Water Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, E.; Cester, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Schotanus, P.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present the characterization of a large area 200 mm ×200 mm EJ-444 scintillation detector to be used for monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in tap water plants. Specific tests were performed in order to determine the best setup to read-out the light from the detector side. The possibility to stack many detectors and get a compact device with total active area of the order of 1 m2 has been explored. Alpha/beta discrimination, efficiency and homogeneity tests were carried out with alpha and beta sources. Background from ambient radioactivity was measured as well. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in drinking water is a goal of the EU project TAWARA_RTM.

  12. Development of diagnostic beams for alpha particle measurement on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, M.; Taniike, A.; Nomura, I.; Wada, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Sato, M.

    1995-08-01

    The feasibility of alpha particle measurement using a high energy diagnostic beam in combination with a neutral particle analyzer is examined for a burning plasma on ITER. In order to measure them in the energy range of 0.5 - 3.5 MeV, the required beam energy is around 1 MeV for a {sup 3}He{sup 0} beam and 3 MeV for a {sup 6}Li{sup 0} beam with the beam current density of around 1 mA/cm{sup 2} for both cases. Among the various methods to produce such a high energy neutral beam, the acceleration of negative ions is most favorable. Recent results of relatively small-scale experiments on these negative ion sources show that the required current density is now realistic. Some technical problems how to scale-up the ion sources to be used on an ITER-size experiment are also studied on these experiments. (author).

  13. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Instituto Superior de Ciencias e Tecnologia Nucleares, La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V{sub MAS}/WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, {tau}{sub c} is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 <{approx_equal} log{sub 10} {tau}{sub c} [S] <{approx_equal} 27.50 and log {sub 10}({tau}/{tau}{sub c}) > -17.0, where {tau} is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  14. Calculated /alpha/-induced thick target neutron yields and spectra, with comparison to measured data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.B.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    One component of the neutron source associated with the decay of actinide nuclides in many environments is due to the interaction of decay /alpha/ particles in (/alpha/,n) reactions on low Z nuclides. Measurements of (/alpha/,n) thick target neutron yields and associated neutron spectra have been made for only a few combinations of /alpha/ energy and target nuclide or mixtures of actinide and target nuclides. Calculations of thick target neutron yields and spectra with the SOURCES code require /alpha/-energy-dependent cross sections for (/alpha/,n) reactions, as well as branching fractions leading to the energetically possible levels of the product nuclides. A library of these data has been accumulated for target nuclides of Z /le/ 15 using that available from measurements and from recent GNASH code calculations. SOURCES, assuming neutrons to be emitted isotopically in the center-of-mass system, uses libraries of /alpha/ stopping cross sections, (/alpha/,n) reaction cross reactions, product nuclide level branching fractions, and actinide decay /alpha/ spectra to calculate thick target (/alpha/,n) yields and neutron spectra for homogeneous combinations of nuclides. The code also calculates the thick target yield and angle intergrated neutron spectrum produced by /alpha/-particle beams on targets of homogeneous mixtures of nuclides. Illustrative calculated results are given and comparisons are made with measured thick target yields and spectra. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnishin, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  16. Study of the peak shape in alpha spectra measured by liquid scintillation

    CERN Document Server

    Vera-Tome, F; Martin-Sanchez, A

    2002-01-01

    Liquid-scintillation counting allows the measurement of alpha and beta activities jointly or only of the alpha-emitting nuclides in a sample. Although the resolution of the alpha spectra is poorer than that attained with semiconductor detectors, it is still an attractive alternative. We describe here attempts to fit a peak shape to experimental liquid-scintillation alpha spectra and discuss the parameters affecting this shape, such as the PSA (pulse-shape analyser) level, vial type, shaking the sample, etc. Spectral analysis has been applied for complex alpha spectra.

  17. Measurement of {alpha}{sub s} with radiative hadronic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbiendi, G.; Braibant, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Ciocca, C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, M.; Fabbri, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Marcellini, S.; Michelini, A.; Rossi, A.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ainsley, C.; Batley, R.J.; Carter, J.R.; Hill, J.C.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R. [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Aakesson, P.F.; Burckhart, H.J.; De Roeck, A.; Ferrari, P.; Frey, A.; Gruwe, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkings, R.; Meijers, F.; Oh, A.; Plane, D.E.; Rembser, C.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroeder, M.; Smith, A.M.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Etzion, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Tsur, E. [Tel Aviv Univ., Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Anagnostou, G.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Hawkes, C.M.; Jovanovic, P.; O' Neale, S.W.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wilson, J.A. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Anderson, K.J.; Gupta, A.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Pilcher, J.E.; Teuscher, R. [Univ. of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Asai, S.; Ishii, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Komamiya, S.; Mashimo, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nanjo, H.; Orito, S.; Saeki, T.; Toya, D.; Ueda, I.; Yamashita, S. [Univ. of Tokyo, International Centre for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Kobe Univ., Kobe (Japan); Axen, D.; McKenna, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Department of Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, I.; Karlen, D.; Keeler, R.K.; McPherson, R.A.; Roney, J.M.; Sobie, R. [Univ. of Victoria, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Barberio, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]|[Univ. of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [and others

    2008-01-15

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling {alpha}{sub s} is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of {alpha}{sub s} is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of {alpha}{sub s} as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1182{+-}0.0015(stat.){+-}0.0101(syst.). (orig.)

  18. Conversion of an Alpha CAM Monitor of Victoreen calibrated of factory for plutonium in a measurement monitor of radon in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno y Moreno, A.

    2004-01-01

    It is presented in this work the conversion of a monitor ALPHA CAM of the monitor Victoreen gauged of it manufactures for plutonium in a monitor for radon mensuration in the atmosphere. Those units in that the radon measures are expressed are: peak curies/unit of volume of air to sampling. This way one has to gauge and to supplement the software and the parts that the old one monitor for plutonium. It requires. This task implies: a) To calibrate and to determine the efficiency of the detector of accustomed to state of 1700 mm 2 for alpha particles coming from the radioactive series of the radon. b) to connect in series and to calibrate a flow measurer of air in it lines with the detector. Measures are presented of the ambient air and other places of the the historical area of the city of Puebla obtained with the team Converted ALPHA-CAM. (Author)

  19. Measurement of radioactive nuclides in the 'Mayak' region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedov, B.F.; Novikov, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    The study of environmental contamination caused by anthropogenic impact and, primarily, by radioactive nuclides is one of the main scientific problems facing contemporary science. Radioecological monitoring, decision making on remediation of polluted areas need detailed information about distribution of radioactive nuclides in the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, knowledge about radioactive nuclide occurrence forms and migration patterns. Experimental tests of nuclear and thermonuclear weapon in atmosphere and underground, nuclear power engineering and numerous accidents that took place at the nuclear power plants (NPP), unauthorized dump of radioactive materials in various places of the ocean and pouring off the strongly dump of radioactive wastes from ships and submarine equipped with nuclear power engines made artificial radionuclides a constant and unretrievable component of the modern biosphere, becoming an additional unfavorable ecological factor. As regards Former Sovient Union (FSU) the most unfavorable regions are Southern Ural, zones suffered from Chernobyl Accident, Altay, Novaya Zemlya, some part of West Siberia near Seversk (Tomsk-7) and Zheleznogorsk (Krasnoyarsk-26). (orig.)

  20. Measurement of radioactive nuclides in the `Mayak` region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasoedov, B.F. [V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Novikov, A.P. [V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The study of environmental contamination caused by anthropogenic impact and, primarily, by radioactive nuclides is one of the main scientific problems facing contemporary science. Radioecological monitoring, decision making on remediation of polluted areas need detailed information about distribution of radioactive nuclides in the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, knowledge about radioactive nuclide occurrence forms and migration patterns. Experimental tests of nuclear and thermonuclear weapon in atmosphere and underground, nuclear power engineering and numerous accidents that took place at the nuclear power plants (NPP), unauthorized dump of radioactive materials in various places of the ocean and pouring off the strongly dump of radioactive wastes from ships and submarine equipped with nuclear power engines made artificial radionuclides a constant and unretrievable component of the modern biosphere, becoming an additional unfavorable ecological factor. As regards Former Sovient Union (FSU) the most unfavorable regions are Southern Ural, zones suffered from Chernobyl Accident, Altay, Novaya Zemlya, some part of West Siberia near Seversk (Tomsk-7) and Zheleznogorsk (Krasnoyarsk-26). (orig.)

  1. Calibration of new measuring systems to detect emissions of radioactive noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.; Kreiner, H.J.

    1977-12-01

    This report describes the calibration of different systems for the integral measurement of radioactive noble gases and the calibration of a measuring chamber for the detection of individual nuclides of radioactive noble gases in the gaseous effluent of nuclear power plants. For these measuring chambers the calibration factors for Kr-85 and Xe-133 are given as well as the detection limits to be obtained with these measuring systems for several radioactive noble gases present in the gaseous effluent at the stack of nuclear power plants. Calibration factors for Kr-85 and Xe-133 and the detection limits of this measuring method for the detections of individual nuclides of radioactive noble gases in air samples are defined taken wirh a high pressure compressor in pressure flasks an measured on a Ge(Li)-semiconductor spectrometer (pressure flask measuring method). A measuring equipment is described and calibrated which allows simultaneous measurement of activity concentration of radioactive noble gases and radioactive aerosols with a sensitivity of 2 x 10 -7 Ci/m 3 for radioactive gases and 1 x 10 -9 Ci/m 3 for radioactive particulates at a background radiation of 1 R/h. This paper is an additional report to our STH-Bericht 3/76, 'Calibration of measuring equipment for monitoring of gaseous effluents from nuclear power plants', which specifies a procedure for the calibration of measuring chambers for monitoring of gaseous radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants /1/. The calibration system used here makes it possible to simultaneously calibrate several noble gas measuring devices. (orig.) [de

  2. Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials

  3. Measurements and calculations of doses from radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, J.B.; Herbaut, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) and Tchernobyl reactor accidents have revealed the importance of the skin exposure to beta radiation produced by small high activity sources, named 'hot particles'. In nuclear power reactors, they may arise as small fragments of irradiated fuel or material which have been neutron activated by passing through the reactor co. In recent years, skin exposure to hot particles has been subject to different limitation criteria, formulated by AIEA, ICRP, NCRP working groups. The present work is the contribution of CEA Grenoble to a contract of the Commission of the European communities in cooperation with several laboratories: University of Birmingham, University of Toulouse and University of Montpellier with the main goal to check experiments and calculations of tissue dose from 60 Co radioactive particles. This report is split up into two parts: hot particle dosimetry close to a 60 Co spherical sample with an approximately 200 μm diameter, using a PTW extrapolation chamber model 233991; dose calculations from two codes: the Varskin Mod 2 computer code and the Hot 25 S2 Monte Carlo algorithm. The two codes lead to similar results; nevertheless there is a large discrepancy (of about 2) between calculations and PTW measurements which are higher by a factor of 1.9. At a 70 μm skin depth and for 1 cm 2 irradiated area, the total (β + γ) tissue dose rate delivered by a spherical ( φ = 200 μm) 60 Co source, in contact with skin, is of the order of 6.1 10 -2 nGy s -1 Bq -1 . (author)

  4. Measurement of Natural Radioactive Nuclide Concentrations and the Dose Estimation of Workers Originated from Radon in Manganese Ore Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.A.; Hassan, N.M.; Blasy, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese ore is widely used in many industries. Such as ore contain natural radioactive nuclides at various concentrations. If this ore contain high concentrations of natural radioactive nuclides, workers handling them might be exposed to significant levels of radiation. Therefore it is important to determine the radioactive nuclides in this ore. Also the regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Nevertheless, at this time there is no globally accepted workplace protocol that sets out safe radon concentration values. In this study the radon concentration measured by using an Alpha Guard radon monitor, the equilibrium factor which was greater than the value given in literature, effective radiation dose, which are necessary for the exact estimation of the radiation dose originating from radon. The regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Approach: The natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) contents of manganese ore samples collected from Umm Bogma, southwest Sinai and from the mountain access Hamid South Eastern Desert, Egypt have been determined by low background spectroscopy using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector. Results: The mean activities due to the three radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) were found to be 1500±65, 490±65 and 364±45 Bqkg -1 , respectively. The absorbed dose rate due to the natural radioactivity in samples under investigation ranged from 1522±45 → 1796±43 nGyh -1 . The radium equivalent activity varied from 3807±114→ 4446±133 Bqkg -1 .The representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples are also estimated. Conclusion: The results of this assessment obtained by the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis, have indicated that the levels of natural radioactivity were lower than the international recommended limits.

  5. Radioactivity Measurement in the Detergent Products by Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksouri, Abir

    2009-01-01

    Our study focuses on the evaluation of the level of radioactivity in the detergents. We have determined the specific activities of gamma emitting radionuclides belonging to the natural families of uranium, thorium and potassium using gamma spectrometry. The activities of radionuclides ( 235 U, 238U , 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40K) and their descendants are below the minimum detectable activity for dishwasher products, soaps, bleaches and shampoos, whereas they are found to levels considered very low (between 0,2 and 13 Bq/kg on average) in the products washes linens. These values are always lower than those of raw materials, what is explained by the conservation of radioactive material throughout the manufacturing process. The effective dose due to external exposure estimated below the regulatory standard recommended (<1 mSv / year), allows us to show that detergent products are not contaminated by radioactivity, are healthy and do not have harmful radiological impact on the consumer.

  6. The system for measurements of radioactive contamination of environment and food in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, D.; Kurowski, W.

    1990-01-01

    The service for Measurements of Radioactive Contamination comprises a network of 152 measuring stations. They are carrying out continuous measurements of gamma radiation dose rates and radioactivity measurements of 24 hours samples of air (aerosols) and total fallout. On the territory of each province there are selected points for sampling of environmental materials and food. Frequency of sampling depends on material being collected. 1 tab., 2 figs. (A.S.)

  7. Measurement of radioactive contamination in the foodstuffs by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihsanullah; Jan, F.; Shafiq, M.; Orfi, S.D.; Atta, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in 1986, resulted in the increase of radioactive contamination at a global level. To avoid undesirable exposure to public, Pakistan like other countries imposed radioactive contamination levels on food items. Various imported/to be exported and locally purchased food items for human consumption have been analysed for gamma emitting radionuclides. Amongst the food items, special attention was focussed on the imported dry milk. In addition to naturally occurring K-40 radionuclide, small amounts of Cs-137 and Cs-134 fission products have been detected in some of the samples. The concentrations of these two fission radionuclides are presented and compared with the relevant limits. (author)

  8. Measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This presentation contains description of measures used in the Slovak Republic to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials. The main goal of these measures is to allow safe and effective utilization of nuclear and other radioactive materials under surveillance of responsible state authorities as well as recover materials that were removed form legal utilization despite the preventive measures. Prevention is the most effective and the cheapest way how to overcome problems. An important precondition for prevention is existence of a national (or state) system for controlled utilization of nuclear and other radioactive materials completed by an effective physical protection of these materials and facilities involved and supported by sufficient low enforcement. A state system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials in Slovakia is based on the IAEA INFCIRC/153 requirements. A fact that the IAEA inspectors never have recognized any unaccounted nuclear material could be the best proof of its quality. Physical protection system in both Slovak NPPs is based on principles applied in development of advanced physical protection systems used in western NPPs. Technological systems and nuclear materials are categorized into three categories - first one is most sensitive. Barriers of each category zone are equipped with sufficient detection systems and are monitored by TV system. The system is operated by NPPs operators. Entrances are guarded by private security guards. Response forces are created by the police. A legal support provides the Act No. 130/1998 on peaceful use of nuclear energy and regulations on accounting and control of nuclear materials, on physical protection of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials and on transports of nuclear materials and radioactive wastes. The Criminal Code of the Slovak Republic has been amended and an illegal possession of nuclear and radioactive materials is treated as a crime. Response

  9. Application of the permeation to the production of low radioactive calibrated gas flows. Low radioactive tritium measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot, Guy.

    1979-12-01

    The permeation of compounds (HT, HTO, 131 ICH 3 , and 129 ICH 3 ) through organic membranes in view of producing low radioactive calibrated gas flows has been studied. This process of which the diffusion is the main stage enables respecting certain conditions (choice of the membrane, temperature, partial pressure differential) our aims to be reached with a good accuracy. In order to measure radioactivity of tritiated standard gases, a detector was built. This detector is an Oeschger type proportional counter with a total volume of 17.4 dm 3 and an useful volume of 3.9 dm 3 . In the conditions of operation, the background is of 1.7.10 -6 I s -1 cm -3 . The counter coupled with a feed-rack enables various samples to be measured and it is possible in the best conditions to detect some 10 -11 μCi cm -3 NTP [fr

  10. Report on air and water radioactivity measurement presented to the Commission for Protection against Ionizing Radiations of the State Secretary for Public Health (sessions of the 6 January and 18 February 1957). Report on the determination of radioactivity of mineral waters presented to High Council for Thermal cures of the State Secretary for Public Health (6 February 1957)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallot, P.; Bugnard, L.

    1957-06-01

    The first part of this document discusses radioactivity measurement techniques which seem to be recommended for the monitoring of the release of radio-elements by civil and military applications of nuclear energy. These methods first concern air radioactivity due to uranium ore extraction, ore storage, air-cooling of piles, uranium fuel sheath failure, plutonium extraction and fission product processing, and nuclear explosion. Methods are discussed for the measurement of gas or aerosol radioactivity. The measurement of water radioactivity is then addressed by distinguishing measurements performed on rainfalls or snow, on effluents from nuclear plants. The second part discusses the determination of radioactivity of mineral waters. The authors describe the three main principles on which measurement methods are based: direct measurement of radioactivity of gases contained by water, direct measurement of gas radioactivity by the active deposit method, and measurement of alpha and beta radiations of the evaporation residue or of water precipitation product. Notably about radon measurement in waters, the instrumentation, dosing procedure, measurement sensitivity and precision are presented and discussed

  11. Radioactivity measurements of a large number of adhesives

    CERN Document Server

    Busto, J; Hubert, F; Hubert, P; Vuilleumier, J M

    2002-01-01

    Low energy and low counting rate experiments in neutrino and astroparticle physics need building materials with natural radioactivity as low as possible. The intrinsic activity of a large number of adhesives, used in the low-level rate experiments MUNU, St-Gotthard and NEMO, is presented.

  12. Measures to prevent breaches in the security of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zika-Ahlberg, G.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper, which is the result of the co-operation between the Swedish Board of Customs, the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, the Security Police and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, is to give an idea of the national prevention system as to illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources. (author)

  13. Low level air radioactivity measurements in Prague, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rulík, P.; Malá, H.; Bečková, V.; Hölgye, Z.; Schlesingerová, E.; Světlík, Ivo; Škrkal, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2009), s. 969-973 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : atmospheric radionuclides * monitoring * low level activities Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.094, year: 2009

  14. Measurement of differential (n,x{alpha}) cross section using 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Kiyosumi, Takehide; Nauchi, Yasushi; Saito, Keiichiro; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1997-03-01

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution {alpha} emission spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ni between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) cross section using a 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus ({sup 55}Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In {sup 12}C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,x{alpha}) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,x{alpha}) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be angular differential cross section and {sup 12}C(n,n`3{alpha}) cross section were obtained. (author)

  15. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  16. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  17. Conditioning of alpha and beta-gamma ashes of incinerator, obtained by radioactive wastes incinerating and encapsulation in several matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, C.J.; Chenavas, P.R.; Auffret, L.

    1993-01-01

    In this final report, the work carried out, and the results, obtained on the ash incinerator conditioning study, by means of encapsulation in several matrices, are presented. Three encapsulation matrices were checked: - a ternary cement, containing OPC, blast furnace slag and flying ash, - a two component epoxide system, - an epoxide-cement compound matrix. Three ash categories were employed: - real alpha ash, coming from plutonium bearing wastes, - ash, from inactive combustible waste, obtained by treatment in an incinerator prototype, - ash coming from inactive waste incineration plant. Using three different matrices, the encapsulated form properties were determined: at the laboratory scale, the encapsulating formulation was established, and physico mechanical data were obtained, - on active encapsulated forms, containing a calculated amount of 238 Pu, a radiolysis study was performed in order to measure the composition and volume of the radiolytic gas flow, - at the industrial scale, a pilot plant operating the polyvalent encapsulating process, was designed and put into service. Bench-scale experiments were done, on alpha ash embedded forms using the modified sulphur cement matrix as embedding agent. 4 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs

  18. Effect of metallic iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 doped with a radioactive alpha emitter in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jegou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Jouan, Gauthier; Peuget, Sylvain; Martin, Christelle

    2017-12-01

    In the hypothesis of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological nuclear waste repository, interactions between the fuel mainly composed of UO2 and its environment must be understood. The dissolution rate of the UO2 matrix, which depends on the redox conditions on the fuel surface, will have a major impact on the release of radionuclides into the environment. The reducing conditions expected for a geological disposal situation would appear to be favorable as regards the solubility and stability of the UO2 matrix, but may be disturbed on the surface of irradiated fuel. In particular, the local redox conditions will result from a competition between the radiolysis effects of water under alpha irradiation (simultaneously producing oxidizing species like H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing species like H2, hydrogen) and those of redox active species from the environment. In particular, Fe2+, a strongly reducing aqueous species coming from the corrosion of the iron canister or from the host rock, could influence the dissolution of the fuel matrix. The effect of iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 was thus investigated under the conditions of the French disposal site, a Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation chosen by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), here tested under alpha irradiation. For this study, UO2 fuel pellets doped with a radioactive alpha emitter (238/239Pu) were leached in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater (representative of the French waste disposal site groundwater) in the presence of a metallic iron foil to simulate the steel canister. The pellets had varying levels of alpha activity, in order to modulate the concentrations of species produced by water radiolysis on the surface and to simulate the activity of aged spent fuel after 50 and 10,000 years of alpha radioactivity decay. The experimental data showed that whatever the sample alpha radioactivity, the presence of iron inhibits the oxidizing dissolution of

  19. The measurement of radioactivity in tomatoes cultivated on mining residues from the Oka niobium mining community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulet, M.; Boudreau, A.; Roy, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactivity contained in the tailings of a niobium mine in the Oka region, Quebec, was the object of concern for the population of the area in 1979. To find the impact of these tailings on fruit and vegetables grown in this environment, an investigation of the radioactivity found on tomatoes grown in green houses in niobium tailings and in vermiculites was undertaken. The tailings contained a high level of natural radioactivity and a small amount of 137 Cs while the vermiculites has a very low level of natural radioactivity and an appreciable amount of 137 Cs. Cesium-137 was the only nuclide detected in tomato ashes in measurable quantity. Absence of natural radioactivity is explained by its presence as insoluble minerals. (author) [fr

  20. Determination of total alpha activity index in samples of radioactive wastes; Determinacion del indice de actividad alfa total en muestras de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia C, F. J.

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a methodology of preparation and quantification of samples containing radionuclides beta and/or alpha emitters, to determine the rates of alpha and beta total activity of radioactive waste samples. For this, a device of planchettes preparer was designed, to assist the planchettes preparation in a controlled environment and free of corrosive vapors. Planchettes were prepared in three means: nitrate, carbonate and sulfate, to different mass thickness, natural uranium (alpha and beta emitter) and in case of Sr-90 (beta emitter pure) only in half nitrate; and these planchettes were quantified in an alpha/beta counter, in order to construct the self-absorption curves for alpha and beta particles. These curves are necessary to determine the rate of alpha-beta activity of any sample because they provide the self-absorption correction factor to be applied in calculating the index. Samples with U were prepared with the help of the device of planchettes preparer and subsequently were analyzed in the proportional counter Mpc-100 Pic brand. Samples with Sr-90 were prepared without the device to see if there was a different behavior with respect to obtaining mass thickness. Similarly they were calcined and carried out count in the Mpc-100. To perform the count, first the parameters of counter operating were determined: operating voltages for alpha and beta particles 630 and 1500 V respectively, a count routine was generated where the time and count type were adjusted, and counting efficiencies for alpha and beta particles, with the aid of calibration sources of {sup 210}Po for alphas and {sup 90}Sr for betas. According to the results, the counts per minute will decrease as increasing the mass thickness of the sample (self-absorption curve), adjusting this behavior to an exponential function in all cases studied. The minor self-absorption of alpha and beta particles in the case of U was obtained in sulfate medium. The self-absorption curves of Sr-90

  1. Radioactive fallout reconstruction from contemporary measurements of reservoir sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, P.W.; Heit, M.; Miller, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal history of atmospheric deposition to a watershed area can be preserved in the sediment of a lake or reservoir that is supplied by the watershed. The 137 Cs and isotopic Pu concentrations with depth were determined in the sediments of two reservoirs, Enterprise and Deer Creek, which are located in widely separated regions of the state of Utah. Our data not only reconstruct the history of the total radioactive fallout in the area, but also permit estimating the contributions from global sources and from the Nevada Test Site detonations in the 1950s

  2. Regularity of the wear control of radioactive sources from the nuclear measurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira L, M.

    2006-01-01

    The control of radioactive sources in Brazil is regulated by the CNEN (National Comissao of Nuclear Energy). The Laboratory of Descontaminacao of the IPEN (Institute of Energy Y Nuclear Investigations) it offers to the companies that work with nuclear measurers, essays for control of the source wear according to the ISO 9978/1992 through the smear tests Y of leakage. The analyses are taken in alpha Y beta detectors of low bottom radiation with annual detection limits around 1 Bq. Certificates of the accepted analyses by the CNEN for sources that already passed its time of validity assured by the makers, but its continue operational are emitted. The smear test is repeated the whole year, while the leakage test repeats to every two years. A balance of the last two years of the activities of the laboratory shows the regularity of the clients Y the growth of companies specialized in radioprotection with official of radioprotection, credited by the regulatory authority that its act as intermediaries in the process, contacting the clients, gathering the samples next to the proprietors of sources Y hiring our services. Overalls, proves that the inspection activities by part of the regulatory authority are fulfil. In 2004, 192 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 86 sources by leakage. In 2005, 232 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 60 sources by leakage. All the leakage tests was made in sources of Americium of oneself Y only client that brings the sources so that they dismantle them to him in the Sources production laboratory of the IPEN. By the quantity Y age of the sources that were analyzed in those two years, it is proven that the number of sources without use conditions (total activity measured by the two added methods smaller than 180Bq) it doesn't arrive to 2%. (Author)

  3. Measurement of radioactivity in building materials: The case of Portland cement used in Kinshasa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshiashala, M.D.; Karisa, N.; Solo, K.; Poloto, I.C.; Bashike, K.M.F.

    2005-01-01

    The study deals with the measurement of radioactivity in some cement samples from the national manufacture of cement of the west area of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The geological materials used in the cement manufacture process may contain some naturel radioactive elements such as U, Th and K. To do so, direct gamma spectrometry using HPGe detector has been performed. Detected radioisotopes from the three main radioactive families have been quantitatively determined. The U, Th and K contents are of the same order of magnitude as in terrestrial crust

  4. Measures to ensure safety of radioactive materials in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P.K.; Sonawane, A.U.; Rane, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    In India, the use of ionizing radiation sources in industry, medicine, agriculture and research registered a significant increase during recent years. The basis of legislative control of the use of radiation in India is the Atomic Energy Act from 1962, which empowers the central Government to provide control over radioactive substances. Exercising these powers, the central Government has promulgated several radiation safety rules, which specify the requirements of licensing, the duties and responsibilities of radiation safety officers, powers of inspection, etc. Later in 1983, by the Act, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) was constituted by the central Government to exercise regulatory and safety functions. The report describes the existing system of regulatory control of radiation sources in India and in particular, refers to the regulatory documents prepared by the AERB, the type approval of radiation equipment, the regulatory consent for every person handling radioactive sources, and the inspection activities and enforcement of regulatory actions. The report also explains how management of disused sources is carried out in India, including the handling of accidents and emergency activities. (author)

  5. International measures needed to protect metal recycling facilities from radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, M.; Wiener, R.

