WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha motifs regulate

  1. In vivo Regulation of the Allergic Response by the Interleukin 4 Receptor Alpha Chain Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Inhibitory Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Khatib, Shadi Al; Schwinglshackl, Andreas; Kim, Hong Sook; Chen, Andrew; Blasioli, Julie; Mathias, Clinton; Kim, Hye-Young; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.; Chatila, Talal A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Signaling by IL-4 and IL-13 via the IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4Rα) plays a critical role in the pathology of allergic diseases. The IL-4Rα is endowed with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM), centered on tyrosine 709 (Y709) in the cytoplasmic domain, that binds a number of regulatory phosphatases. The function of the ITIM in the in vivo regulation of IL-4R signaling remains unknown. Objective To determine the in vivo function of the IL-4Rα ITIM using mice in which the ITIM was inactivated by mutagenesis of the tyrosine Y709 residue into phenylalanine (F709). Methods F709 ITIM mutant mice were derived by knockin mutagenesis. Activation of intracellular signaling cascades by IL-4 and IL-13 was assessed by intracellular staining of phosphorylated signaling intermediates and by gene expression analysis. In vivo responses to allergic sensitization were assessed using models of allergic airway inflammation. Results The F709 mutation increased STAT6 phosphorylation by IL-4 and, disproportionately, by IL-13. This was associated with exaggerated Th2 polarization, enhanced alternative macrophage activation by IL-13, augmented basal and antigen-induced IgE responses and intensified allergen-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Conclusions These results point to a physiologic negative regulatory role for the Y709 ITIM in signaling via IL-4Rα, especially by IL-13. PMID:20392476

  2. Human sterile alpha motif domain 9, a novel gene identified as down-regulated in aggressive fibromatosis, is absent in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Sherilyn

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neoplasia can be driven by mutations resulting in dysregulation of transcription. In the mesenchymal neoplasm, aggressive fibromatosis, subtractive hybridization identified sterile alpha motif domain 9 (SAMD9 as a substantially down regulated gene in neoplasia. SAMD9 was recently found to be mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. In this study, we studied the gene structure and function of SAMD9, and its paralogous gene, SAMD9L, and examined these in a variety of species. Results SAMD9 is located on human chromosome 7q21.2 with a paralogous gene sterile alpha motif domain 9 like (SAMD9L in the head-to-tail orientation. Although both genes are present in a variety of species, the orthologue for SAMD9 is lost in the mouse lineage due to a unique genomic rearrangement. Both SAMD9 and SAMD9L are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. SAMD9 is expressed at a lower level in a variety of neoplasms associated with β-catenin stabilization, such as aggressive fibromatosis, breast, and colon cancers. SAMD9 and SAMD9L contain an amino-terminal SAM domain, but the remainder of the predicted protein structure does not exhibit substantial homology to other known protein motifs. The putative protein product of SAMD9 localizes to the cytoplasm. In vitro data shows that SAMD9 negatively regulates cell proliferation. Over expression of SAMD9 in the colon cancer cell line, SW480, reduces the volume of tumors formed when transplanted into immune-deficient mice. Conclusion SAMD9 and SAMD9L are a novel family of genes, which play a role regulating cell proliferation and suppressing the neoplastic phenotype. This is the first report as far as we know about a human gene that exists in rat, but is lost in mouse, due to a mouse specific rearrangement, resulting in the loss of the SAMD9 gene.

  3. Litopenaeus vannamei sterile-alpha and armadillo motif containing protein (LvSARM is involved in regulation of Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated NF-κB pathway is tightly controlled because overactivation may result in severe damage to the host, such as in the case of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. In mammals, sterile-alpha and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM plays an important role in negatively regulating this pathway. While Caenorhabditis elegans SARM is crucial for an efficient immune response against bacterial and fungal infections, it is still unknown whether Drosophila SARM participates in immune responses. Here, Litopenaeus vannamei SARM (LvSARM was cloned and functionally characterized. LvSARM shared signature domains with and exhibited significant similarities to mammalian SARM. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the expression of LvSARM was responsive to Vibrio alginolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infections in the hemocyte, gill, hepatopancreas and intestine. In Drosophila S2 cells, LvSARM was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and could significantly inhibit the promoters of the NF-κB pathway-controlled antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs. Silencing of LvSARM using dsRNA-mediated RNA interference increased the expression levels of Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors, which are L.vannamei AMPs, and increased the mortality rate after V. alginolyticus infection. Taken together, our results reveal that LvSARM may be a novel component of the shrimp Toll pathway that negatively regulates shrimp AMPs, particularly Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors.

  4. Alpha-actinin structure and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, B; Salmazo, A; Djinović-Carugo, K

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-actinin is a cytoskeletal actin-binding protein and a member of the spectrin superfamily, which comprises spectrin, dystrophin and their homologues and isoforms. It forms an anti-parallel rod-shaped dimer with one actin-binding domain at each end of the rod and bundles actin filaments in multiple cell-type and cytoskeleton frameworks. In non-muscle cells, alpha-actinin is found along the actin filaments and in adhesion sites. In striated, cardiac and smooth muscle cells, it is localized at the Z-disk and analogous dense bodies, where it forms a lattice-like structure and stabilizes the muscle contractile apparatus. Besides binding to actin filaments alpha-actinin associates with a number of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, rendering it important structural and regulatory roles in cytoskeleton organization and muscle contraction. This review reports on the current knowledge on structure and regulation of alpha-actinin.

  5. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous...

  6. Binding of human prothymosin alpha to the leucine-motif/activation domains of HTLV-I Rex and HIV-1 Rev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Adachi, Y; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S

    1995-10-01

    Rex of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and Rev of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) are post-transcriptional regulators of viral gene expression. By means of affinity chromatography, we purified an 18-kDa cellular protein that bound to the conserved leucine-motif/activation domain of HTLV-I Rex or HIV-1 Rev. The protein that was purified through a Rev-affinity column was found to bind to Rex immunoprecipitated with anti-Rex IgG from an HTLV-I-producing cell line. We analyzed the purified approximately 18-kDa protein biochemically and identified it as prothymosin alpha. The binding activity of prothymosin alpha to Rev or Rex was completely abolished when the epsilon-amino groups of its lysine residues were chemically modified by N-succinimidyl-3-(4-hydroxy-3,5-diodo- phenyl)propionate. The functional relationship between the nuclear protein prothymosin alpha and Rex-Rev is discussed.

  7. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  8. Sumoylation regulates nuclear localization of lipin-1alpha in neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hui Liu

    Full Text Available Lipin-1 is a protein that has dual functions as a phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAP and a nuclear transcriptional coactivator. It remains unknown how the nuclear localization and coactivator functions of lipin-1 are regulated. Here, we show that lipin-1 (including both the alpha and beta isoforms is modified by sumoylation at two consensus sumoylation sites. We are unable to detect sumoylation of the related proteins lipin-2 and lipin-3. Lipin-1 is sumoylated at relatively high levels in brain, where lipin-1alpha is the predominant form. In cultured embryonic cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, ectopically expressed lipin-1alpha is localized in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the nuclear localization is abrogated by mutating the consensus sumyolation motifs. The sumoylation site mutant of lipin-1alpha loses the capacity to coactivate the transcriptional (co- activators PGC-1alpha and MEF2, consistent with its nuclear exclusion. Thus, these results show that sumoylation facilitates the nuclear localization and transcriptional coactivator behavior of lipin-1alpha that we observe in cultured neuronal cells, and suggest that lipin-1alpha may act as a sumoylation-regulated transcriptional coactivator in brain.

  9. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2014-05-29

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acidmotifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs. © 2014 Biochemical Society.

  10. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn [Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory of Molecular Neurosurgery and Biotechnology, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Stevens, Victoria L. [Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Owens, Timothy R. [Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Oyesiku, Nelson M., E-mail: noyesik@emory.edu [Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory of Molecular Neurosurgery and Biotechnology, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  11. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  12. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  13. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Céspedes

    Full Text Available Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum were identified in the P. vivax genome. The peptides identified in silico were chemically synthesized; circular dichroism studies indicated partial or high α-helical content. Antigenicity was evaluated using human sera samples from malaria-endemic areas of Colombia and Papua New Guinea. Eight of these fragments were selected and used to assess immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. ELISA assays indicated strong reactivity of serum samples from individuals residing in malaria-endemic regions and sera of immunized mice, with the α-helical coiled coil structures. In addition, ex vivo production of IFN-γ by murine mononuclear cells confirmed the immunogenicity of these structures and the presence of T-cell epitopes in the peptide sequences. Moreover, sera of mice immunized with four of the eight antigens recognized native proteins on blood-stage P. vivax parasites, and antigenic cross-reactivity with three of the peptides was observed when reacted with both the P. falciparum orthologous fragments and whole parasites. Results here point to the α-helical coiled coil peptides as possible P. vivax malaria vaccine candidates as were observed for P. falciparum. Fragments selected here warrant further study in humans and non-human primate models to assess their protective efficacy as single components or assembled as hybrid linear epitopes.

  14. A TGACGT motif in the 5'-upstream region of alpha-amylase gene from Vigna mungo is a cis-element for expression in cotyledons of germinated seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, D

    2001-06-01

    Alpha-amylase is expressed at high levels in cotyledons of germinated seeds of Vigna mungo. The mRNA for alpha-amylase appeared in cotyledons of the seeds at 1 d after imbibition started (DAI). Two TGACGT motifs at -445 and at -125 in the promoter region of the gene interacted with nuclear proteins from cotyledons of dry seeds and the activities were detected until 3 DAI. A transient assay with particle bombardment showed that the downstream region from -135 in the promoter was required for high level expression in the cotyledons and the activity was reduced by mutation of the TGACGT motif at -125. The activities to bind the TGACGT motifs were detected in the axes of the seeds at 1 DAI but disappeared at 4 DAI, although the mRNA for alpha-amylase in the axes appeared at 4 DAI and increased in level by 6 DAI. A transient assay experiment showed that a positive regulatory element for the expression in the axes was located in the region from -630 to -453. These results indicated that the TGACGT motif at -125 was required for high level expression of the gene in the cotyledons of the germinated seeds.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKKEE), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  16. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  17. Mutation of FVS1, encoding a protein with a sterile alpha motif domain, affects asexual reproduction in the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Tsuge, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Fusarium oxysporum produces three kinds of asexual spores: microconidia, macroconidia and chlamydospores. We previously analysed expressed sequence tags during vegetative growth and conidiation in F. oxysporum and found 42 genes that were markedly upregulated during conidiation compared to vegetative growth. One of the genes, FVS1, encodes a protein with a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, which functions in protein-protein interactions that are involved in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. Here, we made FVS1-disrupted mutants from the melon wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis. Although the mutants produced all three kinds of asexual spores with normal morphology, they formed markedly fewer microconidia and macroconidia than the wild type. The mutants appeared to have a defect in the development of the conidiogenesis cells, conidiophores and phialides, required for the formation of microconidia and macroconidia. In contrast, chlamydospore formation was dramatically promoted in the mutants. The growth rates of the mutants on media were slightly reduced, indicating that FVS1 is also involved in, but not essential for, vegetative growth. We also observed that mutation of FVS1 caused defects in conidial germination and virulence, suggesting that the Fvs1 has pleiotropic functions in F. oxysporum.

  18. Trans-Regulation of RNA-Binding Protein Motifs by MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eTenenbaum

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The wide array of vital functions that RNA performs is dependent on its ability to dynamically fold into different structures in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. RNA-binding proteins regulate much of this activity by targeting specific RNA structures or motifs. One of these structures, the 3-way RNA junction, is characteristically found in ribosomal RNA and results from the RNA folding in cis, to produce three separate helices that meet around a central unpaired region. Here we demonstrate that 3-way junctions can also form in trans as a result of the binding of microRNAs in an unconventional manner with mRNA by splinting two non-contiguous regions together. This may be used to reinforce the base of a stem-loop motif being targeted by an RNA-binding protein. Trans interactions between non-coding RNA and mRNA may be used to control the post-transcriptional regulatory code and suggests a possible role for some of the recently described transcripts of unknown function expressed from the human genome.

  19. Role of IKK-alpha in EGFR Signaling Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We herein identified a novel posttranslational modification of EGFR which plays an indispensable role in regulation of EGFR signaling pathways. We...stringently modulated by a previously unknown and reversible modification , ubiquitination through a distinct TRAF6 binding motif of GSK3β. The...factor, plays an important role in many cancer types. The modification patterns of EGFR are critical for its function and the understanding of these

  20. Multiple motifs regulate the trafficking of GABA(B) receptors at distinct checkpoints within the secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restituito, Sophie; Couve, Andrés; Bawagan, Hinayana; Jourdain, Sabine; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Freeman, Katie B; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the mechanisms that regulate receptor surface expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that access to the cell surface for GABA(B)R1 is sequentially controlled by an RSR(R) motif and a LL motif within its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we reveal that msec7-1, a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of GTPases, critical regulators of vesicular membrane trafficking, interacts with GABA(B)R1 via the LL motif in this subunit. Finally, we establish that msec7-1 modulates the cell surface expression of GABA(B) receptors, a process that is dependent upon the integrity of the LL motif in GABA(B)R1. Together, our results demonstrate that the cell surface expression of the GABA(B)R1 subunit is regulated by multiple motifs, which act at distinct checkpoints in the secretory pathway, and also suggest a novel role for msec7-1 in regulating the membrane trafficking of GABA(B)R1 subunits.

  1. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  2. HDAC6 regulates mutant SOD1 aggregation through two SMIR motifs and tubulin acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-05-24

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased α-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q α-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS.

  3. HDAC6 Regulates Mutant SOD1 Aggregation through Two SMIR Motifs and Tubulin Acetylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R.; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased α-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q α-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS. PMID:23580651

  4. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko

    2016-03-01

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomes during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis.

  5. A new calmodulin-binding motif for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Baños-Sanz, Jose I; Monterroso, Begoña; Round, Adam; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; González, Beatriz

    2014-11-01

    IP3-3K [Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase] is a key enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, using Ins(1,4,5)P3 and ATP as substrates. Both inositides, substrate and product, present crucial roles in the cell. Ins(1,4,5)P3 is a key point in Ca2+ metabolism that promotes Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and together with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 regulates Ca2+ homoeostasis. In addition, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 is involved in immune cell development. It has been proved that Ca2+/CaM (calmodulin) regulates the activity of IP3-3K, via direct interaction between both enzymes. Although we have extensive structural knowledge of the kinase domains of the three IP3-3K isoforms, no structural information is available about the interaction between IP3-3K and Ca2+/CaM. In the present paper we describe the crystal structure of the complex between human Ca2+/CaM and the CaM-binding region of human IP3-3K isoform A (residues 158-183) and propose a model for a complex including the kinase domain. The structure obtained allowed us to identify all of the key residues involved in the interaction, which have been evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis, pull-down and fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The results allowed the identification of a new CaM-binding motif, expanding our knowledge about how CaM interacts with its partners.

  6. Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) regulates CD40 expression through SMAR1 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kamini; Sinha, Surajit; Malonia, Sunil Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in

    2010-01-08

    CD40 plays an important role in mediating inflammatory response and is mainly induced by JAK/STAT phosphorylation cascade. TNF{alpha} is the key cytokine that activates CD40 during inflammation and tumorigenesis. We have earlier shown that SMAR1 can repress the transcription of Cyclin D1 promoter by forming a HDAC1 dependent repressor complex. In this study, we show that SMAR1 regulates the transcription of NF-{kappa}B target gene CD40. SMAR1 recruits HDAC1 and forms a repressor complex on CD40 promoter and keeps its basal transcription in check. Further, we show that TNF{alpha} stimulation induces SMAR1 phosphorylation at Ser-347 and promotes its cytoplasmic translocation, thus releasing its negative effect. Concomitantly, TNF{alpha} induced phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr-701 by JAK1 facilitates its nuclear translocation and activation of CD40 through p300 recruitment and core Histone-3 acetylation. Thus, TNF{alpha} mediated regulation of CD40 expression occurs by dual phosphorylation of SMAR1 and STAT1.

  7. alpha-Amylase gene of Streptomyces limosus: nucleotide sequence, expression motifs, and amino acid sequence homology to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the coding and regulatory regions of the alpha-amylase gene (aml) of Streptomyces limosus was determined. High-resolution S1 mapping was used to locate the 5' end of the transcript and demonstrated that the gene is transcribed from a unique promoter. The predicted amino acid sequence has considerable identity to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases, but not to those of plant, fungal, or eubacterial origin. Consistent with this is the susceptibility of the enzym...

  8. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenbao Yu; Gillian Vogel; Yan Coulombe; Danielle Dubeau; Elizabeth Spehalski; Josée Hébert; David O Ferguson; Jean Yves Masson; Stéphane Richard

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs).MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif.In this study,we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines.The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability.Moreover,the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites.The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR.The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR.Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair,and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing,as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling.

  9. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  10. An Unexpected Duo: Rubredoxin Binds Nine TPR Motifs to Form LapB, an Essential Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Chelsy; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and export are essential pathways for bacterial growth, proliferation, and virulence. The essential protein LapB from Escherichia coli has recently been identified as a regulator of LPS synthesis. We have determined the crystal structure of LapB (without the N-terminal transmembrane helix) at 2 Å resolution using zinc single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing derived from a single bound zinc atom. This structure demonstrates the presence of nine tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) motifs, including two TPR folds that were not predicted from sequence, and a rubredoxin-type metal binding domain. The rubredoxin domain is bound intimately to the TPR motifs, which has not been previously observed or predicted. Mutations in the rubredoxin/TPR interface inhibit in vivo cell growth, and in vitro studies indicate that these modifications cause local displacement of rubredoxin from its binding site without changing the secondary structure of LapB. LapB is the first reported structure to contain both a rubredoxin domain and TPR motifs.

  11. The LSD1-Type Zinc Finger Motifs of Pisum sativa LSD1 Are a Novel Nuclear Localization Signal and Interact with Importin Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Shanping He; Kuowei Huang; Xu Zhang; Xiangchun Yu; Ping Huang; Chengcai An

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic studies of the Arabidopsis mutant lsd1 highlight the important role of LSD1 in the negative regulation of plant programmed cell death (PCD). Arabidopsis thaliana LSD1 (AtLSD1) contains three LSD1-type zinc finger motifs, which are involved in the protein-protein interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further understand the function of LSD1, we have analyzed cellular localization and functional localization domains of Pisum sativa LSD1 (PsLSD1), which is a homolog ...

  12. Hypomethylation of proximal CpG motif of interleukin-10 promoter regulates its expression in human rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hong FU; Chun-ling MA; Bin CONG; Shu-jin LI; Hai-ying CHEN; Jing-ge ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Aim:The promoter of human interleukin-10 (IL10),a cytokine crucial for suppressing inflammation and regulating immune responses,contains an interspecies-conserved sequence with CpG motifs.The aim of this study was to investigate whether methylation of CpG motifs could regulate the expression of IL10 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Methods:Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to identify the interspecies-conserved sequence in human,macaque and mouse IL10 genes.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 RA patients and 20 health controls were collected.The PBMCs from 6 patients were cultured in the presence or absence of 5-azacytidine (5 μmol/L).The mRNA and protein levels of IL10 were examined using RT-PCR and ELISA,respectively.The methylation of CpGs in the IL10 promoter was determined by pyrosequencing.Chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assays were performed to detect the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-DNA interactions.Results:One interspecies-conserved sequence was found within the IL10 promoter.The upstream CpGs at -408,-387,-385,and -355 bp were hypermethylated in PBMCs from both the RA patients and healthy controls.In contrast,the proximal CpG at -145 was hypomethylated to much more extent in the RA patients than in the healthy controls (P=0.016),which was correlated with higher IL10 mRNA and serum levels.In the 5-azacytidine-treated PBMCs,the CpG motifs were demethylated,and the expression levels of IL10 mRNA and protein was significantly increased.CHIP assays revealed increased phospho-CREB binding to the IL10 promoter.Conclusion:The methylation of the proximal CpGs in the IL10 promoter may regulate gene transcription in RA.

  13. A conserved stem loop motif in the 5'untranslated region regulates transforming growth factor-β(1 translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Jenkins

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β(1 (TGF-β(1 regulates cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. The human TGF-β(1 transcript is inherently poorly translated, and translational activation has been documented in relation to several stimuli. In this paper, we have sought to identify in cis regulatory elements within the TGF-β(1 5'Untranslated Region (5'UTR. In silico analysis predicted formation of stable secondary structure in a G/C-rich element between nucleotides +77 to +106, and demonstrated that this element is highly conserved across species. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed the presence of secondary structure in this region. The proximal 5'UTR was inhibitory to translation in reporter gene experiments, and mutation of the secondary structure motif increased translational efficiency. Translational regulation of TGF-β(1 mRNA is linked to altered binding of YB-1 protein to its 5'UTR. Immunoprecipitation-RT-qPCR demonstrated a high basal association of YB-1 with TGF-β(1 mRNA. However, mutation of the secondary structure motif did not prevent interaction of YB-1 with the 5'UTR, suggesting that YB-1 binds to this region due to its G/C-rich composition, rather than a specific, sequence-dependent, binding site. These data identify a highly conserved element within the TGF-β(1 5'UTR that forms stable secondary structure, and is responsible for the inherent low translation efficiency of this cytokine.

  14. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali J Vetter

    Full Text Available The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  15. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  16. Estrogen-mediated regulation of Igf1 transcription and uterine growth involves direct binding of estrogen receptor alpha to estrogen-responsive elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Yin; Li, Leping; Korach, Kenneth S

    2010-01-22

    Estrogen enables uterine proliferation, which depends on synthesis of the IGF1 growth factor. This proliferation and IGF1 synthesis requires the estrogen receptor (ER), which binds directly to target DNA sequences (estrogen-responsive elements or EREs), or interacts with other transcription factors, such as AP1, to impact transcription. We observe neither uterine growth nor an increase in Igf1 transcript in a mouse with a DNA-binding mutated ER alpha (KIKO), indicating that both Igf1 regulation and uterine proliferation require the DNA binding function of the ER. We identified several potential EREs in the Igf1 gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed ER alpha binding to these EREs in wild type but not KIKO chromatin. STAT5 is also reported to regulate Igf1; uterine Stat5a transcript is increased by estradiol (E(2)), but not in KIKO or alpha ERKO uteri, indicating ER alpha- and ERE-dependent regulation. ER alpha binds to a potential Stat5a ERE. We hypothesize that E(2) increases Stat5a transcript through ERE binding; that ER alpha, either alone or together with STAT5, then acts to increase Igf1 transcription; and that the resulting lack of IGF1 impairs KIKO uterine growth. Treatment with exogenous IGF1, alone or in combination with E(2), induces proliferation in wild type but not KIKO uteri, indicating that IGF1 replacement does not rescue the KIKO proliferative response. Together, these observations suggest in contrast to previous in vitro studies of IGF-1 regulation involving AP1 motifs that direct ER alpha-DNA interaction is required to increase Igf1 transcription. Additionally, full ER alpha function is needed to mediate other cellular signals of the growth factor for uterine growth.

  17. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyazono, Agasa [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Morimura, Naoko [Laboratory for Comparative Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  18. Distinct C/EBPalpha motifs regulate lipogenic and gluconeogenic gene expression in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas A; Bereshchenko, Oxana; Garcia-Silva, Susana;

    2007-01-01

    The C/EBPalpha transcription factor regulates hepatic nitrogen, glucose, lipid and iron metabolism. However, how it is able to independently control these processes is not known. Here, we use mouse knock-in mutagenesis to identify C/EBPalpha domains that specifically regulate hepatic gluconeogene...

  19. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway regulates levels of retinoic acid receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor alpha in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, M; Wang, Z; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2000-04-15

    Repeated exposure of human skin to solar UV radiation leads to premature aging (photoaging) and skin cancer. UV-induced skin damage can be ameliorated by all-trans retinoic acid treatment. The actions of retinoic acid in skin keratinocytes are mediated primarily by nuclear retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We found that exposure of cultured primary human keratinocytes to UV irradiation (30 mJ/cm2) substantially reduced (50-90%) RARgamma and RXRalpha mRNA and protein within 8 h. The rates of disappearance of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV exposure or treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide were similar. UV irradiation did not increase the rate of breakdown of RARgamma or RXRalpha but rather reduced their rate of synthesis. The addition of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and LLvL, but not the lysosomal inhibitor E64, prevented loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after exposure of keratinocytes to either UV radiation or cycloheximide. Soluble extracts from nonirradiated or UV-irradiated keratinocytes possessed similar levels of proteasome activity that degraded RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins in vitro. Furthermore, RARgamma and RXRalpha were polyubiquitinated in intact cells. RXRalpha was found to contain two proline, glutamate/aspartate, serine, and threonine (PEST) motifs, which confer rapid turnover of many short-lived regulatory proteins that are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, the PEST motifs in RXRalpha did not function to regulate its stability, because deletion of the PEST motifs individually or together did not alter ubiquitination or proteasome-mediated degradation of RXRalpha. These results demonstrate that loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV irradiation results from degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Taken together, the data here indicate that ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated breakdown is an important mechanism regulating the levels of

  20. Abscisic Acid, High-Light, and Oxidative Stress Down-Regulate a Photosynthetic Gene via a Promoter Motif Not Involved in Phytochrome-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto J. Staneloni; María José Rodriguez-Batiller; Jorge J. Casal

    2008-01-01

    In etiolated seedlings, light perceived by phytochrome promotes the expression of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein of photosystem Ⅱ (Lhcb) genes. However, excess of photosynthetically active radiation can reduce Lhcb expression. Here, we investigate the convergence and divergence of phytochrome, high-light stress and abscisic acid (ABA)signaling, which could connect these processes. Etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings bearing an Lhcb promoter fused to a reporter were exposed to continuous far-red light to activate phytochrome and not photosynthesis, and treated with ABA. We identified a cis-acting region of the promoter required for down-regulation by ABA. This region contains a CCAC sequence recently found to be necessary for ABI4-binding to an Lhcb promoter. However, we did not find a G-box-binding core motif often associated with the ABI4-binding site in genes promoted by light and repressed by ABI4. Mutations involving this motif also impaired the responses to reduced water potential, the response to high photosynthetic light and the response to methyl viologen but not the response to low temperature or to Norflurazon. We propose a model based on current and previous findings, in which hydrogen peroxide produced in the chloroplasts under high light conditions interacts with the ABA signaling network to regulate Lhcb expression. Since the mutation that affects high-light and methyl viologen responses does not affect phytochrome-mediated responses, the regulation by retrograde and phytochrome signaling can finally be separated at the target promoter level.

  1. Protein kinase A regulation of P2X(4) receptors: requirement for a specific motif in the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David A; Yule, David I

    2010-02-01

    The P2X purinergic receptor sub-family of ligand-gated ion channels are subject to protein kinase modulation. We have previously demonstrated that P2X(4)R signaling can be positively regulated by increasing intracellular cAMP levels. The molecular mechanism underlying this effect was, however, unknown. The present study initially addressed whether protein kinase A (PKA) activation was required. Subsequently a mutational approach was utilized to determine which region of the receptor was required for this potentiation. In both DT-40 3KO and HEK-293 cells transiently expressing P2X(4)R, forskolin treatment enhanced ATP-mediated signaling. Specific PKA inhibitors prevented the forskolin-induced enhancement of ATP-mediated inward currents in P2X(4)R expressing HEK-293 cells. To define which region of the P2X(4)R was required for the potentiation, mutations were generated in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. It was determined that a limited region of the C-terminus, consisting of a non-canonical tyrosine based sorting motif, was required for the effects of PKA. Of note, this region does not harbor any recognizable PKA phosphorylation motifs, and no direct phosphorylation of P2X(4)R was detected, suggesting that PKA phosphorylation of an accessory protein interacts with the endocytosis motif in the C-terminus of the P2X(4)R. In support of this notion, using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRF)\\ P2X(4)-EGFP was shown to accumulate at/near the plasma membrane following forskolin treatment. In addition, disrupting the endocytosis machinery using a dominant-negative dynamin construct also prevented the PKA-mediated enhancement of ATP-stimulated Ca(2+) signals. Our results are consistent with a novel mechanism of P2XR regulation, whereby PKA activity, without directly phosphorylating P2X(4)R, markedly enhances ATP-stimulated P2X(4)R currents and hence cytosolic Ca(2+) signals. This may occur at least in part, by altering the trafficking of a population of

  2. Furin gene (fur) regulation in differentiating human megakaryoblastic Dami cells: involvement of the proximal GATA recognition motif in the P1 promoter and impact on the maturation of furin substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprise, Marie-Hélène; Grondin, Francine; Cayer, Pauline; McDonald, Patrick P; Dubois, Claire M

    2002-11-15

    The convertase furin is involved in the maturation of key growth/aggregation mediators synthesized by the platelet producers, megakaryocytes, but the regulation of furin in these cells remains unknown. Computer-assisted search of the furin promoter sequence revealed multiple potential binding motifs for GATA-1, suggesting that furin is expressed and regulated in these cells. Using megakaryoblastic Dami cells, we observed that fur mRNA expression increased gradually on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced differentiation, reaching maximum levels (8.3-fold increase) at 10 days. Transient transfections with P1, P1A, or P1B fur-LUC-promoter constructs revealed that in Dami cells, the P1 promoter is the strongest and the most sensitive to forced expression of GATA-1. Coexpression of GATA-1 and its comodulator, Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), resulted in a cooperative increase in P1 activity. Deletion analysis indicated that important GATA-1-regulated sequences are located in the most proximal region of the P1 promoter. Further analysis revealed 2 potential GATA-binding motifs at positions -66 and +62. Point mutation of each of the 2 motifs indicated that the intactness of the first GATA site is required for full basal and GATA-1-stimulated promoter activity. Finally, the inhibition of furin activity through gene transfer of the inhibitor alpha1-AT-PDX led to a block in maturation of the furin substrates transforming growth factor-beta1 and platelet-derived growth factor. Taken together, these results indicate that the most proximal GATA element in the P1 promoter is needed for fur gene expression in megakaryoblastic cells. They also suggest that proper regulation of the fur gene in megakaryocytes has an impact on the activation of furin substrates involved in megakaryocyte maturation and platelet functions.

  3. Plasma Membrane CFTR Regulates RANTES Expression via Its C-Terminal PDZ-Interacting Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Estell, Kim; Braunstein, Gavin; Tucker, Torry; Varga, Karoly; Collawn, James F.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the identification of 1,000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene product CFTR, there remains discordance between CFTR genotype and lung disease phenotype. The study of CFTR, therefore, has expanded beyond its chloride channel activity into other possible functions, such as its role as a regulator of gene expression. Findings indicate that CFTR plays a role in the expression of RANTES in airway epithelia. RANTES is a chemokine that has been implicated in the regulation of mucosal immu...

  4. Isolated pseudo-RNA-recognition motifs of SR proteins can regulate splicing using a noncanonical mode of RNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléry, Antoine; Sinha, Rahul; Anczuków, Olga; Corrionero, Anna; Moursy, Ahmed; Daubner, Gerrit M; Valcárcel, Juan; Krainer, Adrian R; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2013-07-23

    Serine/arginine (SR) proteins, one of the major families of alternative-splicing regulators in Eukarya, have two types of RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs): a canonical RRM and a pseudo-RRM. Although pseudo-RRMs are crucial for activity of SR proteins, their mode of action was unknown. By solving the structure of the human SRSF1 pseudo-RRM bound to RNA, we discovered a very unusual and sequence-specific RNA-binding mode that is centered on one α-helix and does not involve the β-sheet surface, which typically mediates RNA binding by RRMs. Remarkably, this mode of binding is conserved in all pseudo-RRMs tested. Furthermore, the isolated pseudo-RRM is sufficient to regulate splicing of about half of the SRSF1 target genes tested, and the bound α-helix is a pivotal element for this function. Our results strongly suggest that SR proteins with a pseudo-RRM frequently regulate splicing by competing with, rather than recruiting, spliceosome components, using solely this unusual RRM.