    1999-01-01

    . The government of every country that licences the use of radioactive material should institute a program to determine both the location of every known source and the effectiveness of current controls over that source. (ii) Control of orphaned material. Each government should institute a program for the safe removal and control of orphaned radioactive sources and material without penalty to the individual that has unintentionally received it. (iii) Transportation rules. International agreements should be developed that allow discovered radioactive material to be easily yet safely transported to either its point of origin or to a facility for its safe disposal. (iv) Registry of events. An international mechanism should be developed for the documentation and reporting of radiation related incidents and the discovery of potentially orphaned radioactive sources and material. (v) Universal measurements. There are several highly technical ways to describe radioactivity. None of these can be easily understood by the individuals who may encounter this material. The international community should agree on how radioactivity will be measured and qualified in a manner that is easily understood by all individuals. (vi) Technology sharing. As new, user-friendly technology is being advanced, the international community should keep track of such advances, share this information, as well as fund the development of technology that will accurately and consistently identify radioactive material that could be found in all forms of metal or containers. (author)

  6. Measures Against-Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials and Other Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.B.; Nassef, M.H.; El Mongy, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early nineties, illicit trafficking (IT) of nuclear materials and radioactive sources appeared as a new trend which raised the concern of the international community due to the grave consequences that would merge if these materials or radioactive sources fell into the hands of terrorist groups. However, by the end of the last century illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources lost its considerable salience, in spite of seizure of considerable amounts of 2 '3'5U (76% enrichment) in Bulgaria (May 1999) and also 235 U (30% enrichment) in Georgia (April 2000). Nevertheless, IT should be always considered as a continued and viable threat to the international community. Awareness of the problem should be developed and maintained among concerned circles as the first step towards combating illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources. Illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials needs serious consideration and proper attention by the governmental law enforcement authorities. Measures to combat with IT of nuclear material or radioactive sources should be effective in recovery, of stolen, removed or lost nuclear materials or radioactive sources due to the failure of the physical protection system or the State System Accounting and Control (SSAC) system which are normally applied for protecting these materials against illegal actions. Measures such as use of modern and efficient radiation monitoring equipment at the borders inspection points, is an important step in preventing the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials across the borders. Also providing radiological training to specific personnel and workers in this field will minimize the consequences of a radiological attack in case of its occurrence. There is a real need to start to enter into cooperative agreements to strengthen borders security under the umbrella of IAEA to faster as an international cooperation in the illicit trafficking

  7. Measuring radon levels at high exposures with alpha-track detectors. Calibration and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanestad, Katrine; Roennqvist, Tryggve; Jensen, Camilla Lunder

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the TADTAC method - a track area dependent total area counting method, for measuring radon levels at high exposures with alpha-track detectors. Normally radon levels are measured by counting individual tracks. The TADTAC method is developed by Gammadata Maaleteknik AB and implemented at The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Alpha-track detectors used for testing and calibrating the method where exposed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. (author) (tk)

  8. Measurement of cross sections for alpha-induced reactions on 197Auand thick-target yields for the (alpha,gamma) process on 64Zn and63Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basunia, M.S.; Shugart, H.A.; Smith, A.R.; Norman, E.B.

    2006-08-07

    We have measured the cross sections for the197Au(alpha,gamma)201Tl and 197Au(alpha,2n)199Tl reactions in the 17.9-to 23.9-MeV energy range, and 197Au(alpha,n)200Tl reaction in the 13.4-to 23.9-MeV energy range using an activation technique. Thick-targetyields for the 64Zn(alpha,gamma)68Ge (7- to 14-MeV) and63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga (7-MeV) reactions were measured. For allmeasurements, natural elements were bombarded with He+ beams from the88-inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Irradiated samples were counted using a gamma-spectrometry system at LBNLs Low Background Facility. Measured 197Au(alpha,gamma)201Tlcross-sections were compared with the NON-SMOKER theoretical values. Thethick-target yields for the 64Zn(alpha,gamma)68Ge and63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga reactions are also compared with the theoreticalyield, calculated numerically using the energy dependent NON-SMOKER crosssection data. In both cases, measured values are found to follow a trendof overlapping the predicted value near the alpha nucleus barrier heightand fall below with a slowly widening difference between them in the subbarrier energy points.

  9. Neutrons from rock radioactivity in the new Canfranc underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amare, J [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Bauluz, B [Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Beltran, B [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Carmona, J M [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Cebrian, S [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); GarcIa, E [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Gomez, H [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Irastorza, I G [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Luzon, G [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); MartInez, M [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Morales, J [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Solorzano, A Ortiz de [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Pobes, C [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Jpuimedon; RodrIguez, A [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Ruz, J [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Sarsa, M L [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Torres, L [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Villar, J A [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    Measurements of radioactivity and composition of rock from the main hall of the new Canfranc underground laboratory are reported. Estimates of neutron production by spontaneous fission and ({alpha}, n) reactions are given.

  10. An electrostatic radon detector designed for water radioactivity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Jian Xiong; Simpson, J J

    1999-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory contains 1000 t of ultra-pure heavy water and 7000 t of very pure light water. In order to achieve the goal of determining accurately the total number of neutrinos emitted by the sun regardless of type, the radioactivity in the water must be maintained with a radiopurity of less than 10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 g/g of sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U in secular equilibrium with their daughters. This paper describes the design and application of an electrostatic radon detector which determines the amount of radon emanating from a column containing MnO sub 2 used to extract radium from the water. This electrostatic radon detector has a total efficiency of 35% for detecting sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and 22% for sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has proven the technical viability of an on-line, real-time alpha radionuclide instrument for aqueous sample analysis through laboratory and initial field tests of the instrument. The instrument has been shown to be isotonically sensitive to extremely low (ten parts per trillion, or femto Curies per liter) levels of a broad range of radioisotopes. Performance enhancement and other scaling data obtained during the course of this investigation have shown that on-line, real-time operation is possible, with a sub 30-minute response time analyzing 20 ppb (30 pCi/1) natural uranium. Now that these initial field tests in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have been successfully completed, Thermo Power plans to conduct comprehensive field tests of the instrument. The purpose of these endurance tests will be to determine the endurance characteristics of the Thermo Alpha Monitor for Water when it is used by non-Thermo Power personnel in a series of one or more extended field tests. Such endurance testing is the vital next step towards the commercialization of the Alpha Monitor. Subsequently, it will be possible to provide the DOE with an instrument that has the capability of obtaining rapid feedback about the concentrations of alpha-emitting isotope contamination in effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area). It will also be useful for process control of remediation and D and D operations such as monitoring scrubber/rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium and D and D Focus Areas)

  12. Studies on scintillation proximity assay for the measurement of alpha-hCG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Tae Hyun; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Woo, Kwang Sun; Chung, Wee Sup; Lim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Sup [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Awh, Ok Doo [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) does not require the physical separation of receptor bound form from free form. SPA was applied to the study of interaction of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and anti-{alpha} hCG in serum. Anti-{alpha} hCG was biotinylated for the binding to streptavidin. The assay was based on the simple competitive binding method between [{sup 125}I]hCG and the hCG in sample serum, with anti -{alpha} hCG-coated beads. Aliquots of biotinylated anti- {alpha} hCG were dispensed into scintillation vials containing 100 {mu}l [{sup 125}I]hCG and 200 {mu}l of either a standard concentration of hCG for preparation of standard curve or unknown sample, and incubated for 20 min. at room temperature. Then 20 {mu}l streptavidin-coated beads were added to vials, and finally incubated for 10 min at room temperature. Values for unknown samples were then calculated from the standard curve. Optimal background counts were cerificated using varied radioactivity of radionuclides. Appropriate standard curve was obtained from SPA method successively, and the concentration of hCG from unknown serum was determined by standard curve. The result from SPA assay was similar to that of RIA. This observation confirms that SPA method could be useful for clinical diagnosis.

  13. Preventive measures for radioactive contamination in iron and steel used as construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi Huo-Wang; Wu Ching-Hwa; Chou Kei-Den; Yeh Chin-Shiun

    2000-01-01

    At the end of July 1992, Atomic Energy Council (AEC) received tips-off from Taipei local residents, saying some buildings in Taipei had their rebar been contaminated by radioactive materials. Regarding causes and sources of those radioactively contaminated rebar, views from every aspects were pointing toward that scraps mixed with radioactive source smelting in the steel mill as the most possible reason. After investigating houses and constructors, AEC found that most contaminated buildings were constructed during the period of 1982 and 1984. For protection of public rights, AEC then actively undertook nation-wide survey of more than forty thousand buildings constructed between 1982 and 1984. Thermal Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and house by house surveying were major methods to investigate houses contamination. Finally, it was found that radiation contaminated houses are concentrated in Taipei City, Taipei County, Tauoyen County, Keelung County. According to data collected up to December 31, 1999, there were 180 cases, with a total of 1601 contaminated housing units. Based on information data of dose assessment, distribution of annual dose are as the following: higher than 15 mSv -143 housing units (9.21%), 5-15 mSv -117 housing units (7.53%), less than 5 mSv -1293 housing units (83.26%). Except actively conducting remodeling of contaminated houses and granting compensation to house owners, AEC has established following measures to prevent rebars from being radioactively contaminated. (1) Radiation detection training of iron and steel detectors (2) Strengthening controls over radioactive sources (3) Enforcing examination of radioactive levels for imported rebars (4) Requesting domestic steel companies establish radiation detection capability (5) Promoting installation of portal type radiation detectors for steel companies having smelting furnace (6) Enforcing no-radioactive contamination certificate system. The radiation detection training of iron and steel

  14. Portable scintillation gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in extensive objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besshejko, O.A.; Vishnevskij, I.N.; Denisenko, R.V.; Malyuk, I.A.; Petrosyan, Eh.E.; Karpenko, S.A.; Prijmak, V.N.

    2011-01-01

    The portable scintillated gamma-spectrometer for field measurement of radioactivity in the volume objects was designed. The crystal CdWO 4 that has weak dependence of light yield from temperature in combination with PMT was applied as the gamma-rays detector. The design of the device provides the possibility for measuring radioactivity of the extensive objects in 4π-geometry without background measurements. In this case the value of the efficiency needed for specific activity calculation in close approximation depends only from crystal geometry and density of measuring object and may be set as the device parameter without efficiency calibration procedure during the operation. The spectrometer does not have an auxiliary radio-active source and connecting cables in the composition. The smartphone operated under Windows Mobile is used as the control module. Bluetooth connection provides data exchange between smartphone and measurement head.

  15. State of the art of the KFUE and IfR radioactivity measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faleschini, H.; Mozer, W.

    1992-01-01

    A brief account is given of the KFUe and IfR measurement systems (Kernreaktor-FernUeberwachungssystem - nuclear reactor telemonitoring system/Immissionsmessnetz fuer Radioaktivitaet - radioactive-contamination monitoring system) operated by Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umweltschutz (LfU). The corresponding measuring instruments and measuring points are described. (BBR) [de

  16. Measurement of jet production with ATLAS and extraction of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of jets at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD at the highest energies. The process can also be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. Specific topologies can be used to extract the strong coupling constant. The ATLAS collaboration has recently measured the inclusive jet production cross section in data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV and 13TeV. The measurements have been performed differentially in jet rapidity and transverse momentum. The collaboration also presents a first measurement of the di-jet cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 13TeV as a function of the di-jet mass and rapidity. The results have been compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in pQCD, interfaced with different parton distribution functions and can be used to constrain the proton structure. We also present new measurements of transverse energy-energy correlations (TEEC) and their associated asymmetries (ATEEC) in multi-jet events at a center...

  17. The radioactivity measurement in the Loire catchment basin. Actors, networks, data inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this report on the Loire watershed was to broaden at all the nuclear installations of the watershed the method of synthesis made for Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux nuclear power plant, by resting on the whole of actors doing the radioactivity measurements in environment. This report shows that these actors are numerous. The measurement plans implemented have for objective to establish the radiological situation of environment, near or not the nuclear facilities, to detect the abnormal increase of radioactivity, to evaluate the exposure of populations to the ambient radioactivity, or to check the conformity of practices (nuclear activities) and products. This assessment enlightens the lack of a real global strategy in the organisation of the radioactivity measurement at the level of the watershed. The inventory of available data for the Loire watershed allowed to show the diversity of measurements realised. The I.R.S.N. is face to a complex situation of data return in the frame of the implementation of an information system of the national network of radioactivity measurement in environment. (N.C.)

  18. First fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) measurements and simulations on C-2U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolte, N. G., E-mail: nbolte@TriAlphaEnergy.com; Gupta, D.; Onofri, M.; Dettrick, S.; Granstedt, E. M.; Petrov, P. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Stagner, L. [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The first measurements of fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) radiation have been acquired on C-2U, Tri Alpha Energy’s advanced, beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC). These measurements are also forward modeled by FIDASIM. This is the first measurement and simulation of FIDA carried out on an FRC topology. FIDA measurements are made of Doppler-shifted Balmer-alpha light from neutralized fast ions using a bandpass filter and photomultiplier tube. One adjustable line-of-sight measured signals at eight locations and eight times during the FRC lifetime over 26 discharges. Filtered signals include only the highest energy ions (>6 keV) and share some salient features with the FIDASIM result. Highly Doppler-shifted beam radiation is also measured with a high-speed camera and is spatially well-correlated with FIDASIM.

  19. Intermethod discordance for alpha-fetoprotein measurements in Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinat, B; Darsin, D; Guardiola, P; Toubert, M E; Rain, J D; Gluckman, E; Schlageter, M H

    2001-08-01

    The significantly higher serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) than in non-FA aplastic patients has potential diagnostic utility, but the increase is method-dependent. The aim of this study was to compare five AFP assays on FA and non-FA samples and to investigate possible explanations for FA-specific discrepancies. Two methods available in our laboratory (Kryptor and IMx) were compared on 59 FA and 27 non-FA patient samples. Kryptor, Immulite, Elecsys, Immuno-I, and Elsa-2 methods were then compared on 14 FA and 14 non-FA patient samples. The AFP glycosylation profile was analyzed by electrophoretic separation in a lectin-containing gel. With all six methods, AFP values were significantly higher in FA than in non-FA patients, but the diagnostic precision and optimal cutoff values varied. Indeed, two methods reached 100% sensitivity and specificity, but in other methods, one or both of these parameters were significantly <100%. Neither heterophilic antibodies nor a specific glycosylation profile was detected in FA samples. AFP results are method-dependent in FA. New methods must be evaluated before use in differential diagnosis of aplastic patients.

  20. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig

  1. Absolute measurement of the $\\beta\\alpha$ decay of $^{16}$N

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-decay of $^{16}$N at ISOLDE with the aim of determining the branching ratio for $\\beta\\alpha$ decay on an absolute scale. There are indications that the previously measured branching ratio is in error by an amount significantly larger than the quoted uncertainty. This limits the precision with which the S-factor of the astrophysically important $^{12}$C($\\alpha, \\gamma)^{16}$O reaction can be determined.

  2. Measurement of actinides in environmental samples by Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadieux, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, S. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Univ. of Georgia (United States); Fjeld, R.A.; Reboul, S.; Sowder, A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Systems Engineering

    1994-05-01

    This work describes the adaptation of extractive scintillation with a Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) (ORDELA, Inc.) spectrometer to the analysis of actinides in environmental samples from the Savannah River Site (SRS). Environmental quality assurance standards and actual water samples were treated by one of two methods; either a two step direct extraction, or for more complex samples, pretreatment by an extraction chromatographic separation prior to measurement of the alpha activity by PERALS.

  3. Measuring dose profiles and surface dose rates of sealed pure-beta sources to determine radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seongmoon; Choi, Chang Heon; Ye, Sung-Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A beta-emitter of radioisotope has been used for therapeutics and diagnostics in medicine. This radionuclide has been also used as fertilizer tracking, thickness gauges and nuclear battery in industrial application . In other words, the demand for associated radioisotope industry has been rising. One of the most important specifications of radioisotope is a radioactivity. Therefore, determining the methodology of radioactivity assay is also becoming an important procedure. The advancement of the sciences associated with radiation detection has contributed to the development of more sensitive, reliable and user friendly calibration systems. The gas-flow proportional counters, liquid scintillation counters, HP-Ge detectors and ionization chambers have been considered to be necessary for the primary calibration systems of radioactivity. The proportional counter is a type of gas-filled detector and designed to measure a detector output that is proportional to the incident radiation energy. The method developed in this study was applied to determine a radioactivity of Sr/Y-90 test source. The radioactivity determined by this method was about 39% lower than one reported by the manufacturer. This difference might result from the lack of accuracy in determining the radioactivity of the original source liquid and the amount of liquid dropped on the absorbent disk. Furthermore, accuracy in the calculated conversion factor mainly relies on how closely to simulate a sealed source and a detector in MCNP.

  4. LOWRAD 96. Methods and applications of low-level radioactivity measurements. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, J.

    1997-03-01

    The newest developments in the field of low-level radioactivity measurements and new applications for existing and low-level measuring facilities are presented. The contributions mostly were devoted to basic physical aspects and applications of low-level counting. Papers on chemical separation and preparation techniques and on low-level radiation dose determinations were also presented. (DG)

  5. Measurement of the energy dependence of hadronic jet rates and the strong coupling $\\alpha_{s}$ from the four-jet rate with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2005-01-01

    Hadronic events from the data collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP within the energy range from 89 GeV to 209 GeV are selected, their jet rates are determined and compared to predictions of four different event generators. One of them is the recently developed APACIC++ generator which performs a massive matrix element calculation matched to a parton shower followed by string fragmentation. The four-jet rate is used to measure alpha_s in the next-to-leading-order approximation yielding alpha_s(M_Z^2) = 0.1175 +/- 0.0030. The running of alpha_s determined by using four-jet events has been tested. The logarithmic energy slope is measured to be d\\alpha_s^{-1} / d\\log E_{cm} = 1.14 +/- 0.36. Since the analysis is based on four-jet final states it represents an alternative approach to previous DELPHI alpha_s measurements using event shape distributions.

  6. Impact of ICRH on the measurement of fusion alphas by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bindslev, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    , corresponding to an off-axis resonance. The sensitivities of the results to the He-3 concentration (0.1-4%) and the heating power (20-40 MW) are considered. Fusion born alphas dominate the total CTS signal for large Doppler shifts of the scattered radiation. The tritons generate a negligible fraction......Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed for measuring the phase space distributions of confined fast ion populations in ITER plasmas. This study determines the impact of fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the ability of CTS to diagnose fusion alphas...... perpendicular velocities, it may be difficult to draw conclusions about the physics of alpha particles alone by CTS. With this exception, the CTS diagnostic can reveal the physics of the fusion alphas in ITER even under the presence of fast ions due to ICRH....

  7. Reinforced natural radioactivity: the case of radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.; Desray, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summarizing a presentation of radon measurement instruments, of their use and of the interpretation of their results, the authors briefly recall the origin of exposures to radon (geological or occupational), indicate the three types of control (detection of presence of radon, search for and characterization of sources and transfer ways, worker dosimetric follow-on) and the three types of measurement (selective, integrated or continuous), and evoke the range of measurement instruments

  8. Dose {sup 131}I radioactivity interfere with thyroglobulin measurement in patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy with recombinant human TSH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Bang, Ji In; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Sang Eun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is widely used in radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) to avoid side effects caused by hypothyroidism during the therapy. Owing to RIT with rhTSH, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is measured with high 131I concentrations. It is of concern that the relatively high energy of 131I could interfere with Tg measurement using the immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). We investigated the effect of 131I administration on Tg measurement with IRMA after RIT. A total of 67 patients with thyroid cancer were analysed retrospectively. All patients had undergone rhTSH stimulation for RIT. The patients’ sera were sampled 2 days after 131I administration and divided into two portions: for Tg measurements on days 2 and 32 after 131I administration. The count per minute (CPM) of whole serum (200 μl) was also measured at each time point. Student’s paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed for statistical analysis. Serum Tg levels were significantly concordant between days 2 and 32, irrespective of the serum CPM. Subgroup analysis was performed by classification based on the 131I dose. No difference was noted between the results of the two groups. IRMA using 125I did not show interference from 131I in the serum of patients stimulated by rhTSH.

  9. Dependence of Changes of Histogram Shapes from Time and Space Direction is the Same when Fluctuation Intensities of Both Light-Diode Light Flow and 239-Pu Alpha-Activity are Measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinshtein I. A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper tells that spectra of fluctuation amplitudes, that is, shapes of corresponding histograms, resulting measurements of intensity of light fluxes issued by a light-diode and measurements of intensity of 239 Pu alpha-particles issues change synchronously. Experiments with light beams show the same diurnal periodicity and space direction dependencies as experiments with radioactivity. Thus new possibilities for investigation of “macroscopic fluctuations” come.

  10. Radionuclide content of simulated and fully radioactive SRLLL waste glasses: comparison of results from ICP-MS, gamma spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the transuranic content of two transuranic=doped, simulated waste glasses, using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), γ-spectrometry, and α-spectrometry. Average concentrations measured by each technique were within ± 10% of the as-doped concentrations. We also report the transuranic content of three fully radioactive SRL waste glasses that were determined using γ- and α-spectrometry measurements to deconvolute isobaric interferences present in the ICP-MS analyses

  11. Measurement and control of radioactive material transport in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, H.P.; Brehm, W.F.; Moore, F.S.; Stinson, W.P.; Bunch, W.L.; Anantatmula, R.P.; McGuire, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques and equipment have been developed for measuring radionuclide buildup in FFTF. To date, only 54 Mn and 22 Na have been found in significant quantities. Radiation levels of up to 115 mR/h from 54 Mn and 121 mR/h from 22 Na have been measured in the cells, in reasonable agreement with predicted values. No fission products have been found, since no significant operation with breached fuel has yet been experienced. The buildup of corrosion product and fission product radionuclides is not expected to cause severe maintenance problems in FFTF; should problems arise, corrective measures are being developed

  12. Automatic measurement of the radioactive mercury uptake by the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurowski, S.; Raynaud, C.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1976-01-01

    An entirely automatic method to measure the Hg uptake by the kidney is proposed. The following operations are carried out in succession: measurement of extrarenal activity, demarcation of uptake areas, anatomical identification of uptake areas, separation of overlapping organ images and measurement of kidney depth. The first results thus calculated on 30 patients are very close to those obtained with a standard manual method and are highly encouraging. Two important points should be stressed: a broad demarcation of the uptake areas is necessary and an original method, that of standard errors, is useful for the background noise determination and uptake area demarcation. This automatic measurement technique is so designed that it can be applied to other special cases [fr

  13. Measurement of very low alpha activity in water; Medida de muy baja actividad alfa en aguas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, M. T.; Acena, M. L.

    1987-07-01

    Measurement of very low levels of alpha-emitting nuclides in water needs substantial improvements. A system based on the adsorbing properties manganese dioxide eliminates the need for transporting very large volumes of water and increases the sensitivity of the measurement. (Author) 21 refs.

  14. Measurement of the strong coupling $\\alpha^{s}$ from four-jet observables in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Data from e+e- annihilation into hadrons at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP, are used to study the four-jet rate as a function of the Durham algorithm resolution parameter ycut. The four-jet rate is compared to next-to-leading order calculations that include the resummation of large logarithms. The strong coupling measured from the four-jet rate is alphas(Mz0)= 0.1182+-0.0003(stat.)+-0.0015(exp.)+-0.0011(had.)+-0.0012(scale)+-0.0013(mass) in agreement with the world average. Next-to-leading order fits to the D-parameter and thrust minor event-shape observables are also performed for the first time. We find consistent results, but with significantly larger theoretical uncertainties.

  15. Integrated measurement and information system for surveillance of environmental radioactivity in F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehling, A.; Wehner, G.; Gadow, A. von; Edelhaeuser, H.; Bayer, A.; Dehos, R.; Kaul, A.

    1988-01-01

    On December 19, 1986, The German Bundestag (Federal Parliament) passed an Act for the precautionary protection of the population against radiation exposure (Precautionary Radiological Protection Act; Strahlenschutzvorsorgegesetz StrVG). This Act has been assigned the purpose of surveying environmental radioactivity and to keep both radiation exposure of man and radioactive contamination of the environment as low as possible by appropriate measures to be taken in the event of an incident involving radiological impacts. In order to effect the above protection, the Act has laid the foundation of the 'Integrated Measurement and Information System for the Surveillance of the Environmental Radioactivity' (IMIS) which has to be established. The establishment of the integrated measurement and information system for the surveillance of the environmental radioactivity will in future ensure that an event with radiological impacts on the population of the Federal Republic of Germany will be detected in due time and that the information flow between the measurement agencies and those agencies which are responsible for the evaluation of the situation will be punctual and complete so that measures appropriate to the situation can be introduced. 1 fig

  16. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  17. The effect of carbohydrates on alpha-amylase activity measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baks, T.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Ceralpha method can be used for ¿-amylase activity measurements during the hydrolysis of starch at high substrate concentrations (>40 wt.%). However, the results are affected by the carbohydrates present in the samples. The effect of carbohydrates on the Ceralpha ¿-amylase activity

  18. Some statements on the detection threshold of radioactivity measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.U.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that, from the point of view of practical radiation protection, the concept of 'detection threshold' is misleading if, when determining the detection threshold, errors of 2nd kind are not fully taken into account. An 'error of 2nd kind' is defined to be the incorrect assumption of 'no contamination' on the basis of a single measuring result which showed a net counting rate below the incertainty of the background counting rate. These errors are caused by the fact that, due to the statistical nature of the radiation process, the net counting rate of a sample, measured just once, may be below its expectation value. (orig.) [de

  19. Quality control of the concentration measurement of specific radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria, Luis Guillermo; Badilla, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    The counting efficiency of a gamma spectroscopy chain with a Ge (H.p) detector was measured. The Monte Carlo simulation and standard reference materials, in order to calculate the specific activity from 4 reference materials, and from intercomparison samples were used. The purpose was to evaluate the analytical results obtained in the Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Gamma. (author) [es

  20. The verification tests of residual radioactivity measurement and assessment techniques for buildings and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, T.; Ishikura, T.; Yoshimura, Yukio; Nakazawa, M.; Makino, S.; Urayama, K.; Kawasaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    According to the standard procedure for decommissioning a commercial nuclear power plant (CNPP) in Japan, controlled areas will be released for unrestricted use before the dismantling of a reactor building. If manual survey and sampling techniques were applied to measurement for unrestricted release on and in the extensive surface of the building, much time and much specialized labor would be required to assess the appropriateness of the releasing. Therefore the authors selected the following three techniques for demonstrating reliability and applicability of the techniques for CNPPs: (1) technique of assessing radioactive concentration distribution on the surface of buildings (ADB); (2) technique of assessing radioactive permeation distribution in the concrete structure of buildings (APB); (3) technique of assessing radioactive concentration distribution in soil (ADS). These tests include the techniques of measuring and assessing very low radioactive concentration distribution on the extensive surfaces of buildings and the soil surrounding of a plant with automatic devices. Technical investigation and preliminary study of the verification tests were started in 1990. In the study, preconditions were clarified for each technique and the performance requirements were set up. Moreover, simulation models have been constructed for several feasible measurement method to assess their performance in terms of both measurement test and simulation analysis. Fundamental tests have been under way using small-scale apparatuses since 1994

  1. Research on data analysis method of non-destructive assay radioactive waste measurement instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhibo; He Lixia; Shao Jiewen; Sui Hongzhi; Gan Lin

    2008-01-01

    The research concerns in the data analysis and detection efficiency calculation based on Monte-Carlo method for non-destructive assay radioactive waste measurement instrument. The rationality of the methods was experimentally tested, and the tested result shows that the relative deviation between calculated and nominal 235 U content is within 10%. (authors)

  2. Element Synthesis Calculations for Stellar Explosions: Robust Uncertainties, Sensitivities, and Radioactive Ion Beam Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Starrfield, Sumner [Arizona State University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Guidry, Mike W [ORNL; Smith, Donald L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2004-12-01

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  3. Element synthesis calculations for stellar explosions: robust uncertainties, sensitivities, and radioactive ion beam measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hix, W. Raphael [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parete-Koon, Suzanne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dessieux, Luc [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ma, Zhanwen [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Starrfield, Sumner [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bardayan, Daniel W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guidry, Michael W. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Smith, Donald L. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blackmon, Jeffery C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-12-27

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  4. Safety Assessment Approach for Decision Making Related to Remedial Measures and Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybalka, Nataliia; Kondratyev, Sergiy; Alekseeva, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: At each particular case of “legacy” radioactive waste management facilities the optimized remedial measures should be justified taken into account: • results of facility investigations; • site status and characteristics; • safety assessment; • economical reasons; • societal factors; • timeframes; • available technologies and techniques

  5. Measurement of the gross α radioactivity in a river near a sewerage of a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Congxue; Li Tianduo; Zhou Chunlin; Han Feng; Ma Wenyan

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduced the measurement of the gross α radioactivity in a river near a sewerage of a uranium mine. By using the drip infusion set, the water was transfused into the sample trays and evaporated directly. This method makes it possible batch the water samples

  6. Measurement of the dry deposition rates on trees by using the natural radioactivity as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, H.; Jenderek, H.; Roth, C.