  5. Hitchcock's Motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Among the abundant Alfred Hitchcock literature, Hitchcock's Motifs has found a fresh angle. Starting from recurring objects, settings, character-types and events, Michael Walker tracks some forty motifs, themes and clusters across the whole of Hitchcock's oeuvre, including not only all his 52 extant

  6. CFTR is involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion in human and rodent alpha cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Pedersen, Morten Gram; Lindqvist, Andreas; Wierup, Nils; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Eliasson, Lena

    2017-12-01

    Glucagon is the main counterregulatory hormone in the body. Still, the mechanism involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic alpha cells remains elusive. Dysregulated glucagon secretion is common in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) that develop CF related diabetes (CFRD). CF is caused by a mutation in the Cl(-) channel Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but whether CFTR is present in human alpha cells and regulate glucagon secretion has not been investigated in detail. Here, both human and mouse alpha cells showed CFTR protein expression, whereas CFTR was absent in somatostatin secreting delta cells. CFTR-current activity induced by cAMP was measured in single alpha cells. Glucagon secretion at different glucose levels and in the presence of forskolin was increased by CFTR-inhibition in human islets, whereas depolarization-induced glucagon secretion was unaffected. CFTR is suggested to mainly regulate the membrane potential through an intrinsic alpha cell effect, as supported by a mathematical model of alpha cell electrophysiology. In conclusion, CFTR channels are present in alpha cells and act as important negative regulators of cAMP-enhanced glucagon secretion through effects on alpha cell membrane potential. Our data support that loss-of-function mutations in CFTR contributes to dysregulated glucagon secretion in CFRD.

  7. Bioactive motifs of agouti signal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virador, V M; Santis, C; Furumura, M; Kalbacher, H; Hearing, V J

    2000-08-25

    The switch between the synthesis of eu- and pheomelanins is modulated by the interaction of two paracrine signaling molecules, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) and agouti signal protein (ASP), which interact with melanocytes via the MSH receptor (MC1R). Comparison of the primary sequence of ASP with the known MSH pharmacophore provides no suggestion about the putative bioactive domain(s) of ASP. To identify such bioactive motif(s), we synthesized 15-mer peptides that spanned the primary sequence of ASP and determined their effects on the melanogenic activities of murine melanocytes. Northern and Western blotting were used, together with chemical analysis of melanins and enzymatic assays, to identify three distinct bioactive regions of ASP that down-regulate eumelanogenesis. The decrease in eumelanin production was mediated by down-regulation of mRNA levels for tyrosinase and other melanogenic enzymes, as occurs in vivo, and these effects were comparable to those elicited by intact recombinant ASP. Shorter peptides in those motifs were synthesized and their effects on melanogenesis were further investigated. The amino acid arginine, which is present in the MSH peptide pharmacophore (HFRW), is also in the most active domain of ASP (KVARP). Our data suggest that lysines and an arginine (in motifs such as KxxxxKxxR or KxxRxxxxK) are important for the bioactivity of ASP. Identification of the specific ASP epitope that interacts with the MC1R has potential pharmacological applications in treating dysfunctions of skin pigmentation.

  8. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  9. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions.

  10. Cloning of a yeast alpha-amylase promoter and its regulated heterologous expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR; Hooker, Brian S [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Daniel B [Pasco, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  11. Reserpine induces vascular alpha 2-adrenergic supersensitivity and platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor up-regulation in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estan, L.; Senard, J. M.; Tran, M. A.; Montastruc, J. L.; Berlan, M.

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of catecholamine levels on the regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor sensitivity in dogs. 2. Blood pressure and heart rate values at rest, plasma catecholamine levels, platelet and adipocyte alpha 2-adrenoceptors as well as the alpha 2-mediated cardiovascular responses to clonidine (10 micrograms kg-1 i.v., after alpha 1-, beta-adrenoceptor plus muscarinic blockade) or noradrenaline (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 micrograms kg-1 i.v. after alpha 1- and beta-adrenoceptor blockade) were measured before and after reserpine treatment (0.1 mg kg-1 day-1 s.c. over 15 days). 3. Reserpine induced a significant decrease in resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures (213 +/- 2/87 +/- 6 mmHg before vs 158 +/- 5/59 +/- 3 mmHg after treatment) as well as in heart rate (91 +/- 2 beats min-1 before vs 76 +/- 3 beats min-1 after treatment). 4. A 5 min tilt test performed under chloralose anesthesia, failed to modify blood pressure before treatment whereas it induced a significant fall in the same animals after the 15 day treatment. Plasma levels of noradrenaline significantly decreased (262 +/- 58 vs 66 +/- 31 pg ml-1) whereas plasma adrenaline levels were unchanged. 5. The alpha 2-mediated pressor responses to noradrenaline were significantly increased after reserpine. Clonidine induced a marked pressor effect (+72 and +45% in systolic and diastolic blood pressures respectively) after reserpine treatment. This effect was suppressed by administration of RX-821002, a new specific alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175232

  12. Characterization of Evolutionarily ConservedMotifs Involved in Activity and Regulation of theABA-INSENSITIVE (ABI) 4 Transcription Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the transcription factor ABI4 has emerged as an important node of integration for externaland internal signals such as nutrient status and hormone signaling that modulates critical transitions during the growthand development of plants. For this reason, understanding the mechanism of action and regulation of this protein rep-resents an important step towards the elucidation of crosstalk mechanisms in plants. However, this understanding hasbeen hindered due to the negligible levels of this protein as a result of multiple posttranscriptional regulations. To betterunderstand the function and regulation of the ABI4 protein in this work, we performed a functional analysis of severalevolutionarily conserved motifs. Based on these conserved motifs, we identified ortholog genes of ABI4 in differentplant species. The functionality of the putative ortholog from Theobroma cacao was demonstrated in transient expres-sion assays and in complementation studies in plants. The function of the highly conserved motifs was analyzed aftertheir deletion or mutagenesis in the Arabidopsis ABI4 sequence using mesophyll protoplasts. This approach permitted usto immunologically detect the ABI4 protein and identify some of the mechanisms involved in its regulation. We identi-fied sequences required for the nuclear localization (AP2-associated motif) as well as those for transcriptional activationfunction (LRP motif). Moreover, this approach showed that the protein stability of this transcription factor is controlledthrough protein degradation and subcellular localization and involves the AP2-associated and the PEST motifs. We dem-onstrated that the degradation of ABI4 protein through the PEST motif is mediated by the 26S proteasome in responseto changes in the sugar levels.

  13. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal RNA Recognition Motif of mRNA Decay Regulator AUF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding/degradation factor 1 (AUF1 plays a role in destabilizing mRNAs by forming complexes with AU-rich elements (ARE in the 3′-untranslated regions. Multiple AUF1-ARE complexes regulate the translation of encoded products related to the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation. AUF1 contains two tandem RNA recognition motifs (RRM and a Gln- (Q- rich domain in their C-terminal region. To observe how the two RRMs are involved in recognizing ARE, we obtained the AUF1-p37 protein covering the two RRMs. However, only N-terminal RRM (RRM1 was crystallized and its structure was determined at 1.7 Å resolution. It appears that the RRM1 and RRM2 separated before crystallization. To demonstrate which factors affect the separate RRM1-2, we performed limited proteolysis using trypsin. The results indicated that the intact proteins were cleaved by unknown proteases that were associated with them prior to crystallization. In comparison with each of the monomers, the conformations of the β2-β3 loops were highly variable. Furthermore, a comparison with the RRM1-2 structures of HuR and hnRNP A1 revealed that a dimer of RRM1 could be one of the possible conformations of RRM1-2. Our data may provide a guidance for further structural investigations of AUF1 tandem RRM repeat and its mode of ARE binding.

  14. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansing, Hope A. [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States); Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R. [Department of Chemical Physiology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Berrier, Allison L., E-mail: allison.berrier@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  15. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20, a potential biomarker for Graves' disease, is regulated by osteopontin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Li

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD is a common autoimmune disease involving the thyroid gland. The altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GD. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20 is important for interleukin-17 (IL-17 signal activation and a potent chemoattractant for Th17 cells. Meanwhile, Osteopontin (OPN, a broadly expressed pleiotropic cytokine, has been implicated in GD through inducing Th1-involved response to enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but little is known about the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 and IL-17 signaling. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to explore the possibility of CCL20 level as a biomarker for GD, as well as investigate the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 production. METHODS: Fifty untreated GD patients, fifteen euthyroid GD patients, twelve TRAb-negative GD patients and thirty-five healthy control donors were recruited. OPN, CCL20 and other clinical GD diagnosis parameters were measured. CD4+T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using antibody-coated magnetic beads. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to determine CCL20 expression level. RESULTS: We found that the plasma CCL20 level was enhanced in GD patients and decreased in euthyroid and TRAb-negative GD patients. In addition, CCL20 level correlated with GD clinical diagnostic parameters and plasma OPN level. Moreover, we demonstrated that recombinant OPN and plasma from untreated GD patients increased the expression of CCL20 in CD4+T cells, which could be blocked by OPN antibody. Furthermore, we found that the effect of OPN on CCL20 expression was mediated by β3 integrin receptor, IL-17, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrated that CCL20 might serve as a biomarker for GD and suggested the possible role of OPN in induction of CCL20 expression.

  16. Isolation of a gene encoding a developmentally regulated T cell-specific protein with a guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlow, D.A.; Teh, H.S.; Marth, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1995-02-15

    In this study, we describe a novel full length cDNA clone designated Tgtp that encodes a predicted 415-amino acid a T cell-specific guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding protein (TGTP) bearing the characteristic motifs of a guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP) binding protein. Tgtp is expressed preferentially, if not exclusively, in T cells, and is up-regulated in both unfractionated and in purified CD4{sup +}8{sup +} thymocytes upon TCR cross-linking. In contrast, expression of Tgtp in peripheral T cells is maintained at relatively high levels and is not grossly affected by TCR cross-linking. Antiserum generated against synthetic peptides from the predicted TGTP amino acid sequence recognized a single protein with a molecular mass of {approx}50 kDa, corresponding well with the computed molecular mass of 47 kDa. The only known relative of Tgtp is MUSGTP, which is reportedly expressed in B cells and bears a GTP binding motif. Thus, the discovery of Tgtp resolves a subfamily of molecules with GTP binding motifs and apparent lymphoid lineage-restricted expression. Given the restricted expression pattern in T cells, the up-regulated expression observed in response to TCR signaling in immature thymocytes, and the presence of the motifs characteristic of GTP binding proteins, we suggest that TGTP may have an important function in T cell development and/or T cell activation. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  17. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quitterie Venot

    Full Text Available ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1 domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL, which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane.

  18. Integrin engagement by the helical RGD motif of the Helicobacter pylori CagL protein is regulated by pH-induced displacement of a neighboring helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Pham, Kieu T; Beadenkopf, Robert; Diederichs, Kay; Haas, Rainer; Beckett, Dorothy; Fischer, Wolfgang; Sundberg, Eric J

    2015-05-15

    Arginine-aspartate-glycine (RGD) motifs are recognized by integrins to bridge cells to one another and the extracellular matrix. RGD motifs typically reside in exposed loop conformations. X-ray crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori protein CagL revealed that RGD motifs can also exist in helical regions of proteins. Interactions between CagL and host gastric epithelial cell via integrins are required for the translocation of the bacterial oncoprotein CagA. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis of the CagL-host cell interactions using structural, biophysical, and functional analyses. We solved an x-ray crystal structure of CagL that revealed conformational changes induced by low pH not present in previous structures. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we found that pH-induced conformational changes in CagL occur in solution and not just in the crystalline environment. By designing numerous CagL mutants based on all available crystal structures, we probed the functional roles of CagL conformational changes on cell surface integrin engagement. Together, our data indicate that the helical RGD motif in CagL is buried by a neighboring helix at low pH to inhibit CagL binding to integrin, whereas at neutral pH the neighboring helix is displaced to allow integrin access to the CagL RGD motif. This novel molecular mechanism of regulating integrin-RGD motif interactions by changes in the chemical environment provides new insight to H. pylori-mediated oncogenesis.

  19. Hydrophobic motif site-phosphorylated protein kinase CβII between mTORC2 and Akt regulates high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    PKCβII controls the pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy, including glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy. PKCβII contains the COOH-terminal hydrophobic motif site Ser-660. Whether this hydrophobic motif phosphorylation contributes to high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy has not been determined. Here we show that, in mesangial cells, high glucose increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. Using siRNAs to downregulate PKCβII, dominant negative PKCβII, and PKCβII hydrophobic motif phosphorylation-deficient mutant, we found that PKCβII regulates activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mesangial cell hypertrophy by high glucose. PKCβII via its phosphorylation at Ser-660 regulated phosphorylation of Akt at both catalytic loop and hydrophobic motif sites, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of its substrate PRAS40. Specific inhibition of mTORC2 increased mTORC1 activity and induced mesangial cell hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of mTORC2 decreased the phosphorylation of PKCβII and Akt, leading to inhibition of PRAS40 phosphorylation and mTORC1 activity and prevented mesangial cell hypertrophy in response to high glucose; expression of constitutively active Akt or mTORC1 restored mesangial cell hypertrophy. Moreover, constitutively active PKCβII reversed the inhibition of high glucose-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and mesangial cell hypertrophy induced by suppression of mTORC2. Finally, using renal cortexes from type 1 diabetic mice, we found that increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 was associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation. Collectively, our findings identify a signaling route connecting PI3-kinase to mTORC2 to phosphorylate PKCβII at the hydrophobic motif site necessary for Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation, leading to mesangial cell hypertrophy.

  20. An Essential Role for the Glut1 PDZ-Binding Motif in Growth Factor Regulation of Glut1 Degradation and Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Wieman, Heather L.; Horn, Sarah R.; Jacobs, Sarah R.; Altman, Brian J.; Kornbluth, Sally; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface localization of the glucose transporter, Glut1, is a cytokine-controlled process essential to support the metabolism and survival of hematopoietic cells. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Glut1 trafficking, however, are not certain. Here we show a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in Glut1 is critical to promote maximal cytokine-stimulated Glut1 cell surface localization and prevent Glut1 lysosomal degradation in the absence of growth factor. Disruption of this PDZ-binding sequence t...

  1. Consensus PP1 binding motifs regulate transcriptional corepression and alternative RNA splicing activities of the steroid receptor coregulators, p54nrb and PSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangliang; Xie, Ning; Rennie, Paul; Challis, John R G; Gleave, Martin; Lye, Stephen J; Dong, Xuesen

    2011-07-01

    Originally identified as essential pre-mRNA splicing factors, non-POU-domain-containing, octamer binding protein (p54nrb) and PTB-associated RNA splicing factor (PSF) are also steroid receptor corepressors. The mechanisms by which p54nrb and PSF regulate gene transcription remain unclear. Both p54nrb and PSF contain protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) consensus binding RVxF motifs, suggesting that PP1 may regulate phosphorylation status of p54nrb and PSF and thus their function in gene transcription. In this report, we demonstrated that PP1 forms a protein complex with both p54nrb and PSF. PP1 interacts directly with the RVxF motif only in p54nrb, but not in PSF. Association with PP1 results in dephosphorylation of both p54nrb and PSF in vivo and the loss of their transcriptional corepressor activities. Using the CD44 minigene as a reporter, we showed that PP1 regulates p54nrb and PSF alternative splicing activities that determine exon skipping vs. inclusion in the final mature RNA for translation. In addition, changes in transcriptional corepression and RNA splicing activities of p54nrb and PSF are correlated with alterations in protein interactions of p54nrb and PSF with transcriptional corepressors such as Sin3A and histone deacetylase 1, and RNA splicing factors such as U1A and U2AF. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel function of the RVxF motif within PSF that enhances its corepression and RNA splicing activities independent of PP1. We conclude that the RVxF motifs play an important role in controlling the multifunctional properties of p54nrb and PSF in the regulation of gene transcription.

  2. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-11

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex.

  3. Genome-wide prediction and functional validation of promoter motifs regulating gene expression in spore and infection stages of Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sourav; Kagda, Meenakshi; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-03-01

    Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures). Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors.

  4. Testosterone regulates alpha-synuclein mRNA in the avian song system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, V N; Miller, M A; Clayton, D F; Liu, W C; Kroodsma, D E; Brenowitz, E A

    2001-04-17

    Alpha-synuclein is a small, highly conserved protein in vertebrates that has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. The avian song control system is one of the model systems in which the protein was independently discovered. Alpha-synuclein is dynamically regulated in the song system during song learning, a process in which sex steroids play a central role. We compared alpha-synuclein mRNA expression in the brains of 12 adult male chipping sparrows (Spizella passerina) treated with either testosterone or blank s.c. implants. We saw pronounced upregulation of alpha-synuclein mRNA in, as well as an increase in the volume of, the song control nucleus area X in response to exogenous testosterone. To our knowledge this is the first report of steroid regulation of synuclein gene expression in any model system.

  5. Differential regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) expression in schizophrenic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the alpha7* receptor, as measured by [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene expression in schizophrenic hippocampus. We examined the effects of smoking on CHRNA7 expression in the same tissue and find that smoking differentially regulates expression of both mRNA and protein for this gene. CHRNA7 mRNA and protein levels are significantly lower in schizophrenic nonsmokers compared to control nonsmokers and are brought to control levels in schizophrenic smokers. Sufficient protein but low surface expression of the alpha7* receptor, seen in the autoradiographic studies, suggests aberrant assembly or trafficking of the receptor.

  6. Distinct roles of HNF1beta, HNF1alpha, and HNF4alpha in regulating pancreas development, beta-cell function and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Miguel Angel; Cardalda, Carina; Boj, Sylvia F; Luco, Reini F; Servitja, Joan Marc; Ferrer, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding transcriptional regulators HNF1beta (TCF2), HNF1alpha (TCF1), and HNF4alpha cause autosomal dominant diabetes (also known as maturity-onset diabetes of the young). Herein, we review what we have learnt during recent years concerning the functions of these regulators in the developing and adult pancreas. Mouse studies have revealed that HNF1beta is a critical regulator of a transcriptional network that controls the specification, growth, and differentiation of the embryonic pancreas. HNF1beta mutations in humans accordingly often cause pancreas hypoplasia. By contrast, HNF1alpha and HNF4alpha have been shown to regulate the function of differentiated beta-cells. HNF1alpha and HNF4alpha mutations in patients thus cause decreased glucose-induced insulin secretion that leads to a progressive form of diabetes. HNF4alpha mutations paradoxically also cause in utero and neonatal hyperinsulinism, which later evolves to decreased glucose-induced secretion. Recent studies show that Hnf4alpha deficiency in mice causes not only abnormal insulin secretion, but also an impairment of the expansion of beta-cell mass that normally occurs during pregnancy. In line with this finding, we present data that Hnf1alpha-/- beta-cells expressing SV40 large T antigen show a severe impairment of proliferation and failure to form tumours. Collectively, these findings implicate HNF1beta as a regulator of pancreas organogenesis and differentiation, whereas HNF1alpha and HNF4alpha primarily regulate both growth and function of islet beta-cells.

  7. A karyopherin alpha2 nuclear transport pathway is regulated by glucose in hepatic and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassany, Aurélia; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Klein, Christophe; Dalet, Véronique; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of the karyopherin alpha2 nuclear import carrier (also known as importin alpha2) in glucose signaling. In mhAT3F hepatoma cells, GFP-karyopherin alpha2 accumulated massively in the cytoplasm within minutes of glucose extracellular addition and returned to the nucleus after glucose removal. In contrast, GFP-karyopherin alpha1 distribution was unaffected regardless of glucose concentration. Glucose increased GFP-karyopherin alpha2 nuclear efflux by a factor 80 and its shuttling by a factor 4. These glucose-induced movements were not due to glycolytic ATP production. The mechanism involved was leptomycin B-insensitive, but phosphatase- and energy-dependent. HepG2 and COS-7 cells displayed no glucose-induced GFP-karyopherin alpha2 movements. In pancreatic MIN-6 cells, the glucose-induced movements of karyopherin alpha2 and the stimulation of glucose-induced gene transcription were simultaneously lost between passages 28 and 33. Thus, extracellular glucose regulates a nuclear transport pathway by increasing the nuclear efflux and shuttling of karyopherin alpha2 in cells in which glucose can stimulate the transcription of sugar-responsive genes.

  8. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  9. PGC-1alpha down-regulation affects the antioxidant response in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Marmolino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells from individuals with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA show reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes and cannot up-regulate their expression when exposed to oxidative stress. This blunted antioxidant response may play a central role in the pathogenesis. We previously reported that Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma Coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1alpha, a transcriptional master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses, is down-regulated in most cell types from FRDA patients and animal models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used primary fibroblasts from FRDA patients and the knock in-knock out animal model for the disease (KIKO mouse to determine basal superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 levels and the response to oxidative stress induced by the addition of hydrogen peroxide. We measured the same parameters after pharmacological stimulation of PGC-1alpha. Compared to control cells, PGC-1alpha and SOD2 levels were decreased in FRDA cells and did not change after addition of hydrogen peroxide. PGC-1alpha direct silencing with siRNA in control fibroblasts led to a similar loss of SOD2 response to oxidative stress as observed in FRDA fibroblasts. PGC-1alpha activation with the PPARgamma agonist (Pioglitazone or with a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK agonist (AICAR restored normal SOD2 induction. Treatment of the KIKO mice with Pioglitazone significantly up-regulates SOD2 in cerebellum and spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PGC-1alpha down-regulation is likely to contribute to the blunted antioxidant response observed in cells from FRDA patients. This response can be restored by AMPK and PPARgamma agonists, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for FRDA.

  10. Regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in sciatic motor neurons following axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, A J; Devlin, B K; Neitzel, K L; McLaurin, D L; Anderson, K J; Lee, N

    1999-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons are one of the few classes of neurons capable of regenerating axons following axotomy. Injury-induced expression of neurotrophic factors and corresponding receptors may play an important role in this rare ability. A wide variety of indirect data suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha may critically contribute to the regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons. We used immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and retrograde tracing techniques to study the regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in axotomized sciatic motor neurons. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha immunoreactivity, detected with two independent antisera, is increased in a subpopulation of caudal sciatic motor neuron soma one, two and six weeks after sciatic nerve transection and reattachment, while no changes are detected at one day and 15 weeks post-lesion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA levels are augmented in the same classes of neurons following an identical lesion, suggesting that increased synthesis contributes, at least in part, to the additional ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein. Separating the proximal and distal nerve stumps with a plastic barrier does not noticeably affect the injury-induced change in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha regulation, thereby indicating that this injury response is not dependent on signals distal to the lesion traveling retrogradely through the nerve or signals generated by axonal growth through the distal nerve. The prolonged increases in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein and messenger RNA found in regenerating sciatic motor neurons contrast with the responses of non-regenerating central neurons, which are reported to display, at most, a short-lived increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA expression following injury. The present data are the first to demonstrate, in vivo, neuronal regulation of

  11. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: binghjiang@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  12. Osteoblastic regulation of B lymphopoiesis is mediated by Gs{alpha}-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joy Y; Purton, Louise E; Rodda, Stephen J; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; McMahon, Andrew P; Scadden, David T; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-11-04

    Osteoblasts play an increasingly recognized role in supporting hematopoietic development and recently have been implicated in the regulation of B lymphopoiesis. Here we demonstrate that the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit G(s)alpha is required in cells of the osteoblast lineage for normal postnatal B lymphocyte production. Deletion of G(s)alpha early in the osteoblast lineage results in a 59% decrease in the percentage of B cell precursors in the bone marrow. Analysis of peripheral blood from mutant mice revealed a 67% decrease in the number of circulating B lymphocytes by 10 days of age. Strikingly, other mature hematopoietic lineages are not decreased significantly. Mice lacking G(s)alpha in cells of the osteoblast lineage exhibit a reduction in pro-B and pre-B cells. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-7 expression is attenuated in G(s)alpha-deficient osteoblasts, and exogenous IL-7 is able to restore B cell precursor populations in the bone marrow of mutant mice. Finally, the defect in B lymphopoiesis can be rescued by transplantation into a WT microenvironment. These findings confirm that osteoblasts are an important component of the B lymphocyte niche and demonstrate in vivo that G(s)alpha-dependent signaling pathways in cells of the osteoblast lineage extrinsically regulate bone marrow B lymphopoiesis, at least partially in an IL-7-dependent manner.

  13. Mitochondrial complex II participates in normoxic and hypoxic regulation of alpha-keto acids in the murine heart.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhling, J.; Tiefenbach, M.; Lopez-Barneo, J.; Piruat, J.I.; Garcia-Flores, P.; Pfeil, U.; Gries, B.; Muhlfeld, C.; Weigand, M.A.; Kummer, W.; Weissmann, N.; Paddenberg, R.

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Keto acids (alpha-KAs) are not just metabolic intermediates but are also powerful modulators of different cellular pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis that alpha-KA concentrations are regulated by complex II (succinate dehydrogenase=SDH), which represents an intersection between the mitoc

  14. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  15. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.—Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. PMID:27451412

  16. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

  17. Regulation of homocysteine homeostasis through the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siming; Arning, Erland; Liu, Chang; Vitvitsky, Victor; Hernandez, Carlos; Banerjee, Ruma; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Lin, Jiandie D

    2009-03-01

    Plasma homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hcy is a nonprotein amino acid derivative that is generated from the methionine cycle, which provides the methyl group for essentially all biological methylation reactions. Although plasma Hcy levels are elevated in patients with cardiovascular disease, the mechanisms that regulate Hcy homeostasis remain poorly defined. In this study, we found that the expression of key enzymes involved in Hcy metabolism is induced in the liver in response to fasting. This induction coincides with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, a transcriptional coactivator that regulates hepatic gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. PGC-1alpha stimulates the expression of genes involved in Hcy metabolism in cultured primary hepatocytes as well as in the liver. Adenoviral-mediated expression of PGC-1alpha in vivo leads to elevated plasma Hcy levels. In contrast, mice deficient in PGC-1alpha have lower plasma Hcy concentrations. These results define a novel role for the PGC-1alpha coactivator pathway in the regulation of Hcy homeostasis and suggest a potential pathogenic mechanism that contributes to hyperhomocysteinemia.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα, directly regulates transcription of cytochrome P450 CYP2C8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Maria; Winter, Stefan; Klumpp, Britta; Turpeinen, Miia; Klein, Kathrin; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, CYP2C8, metabolizes more than 60 clinically used drugs as well as endogenous substances including retinoic acid and arachidonic acid. However, predictive factors for interindividual variability in the efficacy and toxicity of CYP2C8 drug substrates are essentially lacking. Recently we demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a nuclear receptor primarily involved in control of lipid and energy homeostasis directly regulates the transcription of CYP3A4. Here we investigated the potential regulation of CYP2C8 by PPARα. Two linked intronic SNPs in PPARα (rs4253728, rs4823613) previously associated with hepatic CYP3A4 status showed significant association with CYP2C8 protein level in human liver samples (N = 150). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knock-down of PPARα in HepaRG human hepatocyte cells resulted in up to ∼60 and ∼50% downregulation of CYP2C8 mRNA and activity, while treatment with the PPARα agonist WY14,643 lead to an induction by >150 and >100%, respectively. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation scanning assay we identified a specific upstream gene region that is occupied in vivo by PPARα. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated direct binding of PPARα to a DR-1 motif located at positions -2762/-2775 bp upstream of the CYP2C8 transcription start site. We further validated the functional activity of this element using luciferase reporter gene assays in HuH7 cells. Moreover, based on our previous studies we demonstrated that WNT/β-catenin acts as a functional inhibitor of PPARα-mediated inducibility of CYP2C8 expression. In conclusion, our data suggest direct involvement of PPARα in both constitutive and inducible regulation of CYP2C8 expression in human liver, which is further modulated by WNT/β-catenin pathway. PPARA gene polymorphism could have a modest influence on CYP2C8 phenotype.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα, directly regulates transcription of cytochrome P450 CYP2C8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eThomas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cytochrome P450, CYP2C8, metabolises more than 60 clinically used drugs as well as endogenous substances including retinoic acid and arachidonic acid. However predictive factors for interindividual variability in the efficacy and toxicity of CYP2C8 drug substrates are essentially lacking. Recently we demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα, a nuclear receptor primarily involved in control of lipid and energy homeostasis directly regulates the transcription of CYP3A4. Here we investigated the potential regulation of CYP2C8 by PPARα. Two linked intronic SNPs in PPARα (rs4253728, rs4823613 previously associated with hepatic CYP3A4 status showed significant association with CYP2C8 protein level in human liver samples (N=150. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knock-down of PPARα in HepaRG human hepatocyte cells resulted in up to ~60% and ~50% downregulation of CYP2C8 mRNA and activity, while treatment with the PPARα agonist WY14,643 lead to an induction by >150% and >100%, respectively. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation scanning assay we identified a specific upstream gene region that is occupied in vivo by PPARα. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated direct binding of PPARα to a DR-1 motif located at positions -2762/-2775bp upstream of the CYP2C8 transcription start site. We further validated the functional activity of this element using luciferase reporter gene assays in HuH7 cells. Moreover, based on our previous studies we demonstrated that WNT/β-catenin acts as a functional inhibitor of PPARα-mediated inducibility of CYP2C8 expression. In conclusion, our data suggest direct involvement of PPARα in both constitutive and inducible regulation of CYP2C8 expression in human liver, which is further modulated by WNT/ β-catenin pathway. PPARA gene polymorphism could have a modest influence on CYP2C8 phenotype.

  20. The VTLISFG motif in the BH1 domain plays a significant role in regulating the degradation of Mcl-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mcl-1 is a member of the Bcl-2 family protein; its degradation is required for the initiation of apoptosis. The mechanism, however, is not yet clearly known. Previously, it was reported that Mcl-1 is degraded through the ubiquitination-mediated pathway and the PEST domain is the motif responsible for promoting this degradation. We found evidence that this may not be true. We generated several Mcl-1 deletion mutants and examined their effects on protein stability. Deletion of the PEST domain did not prevent the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis. The BH1 domain, but not the PEST, BH3 or BH2 domain, exhibited a short half-life. A peptide named “F3” (VTLISFG in the C-terminus of the BH1 domain appears to be critical for the rapid turnover of Mcl-1. Deletion of F3 from GFP-Mcl-1-ΔPEST retarded the degradation of this mutant. F3 appeared to be the minimum functional sequence of the degradation motif, since deletion of a single residue was sufficient to abrogate its short half-life. Fusion of F3 with p32 resulted in the degradation of p32 during UV-induced apoptosis, while wild type p32 was not affected. Taken together, these findings suggest that F3 (VTLISFG, instead of PEST, is the major motif responsible for the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis.

  1. Genome-wide prediction and functional validation of promoter motifs regulating gene expression in spore and infection stages of Phytophthora infestans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Roy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures. Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors.

  2. Structural motifs are closed into cycles in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Alexander V

    2010-08-27

    Beta-hairpins, triple-strand beta-sheets and betaalphabeta-units represent simple structural motifs closed into cycles by systems of hydrogen bonds. Secondary closing of these simple motifs into large cycles by means of different superhelices, split beta-hairpins or SS-bridges results in the formation of more complex structural motifs having unique overall folds and unique handedness such as abcd-units, phi-motifs, five- and seven-segment alpha/beta-motifs. Apparently, the complex structural motifs are more cooperative and stable and this may be one of the main reasons of high frequencies of occurrence of the motifs in proteins.

  3. TNF-alpha regulates the effects of irradiation in the mouse bone marrow microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia Cachaço

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary bone marrow (BM myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are increasingly common, as a result of radio or chemotherapy administered to a majority of cancer patients. Patients with secondary MDS have increased BM cell apoptosis, which results in BM dysfunction (cytopenias, and an increased risk of developing fatal acute leukemias. In the present study we asked whether TNF-alpha, known to regulate cell apoptosis, could modulate the onset of secondary MDS. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that TNF-alpha is induced by irradiation and regulates BM cells apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to irradiated wild type (WT mice, TNF-alpha deficient (TNF-alpha KO mice or WT mice treated with a TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibody were partially protected from the apoptotic effects of irradiation. Next we established a 3-cycle irradiation protocol, in which mice were sub-lethally irradiated once monthly over a 3 month period. In this model, irradiated WT mice presented loss of microsatellite markers on BM cells, low white blood cell (WBC counts, reduced megakaryocyte (MK and platelet levels (thrombocytopenia and macrocytic anemia, phenoypes that suggest the irradiation protocol resulted in BM dysfunction with clinical features of MDS. In contrast, TNF-alpha KO mice were protected from the irradiation effects: BM cell apoptosis following irradiation was significantly reduced, concomitant with sustained BM MK numbers and absence of other cytopenias. Moreover, irradiated WT mice with long term (> or = 5 months BM dysfunction had increased BM angiogenesis, MMPs and VEGF and NFkB p65, suggestive of disease progression. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our data shows that TNF-alpha induction following irradiation modulates BM cell apoptosis and is a crucial event in BM dysfunction, secondary MDS onset and progression.

  4. PGC-1{alpha} increases PDH content but does not change acute PDH regulation in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Adser, Helle; Jakobsen, Anne Hviid

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to test if the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator (PGC)1alpha regulates the content of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1alpha and influences PDH activity through regulation of PDK4 expression and subsequently PDH phosphorylation...

  5. The endocytosis and signaling of the γδ T cell coreceptor WC1 are regulated by a dileucine motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Haoting; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins, which are specifically expressed by bovine γδ T cells from a gene array containing 13 members, are part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family. WC1 cytoplasmic domains contains multiple tyrosines, one of which is required to be phosphorylated for TCR coreceptor activity, and a dileucine endocytosis motif. Like the TCR coreceptor CD4, WC1 is endocytosed in response to PMA. Because WC1 endocytosis may play a role in the activation of γδ T cells, we examined WC1 endocytosis in the adherent cell 293T and Jurkat T cell lines using a fusion protein of extracellular CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of WC1. Individual mutation of the two leucine residues of the endocytic dileucine motif in the WC1 cytoplasmic domain significantly reduced PMA-induced endocytosis in both cell types and enhanced IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1 in Jurkat cells, suggesting that the sustained membrane coligation of CD3/TCR with WC1 caused by a decrease in endocytosis increases T cell activation. Mutation of two serines upstream of the endocytic dileucine motif affected endocytosis only in adherent 293T cells. Although the two upstream serines were not required for WC1 endocytosis in Jurkat cells, the pan-protein kinase C inhibitor Gö6983 blocked endocytosis of CD4/WC1, and mutation of the upstream serines in WC1 inhibited IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1. These studies provide insights into the signaling of WC1 gene arrays that are present in most mammals and play critical roles in γδ T cell responses to bacterial pathogens.

  6. Differential regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta5 integrins upon smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Racaud-Sultan, C; Ragab, A; Albiges-Rizo, C; Chap, H; Iberg, N; Morand, O; Perret, B

    2001-11-09

    Smooth muscle cell migration is a key step of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. We demonstrate that alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) integrins synergistically regulate smooth muscle cell migration onto vitronectin. Using an original haptotactic cell migration assay, we measured a strong stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in migrating vascular smooth muscle cells. Phosphatidic acid production and phosphoinositide 3-kinase IA activation were triggered only upon alpha(V)beta(3) engagement. Blockade of alpha(V)beta(3) engagement or phospholipase C activity resulted in a strong inhibition of smooth muscle cell spreading on vitronectin. By contrast, blockade of alpha(V)beta(5) reinforced elongation and polarization of cell shape. Moreover, Pyk2-associated tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 4-kinase activities measured in Pyk2 immunoprecipitates were stimulated upon cell migration. Blockade of either alpha(V)beta(3) or alpha(V)beta(5) function, as well as inhibition of phospholipase C activity, decreased both Pyk2-associated activities. We demonstrated that the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase corresponded to the beta isoform. Our data point to the metabolism of phosphoinositides as a regulatory pathway for the differential roles played by alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) upon cell migration and identify the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase beta as a common target for both integrins.

  7. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  8. Transgenic up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII in forebrain leads to increased anxiety-like behaviors and aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Shunsuke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated essential roles for alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII in learning, memory and long-term potentiation (LTP. However, previous studies have also shown that alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice display a dramatic decrease in anxiety-like and fearful behaviors, and an increase in defensive aggression. These findings indicated that alpha-CaMKII is important not only for learning and memory but also for emotional behaviors. In this study, to understand the roles of alpha-CaMKII in emotional behavior, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain and analyzed their behavioral phenotypes. Results We generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain under the control of the alpha-CaMKII promoter. In contrast to alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in anxiety-like behaviors in open field, elevated zero maze, light-dark transition and social interaction tests, and a decrease in locomotor activity in their home cages and novel environments; these phenotypes were the opposite to those observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice. In addition, similarly with alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in aggression. However, in contrast to the increase in defensive aggression observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in offensive aggression. Conclusion Up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII expression in the forebrain leads to an increase in anxiety-like behaviors and offensive aggression. From the comparisons with previous findings, we suggest that the expression levels of alpha-CaMKII are associated with the state of emotion; the expression level of alpha-CaMKII positively correlates with the anxiety state and strongly affects

  9. Neuronal changes resulting in up-regulation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter D.Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline inhibits the pro-duction and release of pro-inlfammatory cytokines. However, after peripheral nerve and tissue injury, pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to induce the expression of the alpha1A-adreno-ceptor subtype on immune cells and perhaps also on other cells in the injured tissue. In turn, noradrenaline may act on up-regulated alpha1-adrenoceptors to increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. In addition, the release of inflammatory mediators and nerve growth factor from keratinocytes and other cells may augment the expression of al-pha1-adrenoceptors on peripheral nerve ifbers. Consequently, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, and inlfammatory processes build. These mechanisms could contribute to the development of sympathetically maintained pain in conditions such as post-herpetic neuralgia, cutaneous neuromas, amputation stump pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

  10. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-01-23

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 restriction by human-rhesus chimeric tripartite motif 5alpha (TRIM 5alpha) in CD34(+) cell-derived macrophages in vitro and in T cells in vivo in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID-hu) mice transplanted with human fetal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joseph; Akkina, Ramesh

    2008-03-01

    Species-specific innate resistance against viral infections offers novel avenues for antiviral therapeutics. The retroviral restriction factor TRIM5alpha (tripartite motif 5alpha protein) has been shown to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection in otherwise susceptible cell lines and CD34(+) cell-derived macrophages. A 13-amino acid patch in the C-terminal B30.2 (SPRY) domain of rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha has been shown to be involved in HIV-1 capsid recognition and is critical for viral inhibition. A chimeric human-rhesus TRIM5alpha (TRIM5alpha-HRH) was generated by replacing an 11-amino acid patch in the human isoform with the rhesus 13-amino acid patch. Here we show that lentiviral vector expression of this human-rhesus chimera in HIV-1-permissive MAGI-CXCR4 cells conferred resistance as well as a selective survival advantage on HIV-1 challenge. To apply these findings in a stem cell gene therapy setting, TRIM5alpha-HRH was expressed in CD34(+) cell-derived macrophages in vitro and in SCID-hu mouse-derived thymocytes in vivo. On viral challenge, transgenic macrophages and thymocytes were highly resistant to HIV-1 compared with control cells. Normal development of TRIM5alpha-HRH-expressing macrophages and in vivo-derived T cells was also observed by phenotypic flow cytometric analysis. These results demonstrate the efficacy of TRIM5alpha-HRH in a stem cell setting and its further advancement for use in gene therapy applications.

  12. BDNF up-regulates alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels on subpopulations of hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Kerri A; Zago, Wagner M; Berg, Darwin K

    2006-12-01

    In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a number of synaptic components. Among these are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha7 subunits (alpha7-nAChRs), which are interesting because of their relative abundance in the hippocampus and their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that BDNF elevates surface and intracellular pools of alpha7-nAChRs on cultured hippocampal neurons and that glutamatergic activity is both necessary and sufficient for the effect. Blocking transmission through NMDA receptors with APV blocked the BDNF effect; increasing spontaneous excitatory activity with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline replicated the BDNF effect. BDNF antibodies blocked the BDNF-mediated increase but not the bicuculline one, consistent with enhanced glutamatergic activity acting downstream from BDNF. Increased alpha7-nAChR clusters were most prominent on interneuron subtypes known to directly innervate excitatory neurons. The results suggest that BDNF, acting through glutamatergic transmission, can modulate hippocampal output in part by controlling alpha7-nAChR levels.

  13. Regulation of gene expression by the BLM helicase correlates with the presence of G-quadruplex DNA motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Giang Huong; Tang, Weiliang; Robles, Ana I;

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genetic instability and cancer predisposition, and caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Bloom syndrome, RecQ helicase-like (BLM) protein. To determine whether altered gene expression might be responsible for pathological...... features of Bloom syndrome, we analyzed mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in fibroblasts from individuals with Bloom syndrome and in BLM-depleted control fibroblasts. We identified mRNA and miRNA expression differences in Bloom syndrome patient and BLM-depleted cells. Differentially expressed m...... dysfunction, and other features observed in Bloom syndrome individuals. BLM binds to G-quadruplex (G4) DNA, and G4 motifs were enriched at transcription start sites (TSS) and especially within first introns (false discovery rate ≤ 0.001) of differentially expressed mRNAs in Bloom syndrome compared with normal...

  14. Co-regulated transcripts associated to cooperating eSNPs define Bi-fan motifs in human gene networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Kreimer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Associations between the level of single transcripts and single corresponding genetic variants, expression single nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs, have been extensively studied and reported. However, most expression traits are complex, involving the cooperative action of multiple SNPs at different loci affecting multiple genes. Finding these cooperating eSNPs by exhaustive search has proven to be statistically challenging. In this paper we utilized availability of sequencing data with transcriptional profiles in the same cohorts to identify two kinds of usual suspects: eSNPs that alter coding sequences or eSNPs within the span of transcription factors (TFs. We utilize a computational framework for considering triplets, each comprised of a SNP and two associated genes. We examine pairs of triplets with such cooperating source eSNPs that are both associated with the same pair of target genes. We characterize such quartets through their genomic, topological and functional properties. We establish that this regulatory structure of cooperating quartets is frequent in real data, but is rarely observed in permutations. eSNP sources are mostly located on different chromosomes and away from their targets. In the majority of quartets, SNPs affect the expression of the two gene targets independently of one another, suggesting a mutually independent rather than a directionally dependent effect. Furthermore, the directions in which the minor allele count of the SNP affects gene expression within quartets are consistent, so that the two source eSNPs either both have the same effect on the target genes or both affect one gene in the opposite direction to the other. Same-effect eSNPs are observed more often than expected by chance. Cooperating quartets reported here in a human system might correspond to bi-fans, a known network motif of four nodes previously described in model organisms. Overall, our analysis offers insights regarding the fine motif structure

  15. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claas Wodarczyk

    Full Text Available Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2. Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3. A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1 as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP. We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  16. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Distefano, Gianfranco; Rowe, Isaline; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-09-14

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  17. Robustness and backbone motif of a cancer network regulated by miR-17-92 cluster during the G1/S transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Yang

    Full Text Available Based on interactions among transcription factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressors and microRNAs, a Boolean model of cancer network regulated by miR-17-92 cluster is constructed, and the network is associated with the control of G1/S transition in the mammalian cell cycle. The robustness properties of this regulatory network are investigated by virtue of the Boolean network theory. It is found that, during G1/S transition in the cell cycle process, the regulatory networks are robustly constructed, and the robustness property is largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. By using the unique process-based approach, the structure of this network is analyzed. It is shown that the network can be decomposed into a backbone motif which provides the main biological functions, and a remaining motif which makes the regulatory system more stable. The critical role of miR-17-92 in suppressing the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and increasing the uncontrolled proliferation of the cancer cells by targeting a genetic network of interacting proteins is displayed with our model.

  18. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  19. Accumbal alpha-adrenoceptors, but not beta-adrenoceptors, regulate behaviour that is mediated by reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that mesolimbic alpha-adrenoceptors, but not beta-adrenoceptors, control the release of dopamine that is derived from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these storage vesicles also regulate alpha-adrenocep

  20. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase-regulated activation of the PGC-1alpha promoter in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Irrcher

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which PGC-1alpha gene expression is controlled in skeletal muscle remains largely undefined. Thus, we sought to investigate the transcriptional regulation of PGC-1alpha using AICAR, an activator of AMPK, that is known to increase PGC-1alpha expression. A 2.2 kb fragment of the human PGC-1alpha promoter was cloned and sequence analysis revealed that this TATA-less sequence houses putative consensus sites including a GC-box, a CRE, several IRSs, a SRE, binding sites for GATA, MEF2, p 53, NF-kappaB, and EBox binding proteins. AMPK activation for 24 hours increased PGC-1alpha promoter activity with concomitant increases in mRNA expression. The effect of AICAR on transcriptional activation was mediated by an overlapping GATA/EBox binding site at -495 within the PGC-1alpha promoter based on gel shift analyses that revealed increases in GATA/EBox DNA binding. Mutation of the EBox within the GATA/EBox binding site in the promoter reduced basal promoter activity and completely abolished the AICAR effect. Supershift analyses identified USF-1 as a DNA binding transcription factor potentially involved in regulating PGC-1alpha promoter activity, which was confirmed in vivo by ChIP. Overexpression of either GATA-4 or USF-1 alone increased the p851 PGC-1alpha promoter activity by 1.7- and 2.0-fold respectively, while co-expression of GATA-4 and USF-1 led to an additive increase in PGC-1alpha promoter activity. The USF-1-mediated increase in PGC-1alpha promoter activation led to similar increases at the mRNA level. Our data identify a novel AMPK-mediated regulatory pathway that regulates PGC-1alpha gene expression. This could represent a potential therapeutic target to control PGC-1alpha expression in skeletal muscle.

  2. Regulation of the alpha-glucuronidase-encoding gene ( aguA) from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R P; van de Vondervoort, P J I; Hendriks, L; van de Belt, M; Visser, J

    2002-09-01

    The alpha-glucuronidase gene aguA from Aspergillus niger was cloned and characterised. Analysis of the promoter region of aguA revealed the presence of four putative binding sites for the major carbon catabolite repressor protein CREA and one putative binding site for the transcriptional activator XLNR. In addition, a sequence motif was detected which differed only in the last nucleotide from the XLNR consensus site. A construct in which part of the aguA coding region was deleted still resulted in production of a stable mRNA upon transformation of A. niger. The putative XLNR binding sites and two of the putative CREA binding sites were mutated individually in this construct and the effects on expression were examined in A. niger transformants. Northern analysis of the transformants revealed that the consensus XLNR site is not actually functional in the aguA promoter, whereas the sequence that diverges from the consensus at a single position is functional. This indicates that XLNR is also able to bind to the sequence GGCTAG, and the XLNR binding site consensus should therefore be changed to GGCTAR. Both CREA sites are functional, indicating that CREA has a strong influence on aguA expression. A detailed expression analysis of aguA in four genetic backgrounds revealed a second regulatory system involved in activation of aguA gene expression. This system responds to the presence of glucuronic and galacturonic acids, and is not dependent on XLNR.

  3. The CcpA regulon of Streptococcus suis reveals novel insights into the regulation of the streptococcal central carbon metabolism by binding of CcpA to two distinct binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenborg, Jörg; de Greeff, Astrid; Jarek, Michael; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a neglected zoonotic streptococcus causing fatal diseases in humans and in pigs. The transcriptional regulator CcpA (catabolite control protein A) is involved in the metabolic adaptation to different carbohydrate sources and virulence of S. suis and other pathogenic streptococci. In this study, we determined the DNA binding characteristics of CcpA and identified the CcpA regulon during growth of S. suis. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses showed promiscuous DNA binding of CcpA to cognate cre sites in vitro. In contrast, sequencing of immunoprecipitated chromatin revealed two specific consensus motifs, a pseudo-palindromic cre motif (WWGAAARCGYTTTCWW) and a novel cre2 motif (TTTTYHWDHHWWTTTY), within the regulatory elements of the genes directly controlled by CcpA. Via these elements CcpA regulates expression of genes involved in carbohydrate uptake and conversion, and in addition in important metabolic pathways of the central carbon metabolism, like glycolysis, mixed-acid fermentation, and the fragmentary TCA cycle. Furthermore, our analyses provide evidence that CcpA regulates the genes of the central carbon metabolism by binding either the pseudo-palindromic cre motif or the cre2 motif in a HPr(Ser)∼P independent conformation.

  4. Genetic analysis of beta1 integrin "activation motifs" in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Meyer, Hannelore; Legate, Kyle R

    2006-01-01

    tails, leading to tail separation and integrin activation. We analyzed mice in which we mutated the tyrosines of the beta1 tail and the membrane-proximal aspartic acid required for the salt bridge. Tyrosine-to-alanine substitutions abolished beta1 integrin functions and led to a beta1 integrin......-null phenotype in vivo. Surprisingly, neither the substitution of the tyrosines with phenylalanine nor the aspartic acid with alanine resulted in an obvious defect. These data suggest that the NPXY motifs of the beta1 integrin tail are essential for beta1 integrin function, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation......Akey feature of integrins is their ability to regulate the affinity for ligands, a process termed integrin activation. The final step in integrin activation is talin binding to the NPXY motif of the integrin beta cytoplasmic domains. Talin binding disrupts the salt bridge between the alpha/beta...

  5. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  6. WebMOTIFS: automated discovery, filtering and scoring of DNA sequence motifs using multiple programs and Bayesian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Katherine A; Kayombya, Guy-Richard; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2007-07-01

    WebMOTIFS provides a web interface that facilitates the discovery and analysis of DNA-sequence motifs. Several studies have shown that the accuracy of motif discovery can be significantly improved by using multiple de novo motif discovery programs and using randomized control calculations to identify the most significant motifs or by using Bayesian approaches. WebMOTIFS makes it easy to apply these strategies. Using a single submission form, users can run several motif discovery programs and score, cluster and visualize the results. In addition, the Bayesian motif discovery program THEME can be used to determine the class of transcription factors that is most likely to regulate a set of sequences. Input can be provided as a list of gene or probe identifiers. Used with the default settings, WebMOTIFS accurately identifies biologically relevant motifs from diverse data in several species. WebMOTIFS is freely available at http://fraenkel.mit.edu/webmotifs.

  7. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT) in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  8. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Song Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  9. The alpha3 laminin subunit, alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 integrin coordinately regulate wound healing in cultured epithelial cells and in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldfinger, L E; Hopkinson, S B; deHart, G W

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that proteolytic processing within the globular domain of the alpha3 subunit of laminin-5 (LN5) converts LN5 from a cell motility-inducing factor to a protein complex that can trigger the formation of hemidesmosomes, certain cell-matrix attachment sites found in epithe......-inhibiting antibodies, we provide evidence that LN5 and its two integrin receptors (alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1) appear necessary for wound healing to occur in MCF-10A cell culture wounds. We propose a model for healing of wounded epithelial tissues based on these results....... in epithelial cells. We have prepared a monoclonal antibody (12C4) whose epitope is located toward the carboxy terminus of the globular domain of the alpha3 laminin subunit. This epitope is lost from the alpha3 subunit as a consequence of proteolytic processing. Antibody 12C4 stains throughout the matrix...... the wound site. A similar phenomenon is observed in human skin wounds, since we also detect expression of the unprocessed alpha3 laminin subunit at the leading tip of the sheet of epidermal cells that epithelializes skin wounds in vivo. In addition, using alpha3 laminin subunit and integrin function...

  10. Regulation of adherence and virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica lectin cytoplasmic domain, which contains a beta2 integrin motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, R R; Ramakrishnan, G; Rogers, J B; Lockhart, L A; Mann, B J; Petri, W A

    1998-08-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the beta2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin's role in virulence.

  11. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain); Haro, Diego, E-mail: dharo@ub.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain); Relat, Joana [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB) (Spain)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  12. Iron-regulated excretion of alpha-keto acids by Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Reissbrodt, R.; Kingsley, R; Rabsch, W.; Beer, W.; Roberts, M.; Williams, P H

    1997-01-01

    Excretion of alpha-keto acids by clinical isolates and laboratory strains of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of culture supernatants. The levels of excretion increased markedly with increasing iron stress imposed by the presence of alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl or conalbumin in the medium. The major product was pyruvic acid, but significant concentrations of alpha-ketoglutaric acid, alpha-ketoisovaleric acid, and alpha-ketoisocaproic acid were...

  13. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Moral-Chávez, Víctor Del; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for ‘neighborhood’ genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  14. NF-kappaB links innate immunity to the hypoxic response through transcriptional regulation of HIF-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Jordi; Guma, Monica; Schachtrup, Christian; Akassoglou, Katerina; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S; Haddad, Gabriel G; Karin, Michael

    2008-06-05

    The hypoxic response is an ancient stress response triggered by low ambient oxygen (O2) (ref. 1) and controlled by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1), whose alpha subunit is rapidly degraded under normoxia but stabilized when O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) that target its O2-dependent degradation domain are inhibited. Thus, the amount of HIF-1alpha, which controls genes involved in energy metabolism and angiogenesis, is regulated post-translationally. Another ancient stress response is the innate immune response, regulated by several transcription factors, among which NF-kappaB plays a central role. NF-kappaB activation is controlled by IkappaB kinases (IKK), mainly IKK-beta, needed for phosphorylation-induced degradation of IkappaB inhibitors in response to infection and inflammation. IKK-beta is modestly activated in hypoxic cell cultures when PHDs that attenuate its activation are inhibited. However, defining the relationship between NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha has proven elusive. Using in vitro systems, it was reported that HIF-1alpha activates NF-kappaB, that NF-kappaB controls HIF-1alpha transcription and that HIF-1alpha activation may be concurrent with inhibition of NF-kappaB. Here we show, with the use of mice lacking IKK-beta in different cell types, that NF-kappaB is a critical transcriptional activator of HIF-1alpha and that basal NF-kappaB activity is required for HIF-1alpha protein accumulation under hypoxia in cultured cells and in the liver and brain of hypoxic animals. IKK-beta deficiency results in defective induction of HIF-1alpha target genes including vascular endothelial growth factor. IKK-beta is also essential for HIF-1alpha accumulation in macrophages experiencing a bacterial infection. Hence, IKK-beta is an important physiological contributor to the hypoxic response, linking it to innate immunity and inflammation.

  15. Estradiol regulates alternative splicing of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Shu; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2008-03-26

    The biological actions of estrogen are mostly conveyed through interaction with two different types of estrogen receptor (ER), ER-alpha and ER-beta. With regard to ER-alpha, an alternatively spliced form and its translated product, truncated estrogen receptor product-1 (TERP-1), have been identified in the rat pituitary. TERP-1 has the ability to inhibit the ER binding to DNA response element by forming hetero-dimers with the wild-type ER. Furthermore, TERP-1 expression increased concurrently with serum estrogen levels. Although estrogen also plays important roles in the central nervous system, the existence and regulatory mechanism of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA expression has remained unclear. The present study evaluated the expression of the alternatively spliced form of the ER-alpha gene, and examined the influence of a representative ER ligand, 17beta-estradiol (E2), on the expression in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells. A real-time RT-PCR analysis using primer sets designed to amplify from exons 3 to 4, exons 4 to 5, exons 5 to 6, exons 6 to 7, and exons 7 to 8 of the mouse ER-alpha gene revealed the existence of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA and its putative transcription initiation site, located between exon 4 and exon 5. Although E2 had no apparent effect on the overall expression of ER-alpha mRNA, it reduced the incidence of the alternatively spliced form of ER-alpha. The down-regulation by E2 predominantly arose via binding to nuclear ERs. The present study demonstrated that alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA is expressed in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells, and provides evidence for the functional up-regulation of ER-alpha via the ligand-binding activation of ERs.

  16. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  17. Identification of common motifs in the regulation of light harvesting: The case of cyanobacteria IsiA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahadoszamen, Md; D'Haene, Sandrine; Ara, Anjue Mane; Romero, Elisabet; Dekker, Jan P; Grondelle, Rienk van; Berera, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    When cyanobacteria are grown under iron-limited or other oxidative stress conditions the iron stress inducible pigment-protein IsiA is synthesized in variable amounts. IsiA accumulates in aggregates inside the photosynthetic membrane that strongly dissipate chlorophyll excited state energy. In this paper we applied Stark fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy at 77K to IsiA aggregates to gain insight into the nature of the emitting and energy dissipating state(s). Our study shows that two emitting states are present in the system, one emitting at 684 nm and the other emitting at about 730 nm. The new 730 nm state exhibits strongly reduced fluorescence (F) together with a large charge transfer character. We discuss these findings in the light of the energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the regulation of photosynthesis in plants, cyanobacteria and diatoms. Our results suggest that photosynthetic organisms have adopted common mechanisms to cope with the deleterious effects of excess light under unfavorable growth conditions.

  18. Topotecan inhibits cancer cell migration by down-regulation of chemokine CC motif receptor 7 and matrix metalloproteinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sen-sen LIN; Li SUN; Yan-kai ZHANG; Ren-ping ZHAO; Wen-lu LIANG; Sheng-tao YUAN; Lu-yong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of topotecan (TPT) on cancer cell migration.Methods: Growth inhibition of TPT was analyzed by MTT assay, and cancer cell migration was measured by transwell double chamber assay. To verify the effect of TPT on the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7, quantitative PCR, semi-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis were performed. The secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gelatin zymography. To evaluate possible contributions of CCR7 to MMP secretion, the overexpression vectors pcDNA3.1+-CCR7 and CCR7 siRNA were transiently transfected into MDA-MB-435 cells.Results: TPT inhibited cancer cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, TPT significantly decreased the expression of CCR7 in both MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 cells and moderately reduced the expression of CXCR4 in MDA-MB-435 cells. The secretion of MMPs (MMP-2, MMP-9) was also inhibited by TPT. Overexpression of CCR7 increased the secretion of MMP-2/9 and cancer cell migration, whereas knockdown of CCR7 reduced active MMP-2/9 production and migration of MDA-MB-435 cells.Conclusion: TPT inhibited cancer cell migration by down-regulation of CCR7 and MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9).

  19. Ordered transcriptional factor recruitment and epigenetic regulation of tnf-alpha in necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandoval, J.; Pereda, J.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Escobar, J.; Hidalgo, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Franco, L.; Sastre, J.; Lopez-Rodas, G.

    2010-01-01

    Tauhe expression of the critical initiator cytokine TNF-alpha was strongly upregulated in vivo in acute necrotic pancreatitis (AP) in rodents and in vitro in TNF-alpha activated acinar AR42J cells. Upregulation of tnf-alpha, inos, icam-1 and il-6 occurred both in TNF-alpha receptor 1 and 2 knock-out

  20. Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether swimming exercise could improve insulin resistance (IR by regulating tripartite motif family protein 72 (TRIM72 expression and AKT signal pathway in rats fed with high-fat diet. Five-week-old rats were classified into 3 groups: standard diet as control (CON, high-fat diet (HFD, and HFD plus swimming exercise (Ex-HFD. After 8 weeks, glucose infusion rate (GIR, markers of oxidative stress, mRNA and protein expression of TRIM72, protein of IRS, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were determined in quadriceps muscles. Compared with HFD, the GIR, muscle SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly increased (p<0.05, resp., whereas muscle MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased (p<0.05 and p<0.01 in Ex-HFD. Expression levels of TRIM72 mRNA and protein in muscles were significantly reduced (p<0.05 and p<0.01, whereas protein expression levels of IRS-1, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were significantly increased in Ex-HFD compared with HFD (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.05. These results suggest that an 8-week swimming exercise improves HFD-induced insulin resistance maybe through a reduction of TRIM72 in skeletal muscle and enhancement of AKT signal transduction.

  1. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cheng, Jung-Chien [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Huang, He-Feng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Leung, Peter C.K., E-mail: peter.leung@ubc.ca [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  2. Regulation of pulsatile secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha from the ovine uterus by ovarian steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, W J; Raw, R E

    1993-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine how progesterone and oestradiol regulate pulsatile secretion of PGF2 alpha from the ovine uterus. In Expt 1, ovariectomized ewes received: (1) no treatment, (2) oestradiol, (3) progesterone, or (4) oestradiol and progesterone (n = 5 ewes per treatment group) to approximate the changes in steroids that occur during the oestrous cycle. Jugular venous blood samples were collected at 30 min intervals for 48 h beginning at 08:00 on day 14 of steroid replacement. Blood samples were collected from five intact ewes at a comparable time of the oestrous cycle for comparison. The number and magnitude of pulses in 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGF2 alpha (PGFM) in jugular venous blood samples were used to assess uterine secretion of PGF2 alpha. Experiment 2 was conducted as Expt 1, except that the progesterone replacement protocol was modified to duplicate more closely the temporal pattern of progesterone observed in intact ewes. Results were similar in both experiments. Intact ewes averaged 4.4 +/- 0.6 pulses per 48 h blood sampling period. The frequency of pulses was less in ovariectomized ewes (P < 0.05). The number of pulses was increased by progesterone treatment (P < 0.01); the number of pulses in ovariectomized ewes receiving progesterone replacement was similar to that observed in intact ewes. There was a tendency for oestradiol to have a positive effect on the number of pulses (P = 0.12). The magnitude of pulses in intact ewes averaged 419 +/- 38 pg ml-1 and was much less in ovariectomized ewes (P < 0.05) than in intact ewes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Structural motifs and potential sigma homologies in the large subunit of human general transcription factor TFIIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Y; Sumimoto, H; Hoffmann, A; Shimasaki, S; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1991-12-05

    The general transcription factor TFIIE has an essential role in eukaryotic transcription initiation together with RNA polymerase II and other general factors. Human TFIIE consists of two subunits of relative molecular mass 57,000 (TFIIE-alpha) and 34,000 (TFIIE-beta) and joins the preinitiation complex after RNA polymerase II and TFIIF. Here we report the cloning and structure of a complementary DNA encoding a functional human TFIIE-alpha. TFIIE-alpha is necessary for transcription initiation together with TFIIE-beta, and recombinant TFIIE-alpha can fully replace the natural subunit in an in vitro transcription assay. The sequence contains several interesting structural motifs (leucine repeat, zinc finger and helix-turn-helix) and sequence similarities to bacterial sigma factors that suggest direct involvement in the regulation of transcription initiation.