    1993-09-01

    Measurement of the dry deposition rates on trees by using the natural radioactivity as a tracer. The direct measurement of dry deposition fluxes into a canopy or onto single branches or leaves is difficult. The natural particle bound radioactivity in the ground-level air can be used as a tracer to gain information on this process in small scales of time and space. γ- and α-spectroscopy of radioactive daughters of Rn and Tn deposited on filters and on leaves, needles and surrogate acceptors have been developed as highly mobile field-methods. Applying Radon daughters as tracers leads to information on deposition velocities during short time intervals. The evaluation of meteorological effects in the field thus becomes possible. The main factors influencing the deposition velocity are the particle size and the wind speed. Therefore size fractionating sampling devices and anemometer arrangements are needed, both small, light-weight and cheap. We prefered filter and impactor combinations to gain 4 size fractions suitable for radioactivity and composition measurements. The concentration values of compounds and elements have been evaluated by X-ray fluorescence and ionchromatography. Numerous results of measurements on natural leaves and surrogates are presented, showing the state of developement now attained and proving the applicability of this method. (orig.). 41 figs., 108 refs., 28 tabs [de

  7. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams; Medicion de secciones eficaces nucleares usando haces radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a {sup 6} He nuclear radioactive beam ({beta} emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction {sup 6} + {sup 209} Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  8. Safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This report evaluates eventual impacts of the date problem in computer-based systems, referred to as year 2000 or Y2K problem, on the safety of radioactive waste management. It addresses the various types of waste, their processing, storage and disposal, decommissioning activities and sealed sources in terms of the approach to the Y2K problem, eventual remediation or contingencies and regulatory considerations. It assesses also typical processes involved in radioactive waste management for their potential of being affected by the Y2K problem. It addresses also eventual impacts on records and data as well as instruments and measurements

  9. Radioactive Contamination Estimation from Micro-Copters or Helicopter Airborne Survey: Simulation and Real Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halevy, I.; Ghelman, M.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Manor, A.; Sharon, A.; Yaar, I.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main advantages of acquiring aero-radiometric measurements lies in the high collection rate of data over large areas and rough terrain. Typical aero-radiometric system records and saves gamma ray spectrum, correlated with the GPS derived location information in regular time intervals of one to two seconds. Such data can be used to locate radiation anomalies on the ground, map ground contamination or track a radioactive airborne plume. Acquiring spectral data of this type allows separation of natural radioactivity from that of man-made sources and identification of specific isotopes, natural or man-made

  10. Radioactive Contamination Estimation from micro-copters or helicopter Airborne survey: Simulation and real measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halevy, I.; Ghelman, M.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Manor, A.; Dadon, S.; Sharon, A.; Yaar, I.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main advantages of acquiring aero-radiometric measurements lies in the high collection rate of data over large areas and rough terrain. Typical aero-radiometric system records and saves gamma ray spectrum, correlated with the GPS derived location information in regular time intervals of one to two seconds. Such data can be used to locate radiation anomalies on the ground, map ground contamination or track a radioactive airborne plume. Acquiring spectral data of this type allows separation of natural radioactivity from that of man-made sources and identification of specific isotopes, natural or man-made

  11. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in 10 MeV-electron irradiated spices, (1); [gamma]-ray measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Katayama, Tadashi; Ito, Norio; Mizohata, Akira; Matsunami, Tadao; Shibata, Setsuko; Toratani, Hirokazu (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology); Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1994-02-01

    Black pepper, white pepper, red pepper, ginger and turmeric were irradiated with 10 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator to a dose of 100 kGy and radioactivity was measured in order to estimate induced radioactivity in the irradiated foods. Induced radioactivity could not be detected significantly by [gamma]-ray spectrometry in the irradiated samples except for spiked samples which contain some photonuclear target nuclides in the list of photonuclear reactions which could produce radioactivity below 10 MeV. From the amount of observed radioactivities of short-lived photonuclear products in the spiked samples and calculation of H[sub 50] according to ICRP Publication 30, it was concluded that the induced radioactivity and its biological effects in the 10 MeV electron-irradiated natural samples were negligible in comparison with natural radioactivity from [sup 40]K contained in the samples. (author).

  12. How to do again the first measurement of radioactivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagues, M.

    2004-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the first quantitative measurement of the radiation emitted by uranium that was made by Pierre and Marie Curie in a famous experiment. This article is divided into 4 sections. The first section describes the latest achievements in sciences and techniques at the end of the nineteenth century (Roentgen radiation, piezo-electricity or the invention of the cathode-ray oscillograph or of the diesel engine). The second section gives an idea of the instrumentation that was available in laboratories at that time. The third section describes the experimental setting and its instrumentation: the ancestor of the ionization chamber and a sophisticated quadrant-electrometer fitted with a piezo-electrical quartz system in order to get an accurate measurement of the electrical charge. The fourth part presents the experimental method and its accuracy. This experiment has been made again recently with antique instrumentation in the framework of the 'festival of sciences 2003'. (A.C.)

  13. Measurement of carbon 14 radioactivity in its gaseous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Michel

    1967-01-01

    This report presents an apparatus aimed at following in a destructive way the distribution of the specific activity of a C 14 -marked graphite sample by measuring the gaseous C 14 activity. This apparatus is based on the following principle: the sample is oxidised in dry air at 900 C in a thermo-balance which allows the graphite wear to be monitored. The variation of the formed active gas activity is measured by means of a scintillation counter. The knowledge of these both parameters (wear and activity variation in function of time) allows the distribution of the specific activity in the graphite sample to be known. The development and adjustment of the scintillation detector are notably addressed [fr

  14. Radioactivity measurements in some building materials in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibnaouf, Khalid Hassan; Ibnaouf, Omer Abdelrahim

    1998-07-01

    The specific activities of 2 38U , 2 32T h, 1 37C s were measured for some building materials used in Khartoum state using gamma-ray spectrometry technique. The specific activates of 226 R a and 232 T h were compared with different countries and found to be in a lowest range, except for sand samples. the annual dose was calculated using the criteria formula and found to be less that 0.15 cGY. (Author)

  15. Study on influences of experimental factors on energy and absolute activity measurements of alpha-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terini, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents firstly a review of the fundamental results and conclusions obtained through alpha-spectrometry and alpha-counting, and the influence of energy straggling, energy loss, self-absorption and backscattering, on the determination of the energy and the absolute activity of alpha samples. Is is shown that the techniques of source fabrication and the methods of measurements play a capital influence on the obtained results. Moreover, measurements made by us, with a silicon surface barrier detector, show that the peak-asymmetry and peak-shift of an alpha-spectrum increases with the angle of emission, and that the magnitude of this effect depends on the thickness and homogeneity of the sample, as well as on the geometry of the measuring system. Through an analysis of the angular distribution of the emitted particles, the degree of isotropy of some thin Am sup(241) sources was measured and the influence of source backing and the geometry was analysed. We can conclude that, in general, there is a larger precision in measurements made under very small solid angles around the normal to the sample, and we enphasize the necessary cares required on the production of the source and on the set up of the measuring system. (author)

  16. Low level alpha activity measurements with pulse shape discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Masayasu; Satoh, Kaneaki; Higuchi, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Pulse shape discrimination of α and β rays with liquid scintillation counting was investigated for the purpose of low level α activity measurements. Various liquid scintillators for pulse shape discrimination were examined by means of pulse rise time analysis. A new scintillator of low cost and of superior characteristics was found. The figure of merits better than 3.5 in risetime spectrum and the energy resolution better than 9% were obtained for carefully prepared samples. The background counting rate for a sample of 10 ml was reduced to 0.013 cpm/MeV in the range of α ray energy 5 to 7 MeV. (author)

  17. Absolute alpha activity measurements of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahawatte, P.; Hewamanna, R. (Colombo Univ. (Sri Lanka). Radioisotope Centre)

    1991-01-01

    Deposits of monazite bearing soils occur along the Southwest, West and East Coasts of Sri Lanka. High levels of gamma activity in some plant species growing in the West Coast have been reported. The high levels were due to the presence of the daughter nuclides of {sup 232}Th, most of which are alpha emitters. Absolute alpha activity measurements of ash samples of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils were carried out using the alpha sensitive polymeric nuclear track detector CR-39. The values ranged from 60-1900 mBq/g and were in good agreement with the values obtained from conventional scintillation counting method. The activity concentration of {sup 228}Th in the ash samples was also calculated by measuring the activity concentration of emanated thoron trapped inside a glass bottle with the use of a CR-39 track detector. (author).

  18. Conversion of an Alpha CAM Monitor of Victoreen calibrated of factory for plutonium in a measurement monitor of radon in the atmosphere; Conversion de un monitor Alpha CAM de la Victoreen calibrado de fabrica para plutonio en un monitor para medicion de radon en la atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    It is presented in this work the conversion of a monitor ALPHA CAM of the monitor Victoreen gauged of it manufactures for plutonium in a monitor for radon mensuration in the atmosphere. Those units in that the radon measures are expressed are: peak curies/unit of volume of air to sampling. This way one has to gauge and to supplement the software and the parts that the old one monitor for plutonium. It requires. This task implies: a) To calibrate and to determine the efficiency of the detector of accustomed to state of 1700 mm{sup 2} for alpha particles coming from the radioactive series of the radon. b) to connect in series and to calibrate a flow measurer of air in it lines with the detector. Measures are presented of the ambient air and other places of the the historical area of the city of Puebla obtained with the team Converted ALPHA-CAM. (Author)

  19. Reductive capacity measurement of waste forms for secondary radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jung-Seok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-12-01

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  20. Study on Method of Asphalt Density Measurement Using Low Level Radioactive Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin-young; Kim, Jung-hoon; Whang, Joo-ho

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental cause of damage to road pavement is insufficient management of asphalt density during construction. Currently, asphalt density in Korea is measured in a laboratory by extracting a core sample after construction. This method delays the overall time of measurement and therefore it is difficult to achieve real-time density management. Using a radioactive isotope for measuring asphalt density during construction reduces measuring time thus enabling realtime measurement. Also, it is provided reliable density measurement to achieve effective density management at work sites. However, existing radiological equipment has not been widely used because of management restrictions and regulations due to the high radiation dose. In this study, we employed a non-destructive method for density measurement. Density is measured by using a portable gamma-ray backscatter device having a radioactivity emission of 100 μCi or less (notice No. 2002-23, Ministry of Science and Technology, standards on radiation protection, etc.), a sealed radioactive source subject to declaration

  1. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FOR RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION: STATUS AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, D; Ameon, R; Bombard, A; Brun, S; Byrde, F; Chen, J; Duda, J-M; Forte, M; Fournier, M; Fronka, A; Haug, T; Herranz, M; Husain, A; Jerome, S; Jiranek, M; Judge, S; Kim, S B; Kwakman, P; Loyen, J; LLaurado, M; Michel, R; Porterfield, D; Ratsirahonana, A; Richards, A; Rovenska, K; Sanada, T; Schuler, C; Thomas, L; Tokonami, S; Tsapalov, A; Yamada, T

    2017-04-01

    Radiological protection is a matter of concern for members of the public and thus national authorities are more likely to trust the quality of radioactivity data provided by accredited laboratories using common standards. Normative approach based on international standards aims to ensure the accuracy or validity of the test result through calibrations and measurements traceable to the International System of Units. This approach guarantees that radioactivity test results on the same types of samples are comparable over time and space as well as between different testing laboratories. Today, testing laboratories involved in radioactivity measurement have a set of more than 150 international standards to help them perform their work. Most of them are published by the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). This paper reviews the most essential ISO standards that give guidance to testing laboratories at different stages from sampling planning to the transmission of the test report to their customers, summarizes recent activities and achievements and present the perspectives on new standards under development by the ISO Working Groups dealing with radioactivity measurement in connection with radiological protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Measurement of radioactive aerosols as an original indicator of atmospheric pollution in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Petit, G.; Millies-Lacroix, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Service Radioanalyses, Chimie et Environnment (Departement Analyses Surveillance de l'Environnement) of the French Atomic Energy Commission, located in suburban Paris, has for many years been conducting atmospheric radioactivity measurements. Since 1994, the laboratory has been using high volume air samplers equipped with filters for the weekly collection of atmospheric aerosols at a mean rate of about 600 m 3 .h -1 . The polypropylene filters, with a collection efficiency in excess of 93%, are compacted after sampling. The atmospheric radioactivity is measured by HP Ge gamma spectrometry after decay of short-lived natural relationship products. A study conducted in 1996 shows good correlation between the evolution with time of some of the indicators routinely used by AIRPARIF, the organization in charge of monitoring the air quality in the Ile-de-France region, to measure atmospheric pollution in the Paris area (SO 2 , NO) and that related to radioactivity of terrestrial ( 210 Pb, 40 K) and anthropogenic ( 137 Cs) origin, as well as the amount of aerosols collected. Further, the distribution in time of the atmospheric radioactivity of cosmogenic origin ( 7 Be) shows a yearly evolution somewhat similar to that observed with ozone

  3. Measurement of radioactive aerosols as an original indicator of atmospheric pollution in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Petit, G.; Millies-Lacroix, J.-C.; Simon, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Service Radioanalyses, Chimie et Environnement (Departement Analyses Surveillance de l'Environnement) of the French Atomic Energy Commission, located in suburban Paris, has for many years been conducting atmospheric radioactivity measurements. Since 1994, the laboratory has been using high volume air samplers equipped with filters for the weekly collection of atmospheric aerosols at a mean rate of about 600 m 3 .h -1 . The polypropylene filters, with a collection efficiency in excess of 93%, are compacted after sampling. The atmospheric radioactivity is measured by HP Ge gamma spectrometry after decay of short-lived natural relationship products. A study conducted in 1996 shows good correlation between the evolution with time of some of the indicators routinely used by AIRPARIF, the organization in charge of monitoring of the air quality in the Ile-de-France region, to measure atmospheric pollution in the Paris area (SO 2 , NO) and that related to radioactivity of terrestrial ( 210 Pb, 40 K) and anthropogenic ( 137 Cs) origin, as well as the amount of aerosols collected. Further, the distribution in time of the atmospheric radioactivity of cosmogenic origin ( 7 Be) shows a yearly evolution somewhat similar to that observed with ozone. (author). 16 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  4. Radioactivity measurements of metallic 192Ir sources by calorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, Tsuguo; Iwamoto, Seikichi; Takeuchi, Norio

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the traceability of dose measurement in brachytherapy 192 Ir sources is realized by physicians and researchers in the medical field. Standard sources of various shapes such as open-quotes hairpin,close quotes open-quotes single pin,close quotes open-quotes thin wire,close quotes and open-quotes seedclose quotes for calibrating ionization chambers in hospitals are being demanded. Nominal activities of not only these source products but also the standard sources have been so far specified by open-quotes apparentclose quotes values. Determination of open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by an established means such as 4pi-beta-gamma coincidence counting is not practical because quantitative dissolution of metallic iridium is very difficult. We tried to determine the open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by a calorimetric method in a fully nondestructive way

  5. Nuclear charge radius measurements of radioactive beryllium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear charge radii of the beryllium isotopes $^{7,9,10}$Be and the one-neutron halo isotope $^{11}$Be using laser spectroscopy of trapped ions. Ions produced at ISOLDE and ionized with the laser ion source will be cooled and bunched in the radio-frequency buncher of the ISOLTRAP experiment and then transferred into a specially designed Paul trap. Here, they will be cooled to temperatures in the mK range employing sympathetic and direct laser cooling. Precision laser spectroscopy of the isotope shift on the cooled ensemble in combination with accurate atomic structure calculations will provide nuclear charge radii with a precision of better than 3%. This will be the first model-independent determination of a one-neutron halo nuclear charge radius.

  6. Measurement of radioactivity from Chernobyl in population groups in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, B.W.; Robertson, I.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a survey of the uptake of radiocaesium by members of the Scottish population between May 1986 and February 1988 following the Chernobyl reactor accident are described. 251 volunteers from various parts of the country were measured by high sensitivity whole-body monitoring and 487 observations are reported. Influence of age, sex, diet and geographical location on uptake was assessed. All members of the Scottish population have almost certainly taken up some radiocaesium as a result of the accident. Body levels reached a maximum after about 8 months and varied by a factor of 4 from an upper to a lower boundary covering 80% of the population sampled. Total ( 134 Cs + 137 Cs) mean dose equivalents from the observations were 31μSv and 20μSv for the first and second years and 62μSv for the overall dose commitment based on the observed decline of radiocaesium. Fresh milk consumption appeared to be the most important dietary factor influencing body levels and venison and goat-meat eaters formed a special group with significantly higher levels than the rest of the population. (author)

  7. Low geometry counter for the absolute measurement of the activity of alpha-emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Torano, E.; Acena, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A low-geometry counter is described which allows the absolute determination of the activity for alpha-emitting sources. A Si implanted detector is used to obtain the spectrum of the sample. Two samples are measured with this counter and a 2 π gridded ion chamber. The results an their uncertainties for both instruments are discussed. (Author)

  8. Micromegas detector for $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement at n_TOF

    CERN Multimedia

    The present proposal is a consequence of the successful tests performed in 2011 related to the Letter of Intent CERN-INTC-2010-023/I-092. The main goal of this proposal is a first (n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement with the Micromegas detector presently running at n_TOF for monitoring purposes and fission cross section measurements. The $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section is of interest in astrophysics mainly due to the origin of $^{36}$S which is still an open question. $^{33}$S is also of interest in medical physics since it has been proposed as a possible/alternative cooperating target to boron neutron capture therapy. Important discrepancies between previous measurements of $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section and especially between the resonance parameters are found in the literature. We propose to measure the (n,$\\alpha$) cross section of the stable isotope $^{33}$S in the energy range up to 300 keV covering the astrophysical range of interest. The possibility of increasing this energy range will be st...

  9. A CO2 Laser Thomson Scattering Diagnostic For The Measurement Of Fusion Product Alpha Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, R. K.; Bennett, C. A.; Fletcher, L. K.; Hunter, H. T.; Hutchinson, D. P.

    1988-11-01

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic for measuring the alpha particle velocity distribution is described. Calculations of scattering are made for a CIT type plasma using available CO2 laser and heterodyne technology. Tests of a long pulse CO2 laser, multichannel heterodyne detector, and an absorption cell for stray laser radiation are presented.

  10. Multi-criteria analysis for evaluating the radiological and ecological safety measures in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.; Kryshev, I.I.

    2006-01-01

    A methodological approach is presented for multicriterial evaluating the effectiveness of radiation ecological safety measures during radioactive waste management. The approach is based on multicriterial analysis with consideration of radiological, ecological, social, economical consequences of various safety measures. The application of the multicriterial approach is demonstrated taking as an example of decision-making on the most effective actions for rehabilitation of a water subject, contaminated with radionuclides [ru

  11. A software for radioactivity measurement of Ra, Th and K in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Zhengqiang; Bao Min; Chang Yongfu

    2004-01-01

    Radio nuclides of soil, rock, construction material, and almost everything around us. There is growing concern about environmental radioactivity from both scientists and public from an institutional or a common point of view. The regulation and standard on evaluating radioactivity of environmental samples have been issued recently by the authorities. We have developed special purpose Gamma spectra analysis software named ErSpec. The software can effectively process and analyze Gamma spectra measured by a NaI(T1) spectrometry, and can give a relatively precise results of radioactivity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in environmental samples. The main functions of ErSpec include, processing and analyzing Gamma spectra, displaying some useful information for users, generating report, managing user's priority, logging user's manipulation, etc. Because environmental samples usually have low radioactivity and have complex measurement conditions, relative method is employed in ErSpec, and Channel-by-Channel Least-Squared Estimation is adopted as spectra analyzing method. The arithmetic make use of information extracted from data of hundreds of channels, then give a rather good result. In ErSpec, by using external call of MatLAB Math Lib in Visual C++, accuracy and speed of calculation and robustness of software are improved distinctly. Object-Oriented Programming Method and ActiveX techniques are also employed in software designing and coding stage. (authors)

  12. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Murray E; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  13. Sources of variability in alpha emissivity measurements at LA and ULA levels, a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Warburton, William K.; Autran, Jean-Luc; Clark, Brett M.; Cooley, Jodi; Gordon, Michael S.; Zhu, Zhengmao

    2014-01-01

    Alpha emissivity measurements are important in the semiconductor industry for assessing the suitability of materials for use in production processes. A recently published round-robin study that circulated the same samples to several alpha counting centers showed wide center-to-center variations in measured alpha emissivity. A separate analysis of these results hypothesized that much of the variation might arise from differences in sample-to-entrance window separations. XIA recently introduced an ultra low background counter, the UltraLo-1800 (“UltraLo”), that operates in a fundamentally different manner from the proportional counters used at most of the centers in the original study. In particular, by placing the sample within the counting volume, it eliminates the sample-to-entrance window separation issue noted above, and so offers an opportunity to test this hypothesis. In this work we briefly review how the UltraLo operates and describe a new round-robin study conducted entirely on UltraLo instruments using a set of standard samples that included two samples used in the original study. This study shows that, for LA (“Low Alpha” between 2 and 50 α/khr-cm 2 ) sample measurements, the only remaining site-to-site variations were due to counting statistics. Variations in ULA (“Ultra-Low Alpha” 2 ) sample measurements were reduced three-fold, compared to the earlier study, with the measurements suggesting that residual activity variations now primarily arise from site-to-site differences in the cosmogenic background. - Highlights: • We sent a set of samples to 6 counting centers for alpha emissivity measurement. • The counting centers conducted measurements using a recently developed instrument. • The variability in measurement results is examined and compared to a prior study. • Minimal variability observed in measurements of LA level samples. • Variability in ULA measurements appears to be due to cosmogenic background

  14. Improved limits for natural {alpha} radioactivity of tungsten with a CaWO{sub 4} scintillating bolometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, S.; Coron, N.; Dambier, G.; Marcillac, P. de; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Leblanc, J.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Puimedon, J.; Sarsa, M.L.; Villar, J.A

    2003-03-13

    An experiment has been carried out at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory with a 54 g CaWO{sub 4} scintillating bolometer in the frame of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) Collaboration. This detector has been developed in order to achieve a good particle discrimination capability by means of the simultaneous detection of light and heat with the goal of rejecting background in dark matter search. This Letter reports, as a byproduct of such development, improved limits on the lifetime for {alpha} decaying tungsten isotopes.

  15. Containers and systems for the measurement of radioactive gases and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Watrous, Matthew G; Oertel, Christopher P; McGrath, Christopher A

    2017-06-20

    Containers for a fluid sample containing a radionuclide for measurement of radiation from the radionuclide include an outer shell having one or more ports between an interior and an exterior of the outer shell, and an inner shell secured to the outer shell. The inner shell includes a detector receptacle sized for at least partial insertion into the outer shell. The inner shell and outer shell together at least partially define a fluid sample space. The outer shell and inner shell are configured for maintaining an operating pressure within the fluid sample space of at least about 1000 psi. Systems for measuring radioactivity in a fluid include such a container and a radiation detector received at least partially within the detector receptacle. Methods of measuring radioactivity in a fluid sample include maintaining a pressure of a fluid sample within a Marinelli-type container at least at about 1000 psi.

  16. A flowrate measurement method by counting of radioactive particles suspended in a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, G.

    1983-04-01

    By external counting of fine #betta# emitting radioactive particles suspended in a liquid, the flowrate in a system of pipes can be measured. The study comprises three phases: 1. - The hydraulic validity of the method is demonstrated in laminar as well as in turbulent flow under certain conditions of particles size and density and of liquid viscosity. 2. - Radioactive labelling of microspheres of serumalbumin or ion exchange resins with indium 113m delivered by a generator Tin 113 → Indium 113m. 3. - Counting with a scintillation detector: a method of threshold overstepping is experimented with a mechanical or electronic simulator; the statistical study of particle superposition under the detector enables a correction for the resulting counting losses to be proposed. The method provides absolute measurements, but is particularly suitable to measure relative flowrates in a hydraulic network. It can be continuous and does not perturb the flow and the network. The accuracy of the method is analysed in details [fr

  17. Specific calibration problems for gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Wershofen, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples are always done in a close source detector geometry. This geometry causes coincidence-summing effects for measurements of multi-photon emitting nuclides. The measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples are also influenced by the absorption of photons in the materials which have to be analysed. Both effects must be taken into account by correction factors with respect to an energy-specific calibration of the detector system for a given geometry and a given composition of the calibration source. The importance of these corrections is emphasized. It is the aim of the present paper to compare different experimental and theoretical methods for the determination of these correction factors published by various authors and to report about efforts to refine them. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughter products by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Ryan, M.T.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of naturally occurring uranium-238 and thorium-232 produces radon-222 and radon-220 isotopes which can escape into the atmosphere. If these radon gases become concentrated in air, their daughter products may present an inhalation hazard to man. The airborne concentrations of radon-222 can usually be measured very accurately in the presence of normal airborne concentrations of radon-220 and its daughters. In contrast, the measurements of the airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughters are usually complicated by the presence of radon-222 and its daughters even at normally occurring airborne concentrations. The complications involved in these measurements can be overcome in most situations by using an alpha particle spectrometer to distinguish the activity of radon-222 daughters from that due to radon-220 daughters collected on a filter. A practical spectrometer for field measurements of alpha particle activity on a filter is discussed

  19. Spreadsheet design and validation for characteristic limits determination in gross alpha and beta measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Rodrigo G.P. do; Dalmazio, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    The identification and detection of ionizing radiation are essential requisites of radiation protection. Gross alpha and beta measurements are widely applied as a screening method in radiological characterization, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. As in any other analytical technique, test performance depends on the quality of instrumental measurements and reliability of calculations. Characteristic limits refer to three specific statistics, namely, decision threshold, detection limit and confidence interval, which are fundamental to ensuring the quality of determinations. This work describes a way to calculate characteristic limits for measurements of gross alpha and beta activity applying spreadsheets. The approach used for determination of decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval, the mathematical expressions of measurands and uncertainty followed standards guidelines. A succinct overview of this approach and examples are presented and spreadsheets were validated using specific software. Furthermore, these spreadsheets could be used as tool to instruct beginner users of methods for ionizing radiation measurements. (author)

  20. (Alpha, gamma) irradiation effect on the alteration of high-level radioactive wastes matrices (UO2, hollandite, glass SON68)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the effect of irradiation on the alteration of high level nuclear waste forms matrices. The matrices investigated are UO 2 to simulate the spent fuel, the hollandite for the specific conditioning of Cs, and the inactive glass SON68 representing the nuclear glass R7T7) The alpha irradiation experiments on UO 2 colloids in aqueous carbonate media have enabled to distinguish between the oxidation of UO 2 matrix as initial and dissolution as subsequent step. The simultaneous presence of carbonate and H 2 O 2 (product resulting from water radiolysis) increased the dissolution rate of UO 2 to its maximum value governed by the oxidation rate. ii) The study of hollandite alteration under gamma irradiation confirmed the good retention capacity for Cs and Ba. Gamma irradiation had brought only a little influence on releasing of Cs and Ba in solution. Electronic irradiation had conducted to the amorphization of the hollandite only for a dose 1000 times higher than the auto-induced dose of Ba over millions of years. iii) The experiences of glass irradiation under alpha beam and of helium implantation in the glass SON68 were analyzed by positon annihilation spectroscopy. No effect has been observed on the solid surface for an irradiation dose equal to 1000 years of storage. (author)

  1. Radioactive food and environment contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Food and Environment Control Centre of Abu Dhabi Municipality with the help of IAEA has established facilities for regular monitoring of food and environmental samples for radioactive contamination. The Centre is now capable of measuring gamma, beta as well as alpha activity in different types of samples. The main activities in the area of food monitoring are as follows: General monitoring of food gamma radionuclides in foodstuffs by high resolution gamma spectrometry; Determination of specific gamma radionuclides in foodstuffs by high resolution gamma spectrometry; Radiochemical determination of Sr-90 using liquid scintillation analyzer or by gas flow proportional counter; Measurement of gross alpha activity in drinking water

  2. Development of the MICROMEGAS Detector for Measuring the Energy Spectrum of Alpha Particles by using a 241-Am Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Do Yoon; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting {\\alpha} particles emitted from an 241-Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of {\\alpha} particles from the 241-Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the {\\alpha} particle from the 241 Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the {\\alpha} particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for {\\alpha} particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that {\\alpha} particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGA...