  4. Primer extension studies on alpha-amylase mRNAs in barley aleurone. II. Hormonal regulation of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, P M; Jacobsen, J V

    1991-04-01

    Relative levels of different alpha-amylase mRNAs were assessed by primer extension experiments using RNA prepared from aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Himalaya). Three different aleurone systems were studied: protoplasts prepared from aleurone layers, isolated aleurone layers, and aleurone from germinated grain. Oligonucleotide primers specific for the low-pI and high-pI alpha-amylase groups allowed the levels of different alpha-amylase mRNAs to be assessed both within and between the two groups. In all aleurone systems the same set of alpha-amylase mRNAs was produced in response to either applied gibberellic acid (aleurone protoplasts, isolated aleurone layers) or, presumably, native gibberellin(s) (germinated grain). This result indicates that the same set of genes is being expressed in each case. Differences were observed between the different aleurone systems in regulation of levels of alpha-amylase mRNAs. In particular, the regulation of alpha-amylase mRNA levels in aleurone of germinated grain has unique features which are not adequately explained by the response of isolated aleurone layers to gibberellic acid.

  5. Species-specific mechanisms for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) regulation by drugs and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, Christoph; Gnerre, Carmela; Fraser, David J; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia; Jover, Ramiro; Meyer, Urs A

    2005-02-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated in order to control intrahepatic cholesterol and bile acid levels. Ligands of the xenobiotic-sensing pregnane X receptor inhibit CYP7A1 expression. To retrace the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying CYP7A1 inhibition, we used a chicken hepatoma cell system that retains the ability to be induced by phenobarbital and other drugs. Whereas bile acids regulate CYP7A1 via small heterodimer partner and liver receptor homolog-1, mRNA expression of these nuclear receptors is unchanged by xenobiotics. Instead, drugs repress chicken hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) transcript levels concomitant with a reduction in CYP7A1 expression. Importantly, no reduction of HNF4alpha levels is found in mouse liver in vivo and in human primary hepatocyte cultures, respectively. Thus, besides the importance of HNF4alpha in CYP7A1 regulation in all species, birds and mammals use different signaling pathways to adjust CYP7A1 levels after exposure to xenobiotics.

  6. The TACAN4TGCA motif upstream from the -35 region in the sigma70-sigmaS-dependent Pm promoter of the TOL plasmid is the minimum DNA segment required for transcription stimulation by XylS regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, M T; Marqués, S; Ramos, J L

    1996-11-01

    Transcription from the TOL plasmid meta-cleavage pathway operon promoter Pm is dependent on the XylS regulator activated by benzoate effectors or after XylS overproduction. We have generated 5' deletions in Pm and have analyzed expression from wild-type and mutant promoters with the wild-type XylS regulator and XylS mutant regulators that stimulated transcription constitutively. We have found that the motifs T(C or A)CAN4TGCA located between -46 and -57 and -67 and -78 with respect to the main transcription initiation point are required for maximal stimulation of transcription from Pm with effector-activated wild-type XylS. Deletion of the farthest TCCA submotif decreased but did not abolish transcription mediated by the pair XylS with 3-methylbenzoate; however, removal of the motif between -67 and -78 resulted in the loss of stimulation by the wild-type regulator. XylSG44S and XylSS229I stimulated high levels of transcription in the absence of effectors from the wild-type promoter and from a mutant promoter exhibiting only the -46 to -57 motif only when an effector was present. The point mutation Pm5U (with C-47 replaced by G [C-47-->G]) and Pm4 (C-68-->G), located in each 3' TGCA submotif of each motif, resulted in a 90% decrease in transcription stimulation with wild-type XylS; however, the mutant XylSS229I stimulated high levels of transcription from the point mutation promoters both in the presence and in the absence of effectors, while mutant XylSG44S suppressed the two point mutations only with 3-methylbenzoate. Overexpression of XylS and XylSG44S allowed the two regulators to stimulate high levels of transcription from the wild-type promoter, the point mutation Pm4 and Pm5U promoters, and deltaPm promoters exhibiting at least the -46 to -57 motif. Therefore the TACAN4TGCA motif between -46 and -57 represents the minimal DNA segment required for stimulation of transcription from Pm.

  7. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-alpha production through down-regulation of IRF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Barun; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF-alpha on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- alpha inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- alpha production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF-alpha therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  8. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1.

  9. The helical domain of a G protein alpha subunit is a regulator of its effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Northup, J K

    1998-10-27

    The alpha subunit (Galpha) of heterotrimeric G proteins is a major determinant of signaling selectivity. The Galpha structure essentially comprises a GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). We used the vertebrate phototransduction model to test for potential functions of HD and found that the HD of the retinal transducin Galpha (Galphat) and the closely related gustducin (Galphag), but not Galphai1, Galphas, or Galphaq synergistically enhance guanosine 5'-gamma[-thio]triphosphate bound Galphat (GalphatGTPgammaS) activation of bovine rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). In addition, both HDt and HDg, but not HDi1, HDs, or HDq attenuate the trypsin-activated PDE. GalphatGDP and HDt attenuation of trypsin-activated PDE saturate with similar affinities and to an identical 38% of initial activity. These data suggest that interaction of intact Galphat with the PDE catalytic core may be caused by the HD moiety, and they indicate an independent site(s) for the HD moiety of Galphat within the PDE catalytic core in addition to the sites for the inhibitory Pgamma subunits. The HD moiety of GalphatGDP is an attenuator of the activated catalytic core, whereas in the presence of activated GalphatGTPgammaS the independently expressed HDt is a potent synergist. Rhodopsin catalysis of Galphat activation enhances the PDE activation produced by subsaturating levels of Galphat, suggesting a HD-moiety synergism from a transient conformation of Galphat. These results establish HD-selective regulations of vertebrate retinal PDE, and they provide evidence demonstrating that the HD is a modulatory domain. We suggest that the HD works in concert with the RasD, enhancing the efficiency of G protein signaling.

  10. Karyopherin Alpha 1 Regulates Satellite Cell Proliferation and Survival by Modulating Nuclear Import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cutler, Alicia; Pavlath, Grace K

    2016-07-19

    Satellite cells are stem cells with an essential role in skeletal muscle repair. Precise regulation of gene expression is critical for proper satellite cell quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. Nuclear proteins required for gene expression are dependent on the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery to access to nucleus, however little is known about regulation of nuclear transport in satellite cells. The best characterized nuclear import pathway is classical nuclear import which depends on a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS) in a cargo protein and the heterodimeric import receptors, karyopherin alpha (KPNA) and beta (KPNB). Multiple KPNA1 paralogs exist and can differ in importing specific cNLS proteins required for cell differentiation and function. We show that transcripts for six Kpna paralogs underwent distinct changes in mouse satellite cells during muscle regeneration accompanied by changes in cNLS proteins in nuclei. Depletion of KPNA1, the most dramatically altered KPNA, caused satellite cells in uninjured muscle to prematurely activate, proliferate and undergo apoptosis leading to satellite cell exhaustion with age. Increased proliferation of satellite cells led to enhanced muscle regeneration at early stages of regeneration. In addition, we observed impaired nuclear localization of two key KPNA1 cargo proteins: p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor associated with cell cycle control and lymphoid enhancer factor 1, a critical cotranscription factor for β-catenin. These results indicate that regulated nuclear import of proteins by KPNA1 is critical for satellite cell proliferation and survival and establish classical nuclear import as a novel regulatory mechanism for controlling satellite cell fate. Stem Cells 2016.

  11. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Stoll, M; Blomberg, L A; Ramsay, T G

    2015-07-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP, orosomucoid, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute-phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute-phase protein in this species, and its circulating concentration appears to be associated with growth rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of AGP synthesis in hepatocytes prepared from suckling piglets and to provide a framework to compare its regulation with that of haptoglobin (HP), a positive acute-phase protein. Hepatocytes were isolated from preweaned piglets and maintained in serum-free monolayer culture for up to 72 h. The influences of hormones, cytokines, and redox modifiers on the expression and secretion of AGP and HP were determined by relative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring the concentration of each protein secreted into culture medium. The messenger RNA abundance and/or secretion of AGP protein was enhanced by interleukin (IL)-17a, IL-1, and resveratrol and inhibited by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), oncostatin M, and thyroid hormone (P < 0.05). HP expression and synthesis were upregulated by oncostatin M, IL-6, and dexamethasone and downregulated by TNF (P < 0.01). The overall messenger RNA expression at 24 h was in agreement with the secreted protein patterns confirming that control of these proteins in hepatocytes is largely transcriptional. Moreover, these data support the consideration that AGP is a negative acute-phase reactant and appears to be regulated by cytokines (with the exception of TNF) and hormones primarily in a manner opposite to that of the positive acute-phase protein, HP.

  12. The liver-enriched transcription factor CREBH is nutritionally regulated and activated by fatty acids and PPAR{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danno, Hirosuke; Ishii, Kiyo-aki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Mikami, Motoki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Kumadaki, Shin; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro [Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Shimano, Hitoshi, E-mail: hshimano@md.tsukuba.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan)

    2010-01-08

    To elucidate the physiological role of CREBH, the hepatic mRNA and protein levels of CREBH were estimated in various feeding states of wild and obesity mice. In the fast state, the expression of CREBH mRNA and nuclear protein were high and profoundly suppressed by refeeding in the wild-type mice. In ob/ob mice, the refeeding suppression was impaired. The diet studies suggested that CREBH expression was activated by fatty acids. CREBH mRNA levels in the mouse primary hepatocytes were elevated by addition of the palmitate, oleate and eicosapenonate. It was also induced by PPAR{alpha} agonist and repressed by PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that the CREBH promoter activity was induced by fatty acids and co-expression of PPAR{alpha}. Deletion studies identified the PPRE for PPAR{alpha} activation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay confirmed that PPAR{alpha} directly binds to the PPRE. Activation of CREBH at fasting through fatty acids and PPAR{alpha} suggest that CREBH is involved in nutritional regulation.

  13. MIP-1alpha regulates CD4+ T cell chemotaxis and indirectly enhances PMN persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernacki, K A; Barrett, R P; McClellan, S; Hazlett, L D

    2001-12-01

    The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) in cell infiltration into Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected cornea and subsequent disease was examined. Greater amounts of the chemokine (protein and mRNA) were found in the infected cornea of susceptible B6 ("cornea perforates") versus resistant BALB/c ("cornea heals") mice from 1 to 5 days postinfection. Treatment of BALB/c mice with recombinant (r) MIP-1alpha exacerbated disease and was associated with an increased number of neutrophils (PMNs) in the cornea. Treatment of BALB/c mice with rMIP-1alpha also induced recruitment of activated CD4+ T cells into the affected cornea, converting resistant to susceptible mice. Depleting CD4+ T cells in r-treated BALB/c mice significantly decreased PMNs in cornea tissue, suggesting that T cells regulate persistence of PMNs at this site. In B6 mice, administration of neutralizing MIP-1alpha polyclonal antibody also significantly reduced PMN numbers and pathology. Collectively, evidence is provided that MIP-1alpha directly contributed to CD4+ T cell recruitment and indirectly to PMN persistence in the infected cornea.

  14. Density-dependent nerve growth factor regulation of Gs-alpha RNA in pheochromocytoma 12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, G; Aguanno, A; Kumar, R; Benincasa, D; Gubits, R M; Yu, H; Dolan, K P

    1990-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) affects levels of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gs-alpha) in pheochromocytoma 12 cells in a bidirectional, density-dependent manner. Cells grown at high density responded to NGF treatment with increased levels of Gs-alpha mRNA and protein. Conversely, in cells grown in low-density cultures, levels of this mRNA were lowered by NGF treatment. Images PMID:2160599

  15. Network Analysis Implicates Alpha-Synuclein (Snca) in the Regulation of Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Gina; Mesner, Larry D.; Foley, Patricia L.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Farber, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The postmenopausal period in women is associated with decreased circulating estrogen levels, which accelerate bone loss and increase the risk of fracture. Here, we gained novel insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, a model of human menopause, using co-expression network analysis. Specifically, we generated a co-expression network consisting of 53 gene modules using expression profiles from intact and OVX mice from a panel of inbred strains. The expression of four modules was altered by OVX, including module 23 whose expression was decreased by OVX across all strains. Module 23 was enriched for genes involved in the response to oxidative stress, a process known to be involved in OVX-induced bone loss. Additionally, module 23 homologs were co-expressed in human bone marrow. Alpha synuclein (Snca) was one of the most highly connected “hub” genes in module 23. We characterized mice deficient in Snca and observed a 40% reduction in OVX-induced bone loss. Furthermore, protection was associated with the altered expression of specific network modules, including module 23. In summary, the results of this study suggest that Snca regulates bone network homeostasis and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. PMID:27378017

  16. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  17. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  18. The conserved dileucine- and tyrosine-based motifs in MLV and MPMV envelope glycoproteins are both important to regulate a common Env intracellular trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Vergès Sandra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrovirus particles emerge from the assembly of two structural protein components, Gag that is translated as a soluble protein in the cytoplasm of the host cells, and Env, a type I transmembrane protein. Because both components are translated in different intracellular compartments, elucidating the mechanisms of retrovirus assembly thus requires the study of their intracellular trafficking. Results We used a CD25 (Tac chimera-based approach to study the trafficking of Moloney murine leukemia virus and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus Env proteins. We found that the cytoplasmic tails (CTs of both Env conserved two major signals that control a complex intracellular trafficking. A dileucine-based motif controls the sorting of the chimeras from the trans-Golgi network (TGN toward endosomal compartments. Env proteins then follow a retrograde transport to the TGN due to the action of a tyrosine-based motif. Mutation of either motif induces the mis-localization of the chimeric proteins and both motifs are found to mediate interactions of the viral CTs with clathrin adaptors. Conclusion This data reveals the unexpected complexity of the intracellular trafficking of retrovirus Env proteins that cycle between the TGN and endosomes. Given that Gag proteins hijack endosomal host proteins, our work suggests that the endosomal pathway may be used by retroviruses to ensure proper encountering of viral structural Gag and Env proteins in cells, an essential step of virus assembly.

  19. An amphipathic alpha-helix in the prodomain of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript peptide precursor serves as its sorting signal to the regulated secretory pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías H Blanco

    Full Text Available Cocaine and Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART peptides are anorexigenic neuropeptides. The L34F mutation in human CART peptide precursor (proCART has been linked to obesity (Yanik et al. Endocrinology 147: 39, 2006. Decrease in CART peptide levels in individuals carrying the L34F mutation was attributed to proCART subcellular missorting. We studied proCART features required to enter the regulated secretory pathway. The subcellular localization and the secretion mode of monomeric EGFP fused to the full-length or truncated forms of human proCART transiently transfected in PC12 cells were analyzed. Our results showed that the N-terminal 1-41 fragment of proCART was necessary and sufficient to sort proCART to the regulated secretory pathway. In silico modeling predicted an alpha-helix structure located between residues 24-37 of proCART. Helical wheel projection of proCART alpha-helix showed an amphipathic configuration. The L34F mutation does not modify the amphipathicity of proCART alpha-helix and consistently proCARTL34F was efficiently sorted to the regulated secretory pathway. However, four additional mutations to proCARTL34F that reduced its alpha-helix amphipathicity resulted in the missorting of the mutated proCART toward the constitutive secretory pathway. These findings show that an amphipathic alpha-helix is a key cis-structure for the proCART sorting mechanism. In addition, our results indicate that the association between L34F mutation and obesity is not explained by proCART missorting.

  20. Regulation of miR-200c by nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha}, LRH-1 and SHP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yang, Zhihong [Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Oncological Science, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Whitby, Richard [Department of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hants SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Wang, Li, E-mail: l.wang@hsc.utah.edu [Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Oncological Science, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 abolishes miR-200c inhibition of HCC cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP represses miR-200c expression via inhibition of the activity of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RJW100 exhibits strong ability to downregulate ZEB1 and ZEB2 proteins. -- Abstract: We investigated regulation of miR-200c expression by nuclear receptors. Ectopic expression of miR-200c inhibited MHCC97H cell migration, which was abrogated by the synergistic effects of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 siRNAs. The expression of miR-200c was decreased by PPAR{alpha}/LRH-1 siRNAs and increased by SHP siRNAs, and overexpression of the receptors reversed the effects of their respective siRNAs. SHP siRNAs also drastically enhanced the ability of the LRH-1 agonist RJW100 to induce miR-200c and downregulate ZEB1 and ZEB2 proteins. Co-expression of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 moderately transactivated the miR-200c promoter, which was repressed by SHP co-expression. RJW100 caused strong activation of the miR-200c promoter. This is the first report to demonstrate that miR-200c expression is controlled by nuclear receptors.

  1. Autocrine regulation of cell proliferation by estrogen receptor-alpha in estrogen receptor-alpha-positive breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhongzong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor-α (ERα is essential for mammary gland development and is a major oncogene in breast cancer. Since ERα is not colocalized with the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the normal mammary glands and the majority of primary breast tumors, it is generally believed that paracrine regulation is involved in ERα mediated cell proliferation. In the paracrine model, ERα-positive cells don't proliferate but will release some paracrine growth factors to stimulate the neighboring cells to proliferate. In a subpopulation of cancer cells in some primary breast tumors, however, ERα does colocalize with the cell proliferation marker Ki-67, suggesting an autocrine regulation by ERα in some primary breast tumors. Methods Colocalization of ERα with Ki-67 in ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1 was evaluated by immunofluorescent staining. Cell cycle phase dependent expression of ERα was determined by co-immunofluorescent staining of ERα and the major cyclins (D, E, A, B, and by flow cytometry analysis of ERαhigh cells. To further confirm the autocrine action of ERα, MCF-7 cells were growth arrested by ICI182780 treatment, followed by treatment with EGFR inhibitor, before estrogen stimulation and analyses for colocalization of Ki-67 and ERα and cell cycle progression. Results Colocalization of ERα with Ki-67 was present in all three ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines. Unlike that in the normal mammary glands and the majority of primary breast tumors, ERα is highly expressed throughout the cell cycle in MCF-7 cells. Without E2 stimulation, MCF-7 cells released from ICI182780 treatment remain at G1 phase. E2 stimulation of ICI182780 treated cells, however, promotes the expression and colocalization of ERα and Ki-67 as well as the cell cycle progressing through the S and G2/M phases. Inhibition of EGFR signaling does not inhibit the autocrine action of ERα. Conclusion Our data indicate

  2. Differential expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and its regulation by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in normal and malignant prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarayan, V; Sabichi, A L; Llansa, N; Lippman, S M; Menter, D G

    2001-03-15

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression is elevated in some malignancies; however, information is scarce regarding COX-2 contributions to the development of prostate cancer and its regulation by inflammatory cytokines. The present study compared and contrasted the expression levels and subcellular distribution patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 in normal prostate [prostate epithelial cell (PrEC), prostate smooth muscle (PrSM), and prostate stromal (PrSt)] primary cell cultures and prostatic carcinoma cell lines (PC-3, LNCaP, and DU145). The basal COX-2 mRNA and protein levels were high in normal PrEC and low in tumor cells, unlike many other normal cells and tumor cells. Because COX-2 levels were low in prostate smooth muscle cells, prostate stromal cells, and tumor cells, we also examined whether COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression was elevated in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a strong inducer of COX-2 expression. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated different patterns and kinetics of expression for COX-1 and COX-2 among normal cells and tumor cells in response to TNF-alpha. In particular, COX-2 protein levels increased, and the subcellular distribution formed a distinct perinuclear ring in the normal cells at 4 h after TNF-alpha exposure. The COX-2 protein levels also increased in cancer cells, but the subcellular distribution was less organized; COX-2 protein appeared diffuse in some cells and accumulated as focal deposits in the cytoplasm of other cells. TNF-alpha induction of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 correlated inversely with induction of apoptosis. We conclude that COX-2 expression may be important to PrEC cell function. Although it is low in stromal and tumor cells, COX-2 expression is induced by TNF-alpha in these cells, and this responsiveness may play an important role in prostate cancer progression.

  3. Species-specific mechanisms for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) regulation by drugs and bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    C. Handschin.; Gnerre, C; Fraser, D. J.; Martinez-Jimenez, C.; Jover, R; Meyer, U A

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated in order to control intrahepatic cholesterol and bile acid levels. Ligands of the xenobiotic-sensing pregnane X receptor inhibit CYP7A1 expression. To retrace the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying CYP7A1 inhibition, we used a chicken hepatoma cell system that retains the ability to be induced by phenobarbital and other drugs. Whereas bile acids regulate CYP7A1 via small heterodimer partner and liver ...

  4. DMPD: Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16846591 Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti...Distinct functions of IRF-3 and IRF-7 in IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti... IFN-alpha gene regulation and controlof anti-tumor activity in primary macrophages. Authors Solis M, Goubau

  5. The Motif Tracking Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe; 10.1007/s11633.008.0032.0

    2010-01-01

    The search for patterns or motifs in data represents a problem area of key interest to finance and economic researchers. In this paper we introduce the Motif Tracking Algorithm, a novel immune inspired pattern identification tool that is able to identify unknown motifs of a non specified length which repeat within time series data. The power of the algorithm comes from the fact that it uses a small number of parameters with minimal assumptions regarding the data being examined or the underlying motifs. Our interest lies in applying the algorithm to financial time series data to identify unknown patterns that exist. The algorithm is tested using three separate data sets. Particular suitability to financial data is shown by applying it to oil price data. In all cases the algorithm identifies the presence of a motif population in a fast and efficient manner due to the utilisation of an intuitive symbolic representation. The resulting population of motifs is shown to have considerable potential value for other ap...

  6. The Motif Tracking Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The search for patterns or motifs in data represents a problem area of key interest to finance and economic researchers. In this paper, we introduce the motif tracking algorithm (MTA), a novel immune inspired (IS) pattern identification tool that is able to identify unknown motifs of a non specified length which repeat within time series data. The power of the algorithm comes from the fact that it uses a small number of parameters with minimal assumptions regarding the data being examined or the underlying motifs. Our interest lies in applying the algorithm to financial time series data to identify unknown patterns that exist. The algorithm is tested using three separate data sets. Particular suitability to financial data is shown by applying it to oil price data. In all cases, the algorithm identifies the presence of a motif population in a fast and efficient manner due to the utilization of an intuitive symbolic representation.The resulting population of motifs is shown to have considerable potential value for other applications such as forecasting and algorithm seeding.

  7. Regulation of valine and. alpha. -ketoisocaproate metabolism in rat kidney mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Harper, A.E. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1988-10-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) aminotransferase (BCAT) and {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) were assayed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of rats. Rates of transamination of valine and oxidation of keto acids {alpha}-ketoisocaproate (KIC) or {alpha}-ketoisovalerate (KIV) were estimated using radioactive tracers of the appropriate substrate from amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled products formed. Because of the high mitochondrial BCAT activity, an amino acceptor for BCAT, {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}-KG) or KIC, was added to the assay medium when valine was the substrate. Rates of valine transamination and subsequent oxidation of the KIV formed were determined with 0.5 mM {alpha}-KG as the amino acceptor; these rates were 5- to 50-fold those without added {alpha}-KG. Rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine also increased when KIC was present; however, with KIC concentrations above 0.2 mM, rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine declined although rates of transamination continued to rise. When 0.05 mM KIC was added to the assay medium, oxidation of KIC was suppressed by inclusion of valine or glutamate in the medium. When valine was present KIC was not oxidized preferentially, presumably because it was also serving as an amino acceptor for BCAT. These results indicate that as the supply of amino acceptor, {alpha}-KG or KIC, is increased in mitochondria not only is the rate of valine transamination stimulated but also the rate of oxidation of the KIV formed from valine. Thus the rate of oxidation of BCAA can be controlled by factors that influence the rate and direction of BCAA transamination and, thereby, the supply of substrate for BCKD.

  8. Regulation of TNF-alpha secretion by a specific melanocortin-1 receptor peptide agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignar, Diane M; Andrews, John L; Jansen, Marilyn; Eilert, Michelle M; Pink, Heather M; Lin, Peiyuan; Sherrill, Ronald G; Szewczyk, Jerzy R; Conway, James G

    2003-05-01

    The lack of specific pharmacological tools has impeded the evaluation of the role of each melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtype in the myriad physiological effects of melanocortins. 154N-5 is an octapeptide (MFRdWFKPV-NH(2)) that was first identified as an MC1R antagonist in Xenopus melanophores [J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 29846]. In this manuscript, we show that 154N-5 is a specific agonist for human and murine MC1R. The peptide has negligible activity at MC3R and MC4R and is 25-fold less potent and a weak agonist at MC5R. 154N-5 was tested in both a cellular and an animal model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion. The inhibitory efficacy of 154N-5 on TNF-alpha secretion in both models was similar to the nonselective agonist NDP-alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-alphaMSH), thus, we conclude that inhibition of TNF-alpha secretion by melanocortin peptides is mediated by MC1R. 154N-5 is a valuable new tool for the evaluation of specific contribution of MC1R agonism to physiological and pathological processes.

  9. Using SCOPE to identify potential regulatory motifs in coregulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Viktor; Gross, Robert H

    2011-05-31

    SCOPE is an ensemble motif finder that uses three component algorithms in parallel to identify potential regulatory motifs by over-representation and motif position preference. Each component algorithm is optimized to find a different kind of motif. By taking the best of these three approaches, SCOPE performs better than any single algorithm, even in the presence of noisy data. In this article, we utilize a web version of SCOPE to examine genes that are involved in telomere maintenance. SCOPE has been incorporated into at least two other motif finding programs and has been used in other studies. The three algorithms that comprise SCOPE are BEAM, which finds non-degenerate motifs (ACCGGT), PRISM, which finds degenerate motifs (ASCGWT), and SPACER, which finds longer bipartite motifs (ACCnnnnnnnnGGT). These three algorithms have been optimized to find their corresponding type of motif. Together, they allow SCOPE to perform extremely well. Once a gene set has been analyzed and candidate motifs identified, SCOPE can look for other genes that contain the motif which, when added to the original set, will improve the motif score. This can occur through over-representation or motif position preference. Working with partial gene sets that have biologically verified transcription factor binding sites, SCOPE was able to identify most of the rest of the genes also regulated by the given transcription factor. Output from SCOPE shows candidate motifs, their significance, and other information both as a table and as a graphical motif map. FAQs and video tutorials are available at the SCOPE web site which also includes a "Sample Search" button that allows the user to perform a trial run. Scope has a very friendly user interface that enables novice users to access the algorithm's full power without having to become an expert in the bioinformatics of motif finding. As input, SCOPE can take a list of genes, or FASTA sequences. These can be entered in browser text fields, or read from

  10. Imidazoline receptors but not alpha 2-adrenoceptors are regulated in spontaneously hypertensive rat heart by chronic moxonidine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Menaouar, Ahmed; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla

    2004-08-01

    We have recently identified imidazoline I(1)-receptors in the heart. In the present study, we tested regulation of cardiac I(1)-receptors versus alpha(2) -adrenoceptors in response to hypertension and to chronic exposure to agonist. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, 12-14 weeks old) received moxonidine (10, 60, and 120 microg/kg/h s.c.) for 1 and 4 weeks. Autoradiographic binding of (125)I-paraiodoclonidine (0.5 nM, 1 h, 22 degrees C) and inhibition of binding with epinephrine (10(-10)-10(-5) M) demonstrated the presence of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in heart atria and ventricles. Immunoblotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified alpha(2A)-alpha(2B)-, and alpha(2C), and -adrenoceptor proteins and mRNA, respectively. However, compared with normotensive controls, cardiac alpha(2) -adrenoceptor kinetic parameters, receptor proteins, and mRNAs were not altered in SHR with or without moxonidine treatment. In contrast, autoradiography showed that up-regulated atrial I(1)-receptors in SHR are dose-dependently normalized by 1 week, with no additional effect after 4 weeks of treatment. Moxonidine (120 microg/kg/h) decreased B(max) in right (40.0 +/- 2.9-7.0 +/- 0.6 fmol/unit area; p < 0.01) and left (27.7 +/- 2.8-7.1 +/- 0.4 fmol/unit area; p < 0.01) atria, and decreased the 85- and 29-kDa imidazoline receptor protein bands, in right atria, to 51.8 +/- 3.0% (p < 0.01) and 82.7 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.03) of vehicle-treated SHR, respectively. Moxonidine-associated percentage of decrease in B(max) only correlated with the 85-kDa protein (R(2) = 0.57; p < 0.006), suggesting that this protein may represent I(2)-receptors. The weak but significant correlation between the two imidazoline receptor proteins (R(2) = 0.28; p < 0.03) implies that they arise from the same gene. In conclusion, the heart possesses I(1)-receptors and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, but only I(1)-receptors are responsive to hypertension and to chronic in vivo treatment with a selective I(1

  11. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  12. Erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene regulation by the CP2 transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chae, Ji Hyung; Lee, Yeon Ho; Park, Mi-Ae; Shin, June Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Cho, Yoon Shin; Fiering, Steven; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that ubiquitously expressed CP2c exerts potent erythroid-specific transactivation of alpha-globin through an unknown mechanism. This mechanism is reported here to involve specific CP2 splice variants and protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1). We identify a novel murine splice isoform of CP2, CP2b, which is identical to CP2a except that it has an additional 36 amino acids encoded by an extra exon. CP2b has an erythroid cell-specific transcriptional activation domain, which requires the extra exon and can form heteromeric complexes with other CP2 isoforms, but lacks the DNA binding activity found in CP2a and CP2c. Transcriptional activation of alpha-globin occurred following dimerization between CP2b and CP2c in erythroid K562 and MEL cells, but this dimerization did not activate the alpha-globin promoter in nonerythroid 293T cells, indicating that an additional erythroid factor is missing in 293T cells. PIAS1 was confirmed as a CP2 binding protein by the yeast two-hybrid screen, and expression of CP2b, CP2c, and PIAS1 in 293T cell induced alpha-globin promoter activation. These results show that ubiquitously expressed CP2b exerts potent erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene expression by complexing with CP2c and PIAS1.

  13. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  14. The lesional skin of linear IgA bullous dermatosis expresses growth-regulated peptide (GRO)-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Ihn, Hironobu; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2004-07-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old man with erythema with tense vesiculobullae and erosions on the bilateral elbows, right knee, and one buttock. A skin biopsy specimen revealed subepidermal blister formation with a predominant infiltration of neutrophils and papillary neutrophilic microabscesses. Direct immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA and weak deposition of IgG at the basement membrane zone of the lesional skin, and indirect immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA at the epidermal side of the 1M NaCl-separated normal skin. He was diagnosed with linear IgA bullous dermatosis. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the lesional and perilesional keratinocytes expressed growth-regulated peptide (GRO) -alpha, a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. This suggests that GRO-alpha plays a role in the infiltration of neutrophils into the lesional skin and in bulla formation in linear IgA bullous dermatosis.

  15. Copper binding regulates intracellular alpha-synuclein localisation, aggregation and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Moualla, Dima; Wright, Josephine A; Brown, David R

    2010-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a natively unfolded protein that aggregates and forms inclusions that are associated with a range of diseases that include Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The mechanism behind the formation of these inclusions and their possible role in disease remains unclear. Alpha-synuclein has also been shown to bind metals including copper and iron. We used a cell culture model of alpha-synuclein aggregation to examine the relationship between metals and formation of aggregates of the protein. While the levels of iron appear to have no role in aggregate formation or localisation of the protein in cells, copper appears to be important for both aggregation and cellular localisation of alpha-synuclein. Reduction in cellular copper resulted in a great decrease in aggregate formation both in terms of large aggregates visible in cells and oligomers observed in western blot analysis of cell extracts. Reduction in copper also resulted in a change in localisation of the protein which became more intensely localised to the plasma membrane in medium with low copper. These changes were reversed when copper was restored to the cells. Mutants of the copper binding domains altered the response to copper. Deletion of either the N- or C-termini resulted in a loss of aggregation while deletion of the C-termini also resulted in a loss of membrane association. Increased expression of alpha-synuclein also increased cell sensitivity to the toxicity of copper. These results suggest that the potential pathological role of alpha-synuclein aggregates is dependent upon the copper binding capacity of the protein.

  16. Pathway-specific profiling identifies the NF-kappa B-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha-regulated genes in epidermal keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Tomohiro; Gazel, Alix; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-05-13

    Identification of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) as the key agent in inflammatory disorders led to new therapies specifically targeting TNF alpha and avoiding many side effects of earlier anti-inflammatory drugs. However, because of the wide spectrum of systems affected by TNF alpha, drugs targeting TNF alpha have a potential risk of delaying wound healing, secondary infections, and cancer. Indeed, increased risks of tuberculosis and carcinogenesis have been reported as side effects after anti-TNF alpha therapy. TNF alpha regulates many processes (e.g. immune response, cell cycle, and apoptosis) through several signal transduction pathways that convey the TNF alpha signals to the nucleus. Hypothesizing that specific TNF alpha-dependent pathways control specific processes and that inhibition of a specific pathway may yield even more precisely targeted therapies, we used oligonucleotide microarrays and parthenolide, an NF-kappa B-specific inhibitor, to identify the NF-kappa B-dependent set of the TNF alpha-regulated genes in human epidermal keratinocytes. Expression of approximately 40% of all TNF alpha-regulated genes depends on NF-kappa B; 17% are regulated early (1-4 h post-treatment), and 23% are regulated late (24-48 h). Cytokines and apoptosis-related and cornification proteins belong to the "early" NF-kappa B-dependent group, and antigen presentation proteins belong to the "late" group, whereas most cell cycle, RNA-processing, and metabolic enzymes are not NF-kappa B-dependent. Therefore, inflammation, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and differentiation are on the NF-kappa B pathway, and cell cycle, metabolism, and RNA processing are not. Most early genes contain consensus NF-kappaB binding sites in their promoter DNA and are, presumably, directly regulated by NF-kappa B, except, curiously, the cornification markers. Using siRNA silencing, we identified cFLIP/CFLAR as an essential NF-kappa B-dependent antiapoptotic gene. The results confirm our

  17. ATP regulation of type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity does not require walker A-type ATP-binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Wagner, Larry E; Park, Hyung Seo; Yule, David I

    2009-06-12

    ATP is known to increase the activity of the type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R1). This effect is attributed to the binding of ATP to glycine rich Walker A-type motifs present in the regulatory domain of the receptor. Only two such motifs are present in neuronal S2+ splice variant of InsP3R1 and are designated the ATPA and ATPB sites. The ATPA site is unique to InsP3R1, and the ATPB site is conserved among all three InsP3R isoforms. Despite the fact that both the ATPA and ATPB sites are known to bind ATP, the relative contribution of these two sites to the enhancing effects of ATP on InsP3R1 function is not known. We report here a mutational analysis of the ATPA and ATPB sites and conclude neither of these sites is required for ATP modulation of InsP3R1. ATP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from permeabilized cells expressing wild type and ATP-binding site-deficient InsP3R1. Similarly, ATP increased the single channel open probability of the mutated InsP3R1 to the same extent as wild type. ATP likely exerts its effects on InsP3R1 channel function via a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism.

  18. Visibility graph motifs

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovacci, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of visibility graph motifs, smaller substructures that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated to general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable to distinguish among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification a...

  19. 1-t-motifs

    CERN Document Server

    Taelman, Lenny

    2009-01-01

    We show that the module of rational points on an abelian t-module E is canonically isomorphic with the module Ext^1(M_E, K[t]) of extensions of the trivial t-motif K[t] by the t-motif M_E associated with E. This generalizes prior results of Anderson and Thakur and of Papanikolas and Ramachandran. In case E is uniformizable then we show that this extension module is canonically isomorphic with the corresponding extension module of Pink-Hodge structures. This situation is formally very similar to Deligne's theory of 1-motifs and we have tried to build up the theory in a way that makes this analogy as clear as possible.

  20. MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . Algorithms that predict which peptides MHC molecules bind have recently been developed and cover many different alleles, but the utility of these algorithms is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing the specificity of these molecules. We have, therefore, developed a web server, MHC motif...... viewer, that allows the display of the likely binding motif for all human class I proteins of the loci HLA A, B, C, and E and for MHC class I molecules from chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), and mouse (Mus musculus). Furthermore, it covers all HLA-DR protein sequences...

  1. The MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    of peptides, and knowledge of their binding specificities is important for understanding differences in the immune response between individuals. Algorithms predicting which peptides bind a given MHC molecule have recently been developed with high prediction accuracy. The utility of these algorithms...... is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  2. Regulation of bile acid synthesis by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duez, Helene; Van Der Veen, Jelske N.; Duhem, Christian; Pourcet, Benoit; Touvier, Thierry; Fontaine, Coralie; Derudas, Bruno; Bauge, Eric; Havinga, Rick; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Henk; Van Der Sluijs, Fjodor H.; Vennstrom, Bjorn; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims: Conversion into bile acids represents an important route to remove excess cholesterol from the body. Rev-erb alpha is a nuclear receptor that participates as one of the clock genes in the control of circadian rhythmicity and plays a regulatory role in lipid metabolism and adipogen

  3. IL-13 receptor alpha-2 regulates the immune and functional response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    IL-13 has a prominent role in host defense against the gastrointestinal nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; however, the role of IL-13 alpha2 in the immune and functional response to enteric infection is not known. In the current study, we investigated changes in smooth muscle and epithelial ce...

  4. DeltaNp73alpha regulates MDR1 expression by inhibiting p53 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, A; Wei, J X; Piazuelo, M B; Washington, M K; Prassolov, V; El-Rifai, W; Zaika, A

    2008-04-01

    The p73 protein is a transcription factor and member of the p53 protein family that expresses as a complex variety of isoforms. DeltaNp73alpha is an N-terminally truncated isoform of p73. We found that DeltaNp73 protein is upregulated in human gastric carcinoma suggesting that DeltaNp73 may play an oncogenic role in these tumors. Although it has been shown that DeltaNp73alpha inhibits apoptosis and counteracts the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs, the underlying mechanism by which this p73 isoform contributes to chemotherapeutic drug response remains to be explored. We found that DeltaNp73alpha upregulates MDR1 mRNA and p-glycoprotein (p-gp), which is involved in chemotherapeutic drug transport. This p-gp upregulation was accompanied by increased p-gp functional activity in gastric cancer cells. Our data suggest that upregulation of MDR1 by DeltaNp73alpha is mediated by interaction with p53 at the MDR1 promoter.

  5. Bi-phasic effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha: IFN-alpha up- and down-regulates interleukin-4 signaling in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Sommer, Viveca Horst; Woetmann, Anders

    2003-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN-gamma) is......Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN......-gamma) is a Th1 cytokine. Here, we study cross-talk between IFN-alpha and IL-4 in human T cells. As expected, stimulation with IFN-alpha for 12-24 h inhibits IL-4 signaling. Surprisingly, however, IFN-alpha has the opposite effect on IL-4 signaling at earlier time points (up to 6 h). Thus, IFN-alpha enhances IL...

  6. Functional characterization of variations on regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lapidot

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs regulate gene expression through specific interactions with short promoter elements. The same regulatory protein may recognize a variety of related sequences. Moreover, once they are detected it is hard to predict whether highly similar sequence motifs will be recognized by the same TF and regulate similar gene expression patterns, or serve as binding sites for distinct regulatory factors. We developed computational measures to assess the functional implications of variations on regulatory motifs and to compare the functions of related sites. We have developed computational means for estimating the functional outcome of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. We predict the effects of nucleotide variations within motifs on gene expression patterns. In cases where such predictions could be compared to suitable published experimental evidence, we found very good agreement. We further accumulated statistics from multiple substitutions across various binding sites in an attempt to deduce general properties that characterize nucleotide substitutions that are more likely to alter expression. We found that substitutions involving Adenine are more likely to retain the expression pattern and that substitutions involving Guanine are more likely to alter expression compared to the rest of the substitutions. Our results should facilitate the prediction of the expression outcomes of binding site variations. One typical important implication is expected to be the ability to predict the phenotypic effect of variation in regulatory motifs in promoters.

  7. [Personal motif in art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  8. Comparison of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and their regulation in rodent and porcine species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, D.J.; Bylund, D.B.

    1984-02-01

    The alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H)yohimbine (YOH) and the alpha-2 agonist (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine (PAC) saturably label high-affinity binding sites in the submandibular gland from 3-week-old rats and 5-week-old pigs and in the lung from neonatal rats and 5-week-old pigs. (/sup 3/H)YOH had KD values of 5.5, 1.8, 0.45 and 0.22 nM in the rat gland and lung and porcine gland and lung, respectively. KD values of 2.4, 5.3 and 1.3 nM were found for (/sup 3/H)PAC in rodent and pig submandibular gland and pig lung, respectively. Both /sup 3/H-ligands labeled approximately the same density of sites within each tissue except in the rat lung in which (/sup 3/H)PAC binding was too low to reliably estimate. In all cases the pharmacologic profile was indicative of an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor site. However, the Ki of yohimbine vs. (/sup 3/H)PAC was 30- to 140-fold higher for the rodent relative to the porcine species. GTP decreased the affinity of (-)-epinephrine and PAC at (/sup 3/H)YOH-labeled sites in the pig gland and lung, but did not shift the affinity of epinephrine in the rat gland. These results suggest the possibility of subtype or species differences for the alpha-2 receptor. The Ki values of the antagonists YOH and phentolamine were different at (/sup 3/H)PAC and (/sup 3/H)YOH sites. GTP caused a dose-dependent reduction in (/sup 3/H)PAC binding in the porcine submandibular gland and lung. At 10 microM GTP, this loss was due to a decrease in /sup 3/H-agonist affinity, but not density.

  9. The alpha-chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex binds to and regulates FADD function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilo, Romania; Liguoro, Domenico; di Jeso, Bruno; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale

    2003-04-18

    FADD protein is a critical mediator of signal transduction pathways activated by several members of the TNF-receptor gene superfamily. Recently, an induced proximity model has been proposed to interpret FADD-mediated signaling events. According to this model, FADD facilitates signaling by inducing clusters of effector molecules in proximity of the activated receptor complex. An important corollary of the induced-proximity model is that FADD protein should not form oligomers in the absence of receptor stimulation. Here we show that, in the absence of death receptor stimulation, FADD is found associated to the alpha chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Exposure to TNF results in disruption of FADD/NAC complex. Expression of NAC regulates formation of FADD oligomers and modulates FADD-mediated signaling. Thus, our observation indicates that NAC may serve as an intracellular regulator of FADD function.

  10. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Raekil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM. Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  11. Regulation of diurnal variation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) activity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovár, J; Lenícek, M; Zimolová, M; Vítek, L; Jirsa, M; Pitha, J

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, displays a pronounced diurnal variation. To better understand the regulation of CYP7A1 activity, three day-long examinations were carried out in 12 healthy men. The concentrations of 7alpha-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one (C4), a surrogate marker of CYP7A1 activity, bile acids (BA), insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol were measured in serum in 90-min intervals from 7 AM till 10 PM. To lower and to increase BA concentration during the study, the subjects received cholestyramine and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, in two examinations. No drug was used in the control examination. There was a pronounced diurnal variation of C4 concentration with a peak around 1 PM in most of the subjects. The area under the curve (AUC) of C4 concentration was five times higher and three times lower when subjects were treated with cholestyramine and CDCA, respectively. No relationship was found between AUC of C4 and AUC of BA concentration, but AUC of C4 correlated positively with that of insulin. Moreover, short-term treatment with cholestyramine resulted in about 10 % suppression of glycemia throughout the day. Our results suggest that insulin is involved in the regulation of diurnal variation of CYP7A1 activity in humans.

  12. Novel Epigenetic Regulation of Alpha-Synuclein Expression in Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Narayan; Meeker, Harry C; Brown, W Ted

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA), a presynaptic protein, is significantly reduced in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model of DS. Methylation analyses of promoter proximal CpG sites indicate similar reduction in Ts65Dn mice compared to control mice. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic catechin present in green tea extract, increases methylation of SNCA promoter proximal CpG sites and expression in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest a positive link between CpG methylation and SNCA expression in Down syndrome.

  13. Alpha-adrenergic regulation of growth hormone release after electroconvulsive therapy in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigas, M; Wiedermann, V; Németh, S; Jurcovicová, J; Zigo, L

    1976-01-01

    When electroshcok therapy was administered to male psychiatric patients without anticonvulsive premedication, serum growth hormone (GH) increased; the increase was not prevented by an infusion of 20% glucose (5 ml per min) 20 min prior to electroshock. Therefore, the GH rise is not caused by muscle exercise during convulsions. Infusing 30 mg of phentolamine 40 min prior to electroshcok inhibited the GH response. Phentolamine's effect shows that the stress-induced GH release that follows electroconvulsive therapy is mediated by alpha-adrenergic neurons.

  14. New type of starch-binding domain: the direct repeat motif in the C-terminal region of Bacillus sp. no. 195 alpha-amylase contributes to starch binding and raw starch degrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, J; Tottori, T; Kawaguchi, T; Arai, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha-amylase from Bacillus sp. no. 195 (BAA) consists of two domains: one is the catalytic domain similar to alpha-amylases from animals and Streptomyces in the N-terminal region; the other is the functionally unknown domain composed of an approx. 90-residue direct repeat in the C-terminal region. The gene coding for BAA was expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24. Three active forms of the gene products were found. The pH and thermal profiles of BAAs, and their catalytic activities for p-nitrophenyl maltopentaoside and soluble starch, showed almost the same behaviours. The largest, 69 kDa, form (BAA-alpha) was of the same molecular mass as that of the mature protein estimated from the nucleotide sequence, and had raw-starch-binding and -degrading abilities. The second largest, 60 kDa, form (BAA-beta), whose molecular mass was the same as that of the natural enzyme from Bacillus sp. no. 195, was generated by proteolytic processing between the two repeat sequences in the C-terminal region, and had lower activities for raw starch binding and degrading than those of BAA-alpha. The smallest, 50 kDa, form (BAA-gamma) contained only the N-terminal catalytic domain as a result of removal of the C-terminal repeat sequence, which led to loss of binding and degradation of insoluble starches. Thus the starch adsorption capacity and raw-starch-degrading activity of BAAs depends on the existence of the repeat sequence in the C-terminal region. BAA-alpha was specifically adsorbed on starch or dextran (alpha-1,4 or alpha-1,6 glucan), and specifically desorbed with maltose or beta-cyclodextrin. These observations indicated that the repeat sequence of the enzyme was functional in the starch-binding domain (SBD). We propose the designation of the homologues to the SBD of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger as family I SBDs, the homologues to that of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae as family II, and the homologues of this repeat sequence of BAA as family III.

  15. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung [Department of Anesthesiology, Health Sciences Center L4 Rm 081, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rebecchi, Mario, E-mail: Mario.rebecchi@SBUmed.org [Department of Anesthesiology, Health Sciences Center L4 Rm 081, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  16. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L

    1997-01-01

    Several receptors are downregulated by internalization after ligand binding. Regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) expression is an important step in T cell activation, desensitization, and tolerance induction. One way T cells regulate TCR expression is by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the TCR...

  17. The CD3 gamma leucine-based receptor-sorting motif is required for efficient ligand-mediated TCR down-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina; Menné, Charlotte; Nielsen, Bodil L;

    2002-01-01

    TCR down-regulation plays an important role in modulating T cell responses both during T cell development and in mature T cells. At least two distinct pathways exist for down-regulation of the TCR. One pathway is activated following TCR ligation and is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation. The o...

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Expression by the Nuclear Receptor ROR alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genoux, Annelise; Dehondt, Helene; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Duhem, Christian; Hum, Dean W.; Martin, Genevieve; Pennacchio, Len; Staels, Bart; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2004-10-01

    Apolipoprotein A5 has recently been identified as a crucial determinant of plasma triglyceride levels. Our results showed that RORa up-regulates human APOA5 but has no effect on mouse apoa5 promoter. These data suggest an additional important physiological role for RORa in the regulation of genes involved in plasma triglyceride homeostasis in human and probably in the development of atherosclerosis

  19. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Transport of prostaglandin F(2alpha) pulses from the uterus to the ovary at the time of luteolysis in ruminants is regulated by prostaglandin transporter-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JeHoon; McCracken, John A; Banu, Sakhila K; Rodriguez, Royce; Nithy, Thamizh K; Arosh, Joe A

    2010-07-01

    In ruminants, prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF(2alpha)) is the uterine luteolytic hormone. During luteolysis, PGF(2alpha) is synthesized and released from the endometrium in a pulsatile pattern. The unique structure of the vascular utero-ovarian plexus (UOP) allows transport of luteolytic PGF(2alpha) pulses directly from the uterus to the ovary, thus bypassing the systemic circulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not known. The objective of the present study was to determine a role for PG transporter protein (PGT) in the compartmental transport of PGF(2alpha) from uterus to ovary through the UOP at the time of luteolysis using the sheep as a ruminant model. [(3)H]PGF(2alpha), with or without a PGT inhibitor, was infused into UOP, and PGF(2alpha) transport and PGT protein expression were determined. Results indicate that PGT protein is expressed in tunica intima, tunica media, and tunica adventitia of the utero-ovarian vein and the ovarian artery of the UOP, and the expression levels are higher on d 10-15 compared with d 3-6 of the estrous cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of PGT prevented transport of exogenous [(3)H]PGF(2alpha) as well as oxytocin-induced endogenous luteolytic PGF(2alpha) pulse up to 80% from uterine venous blood into ovarian arterial blood through the UOP at the time of luteolysis in sheep. Taken together, these results indicate that at the time of luteolysis, transport of PGF(2alpha) from uterus to ovary through the UOP is regulated by PGT-mediated mechanisms. These findings also suggest that impaired PGT-mediated transport of PGF(2alpha) from the utero-ovarian vein into the ovarian artery could adversely influence luteolysis and thus affect fertility in ruminants.

  1. Up-Regulation of Hepatic Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein Transcription by Testosterone via Androgen Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG, a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Conclusions: Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  2. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutant (Δada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor.

  3. Glucagon and cAMP inhibit cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expression in human hepatocytes: discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated to control bile acid synthesis and maintain lipid homeostasis. Recent studies in mice suggest that bile acid synthesis is regulated by the fasted-to-fed cycle, and fasting induces CYP7A1 gene expression in parallel to the induction of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). How glucagon regulates CYP7A1 gene expression in the human liver is not clear. Here we show that glucagon and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) strongly repressed CYP7A1 mRNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. Reporter assays confirmed that cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited human CYP7A1 gene transcription, in contrast to their stimulation of the PEPCK gene. Mutagenesis analysis identified a PKA-responsive region located within the previously identified HNF4alpha binding site in the human CYP7A1 promoter. Glucagon and cAMP increased HNF4alpha phosphorylation and reduced the amount of HNF4alpha present in CYP7A1 chromatin. Our findings suggest that glucagon inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression via PKA phosphorylation of HNF4alpha, which lost its ability to bind the CYP7A1 gene and resulted in inhibition of human CYP7A1 gene transcription. In conclusion, this study unveils a species difference in nutrient regulation of the human and mouse CYP7A1 gene and suggests a discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis by glucagon in human livers during fasting.

  4. Comparative analysis of the ATRX promoter and 5' regulatory region reveals conserved regulatory elements which are linked to roles in neurodevelopment, alpha-globin regulation and testicular function

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Paisu; Frankenberg, Stephen; Argentaro, Anthony; Graves, Jennifer M; Familari, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Background ATRX is a tightly-regulated multifunctional protein with crucial roles in mammalian development. Mutations in the ATRX gene cause ATR-X syndrome, an X-linked recessive developmental disorder resulting in severe mental retardation and mild alpha-thalassemia with facial, skeletal and genital abnormalities. Although ubiquitously expressed the clinical features of the syndrome indicate that ATRX is not likely to be a global regulator of gene expression but involved in regulating specif...

  5. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K...... but are not fully redundant. We conclude that PTPepsilon and PTPalpha differ significantly in their regulation of Kv channels and Src in the system examined and that similarity between PTPs does not necessarily result in full functional redundancy in vivo....

  6. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved.

  7. Effects of adrenalectomy on the alpha-adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenrich, C.C.; Borle, A.B.

    1988-06-25

    We have previously published that bilateral adrenalectomy in the rat reduces the Ca2+-mediated alpha-adrenergic activation of hepatic glycogenolysis, while it increases the cellular calcium content of hepatocytes. In the experiments presented here, the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+i) at rest and in response to epinephrine was measured in aequorin-loaded hepatocytes isolated from sham and adrenalectomized male rats. We found that in adrenalectomized rats the resting Ca2+i was elevated, the rise in Ca2+i evoked by epinephrine was reduced, and the rise in /sup 45/Ca efflux that follows such stimulation was depressed. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca2+i and calcium efflux was decreased 60% in adrenalectomized. Adrenalectomy did not change Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP3 in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. The EC50 for inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and the maximal Ca2+ released were similar in both sham and adrenalectomized animals. Finally, the liver calmodulin content determined by radioimmunoassay was not significantly different between sham and adrenalectomized rats. These results suggest that 1) adrenalectomy reduces calcium efflux from the hepatocyte, probably by an effect on the plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase-dependent Ca2+ pump and thus alters cellular calcium homeostasis; 2) adrenalectomy decreases the rise in Ca2+i in response to epinephrine; 3) this decreased rise in Ca2+i is not due to defects in the intracellular Ca2+ storage and mobilization processes; and 4) the effects of adrenalectomy on cellular calcium metabolism and on alpha-adrenergic activation of glycogenolysis are not caused by a reduction in soluble calmodulin.

  8. Robust and Adaptive MicroRNA-Mediated Incoherent Feedforward Motifs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Feng-Dan; LIU Zeng-Rong; ZHANG Zhi-Yong; SHEN Jian-Wei

    2009-01-01

    We integrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation into microRNA-mediated incoherent feedforward motifs and analyse their dynamical behaviour and functions. The analysis show that the behaviour of the system is almost uninfluenced by the varying input in certain ranges and by introducing of delay and noise. The results indicate that microRNA-mediated incoherent feedforward motifs greatly enhance the robustness of gene regulation.

  9. Cartilage development requires the function of Estrogen-related receptor alpha that directly regulates sox9 expression in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; No Lee, Joon; Bhandari, Sushil; Nam, In-Koo; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-12-10

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRa) regulates a number of cellular processes including development of bone and muscles. However, direct evidence regarding its involvement in cartilage development remains elusive. In this report, we establish an in vivo role of Esrra in cartilage development during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Gene expression analysis indicates that esrra is expressed in developing pharyngeal arches where genes necessary for cartilage development are also expressed. Loss of function analysis shows that knockdown of esrra impairs expression of genes including sox9, col2a1, sox5, sox6, runx2 and col10a1 thus induces abnormally formed cartilage in pharyngeal arches. Importantly, we identify putative ESRRa binding elements in upstream regions of sox9 to which ESRRa can directly bind, indicating that Esrra may directly regulate sox9 expression. Accordingly, ectopic expression of sox9 rescues defective formation of cartilage induced by the knockdown of esrra. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that ESRRa is essential for cartilage development by regulating sox9 expression during vertebrate development.

  10. 1. alpha. ,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 regulates the expression of carbonic anhydrase II in nonerythroid avian bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billecocq, A.; Emanuel, J.R.; Levenson, R.; Baron, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-08-01

    1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}), the active metabolite of the steroid hormone vitamin D, is a potent regulator of macrophage and osteoclast differentiation. The mature osteoclast, unlike the circulating monocyte or the tissue macrophage, expresses high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). This enzyme generates protons and bicarbonate from water and carbon dioxide and is involved in bone resorption and acid-base regulation. To test whether 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} could induce the differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors toward osteoclasts rather than macrophages, analyzed its effects on the expression of CAII in bone marrow cultures containing precursors common to both cell types. The expression of CAII was markedly increased by 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in a dose-and time-dependent manner. In bone marrow, this increase occurred at the mRNA and protein levels and was detectable as early as 24 hr after stimulation. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was also found to induce CAII expression in a transformed myelomonocytic avian cell line. These results suggest that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} regulates the level at which myelomonocytic precursors express CAII, an enzyme that is involved in the function of the mature osteoclast.

  11. Distinct recognition modes of FXXLF and LXXLL motifs by the androgen receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); R. Hersmus (Remko); C.S. Verma (Chandra); H.A.G.M. van der Korput (Hetty); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J. van Tol (Judith); A.C.J. Ziel-van der Made (Angelique); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); A.C. Pike (Ashley); J. Trapman (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAmong nuclear receptors, the androgen receptor (AR) is unique in that its ligand-binding domain (LBD) interacts with the FXXLF motif in the N-terminal domain, resembling coactivator LXXLL motifs. We compared AR- and estrogen receptor alpha-LBD interactions of the wild-t

  12. Role of ornithine decarboxylase in regulation of estrogen receptor alpha expression and growth in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingsong; Jin, Lihua; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that specific polyamine analogues, oligoamines, down-regulated the activity of a key polyamine biosynthesis enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and suppressed expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in human breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying the potential regulation of ERα expression by polyamine metabolism has not been explored. Here, we demonstrated that RNAi-mediated knockdown of ODC (ODC KD) down-regulated the polyamine pool, and hindered growth in ERα-positive MCF7 and T47D and ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. ODC KD significantly induced the expression and activity of the key polyamine catabolism enzymes, spermine oxidase (SMO) and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT). However, ODC KD-induced growth inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous spermidine or overexpression of antizyme inhibitor (AZI), suggesting that regulation of ODC on cell proliferation may involve the signaling pathways independent of polyamine metabolism. In MCF7 and T47D cells, ODC KD, but not DFMO treatment, diminished the mRNA and protein expression of ERα. Overexpression of antizyme (AZ), an ODC inhibitory protein, suppressed ERα expression, suggesting that ODC plays an important role in regulation of ERα expression. Decrease of ERα expression by ODC siRNA altered the mRNA expression of a subset of ERα response genes. Our previous analysis showed that oligoamines disrupt the binding of Sp1 family members to an ERα minimal promoter element containing GC/CA-rich boxes. By using DNA affinity precipitation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified ZBTB7A, MeCP2, PARP-1, AP2, and MAZ as co-factors of Sp1 family members that are associated with the ERα minimal promoter element. Taken together, these data provide insight into a novel antiestrogenic mechanism for polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in breast cancer. PMID:22976807

  13. Motif Participation by Genes in E. coli Transcriptional Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMayo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Motifs are patterns of recurring connections among the genes of genetic networks that occur more frequently than would be expected from randomized networks with the same degree sequence. Although the abundance of certain three-node motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, is positively correlated with a networks’ ability to tolerate moderate disruptions to gene expression, little is known regarding the connectivity of individual genes participating in multiple motifs. Using the transcriptional network of the bacterium Escherichia coli, we investigate this feature by reconstructing the distribution of genes participating in feed-forward loop motifs from its largest connected network component. We contrast these motif participation distributions with those obtained from model networks built using the preferential attachment mechanism employed by many biological and man-made networks. We report that, although some of these model networks support a motif participation distribution that appears qualitatively similar to that obtained from the bacterium Escherichia coli, the probability for a node to support a feed-forward loop motif may instead be strongly influenced by only a few master transcriptional regulators within the network. From these analyses we conclude that such master regulators may be a crucial ingredient to describe coupling among feed-forward loop motifs in transcriptional regulatory networks.

  14. Inside-Out Regulation of ICAM-1 Dynamics in TNF-alpha-Activated Endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, J.D.; van Rijssel, J.; van Alphen, F.P.J.; Hoogenboezem, M.; Tol, S.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; Mul, E.P.J.; Hordijk, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: During transendothelial migration, leukocytes use adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1, to adhere to the endothelium. ICAM-1 is a dynamic molecule that is localized in the apical membrane of the endothelium and clusters upon binding to leukocytes. However, not much is known about the regul

  15. A network of stimulatory and inhibitory G alpha-subunits regulates olfaction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); G. Jansen (Gert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe two pairs of sensory neurons of C. elegans, AWA and AWC, that mediate odorant attraction, express six Galpha-subunits, suggesting that olfaction is regulated by a complex signaling network. Here, we describe the cellular localization and functions of the six olfacto

  16. Integrin alpha1beta1 controls reactive oxygen species synthesis by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated Rac activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwu; Abair, Tristin D; Ibanez, Maria R; Su, Yan; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Polk, D Brent; Singh, Amar B; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2007-05-01

    Integrins control many cell functions, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of collagen synthesis. Mesangial cells, found in the glomerulus of the kidney, are able to produce large amounts of ROS via the NADPH oxidase. We previously demonstrated that integrin alpha1-null mice develop worse fibrosis than wild-type mice following glomerular injury and this is due, in part, to excessive ROS production by alpha1-null mesangial cells. In the present studies, we describe the mechanism whereby integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells produce excessive ROS. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells have constitutively increased basal levels of activated Rac1, which result in its increased translocation to the cell membrane, excessive ROS production, and consequent collagen IV deposition. Basal Rac1 activation is a direct consequence of ligand-independent increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in alpha1-null mesangial cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that integrin alpha1beta1-EGFR cross talk is a key step in negatively regulating Rac1 activation, ROS production, and excessive collagen synthesis, which is a hallmark of diseases characterized by irreversible fibrosis.

  17. TNF-alpha increases ubiquitin-conjugating activity in skeletal muscle by up-regulating UbcH2/E220k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Lecker, Stewart H.; Chen, Yuling; Waddell, Ian D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Reid, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    In some inflammatory diseases, TNF-alpha is thought to stimulate muscle catabolism via an NF-kappaB-dependent process that increases ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins. The transcriptional mechanism of this response has not been determined. Here we studied the potential role of UbcH2, a ubiquitin carrier protein and homologue of murine E220k. We find that UbcH2 is constitutively expressed by human skeletal and cardiac muscles, murine limb muscle, and cultured myotubes. TNF-alpha stimulates UbcH2 expression in mouse limb muscles in vivo and in cultured myotubes. The UbcH2 promoter region contains a functional NF-kappaB binding site; NF-kappaB binding to this sequence is increased by TNF-alpha stimulation. A dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation blocks both UbcH2 up-regulation and the increase in ubiquitin-conjugating activity stimulated by TNF-alpha. In extracts from TNF-alpha-treated myotubes, ubiquitin-conjugating activity is limited by UbcH2 availability; activity is inhibited by an antiserum to UbcH2 or a dominant negative mutant of UbcH2 and is enhanced by wild-type UbcH2. Thus, UbcH2 up-regulation is a novel response to TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle that appears to be essential for the increased ubiquitin conjugation induced by this cytokine.