  3. Measurement of radioactive contamination and decontamination on wooden exteriors and garden trees in Northern Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Keisuke; Kayama, Yukihiko

    2012-01-01

    Measurement and decontamination of surface of trees and surrounding wooden structures contaminated by radioactive substance were studied in the gardens and public parks of Northern Fukushima Prefecture which experienced radioactive contamination due to the accident at the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The counts per minute (CPM) above the centre surface of wooden garden tables in open air were 1.5 times higher than those of garden benches and 9 times higher than that of a garden bench in the square gazebo. Decontamination of wooden garden benches by high-pressure washing was more effective than planing. The counts per minute (CPM) above the soil around garden trees increased by 1.2 times after high-pressure washing. Radioactivity counting rate did not decrease when the leaves fallen from zelocova trees were removed; however, they decreased by about half when soil cover was installed at the base of the trees. Clearly, the upper surfaces of garden trees and wooden surrounding structures were strongly contaminated by radioactive substances, and they should be decontaminated by high-pressure washing before removing the surface soil. (author)

  4. Modeling of possible localized electron flux in cosmic rays with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2017-10-01

    Discrete quantum Boltzmann model together with the introduction of an external-field-tuned orientation parameter as well as the acoustic analog are adopted to study the possible localization of electron (fermion) flux in cosmic rays considering the precision measurement with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Our approximate results match qualitatively with those data measured with the AMS on the ISS.

  5. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. General radioactive contamination of the biosphere measurements in the Netherlands 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    For several years, measurements have been performed in the Netherlands to determine radioactive contamination of the biosphere. These measurements are carried out by various institutes responsible to three ministries: the Ministery of 'Health and Environmental Protection', of 'Agriculture and Fisheries' and of 'Transport and Water', (Dutch: 'Verkeer en Waterstaat', under the supervision of the Coordination Commission Radioactive Measurements (CCRA)). Besides radionuclides, many other elements and compounds are considered harmful for man, animal and the environment. A systematic control of the extent of the contamination of the biosphere, in the same way as is in operation for radionuclides, has been proposed for a number of the most harmful contaminants of the biosphere. The measurements are divided into measurements for the National Measuring Programme and additional Measurements. The former include the analyses essential for an efficacious control of the radioactivity of the biosphere. Measurements are performed in air, soil, surface water, milk and in deposition on the surface of the earth. Besides the determination of the usual radionuclides, as performed up to 1970, deposited radioactivity and surface water are also tested for some other specific radionuclides which may be set free at nuclear installations. Finally, samples of milk and grass from the surroundings of nuclear reactors and water from drinking-waterreservoirs have been analysed. Results are given of determination of tritium in drinking water of four big cities, and of radionuclides in some fishery products from the Dutch coastal waters in view of the potential of some marine organisms to concentrate fission products and especially activated corrosion products from nuclear installations. Adiitionally are given the results of measurements by the licensees of the Dutch nuclear installations of samples from the surroundings of their plants. After a discussion of the results of the analyses of the

  7. Supplementary radiological measurements at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, 1976--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.L.; Montgomery, D.M.; Kolde, H.E.; Gels, G.L.

    1978-09-01

    Evaporator effluents were investigated further to better define quantities of radionuclides discharged to the atmosphere and improve decontamination factors assigned to the principal radionuclides observed in the evaporator feed: 3 H, 14 C, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, and 239 Pu. On-site measurements included soil sample profiles taken to a maximum depth of 3.5 m from the trench area and from within the main washes east and south of the site. These measurements provided additional information on the near-surface lateral movement of radioactivity. Radiochemical analysis of a test-well sample showed that all measurable radioactivity was associated with the sediment in the well and the highest specific radioactivity was associated with the smaller particles (< 5 μm). Milk and vegetables were again sampled from a number of nearby farms. As previously reported, tritium was the only radionuclide measured in these foods above ambient levels, although concentrations were less than in similar samples collected during the earlier study. 4 figures, 17 tables

  8. Measurement of radioactive gases. Study of SACM type CD2 differential chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benezech, G.

    1963-01-01

    This study aims at precising practical conditions of use of a circulation chamber to measure the activity of beta- and gamma-emitting radioactive gases. Results more particularly concern the SACM type CD 2 differential chamber but can easily be adapted to any other chamber type. Calibration calculations allow the definition of the field of use of this chamber. It appears that this apparatus will not generally allow a fine dosimetry of radioactive gases as the method is not selective and requires the knowledge of the gas nature. The author presents the operation principle, describes the experimental assembly, and discusses its performance in the case of a linear assembly and of a logarithmic assembly. He reports the calibration process and calculations (calculation of the ionization current with respect to gas activity, experimental measurement of this ionization current with respect to activity) [fr

  9. Quality assurance for the measurements and monitoring of radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, Maria; Aldave de las Heras, Laura

    2004-01-01

    During the Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) of the European Commission--according to an institutional programme in support to the policy of the European Commission for the implementation of Art. 35 and 36 of the Euratom Treaty as well as in the framework of the OSPAR Convention for the protection of marine environment of the north-east Atlantic--at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU-General Directorate Joint Research Centre-European Commission), a reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in the environment (MaRE laboratory) has been set up. In this paper, the principles and philosophy in order to improve the quality and reliability of analytical data for the measurement and monitoring of radioactivity in the environment under a quality assurance (QA) programme are presented. Examples of how a QA programme at the MaRE laboratory is developed and applied are given. Internal and external quality control (QC) programmes are also discussed

  10. National network of measurement of radioactivity in the environment - 2014 management report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couvez, Celine; Wyckaert, Laure; Picolo, Jean-Louis; Bicheron, Genevieve

    2015-10-01

    This report aims at presenting evolutions of the regulation of the French National network of measurement of radioactivity in the environment (the RNM), of its organisation, of the operation of its steering committee and various work groups. It also presents evolutions implemented in its information system and Internet web-site which gives public access to radioactivity measurements. After presentation of the RNM objectives and challenges, of the legal context, and a description of the RNM operation, the report presents the involved actors (ASN, IRSN, members of the RNM). The operation of the steering committee and work-groups is assessed. A chapter addresses the information system: description, data harmonisation and new information exchange protocol, technical support by the IRSN to data producers, interaction between the IRSN and system host, application management and third-party applications acceptance. Next parts propose an overview of laboratories certification, and activities related to communication and publications

  11. Measurement of residual radioactivity in cooper exposed to high energy heavy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Nakamura, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Ito, Sachiko; Fukumura, Akifumi

    1999-03-01

    The residual radioactivities produced by high energy heavy ions have been measured using the heavy ion beams of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The spatial distribution of residual radioactivities in 3.5 cm, 5.5 cm and 10 cm thick copper targets of 10 cm x 10 cm size bombarded by 290 MeV/u, 400 MeV/u-{sup 12}C ion beams and 400 MeV/u-{sup 20}Ne ion beam, respectively, were obtained by measuring the gamma-ray activities of 0.5 mm thick copper foil inserted in the target with a high purity Ge detector after about 1 hour to 6 hours irradiation. (author)

  12. Ordinance on measures for preparation of a radioactive waste repository (Ordinance on preparatory measures) of 24 October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Ordinance contains details concerning the special procedure provided for under Section 10(2) of the Federal Order of 6th October 1978 concerning the Atomic Energy Act whereby the Federal Council must grant permission before preparations for the construction of radioactive waste repositories may be undertaken. The Ordinance defines the preparatory measures, which include maps and plans of the area, a geological report, etc. (NEA) [fr

  13. Crosslinked plastic scintillators: A new detection system for radioactivity measurement in organic and aggressive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagán, Héctor; Tarancón, Alex; Ye, Lei; García, José F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A crosslinked plastic scintillatior for radioactivity measurement was developed. • The effect of C-PS composition in the detection efficiency was evaluated. • C-PS permits the measurement of radioactivity in organic and aggressive media. • C-PS exhibits high detection efficiency in water and even higher in organic media. • C-PS exhibits good reproducibility under different polymerisations with elevated yield. - Abstract: The measurement of radioactive solutions containing organic or aggressive media may cause stability problems in liquid and plastic scintillation (PS) techniques. In the case of PS, this can be overcome by adding a crosslinker to the polymer structure. The objectives of this study are to synthesise a suitable crosslinked plastic scintillator (C-PS) for radioactivity determination in organic and aggressive media. The results indicated that an increase in the crosslinker content reduces the detection efficiency and a more flexible crosslinker yields higher detection efficiency. For the polymer composition studied, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) is the most adequate fluorescent solute and an increase in its concentration causes little change in the detection efficiency. The inclusion of a secondary fluorescent solute 1,4-bis-2-(5-phenyloxazolyl) benzene (POPOP) improves the C-PS radiometrical characteristics. For the final composition chosen, the synthesis of the C-PS exhibits good reproducibility with elevated yield. The obtained C-PS also displays high stability in different organic (toluene, hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) and methanol) and aggressive media (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide). Finally, the C-PS exhibits high detection efficiency both in water and in aggressive media and can also be applied in organic media showing similar or even higher detection efficiency values

  14. Radiation protection of staff during treatment, transport and storage of radioactive materials and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Release of radioactive materials and radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the proceedings volume of the 4th meeting of radiation protection experts, held at Bad Kohlgrub in Bavaria on March 23 - 26, 2004. Subjects were: Protection of staff during dismantling of nuclear plants and facilities; Protection of staff during treatment,transport and storage of radioactive materials; Release of radioactive materials and radiation measuring technology, and three parallel workshops on the above subjects for discussion of the three years of experience in the implementation of the new StrlSchV. (orig.)

  15. Technique for measuring the losses of alpha particles to the wall in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, A.C.

    1984-03-01

    It is proposed to measure the losses of alpha particles to the wall in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) or any large deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning tokamak by a nuclear technique. For this purpose, a chamber containing a suitable fluid would be mounted near the wall of the tokamak. Alpha particles would enter the chamber through a thin window and cause nuclear reactions in the fluid. The material would then be transported through a tube to a remote, low-background location for measurement of the activity. The most favorable reaction suggested here is 10 B(α,n) 13 N, although 14 N(α,γ) 18 F and others may be possible. The system, the sensitivity, the probe design, and the sources of error are described

  16. Environmental radioactivity measurements in greece following the Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiriadis, C.; Kolovou, M.; Clouvas, A.; Xanthos, S.

    2008-01-01

    Since the double disaster of the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami that affected hundreds of thousands of people and seriously damaged the Fukushima Daichi power plant in Japan on 11 March 2011, traces of radioactive emissions from Fukushima have spread across the entire northern hemisphere. The radioactive isotope of iodine 131 I that was generated by the nuclear accident in Fukushima arrived in Greece on 24 March 2011. Radioactive iodine is present in the air either as gas or bound to particles (aerosols). The maximum 131 I concentrations were measured between 3 and 5 April 2011. In aerosols the maximum 131 I values measured in Southern Greece (Athens) and Northern Greece (Thessaloniki) were 585±70 and 408±61 μBq m -3 , respectively 131 I concentrations in gas were about 3.5 times higher than in aerosols. Since 29 April 2011, the 131 I concentration has been below detection limits. Traces of 137 Cs and 134 Cs were also measured in the air filters with an activity ratio of 137 Cs/ 134 Cs equal to 1 and 131 I/ 137 Cs activity ratio of about 3. Since 16 May 2011, the 137 Cs concentration in air has been determined to be about the same as before the Fukushima accident. Traces of 131 I were also measured in grass and milk. The maximum measured activity of 131 I in sheep milk was about 2 Bq l -1 which is 5000 times less than that measured in Greece immediately after the Chernobyl accident. The measured activity concentrations of artificial radionuclides in Greece due to the Fukushima release, have been very low, with no impact on human health. (authors)

  17. Early in situ measurement of radioactive fallout in Fukushima city due to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masashi; Suzuki, Toshikazu

    2013-07-01

    Using a high-purity germanium detector, both indoor and outdoor radionuclides that had deposited 1.5 d after the radioactive fallout events in the city of Fukushima were experimentally measured. Eleven artificial ((131)I, (132)I, (134)Cs, (136)Cs, (137)Cs, (129)Te, (129m)Te, (131m)Te, (132)Te, (140)La and (99m)Tc) and 5 natural radionuclides were identified. Total air kerma rates were mainly due to (132)I, (134)Cs and (136)Cs from 4 to 6 µGy/h at a 7.5-cm height from the ground. Radioactive contamination on the ground was contributed by (132)I and (132)Te, from 330 to 420 Bq/cm(2). In a worst-case scenario, the maximum skin dose rates were estimated to be from 520 to 670 µGy/h. Effective dose rates were evaluated to be 10 to 15 µSv/h and reached 17.9 µSv/h at 4 a.m. on 16 March. In the effective dose rates, (132)I, (134)Cs and (132)Te were the main contributors. Our measurements are useful for estimating dose levels in the public in the city of Fukushima during the days after radioactive fallout contamination.

  18. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  19. Measurement of resuspended aerosol in the Chernobyl area. Pt. 2. Size distribution of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garger, E.K.; Kashpur, V.; Paretzke, H.G.; Tschiersch, J.

    1998-01-01

    Size distribution measurements of particulate radionuclides were performed at two sites in the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone using several cascade impactors. The results obtained in the period September 1986 till June 1993 were discussed with regard to the general assumption of a log-normal activity size distribution in inhalation dose assessment. At Zapolie (a site 14 km from the Chernobyl reactor) a bimodal distribution was observed in 91% of all measured distributions. In most cases the medians were about 4 μm and in the range 20-30 μm. According to soil granulometric data this finding was explained by superimposing two processes: local resuspension and advective transport of radioactive aerosol from highly contaminated territories. The mean air concentration showed an increasing proportion of inhalable particles over the years since the accident. In 1993 the inhalable fraction was about 48% of the total concentration. At Pripyat, a site situated within a highly contaminated area, unimodal types of size distributions were predominant with the median diameters in the range 5-10 μm for 137 Cs. For the three nuclides 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 106 Ru, very similar types of distribution were observed. Apparently, the radioactive aerosol was of fuel origin. During a forest fire at a distance of 17 km, the majority of the radioactivity was associated with submicrometer particles with median diameters in the range 0.28-0.50 μm. (orig.)

  20. Visualisation of Radioactivity in Real-Time on a Tablet Measured by a Hybrid Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749233; Bantel, Michael; Grünhaupt, Ulrich

    This work explores a method to visualise and interact with radioactivity over time and space by means of augmented reality on a screen. A prototype, iPadPix, was built to demonstrate use as an intuitive new tool for educative and training purposes. Measured by a hybrid pixel detector, Timepix, traces of radioactive decays are displayed in real- time on a mobile device. Its detection principle and properties are detailed as well as the calibration of the sensor. An embedded board is used to process and forward the sensor data to a tablet over a wireless network connection. Software was developed to processes and overlay signatures of ionising radiation and particles on a live camera feed. It is described here and published as open source.

  1. Radioactivity and measurements of sediment deposition rate of the Drenova reservoir (B&H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Radislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the first estimate of the radioactivity and sediment deposition rate of the Drenova reservoir. The radioactivity and sedimentation rate were computed applying the 210Pb and 137Cs methods. Samples of 210Pb and 137Cs were taken from four boreholes drilled in the Drenova reservoir in June 2010. Vertical distribution of the natural and artificial radionuclides in four boreholes was examined using a gamma spectrometry measurement with HpGe detectors, Gamma X type (10 keV-3 MeV. Activities ranging from 122-8 Bq/kg were found for 210Pb, and from 140-0.8 Bq/kg for 137Cs. The sedimentation rate in the Drenova reservoir varied from 1.96 to 2.90 cm per year for unsupported 210Pb and 0.47 to 5.33 cm per year for 137Cs.

  2. Validation of an advanced analytical procedure applied to the measurement of environmental radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Vuong, Le Quang; Ho, Phan Long; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Tao, Chau Van

    2018-04-01

    In this work, an advanced analytical procedure was applied to calculate radioactivity in spiked water samples in a close geometry gamma spectroscopy. It included MCNP-CP code in order to calculate the coincidence summing correction factor (CSF). The CSF results were validated by a deterministic method using ETNA code for both p-type HPGe detectors. It showed that a good agreement for both codes. Finally, the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed by a proficiency test to calculate the activities of various radionuclides. The results of the radioactivity measurement with both detectors using the advanced analytical procedure were received the ''Accepted'' statuses following the proficiency test. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How the schools can participate in measuring radon, thoron and radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storruste, A.; Larsen, E.

    1989-12-01

    The Chernobyl accident revealed that people in general have very little knowledge about radioactivity. The general knowledge should be improved rather cheaply and with small efforts through the introduction of a few experiments into the school curriculum. In the report some simple experiments of this kind are described. All the main apparatus needed are an ordinary GM counter and a vacuum cleaner. By using the same method at many schools, the data from the measurement of natural radioactivity variations in the air throughout the year could be usefully collected and collated. This would make the experiments more interesting than an experiments having no other purpose than the learning process itself. 12 refs.; 5 figs

  4. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  5. Radioactivity measurement of α-nuclides by small solid angle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianqing; Li Xiaodi; Chen Xilin; Wang Guojun

    1998-06-01

    Counting under a precise small solid angle is one of the oldest methods developed for the radioactivities measurement of α-nuclides. The principle of solid angle counting is very simple and the accuracy is much better. The advantages of an equipment developed by the authors, in which a large area Au-Si surface barrier detector (450 mm 2 ) is used, are introduced. Some comparisons on measurement results have been obtained with the gridded ionization chamber, and a national comparison result of 241 Am which deviated from the average result is less than 0.2% are presented in detail

  6. Best practice guide for radioactivity measurement laboratories in a post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Published for laboratories likely to be asked to perform radioactivity measurements at the time of or after a radiological or nuclear accident in France or abroad, this guide aims at defining the best practices in terms of laboratory organisation (sample flow management, personnel radioprotection, sample identification and recording, sample cross-contamination risks, result transmission, archiving of data, results and samples, waste dismissal), and in terms of metrology (adaptation to needs in terms of detection limit and measurement uncertainty, preferred use of gamma spectrometry, analysis strategies)

  7. Measurement of the radioactive internal contamination and interpretation of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colard, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    After a reminder of the purpose of these measurements and of the instrumentation used for direct assessment of radioactive contamination in man, performances of a Ge(Li) and a NaI detector of usual dimensions are compared. Afterwards evolution of ICRP concepts and recommendations are discussed, since ICRP publication 2 in 1959, till publication 30 in 1979; recommended norms are applied for three particular radioelements: I 131, Cs 137, Pu 239. The difficulty to determine derived investigation levels to which results of direct measurements should be compared is pointed out. (author)

  8. Improvements in or relating to systems for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    A system for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprises a set of containers for containing aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers; an electric drive for setting the set of containers in stepwise motion: means for acid precipitation of biopolymers arranged to provide feeding of preset volumes of a coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to the containers: means for removal of suspensions, filtering, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers and consecutively feeding the mixture and a scintillator to a detection chamber, and a measuring cell arranged in the detection chamber. The sequence of operations is controlled automatically. (author)

  9. Measurement of the strong coupling alpha(s) from four-jet observables in e+ e- annihilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Taševský, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2006), s. 295-307 ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : four-jet events * Durham algoritmus * alphas Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.251, year: 2006

  10. Decommissioning and dismantling: Qualification of gamma scanning method for decontrolling measurement of radioactive wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genrich, V.; Sattler, P.

    1998-01-01

    At the time being measurements for the release of buildings and parts of buildings are mainly performed with contamination monitors, free release equipment, wipe test a. s. o. The technical application of in-situ gamma-scanning systems for release measurement should be demonstrated with this research project. This method presents considerable advantages in comparison with standard procedures, as f. ex. reduction of radioactive waste or area covering investigation of the inspected building. A system with a NaI(Tl) and a HPGe-detector was applied. With the high-resolving system it can be shown that also low limit values can be kept with short measurement time. With the NaI(Tl)-detector system it was demonstrated that with limit values lower than 1 Bq/m 3 there may be problems observing the limit values. The investigation showed that especially the high-resolving system for the release measurement of buildings (f. ex. floors, walls, complete rooms) is well-suited. The in-situ gamma-scanning shows big advantages in its economy as f. ex. no sampling and only short measurement times are required. The sharp limitation of the existing contamination and the reduction of radioactive waste involved herewith are further advantages which justify the application of this measurement technique. (orig.)

  11. Direct measurement of radioactive carbon in Vietnamese vodkas by Liquid Scintillation Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takamitsu

    2014-01-01

    From the view point of applying to laboratory exercise of radioactivity measurement by a Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC), Vietnamese vodkas have specific features as measurement samples, for example, they are colorless, have high ethanol content, and only very few organic materials are included. Investigation was made to make sure that the Vietnamese vodkas are appropriate or not as a measurement sample for the LSC exercise. Direct measurements of 14 C without any chemical pre-treatment were made on both radioactive concentrations and specific activities of three kinds of Vietnamese vodka and also pure ethanol reagent. The LSC measurements reveal that estimated 14 C concentration is proportional to ethanol content in samples and that specific activity of 14 C shows good agreement among the Vietnamese vodkas and pure ethanol, as well as the reference value of 0.25 Bq/g of Carbon. Thus the conclusion is derived that the Vietnamese vodkas can be applied with high accuracy to the LSC exercise as measurement samples. (author)

  12. New measurements of W-values for protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, U.; Beck, J.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing importance of ion beams in cancer therapy and the lack of experimental data for W-values for protons and heavy ions in air require new measurements. A new experimental set-up was developed at PTB and consistent measurements of W-values in argon, nitrogen and air for protons and alpha particles with energies from 0.7 to 3.5 MeV u -1 at PTB, and for carbon ions between 3.6 and 7.0 MeV u -1 at GSI were carried out. This publication concentrates on the measurements with protons and alpha particles at PTB. The experimental methods and the determination of corrections for recombination effects, beam-induced background radiation and additional effects are presented. W-values in argon, nitrogen and air were measured for protons with energies of 1-3 MeV and for alpha particles with energies of 2.7-14 MeV. The energies of the primary particle beam were corrected for energy losses in the gold and Mylar foils, as well as for the kinematic energy loss due to scattering by 45 deg.. Beam-induced radiation backgrounds as well as recombination effects were determined and corrected for. The present results are summarised in Figure 2 for all three gases. The solid lines through the data points for each gas indicate an average W-value for that gas. The higher values for 2.7-MeV alpha particles agree with the trend in previous data towards lower energies. They are excluded from the averages. The relative standard uncertainties of the individual data points range from 1.3 to 3 %. The weighted averages over all energies are W(Ar) = 25.7 eV, W(N 2 ) = 35.6 eV and W(Air) = 34.2 eV. The averages serve as a first comparison and the lines on the plot are to guide the eye and are not meant to imply constant W-values for all energies and particles. The W-values for protons and alpha particles in argon and nitrogen have smaller uncertainties and are lower than the suggested values, but they are still in agreement within the uncertainties. For alpha particles with energies of 12

  13. Putative EEG measures of social anxiety : Comparing frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrewijn, A.; Van, der Molen M.J.W.; Westenberg, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation during resting state, anticipation, and recovery are electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of social anxiety. For the first time, we jointly examined frontal alpha asymmetry and

  14. CANALPH-3: a portable three-channel alpha spectrometer for measuring the daughter products of radon and thoron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, D.W.

    1979-07-01

    A portable three-channel alpha spectrometer for the measurment of radon and thoron daughters in uranium mines or homes is described. The computer programs for analysing the data to give the working levels of radon and thoron by both the alpha spectrometric and modified Kusnetz methods are included along with some typical results

  15. Radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms. Current measured values (State: 2013); Radioaktive Kontamination von Speisepilzen. Aktuelle Messwerte (Stand: 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabai, Eva; Hiersche, Lydia

    2015-01-15

    The report includes the current measured values (2013) of the radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms in Southern Germany (Cs137 and K-40) and discusses the relation radio-cesium intake and radiation exposure now and and the future.

  16. Measurements of airborne short-lived radioactivity concentration in a PET facility at a national University hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    National universities in Japan became under regulation of Industrial Safety and Health Law since 2004FY. One of the legal obligations is working environment measurements such as airborne radioactivity concentration in the rooms where employees handle unsealed radiation sources. Both in 2004FY and in 2005FY, measurements of airborne radioactivity concentration were carried out by two different agencies. The most prominent difference among them is the measurement for short-lived PET nuclides. In 2004FY, one agency measured the radioactivity with a Ge spectrometer at its own laboratory, whereas, in 2005FY, the other agency brought a NaI scintillation counter for gross gamma counting to the Hospital. It can be shown that detection limits for short-lived PET nuclides are in principle almost the same in both methods. It is also found that, in the actual case, gamma spectrometry with a Ge spectrometer is superior in judgement of detection of the radioactivity. (author)

  17. Improving the limits of detection of low background alpha emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Harris, Jack T.; Warburton, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Alpha particle emission - even at extremely low levels - is a significant issue in the search for rare events (e.g., double beta decay, dark matter detection). Traditional measurement techniques require long counting times to measure low sample rates in the presence of much larger instrumental backgrounds. To address this, a commercially available instrument developed by XIA uses pulse shape analysis to discriminate alpha emissions produced by the sample from those produced by other surfaces of the instrument itself. Experience with this system has uncovered two residual sources of background: cosmogenics and radon emanation from internal components. An R&D program is underway to enhance the system and extend the pulse shape analysis technique further, so that these residual sources can be identified and rejected as well. In this paper, we review the theory of operation and pulse shape analysis techniques used in XIA's alpha counter, and briefly explore data suggesting the origin of the residual background terms. We will then present our approach to enhance the system's ability to identify and reject these terms. Finally, we will describe a prototype system that incorporates our concepts and demonstrates their feasibility.

  18. Testing an ionization chamber with gaseous samples and measurements of the (n, alpha) reaction cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M; Salatskii, V I; Sedyshev, P V; Andrzejewski, J; Szalanski, P

    1999-01-01

    A new ionization chamber with gaseous samples (GIC) has been designed and tested on the thermal and resonance neutron beams of FLNP's neutron sources. The exposed gas volume serves as a target for neutrons. The obtained thermal cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 O(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 2 sup 1 Ne(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 8 O and sup 3 sup 6 Ar(n, alpha) sup 3 sup 3 S reactions are (233+-12) mb, (0.18+-0.09) mb and (5.43+-0.27) mb, respectively. These measurements have been performed on a pure beam of thermal neutrons from the high flux reactor IBR-2; and they demonstrated high efficiency and reliability of the method. Compared to samples on substrates, the application of gaseous samples makes the beam background essentially lower, and what is more important, the background component is totally absent due to the absence of Li and B microimpurities in gaseous samples while they do present in the samples on substrates. The method is also applicable to measurements with resonance neutrons. The recovery capabili...

  19. Set up and application of an underwater Α-ray spectrometer for radioactivity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. TSABARIS

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The set up and control of an underwater measuring instrument for radioactivity pollution in the marine environment is described. The detection system is based on a NaI scintillator (RADAM III with modifications for use in the marine environment with on-line measurements. The system is simple, has low power consumption and is stable for long-term monitoring (10 months. Before its deployment, the sensor was calibrated in the laboratory in a tank full of water to reproduce the marine environment. The calibrations were performed, by detecting the 661keV and 1461 keV gamma rays of known activity liquid sources 137 Cs and 40 K, respectively. The measured spectra in the laboratory were compared with spectra from a similar detector as acquired in the field. The analysis of the parallel measurement gave satisfactory agreement for the concentration of the potassium (40 K, as calculated from the salinity in the seawater, thus enabling the system for quantitative measurement of the seawater radioactivity.