  18. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1-Dependent Regulation of the Mouse Oviductal Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katheryn L Cerny

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor-α (ESR1 is an important transcriptional regulator in the mammalian oviduct, however ESR1-dependent regulation of the transcriptome of this organ is not well defined, especially at the genomic level. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate estradiol- and ESR1-dependent regulation of the transcriptome of the oviduct using transgenic mice, both with (ESR1KO and without (wild-type, WT a global deletion of ESR1. Oviducts were collected from ESR1KO and WT littermates at 23 days of age, or ESR1KO and WT mice were treated with 5 IU PMSG to stimulate follicular development and the production of ovarian estradiol, and the oviducts collected 48 h later. RNA extracted from whole oviducts was hybridized to Affymetrix Genechip Mouse Genome 430-2.0 arrays (n = 3 arrays per genotype and treatment or reverse transcribed to cDNA for analysis of the expression of selected mRNAs by real-time PCR. Following microarray analysis, a statistical two-way ANOVA and pairwise comparison (LSD test revealed 2428 differentially expressed transcripts (DEG's, P < 0.01. Genotype affected the expression of 2215 genes, treatment (PMSG affected the expression of 465 genes, and genotype x treatment affected the expression of 438 genes. With the goal of determining estradiol/ESR1-regulated function, gene ontology (GO and bioinformatic pathway analyses were performed on DEG's in the oviducts of PMSG-treated ESR1KO versus PMSG-treated WT mice. Significantly enriched GO molecular function categories included binding and catalytic activity. Significantly enriched GO cellular component categories indicated the extracellular region. Significantly enriched GO biological process categories involved a single organism, modulation of a measurable attribute and developmental processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed ESR1-regulation of the immune response within the oviduct as the primary canonical pathway. In summary, a transcriptomal profile of estradiol- and

  19. The psmα locus regulates production of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; Otto, Michael; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human bacterial infection, causing a wide spectrum of disease ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening pneumonia and sepsis. S. aureus toxins play an essential role in disease pathogenesis, contributing to both immunomodulation and host tissue injury. Prominent among these toxins are the membrane-active pore-forming cytolysin alpha-toxin (Hla) and the amphipathic α-helical phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides. As deletion of either the hla or psm locus leads to a phenotypically similar virulence defect in skin and soft tissue infection, we sought to determine the relative contribution of each locus to disease pathogenesis. Here we show that production of Hla can be modulated by PSM expression. An S. aureus mutant lacking PSM expression exhibits a transcriptional delay in hla mRNA production and therefore fails to secrete normal levels of Hla at early phases of growth. This leads to attenuation of virulence in vitro and in murine skin and lung models of infection, correlating with reduced recovery of Hla from host tissues. Production of Hla and restoration of staphylococcal virulence can be achieved in the psm mutant by plasmid-driven overexpression of hla. Our study suggests the coordinated action of Hla and PSMs in host tissue during early pathogenesis, confirming a major role for Hla in epithelial injury during S. aureus infection. These findings highlight the possibility that therapeutics targeting PSM production may simultaneously prevent Hla-mediated tissue injury.

  20. Effect of some plant growth regulators on lindane and alpha-endosulfan toxicity to Brassica chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouychai, Waraporn

    2012-07-01

    The effect of indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellic acid (GA3), to alleviate the organochlorine phytotoxicity were studied in Brassica chinensis. Presence of organochlorine decreased Brassica chinensis seedlings growth in contaminated alkaline soil. One mg l(-1) IBA could enhance 14 and 26% shoot and root length of B. chinensis seedlings grown at 40 mg kg(-1) lindane contaminated soil, respectively. Ten mg l(-1) IBA also increased 80 and 40% root fresh weight of seedling grown in 40 mg kg(-1) lindane and alpha-endosulfan contaminated soils, respectively. However, IBAhad no effect on shoot and root length of seedlings grown in endosulfan contaminated soil. On the other hand, 10 mg l(-1) GA3 only increased 80% of shoot and root fresh weigh of B. chinensisin 40 mg kg(-1) endosulfan contaminated soil. External auxin addition could increase B. chinensis growth in lindane more than endosulfan contaminated soil. External gibberellin was less effective than external auxin to increase B. chinensis growth in organochlorine contaminated soil. There is possibility that auxin could decrease organochlorine phytotoxicity in plants and hence can be useful for organochlorine phytoremediation.

  1. Characteristic features of kynurenine aminotransferase allosterically regulated by (alpha-ketoglutarate in cooperation with kynurenine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Okada

    Full Text Available Kynurenine aminotransferase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhKAT, which is a homodimeric protein, catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine (KYN to kynurenic acid (KYNA. We analyzed the transaminase reaction mechanisms of this protein with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP, KYN and α-ketoglutaric acid (2OG or oxaloacetic acid (OXA. 2OG significantly inhibited KAT activities in kinetic analyses, suggesting that a KYNA biosynthesis is allosterically regulated by 2OG. Its inhibitions evidently were unlocked by KYN. 2OG and KYN functioned as an inhibitor and activator in response to changes in the concentrations of KYN and 2OG, respectively. The affinities of one subunit for PLP or 2OG were different from that of the other subunit, as confirmed by spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry, suggesting that the difference of affinities between subunits might play a role in regulations of the KAT reaction. Moreover, we identified two active and allosteric sites in the crystal structure of PhKAT-2OG complexes. The crystal structure of PhKAT in complex with four 2OGs demonstrates that two 2OGs in allosteric sites are effector molecules which inhibit the KYNA productions. Thus, the combined data lead to the conclusion that PhKAT probably is regulated by allosteric control machineries, with 2OG as the allosteric inhibitor.

  2. Class II histone deacetylases are associated with VHL-independent regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, David Z; Kachhap, Sushant K; Collis, Spencer J; Verheul, Henk M W; Carducci, Michael A; Atadja, Peter; Pili, Roberto

    2006-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) plays a critical role in transcriptional gene activation involved in tumor angiogenesis. A novel class of agents, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, has been shown to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and HIF-1 alpha protein expression. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the molecular link between HIF-1 alpha inhibition and HDAC inhibition. Treatment of the VHL-deficient human renal cell carcinoma cell line UMRC2 with the hydroxamic HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of HIF-1 alpha protein via a VHL-independent mechanism and reduction of HIF-1 alpha transcriptional activity. HIF-1 alpha inhibition by LAQ824 was associated with HIF-1 alpha acetylation and polyubiquitination. HIF-1 alpha immunoprecipitates contained HDAC activity. Then, we tested different classes of HDAC inhibitors with diverse inhibitory activity of class I versus class II HDACs and assessed their capability of targeting HIF-1 alpha. Hydroxamic acid derivatives with known activity against both class I and class II HDACs were effective in inhibiting HIF-1 alpha at low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, valproic acid and trapoxin were able to inhibit HIF-1 alpha only at concentrations that are effective against class II HDACs. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that class II HDAC4 and HDAC6 were associated with HIF-1 alpha protein. Inhibition by small interfering RNA of HDAC4 and HDAC6 reduced HIF-1 alpha protein expression and transcriptional activity. Taken together, these results suggest that class II HDACs are associated with HIF-1 alpha stability and provide a rationale for targeting HIF-1 alpha with HDAC inhibitors against class II isozymes.

  3. Positional bias of general and tissue-specific regulatory motifs in mouse gene promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farré Domènec

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arrangement of regulatory motifs in gene promoters, or promoter architecture, is the result of mutation and selection processes that have operated over many millions of years. In mammals, tissue-specific transcriptional regulation is related to the presence of specific protein-interacting DNA motifs in gene promoters. However, little is known about the relative location and spacing of these motifs. To fill this gap, we have performed a systematic search for motifs that show significant bias at specific promoter locations in a large collection of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. Results We observe that promoters driving housekeeping gene expression are enriched in particular motifs with strong positional bias, such as YY1, which are of little relevance in promoters driving tissue-specific expression. We also identify a large number of motifs that show positional bias in genes expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner. They include well-known tissue-specific motifs, such as HNF1 and HNF4 motifs in liver, kidney and small intestine, or RFX motifs in testis, as well as many potentially novel regulatory motifs. Based on this analysis, we provide predictions for 559 tissue-specific motifs in mouse gene promoters. Conclusion The study shows that motif positional bias is an important feature of mammalian proximal promoters and that it affects both general and tissue-specific motifs. Motif positional constraints define very distinct promoter architectures depending on breadth of expression and type of tissue.

  4. Regulation of topoisomerase II alpha and beta in HIV-1 infected and uninfected neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cells: involvement of distinct nordihydroguaretic acid sensitive inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandraju, Raj Kumar; Kondapi, Anand K

    2007-05-01

    The activity of Topoisomerase II alpha and beta isoforms is tightly regulated during different phases of cell cycle. In the present study, the action of anti-inflammatory agents, nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) is analyzed in HIV-1 infected CXCR4(+), CCR5(+) and CD4(-) SK-N-SH neuroblastoma, CXCR4(+), CCR5(+) and CD4(-) 1321N1 astrocytoma and CXCR4(+), CCR5(+/-) and CD4(-) GO-G-CCM glioblastoma cell lines. In SK-N-SH and 1321N1 the expression of Topoisomerase II alpha is concomitant with that of LOX-5 and is highly sensitive to NDGA, while the Topoisomerase II beta is expressed along with TNFalpha and exhibits low sensitivity to NDGA, suggesting distinct pathways of regulation for the two isoforms. HIV-1 infection in these cells enhanced the expression of Topo II alpha and beta. Further, the regulation of Topo II beta and TNFalpha in infected and uninfected SK cells is distinctly different. HIV-1 gp120 derived peptides could block HIV-1 mediated inflammation and Topoisomerase II alpha and beta expression, suggesting the viral mediated response. A combination of NDGA, gp-120 derived peptides and AZT has completely blocked the viral replication, suggesting the enhancement of potency of AZT under the suppression of inflammatory response. In contrast, the expression of Topo II alpha and beta was stimulated by NDGA in GO-G-CCM cells showing distinct regulatory pathway in these cells that was resistant to HIV-1 infection. This suggests the requirement of inflammatory response for productive viral infection. In summary, an induction of co-receptor mediated inflammatory response can distinctly enhance regulated expression of the cellular Topo II alpha and beta and promote productive infection in neurons and astrocytes.

  5. The limits of de novo DNA motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simcha

    Full Text Available A major challenge in molecular biology is reverse-engineering the cis-regulatory logic that plays a major role in the control of gene expression. This program includes searching through DNA sequences to identify "motifs" that serve as the binding sites for transcription factors or, more generally, are predictive of gene expression across cellular conditions. Several approaches have been proposed for de novo motif discovery-searching sequences without prior knowledge of binding sites or nucleotide patterns. However, unbiased validation is not straightforward. We consider two approaches to unbiased validation of discovered motifs: testing the statistical significance of a motif using a DNA "background" sequence model to represent the null hypothesis and measuring performance in predicting membership in gene clusters. We demonstrate that the background models typically used are "too null," resulting in overly optimistic assessments of significance, and argue that performance in predicting TF binding or expression patterns from DNA motifs should be assessed by held-out data, as in predictive learning. Applying this criterion to common motif discovery methods resulted in universally poor performance, although there is a marked improvement when motifs are statistically significant against real background sequences. Moreover, on synthetic data where "ground truth" is known, discriminative performance of all algorithms is far below the theoretical upper bound, with pronounced "over-fitting" in training. A key conclusion from this work is that the failure of de novo discovery approaches to accurately identify motifs is basically due to statistical intractability resulting from the fixed size of co-regulated gene clusters, and thus such failures do not necessarily provide evidence that unfound motifs are not active biologically. Consequently, the use of prior knowledge to enhance motif discovery is not just advantageous but necessary. An implementation of

  6. Expression of AtWRKY33 encoding a pathogen- or PAMP-responsive WRKY transcription factor is regulated by a composite DNA motif containing W box elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippok, Bernadette; Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Rivory, Gaelle; Brümmer, Janna; Schmelzer, Elmon; Logemann, Elke; Somssich, Imre E

    2007-04-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate distinct parts of the plant defense transcriptome. Expression of many WRKY genes themselves is induced by pathogens or pathogen-mimicking molecules. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis WRKY33 responds to various stimuli associated with plant defense as well as to different kinds of phytopathogens. Although rapid pathogen-induced AtWRKY33 expression does not require salicylic acid (SA) signaling, it is dependent on PAD4, a key regulator upstream of SA. Activation of AtWRKY33 is independent of de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that it is at least partly under negative regulatory control. We show that a set of three WRKY-specific cis-acting DNA elements (W boxes) within the AtWRKY33 promoter is required for efficient pathogen- or PAMP-triggered gene activation. This strongly indicates that WRKY transcription factors are major components of the regulatory machinery modulating immediate to early expression of this gene in response to pathogen attack.

  7. Expression and regulation of HIF-1 alpha in macrophages under inflammatory conditions; significant reduction of VEGF by CaMKII inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Johanna; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Roosmalen, Ingrid A. M.; Doornbos-van der Meer, Berber; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; WESTRA, H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Macrophages expressing the pro-angiogenic transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha have been demonstrated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the synovial tissue. Aim of the present study was to investigate intracellular signal transduction regulation of pro-inflammatory HI

  8. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Tang, Dong-Qi [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Li, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: dsli@yymc.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  9. P2X7-dependent, but differentially regulated release of IL-6, CCL2, and TNF-alpha in cultured mouse microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shieh, Chu-Hsin; Heinrich, Annette; Serchov, Tsvetan; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    2014-01-01

    ATP is an important regulator of microglia and its effects on microglial cytokine release are currently discussed as important contributors in a variety of brain diseases. We here analyzed the effects of ATP on the production of six inflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-10, CCL2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, an

  10. Discovering large network motifs from a complex biological network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, Aika; Sese, Jun, E-mail: terada@sel.is.ocha.ac.j, E-mail: sesejun@is.ocha.ac.j [Department of Computer Science, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Ohtsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan)

    2009-12-01

    Graph structures representing relationships between entries have been studied in statistical analysis, and the results of these studies have been applied to biological networks, whose nodes and edges represent proteins and the relationships between them, respectively. Most of the studies have focused on only graph structures such as scale-free properties and cliques, but the relationships between nodes are also important features since most of the proteins perform their functions by connecting to other proteins. In order to determine such relationships, the problem of network motif discovery has been addressed; network motifs are frequently appearing graph structures in a given graph. However, the methods for network motif discovery are highly restrictive for the application to biological network because they can only be used to find small network motifs or they do not consider noise and uncertainty in observations. In this study, we introduce a new index to measure network motifs called AR index and develop a novel algorithm called ARIANA for finding large motifs even when the network has noise. Experiments using a synthetic network verify that our method can find better network motifs than an existing algorithm. By applying ARIANA to a real complex biological network, we find network motifs associated with regulations of start time of cell functions and generation of cell energies and discover that the cell cycle proteins can be categorized into two different groups.

  11. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  12. Inside-out regulation of ICAM-1 dynamics in TNF-alpha-activated endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap D van Buul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During transendothelial migration, leukocytes use adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1, to adhere to the endothelium. ICAM-1 is a dynamic molecule that is localized in the apical membrane of the endothelium and clusters upon binding to leukocytes. However, not much is known about the regulation of ICAM-1 clustering and whether membrane dynamics are linked to the ability of ICAM-1 to cluster and bind leukocyte integrins. Therefore, we studied the dynamics of endothelial ICAM-1 under non-clustered and clustered conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Detailed scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy showed that the apical surface of endothelial cells constitutively forms small filopodia-like protrusions that are positive for ICAM-1 and freely move within the lateral plane of the membrane. Clustering of ICAM-1, using anti-ICAM-1 antibody-coated beads, efficiently and rapidly recruits ICAM-1. Using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP, we found that clustering increased the immobile fraction of ICAM-1, compared to non-clustered ICAM-1. This shift required the intracellular portion of ICAM-1. Moreover, biochemical assays showed that ICAM-1 clustering recruited beta-actin and filamin. Cytochalasin B, which interferes with actin polymerization, delayed the clustering of ICAM-1. In addition, we could show that cytochalasin B decreased the immobile fraction of clustered ICAM-1-GFP, but had no effect on non-clustered ICAM-1. Also, the motor protein myosin-II is recruited to ICAM-1 adhesion sites and its inhibition increased the immobile fraction of both non-clustered and clustered ICAM-1. Finally, blocking Rac1 activation, the formation of lipid rafts, myosin-II activity or actin polymerization, but not Src, reduced the adhesive function of ICAM-1, tested under physiological flow conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these findings indicate that ICAM-1 clustering is regulated in an inside-out fashion through the actin cytoskeleton. Overall

  13. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  14. Scaling and alpha-helix regulation of protein relaxation in a lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Kwan Hon; Vaughn, Mark W.

    2014-12-01

    Protein conformation and orientation in the lipid membrane plays a key role in many cellular processes. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the relaxation and C-terminus diffusion of a model helical peptide: beta-amyloid (Aβ) in a lipid membrane. We observed that after the helical peptide was initially half-embedded in the extracelluar leaflet of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or PC/cholesterol (PC/CHOL) membrane, the C-terminus diffused across the membrane and anchored to PC headgroups of the cytofacial lipid leaflet. In some cases, the membrane insertion domain of the Aβ was observed to partially unfold. Applying a sigmoidal fit to the process, we found that the characteristic velocity of the C-terminus, as it moved to its anchor site, scaled with θu-4/3, where θu is the fraction of the original helix that was lost during a helix to coil transition. Comparing this scaling with that of bead-spring models of polymer relaxation suggests that the C-terminus velocity is highly regulated by the peptide helical content, but that it is independent of the amino acid type. The Aβ was stabilized by the attachment of the positive Lys28 side chain to the negative phosphate of PC or 3β oxygen of CHOL in the extracellular lipid leaflet and of the C-terminus to its anchor site in the cytofacial lipid leaflet.

  15. Comparative analysis of the ATRX promoter and 5' regulatory region reveals conserved regulatory elements which are linked to roles in neurodevelopment, alpha-globin regulation and testicular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argentaro Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATRX is a tightly-regulated multifunctional protein with crucial roles in mammalian development. Mutations in the ATRX gene cause ATR-X syndrome, an X-linked recessive developmental disorder resulting in severe mental retardation and mild alpha-thalassemia with facial, skeletal and genital abnormalities. Although ubiquitously expressed the clinical features of the syndrome indicate that ATRX is not likely to be a global regulator of gene expression but involved in regulating specific target genes. The regulation of ATRX expression is not well understood and this is reflected by the current lack of identified upstream regulators. The availability of genomic data from a range of species and the very highly conserved 5' regulatory regions of the ATRX gene has allowed us to investigate putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in evolutionarily conserved regions of the mammalian ATRX promoter. Results We identified 12 highly conserved TFBSs of key gene regulators involved in biologically relevant processes such as neural and testis development and alpha-globin regulation. Conclusions Our results reveal potentially important regulatory elements in the ATRX gene which may lead to the identification of upstream regulators of ATRX and aid in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie ATR-X syndrome.

  16. TIP30 interacts with an estrogen receptor alpha-interacting coactivator CIA and regulates c-myc transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Piening, Valerie; Bruck, Kristy; Roeder, Robert G; Xiao, Hua

    2004-06-25

    Deregulation of c-myc expression is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neoplasias. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) can increase the rate of c-myc transcription through the recruitment of a variety of cofactors to the promoter, yet the precise roles of these cofactors in transcription and tumorigenesis are largely unknown. We show here that a putative tumor suppressor TIP30, also called CC3 or Htatip2, interacts with an ERalpha-interacting coactivator CIA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that TIP30 and CIA are distinct cofactors that are dynamically associated with the promoter and downstream regions of the c-myc gene in response to estrogen. Both TIP30 and CIA are recruited to the c-myc gene promoter by liganded ERalpha in the second transcription cycle. TIP30 overexpression represses ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription, whereas TIP30 deficiency enhances c-myc transcription in both the absence and presence of estrogen. Ectopic CIA cooperates with TIP30 to repress ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription. Moreover, virgin TIP30 knockout mice exhibit increased c-myc expression in mammary glands. Together, these results reveal an important role for TIP30 in the regulation of ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription and suggest a mechanism for tumorigenesis promoted by TIP30 deficiency.

  17. TNF-alpha and Notch signaling regulates the expression of HOXB4 and GATA3 during early T lymphopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Schiavinato, Josiane Lilian; Oliveira, Lucila Habib Bourguignon; Araujo, Amélia Goes; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; de Palma, Patrícia Viana Bonini; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Zago, Marco Antonio; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    During the early thymus colonization, Notch signaling activation on hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) drives proliferation and T cell commitment. Although these processes are driven by transcription factors such as HOXB4 and GATA3, there is no evidence that Notch directly regulates their transcription. To evaluate the role of NOTCH and TNF signaling in this process, human CD34(+) HPCs were cocultured with OP9-DL1 cells, in the presence or absence of TNF. The use of a Notch signaling inhibitor and a protein synthesis inhibitor allowed us to distinguish primary effects, mediated by direct signaling downstream Notch and TNF, from secondary effects, mediated by de novo synthesized proteins. A low and physiologically relevant concentration of TNF promoted T lymphopoiesis in OP9-DL1 cocultures. TNF positively modulated the expression of both transcripts in a Notch-dependent manner; however, GATA3 induction was mediated by a direct mechanism, while HOXB4 induction was indirect. Induction of both transcripts was repressed by a GSK3β inhibitor, indicating that activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits rather than induces their expression. Our study provides novel evidences of the mechanisms integrating Notch and TNF-alpha signaling in the transcriptional induction of GATA3 and HOXB4. This mechanism has direct implications in the control of self-renewal, proliferation, commitment, and T cell differentiation.

  18. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Fajardo

    Full Text Available Tocopherylquinone (TQ, the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT, is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells, whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells.

  19. Identification and characterization of an alternative promoter of the human PGC-1{alpha} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Toyo; Inagaki, Kenjiro [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuya, E-mail: noguchi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Sakai, Mashito; Ogawa, Wataru; Hosooka, Tetsuya [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Iguchi, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Eijiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Hiramatsu, Ryuji [Genomic Science Laboratories, DainipponSumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., 4-2-1 Takatsukasa, Takarazuka 665-8555 (Japan); Kasuga, Masato [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan)

    2009-04-17

    The transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) controls mitochondrial biogenesis and energy homeostasis. Although physical exercise induces PGC-1{alpha} expression in muscle, the underlying mechanism of this effect has remained incompletely understood. We recently identified a novel muscle-enriched isoform of PGC-1{alpha} transcript (designated PGC-1{alpha}-b) that is derived from a previously unidentified first exon. We have now cloned and characterized the human PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter. The muscle-specific transcription factors MyoD and MRF4 transactivated this promoter through interaction with a proximal E-box motif. Furthermore, either forced expression of Ca{sup 2+}- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), calcineurin A, or the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) kinase MKK6 or the intracellular accumulation of cAMP activated the PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter in cultured myoblasts through recruitment of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) to a putative CRE located downstream of the E-box. Our results thus reveal a potential molecular basis for isoform-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} expression in contracting muscle.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  1. Addition of interferon-alpha to a standard maturation cocktail induces CD38 up-regulation and increases dendritic cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan;

    2009-01-01

    differs from sDC maturation: The major phenotypic change after IFN-alpha maturation was dose-dependent up-regulation of CD38 but not CD83, while sDCs expressed the opposite profile with low CD38 and high CD83 expression. Similarly, maturation by Poly I:C leads to CD38high, CD83low DCs indicating...... other changes in DC phenotype and cytokine secretion. Our observations suggest that IFN-alpha could be included in maturation protocols for clinical grade DCs used for immunotherapy against cancer and should be included if DCs are used for CD8+ T-cell stimulation in vitro.......Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) are used as adjuvant cells in cancer immunotherapy and have shown promising results. In order to obtain full functional capacity, these DCs need to be maturated, and the current "gold standard" for this process is maturation with TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6...

  2. VAMP subfamilies identified by specific R-SNARE motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Valeria; Picco, Raffaella; Vacca, Marcella; D'Esposito, Maurizio; D'Urso, Michele; Galli, Thierry; Filippini, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    In eukaryotes, interactions among the alpha-helical coiled-coil domains (CCDs) of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) play a pivotal role in mediating the fusion among vesicles and target membranes. Surface residues of such CCDs are major candidates to regulate the specificity of membrane fusion, as they may alter local charge at the interaction layers and surface of the fusion complex, possibly modulating its formation and/or the binding of non-SNARE regulatory factors. Based on alternate patterns in surface residues, we have identified two motifs which group vesicular SNAREs in two novel subfamilies: RG-SNAREs and RD-SNAREs. The RG-SNARE CCD is common to all members of the widely conserved family of long VAMPs or longins and to yeast and non-neuronal VAMPs, possibly mediating "basic" fusion mechanisms; instead, only synaptobrevins from Bilateria share an RD-SNARE CCD, which is likely to mediate interactions to specific, yet unknown, regulatory factors and/or be the landmark of rapid fusion reactions like that mediating the release of neurotransmitters.

  3. Association of protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha (a proline-directed kinase and a regulator of protooncogenes) with human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S D; Yu, J S; Lee, T T; Ni, M H; Yang, C C; Ho, Y S; Tsen, T Z

    1995-10-01

    Computer analysis of protein phosphorylation-sites sequence revealed that most transcriptional factors and viral oncoproteins are prime targets for regulation of proline-directed protein phosphorylation, suggesting an association of proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) family with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. In this report, an immunoprecipitate activity assay of protein kinase FA/glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha (kinase FA/GSK-3alpha) (a particular member of PDPK family) has been optimized for human cervical tissue and used to demonstrate for the first time significantly increased (P < 0.001) activity in poorly differentiated cervical carcinoma (82.8 +/- 6.6 U/mg of protein), moderately differentiated carcinoma (36.2 +/- 3.4 U/mg of protein), and well-differentiated carcinoma (18.3 +/- 2.4 U/mg of protein) from 36 human cervical carcinoma samples when compared to 12 normal controls (4.9 +/- 0.6 U/mg of protein). Immunoblotting analysis further revealed that increased activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha in cervical carcinoma is due to overexpression of protein synthesis of the kinase. Taken together, the results provide initial evidence that overexpression of protein synthesis and cellular activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may be involved in human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression, supporting an association of proline-directed protein kinase with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Since protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may function as a possible regulator of transcription factors/proto-oncogenes, the results further suggest that kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may play a potential role in human cervical carcinogenesis, especially in its dedifferentiation and progression.

  4. Growth hormone regulation of p85alpha expression and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity in adipose tissue: mechanism for growth hormone-mediated insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rincon, Juan-Pablo; Iida, Keiji; Gaylinn, Bruce D; McCurdy, Carrie E; Leitner, J Wayne; Barbour, Linda A; Kopchick, John J; Friedman, Jacob E; Draznin, Boris; Thorner, Michael O

    2007-06-01

    Phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase is involved in insulin-mediated effects on glucose uptake, lipid deposition, and adiponectin secretion from adipocytes. Genetic disruption of the p85alpha regulatory subunit of PI 3-kinase increases insulin sensitivity, whereas elevated p85alpha levels are associated with insulin resistance through PI 3-kinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Adipose tissue plays a critical role in the antagonistic effects of growth hormone (GH) on insulin actions on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism through changes in gene transcription. The objective of this study was to assess the role of the p85alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling in GH-mediated insulin resistance in adipose tissue. To do this, p85alpha mRNA and protein expression and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity were measured in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice with GH excess, deficiency, and sufficiency. Additional studies using 3T3-F442A cells were conducted to confirm direct effects of GH on free p85alpha protein abundance. We found that p85alpha expression 1) is decreased in WAT from mice with isolated GH deficiency, 2) is increased in WAT from mice with chronic GH excess, 3) is acutely upregulated in WAT from GH-deficient and -sufficient mice after GH administration, and 4) is directly upregulated by GH in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. The insulin-induced increase in PI 3-kinase activity was robust in mice with GH deficiency, but not in mice with GH excess. In conclusion, GH regulates p85alpha expression and PI 3-kinase activity in WAT and provides a potential explanation for 1) the insulin hypersensitivity and associated obesity and hyperadiponectinemia of GH-deficient mice and 2) the insulin resistance and associated reduced fat mass and hypoadiponectinemia of mice with GH excess.

  5. Regulation of deleted in liver cancer-1 gene domains on the proliferation of human colon cancer HT29 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴平平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of deleted in liver cancer-1(DLC-1) gene main domains on the regulation of hu-man colon cancer HT29 cell proliferation. Methods Subcloning recombinant plasmid vectors with Rho GTPase activating protein(RhoGAP),sterile alpha motif(SAM)

  6. Network motifs in music sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Zanette, Damian H

    2010-01-01

    In this note, I summarize ongoing research on motif distribution in networks built up out of symbolic sequences of Western musical origin. Their motif significance profiles exhibit remarkable consistency over different styles and periods, and define a class that cannot be identified with any of the four "superfamilies" to which most real networks seem to belong. Networks from music sequences possess an unusual abundance of bidirectional connections, due to the inherent reversibility of short musical note patterns. This property contributes to motif significance from both local and large-scale features of musical structure.

  7. The lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha regulates the phosphorylation status of hepatitis C virus NS5A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα is an essential host factor of hepatitis C virus (HCV replication. PI4KIIIα catalyzes the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P accumulating in HCV replicating cells due to enzyme activation resulting from its interaction with nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A. This study describes the interaction between PI4KIIIα and NS5A and its mechanistic role in viral RNA replication. We mapped the NS5A sequence involved in PI4KIIIα interaction to the carboxyterminal end of domain 1 and identified a highly conserved PI4KIIIα functional interaction site (PFIS encompassing seven amino acids, which are essential for viral RNA replication. Mutations within this region were also impaired in NS5A-PI4KIIIα binding, reduced PI4P levels and altered the morphology of viral replication sites, reminiscent to the phenotype observed by silencing of PI4KIIIα. Interestingly, abrogation of RNA replication caused by mutations in the PFIS correlated with increased levels of hyperphosphorylated NS5A (p58, indicating that PI4KIIIα affects the phosphorylation status of NS5A. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PI4KIIIα or pharmacological ablation of kinase activity led to a relative increase of p58. In contrast, overexpression of enzymatically active PI4KIIIα increased relative abundance of basally phosphorylated NS5A (p56. PI4KIIIα therefore regulates the phosphorylation status of NS5A and viral RNA replication by favoring p56 or repressing p58 synthesis. Replication deficiencies of PFIS mutants in NS5A could not be rescued by increasing PI4P levels, but by supplying functional NS5A, supporting an essential role of PI4KIIIα in HCV replication regulating NS5A phosphorylation, thereby modulating the morphology of viral replication sites. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PI4KIIIα activity affects the NS5A phosphorylation status. Our results highlight the importance of PI4KIIIα in the morphogenesis

  8. Cyclic nucleotides differentially regulate the synthesis of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta by human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, S; Fülle, H J; Sinha, B; Stoll, D; Dinarello, C A; Gerzer, R; Weber, P C

    1991-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors suppress production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in mouse macrophages. In the present study we show that theophylline, pentoxifylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine markedly suppress the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induce

  9. Tumor necrosis factor expressed by primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells is regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renauld, A E; Spengler, R N

    2002-01-15

    Neuron expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and the regulation of the levels of TNF by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation were investigated. Adult rat hippocampal neurons and phorbol ester (PMA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were examined. Intracellular levels of TNF mRNA accumulation, as well as TNF protein and that released into the supernatant were quantified by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and bioanalysis, respectively. Both neuron cultures demonstrated constitutive production of TNF. Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor increased intracellular levels of TNF mRNA and protein in SH-SY5Y cells after addition of graded concentrations of the selective agonist, Brimonidine (UK-14304) to parallel cultures. Intracellular levels of mRNA were increased in a concentration-dependent fashion within 15 min of UK-14304 addition and were sustained during 24 hr of receptor activation. In addition, the levels of TNF in the supernatant were increased in both types of neuron cultures within 15 min of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation. Furthermore, levels of TNF significantly increased in the supernatants of both neuron cultures after potassium-induced depolarization. A reduction in this depolarization-induced release occurred in hippocampal neuron cultures after exposure to the sympathomimetic tyramine with media replacement to deplete endogenous catecholamines. This finding reveals a role for endogenous catecholamines in the regulation of TNF production. Potassium-induced depolarization resulted in the release of TNF in hippocampal neuron cultures within 15 min but not until 24 hr in SH-SY5Y cultures demonstrating a temporally mediated event dependent upon cell type. Neuron expression of TNF, regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation demonstrates not only how a neuron controls its own production of this pleiotropic cytokine, but also displays a normal role for neurons in directing the many functions of TNF.

  10. Identification of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a novel bioactive amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, and its physiological roles in the regulation of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Koyama, Teppei; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Vaudry, Hubert

    2010-09-01

    We now know that steroids can be synthesized de novo by the brain and the peripheral nervous system. Such steroids are called neurosteroids and de novo neurosteroidogenesis from cholesterol is a conserved property of vertebrate brains. Our studies over the past decade have demonstrated that the brain expresses several kinds of steroidogenic enzymes and produces a variety of neurosteroids in sub-mammalian species. However, neurosteroid biosynthetic pathways in amphibians, as well as other vertebrates may still not be fully mapped. We first found that the newt brain actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a previously undescribed amphibian neurosteroid. We then demonstrated that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone acts as a novel bioactive neurosteroid to stimulate locomotor activity of newt by means of the dopaminergic system. Subsequently, we analyzed the physiological roles of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the regulation of locomotor activity of newt. This paper summarizes the advances made in our understanding of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a newly discovered bioactive amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, and its physiological roles in the regulation of locomotion in newt.

  11. Recombinant human growth-regulated oncogene-alpha induces T lymphocyte chemotaxis. A process regulated via IL-8 receptors by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Frydenberg, Jane; Mukaida, N

    1995-01-01

    , but not for anti-CD3 mAb-activated T lymphocytes. It attracts CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets to an equal extent. The migrating T lymphocytes toward rhGRO-alpha are predominantly CD45RO+ memory CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. The chemotactic migration of T lymphocytes toward rhGRO-alpha is stimulated via the IL-8...

  12. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han [Jiangsu Center for Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang, Luyong, E-mail: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Center for Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  13. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Lu, Angeleem; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Sun, Ran; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Sha-Na; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α) is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1) extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP), an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  14. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    Full Text Available Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1 extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  15. TNF alpha acts in synergy with GM-CSF to induce proliferation of acute myeloid leukemia cells by up-regulating the GM-CSF receptor and GM-CSF gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailly, H; Pebusque, M J; Tabilio, A; Mannoni, P

    1993-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are dependent for their survival and proliferation on hematopoietic growth factors. As tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) can increase the proliferation of primary cultures of AML cells, we have investigated the effect of TNF alpha on the autocrine and/or paracrine growth control by one of the major AML growth factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). First, a panel of AML cells were analysed with respect to their proliferative response to TNF alpha. We provide experimental evidence that TNF alpha induces both GM-CSF gene expression and up-regulation of high-affinity GM-CSF membrane receptor in TNF alpha-responsive cells. This effect is not restricted to the malignant phenotype, although it could account for the selective growth advantage of the leukemic clone over the normal cells upon TNF alpha stimulation.

  16. Motif Yggdrasil: sampling sequence motifs from a tree mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Samuel A; Lagergren, Jens

    2007-06-01

    In phylogenetic foot-printing, putative regulatory elements are found in upstream regions of orthologous genes by searching for common motifs. Motifs in different upstream sequences are subject to mutations along the edges of the corresponding phylogenetic tree, consequently taking advantage of the tree in the motif search is an appealing idea. We describe the Motif Yggdrasil sampler; the first Gibbs sampler based on a general tree that uses unaligned sequences. Previous tree-based Gibbs samplers have assumed a star-shaped tree or partially aligned upstream regions. We give a probabilistic model (MY model) describing upstream sequences with regulatory elements and build a Gibbs sampler with respect to this model. The model allows toggling, i.e., the restriction of a position to a subset of nucleotides, but does not require aligned sequences nor edge lengths, which may be difficult to come by. We apply the collapsing technique to eliminate the need to sample nuisance parameters, and give a derivation of the predictive update formula. We show that the MY model improves the modeling of difficult motif instances and that the use of the tree achieves a substantial increase in nucleotide level correlation coefficient both for synthetic data and 37 bacterial lexA genes. We investigate the sensitivity to errors in the tree and show that using random trees MY sampler still has a performance similar to the original version.

  17. A Role for the Androgen Metabolite, 5alpha androstane, 3beta, 17beta Diol (3b-DIol in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert James Handa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a basic reaction of animals to environmental perturbations that threaten homeostasis. These responses are ultimately regulated by neurons residing within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN. Within the PVN, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, vasopressin (AVP and oxytocin (OT expressing neurons are critical as they can regulate both neuroendocrine and autonomic responses. Estradiol (E2 and testosterone (T are well known reproductive hormones, however, they have also been shown to modulate stress reactivity. In rodent models, evidence shows that under some conditions E2 enhances stress activated ACTH and corticosterone secretion. In contrast, T decreases the gain of the HPA axis. The modulatory role of testosterone was originally thought to be via 5 alpha reduction to the potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone, whereas E2 effects were thought to be mediated by both estrogen receptors alpha (ERα and beta (ERβ. However, DHT has been shown to be metabolized to the ERβ agonist, 5alpha- androstane 3beta,17beta diol (3b-Diol. The actions of 3β-Diol on the HPA axis are mediated by ERbeta which inhibits the PVN response to stressors. In gonadectomized rats, ERbeta agonists reduce CORT and ACTH responses to restraint stress, an effect that is also present in wild-type but not ERbeta knockout mice. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the actions of ERbeta to alter HPA reactivity are not currently known. CRH, AVP and OT have all been shown to be regulated by estradiol and recent studies indicate an important role of ERbeta in these regulatory processes. Moreover, activation of the CRH and AVP promoters have been shown by 3β-Diol binding to ERbeta and this is thought to be through alternate pathways of gene regulation. Based on available data, a novel and important role for 3beta Diol in the regulation of the HPA axis is suggested.

  18. Transduction motif analysis of gastric cancer based on a human signaling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Li, D.Z.; Jiang, C.S.; Wang, W. [Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    To investigate signal regulation models of gastric cancer, databases and literature were used to construct the signaling network in humans. Topological characteristics of the network were analyzed by CytoScape. After marking gastric cancer-related genes extracted from the CancerResource, GeneRIF, and COSMIC databases, the FANMOD software was used for the mining of gastric cancer-related motifs in a network with three vertices. The significant motif difference method was adopted to identify significantly different motifs in the normal and cancer states. Finally, we conducted a series of analyses of the significantly different motifs, including gene ontology, function annotation of genes, and model classification. A human signaling network was constructed, with 1643 nodes and 5089 regulating interactions. The network was configured to have the characteristics of other biological networks. There were 57,942 motifs marked with gastric cancer-related genes out of a total of 69,492 motifs, and 264 motifs were selected as significantly different motifs by calculating the significant motif difference (SMD) scores. Genes in significantly different motifs were mainly enriched in functions associated with cancer genesis, such as regulation of cell death, amino acid phosphorylation of proteins, and intracellular signaling cascades. The top five significantly different motifs were mainly cascade and positive feedback types. Almost all genes in the five motifs were cancer related, including EPOR, MAPK14, BCL2L1, KRT18, PTPN6, CASP3, TGFBR2, AR, and CASP7. The development of cancer might be curbed by inhibiting signal transductions upstream and downstream of the selected motifs.

  19. Regulation of the nuclear gene that encodes the alpha-subunit of the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase complex. Activation by upstream stimulatory factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, G A; Jordan, E M

    1997-04-18

    We have previously identified several positive cis-acting regulatory regions in the promoters of the bovine and human nuclear-encoded mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase alpha-subunit genes (ATPA). One of these cis-acting regions contains the sequence 5'-CACGTG-3' (an E-box), to which a number of transcription factors containing a basic helix-loop-helix motif can bind. This E-box element is required for maximum activity of the ATPA promoter in HeLa cells. The present study identifies the human transcription factor, upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), as a nuclear factor that binds to the ATPA E-box and demonstrates that USF2 plays a critical role in the activation of the ATPA gene in vivo. Evidence includes the following. Antiserum directed against USF2 recognized factors present in HeLa nuclear extracts that interact with the ATPA promoter in mobility shift assays. Wild-type USF2 proteins synthesized from expression vectors trans-activated the ATPA promoter through the E-box, whereas truncated USF2 proteins devoid of the amino-terminal activation domains did not. Importantly, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of USF2 lacking the basic DNA binding domain but able to dimerize with endogenous USF proteins significantly reduced the level of activation of the ATPA promoter caused by ectopically coexpressed USF2, demonstrating the importance of endogenous USF2 in activation of the ATPA gene.

  20. Network motifs provide signatures that characterize metabolism†

    OpenAIRE

    Shellman, Erin R.; Burant, Charles F.; Schnell, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are repeating patterns that determine the local properties of networks. In this work, we characterized all 3-node motifs using enzyme commission numbers of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology to show that motif abundance is related to biochemical function. Further, we present a comparative analysis of motif distributions in the metabolic networks of 21 species across six kingdoms of life. We found the distribution of motif abundances to be similar between spec...

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene. Identification of a repressor element and its transcription factors Hes-1 and YY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, B; Heus, J; Lu, N; Nichols, R C; Raben, N; Plotz, P H

    2001-01-19

    Acid alpha-glucosidase, the product of a housekeeping gene, is a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycogen. A deficiency of this enzyme is responsible for a recessively inherited myopathy and cardiomyopathy, glycogenesis type II. We have previously demonstrated that the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene expression is regulated by a silencer within intron 1, which is located in the 5'-untranslated region. In this study, we have used deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and footprint analysis to further localize the silencer to a 25-base pair element. The repressive effect on the TK promoter was about 50% in both orientations in expression plasmid, and two transcriptional factors were identified with antibodies binding specifically to the element. Mutagenesis and functional analyses of the element demonstrated that the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split (Hes-1) binding to an E box (CACGCG) and global transcription factor-YY1 binding to its core site function as a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, the overexpression of Hes-1 significantly enhanced the repressive effect of the silencer element. The data should be helpful in understanding the expression and regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene as well as other lysosomal enzyme genes.

  2. Enhanced invasiveness of breast cancer cell lines upon co-cultivation with macrophages is due to TNF-alpha dependent up-regulation of matrix metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Thorsten; Robinson, Stephen C; Schulz, Matthias; Trümper, Lorenz; Balkwill, Frances R; Binder, Claudia

    2004-08-01

    Apart from the neoplastic cells, malignant tumours consist of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and normal cells, in particular tumour-associated macrophages (TAM). To understand the mechanisms by which TAM can influence tumour cell invasion we co-cultured the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, SK-BR-3 and the benign mammary epithelial cell line hTERT-HME1 with macrophages. Co-incubation enhanced invasiveness of the tumour cells, while hTERT-HME1 remained non-invasive. Addition of the broad-spectrum matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-inhibitor FN 439, neutralizing MMP-9 or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antibodies reduced invasiveness to basal levels. As shown by zymography, all cell lines produced low amounts of MMP-2, -3, -7 and -9 under control conditions. Basal MMP production by macrophages was significantly higher. Upon co-incubation, supernatant levels of MMPs -2, -3, -7 and -9 increased significantly, paralleled by an increase of MMP-2 activation. MMP-2 and -9 induction could be blocked by TNF-alpha antibodies. Co-culture of macrophages and hTERT-HME1 did not lead to MMP induction. In the co-cultures, mRNAs for MMPs and TNF-alpha were significantly up-regulated in macrophages, while the mRNA concentrations in the tumour cells remained unchanged. In summary, we have found that co-cultivation of tumour cells with macrophages leads to enhanced invasiveness of the malignant cells due to TNF-alpha dependent MMP induction in the macrophages.

  3. [IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL PERSONALITY FEATURES ON ABILITY TO VOLUNTARY REGULATION OF EXPRESSION EEG ALPHA AND BETA FREQUENCIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, E V; Kiroy, V N; Stoletniy, A S; Lazurenko, D M; Bahtin, O M; Minyaeva, N R; Kiroy, R I

    2015-05-01

    The ability to voluntary control severity of alpha- and beta-2 frequency bands in the parietal and frontal cortical areas was investigated at 17 volunteers using biofeedback. The impact of different personality traits on the effectiveness of control was evaluated. According to the data, it was easier task to decrease expression beta-2 frequency in the frontal cortex than to decline the power of alpha frequency in the parietal cortex. The effectiveness of voluntary control of brain activity is influenced by personality features as extraversion, psychoticism, neuroticism, mobility and steadiness of nerve processes, level of person anxiety.

  4. Promoter Motifs in NCLDVs: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Andrade, Ana Cláudia dos Santos Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Arantes, Thalita Souza; Boratto, Paulo Victor Miranda; Silva, Ludmila Karen dos Santos; Dornas, Fábio Pio; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; La Scola, Bernard; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-01-01

    For many years, gene expression in the three cellular domains has been studied in an attempt to discover sequences associated with the regulation of the transcription process. Some specific transcriptional features were described in viruses, although few studies have been devoted to understanding the evolutionary aspects related to the spread of promoter motifs through related viral families. The discovery of giant viruses and the proposition of the new viral order Megavirales that comprise a monophyletic group, named nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV), raised new questions in the field. Some putative promoter sequences have already been described for some NCLDV members, bringing new insights into the evolutionary history of these complex microorganisms. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of the transcription regulation process in the three domains of life, followed by a systematic description of what is currently known about promoter regions in several NCLDVs. We also discuss how the analysis of the promoter sequences could bring new ideas about the giant viruses’ evolution. Finally, considering a possible common ancestor for the NCLDV group, we discussed possible promoters’ evolutionary scenarios and propose the term “MEGA-box” to designate an ancestor promoter motif (‘TATATAAAATTGA’) that could be evolved gradually by nucleotides’ gain and loss and point mutations. PMID:28117683

  5. Endogenous IGF-I and alpha v beta3 integrin ligands regulate increased smooth muscle growth in TNBS-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelgrove, Krystina B; Flynn, Robert S; Qiao, Li-Ya; Grider, John R; Kuemmerle, John F

    2009-06-01

    Endogenous insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates intestinal smooth muscle growth by concomitantly stimulating proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. IGF-I-stimulated growth is augmented by the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin ligands vitronectin and fibronectin. IGF-I expression in smooth muscle is increased in both TNBS-induced colitis and Crohn's disease. We hypothesized that intestinal inflammation increased vitronectin and fibronectin expression by smooth muscle and, along with IGF-I upregulation, increased intestinal muscle growth. Intestinal smooth muscle cells were examined 7 days following the induction of TNBS-induced colitis. Although alpha(v)beta(3) integrin expression was not altered by TNBS-induced colitis, vitronectin and fibronectin levels were increased by 80 +/- 10% and 90 +/- 15%, above control levels, respectively. Basal IGF-I receptor phosphorylation in inflamed muscle from TNBS-treated rats was increased by 86 +/- 8% over vehicle-treated controls. Basal ERK1/2, p70S6 kinase, and GSK-3beta phosphorylation in muscle cells of TNBS-treated rats were also increased by 140-180%. TNBS treatment increased basal muscle cell proliferation by 130 +/- 15% and decreased apoptosis by 20 +/- 2% compared with that in vehicle-treated controls. The changes in proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by an IGF-I receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor or an alpha(v)beta(3) integrin antagonist. The results suggest that smooth muscle hyperplasia in TNBS-induced colitis partly results from the upregulation of endogenous IGF-I and ligands of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin that mediate increased smooth muscle cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. This paper has identified one mechanism regulating smooth muscle hyperplasia, a feature of stricture formation that occurs in the chronically inflamed intestine of TNBS-induced colitis and potentially Crohn's disease.

  6. Alpha Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have no effect 1 on the anemia. αα αα Normal alpha ...

  7. Reference: TCA1MOTIF [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TCA1MOTIF Goldsbrough AP, Albrecht H, Stratford R Salicylic acid-inducible binding ...of a tobacco nuclear protein to a 10 bp sequence which is highly conserved amongst stress-inducible genes. Plant J 3:563-571 (1993) PubMed: 8220463; ...

  8. Amino acid composition of alpha1/alpha2 domains and cytoplasmic tail of MHC class I molecules determine their susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus US11-mediated down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barel, Martine T; Pizzato, Nathalie; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Bouteiller, Philippe Le; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Lenfant, Francoise

    2003-06-01

    During co-evolution with its host, human cytomegalovirus has acquired multiple defense mechanisms to escape from immune recognition. In this study, we focused on US11, which binds to MHC class I heavy chains and mediates their dislocation to the cytosol and subsequent degradation by proteasomes. To examine which domains of class I heavy chains are involved in this process, we constructed chimeric HLA molecules of US11-sensitive and -insensitive class I molecules (HLA-A2 and HLA-G, respectively). Pulse-chase experiments were performed to evaluate protein stability and interactions between class I heavy chains and US11. Flow cytometry was employed to assess the effect of US11 on surface expression of the different chimeras. Our results indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of HLA molecules are important for the affinity of US11 association. However, the degradation efficiency seems to rely mostly on cytosolic tail residues. We found that the nonclassical HLA-G molecule is insensitive to US11-mediated degradation solely because it lacks essential tail residues. A deletion of the last two tail residues in full-length MHC class I molecules already caused a severe reduction in degradation efficiency. Altogether, our data provide new insights into the mechanism by which US11 down-regulates MHC class I molecules.

  9. Sequence determination and modeling of structural motifs for the smallest monomeric aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Y M; Shiba, K; Mottes, C; Schimmel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Polypeptide chains of 19 previously studied Escherichia coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are as large as 951 amino acids and, depending on the enzyme, have quaternary structures of alpha, alpha 2, alpha 2 beta 2, and alpha 4. These enzymes have been organized into two classes which are defined by sequence motifs that are associated with specific three-dimensional structures. We isolated, cloned, and sequenced the previously uncharacterized gene for E. coli cysteine-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.16...

  10. Improvement of cloned [alpha]-amylase gene expression in fed-batch culture of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by regulating both glucose and ethanol concentrations using a fuzzy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Sumihisa; Nishida, Yoshio; Park, Y.S.; Iijima, Shinji; Kobayashi, Takeshi (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-11-05

    The effect of ethanol concentration on cloned gene expression in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 20B-12 containing one of two plasmids, pNA3 and pNA7, was investigated in batch cultures. Plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 contain the [alpha]-amylase gene under the control of the SUC2 or PGK promoter, respectively. When the ethanol concentration was controlled at 2 to 5 g/L, the gene expressions were two times higher than those at 20 g/L ethanol. To increase the gene expression by maintaining both the ethanol and glucose concentrations at low levels, a fuzzy controller was developed. The concentrations of glucose and ethanol were controlled simultaneously at 0.15 and 2 g/L, respectively, in the production phase using the fuzzy controller in fed-batch culture. The synthesis of [alpha]-amylase was induced by the low glucose concentration and maintained at a high level of activity by regulating the ethanol concentration at 2 g/L. The secretory [alpha]-amylase activities of cells harboring plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 in fed-batch culture were 175 and 392 U/mL, and their maximal specific activities 7.7 and 12.4 U/mg dry cells, respectively. These values are two to three times higher in activity and three to four times higher in specific activity than those obtained when glucose only was controlled.

  11. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  12. Different regulation of human delta-opioid receptors by SNC-80 [(+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] and endogenous enkephalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoq, I; Marie, N; Jauzac, Ph; Allouche, S

    2004-08-01

    Among the different mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance, receptor desensitization would represent a major cellular adaptation process in which the role of receptor internalization is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we examined desensitization of the human delta-opioid receptor (hDOR) produced by endogenous opioid peptides Leu-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) and Met-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met), and the contribution of internalization in this process. Results obtained with natural peptides were compared with those produced by a synthetic opioid agonist, SNC-80 [(+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide). After a 30-min treatment, we observed a different regulation of hDOR between agonists. SNC-80 produced a stronger and faster desensitization and was associated with a loss of opioid binding sites by 50%. SNC-80 also caused a marked hDOR down-regulation by 30% as observed by Western blot. Immunocytochemistry revealed that SNC-80 induced a complete redistribution of hDOR from cell surface into intracellular compartments, whereas a partial internalization was visualized upon enkephalin exposure. In contrast, a stronger hDOR recycling and resensitization were measured after enkephalin treatment compared with SNC-80. These data strongly suggested a differential sorting of the internalized receptors caused by enkephalins and SNC-80 that was further confirmed by chloroquine as a lysosomal degradation blocker and monensin as a recycling endosome inhibitor. Finally, by preventing hDOR internalization with 0.5 M sucrose, we demonstrated that hDOR internalization contributes partially to desensitization. In conclusion, hDOR desensitization depends both on its internalization and its sorting either to the recycling pathway or to lysosomes.

  13. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  14. Main: TCA1MOTIF [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TCA1MOTIF S000159 17-May-1998 (last modified) kehi TCA-1 (tobacco nuclear protein 1...) binding site; Related to salicylic acid-inducible expression of many genes; Found in barley beta-1,3-gluca...nase and over 30 different plant genes which are known to be induced by one or more forms of stress; A similar sequence (TCA... et al., 1997); SA; salicylic acid; stress; TCA-1; barley (Hordeum vulgare); tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum); TCATCTTCTT ...

  15. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  16. Acetylsalicylic acid regulates MMP-2 activity and inhibits colorectal invasion of murine B16F0 melanoma cells in C57BL/6J mice: effects of prostaglandin F(2)alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Shaw Stella; Luo, Shue-Fen; Ning, Chung-Chu; Lin, Chien-Liang; Jiang, Ming-Chung; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that acetylsalicylic acid may reduce the risk of mortality due to colon cancers. Metastasis is the major cause of cancer death. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in tumor invasion regulation, and prostaglandin F(2)alpha (PGF(2)alpha) is a key stimulator of MMP production. Thus, we investigated whether acetylsalicylic acid regulated MMP activity and the invasion of cancer cells and whether PGF(2)alpha attenuated acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of cancer cells. Gelatin-based zymography assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the MMP-2 activity of B16F0 melanoma cells. Matrigel-based chemoinvasion assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the invasion of B16F0 cells. Acetylsalicylic acid can inhibit PGF(2)alpha synthesis and PGF(2)alpha is a key stimulator of MMP-2 production. Our data showed that PGF(2)alpha treatment attenuated the acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of B16F0 cells. In animal experiments, acetylsalicylic acid reduced colorectal metastasis of B16F0 cells in C57BL/6J mice by 44%. Our results suggest that PGF(2)alpha is a therapeutic target for metastasis inhibition and acetylsalicylic acid may possess anti-metastasis ability.

  17. seeMotif: exploring and visualizing sequence motifs in 3D structures

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Sequence motifs are important in the study of molecular biology. Motif discovery tools efficiently deliver many function related signatures of proteins and largely facilitate sequence annotation. As increasing numbers of motifs are detected experimentally or predicted computationally, characterizing the functional roles of motifs and identifying the potential synergetic relationships between them are important next steps. A good way to investigate novel motifs is to utilize the abundant 3D st...

  18. Nuclear receptor Rev-erb alpha (Nr1d1 functions in concert with Nr2e3 to regulate transcriptional networks in the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissa J Mollema

    Full Text Available The majority of diseases in the retina are caused by genetic mutations affecting the development and function of photoreceptor cells. The transcriptional networks directing these processes are regulated by genes such as nuclear hormone receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor gene Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 has been widely studied for its role in the circadian cycle and cell metabolism, however its role in the retina is unknown. In order to understand the role of Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 in the retina, we evaluated the effects of loss of Nr1d1 to the developing retina and its co-regulation with the photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor gene Nr2e3 in the developing and mature retina. Knock-down of Nr1d1 expression in the developing retina results in pan-retinal spotting and reduced retinal function by electroretinogram. Our studies show that NR1D1 protein is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer neuroblastic layer of the developing mouse retina. In the adult retina, NR1D1 is expressed in the ganglion cell layer and is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer nuclear layer, within rods and cones. Several genes co-targeted by NR2E3 and NR1D1 were identified that include: Nr2c1, Recoverin, Rgr, Rarres2, Pde8a, and Nupr1. We examined the cyclic expression of Nr1d1 and Nr2e3 over a twenty-four hour period and observed that both nuclear receptors cycle in a similar manner. Taken together, these studies reveal a novel role for Nr1d1, in conjunction with its cofactor Nr2e3, in regulating transcriptional networks critical for photoreceptor development and function.

  19. Nuclear receptor Rev-erb alpha (Nr1d1) functions in concert with Nr2e3 to regulate transcriptional networks in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollema, Nissa J; Yuan, Yang; Jelcick, Austin S; Sachs, Andrew J; von Alpen, Désirée; Schorderet, Daniel; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B

    2011-03-08

    The majority of diseases in the retina are caused by genetic mutations affecting the development and function of photoreceptor cells. The transcriptional networks directing these processes are regulated by genes such as nuclear hormone receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor gene Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 has been widely studied for its role in the circadian cycle and cell metabolism, however its role in the retina is unknown. In order to understand the role of Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 in the retina, we evaluated the effects of loss of Nr1d1 to the developing retina and its co-regulation with the photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor gene Nr2e3 in the developing and mature retina. Knock-down of Nr1d1 expression in the developing retina results in pan-retinal spotting and reduced retinal function by electroretinogram. Our studies show that NR1D1 protein is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer neuroblastic layer of the developing mouse retina. In the adult retina, NR1D1 is expressed in the ganglion cell layer and is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer nuclear layer, within rods and cones. Several genes co-targeted by NR2E3 and NR1D1 were identified that include: Nr2c1, Recoverin, Rgr, Rarres2, Pde8a, and Nupr1. We examined the cyclic expression of Nr1d1 and Nr2e3 over a twenty-four hour period and observed that both nuclear receptors cycle in a similar manner. Taken together, these studies reveal a novel role for Nr1d1, in conjunction with its cofactor Nr2e3, in regulating transcriptional networks critical for photoreceptor development and function.

  20. Discovering motifs in ranked lists of DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Eden

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP-chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs, which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP-chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF binding sites in yeast ChIP-chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked

  1. Estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha mediates up-regulation of aromatase expression by prostaglandin E2 in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lin; Shi, Jiandang; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhu, Yan; Du, Xiaoling; Jiao, Hongli; Mo, Zengnan; Klocker, Helmut; Lee, Chung; Zhang, Ju

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. ERRalpha is highly expressed in the prostate, especially in prostate stromal cells. However, little is known about the regulation and function of ERRalpha, which may contribute to the progression of prostatic diseases. We previously found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) up-regulated the expression of aromatase in prostate stromal cells. Here we show that PGE2 also up-regulates the expression of ERRalpha, which, as a transcription factor, further mediates the regulatory effects of PGE2 on the expression of aromatase. ERRalpha expression was up-regulated by PGE2 in prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1, which was mediated mainly through the protein kinase A signaling pathway by PGE2 receptor EP2. Suppression of ERRalpha activity by chlordane (an antagonist of ERRalpha) or small interfering RNA knockdown of ERRalpha blocked the increase of expression and promoter activity of aromatase induced by PGE2. Overexpression of ERRalpha significantly increased aromatase expression and promoter activity, which were further augmented by PGE2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that ERRalpha directly bound to the aromatase promoter in vivo, and PGE2 enhanced the recruitment of ERRalpha and promoted transcriptional regulatory effects on aromatase expression in WPMY-1. 17Beta-estradiol concentration in WPMY-1 medium was up-regulated by ERRalpha expression, and that was further increased by PGE2. Our results provided evidence that ERRalpha contributed to local estrogen production by up-regulating aromatase expression in response to PGE2 and provided further insights into the potential role of ERRalpha in estrogen-related prostatic diseases.

  2. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Arash; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma.

  3. STRADalpha regulates LKB1 localization by blocking access to importin-alpha, and by association with Crm1 and exportin-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Julia; Macara, Ian G

    2008-04-01

    LKB1, a serine/threonine kinase, regulates cell polarity, metabolism, and cell growth. The activity and cellular distribution of LKB1 are determined by cofactors, STRADalpha and MO25. STRADalpha induces relocalization of LKB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and stimulates its catalytic activity. MO25 stabilizes the STRADalpha/LKB1 interaction. We investigated the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport of LKB1 in response to its cofactors. Although LKB1 is imported into the nucleus by importin-alpha/beta, STRADalpha and MO25 passively diffuse between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. STRADalpha induces nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of LKB1. STRADalpha facilitates nuclear export of LKB1 by serving as an adaptor between LKB1 and exportins CRM1 and exportin7. STRADalpha inhibits import of LKB1 by competing with importin-alpha for binding to LKB1. MO25 stabilizes the LKB1-STRADalpha complex but it does not facilitate its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Strikingly, the STRADbeta, isoform which differs from STRADalpha in the N- and C-terminal domains that are responsible for interaction with export receptors, does not efficiently relocalize LKB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These results identify a multifactored mechanism to control LKB1 localization, and they suggest that the STRADbeta-LKB1 complex might possess unique functions in the nucleus.

  4. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  5. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidian, Arash; Stedingk, Kristoffer von; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven, E-mail: sven.pahlman@med.lu.se

    2015-06-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma. - Highlights: • Transcriptional control of HIF-2α is restricted to neural cell-derived tumors. • Enhanced transcription of HIF2A is not due to increased mRNA stability. • Chemical stabilization of the HIF-α subunits leads to increased HIF2A transcription. • ERRα regulates HIF2A mRNA expression in neuroblastoma. • High expression of ESRRA correlates to poor outcome in neuroblastoma.

  6. Statistical tests to compare motif count exceptionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewalle Vincent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding over- or under-represented motifs in biological sequences is now a common task in genomics. Thanks to p-value calculation for motif counts, exceptional motifs are identified and represent candidate functional motifs. The present work addresses the related question of comparing the exceptionality of one motif in two different sequences. Just comparing the motif count p-values in each sequence is indeed not sufficient to decide if this motif is significantly more exceptional in one sequence compared to the other one. A statistical test is required. Results We develop and analyze two statistical tests, an exact binomial one and an asymptotic likelihood ratio test, to decide whether the exceptionality of a given motif is equivalent or significantly different in two sequences of interest. For that purpose, motif occurrences are modeled by Poisson processes, with a special care for overlapping motifs. Both tests can take the sequence compositions into account. As an illustration, we compare the octamer exceptionalities in the Escherichia coli K-12 backbone versus variable strain-specific loops. Conclusion The exact binomial test is particularly adapted for small counts. For large counts, we advise to use the likelihood ratio test which is asymptotic but strongly correlated with the exact binomial test and very simple to use.

  7. Regulation of leptin expression by 17beta-estradiol in human placental cells involves membrane associated estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Yésica P; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Dueñas, José L; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor; Varone, Cecilia L

    2012-04-01

    The placenta produces a wide number of molecules that play essential roles in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. In this context, leptin has emerged as an important player in reproduction. The synthesis of leptin in normal trophoblastic cells is regulated by different endogenous biochemical agents, but the regulation of placental leptin expression is still poorly understood. We have previously reported that 17β-estradiol (E(2)) up-regulates placental leptin expression. To improve the understanding of estrogen receptor mechanisms in regulating leptin gene expression, in the current study we examined the effect of membrane-constrained E(2) conjugate, E-BSA, on leptin expression in human placental cells. We have found that leptin expression was induced by E-BSA both in BeWo cells and human placental explants, suggesting that E(2) also exerts its effects through membrane receptors. Moreover E-BSA rapidly activated different MAPKs and AKT pathways, and these pathways were involved in E(2) induced placental leptin expression. On the other hand we demonstrated the presence of ERα associated to the plasma membrane of BeWo cells. We showed that E(2) genomic and nongenomic actions could be mediated by ERα. Supporting this idea, the downregulation of ERα level through a specific siRNA, decreased E-BSA effects on leptin expression. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the mechanisms whereby E(2) regulates leptin expression in placenta and support the importance of leptin in placental physiology.