  20. Improved Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha Using B0 to rho+rho- Decays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2005-03-29

    We present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} ({bar B}{sup 0}) {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure the longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} = 0.978 {+-} 0.014(stat){sub -0.029}{sup +0.021}(syst) and the CP-violating parameters S{sub L} = -0.33 {+-} 0.24(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.08}(syst) and C{sub L} = -0.03 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays we determine the unitarity triangle {alpha}. The solution compatible with the Standard Model is {alpha} = (100 {+-} 13){sup o}.

  1. Measurement of radon progeny concentrations in air by alpha-particle spectrometey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1975-07-01

    A technique is presented for measuring air concentrations of the short-lived progeny of radon-222 by the use of alpha spectrometry. In this technique, the concentration of RaA, RaB, and RaC are calculated from one integral count of the RaA and two integral counts of the RaC' alpha-particle activity collected on a filter with an air sampling device. The influence of air sampling and counting intervals of time on the accuracy of the calculated concentrations is discussed in the report. A computer program is presented for use with this technique. It is written in the BASIC language. The program will calculate the air concentrations of RaA, RaB, and RaC, and will estimate the accuracy in these calculated concentrations. (U.S.)

  2. Sampling airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive contaminants have historically been considered apart from chemical contaminants because it is their radiological properties that determine their biological and environmental impact. Additionally they have been regulated by special government agencies concerned with radiological protection. Radioactive contaminants are also distinguished by the specialized and very sensitive methods available for the detection of radioactivity. Measurements of a few thousand atoms per liter are not uncommon. Radiation detectors in common use are gas filled chambers, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, and the more recently developed thermoluminescent and etched track detectors. Solid-state nuclear track detectors consist of a large group of inorganic and organic dielectrics which register tracks when traversed by heavy charged particles. They do not respond to light, beta particles or gamma ray photons and thus provide a very low background system for the detection of extremely low levels of radioactivity. In addition, no power source or electronic equipment is required. Cellulose nitrate detectors are currently in use for long term integrated sampling of environmental radon. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TID's) are crystalline materials, in which electrons which have been displaced by an interaction with ionizing radiation become trapped at an elevated energy level and emit visible light when released from that energy level. As which etched-track detectors no power or electronic equipment is needed for the TID's at a measurement site, but they respond to alpha, beta and gamma radiation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are useful for long term environmental monitoring, and have also been newly incorporated into integrating radon detection systems

  3. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  4. OPEN RADIATION: a collaborative project for radioactivity measurement in the environment by the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Allain, E.; Baumont, G.; Berthelot, N.; Clairand, I.; Couvez, C.; Darley, G.; Henry, B.; Jolivet, T.; Laroche, P.; Lebau-Livé, A.; Lejeune, V.; Miss, J.; Monange, W.; Quéinnec, F.; Richet, Y.; Simon, C.; Trompier, F.; Vayron, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the Fukushima accident, initiatives emerged from the public to carry out themselves measurements of the radioactivity in the environment with various devices, among which smartphones, and to share data and experiences through collaborative tools and social networks. Such measurements have two major interests, on the one hand, to enable each individual of the public to assess his own risk regarding the radioactivity and, on the other hand, to provide "real time" data from the field at various locations, especially in the early phase of an emergency situation, which could be very useful for the emergency management. The objective of the OPENRADIATION project is to offer to the public the opportunity to be an actor for measurements of the radioactivity in the environment using connected dosimetric applications on smartphones. The challenge is to operate such a system on a sustainable basis in peaceful time and be useful in case of emergency. In "peaceful situation", this project is based on a collaborative approach with the aim to get complementary data to the existing ones, to consolidate the radiation background, to generate alerts in case of problem and to provide education & training and enhanced pedagogical approaches for a clear understanding of measures for the public. In case of emergency situation, data will be available "spontaneously" from the field in "real time" providing an opportunity for the emergency management and the communication with the public. … The practical objective is i) to develop a website centralising data from various systems/dosimeters, providing dose maps with raw and filtered data and creating dedicated areas for specific initiatives and exchanges of data and ii) to develop a data acquisition protocol and a dosimetric application using a connected dosimeter with a bluetooth connection. This project is conducted within a partnership between organisms' representative of the scientific community and associations to create links

  5. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  6. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 238,239}Pu and {sup 241}Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P., E-mail: michael.dion@pnnl.gov; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-11

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm{sup 2} silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for {sup 241}Am.

  7. Air radioactivity levels following the Fukushima reactor accident measured at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, P; Brudanin, V; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J-L; Stekl, I; Warot, G; Zampaolo, M

    2012-12-01

    The radioactivity levels in the air of the radionuclides released by the Fukushima accident were measured at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, in the South-East of France, during the period 25 March-18 April 2011. Air-filters from the ventilation system exposed for one or two days were measured using low-background gamma-ray spectrometry. In this paper we present the activity concentrations obtained for the radionuclides (131)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (95)Nb, (95)Zr, (106)Ru, (140)Ba/La and (103)Ru. The activity concentration of (131)I was of the order of 100 μBq/m(3), more than 100 times higher than the activities of other fission products. The highest activities of (131)I were measured as a first peak on 30 March and a second peak on 3-4 April. The activity concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs varied from 5 to 30 μBq/m(3). The highest activity concentration recorded for Cs corresponded to the same period as for (131)I, with a peak on 2-3 April. The results of the radioactivity concentration levels in grass and mushrooms exposed to the air in the Modane region were also measured. Activity concentrations of (131)I of about 100 mBq/m(2) were found in grass. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radioactivity measurements on migrating birds (Turdus philomelos) captured in the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, E.; Roldan, C.; Cervera, J.; Ferrero, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radionuclides 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 90 Sr have been measured in edible tissues and bones of migratory birds (song-thrushes, Turdus philomelos) from central and northern Europe and captured in the Comunidad Valenciana, Spain in the 1994 autumn-winter season. Eight years after the Chernobyl accident, extensive agricultural lands in Europe are still contaminated and this study shows that there was a transfer of radioactive isotopes to the captured migratory song-thrushes. The whole-body dose commitment to humans consuming these birds is estimated

  9. Calculation of uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements and their functions. Practical Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Leonarte, C; Anton Mateos, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the procedure used to calculate the uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements, focusing on those obtained by radiochemical separation in which tracers have been added. Uncertainties linked to activity concentration calculations, isotopic rat iso, inventories, sequential leaching data, chronology dating by using C.R.S. model and duplicate analysis are described in detail. The objective of this article is to serve as a guide to people not familiarized with this kind of calculations, showing clear practical examples. The input of the formulas and all the data needed to achieve these calculations into the Lotus 1, 2, 3 WTN is outlined as well. (Author) 13 refs

  10. Calculation of uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements and their functions. Practical Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Leonarte, C.; Anton Mateos, M.P.

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the procedure used to calculate the uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements. focusing on those obtained by radiochemical separation in which tracers have been added. Uncertainties linked to activity concentration calculations, isotopic ratio, inventories, sequential leaching data, chronology dating by using C.R.S model and duplicate analysis are described in detail. The objective of this article is to serve as a guide to people not familiarized with this kind of calculations, showing clear practical examples. The input of the formulas and all the data needed to achieve these calculations into the Lotus 1,2,3, WIN is outlined as well. (Author)

  11. Commentary on guidelines for radiation measurement and treatment of substances including naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoyuki; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2007-01-01

    Study group on safety regulation on research reactors in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) reported the guidelines of 'Guidelines on radiation measurement and treatment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)' on 6 February 2006. RANDEC made the website contents 'Study on use and safety of the substances including uranium or thorium', based on the contract with MEXT to make theirs contents. This paper describes the outline of the website in MEXT homepage, background and contents of NORM guidelines in order to understand easily and visually the NORM guidelines, adding in some flowcharts and figures. (author)

  12. Standard test bench for calibrating instruments used to measure natural or artificial radioactive airborne particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charuau, J.; Grivaud, L.; Le Breton, M.

    1992-01-01

    An aerodynamic calibration device, known as ICARE, has been set up in France at the Saclay Research Centre to certify instruments used to measure natural or artificial airborne radioactive particulate contamination or radon. ICARE can calibrate passive detectors and monitors with sampling air flow-rates of less than 60 m 3 /h. The adjustment of such parameters as 222 Rn daughters volume activity, attached fraction and equilibrium factor, and the volume activity and size of α or β emitter carrying aerosols, allows realistic conditions to be obtained. ICARE complies with monitor test method standard currently under development by the International Electrotechnical Commission

  13. Comparative discussion on some measurements of the atmospheric natural radioactivity and pollution with coal smoke particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran, M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of measuring the natural radioactivity and coal smoke pollution are discussed for two sites in an industrial town, as well as for two heights at the same site, in connection with large scale and local atmospheric stability. The effects of the radiation fog upon the radon daughters acumulation near the ground are examined in some detail. By comparing the pollutant diurnal variations during two periods of similar atmospheric stability in autumn, respectively in winter, the contribution from the dwelling coal heating has been estimated to be about half of the total pollution in the town. (author)

  14. The measurement of blood flow in the cerebral hemispheres using a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, J.U.M.; Reis, J.M.M. dos; Lopes, P.G.; Ribeiro, J.I.C.; Mansano, A.

    1978-01-01

    The modified Olendorf technique to measure the passage of a non-diffusible radioactive tracer through the cerebral hemispheres is described. The results given as brain transit time presents the following normal values: right hemisphere = 11,0 +- 2,8s (s.d.); left hemisphere = 11,0 +- 2,9s (s.d.). The equipment used is a two scintillation detectors sistem (with flat field collimation) with simultaneous chard recorder. The values obtained are taken as cerebral blood flow index. From 20 patients studied, 12 have obstructive carotid [pt

  15. Post-Chernobyl accident radioactivity measurements in the Comunidad Autonoma de Valencia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, J.; Ballesteros, L.; Serradell, V.

    1992-01-01

    Increased atmospheric radioactivity after the accident in Chernobyl was first detected on air filters. Measurements were begun in Valencia on May 2, 1986, with the maximum activity being observed around May 3-4, 1986. As a consequence of this accident, annual campaigns of measurements on migrating birds (several species of aquatic birds and song-thrushes) were started. The data corresponding to the campaign immediately after the accident (1986/87) show a generalized contamination (approximately 50% of the measured specimens). Significant levels of 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 110 Ag m were found. It is important to note that 110 Ag m is only present in Aythya ferina. In the successive campaign is 1988/89 and 1989/91 few samples were found to be contaminated and only 137 Cs was identified. Strontium-90 was measured and identified in some specimens, mainly in their bones. (author)

  16. New instruments and methods for measuring the concentration of radioactive products in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehanno, C.; Blanc, A.; Lallemant, C.; Roux, G.

    1959-01-01

    Different recorders for radioactive aerosols have been developed for measuring the pollution of the atmosphere in laboratories or the external atmosphere. EAR 600. - Allows continuous measurement, instantaneously and 3 to 10 hours after sampling, of concentrations of α or β emitting aerosols varying between some 10 -11 and some 10 -8 curie per cubic metre of air. EAR 800. - Allows continuous measurement of concentration of α emitting aerosols varying between 10 -11 and 10 -5 curie per cubic metre of air and concentration of β emitting aerosols from 10 -11 to 10 -1 curie per cubic metre of air. EAR Plutonium. - Allows detection after several minutes of 1000 MPD (2 x 10 -9 curie par cubic metre), and after 8 hours 1 MPD (2 x 10 -12 curie per cubic metre). Two methods are used to separate the activity due to plutonium from that due to the descendants of radon and thoron: a) by amplitude discrimination, b) by RaC-RaC' and ThC-ThC' (α β ) coincidences. SP4. This system, mounted on a jeep, allows the measurement of irradiation produced on the ground by the smoke from the piles. The sensitivity is 5μR/h. A.D.I.R. - This autonomous and portable instrument is designed for the instantaneous measurement of the radon content of the atmosphere in mines. It allows the measurement of contents in air varying between 0.4 and 400 x 10 -10 curie per litre of air (0.4 and 400 MPD). The measurement of radioactive fall-out is carried out after collection of this activity by a special rain gauge which comprises an adhesive surface and a tube containing ion exchange resins. The radioactivity of the fall-out varies between some 10 -9 and some 10 -7 curie per square metre per month. Concentrations in fission products of the atmosphere are measured after collecting on filter paper. Concentrations measured in air at ground level vary between 10 -13 and 10 -12 curie per cubic metre. (author) [fr

  17. arXiv Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee Geneva, Switzerland, October 2-13, 2015

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David; Alekhin, S.; Banfi, A.; Bethke, S.; Blümlein, J.; Chetyrkin, K.G.; Dissertori, G.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Hoang, A.H.; Klasen, M.; Klijnsma, T.; Kluth, S.; Kneur, J.-L.; Kniehl, B.A.; Kolodrubetz, D.W.; Kühn, J.; Mackenzie, P.; Malaescu, B.; Mateu, V.; Mihaila, L.; Moch, S.; Mönig, K.; Pérez-Ramos, R.; Pich, A.; Pires, J.; Rabbertz, K.; Salam, G.P.; Sannino, F.; Soto i Riera, J.; Srebre, M.; Stewart, I.W.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experiment...

  18. Malicious release of radioactive materials in urban area. Exposure of the public and emergency staff, protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Wolfgang; Lange, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    The preparedness for hypothetical radiological scenarios is part of the tasks for governmental authorities, safety and emergency organizations and the staff in case of the incident. The EURATOM guideline for radiation protection has to be implemented into national laws. According to the guidelines it is required that emergency planning has to be prepared for hypothetical radiological scenarios including terroristic or other maliciously motivated attacks using radioactive materials. The study includes assumptions on the released respirable radioactivity, restriction of the hazardous area, wind induced re-suspension of radioactive dusts and inhalation exposure, and mitigation measures.

  19. Measurement of radioactive aerosol behavior during dismantling and reflection to the exposure dose evaluation - 16107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Kato, Masami

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive aerosol disperses slightly via contamination prevention systems such as control enclosures and filters when the nuclear installation is dismantled, and it might impact the environment. Therefore, when decommissioning is planned, it is necessary to assess the safety such as exposure dose evaluation to the public. For the radioactive aerosol, it is possible that the dispersion ratio is different according to the contamination condition, the dismantlement method of the material, nuclides (elements), etc. The radiation exposure evaluation for the decommissioning plan has been executed by operators in Japan based on a number of experiments (mostly cold tests) and overseas results. The decommissioning is now being carried out at the Tokai Power Station (GCR) and Fugen Decommissioning Engineering Center in Japan. In this study, the results data is acquired at the decommissioning sites, and the methodology and data for the exposure dose evaluation are verified and confirmed. These examination results will lead to the upgrading and improvement of the exposure evaluation methodology. In particular, the dismantlement work of connected piping of the heat exchanger (steam generator) was executed in the Tokai Power Station in 2008. In this study, we paid attention to the radionuclides of Co-60 and Cs-137 that adhered to piping, and the dispersion behavior of aerosol was measured and contamination prevention effect was assured. As a result, the data show that the cesium concentrates about four times higher than cobalt. Moreover, the effects of the prevention measures of contamination were confirmed and the behavior of the radioactive aerosol became clear and the effective findings about the dose evaluation of the dismantling were collected. (authors)

  20. An automated LS(β)- NaI(Tl)(γ) coincidence system as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Leena; Das, A P; Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Kulkarni, M S

    2018-03-06

    4πβ-γ coincidence method is a powerful and widely used method to determine the absolute activity concentration of radioactive solutions. A new automated liquid scintillator based coincidence system has been designed, developed, tested and established as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements. The automation is achieved using PLC (programmable logic controller) and SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition). Radioactive solution of 60 Co was standardized to compare the performance of the automated system with proportional counter based absolute standard maintained in the laboratory. The activity concentrations determined using these two systems were in very good agreement; the new automated system can be used for absolute measurement of activity concentration of radioactive solutions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnelli, P.F.F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K.E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P.F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C.L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S.T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R.C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15 C+ 12 C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier

  2. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnelli, P.F.F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Almaraz-Calderon, S. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P.F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fernández Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Henderson, D.; Jiang, C.L. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lai, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Marley, S.T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R.C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Ugalde, C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the {sup 10,13,15}C+{sup 12}C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  3. In-situ-gamma ray spectrometry for measurements of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed description of the method is presented. The range of application is shown. The calibration of the in-situ gamma ray spectrometer with a HPGe semiconductor detector and the evaluation of the spectra are described. A measuring time of about 15-30 min is sufficient to determine the specific natural and man-made radioactivity of the soil of some ten Bq/m 2 . The results of soil contamination measurements in Germany after the Chernobyl accident are reported. A total of 22 nuclides are detected. The measured contamination for the first days after the accident was as follows: 132 Te/ 132 I - 100 kBq/m 2 , and 131 I - 70 kBq/m 2 . 6 figs., 4 tabs. (orig.)

  4. Measures to prevent, intercept and respond to illicit uses of nuclear material and radioactive sources. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    As nuclear programmes have evolved, the quantities of nuclear material in use or storage, and the number of facilities operating or shut down has increased. In particular, the dismantling of nuclear weapons has resulted in greatly increased stockpiles of weapons usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium. Concern over the security of these and related materials has been further raised by the continued occurrence of cases of illicit trafficking. The risks are theft, leading to trafficking and possible illicit use, and sabotage which could lead to the creation of radiological hazards. The challenge is threefold: prevention, detection and interception, and response. Prevention starts with effective national systems for accountancy, control and protection. Detection and interception involves effective measures to combat illicit trafficking, and response requires planning for the consequences of theft and sabotage. Responsibilities in these fields are national, but nuclear security also has a powerful international dimension. The consequences of failures in national measures reach beyond national boundaries. The effectiveness of national nuclear security can be enhanced through international measures: through agreed international norms, standards and guides, through training and advice, through information exchange and the sharing of experience, and through developing common understandings and perceptions. The Stockholm Conference contributed by focusing on the threats, including terrorist, to nuclear and other radioactive materials; on how to assess them and on how to develop the appropriate security measures. National measures to protect nuclear material and facilities and the continuing development of international standards and obligations were described. The conference discussed the patterns and trends in the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials and national and international measures to combat such trafficking. Finally, it considered

  5. Results of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Member States of the European Community for air - deposition - water - milk. 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This is the 21st report on ambient radioactivity published by the Health and Safety Directorate of the Commission of the European Communities. It was drawn up using the data collected by stations responsible for environmental radioactivity monitoring in Member States. The results are extracts from the data sent to the Commission under Article 36 of the Treaty of Rome establishing the European Atomic Energy Community. The results presented in this report deal with radioactivity of the air, deposition, surface water and milk during 1981 in the ten Member States of the European Community, viz. Belgium, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, France, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The results are presented under four main headings: artificial radioactivity in the air at ground level; artificial radioactivity in deposition; radioactivity of water; radioactivity of milk. The report also contains the list of sampling stations and laboratories, together with a list of publications by Member States in this field. This report places special emphasis on the measurement results for specific radionuclides, but it also contains data on total beta activity so as to ensure continuity vis-a-vis previous and provide comparative values

  6. Implantation of the NC ISO 9001 in the Radioactivity measurement service in junks of CPHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos V, E.O.; Dominguez L, O.; Capote F, E.; Fernandez G, I.M.; Caveda R, C.; Alonso A, D.; Barroso P, I.; Madraso M, S.

    2006-01-01

    In the last years in the international environment, radiological incidents have been reported, due to the presence of radioactive materials in the junk, that have implied the adoption of measures in matter of radiological safety, to avoid affectations in the public and the environment, as well as in the international trade. The establishment of the radiological control of junk during it commercialization requires of the implantation of a quality management program. In such sense, the present work exposes the experience of our institution in the design and organization of a service for the radioactivity measurement in junks based on a quality administration system based on the requirements of the quality standards ISO 9001:2000, ISO/IEC 17050 and ISO/IEC 17025:2000. In coherence with the postulates defined in the institutional strategy related to the implantation of a total quality system and the international demands on this matter. To such ends the processes that compose the service were identified, the corresponding and implemented procedures were elaborated, the registrations associated to the same one, being worked in the design of a quality assurance program that allowed the evaluation of the conformity of the product and the customer. (Author)

  7. Uptake of (3H)progesterone and (3H)5alpha-dihydroprogesterone by rat tissues in vivo and analysis of accumulated radioactivity: accumulation of 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone by pituitary and hypothalamic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolas, H J; Hodges, D; O'Brien, D

    1976-01-01

    These in vivo studies explored the possibility that the metabolism of progesterone to 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5alpha-DHP) and 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one in hypothalamus and pituitary may influence gonadotropin release. [3H]progesterone or [3H]5alpha-DHP was injected iv into ovariectomized or ovariectomized-adrenalectomized rats for 10 0r 30 min. 3H content was determined for plasma, anterior pituitary, medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), cerebral cortex, muscle and uterus. Isotopic dilution analyses of the accumulated 3H were made for progesterone, 5alpha-DHP, 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one, 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone, 20alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-3-one, and 5alpha-pregnane-3alpha, 20alpha-diol on samples from the 10 min groups. With progesterone injections, most of the tissue 3H was distributed among progesterone, 5alpha-DHP, and 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one. Progesterone was the predominant 3H-steroid in uterus, MBH, cerebral cortex and muscle. [3H]5alpha-DHP was the other major 3H-steroid in MBH and the predominant one in pituitary. In terms of tissue/plasma concentration comparisons, no tissue concentration of [3H]progesterone was greater than that in plasma except for MBH in the ovariectomized-adrenalectomized group. In contrast, [3H]5alpha-DHP levels in pituitary, MBH and cerebral cortex were many fold greater than those in plasma and muscle. MBH and pituitary levels were significantly greater than that in cerebral cortex. With 5alpha-DHP injections, most tissue 3H was associated with 5alpha-DHP and/or 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one. No [3H]progesterone was detected. [3H]5alpha-DHP predominated in pituitary and MBH, while 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one predominated in the others. In terms of tissue and plasma concentration comparisons, MBH, pituitary and cerebral cortical concentrations of [3H]5alpha-DHP were markedly higher than plasma, muscle, and uterine levels. Pituitary and MBH concentrations were also greater than

  8. Investigation on the measurement of radioactivities of 131I in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Syojiro; Morimoto, Junko

    1990-01-01

    The analytical method combined with chemical treatment (ion exchange, solvent extraction, coprecipitation) and measurement of β radiation by a low back ground counter has been adopted in 'Standard Method of Analysis for Hygienic Chemicals' as the analytical method of 131 I in milk. However, it was difficult to apply this method to the analysis of some kinds of milk on the market, because some colloidal phenomena appeared at the coprecipitation step. As a result of detection by use of thin layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, it is guessed that this is caused by materials possessing surface active action, such as fatty acids which constitute milk fat (e.g., palmitic acid, stearic acid etc.), and surface active agents added to dairy products. Therefore, after the removal with ether of these surfactants before the coprecipitation step, the measurement of radioactivities of 131 I can be carried out without trouble. (author)

  9. Total cross section measurement of radioactive isotopes with a thin beam neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razbudej, V.F.; Vertebnyj, V.P.; Padun, G.S.; Muravitskij, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The method for measuring the neutron total cross sections of radioactive isotopes by a time-of-flight spectrometer with a narrow (0.17 mm in diameter) beam of thermal neutrons is described. The distinguishing feature of this method is the use of capillary samples with a small amount of substance (0.05-1.0 mg). The energy range is 0.01-0.3 eV. The total cross sections of irradiated samples of sub(153)Eu and sub(151)Eu are measured. From them are obtained the cross sections of sub(152)Eu (Tsub(1/2)=12.4 g) and of sub(154)E (Tsub(1/2)=8.6 yr); they equal 11400+-1400 and 1530+-190 barn at E=0.0253 eV. The cross section of the sub(152)Eu absorption for the thermal spectrum (T=333 K) is determined by the activation method; it is 8900+-1200 barn

  10. Radioactivity measurements applied to the dating and authentication of old wines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberta, Ph.; Perrot, F.; Gaye, J.; Medina, B.; Pravikoff, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    For many years the neutrino group in the CENBG has been involved in the development of low background γ-ray spectrometers, based on the use of HPGe crystals. When applied to radioactivity measurements of wine in bottles, it has been shown that besides the well-known isotope 40 K, the wine contains also trace amounts of 137 Cs (less than 1 Bq/l) with an activity depending on the vintage. This technique has thus led to the possibility to date the wine bottles of vintages between 1952 and ∼ 1980 and to verify the year written on the label or on the cork. Since the measurements do not require opening the bottle, the technique has also proved to be very useful for detecting counterfeit wines of the 19. century and first half of the 20. century. (authors)

  11. The Citizen Observatory of Radioactivity - Assessment of results - Measurement of gamma emitters. Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document proposes a set of tables containing different information and data regarding measurements of gamma radioactivity made during the first and second half-year of 2009 in different marine and water environments (algae, sands, sea water, molluscs, sediments, water mosses, vegetal) in different locations: a bay close to the AREVA plant in La Hague, different locations on the Normandy coast, around the AREVA plant in La Hague, waterways in Normandy and in other river near the Chinon and Civaux nuclear power stations. These tables contain information about the sampling (date, location, quantity, analysed fraction, and so on) and results of measurements of artificial (isotopes of cobalt, ruthenium-rhodium, silver, iodine, caesium, americium, europium) and natural (potassium, beryllium, lead, bismuth, etc.) radionuclides

  12. Use of proportional gas scintillator in absolute measurements of alpha-gamma emitter activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a U 3 O 8 sample was measured utilizing a sum-coincidence circuit which selects only the alpha particles which are simultaneous with the 143 KeV and 186 KeV gamma radiations from the Th-231 (product nucleus). The alpha particles were detected by means of a new type of a gas scintillating chamber, in which the light emitted by excitation of the gas atoms, due to the passage of a charged incoming particle, has its intensity increased by the action of an applied electric field. The gamma radiations were detected by means of a NaI(Tl) 1'' x 1 1/2'' scintillation detector. The value obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with the data available from various observers which used different experimental techniques. It is shown tht the results, are in excellent agreement with the best international data available on the subject and that, therefore, the sum-coincidence technique constitutes an important method for such measurements. (Author) [pt

  13. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [ 18 F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R 2 >0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of a radioactive gas sampling system for NESHAP compliance measurements of 41Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Ghanbari, F.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    United States Department of Energy facilities are required to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) 40 CFR, part 61, subpart H. Compliance generally requires confirmatory measurements of emitted radionuclides. Although a number of standard procedures exist for extractive sampling of particle-associated radionuclides, sampling approaches for radioactive gases are less defined. Real-time, flow-through sampling of radioactive gases can be done when concentrations are high compared to interferences from background radiation. Cold traps can be used to collect and concentrate condensible effluents in applications where cryogenic conditions can be established and maintained. Commercially available gas-sampling cylinders can be used to capture grab samples of contaminated air under ambient or compressed conditions, if suitable sampling and control hardware are added to the cylinders. The purpose of the current study was to develop an efficient and compact set of sampling and control hardware for use with commercially available gas-sampling cylinders, and to demonstrate its use in NESHAP compliance testing of 41 Ar at two experimental research reactors

  15. Measurement of natural radioactivity of surface soils in Igbokoda, Ondo State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwankpa, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of surface soils collected from various locations of Igbokoda were measured by means of well calibrated High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector, Canberra model GR2520-7500SL coupled to a versatile Canberra S100 Multichannel Analyzer, at the Pollution Laboratory of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. The samples were collected at five locations with four samples taken from each location. The emission line spectra used in identifying the natural radioisotopes belong to ''2''3''8U and ''2''3''2Th decay series and that of naturally occurring ''4''0K. The average gamma activity obtained for ''4''0K, ''2''3''2Th and ''2''3''8U are 47.01±3.90, 11.41±2.80 and 14.93±2.50 Bq/kg respectively. The mean absorbed dose rate at 1.0 m above the ground level is 15.98 nGy''-''1. No artificial radionuclide was found at any of the locations surveyed. The data presented will serve as baseline survey for the radioactivity level in the area

  16. Development of measuring and control systems for underwater cutting of radioactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Fuchs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Shutdown and dismantling of nuclear power plants requires special techniques to decommission the radioactive components involved. For reasons of safety, decommissioning of components under water can be advantageous because of the radioactive shielding effect of water. In this project, research activities and developmental works focused on the realization of different sensor systems and their adaptation to cutting tasks. A new image-processing system has been developed in addition to the use of a modified underwater TV camera for optical cutting process control (plasma and abrasive wheel cutting). For control of process parameters, different inductive, ultrasonic and optical sensors have been modified and tested. The investigations performed are aimed at assuring high-quality underwater cutting with the help of sensor systems specially adapted to cutting tasks, with special signal procession and evaluation through microcomputer control. It is important that special attention be paid to the reduction of interferences in image pick-up and procession. The measuring system has been designed and realized according to the consideration of the demands for underwater cutting processes. The reliability of the system was tested in conjunction with a four-axes handling system

  17. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  18. Environmental pollutant isotope measurements and natural radioactivity assessment for North Tushki area, south western desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroor, A. E-mail: amanysroor@hotmail.com; Afifi, S.Y.; Abdel-Haleem, A.S.; Salman, A.B.; Abdel-Sammad, M

    2002-09-01

    Natural radioactive materials under certain conditions can reach hazardous radiological levels. The natural radionuclide ({sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K) contents of rock samples at various locations in the North Tushki area were investigated using gamma-spectrometric analysis. Estimates of the measured radionuclide content have been made for the absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation. The equivalent radium (R{sub eq}) and the external hazard index (H{sub ex}) which resulted from the natural radionuclides in soil are also calculated and tabulated. The studied samples have been collected from various rock exposures in the North Tushki area. The distribution of major oxides, U and Th were studied. It is found that the enrichment and depletion of the major oxides are mainly due to the effect of hydrothermal alteration, which caused mobility of some major oxides, which increases some elements and decreases others. It is important to mention that the study area is far from the development region of the Tushki project and is only a local hazard. Therefore, additional regional studies of the Tushki Project area should be under taken to explore any unexpected environmental hazard due to the high concentration of the radioactive elements, which have been observed at its north boundary.

  19. radioactive survey on the contact zone (paleogene - neogene) in Ad-Daww basin of Syria, using alpha sensitive plastic film technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouty, M.; Al-Hilal, M.; Kattaa, B.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed radon survey has been carried out over the contact zone of marine Paleogene and continental Neogene Formations in Ad-Daww basin (Central Syria), for the purpose of uranium exploration. Radon measurements were performed in a grid pattern using alpha sensitive plastic film technique, type 1B CN-85. Radon concentrations in soil were monitored across the aforementioned zone for 1.5 year, from April 93 to July 94, and their average has been calculated. Alpha Track density was found to be varying from 81 to 227 T/mm2 in Qarytein station, 65 to 124 T/mm2 in Bardeh station and 101 to 196 T/mm2 in Tyas station. The results of this work showed that the anomalous radon values were found to be corresponded to the Oligocene-Miocene geological surface in the study area. These relatively high values are most likely related to scattered uranium mineralization precipitated on surface along a chemically reducing zone where surface water of terrestrial and marine origin intermingled. A comparison between gamma count rate and trak etch density revealed a fairly good correlation, which indicates that the uranium occurrences on the geological contact (Oli - Mio) in Ad-Daww basin are of surficial nature. However, this may give a preliminary indication of probable subsurface extension of these occurrences preserved at depth away from surfacial weathering. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs

  20. Measurement of g factors of excited states in radioactive beams by the transient field technique: 132Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G.; Gurdal, G; Gross, Carl J; Krieger, B; Hatarik, Robert; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, S. D.; Segen, L.; Baktash, Cyrus; Bingham, C. R.; Danchev, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Mazzocchi, C.

    2008-01-01

    The g factor of the 2 1 + state in 52 132 Te, E(2 1 + ) = 0.9739 MeV, r = 2.6 ps, was measured by the transient field technique applied to a radioactive beam. The development of an experimental approach necessary for work in radioactive beam environments is described. The result g = 0.28(15) agrees with the previous measurement by the recoil-in-vacuum technique, but here the sign of the g factor is measured as well

  1. Study of Efficiency Calibrations of HPGe Detectors for Radioactivity Measurements of Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, S.; Salahel Din, K.; Abbady, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of calibrating of efficiency of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry of bulk environmental samples (Tea, crops, water, and soil) is a significant part of the environmental radioactivity measurements. Here we will discuss the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of three HPGe detectors it as a consequence, it is essential that the efficiency is determined for each set-up employed. Besides to take full advantage at gamma-ray spectrometry, a set of efficiency at several energies which covers the wide the range in energy, the large the number of radionuclides whose concentration can be determined to measure the main natural gamma-ray emitters, the efficiency should be known at least from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y). Radioactive sources were prepared from two different standards, a first mixed standard QC Y 40 containing 210 Pb, 241 Am, 109 Cd, and Co 57 , and the second QC Y 48 containing 241 Am, 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 88 Y, and 60 Co is necessary in order to calculate the activity of the different radionuclides contained in a sample. In this work, we will study the efficiency calibration as a function of different parameters as:- Energy of gamma ray from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y), three different detectors A, B, and C, geometry of containers (point source, marinelli beaker, and cylindrical bottle 1 L), height of standard soil samples in bottle 250 ml, and density of standard environmental samples. These standard environmental sample must be measured before added standard solution because we will use the same environmental samples in order to consider the self absorption especially and composition in the case of volume samples.

  2. PROMETHEE: An Alpha Low Level Waste Assay System Using Passive and Active Neutron Measurement Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passard, Christian; Mariani, Alain; Jallu, Fanny; Romeyer-Dherbey, Jacques; Recroix, Herve; Rodriguez, Michel; Loridon, Joel; Denis, Caroline; Toubon, Herve

    2002-01-01

    The development of a passive-active neutron assay system for alpha low level waste characterization at the French Atomic Energy Commission is discussed. Less than 50 Bq[α] (about 50 μg Pu) per gram of crude waste must be measured in 118-l 'European' drums in order to reach the requirements for incinerating wastes. Detection limits of about 0.12 mg of effective 239 Pu in total active neutron counting, and 0.08 mg of effective 239 Pu coincident active neutron counting, may currently be detected (empty cavity, measurement time of 15 min, neutron generator emission of 1.6 x 10 8 s -1 [4π]). The most limiting parameters in terms of performances are the matrix of the drum - its composition (H, Cl...), its density, and its heterogeneity degree - and the localization and self-shielding properties of the contaminant

  3. Cross section measurement of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural cadmium up to 52 MeV

    OpenAIRE

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions have been measured on thin natural cadmium targets foils in the energy range from 11 to 51.2 MeV. This work was a part of our systematic study on excitation functions of light ion induced nuclear reactions on different target materials. Regarding the cross sections, the alpha induced reactions are not deeply enough investigated. Some of the produced isotopes are of medical interest, others have application in research and industry. Th...

  4. Accurate measurement of gene copy number for human alpha-defensin DEFA1A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fayeza F; Carpenter, Danielle; Mitchell, Laura; Mansouri, Omniah; Black, Holly A; Tyson, Jess; Armour, John A L

    2013-10-20

    Multi-allelic copy number variants include examples of extensive variation between individuals in the copy number of important genes, most notably genes involved in immune function. The definition of this variation, and analysis of its impact on function, has been hampered by the technical difficulty of large-scale but accurate typing of genomic copy number. The copy-variable alpha-defensin locus DEFA1A3 on human chromosome 8 commonly varies between 4 and 10 copies per diploid genome, and presents considerable challenges for accurate high-throughput typing. In this study, we developed two paralogue ratio tests and three allelic ratio measurements that, in combination, provide an accurate and scalable method for measurement of DEFA1A3 gene number. We combined information from different measurements in a maximum-likelihood framework which suggests that most samples can be assigned to an integer copy number with high confidence, and applied it to typing 589 unrelated European DNA samples. Typing the members of three-generation pedigrees provided further reassurance that correct integer copy numbers had been assigned. Our results have allowed us to discover that the SNP rs4300027 is strongly associated with DEFA1A3 gene copy number in European samples. We have developed an accurate and robust method for measurement of DEFA1A3 copy number. Interrogation of rs4300027 and associated SNPs in Genome-Wide Association Study SNP data provides no evidence that alpha-defensin copy number is a strong risk factor for phenotypes such as Crohn's disease, type I diabetes, HIV progression and multiple sclerosis.

  5. Updated Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha Using B0->rho+rho- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    The authors present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 316 fb{sup -1} of {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays observed with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They measure the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L}, and the CP-violating parameters S{sub long} and C{sub long}: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = (23.5 {+-} 2.2(stat) {+-} 4.1(syst)) x 10{sup -6}, f{sub L} = 0.977 {+-} 0.024(stat){sub -0.013}{sup +0.015}(syst), S{sub long} = -0.19 {+-} 0.21(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.05}(syst), C{sub long} = -0.07 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays they determine the angle {alpha} of the unitarity triangle. One of the two solutions, {alpha} [74,117]{sup o} at 68% CL, is compatible with the standard model. All results presented here are preliminary.

  6. Evaluation of gross radioactivity in foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorer, Oezlem Selcuk; Oeter, Cigdem [Yuzuncu Yil Univ., Van (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-05-15

    The paper presents the results of radiological investigations of food products sampled in the summer and fall of 2011 and 2012 in different parts of Van, Turkey. Gross radioactivity measurements in food products were evaluated. Food items were divided into eight groups: (1) water, (2) fish, (3) cheese products, (4) fruits, (5) vegetables, (6) herbs, (7) walnut and (8) rock salt. The levels of the gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in all food samples varied widely ranging from 0.070 to 10.885 Bq/g and from 0.132 to 48.285 Bq/g on dry mass basis, respectively. In one sample, gross alpha and gross beta activity concentrations were found to be relatively high according to the other samples and in all samples, the gross alpha radioactivity was measured lower than the gross beta radioactivity. The gross α and gross β activities were measured by using α/β counter of the multi-detector low background system (PIC MPC-9604).

  7. Measurement of exposures to radioactivity and monitoring of effects on health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spira, Alfred; Boutou, Odile

    1999-01-01

    On the request of the French ministries of Health and of the Environment, the author reports thoughts and proposals regarding epidemiological problems related to natural and artificial radioactive emissions. He first reports an analysis of the present context (assessment of health risks, ionizing radiation in France, radiation protection, nuclear operators, relationship between ionizing radiation and health, epidemiology) and knowledge (about nuclear and health, available results, current investigations). He outlines the benefits of an epidemiological monitoring and its requirements, and identifies the various components of this monitoring. While presenting current works, biological and epidemiological studies performed in the northern Cotentin area, he makes some specific proposals for this area and notably for the workers of La Hague. He proposes the implementation of a national arrangement comprising a measurement of exposures, an epidemiological monitoring, and a sociological survey. He discusses the associated administrative organisation and needs

  8. Measurement of blood flow through surgical anastomosis using the radioactive microsphere technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, S.J.; Delgado, G.; Butterfield, A.; Dritschilo, A.; Harbert, J.

    1985-10-01

    Two different radioactive microspheres ( U Ce and UWSc) were used to measure blood flow to an area of the large intestine in dogs before and after a surgical resection was performed with surgical staples. The healing of an anastomosis is theoretically related to the blood flow to the anastomotic site. Blood flow studies were conducted in three dogs using this technique. The average blood flow preoperatively was 0.558 mL/minute per gram and 1.04 mL/minute per gram postoperatively. These results indicate a statistically significant increase in blood flow at the anastomotic site six days after anastomosis when compared with the blood flow to the same area before any surgical procedures.

  9. Measurement of blood flow through surgical anastomosis using the radioactive microsphere technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, S.J.; Delgado, G.; Butterfield, A.; Dritschilo, A.; Harbert, J.

    1985-01-01

    Two different radioactive microspheres ( 141 Ce and 46 Sc) were used to measure blood flow to an area of the large intestine in dogs before and after a surgical resection was performed with surgical staples. The healing of an anastomosis is theoretically related to the blood flow to the anastomotic site. Blood flow studies were conducted in three dogs using this technique. The average blood flow preoperatively was 0.558 mL/minute per gram and 1.04 mL/minute per gram postoperatively. These results indicate a statistically significant increase in blood flow at the anastomotic site six days after anastomosis when compared with the blood flow to the same area before any surgical procedures

  10. Analysis of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Min; Shi Quanlin; Zhang Jiamei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the net peak counts calculating of nuclide 137 Cs at 662 keV of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions. Mathematic model is founded by analyzing every factor that has contribution to Cs peak counts in spectra, and multiple linear regression function is established. Calculating process adopts stepwise regression, and the indistinctive factors are eliminated by F check. The regression results and its uncertainty are calculated using Least Square Estimation, then the Cs peak net counts and its uncertainty can be gotten. The analysis results for experimental spectrum are displayed. The influence of energy shift and energy resolution on the analyzing result is discussed. In comparison with the stripping spectra method, multiple linear regression method needn't stripping radios, and the calculating result has relation with the counts in Cs peak only, and the calculating uncertainty is reduced. (authors)

  11. Comparison of predicted versus measured dose rates for low-level radioactive waste cask shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macher, Martin S.

    1992-01-01

    Shippers of low-level radioactive waste must select casks which will provide sufficient shielding to keep dose rates below the federal limit of 10 mr/hr at 2 meters from the vehicle. Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. uses a cask selection methodology which is based on shielding analysis code predictions with an additional factor of safety applied to compensate for inhomogeneities in the waste, uncertainties in waste characterization, and inaccuracy in the calculational methods. This proven cask selection methodology is explained and suggested factors of safety are presented based on comparisons of predicted and measured dose rates. A safety factor of 2 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively homogeneous waste and a safety factor of between 3 and 4 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively inhomogeneous wastes. (author)

  12. The national network of measurements of radioactivity in the environment. Management report - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprieur, Fabrice; Chaptal-Gradoz, Nathalie; Wyckaert, Laure; Guldner, Bruno; Jaunet, Pierrick; Levelut, Marie-Noelle

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the objectives and challenges of the French national network for the measurement of radioactivity in the environment, its legal and regulatory context, its operation, its actors (ASN, IRSN and other actors). It proposes the moral report on the steering committee and work-groups. It describes the development of the information system: main stages, synthetic description, process from data transmission to edition on Internet sites, exploitation of the public Internet site, of the requester internet site, of hosting platforms, harmonization of transmitted data, planning for 2011. It presents the exploitation assessment for 2011: technical support activities, interactions between the IRSN and the national network information system host, and so on. The last part deals with communication and publication activities

  13. Measurements of neutron yields and radioactive isotope transmutation in collisions of relativistic ions with heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.

    1999-01-01

    The paper is based on the report presented at the 85th Session of the JINR Scientific Council. Some aspects of experimental studies of the problem of reprocessing radioactive wastes by means of transmutation in the fields of neutrons generated by relativistic particle beams are discussed. Research results on measurement of neutron yields in heavy targets irradiated with protons at energies up to 3.7 GeV as well as transmutation cross sections of some fission products (I-129) and actinides (Np-237) using radiochemical methods, activation detectors, solid state nuclear track detectors and other methods are presented. Experiments have been performed at the accelerator complex of the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR. Analogous results obtained by other research groups are also discussed

  14. Simultaneous Measurements of Nanoaerosols and Radioactive Aerosols Containing the Short-lived Radon Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otahal, P P S; Burian, I; Ondracek, J; Zdimal, V; Holub, R F

    2017-11-01

    The activity size distribution of the Equilibrium-Equivalent Concentration (EER) of 222Rn is one of the most important parameters for the estimation of radiation dose by inhalation of radon decay products. A series of measurements of the EER activity size distribution were performed by the screen diffusion battery in Radon-Aerosol chamber (10 m3) at the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Protection (SUJCHBO). These measurements were performed at different levels of radon concentration. For this study, the Graded Screen Array Diffusion Battery (GSA DB), developed by the SUJCHBO (based on Earl Knutson and Robert F Holub design), consists of 10 screens and backup filter used to collect all particles that penetrated the screens. The measuring range of this GSA DB allows measuring the radioactive nanoaerosols in the size range from 0.5 to 100 nm. The Earl Knutson algorithm was used for EER activity size distribution evaluation. The results of EER activity size distribution were subsequently compared with the aerosol particle size distribution measured by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer Spectrometer (SMPS 3936 N, TSI Inc., MN, USA). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Measuring the Stellar Populations of Individual Lyman Alpha Emitters During the Epoch of Peak Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Naveen

    2010-09-01

    Selecting galaxies by their strong Lyman-alpha emission provides a powerful means of probing the reionization epoch and the faint/low-mass galaxies that dominate star formation at high redshift. Yet, our understanding of high-redshift Lyman-alpha emitters {LAEs} has lagged behind that of other well-studied populations {e.g., Lyman break galaxies} due to their continuum faintness and the shifting of age/mass-sensitive features into the near-IR where the high terrestrial background inhibits deep observations. All existing studies of LAEs at z>2 have used stacked optical and/or Spitzer infrared data to discern their median properties, but the actual distributions of ages, reddenings, and stellar masses for these populations are poorly characterized. To fill this glaring gap in the observations and advance our understanding of this important population, we propose WFC3/IR+F160W imaging of fields where we have conducted a survey of low redshift {z 1.9} Lyman-alpha emitters {LAEs}, in order to measure their ages and stellar masses at an epoch where such observations directly probe the age-sensitive Balmer/4000 AA breaks. The targeted sample will include 45-50 spectroscopically confirmed LAEs at z=1.7-2.1 and roughly twice as many candidates, making it the largest sample of homogeneously selected LAEs with individual measurements of the ages, masses, and dust extinction. With these data we will {1} carefully take into account the age-dependence of the extinction curve to make robust comparisons between LAEs and continuum-selected galaxies at the same redshifts; {2} combine clustering and stellar mass measurements to infer the duty cycles of LAEs and determine if they are triggered in the presence of large-scale structures; and {3} quantify the importance of the LAE phase at different galaxy luminosity and mass scales, over a large dynamic range in these properties. An economical investment of just 12 orbits will allow us to accomplish these goals, and remains the only

  16. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R.; Beaumont, O.; Failleau, G.; Hay, B.; Plumeri, S.

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m3) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  17. Application of the specific activity approach to radioactivity measurements in public water supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Intake of radioactivity by the general population is mainly through ingestion of farm and aquatic produce and from drinking water when the source water supply contains trace radioactivity. The radioactive pollutants, participate in environmental processes exactly as the stable elements do and reach man in magnified concentrations. Isotopic stable elements present in total dissolved solids in public water supplies influence the body uptake of radionuclides by isotopic dilution. The applicability of this Specific Activity Principle for safety of the population is discussed. (author)

  18. Measurement methodology of natural radioactivity in the thermal establishments; Methodologies de mesure de la radioactivite naturelle dans les etablissements thermaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameon, R.; Robe, M.C

    2004-11-15

    The thermal baths have been identified as an activity susceptible to expose to ionizing radiations the workers through the natural sources of radon and radon 220. The new regulation obliges these facilities to realize radioactivity measurements. The principal ways of exposure are radon and its daughters inhalation,, exposure to gamma radiation, ingestion of radioelements in thermal waters. I.R.S.N. proposes two methods of measurements of the natural radioactivity in application to the regulation relative to the protection of persons and workers. Some principles to reduce exposure to radon are reminded. (N.C.)0.

  19. Results of radiometric and geochemical measurement for the natural radioactivity map of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišo Andjelov

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, a program was initiated to cover Slovenia with portable gamma-ray spectrometer measurements on a 5 x 5 km grid. The measurements were performed with a four channel Scintrex GAD-6 spectrometer. Five gamma-ray measurements were taken at each of 816 locations. Samples of the upper 10 cm of soil profile were collected for laboratory analysis. Uranium in samples was determinedby delayed neutron method (DNC. Other 35 elements: Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be,Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Ti,U, V, W, Y, Zn and Zr were analyzed by plasma-coupled emission spectrometry (ICP. The field gamma-ray measurements were converted to ground concentrationsof potassium, uranium and thorium. These show good correlation with the laboratory analyses of soil samples. Regardless of the wide spaced sampling, the produced maps show relatively good correlation with main geological units. They demonstrated that the methodology can be successfully implemented for environmental monitoring, geological mapping and mineral exploration. The product ofthis project is the frist natural background radioactivity map of Slovenia covering the entire country.

  20. Measurement of cesium and mercury emissions from the vitrification of simulated high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, it is desired to measure non-radioactive cesium in the offgas system from the glass melter. From a pilot scale melter system, offgas particulate samples were taken on filter paper media and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS method proved to be sufficiently sensitive to measure cesium quantities as low as 0.135 μg, with the sensitivity being limited by the background cesium present in the filter paper. This sensitivity allowed determination of cesium decontamination factors for four of the five major components of the offgas system. In addition, total particulate measurements were also made. Measurements of mercury decontamination factors were made on the same equipment; the results indicate that most of the mercury in the offgas system probably exists as elemental mercury and HgCl 2 , with some HgO and Hg 2 Cl 2 . The decontamination factors determined for cesium, total particulate, and mercury all compared favorably with the design values

  1. Artificial and natural radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of Ghana nuclear research reactor (GHARR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanu, A.; Awudua, A.R.; Darko, E.O.; Emi-Reynolds, G.; Inkooma, S.; Adukpo, O.; Kpeglo, D.O.; Lawluva, H.; Obeng, M.K; Titiati, J.; Agyeman, B.; Kpodzro, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Gloverb, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in soil and water samples around the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) and the immediate surroundings have been investigated using gamma spectrometry. The primary aim of this study was to establish baseline radioactivity levels in the environs of GHARR-1. The average activity concentration in soil for 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were 19.8 Bqkg-1, 40.4 Bqkg-1, 95.3 Bqkg-1 and 1.5 Bqkg-1 respectively. For the water samples the average activity concentration of 226Ra was 2.15 Bql-1, 232Th was 0.61 Bql-1, 40K was 10.75Bql-1 and 137Cs was 0.47 Bql-1. The 226Ra and 232Th concentrations compare quite well with world averages, whilst the 40K concentration was lower than the world average. The activity concentrations of 137Cs observed in the samples are within the range of background. concentrations. The estimated average annual effective dose from external exposure to soil and ingestion of water samples was calculated to be 0.64 mSv. The estimated outdoor external gamma dose rate measured in air ranged from 10-430 nGyh-1 with an average value of 41 nGyh-1 which is lower than the worldwide average value of 60 nGyh-1. In the case of the water samples, the average annual effective value was higher than the WHO guideline value of 0.1 mSvy-1 (author)

  2. Measurement of radioactive gaseous effluents from voloxidation and dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, J.A.; Johnson, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory-scale tests gave data on the release of tritium, /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I as radioactive gases from spent nuclear fuels during voloxidation and dissolution. Voloxidation, a proposed reprocessing step, is intended to remove tritium from fuel by oxidation of UO/sub 2/ to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ prior to dissolution of the fuel with nitric acid. /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I may be evolved in both steps. Quantitative data from the tests may be used in designing off-gas treatment processes and equipment. The tests were performed in a shielded cell with a combination voloxidizer-dissolver. With a recirculating off-gas system, tritium and /sup 14/C were trapped on molecular sieves; /sup 129/I was trapped on silver-exchanged zeolite. /sup 85/Kr was measured by online gamma-ray counting. Zircaloy-clad UO/sub 2/ fuels from H. B. Robinson-2, Oconee-1, and Saxton reactors, with burnups from approximately 100 to approximately 28,000 MWD/MTHM, were tested. The results confirm that voloxidation released most of the tritium but only small fractions of the /sup 14/C, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 129/I; the remainder of these radioactive gases evolved when the voloxidized fuels were dissolved. Voloxidation off-gases typically contained >99.8% of the tritium, 17 to 22% of the /sup 14/C, 7 to 17% of the /sup 85/Kr, and <8% of the /sup 129/I. Tritium evolved as HTO, with <0.1% as HT.

  3. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Stuart; Miyagawa, Shoji; Kasuga, Fumiko; Shibuya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG), and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents. We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF) and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for areas at risk of

  4. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gilmour

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG, and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents.We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137 of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for

  5. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha-induced reactions on yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Naik, Haladhara [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Zaman, Muhammad [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung-Chul [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae-Young [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    The excitation functions of {sup 89g,m,90,91m,92m}Nb,{sup 88,89}Zr, and {sup 87g,m,88,90m,91m}Y from alpha-induced reactions on {sup 89}Y were measured from their respective threshold to 45 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation technique at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The results were compared with the earlier reported data as well as with the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 library based on the TALYS1.6 code. Our measurements in the energy region from the threshold energy to 45 MeV are in general good agreement with the other experimental data and calculated results. The integral yields for thick target of the produced radionuclides were also deduced from their measured cross sections and the stopping power of {sup 89}Y. The measured excitation functions find importance in various practical applications including nuclear medicine and improvement of nuclear model calculations.

  6. Digital Pulse Shape Analysis with Phoswich Detectors to Simplify Coincidence Measurements of Radioactive Xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Wolfgang; Tan, Hui; Warburton, William K.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty establishes a network of monitoring stations to detect radioactive Xenon in the atmosphere from nuclear weapons testing. One such monitoring system is the Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which uses a complex arrangement of separate beta and gamma detectors to detect beta-gamma coincidences from the Xe isotopes of interest. The coincidence measurement is very sensitive, but the large number of detectors and photomultiplier tubes require careful calibration which makes the system hard to use. It has been suggested that beta-gamma coincidences could be detected with only a single photomultiplier tube and electronics channel by using a phoswich detector consisting of optically coupled beta and gamma detectors (Ely, 2003). In that work, rise time analysis of signals from a phoswich detector was explored as a method to determine if interactions occurred in either the beta or the gamma detector or in both simultaneously. However, this approach was not able to detect coincidences with the required sensitivity or to measure the beta and gamma energies with sufficient precision for Xenon monitoring. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to detect coincidences by pulse shape analysis of the signals from a BC-404/CsI(Tl) phoswich detector. Implemented on fast digital readout electronics, the algorithm achieves clear separation of beta only, gamma only and coincidence events, accurate measurement of both beta and gamma energies, and has an error rate for detecting coincidences of less than 0.1%. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and light collection were performed to optimize design parameters for a replacement detector module for the ARSA system, obtaining an estimated coincidence detection efficiency of 82-92% and a background rejection rate better than 99%. The new phoswich/pulse shape analysis method is thus suitable to simplify the existing ARSA

  7. Review of Electret ion chamber technology for measuring technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrappa, P.

    2002-01-01

    Electret ion chamber (EIC) is a passive integrating ionization chamber used extensively for measuring technologically enhanced radioactivity. Commercially available electret ion chambers called 1E-PERM (Electret-Passive Environmental Radiation Monitors) electret ion chambers are relatively new and are in use only from the past 10 years. The EIC consists of a stable electret (electrically charged Teflon disc) mounted inside an electrically conducting chamber. The electret serves both as a source of the electric field and as a sensor. The ions produced inside the chamber are collected by the electret. The reduction in charge of the electret is related to total ionization during the period of exposure. This charge reduction is measured using a battery operated electret reader. Using appropriate calibration factors and the exposure time, the desired parameters such as radon concentration in air is calculated. These low cost monitors require neither power nor battery and several hundreds of these can be used simultaneously and serviced by one reader. These monitors do not provide on line readings, but provide an average value over a period of time. The EICs have been used for measuring: (a) indoor and outdoor radon, (b) thoron, (c) dissolved radon and radium in water, (d) environmental gamma, (e) radon emanating radon concentration in soil samples and in pipes, (f) radon flux from surfaces and building materials. The purpose of this paper is to describe these methods and give selected reference to the related publications for more detailed reading. (author)

  8. IMIS (Integrated Measurement and Information System) - the German integrated radioactivity information and decision support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.; Leeb, H.

    1993-01-01

    IMIS is being set up as part of the German Government's National Response Plan for dealing with the consequences of a large scale radioactive contamination of the environment. The IMIS system has three operational action levels. Level 3 covers the collection of radiological data from state-of-the-art monitoring networks and measurement laboratories. Level 2 involves computerised data processing and quality control, based on standardised procedures for the collection and presentation of measurements. This level also includes the use of transport and dose assessment models. Level 1 includes evaluation of the data, management of the consequences of a given situation, legal enforcement of protective measures and provision of information to the public. In its final form the IMIS system will consist of a total of 75 RISC computers linked together by an efficient packet-switched Wide Area Network. Owing to various demands of the individual users, three different types of RISC computers are used. The system software includes ULTRIX, TCP/IP and X windows. The relational database management system ORACLE is used together with the query language SQL-Plus. Statistical analyses are carried out with the standard product SAS. The geographical information system TERRA provides all the tools necessary for a detailed geographic presentation of the data. (author)

  9. Helium burning: a further measurement of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    The 12 C (α,γ) 16 O is a key (but still unknown) reaction in helium burning. Several attempts to constrain the p-wave S-factor at Helium burning temperatures (200 M K) using the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N have been made. However, some discrepancy exists between the spectra measured at Settle and that of TRIUMF. We have improved our previous study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N by improving our statistical sample (by more than a factor of 5), improving the energy resolution of the experiment (by 20%), and in understanding our line shape, deduced from measured quantities. Our newly measured spectrum of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N is consistent with the Seattle ('95) data, as well as an earlier experiment performed at Mains ('71) and is not consistent with the TRIUMF ('94) data. (author)

  10. Results of special radiation measurements resulting from the Chernobyl accident and regional analysis of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the results concerning the monitoring of the environmental radioactivity in France following Chernobyl accident. Atmospheric dusts, milk and milk products, vegetables, water and various beverages are analyzed. More than 1500 additional food samples are presented. Regional analysis of radioactivity and human gamma-spectrometric investigations are included [fr

  11. Measurement of event shape distributions and moments in $e^{+}e^{-} \\to$ hadrons at 91-209 GeV and a determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Roeck, A.De; Wolf, E.A.De; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; Krogh, J.von; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies from 91 to 209 GeV. We present distributions of event shape observables and their moments at each energy and compare with QCD Monte Carlo models. From the event shape distributions we extract the strong coupling alpha_s and test its evolution with energy scale. The results are consistent with the running of alpha_s expected from QCD. Combining all data, the value of alpha_s (M_z) is determined to be alpha_s(Mz)=0.1191+-0.0005(stat.)+-0.0010 (expt.)+-0.0011(hadr.)+-0.0044(theo.) The energy evolution of the moments is also used to determine a value of alpha_ with slightly larger errors: alpha_s(Mz)=0.1223+-0.0005(stat.) +-0.0014(expt.) +-0.0016(hadr.) +0.0054 -0.0036 (theo).

  12. Measurement of the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} slope parameter {alpha} with the KLOE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F., E-mail: Fabio.Ambrosino@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Beltrame, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Bencivenni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); Bloise, C. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bocchetta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Roma Tre' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Bossi, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Branchini, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Campana, P.; Capon, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Capussela, T., E-mail: Tiziana.Capussela@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Ceradini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Roma Tre' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Santis, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); De Simone, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Zorzi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy)

    2010-10-25

    We present a measurement of the slope parameter {alpha} for the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} decay, with the KLOE experiment at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory, based on a background free sample of {approx}17 million {eta} mesons produced in {phi} radiative decays. By fitting the event density in the Dalitz plot we determine {alpha}=-0.0301{+-}0.0035stat{sub -0.0035}{sup +0.0022}syst. The result is in agreement with recent measurements from hadro- and photo-production experiments.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase: Application and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, Jana; Skoluda, Nadine; Kappert, Mattes B; Nater, Urs M

    2017-12-01

    Salivary cortisol (sCort) and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) constitute proxy measures of the two major stress response systems, i.e. the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic nervous system, respectively. Potentially confounding determinants of sCort and sAA may limit a reliable concurrent measurement of both biomarkers, if not adequately considered. We reviewed the most important determinants of sCort and sAA and provide recommendations for handling these potential confounders. We focused on a selection of confounders, resulting in an in-depth consideration of age, sex steroid-related factors, somatic health, acute medication, smoking, consumption of food and drinks, alcohol consumption, physical activity/fitness, and sleep. Our review further highlights the importance of the consideration of potential confounders for a reliable and valid simultaneous measurement of sCort and sAA. We further provide recommendations about which and how to handle relevant confounders in the study design or data analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Application of Tritium Radioactive Tracer for Measuring Mass Recovery of Water Reinjection on Geothermal Field Kamojang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djijono; Zainal Abidin; Alip; Rasi Prasetyo

    2004-01-01

    The investigations has been done by using tritium radioactive for measuring water reinjection mass recovery at Kamojang geothermal field, West Java. The aim of the investigation is to know the water reinjection effectively for steam production. The method is to inject 10 Ci of tritium radioactive in KMJ-15 well. Monitoring has been done by collected and condensed steam at production well KMJ-11, 14,17 and 18 periodically. Samples be analyzed by enrichment method and counted by liquid scintillation counter. Counting results be simulated by TRINV model. The result is that the total mass recovery for KMJ-11, 14, 17 and 18 inject water is 8.35 %. (author)

  15. Development of the precise measurement method for gamma-ray energy of neutron induced radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishikawa, Toshiaki; Uemura, Jitsuya

    1998-01-01

    Goal of the research is to develop a new energy calibration method to perform precise measurement of photon energy by gamma-ray spectrometry. Here, we regard reference standard energies to be those of photon of radioactive isotopes measured basing on a laser wavelength of 86 Kr (606 nm) together with energy-wavelength conversion factor E λ = 1.239 842 44 x 10 -6 eV m ±0.03 ppm (CODATA 1986). As such the reference standard we use 192 Ir isotope. Deviation of photon energy values between data obtained by photon spectrometry, i.e., the decay gamma-ray analysis and the prompt gamma-ray analysis with Ge or Ge(Li) detectors, and those obtained by crystal diffraction spectrometry, has led that the 'conventional' method of energy calibration for the photon spectrometry is not adequate to the precise energy assignment. A 'new' method has solved this problem by introducing the concept of an instrument function, which is the transfer function between an input signal-shape function and an output (measured) signal-shape function, as summarized in reference 1. Present status of photon energy values has been examined for the nuclear-decay gamma-rays, the nuclear excitation gamma-rays and the mesonic-atom X-rays. At the previous stage of research we evaluated that a commonly-used internal standard method, mainly used for activation analysis study, was inadequate for the precise measurement of photon energy, so far as we use base subtraction method. In the present study, we examined the cause of the inadequacy of a base-subtraction method for obtaining the photopeak line shape for the precise energy measurement. (author)

  16. Radioactivity measurement of nuts and seeds available in Erbil city markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzulddin, Saman Khabbat; Ahmed, Ali Hassan; Samad, Ahmed Ismael; Othman, Sardar Qader

    2017-09-01

    A study of natural and artificial radionuclides in nut and seed samples consumed in Erbil city has been performed. The NaI(TI) scintillation detector and nuclear track detector were used to measure the activity concentration of 40K, 232Th, 226Ra, 137Cs and 222Rn; respectively. The measured activity in samples ranges from (207.63 to 533.88) Bq.kg-1 with the mean value of 290.6 Bq.kg-1 for 40K, (0.031 to 0.52) Bq.kg-1 with a mean value of (0.149) Bq.kg-1for 226Ra (0.101 to 0.554) Bq.kg-1 with the mean value of (0.218) Bq.kg-1 for 232Th, 0.033 to 0.0.266 Bq.kg-1 with the mean value of (0.111) Bq.kg-1 for 137Cs and radon concentration ranged from 128.77to 298.1 Bq.m-3 with an average value of 202.7 Bq.m-3. To assess the radiological hazard due to natural radioactivity, the average values of the radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), internal hazard index (Hin) and Gamma index (Iγ) have been calculated to be (22.67) Bq/kg, (0.061), (1.12) and (0.195) respectively.

  17. Radioactivity measurements in Egyptian phosphate mines and their significance in the occupational exposure of mine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Hussein, Mohamed I.; Hussein, A.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactivity measurements have been conducted in nine underground phosphate mines in the Egyptian Eastern Desert in order to estimate the occupational radiation exposure of mine workers in those mining sites. Measurements were carried out of airborne radon ( 222 Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny) and thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny, as well as γ-radiation from mine walls, ceilings and floors. Comparison of experimental data and theoretical predictions showed partial agreement between these two sets of data. This result is partly attributed to the complex layout of these mines which causes undesirable ventilation conditions, such as recirculation airflow patterns which could not be adequately identified or quantified. The radiation data obtained were used to estimate the Maximum Annual Dose (MAD), and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. These calculations indicate that in eight out of the nine mines surveyed, the MAD exceeded (by a factor of up to 7) the maximum recommended level by ICRP-60. A number of suggestions are made in order to reduce the MAD in the affected mines

  18. Radioactivity measurements in Austria from 1992 to 1993 - data and assesment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, E.

    1995-05-01

    The Federal Ministry of Health and Consumer Protection is responsible for the large scale surveillance of radioactive contaminations of the Austrian territory. For this purpose on one hand an on-line measurement system has been set up, using gamma dose rate measuring devices situated in 336 locations. On the other hand, various media e.g. aerosols, precipitation, surface water and foodstuffs are being collected. Their radionuclide content is analyzed in several laboratories. Additional special projects have been set up to improve the knowledge of the time dependence respectively of regional aspects of the contamination situation. The report covers the results of this surveillance for the years 1992 and 1993. It can be seen that the main contributions to the radiation dose are due to natural exposure pathways, among which the inhalation of indoor radon is of main importance. (Compared to the data in earlier reports due to a new evaluation of the radon risk by ICRP this dose contribution is significantly lower.) In comparison, the component due to the consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident in 1986 onto Austrian territory during 1992 and 1993 was marginal. (author)

  19. Measures to be taken in cases of radioactive contamination of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This recommendation refers to those technical, medical and scientific facilities in which unsealed radioactive substances are handled. These facilities include, among other things: nuclear power plants, facilities of the fuel cycle, scientific and industrial laboratories, doctors' practices, hospitals and medical laboratories. Any unnecessary contamination of individuals shall be avoided. If contamination does occur, the resulting radiation exposure shall be kept as low as possible, even below the dose limits of the Radiological Protection Ordinance, taking into consideration the state of the art and also taking into account all circumstances pertaining to each individual case. Preventive measures to avoid or limit contamination represent the most effective form of protection. Preventive measures therefore include regular checks on the condition of the skin and constant personal skin care. Specific decontamination instructions must be provided for each individual plant and also, where applicable, for each individual workplace. Contaminated items of clothing must be removed before decontamination is commenced. Low levels of contamination can usually be eleminated in one step by washing with water. There is no need to carry out further decontamination steps where the decontamination effect is less than 10% and the remaining surface-related activity is less than 10 Bq/cm 2 (averaged over 100 cm 2 where the contamination is largely distributed over the entire area). (orig.) [de

  20. Measurement of induced radioactivity in a spallation neutron field of a mercury target for GeV-proton bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasugai, Y.; Takada, H.; Nakashima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    An integral experiment on radioactivity induced in spallation neutron fields was carried out under the ASTE (AGS-Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration using AGS (Alternative Gradient Synchrotron) at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory). The spallation neutrons were produced by bombarding a mercury target with protons of 1.6, 12 and 24 GeV. The number of protons was 3 - 4 x 10{sup 13} for each irradiation. The irradiated materials were titanium, nickel, cobalt, yttrium, and bismuth, and placed on the cylindrical surface of the mercury target at the distance of 15 - 16 cm from the beam-incident-surface of the target. Disintegration rates of induced radioactivities were measured at several cooling-time ranging from hours to months. The principal nuclides contributing to the radioactivity were pointed out for each material. The experimental results for bismuth were compared with the calculations with DCAHIN-SP code. (author)

  1. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.; Khan, A.J.; Semkow, T.M.; Syed, U.-F.; Roselan, A.; Haines, D.K.; Roth, G.; West, L.; Arndt, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with 241 Am (alpha radioactivity), 90 Sr/ 90 Y (beta radioactivity), and 60 Co, 137 Cs, and 241 Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity.

  2. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear material and radioactive sources in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotoukh, O.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Republic of Belarus strives to take an active part in international cooperation in the field of prevention and interception of illicit uses of nuclear material and radioactive sources through: multilateral international agreements and bilateral interagency treatments; information exchange within the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database; participation in different international seminars, workshops, conferences including those under the IAEA auspices etc. Belarus is constantly improving regulatory, legal and technical aspects of activities aimed at: accounting, control and ensuring of physical protection of nuclear material and security of radioactive sources; exercising efficient control over their export and import; detecting cases of their illicit uses and illegal cross-border movements and informing of such cases through the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database; developing and providing training opportunities for personnel. Through Resolution 'On Measures for Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials' issued by the Council of Ministers in 1993, Committee for Supervision of Industrial and Nuclear Safety (PROMATOMNADZOR) was appointed as the authority responsible for ensuring physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Through Resolution 'On Measures for Fulfillment of Provisions of the Non-Proliferation Treaty' issued by the Council of Ministers in 1993, Promatomnadzor was designated as the national competent authority responsible for the establishment and maintenance of the State System of Accounting and Control of nuclear material. The system accounts all the nuclear material meeting the criteria defined in the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA. The system includes two levels: i.e. on-site accounting and control and state accounting and control exercised by Promatomnadzor. Apart from reporting to the Agency, the system also provides for national tasks being accomplished: control over uses of nuclear material, its physical protection, access

  4. Measurement of radioactive lines in powdered milk samples in Londrina (Parana State, Brazil) region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melquiades, Fabio Luiz

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement of radioactive lines in powdered milk, with high resolution gamma spectrometry, using a HPGe detector with relative efficiency of 10%, coupled to the electronic nuclear chain and a multichannel card of 8192 channels. Some tests were realized before beginning the measurements. The first of them was to define the shield to be used, making several measured with different shields according to the available materials, opting finally for a shield composed of bricks of lead (10 cm thickness), plates of iron (4nm thickness) and of aluminum (2 mm thickness). Four different geometries for the samples recipients were tested, and the Marinelli beaker of 2,1 liters totally filled was the one which supplied the best peak/background ratio. A statistical inference was also realized to determine the sampling that represents each one of the lots of milk to be measured, resulting in a number of 6 samples, for a confidence level of 95%. Two different kinds of powdered milk produced at Londrina were analyzed, Integral Powdered Milk Cativa and Integral Powdered Milk Polly. The samples were properly put in the Marinelli beaker of 2,1 L, sealed and kept for 40 days to reach the secular equilibrium. The counting time for each measurement was two days. It was possible to identify the radionuclides 40 K, 137 Cs and 232 Th (from 208 Tl), whose activities were calculated according to the International Atomic Energy Agency norms (IAEA, 1989). The detector efficiency was measured using calibrated samples, prepared with the certified reference materials IAEA-326 and IAEA-375. Corrections for self-absorption were accomplished, based on measures of samples with different densities. The results obtained for the powdered milk Cativa were: 464± 12 Bq/kg for 40 K, 3,46 ± 1,05 and 0,46 ± 1,05 and 0,46 ± 0,16 Bq/kg for the minimum detectable activities of 137 Cs and 232 Th, respectively. For the milk Polly, the results were: 452±10 Bq/kg for 40 K, 3,19 ± 0

  5. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear terrorism and the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive material threaten the security of all States. There are large quantities of diverse radioactive material in existence, which are used in areas such as health, the environment, agriculture and industry. The possibility that nuclear and other radioactive material may be used for terrorist acts cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material, and to establish capabilities for detection and response to nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This approach recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive material; national response plans; and contingency measures. Within its nuclear security programme, the IAEA aims to assist States in implementing and sustaining such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, specifically: to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; to combat illicit trafficking; and to detect and respond to nuclear security events. This is an Implementing Guide on nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The objective of the publication is to provide guidance to Member States for the

  6. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.; Miyagi, I.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP) in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG). PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1) The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14-15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2) An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m-1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) Low but finite values of the PG during 16-20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4) Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20-22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5) Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6) Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  7. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG. PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1 The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14–15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2 An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m−1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3 Low but finite values of the PG during 16–20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4 Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20–22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5 Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6 Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  8. Biological Half-Life Measurements of Radioactive Strontium in Hormonal-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haquin, G.; Riemer, T.; Kaniun, N.; Datz, H.; Yungreiss, Z.; Vexler, A.; Ben-Yosef, R.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Marko, R.; Teshuva, A.; Kol, R.

    2004-01-01

    Therapy for metastatic bone pain in Hormonal-Resistant Prostate Cancer (HRPC) patients is performed by administering systemic radioisotope therapy [1]. The beta radiation emitted by the radioactive strontium 89 Sr [T 1/2 =50.5 d, E β (max)=1.49 MeV], an adequate radionuclide for this therapy procedure, irradiates the metastatic cells in the bone, producing the desired palliative effect. The beta disintegration of 89 Sr is followed by a low abundance (0.00945%) gamma ray with energy of 909 keV. The commercially available 89 Sr is in the form of Sr Cl and contains an impurity of less than 0.5% of 85 Sr [T 1/2 =64.8 d] ,which decays by electron capture, emitting gamma rays at 511 keV (95.71%). The radiation dose to the metastatic cells due to the gamma rays is negligible compared to the dose given by the beta radiation, assuming that the 89 Sr is concentrated at the metastatic bony lesions. Accurate information about retention and excretion of Sr in the patient's body will contribute to better evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. he effective half-life of 89 Sr can be calculated either from Whole Body Counting (WBC) measurements or by measuring 85 Sr and/or 89 Sr in urine/blood. WBC measurements, using collimated HPGe detectors, allow the follow-up of 89 Sr and 85 Sr at different sites in the skeletal bones of the patient. Biological half-lives of Sr in different body sections measured by WBC and the correlation with excretion-rate-based biological half-lives are presented

  9. Positron annihilation measurements in high-energy alpha-irradiated n-type gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Sandip; Mandal, Arunava; SenGupta, Asmita [Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Roychowdhury, Anirban [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-15

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening annihilation line-shape measurements have been carried out in 40-MeV alpha-irradiated n-type GaAs. After irradiation, the sample has been subjected to an isochronal annealing over temperature region of 25-800 C with an annealing time of 30 min at each set temperature. After each annealing, the positron measurements are taken at room temperature. Formation of radiation-induced defects and their recovery with annealing temperature are investigated. The lifetime spectra of the irradiated sample have been fitted with two lifetimes. The average positron lifetime τ{sub avg} = 244 ps at room temperature after irradiation indicates the presence of defects, and the value of τ{sub 2} (262 ps) at room temperature suggests that the probable defects are mono-vacancies. Two distinct annealing stages in τ{sub avg} at 400-600 C and at 650-800 C are observed. The variations in line-shape parameter (S) and defect-specific parameter (R) during annealing in the temperature region 25-800 C resemble the behaviour of τ{sub avg} indicating the migration of vacancies, formation of vacancy clusters and the disappearance of defects between 400 and 800 C. (orig.)

  10. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO 2 interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  11. Flowrate measurements in closed pipes by the method of transit time measurement. Pt.1 Method of transit time of a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubail, A.; Favennec, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Classical methods of flowrate measuring in closed pipes generally make use of indirect principles (for example: the measurements of the pressure loss through an orifice plate). Absolute or fundamental methods of the measurements of volume and time allow the ''in situ'' calibration and control of flowmeters in their nominal conditions of use. The method of transit-time measurements by fast injection of a radioactive tracer is described and analyzed [fr

  12. Measuring the absolute disintegration rate of a radioactive gas with a moveable endplate discharge counter (MEP) and theoretical calculation of wall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffey, A.H.; Gray, J.; Bentley, W.C.; Lerner, J.L.

    1987-09-01

    A precision built moveable endplate Geiger-Mueller counter was used to measure the absolute disintegration rate of a beta-emitting radioactive gas. A Geiger-Mueller counter used for measuring gaseous radioactivity has 85 Kr (beta energy, 0.67 MeV). The wall effect calculation is readily extendable to other beta energies

  13. Illegal handling of radioactive and nuclear materials. Threats and suggestions for measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Melin, Lena; Prawitz, Jan; Ringbom, Anders; Sandstroem, Bjoern; Wigg, Lars; Wirstam, Jens

    2004-01-01

    This project deals with threats from smuggling or other illegal transportation of radioactive or nuclear materials across the borders to Sweden, and with the security of handling such materials in Sweden. The project has included studies of relevant documentation; visits and interviews at industries, hospitals, research institutes and military institutions in Sweden that handle radioactive materials; a pilot study at the Stockholm freeport, where equipment for detection of radioactive materials has been tested for six months; an analysis of incidents reported to the IAEA database; and an analysis of Swedish incidents. The following conclusions are drawn: Stricter rules regarding the physical protection of radiation sources and radioactive materials should be implemented in Sweden. The recommendations recently issued by IAEA should serve as a point of departure for working out such rules

  14. Heat of hydration measurements on cemented radioactive wastes. Part 1: cement-water pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the hydration of cement pastes in terms of chemical and kinetic models. A calorimetric technique was used to measure the heat of hydration to develop these models. The effects of temperature, water/cement ratio and cement replacements, ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and pulverised fuel ash (PFA) on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is reported. The incorporation of BFS or PFA has a marked effect on the hydration reaction. The effect of temperature is also important but changing the water/cement ratio has little effect. Results from cement pastes containing only water and cement yield total heats of reaction of 400, 200 and 100 kJ/kg for OPC, BFS and PFA respectively. Using the results from the models which have been developed, the effect of major salts present in radioactive waste streams can be assessed. Values of the total heat of reaction, the time to complete 50 percent reaction, and the energy of activation, can be compared for different waste systems. (U.K.)

  15. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Krauser

    Full Text Available Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14C or (3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  16. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector. PMID:22723932

  17. Radioactivity measurements and risk assessments in soil samples at south and middle of Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kinani, A.; Al Dosari, M.; Amr, M.A.; Al-Saad, K.A.; Helal, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Health risks associated with the exposure to the natural radioactivity present in soil materials has great concern all over the world. Thus soil samples collected from an urban area at south and middle of Qatar in order to measure natural radioactivity, 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th and the artificial 137 Cs using gamma-ray spectrometry method.The soil activity concentrations ranges from 25.01- 40.31 for 226 Ra, 12.37- 4.99 for 232 Th and 133.8 - 250.1 for 40 K with mean values of 57, 87 and 207 Bq/ kg, respectively. The concentrations of these radionuclides are compared with the available data from other countries. The average and ranges of activity concentration of 226 Ra in Qatar soil areas are very much comparable to the world Figures. However, the concentration for 232 Th is comparable to other Gulf area and lower than that for Egypt and the world figures.The concentration for 40 K is lower as compared with Egypt, world, and Kuwait figures but comparable to Oman figures.The radium equivalent activity (Ra eq) in these soil samples ranges from 74.45 Bq/ kg to 41.21 Bq/ kg) with mean value of 57.4 Bq/ kg which is far below the safe limit (permissible) limit (370 Bq/ kg). The calculated values for external hazard index Hex for the soil samples range from 0.102 - 0.21 and average concentration of 0.164 which is lower than other values reported .However these values are lower than unity; therefore, the soil from these regions is safe and can be used as a construction material without posing any significant radiological threat to population.The absorbed dose rate calculated from activity concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K ranges between 11.529 - 21.446, 2.383 - 11.744, and 5.304 -10.357 n Gy/ h, respectively and the total average absorbed dose rate 28.915 n Gy/ h which are lower than the world wide average absorbed dose rate 51 n Gy/ h. The total absorbed dose in the study area ranges from 20.146 - 40.389 n Gy/ h with an average value of 28.915 n Gy/ h .The

  18. Simultaneous Measurements of Nanoaerosols and Radioactive Aerosols Containing the Short-lived Radon Isotopes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, P.P.S.; Burian, I.; Ondráček, Jakub; Ždímal, Vladimír; Holub, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 5 (2017), s. 53-56 ISSN 0144-8420. [Conference on Protection against Radon at Home and at Work / 13th International Workshop on the Geological Aspects of Radon Risk Mapping /8./. Prague, 12.09.2017-16.09.2017] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : equilibrium -equivalent concentration * radon * radioactive nenoaerosols Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2016

  19. Absolute measurements of the alpha-gamma emitters activities by a sum-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a UO 2 sample, using a sum-coincidence circuit which selected only the alpha particles which were simultaneous with the well known 184 Kev gamma radiation from Th-231. The alpha particles were detected by ZnS(Ag) scintillator specially designed to show its maximun efficiency for U-235 alpha particles, whereas the gamma radiation was detected by NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The values obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with data from various observers using different experimental techniques. (Author) [pt

  20. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in 210Pb and 210Po measurement in water by alpha spectrometry using 210Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Pedro L.; Gómez, José; Ródenas, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    An easy and accurate method for the determination of 210 Pb and 210 Po in water using 210 Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk is proposed and assessed for its detection capabilities according to the ISO Guide for the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) and ISO Standard 11929-7 concerning the evaluation of the characteristic limits for ionizing radiation measurements. The method makes no assumption on the initial values of the activity concentrations of 210 Pb, 210 Bi and 210 Po in the sample to be analyzed, and is based on the alpha spectrometric measurement of 210 Po in two different aliquots: the first one measured five weeks after the sampling date to ensure radioactive equilibrium between 210 Pb and 210 Bi and the second after a sufficient time for the ingrowth of 210 Po from 210 Pb to be significant. As shown, for a recommended time interval of seven months between 210 Po measurements, the applicability of the proposed method is limited to water samples with a 226 Ra to 210 Pb activity ratio C Ra /C Pb ≤4, as usual in natural waters. Using sample and background counting times of 24 h and 240 h, respectively, the detection limit of the activity concentration of each radionuclide at the sampling time for a 1 L sample typically varies between 0.7 and 16 mBq L −1 for 210 Pb in water samples with an initial activity of 210 Po in the range 0–200 mBq L −1 , and between 0.6 and 8.5 mBq L −1 for 210 Po in water samples with an initial activity of 210 Pb in the same range. - Highlights: ► 210 Pb and 210 Po measurement in water by 210 Po spontaneous deposition onto silver disks. ► 210 Pb and 210 Po determination based on 210 Po measurement in two different aliquots. ► Evaluation of characteristic limits in radioactivity measurements using ISO 11929-7. ► 10 Pb - 210 Po detection limits decrease with time elapsed between 210 Po measurements.

  1. Measurement of potential alpha energy concentration in some schools in Shillong city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maibam, Deveshwori; Sharma, Yubaraj; Saxena, Atul; Walia, Devesh; Diengdoh, Evamary; Rapmai, Aibora K.

    2011-01-01

    Radon and its progeny account for more than 50% of total natural radiation exposure to humans and are considered to an important cause of lung cancer (UNSCEAR, 2008). Indoor radon levels are much higher than outdoor levels hence the importance of assessing radon levels in indoor environments, particularly schools which serve as a significant source of radon exposure both for children and the staffs. Children have smaller lung volumes and higher breathing rates therefore an augmented radon concentration results to a higher radiation dose in children. In our study, potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of 20 schools in Shillong region has been measured using the SSNTD method with LR-115 type 2 detectors. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at different floors of each school during winter and summer season. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at diff rent floors of each school during winter and summer season. The PAEC (mWL) at each of the selected schools are calculated and it ranges from 2.56 - 58.2 mWL (Arithmetic mean) and 2.34 - 58.18 mWL (Geometric mean). And the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) ranges from 0.74 - 17.85 mSv.y -1 . This preliminary study shows that the AEDE values of the schools under study are below the prescribed action limit by AERB i.e. 30 mSv.y -1 . (author)

  2. Radioactive Microspheres for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    HÄfeli, Urs

    This paper reviews the preparation and application of radioactive microspheres for medical purposes. It first discusses the properties of relevant radioisotopes and then explores the diagnostic uses of gamma-emitter labelled microspheres, such as blood flow measurement and imaging of the liver and other organs. The therapeutic uses of alpha- and beta-emitting microspheres, such as radioembolization, local tumour therapy and radiosynovectomy, are then described, and the recent developments in neutron capture therapy using gadolinium microspheres and boron liposomes discussed. The review concludes with some considerations in radiopharmaceutical kit preparations and radioisotope generator use, as well as with some radiobiological and dosimetric concerns.

  3. Breakout from the hot CNO cycle: the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}) and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradfield-Smith, W.; Laird, A.M.; Davinson, T.; Pietro, A. di; Ostrowski, A.N.; Shotter, A.C.; Woods, P.J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cherubini, S.; Galster, W.; Graulich, J.S.; Leleux, P.; Michel, L.; Ninane, A.; Vervier, J. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Aliotta, M.; Cali, D.; Cappussello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Catania (Italy); Gorres, J.; Wiescher, M. [Notre Dame Univ. (United States); Rahighi, J. [Van de Graaf Lab., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hinnefeld, J. [Indiana Univ., South Bend (United States)

    1998-06-01

    One of the most important reactions which determines the rate of breakout from the hot CNO cycle is the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne. The reaction {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na may also provide an alternative breakout route. Experiments are being undertaken at Louvain-La-Neuve using the radioactive {sup 18}Ne beam to study these reactions by measurement of {alpha}({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 21}Na and d({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 19}Ne{sup *} {yields} {sup 15}O + {alpha} (orig.)

  4. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Duong, H.H.

    1996-05-01

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He 3 RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail

  5. In-situ Measurements and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.F.; Ilie, G.; Russ, W.R.; Lange, H.J.; Rotty, M.

    2013-06-01

    The measurement and quantification of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) is an important element of workplace radioprotection in key industries such as oil and gas production, heavy metals mining and refining, coal burning waste, and water treatment. Monitoring of NORM content in home building materials is another challenge for human safety in the prevention of chronic dose uptake. Materials are classified NORM in case they contain significant amounts of the decay chains of U-238 (Ra-226 as a long lived daughter), U-235 or Th- 232 or the primordial nuclide K-40. Due to the decay of the radionuclides, gamma rays with a signature in the energy range from 45 keV up to 2615 keV are emitted. The most accurate method to measure NORM in a sample is to use a high resolution spectrometric instrument such as a germanium detector in a well-shielded laboratory environment. The shield is used to prevent background with the same signature from the building material of the laboratory. There are occasions in which one is required to assay samples in the field. These in situ field applications may require performing measurements with reduced (or no) background shielding conditions, or involve the use of medium resolution spectrometric instruments such as LaBr 3 or NaI detectors. In-situ analyses such as these have increased complexity. The reduced shielding enforces the subtraction of NORM events produced from the environment but the sample material and container can also shield the detector against this background thus biasing the measured results if not appropriately accounted. The use of medium resolution detectors has additional complications that the multiplicity of gamma-rays from NORM materials is such that most of the gamma-rays are interfering and thus require a very careful quantitative analysis. In this presentation, we will discuss the details of the NORM source term both in the environment and what could potentially be in the sample. We will also discuss

  6. A DEVICE TO MEASURE LOW LEVELS OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS IN ULTRA-CLEAN MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James H Reeves; Matthew Kauer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a radiation detection device so sensitive that a decay rate of only one atom per 11.57 days per kilogram of material could be detected. Such a detector is needed for screening materials that will be used in exotic high energy physics experiments currently being planned for the near future. The research was performed deep underground at the Underground Mine State Park in Soudan, Minnesota. The overburden there is ∼1800 meters water equivalent. The reason for performing the research at such depth was to vastly reduce the effects of cosmic radiation. The flux of muons and fast neutrons is about 100,000 times lower than at the surface. A small clean room quality lab building was constructed so that work could be performed in such a manner that radioactive contamination could be kept at a minimum. Glove boxes filled with dry nitrogen gas were used to further reduce contamination from dirt and also help reduce the concentration of the radioactive gas 222Ra and daughter radionuclides which are normally present in air. A massive lead shield (about 20 tons) was constructed in such a manner that an eight inch cube of space in the center was available for the sample and detector. The innermost 4 inch thick lead walls were made of ∼460 year old lead previously used in double beta decay experiments and known to be virtually free of 210Pb. A one and one half inch thick shell of active plastic scintillator was imbedded in the center of the 16 inch thick lead walls, ceiling, and floor of the shield and is used to help reduce activity due to the few muons and fast neutrons seen at this depth. The thick lead shielding was necessary to shield the detector from gamma rays emitted by radionuclides in the rock walls of the mine. A sealable chamber was constructed and located on top of the shield that included a device for raising and lowering the detector and samples into and out of the center chamber of the shield. A plastic scintillator

  7. A study of jet rates and measurement of [alpha][sub S] at the Z[sup 0] resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling [alpha][sub s](M[sub Z][sup o]) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z[sup 0] decays in e[sup +] e[sup [minus

  8. Monazite: a new, natural, radioactive measurement for the treatment of rheumatic, dermatoses and other allergic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Pupo, J. de

    1981-01-01

    Monazite: a new, natural, radioactive medication for the treatment of rheumatism, dermatosis and other allergic diseases. The cure of rheumatic and other diseases observed during the last 40 years by ordinary people at the beaches of monazitic sand in the town Guarapari, was confirmed by local physicians and visitors of the great radioaclimatic station. The effects of the medication, imputed to the local radioactivity by the great Brazilian doctor Silva Mello, were confirmed by two physicists of the Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, the Jesuit priests Roser and Cullen, after careful physical determinations of the radioactivity resultant from thorium oxide, which is present at a rate of 6.4%. This new and inocuous medicament, unknown in the annals of medical biology, is divulged in the present paper, suggesting new and interesting medico-social studies to our young doctors. (author) [pt

  9. Emergency measures and treatment in the event of accidental aver exposure to radiation or of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammet, H.

    1960-01-01

    In the first part the author presents an overall view of emergency measures to be applied in the case of internal or external radioactive contamination. He states in particular, in these two cases, the methods by which it is possible to eliminate the contaminating radioactive substances from the organism. The author then considers the therapeutic methods to be adopted in the case of an accident of overexposure to radiation, distinguishing between the case of a partial irradiation and that of an acute total irradiation. There will be essentially three methods used depending on the physical measures carried out (irradiation, conditions, estimation of the dose received) and of the clinical data collected: particular treatments, treatment for helping the organism during its return to normal activity, temporary or permanent replacement of the organs affected. (author) [fr

  10. Comparative overview of dangers, protective measures and risks for the final disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the anticipated risks of geological disposal of radioactive wastes and to compare these to 'conventional' risks, which voluntarily or involuntarily are associated with human activities and have accompanied mankind for long times. Radioactive wastes which result from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear reactors as well as those originating from research, industrial and medical applications necessitate prolonged isolation from the biosphere to their long-lived, although decaying, toxicity. Chapter 2 of this report contains a survey of the nature and extent of the potential hazard of radioactive waste, drawing attention to the fact that the toxicity of radionuclides is comparable to that of nonradioactive chemical compounds. The possibility of adverse effects on the public cannot be ruled out for either kind of waste. Current plans aim at the safe and effective disposal of radioactive wastes in deep and stable geological formations which should serve as hosts for engineered final repositories. For a final repository to be suitable, the site chosen should be free from circulating groundwater or the free movement of the groundwater must be strongly restricted. In order to prevent radioactive substances migrating away from the final repository in which they have been placed, it is planned to utilise natural and man-made barriers which function largely independently from each other. Thorough knowledge of the properties of man-made barriers, is as important as knowledge of the natural barriers, which are determined by the geology and hydrogeology of the site of the final repository. This principle of protection is known as a 'multiple-barrier concept' and is considered capable of providing safe disposal of radioactive wastes

  11. Ternary fission and cluster radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W; Gherghescu, R A; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2002-01-01

    Ternary fission yield for different kinds of light particle accompanied fission processes is compared to the Q-values for the corresponding cold phenomena, showing a striking correlation. The experimental evidence for the existence of a quasimolecular state in sup 1 sup 0 Be accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf may be explained using a three-center phenomenological model which generates a third minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. This model is a natural extension of the unified approach to three groups of binary decay modes (cold fission, cluster radioactivities and alpha decay), illustrated by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 U decay modes, and the alpha valley on the potential energy surfaces of sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Te. New measurements of cluster decay modes, confirming earlier predictions within analytical superasymmetric fission model, are included in a comprehensive half-life systematics. (authors)

  12. A study of jet rates and measurement of {alpha}{sub S} at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays in e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} annihilations. The relative jet rates are obtained using the JADE-type algorithms. The results are compared with the jet rates obtained from a new jet algorithm proposed by N. Brown et al. called the ``Durham`` algorithm. The data can be well described by O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) QCD calculations and by QCD shower model calculations. A fit of the theoretical predictions to the data taken with the SLD yields a value, {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) = 0.120 {plus_minus} 0.002(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.003(exp.){sub {minus}0.009}{sup +0.011}(theor.). The error is dominated by the theoretical uncertainties. The measurement is compared with results from other experiments and it is shown that the value obtained for {alpha}{sub s} agrees well with these results and furthermore supports the evidence for the running of the strong coupling, consistent with the non-Abelian nature of QCD. The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) can deliver partially longitudinally polarized electrons to the interaction point. Jet production rates and values for {alpha}{sub s} are calculated both for right-handed and left-handed initial state electrons. All results are consistent with the unpolarized result, as predicted by the Standard Model.

  13. Alpha-in-air monitor for continuous monitoring based on alpha to beta ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayaji, K.S.; Venkataramani, R.; Swaminathan, N.; Pushparaja

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of long-lived alpha activity collected on a filter paper in continuous air monitoring of ambient working environment is difficult due to interference from much larger concentrations of short-lived alpha emitting daughter products of 222 Rn and 220 Rn. However, the ratio between the natural alpha and beta activity is approximately constant and this constancy of the ratio is used to discriminate against short-lived natural radioactivity in continuous air monitoring. Detection system was specially designed for the purpose of simultaneous counting of alpha and beta activity deposited on the filter paper during continuous monitoring. The activity ratios were calculated and plotted against the monitoring duration up to about six hours. Monitoring was carried out in three facilities with different ventilation conditions. Presence of any long-lived alpha contamination on the filter paper results in increase in the alpha to beta ratio. Long-lived 239 Pu contamination of about 16 DAC.h could be detected after about 45 minutes of commencement of the sampling. The experimental results using prototype units have shown that the approach of using alpha to beta activity ratio method to detect long-lived alpha activity in the presence of short-lived natural activity is satisfactory. (author)

  14. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  15. Measurements of the radioactivity of power plant by-products processed into construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, S.A.; Dudelewski, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of the recycling of residual products comprising, inter alia, fly ash and slags accuring from the combustion of black and brown coal in modern coal dust boilers in the power industry has been topical for a number of years. Numerous discussions and articles in technical periodicals and the daily press have revolved around the problem of the radioactivity of construction materials or construction elements obtained from fly ash or slags of power plant. In Poland, this was a forbidden subject until the publication in 1980 by the Warsaw institute of construction technology of standard no. 234 entitled: 'Recommendations for establishing the natural radioactivity of products processed into construction materials'. (orig.) [de

  16. Simultaneous Measurements of Nanoaerosols and Radioactive Aerosols Containing the Short-lived Radon Isotopes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, P.P.S.; Burian, I.; Ondráček, Jakub; Ždímal, Vladimír; Holub, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 5 (2017), s. 53-56 ISSN 0144-8420. [Conference on Protection against Radon at Home and at Work / 13th International Workshop on the Geological Aspects of Radon Risk Mapping /8./. Prague, 12.09.2017-16.09.2017] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : equilibrium-equivalent concentration * radon * radioactive nenoaerosols Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2016

  17. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively.

  18. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min

    2015-01-01

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively

  19. Radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms. Current measured values (State: 2014); Radioaktive Kontamination von Speisepilzen. Aktuelle Messwerte (Stand: 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabai, Eva; Hiersche, Lydia

    2015-09-15

    The report on the radioactive contamination of different wild edible mushrooms in southern Germany summarizes the actual situation in 2014 in comparison with the data since 2005. The mushrooms were fund in the regions contaminated as a consequence of the reactor accident in Chernobyl 1986. The data for Cs-137 and K-40 contamination of a large amount of wild edible mushrooms are tabulated for different sampling sites. Measured data of the years 2004 to 2013 are included.

  20. Risk analysis and protective measures for occupationally workers with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, R.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Elevated concentrations of these radionuclides are often found in certain geological materials, namely igneous rocks and ores. Human activities that exploit these resources may lead to enhanced concentrations of radionuclides (often referred to as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TE-NORM). Enhanced levels of natural background radiation are encountered in many occupational industrial activities involving a large number of workers. Uncontrolled activities associated with TE-NORM can contaminate the environment and pose a risk to human health. This risk can be alleviated by the adoption of controls to identify where NORM is present; and cleaning the NORM-contaminated equipment and waste management while protecting workers. The main objective of this study is to investigate the natural radioactivity and the hazard parameters in the TE-NORM samples from different industrial activities. Also to describe the models and develop the computer codes that allow one to estimate the risk of cancer resulting from any specified dose of ionizing radiation for occupationally workers in different industrial activities. The present study deals with 50 different samples. This waste generated from petroleum fields, phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples. The radon exhalation rates calculated using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radon exhalation rate 58.82±5.3 x10 3 , 4.28±0.49 x10 3 and 0.306±0.025 x10 3 Bq/m 2 h for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The value of radon exhalation rate 82.67±7.98, 62.58 ±5.7, 46.16 ±3.91 and 198.51±18.68 Bq/m 2 h for phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples, respectively. The 226 Ra activity concentrations were 301.4±771.5, 52.1±438 and 2.56±55.37 kBq/kg for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The

  1. Distortion in simulated alpha and FWHM measurements on OS-40 oscilloscopes linked in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, T.L.

    1975-01-01

    When a prompt diagnostic signal of the type recorded in underground nuclear tests is fed into a chain of OS-40 amplifiers linked in series, it is not recorded exactly the same from one oscilloscope to the next. This report describes a study in which a particular configuration of OS-40 oscilloscopes was used to record simulated alpha signals ranging from 2000 to more than 4000 μsec -1 and pulses having a FWHM of approximately 10 nsec. Alpha values of less than or equal to 2000 μsec -1 were recorded adequately by the stacked oscilloscopes, whereas for alpha values of 4000 μsec -1 and greater, serious degradation in the data was observed on all but the first scope in the chain. Peak width studies seem to indicate some broadening in the recorded FWHM the farther one proceeds along the oscillator chain.(U.S.)

  2. Autoradiographic measurement of low concentrations of alpha-active nuclides using CR-39 track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, K.; Dietze, K.; Weisse, S.; Kummer, G.

    1991-01-01

    An autoradiographic method for the determination of alpha emission rates from plastic packaging materials for VLSI silicon memory devices based on long-time exposure of the samples on CR-39 detectors has been tested. The lower limit of detection will be strongly influenced by the background of the detector material and amounts at times to 0.002 alpha particles cm -2 h -1 after 200 days exposure. A mathematical method for the interpretation of very low track densities is discussed. The first results of its application are presented. (author)

  3. Measuring relative humidity in the radioactive environment of the IRRAD proton facility

    CERN Document Server

    Paerg, Marten

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the project was to obtain information on relative humidity conditions at different locations in the IRRAD proton facility. Due to high radiation levels inside the facility, different sensors had to be qualified and dedicated electronics had to be built to transfer the data of the sensors over long wires to a less radioactive area, where it could be collected.

  4. Flow measurements of the kidney after selective administration of radioactive xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of perfusion studies in the kidney through the renal artery in human subjects, after selective administration of the inert radioactive gas Xenon-133. The examinations have been carried out in conjunction with renal angiography. From October 1979 to May 1981, a total of 150 studies have been performed in 86 patients. (Auth.)

  5. Criteria and measurement techniques applicable to residual radioactivity on a decommissioned reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollam, P.B.

    1988-12-01

    This document summarises the radiological criteria which might be developed to cover the release of a partly decommissioned nuclear reactor site, then looks at the techniques available by which the site could be monitored to assure compliance with these criteria. In particular, the implications of existing levels of radioactive contamination resulting from airburst nuclear weapons tests and the Chernobyl accident are discussed. (author)

  6. Radioactivity measurement of soil and vegetables contaminated from low level radioactive fall out arised from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. A study on Institute for Sustainable Agro-ecosystem Services, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshita, Seiichi; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Tanoi, Keitaro; Makino, Yoshio; Yasunaga, Eriko; Takata, Daisuke; Sasaki, Haruto

    2011-01-01

    After the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant, vegetables were grown at an experimental farm of Nishi-Tokyo City in Tokyo, which was located about 230km away from the power plant. The outer leaves of cabbages and leaves of potatoes were taken after 47 and 40 days, respectively, and the radioactivity of 134 Cs and 137 Cs was measured. The total radioactivity of 134 Cs and 137 Cs in both plants was less than 9Bq/kg, which was far lower than that of the regulated value, 500Bq/kg, for human to intake. The radioactivity of soil was about 130Bq/kg, less than that of the natural activity of 40 K, about 290Bq/kg. The difference of the radioactivity image of cabbage outer leaves, washed and without washing, was not observed using an imaging plate. (author)

  7. Validation of fast-ion D-alpha spectrum measurements during EAST neutral-beam heated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J., E-mail: juan.huang@ipp.ac.cn; Wu, C. R.; Hou, Y. M.; Chang, J. F.; Ding, S. Y.; Chen, Y. J.; Jin, Z.; Xu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wang, J. F.; Lyu, B.; Zang, Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Hu, L.; Wan, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, 230031 Hefei, Anhui (China); Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.; Zhu, Y. B. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Hellermann, M. G. von [Diagnostic Team, ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the fast ion behavior, a fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic system has been installed on EAST. Fast ion features can be inferred from the Doppler shifted spectrum of Balmer-alpha light from energetic hydrogenic atoms. This paper will focus on the validation of FIDA measurements performed using MHD-quiescent discharges in 2015 campaign. Two codes have been applied to calculate the D{sub α} spectrum: one is a Monte Carlo code, Fortran 90 version FIDASIM, and the other is an analytical code, Simulation of Spectra (SOS). The predicted SOS fast-ion spectrum agrees well with the measurement; however, the level of fast-ion part from FIDASIM is lower. The discrepancy is possibly due to the difference between FIDASIM and SOS velocity distribution function. The details will be presented in the paper to primarily address comparisons of predicted and observed spectrum shapes/amplitudes.

  8. Measurement of natural radioactivity in building materials of Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India using gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, R; Vanasundari, K; Chandrasekaran, A; Rajalakshmi, A; Suganya, M; Vijayagopal, P; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2012-04-01

    The natural level of radioactivity in building materials is one of the major causes of external exposure to γ-rays. The primordial radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the radioactivity level in building materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the specific activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in commonly used building materials from Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India, using gamma-ray spectrometer. The radiation hazard due to the total natural radioactivity in the studied building materials was estimated by different approaches. The concentrations of the natural radionuclides and the radium equivalent activity in studied samples were compared with the corresponding results of different countries. From the analysis, it is found that these materials may be safely used as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of Gs-alpha activating mutations in human thyroid tumors measured by subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelov, V N; Gyenes, M; Neser, F; Röher, H D; Goretzki, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the search for the prevalence and distribution pattern of Gs-alpha gene mutations in differentiated thyroid tumors we examined 66 tumor tissue samples for the presence of mutations at "hot-spot" codons 201 and 227 using methods based on the polymerase chain reaction, subcloning and sequencing. The prevailing type of single-base substitution at codon 201 (71.4%) corresponded to the replacement of the wild-type sequence CGT (Arg) with TGT (Cys). The fragments of the Gs-alpha gene, including codon 201 or 227 from five follicular carcinomas and one follicular adenoma, were subcloned in Escherichia coli and it was found that the proportion of alleles with mutated codon 201 varied from 3.2% to 43%. Sequencing of the corresponding region has confirmed preliminary data indicating that the single-base changes CGT (Arg) to TGT (Cys) or CGT to CAT (His) occurred. There was only a weak correlation between the prevalence of cells bearing a mutation in the Gs-alpha gene and the level of Gs-alpha protein expression in the corresponding thyroid tumors.

  10. CO2 laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for fusion product alpha particle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, R. K.; Bennett, C. A.; Fletcher, L. K.; Hunter, H. T.; Hutchinson, D. P.

    1988-08-01

    A description of a CO2 laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for fusion product alpha particles is presented. Scattering calculations based on CIT plasma parameters are presented and compared to previous work based on TFTR parameters. System components are described and a proof-of-principle test in a nonburning plasma is discussed.

  11. A CO2 laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for fusion product alpha particle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, R. K.; Bennett, C. A.; Fletcher, L. K.; Hunter, H. T.; Hutchinson, D. P.

    A description of a CO2 laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for fusion alpha particles is presented. Scattering calculations based on CIT plasma parameters are presented and compared to previous work based on TFTR parameters. Systems components are described and a proof-of-principle test in a nonburning plasma is discussed.

  12. Test-retest reliability of frontal alpha electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) measures in adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegust, Adira K; Mathewson, Karen J; Schmidt, Louis A

    2014-12-01

    A number of studies have shown that the pattern of resting frontal EEG alpha power and asymmetry and heart rate are predictive of individual differences in affective style in children and adults. Although test-retest reliability of frontal electrocortical and autonomic measures has been established in adult and child and some clinical populations, few studies have examined test-retest reliability of these measures in adolescents. Here, we conducted a pilot study to examine the test-retest reliability of frontal EEG alpha power and asymmetry and heart period and heart rate in 10 typically developing adolescent participants (M age = 15.9 years) over a 1 month period. We found acceptable test-retest reliability using Pearson and intra-class correlations in left and right mid-frontal alpha power and asymmetry and heart period and heart rate over 1 month. These results provide initial evidence for acceptable levels of test-retest reliability in central and peripheral psychophysiological measures in adolescents used to index affective style in children and adults. Future studies are needed with a larger sample to ensure the reliability of these results.

  13. Benchmark and combined velocity-space tomography of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy and collective Thomson scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.

    2016-01-01

    measurements without using a numerical simulation as common reference. Combined velocity-space tomographies from FIDA and CTS measurements confirm that sawtooth crashes reduce the fast-ion phase-space densities in the plasma center and affect ions with pitches close to one more strongly than those with pitches......We demonstrate the combination of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy (FIDA) and collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements to determine a common best estimate of the fastion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography. We further demonstrate a benchmark of FIDA tomography and CTS...

  14. Measuring physical activity-related environmental factors: reliability and predictive validity of the European environmental questionnaire ALPHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppert Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A questionnaire to assess physical activity related environmental factors in the European population (a 49-item and an 11-item version was created as part of the framework of the EU-funded project "Instruments for Assessing Levels of PHysical Activity and fitness (ALPHA". This paper reports on the development and assessment of the questionnaire's test-retest stability, predictive validity, and applicability to European adults. Methods The first pilot test was conducted in Belgium, France and the UK. In total 190 adults completed both forms of the ALPHA questionnaire twice with a one-week interval. Physical activity was concurrently measured (i by administration of the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ by interview and (ii by accelerometry (Actigraph™ device. After adaptations, the second field test took place in Belgium, the UK and Austria; 166 adults completed the adapted questionnaire at two time points, with minimum one-week interval. In both field studies intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC and proportion of agreement were computed to assess the stability of the two test scores. Predictive validity was examined in the first field test by correlating the results of the questionnaires with physical activity data from accelerometry and long IPAQ-last 7 days. Results The reliability scores of the ALPHA questionnaire were moderate-to good in the first field testing (ICC range 0.66 - 0.86 and good in the second field testing (ICC range 0.71 - 0.87. The proportion of agreement for the ALPHA short increased significantly from the first (range 50 - 83% to the second field testing (range 85 - 95%. Environmental scales from both versions of the ALPHA questionnaire were significantly associated with self-reported minutes of transport-related walking, and objectively measured low intensity physical activity levels, particularly in women. Both versions were easily administered with an

  15. A mathematical model to determine incorporated quantities of radioactivity from the measured photometric values of tritium-autoradiographs in neuroanatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennissen, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical/empirical model developed in this paper helps to determine the incorporated radioactivity from the measured photometric values and the exposure time T. Possible errors of autoradiography due to the exposure time or the preparation are taken into consideration by the empirical model. It is shown that the error of appr. 400% appearing in the sole comparison of the measured photometric values can be corrected. The model is valid for neuroanatomy as optical nerves, i.e. neuroanatomical material, were used to develop it. Its application also to the other sections of the central nervous system seems to be justified due to the reduction of errors thus achieved. (orig.) [de

  16. Problems and management of radioactive sources and measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear materials in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strezov, A.

    1998-01-01

    Illicit trafficking of nuclear materials continues to pose a danger to public health and safety and to nuclear non proliferation efforts. The majority of cases so far have involved only small amounts of fissile materials or mainly radioactive sources in Bulgaria. A proper scheme for analysis of seized nuclear materials will be developed based on existing equipment for NDA analysis of nuclear materials supplemented by new system through PHARE project assistance by EU experts. (author)

  17. Measures to detect and control radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap at border checkpoints in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smagala, G.

    1999-01-01

    The issue of radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap has never received a high priority in Poland and in the international community. Since the dissolution of the former Soviet Union a higher attention has been given to the problem. Poland which is located between the West and East Europe has the obligation to develop and implement an effective prevention and detection system. The reasons to increase national control and detection system at the border checkpoints in Poland are to avoid the following risks: post Chernobyl contamination transports of commodities; transport of contaminated metal scrap; transfer of radioactive waste for their disposal or utilization; high risk of becoming a transit country of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources. In order to avoid the above-mentioned risks, Poland initiated in 1990, a deployment of the portable radiation devices at the border checkpoints and, as of 1998, the number of installed instruments exceeded a hundred. This paper presents Poland's activities to detect contaminated scrap at its border checkpoints. (author)

  18. Use of flow scintillation analyzer combined with amino acid analyzer for measuring low-level radioactivity of tritium-labelled amino acids

    CERN Document Server

    Lukashina, E V; Fedoseev, V M; Ksenofontov, A L; Baratova, L A; Dobrov, E N

    2002-01-01

    Potential application of the Radiomatic 150TR Flow Scintillation Analyzer (Packard Instrument Co., USA) for measuring low radioactivity of tritium-labelled amino acids in eluate from the Amino Acid Analyzer 835 (Hitachi, Japan) was studied. Six scintillating cocktails were tested and the Hionic-Fluor and Ultima-Flo AP cocktails proved the most appropriate for flow measurement of radioactivity. Efficiency of tritium radioactivity recording under various conditions of analysis was determined. Under optimal conditions the lower detection limit for the Hionic-Fluor was 150, while for Ultima-Flo AP-100 decays/min in the peak of amino acid

  19. Distribution of radioactive constituents in river waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, M.; Elejalde, C.; Legarda, F.; Romero, F.

    1994-01-01

    For a research project on the distribution and evaluation of natural and artificial radioactive constituents in ecological segments of Biscay (northeast spain), the amounts of nuclides present in the main river waters were measured. Radioactive procedures include i) total alpha and beta indexes with a gas flow detector, dry residues near to 2 and 10 mg/ cm sup 2, respectively and counting periods of 1000 mn, ii) gamma emitters with a low level gamma spectrometer (Ge-HP detector + 8000 channels analyser) using the dry residue from 8 litres and a counting period of 4 days and iii) statistical treatment of data at 95% confidence.In this paper, ten water samples from the nervion river basin are included. Physical and chemical parameters of samples were also determined by standard procedures, because there is a sharp change in the composition of this river in the first part of the course. Radioactive constituents were identified as follows: a sample has a detectable alpha index, all samples contains beta emitters with a high variability, natural nuclides from uranium and thorium families were detected in some cases. A parallel behaviour is found between samples where K-40 and Cs-137 were found. The paper tries at last to find relations among chemical and radioactive constituents by the application of multivariate statistical methods, specially for the case of Cs-137, the only artificial nuclide identified in this work. 1 tab., 2 figs., 5 refs. (author)

  20. Results of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Member States of the European Community for air - deposition - water - milk - 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The present document is the seventeenth report published by the Health and Safety Directorate of the Commission of the European Communities concerning ambient radioactivity. It was drawn up using the data collected by the stations responsible for environmental radioactivity monitoring in the Member States. The results are extracts from the data sent to the Commission in application of Article 36 of the Treaty of Rome establishing the European Atomic Energy Community. The results presented in this report deal with radioactive contamination of the air, precipitation and fallout, surface water and milk during 1977 in the nine Member States of the European Community, viz. Belgium, Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The report also contains supplementary data on short-lived radioelements detected during the fourth quarter of 1977, the list of sampling stations and laboratories together With a list of publications by Member States in this field. This report places special emphasis on the measurement results for specific radionuclides, but it also contains data on total beta activity so as to ensure continuity vis-a-vis previous reports and provide comparative values