  8. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  9. Effects of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) on alpha2-adrenoceptors which regulate the synthesis and release of noradrenaline in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, M; Giralt, M T

    2001-03-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) induces a degeneration of noradrenergic axons originating in the locus coeruleus. The sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors which regulate the synthesis and release of noradrenaline was investigated in three brain regions which receive an unequal innervation from locus coeruleus, 21 days after DSP4 (50 mg/kg) administration. After giving treated rats a dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, the in vivo tyrosine hydroxylase activity and the tissue concentrations of noradrenaline were also evaluated. Relevant reductions of noradrenaline levels were found in hippocampus and parietal cortex (91% and 77.5%, respectively; PDSP4 (10+/-5% vs 57+/-3% in the control group, PDSP4 for noradrenergic terminals arising from locus coeruleus and suggest a more severe lesioning of the hippocampus than the parietal cortex.

  10. An unusual helix turn helix motif in the catalytic core of HIV-1 integrase binds viral DNA and LEDGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayate Merad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrase (IN of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into host cellular DNA. We identified a bi-helix motif (residues 149-186 in the crystal structure of the catalytic core (CC of the IN-Phe185Lys variant that consists of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices connected by a 3 to 5-residue turn. The motif is embedded in a large array of interactions that stabilize the monomer and the dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the conformational and binding properties of the corresponding synthetic peptide. This displays features of the protein motif structure thanks to the mutual intramolecular interactions of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices that maintain the fold. The main properties are the binding to: 1- the processing-attachment site at the LTR (long terminal repeat ends of virus DNA with a K(d (dissociation constant in the sub-micromolar range; 2- the whole IN enzyme; and 3- the IN binding domain (IBD but not the IBD-Asp366Asn variant of LEDGF (lens epidermal derived growth factor lacking the essential Asp366 residue. In our motif, in contrast to the conventional HTH (helix-turn-helix, it is the N terminal helix (alpha(4 which has the role of DNA recognition helix, while the C terminal helix (alpha(5 would rather contribute to the motif stabilization by interactions with the alpha(4 helix. CONCLUSION: The motif, termed HTHi (i, for inverted emerges as a central piece of the IN structure and function. It could therefore represent an attractive target in the search for inhibitors working at the DNA-IN, IN-IN and IN-LEDGF interfaces.

  11. rMotifGen: random motif generator for DNA and protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardin C Timothy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of short, subtle conserved motif regions within a set of related DNA or amino acid sequences can lead to discoveries about important regulatory domains such as transcription factor and DNA binding sites as well as conserved protein domains. In order to help assess motif detection algorithms on motifs with varying properties and levels of conservation, we have developed a computational tool, rMotifGen, with the sole purpose of generating a number of random DNA or protein sequences containing short sequence motifs. Each motif consensus can be user-defined, randomly generated, or created from a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM. Insertions and mutations within these motifs are created according to user-defined parameters and substitution matrices. The resulting sequences can be helpful in mutational simulations and in testing the limits of motif detection algorithms. Results Two implementations of rMotifGen have been created, one providing a graphical user interface (GUI for random motif construction, and the other serving as a command line interface. The second implementation has the added advantages of platform independence and being able to be called in a batch mode. rMotifGen was used to construct sample sets of sequences containing DNA motifs and amino acid motifs that were then tested against the Gibbs sampler and MEME packages. Conclusion rMotifGen provides an efficient and convenient method for creating random DNA or amino acid sequences with a variable number of motifs, where the instance of each motif can be incorporated using a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM or by creating an instance mutated from its corresponding consensus using an evolutionary model based on substitution matrices. rMotifGen is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/brg/rMotifGen/.

  12. Regulation of Mammary Stem Cell Quiescence via Post-Translational Modification of DeltaNp63alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    were collected by centrifugation and lysed by sonication in the presence of a cocktail of protease inhibitors. Lysates were cleared by centrifugation...Cherukuri P, Li H, Yuan Z, et al. (2008) Reciprocal intraepithelial interactions between TP63 and hedgehog signaling regulate quiescence and activation of

  13. Substrate Elastic Modulus Regulates the Morphology, Focal Adhesions, and alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression of Retinal Muller Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; van Putten, Sander M.; Wouters, Olaf; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix has been shown to regulate cell adhesion, migration, and transdifferentiation in fibrotic processes. Retinal Muller cells have been shown to be mechanosensitive; they are involved in fibrotic vitreoretinal diseases. Since fibrosis increases the rigi

  14. Cloning and comparative analysis of gene structure in promoter site of alpha-s1 casein gene in Naeinian goat and sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Najafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 5′ end or alpha-S1 casein promoter has a significant role in milk protein gene expression. The understanding of the translation process of alpha-S1 casein mutants will provide us an opportunity to make the best selection in livestock providing more proteins in milk. Blood samples were taken from three hundred of Naeinian goats and sheep, and DNA extraction was done using modified salting out method. Polymerase chain reactions (PCR were carried out using a specific primer pairs for amplification a fragment of 1133 bp from part of 5′-UTR and exon 1 of alpha s1 casein gene. The AluI and HinfI restriction enzyme treatment of all samples provided the same homozygous AA genotype in both species. Subsequently, one sample of each species was selected and cloned, and the final sequences were analyzed by BioEdit, CLC genomic, Mega4 and DNASIS MAX software. Several polymorphisms are recognized between Naeinian goat and sheep that are presented on motif sites. In this research, the interested location, including exon I and a part of 5′, was analyzed, and genetic element comparisons were done between Naeinian goat and sheep. The number and location of probable binding sites can have a crucial role as a result of antagonistic and synergistic effects on gene regulation activities.

  15. Cutting edge: the nucleotide receptor P2X7 contains multiple protein- and lipid-interaction motifs including a potential binding site for bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, L C; Fisette, P L; Sommer, J A; Watters, J J; Prabhu, U; Dubyak, G R; Proctor, R A; Bertics, P J

    2001-08-15

    The nucleotide receptor P2X7 has been shown to modulate LPS-induced macrophage production of numerous inflammatory mediators. Although the C-terminal portion of P2X7 is thought to be essential for multiple receptor functions, little is known regarding the structural motifs that lie within this region. We show here that the P2X7 C-terminal domain contains several apparent protein-protein and protein-lipid interaction motifs with potential importance to macrophage signaling and LPS action. Surprisingly, P2X7 also contains a conserved LPS-binding domain. In this report, we demonstrate that peptides derived from this P2X7 sequence bind LPS in vitro. Moreover, these peptides neutralize the ability of LPS to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1, ERK2) and to promote the degradation of the inhibitor of kappaB-alpha isoform (IkappaB-alpha) in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Collectively, these data suggest that the C-terminal domain of P2X7 may directly coordinate several signal transduction events related to macrophage function and LPS action.

  16. Interleukin-13 (IL-13)/IL-13 receptor alpha1 (IL-13Ralpha1) signaling regulates intestinal epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel-dependent Cl- secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David; Ahrens, Richard; Osterfeld, Heather; Noah, Taeko K; Groschwitz, Katherine; Foster, Paul S; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Rothenberg, Marc E; Shroyer, Noah F; Matthaei, Klaus I; Finkelman, Fred D; Hogan, Simon P

    2011-04-15

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) has been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. It is postulated that IL-13 drives inflammatory lesions through the modulation of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell function in the intestine. To delineate the relevant contribution of elevated levels of intestinal IL-13 to intestinal structure and function, we generated an intestinal IL-13 transgenic mouse (iIL-13Tg). We show that constitutive overexpression of IL-13 in the small bowel induces modification of intestinal epithelial architecture (villus blunting, goblet cell hyperplasia, and increased epithelial proliferation) and epithelial function (altered basolateral → apical Cl(-) ion conductance). Pharmacological analyses in vitro and in vivo determined that elevated Cl(-) conductance is mediated by altered cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression and activity. Generation of iIL-13Tg/Il13rα1(-/-), iIL-13Tg/Il13rα2(-/-), and iIL-13Tg/Stat6(-/-) mice revealed that IL-13-mediated dysregulation of epithelial architecture and Cl(-) conductance is dependent on IL-13Rα1 and STAT-6. These observations demonstrate a central role for the IL-13/IL-13Rα1 pathway in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell Cl(-) secretion via up-regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, suggesting an important role for this pathway in secretory diarrhea.

  17. MUC1 mucin stabilizes and activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha to regulate metabolism in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaika, Nina V.; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Lewallen, Michelle E.; Purohit, Vinee; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Mehla, Kamiya; Brown, Roger B.; Caffrey, Thomas; Yu, Fang; Johnson, Keith R.; Powers, Robert; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer that facilitates cancer cell survival and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that MUC1, a large, type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in several carcinomas including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, modulates cancer cell metabolism to facilitate growth properties of cancer cells. MUC1 occupies the promoter elements of multiple genes directly involved in glucose metabolism and regulates their expression. Furthermore, MUC1 expression enhances glycolytic activity in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrate that MUC1 expression enhances in vivo glucose uptake and expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in orthotopic implantation models of pancreatic cancer. The MUC1 cytoplasmic tail is known to activate multiple signaling pathways through its interactions with several transcription factors/coregulators at the promoter elements of various genes. Our results indicate that MUC1 acts as a modulator of the hypoxic response in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression/stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). MUC1 physically interacts with HIF-1α and p300 and stabilizes the former at the protein level. By using a ChIP assay, we demonstrate that MUC1 facilitates recruitment of HIF-1α and p300 on glycolytic gene promoters in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Also, by metabolomic studies, we demonstrate that MUC1 regulates multiple metabolite intermediates in the glucose and amino acid metabolic pathways. Thus, our studies indicate that MUC1 acts as a master regulator of the metabolic program and facilitates metabolic alterations in the hypoxic environments that help tumor cells survive and proliferate under such conditions. PMID:22869720

  18. Alpha-2-glycoprotein 1(AZGP1 regulates biological behaviors of LoVo cells by down-regulating mTOR signaling pathway and endogenous fatty acid synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligong Chang

    Full Text Available AZGP1 is a multifaceted protein associated with lipid mobilization, a process that is regulated by FASN and other metabolic pathways such as mTOR signaling. The active mTOR signaling pathway has been found to be involved in a variety of tumors. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the regulation of AZGP1 and FASN. An AZGP1-expressing plasmid was transfected into a human colorectal cancer cell line (LoVo with a low expression of AZGP1. The expression of AZGP1, FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6,and S6K1 were measured by Western blot analysis, and target genes were detected by RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was studied using the MTT and colony formation assays. The analysis of apoptosis and the cell cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry. The capacity of cell migration was investigated using the transwell migration assay. We found that the expression of AZGP1 was up-regulated while the expression of FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6, and S6K1 were down-regulated in LoVo cells after AZGP1 was expressed. The proliferation of malignant cells was reduced in AZGP1-overexpression cells, which is consistent with an increased in the G2-arrest and apoptosis rate. Furthermore, the migration of AZGP1-overexpression cells was decreased. The overexpression of AZGP1 suppressed the activation of the mTOR pathway and endogenous FASN-regulated fatty acid synthesis, mitigating the malignant phenotype of LoVo cells. Herein, we provide evidence that AZGP1 may constitute a novel tumor suppressor for LoVo colorectal cancer cells.

  19. Alpha-2-glycoprotein 1(AZGP1) regulates biological behaviors of LoVo cells by down-regulating mTOR signaling pathway and endogenous fatty acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ligong; Tian, Xiaoqiang; Lu, Yinghui; Jia, Min; Wu, Peng; Huang, Peilin

    2014-01-01

    AZGP1 is a multifaceted protein associated with lipid mobilization, a process that is regulated by FASN and other metabolic pathways such as mTOR signaling. The active mTOR signaling pathway has been found to be involved in a variety of tumors. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the regulation of AZGP1 and FASN. An AZGP1-expressing plasmid was transfected into a human colorectal cancer cell line (LoVo) with a low expression of AZGP1. The expression of AZGP1, FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6,and S6K1 were measured by Western blot analysis, and target genes were detected by RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was studied using the MTT and colony formation assays. The analysis of apoptosis and the cell cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry. The capacity of cell migration was investigated using the transwell migration assay. We found that the expression of AZGP1 was up-regulated while the expression of FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6, and S6K1 were down-regulated in LoVo cells after AZGP1 was expressed. The proliferation of malignant cells was reduced in AZGP1-overexpression cells, which is consistent with an increased in the G2-arrest and apoptosis rate. Furthermore, the migration of AZGP1-overexpression cells was decreased. The overexpression of AZGP1 suppressed the activation of the mTOR pathway and endogenous FASN-regulated fatty acid synthesis, mitigating the malignant phenotype of LoVo cells. Herein, we provide evidence that AZGP1 may constitute a novel tumor suppressor for LoVo colorectal cancer cells.

  20. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1 is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models.

  1. daf-31 encodes the catalytic subunit of N alpha-acetyltransferase that regulates Caenorhabditis elegans development, metabolism and adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Zhang, Jiuli; Minnerly, Justin; Kaul, Tiffany; Riddle, Donald L; Jia, Kailiang

    2014-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larva is a facultative state of diapause. Mutations affecting dauer signal transduction and morphogenesis have been reported. Of these, most that result in constitutive formation of dauer larvae are temperature-sensitive (ts). The daf-31 mutant was isolated in genetic screens looking for novel and underrepresented classes of mutants that form dauer and dauer-like larvae non-conditionally. Dauer-like larvae are arrested in development and have some, but not all, of the normal dauer characteristics. We show here that daf-31 mutants form dauer-like larvae under starvation conditions but are sensitive to SDS treatment. Moreover, metabolism is shifted to fat accumulation in daf-31 mutants. We cloned the daf-31 gene and it encodes an ortholog of the arrest-defective-1 protein (ARD1) that is the catalytic subunit of the major N alpha-acetyltransferase (NatA). A daf-31 promoter::GFP reporter gene indicates daf-31 is expressed in multiple tissues including neurons, pharynx, intestine and hypodermal cells. Interestingly, overexpression of daf-31 enhances the longevity phenotype of daf-2 mutants, which is dependent on the forkhead transcription factor (FOXO) DAF-16. We demonstrate that overexpression of daf-31 stimulates the transcriptional activity of DAF-16 without influencing its subcellular localization. These data reveal an essential role of NatA in controlling C. elegans life history and also a novel interaction between ARD1 and FOXO transcription factors, which may contribute to understanding the function of ARD1 in mammals.

  2. Hesperidin attenuates benzo[alpha] pyrene-induced testicular toxicity in rats via regulation of oxidant/antioxidant balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, H M M; Aly, H A A; Abd-Ellah, M F; El-Refaey, H M

    2009-07-01

    Benzo[alpha]pyrene (BaP) is one of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which has shown carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic potentials. The reproductive toxicity of BaP in male was not well investigated. Thereby, we have addressed in the current study the testicular toxicity of BaP and the postulate whether or not the citrus flavonoid, hesperidin (HDN), could ameliorate such toxicity in male Swiss albino rats. In this sense, animals were challenged with BaP (50 mg/kg/day, orally) for 10 consecutive days. HDN (200 mg/kg/day, orally) was administered ahead of BaP challenge for 10 consecutive days. BaP induced testicular toxicity that was well characterized histologically and biochemically. It decreased the relative testis weight and induced pyknosis and necrobiotic changes as well as chromatolysis in the nuclei of the spermatocytes in the seminiferous tubules. It also markedly deteriorated epididymal function as shown by decreased sperm count, motility, and daily sperm production. The polyaromatic hydrocarbon also reduced the testicular activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-X), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Besides, it decreased the testicular reduced glutathione (GSH) but increased malondialdehyde (MDA) contents. Prior administration of HDN ahead of BaP challenge ameliorated all the histological and biochemical alterations induced by BaP. It improved the epididymal function and mitigated the injurious effects of BaP on the seminiferous tubules. In conclusion, HDN has proven protective effects in BaP-induced testicular toxicity paradigm, and this protection resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant properties.

  3. Reciprocal signals between microglia and neurons regulate alpha-synuclein secretion by exophagy through a neuronal cJU-N-Nterminal kinase-signaling axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dan Ploug; Ejlerskov, Patrick; Rasmussen, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Secretion of proteopathic alpha-synuclein (alpha-SNC) species from neurons is a suspected driving force in the propagation of Parkinson's disease (PD). We have previously implicated exophagy, the exocytosis of autophagosomes, as a dominant mechanism of alpha-SNC secretion in different...

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of a conserved sequence motif in the ribosomal genes of the ciliate Paramecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In protozoa, the identification of preserved motifs by comparative genomics is often impeded by difficulties to generate reliable alignments for non-coding sequences. Moreover, the evolutionary dynamics of regulatory elements in 3' untranslated regions (both in protozoa and metazoa remains a virtually unexplored issue. Results By screening Paramecium tetraurelia's 3' untranslated regions for 8-mers that were previously found to be preserved in mammalian 3' UTRs, we detect and characterize a motif that is distinctly conserved in the ribosomal genes of this ciliate. The motif appears to be conserved across Paramecium aurelia species but is absent from the ribosomal genes of four additional non-Paramecium species surveyed, including another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Motif-free ribosomal genes retain fewer paralogs in the genome and appear to be lost more rapidly relative to motif-containing genes. Features associated with the discovered preserved motif are consistent with this 8-mer playing a role in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions Our observations 1 shed light on the evolution of a putative regulatory motif across large phylogenetic distances; 2 are expected to facilitate the understanding of the modulation of ribosomal genes expression in Paramecium; and 3 reveal a largely unexplored--and presumably not restricted to Paramecium--association between the presence/absence of a DNA motif and the evolutionary fate of its host genes.

  5. Romance of the three kingdoms: RORgammat allies with HIF1alpha against FoxP3 in regulating T cell metabolism and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsun, Andy; Chen, Zuojia; Li, Bin

    2011-10-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in immune homeostasis by controlling the function of various immune effector cells, including RAR-related orphan receptor gammat(+) (RORγt(+)) T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Foekhead box P(3) (FoxP(3)) is the master regulator of Treg cell function, while RORγt is the key transcription factor for the induction of the interleukin (IL)-17 family of cytokines during Th17 cell differentiation. FoxP3 can directly interact with and negatively regulate the function of RORγt, to determine the balance between induced Treg (iTreg) and Th17 cell polarization. Two recent independent studies from the Pan and Chi Labs have shown how hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) is able to tip the balance of T cell differentiation toward the Th17 lineage by responding to the local changes in metabolic shift or an increase in proinflammatory mediators in the microenvironment. By allying with HIF1α, RORγt wins the fight against FoxP3 and Treg cell commitment.

  6. Autophagy down regulates pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells and rescues both LPS and alpha-synuclein induced neuronal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussi, Claudio; Ramos, Javier Maria Peralta; Arroyo, Daniela S.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Gallea, Jose Ignacio; Wang, Ji Ming; Celej, Maria Soledad; Iribarren, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental cellular homeostatic mechanism, whereby cells autodigest parts of their cytoplasm for removal or turnover. Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with autophagy dysregulation, and drugs modulating autophagy have been successful in several animal models. Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) that become activated in pathological conditions and determine the fate of other neural cells. Here, we studied the effects of autophagy on the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in microglial cells and their effects on neuronal cells. We observed that both trehalose and rapamycin activate autophagy in BV2 microglial cells and down-regulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO), in response to LPS and alpha-synuclein. Autophagy also modulated the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs in BV2 cells, which was required for NO production. These actions of autophagy modified the impact of microglial activation on neuronal cells, leading to suppression of neurotoxicity. Our results demonstrate a novel role for autophagy in the regulation of microglial cell activation and pro-inflammatory molecule secretion, which may be important for the control of inflammatory responses in the CNS and neurotoxicity. PMID:28256519

  7. Simultaneous quantification of GABAergic 3alpha,5alpha/3alpha,5beta neuroactive steroids in human and rat serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Alward, Sarah E; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Girdler, Susan S; Morrow, A Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and produce inhibitory neurobehavioral and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite substantial information on the progesterone derivative (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP, allopregnanolone), the physiological significance of the other endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids has remained elusive. Here, we describe the validation of a method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to simultaneously identify serum levels of the eight 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone. The method shows specificity, sensitivity and enhanced throughput compared to other methods already available for neuroactive steroid quantification. Administration of pregnenolone to rats and progesterone to women produced selective effects on the 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced neuroactive steroids, indicating differential regulation of their biosynthetic pathways. Pregnenolone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1488%, psteroid was detected only in 3/16 control subjects. Levels of 3alpha,5alpha-A, 3alpha,5beta-A and pregnenolone were not altered. This method can be used to investigate the physiological and pathological role of neuroactive steroids and to develop biomarkers and new therapeutics for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  8. HNF-4alpha Negatively Regulates Hepcidin Expression Through BMPR1A in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wencai; Wang, Heyang; Zheng, Xuan; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Zheng; Shen, Hui; Li, Min

    2016-09-23

    Hepcidin synthesis is reported to be inadequate according to the body iron store in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) undergoing hepatic iron overload (HIO). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α) may negatively regulate hepcidin expression and contribute to hepcidin deficiency in NAFLD patients. The effect of HNF-4α on hepcidin expression was observed by transfecting specific HNF-4α small interfering RNA (siRNA) or plasmids into HepG2 cells. Both direct and indirect mechanisms involved in the regulation of HNF-4α on hepcidin were detected by real-time PCR, Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (chIP), and reporter genes. It was found that HNF-4α suppressed hepcidin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions in HepG2 cells, and this suppressive effect was independent of the potential HNF-4α response elements. Phosphorylation of SMAD1 but not STAT3 was inactivated by HNF-4α, and the SMAD4 response element was found essential to HNF-4α-induced hepcidin reduction. Neither inhibitory SMADs, SMAD6, and SMAD7 nor BMPR ligands, BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, and BMP7 were regulated by HNF-4α in HepG2 cells. BMPR1A, but not BMPR1B, BMPR2, ActR2A, ActR2B, or HJV, was decreased by HNF-4α, and HNF4α-knockdown-induced stimulation of hepcidin could be entirely blocked when BMPR1A was interfered with at the same time. In conclusion, the present study suggests that HNF-4α has a suppressive effect on hepcidin expression by inactivating the BMP pathway, specifically via BMPR1A, in HepG2 cells.

  9. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrick Kim

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures.

  10. Assessment of composite motif discovery methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansen Jostein

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational discovery of regulatory elements is an important area of bioinformatics research and more than a hundred motif discovery methods have been published. Traditionally, most of these methods have addressed the problem of single motif discovery – discovering binding motifs for individual transcription factors. In higher organisms, however, transcription factors usually act in combination with nearby bound factors to induce specific regulatory behaviours. Hence, recent focus has shifted from single motifs to the discovery of sets of motifs bound by multiple cooperating transcription factors, so called composite motifs or cis-regulatory modules. Given the large number and diversity of methods available, independent assessment of methods becomes important. Although there have been several benchmark studies of single motif discovery, no similar studies have previously been conducted concerning composite motif discovery. Results We have developed a benchmarking framework for composite motif discovery and used it to evaluate the performance of eight published module discovery tools. Benchmark datasets were constructed based on real genomic sequences containing experimentally verified regulatory modules, and the module discovery programs were asked to predict both the locations of these modules and to specify the single motifs involved. To aid the programs in their search, we provided position weight matrices corresponding to the binding motifs of the transcription factors involved. In addition, selections of decoy matrices were mixed with the genuine matrices on one dataset to test the response of programs to varying levels of noise. Conclusion Although some of the methods tested tended to score somewhat better than others overall, there were still large variations between individual datasets and no single method performed consistently better than the rest in all situations. The variation in performance on individual

  11. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα regulates granulosa cell tumor (GCT cell proliferation and migration through activation of multiple pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs are the most common ovarian estrogen producing tumors, leading to symptoms of excessive estrogen such as endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial adenocarcinoma. These tumors have malignant potential and often recur. The etiology of GCT is unknown. TGFα is a potent mitogen for many different cells. However, its function in GCT initiation, progression and metastasis has not been determined. The present study aims to determine whether TGFα plays a role in the growth of GCT cells. KGN cells, which are derived from an invasive GCT and have many features of normal granulosa cells, were used as the cellular model. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and RT-PCR results showed that the ErbB family of receptors is expressed in human GCT tissues and GCT cell lines. RT-PCR results also indicated that TGFα and EGF are expressed in the human granulosa cells and the GCT cell lines, suggesting that TGFα might regulate GCT cell function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. TGFα stimulated KGN cell DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell viability, cell cycle progression, and cell migration. TGFα rapidly activated EGFR/PI3K/Akt and mTOR pathways, as indicated by rapid phosphorylation of Akt, TSC2, Rictor, mTOR, P70S6K and S6 proteins following TGFα treatment. TGFα also rapidly activated the EGFR/MEK/ERK pathway, and P38 MAPK pathways, as indicated by the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR, MEK, ERK1/2, P38, and CREB after TGFα treatment. Whereas TGFα triggered a transient activation of Akt, it induced a sustained activation of ERK1/2 in KGN cells. Long-term treatment of KGN cells with TGFα resulted in a significant increase in cyclin D2 and a decrease in p27/Kip1, two critical regulators of granulosa cell proliferation and granulosa cell tumorigenesis. In conclusion, TGFα, via multiple signaling pathways, regulates KGN cell proliferation and migration and may play an important role in the growth and metastasis of GCTs.

  12. Repression of MHC class I transcription by HPV16E7 through interaction with a putative RXR{beta} motif and NF-{kappa}B cytoplasmic sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Zhan, TaiLan; Li, Chang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Mugen, E-mail: lium@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Qing K., E-mail: qkwang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Center for Cardiovascular Genetics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Down-regulation of transcription of the MHC class I genes in HPV16 tumorigenic cells is partly due to HPV16E7 associated with the MHC class I promoter and repressed chromatin activation. In this study, we further demonstrated that HPV16E7 is physically associated with a putative RXR{beta} binding motif (GGTCA) of the proximal promoter of the MHC class I genes by using reporter transcriptional assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data also provide evidence that HPV16E7 inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced up-regulation of MHC class I transcription by impaired nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. More importantly, CaSki tumor cells treated with TSA and transfected with the constitutively active mutant form of IKK-{alpha} (which can activate NF-{kappa}B directly) showed a maximal level of up-regulation of MHC-I expression. Taken together, our results suggest that HPV16E7 may employ two independent mechanisms to ensure that either the constitutive or inducible transcription of MHC class I genes is down-regulated.

  13. Fitness for synchronization of network motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, Y.M.; Vázquez-Prada, M.; Pacheco, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the synchronization of Kuramoto's oscillators in small parts of networks known as motifs. We first report on the system dynamics for the case of a scale-free network and show the existence of a non-trivial critical point. We compute the probability that network motifs synchronize, and fi...

  14. A polymorphic autoregulatory hormone response element in the human estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) promoter dictates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha control of ERRalpha expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganière, Josée; Tremblay, Gilles B; Dufour, Catherine R; Giroux, Sylvie; Rousseau, François; Giguère, Vincent

    2004-04-30

    The orphan nuclear estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and transcriptional cofactor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Recently, extensive cross-talk between PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha has been demonstrated. The presence of PGC-1alpha is associated with an elevated expression of ERRalpha, and the two proteins can influence the transcriptional activities of one another. Using a candidate gene approach to detect regulatory variants within genes encoding nuclear receptors, we have identified a 23-bp sequence (ESRRA23) containing two nuclear receptor recognition half-site motifs that is present in 1-4 copies within the promoter of the human ESRRA gene encoding ERRalpha. The ESRRA23 sequence contains a functional ERR response element that is specifically bound by ERRalpha, and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous ERRalpha occupies its own promoter in vivo. Strikingly, introduction of PGC-1alpha in HeLa cells by transient transfection induces the activity of the ESRRA promoter in a manner that is dependent on the presence of the ESRRA23 element and on its dosage. Coexpression of ERRalpha and PGC-1alpha results in a synergistic activation of the ESRRA promoter. In experiments using ERRalpha null fibroblasts, the ability of PGC-1alpha to stimulate the ESRRA promoter is considerably reduced but can be restored by addition of ERRalpha. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an interdependent ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-based transcriptional pathway targets the ESRRA23 element to dictate the level of ERRalpha expression. This study further suggests that this regulatory polymorphism may provide differential responses to ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-mediated metabolic cues in the human population.

  15. Drosophila casein kinase I alpha regulates homolog pairing and genome organization by modulating condensin II subunit Cap-H2 levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Q Nguyen

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1α as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1α-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1α depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1α loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1α facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein.

  16. Drosophila Casein Kinase I Alpha Regulates Homolog Pairing and Genome Organization by Modulating Condensin II Subunit Cap-H2 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1α) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1α-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1α depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1α loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1α facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein. PMID:25723539

  17. TNF-alpha-dependent regulation of acute pancreatitis severity by Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perides, George; Weiss, Eric R; Michael, Emily S; Laukkarinen, Johanna M; Duffield, Jeremy S; Steer, Michael L

    2011-04-15

    The roles of monocytes/macrophages and their mechanisms of action in the regulation of pancreatitis are poorly understood. To address these issues, we have employed genetically altered mouse strains that either express the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) coupled to the CD11b promoter or have global deletion of TNF-α. Targeted, conditional depletion of monocytes/macrophages was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) to CD11b-DTR mice. We show that in the absence of DT administration, pancreatitis is associated with an increase in pancreatic content of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes/macrophages but that this response is prevented by prior administration of DT to CD11b-DTR mice. DT administration also reduces pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis in two dissimilar experimental models of acute pancreatitis (a secretagogue-induced model and a model elicited by retrograde pancreatic duct infusion of sodium taurocholate). In the secretagogue-elicited model, the DT-induced decrease in pancreatitis severity is reversed by adoptive transfer of purified Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from non-DT-treated CD11b-DTR mice or by the transfer of purified Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from TNF-α(+/+) donor mice, but it is not reversed by the transfer of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from TNF-α(-/-) donors. Our studies indicate that the Ly-6C(hi) monocyte subset regulates the severity of pancreatitis by promoting pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis and that this phenomenon is dependent upon the expression of TNF-α by those cells. They suggest that therapies targeting Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and/or TNF-α expression by Ly-6C(hi) monocytes might prove beneficial in the prevention or treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  18. Correlating overrepresented upstream motifs to gene expression a computational approach to regulatory element discovery in eukaryotes

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, M; Provero, P

    2002-01-01

    Gene regulation in eukaryotes is mainly effected through transcription factors binding to rather short recognition motifs generally located upstream of the coding region. We present a novel computational method to identify regulatory elements in the upstream region of eukaryotic genes. The genes are grouped in sets sharing an overrepresented short motif in their upstream sequence. For each set, the average expression level from a microarray experiment is determined: If this level is significantly higher or lower than the average taken over the whole genome, then the overerpresented motif shared by the genes in the set is likely to play a role in their regulation. The method was tested by applying it to the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using the publicly available results of a DNA microarray experiment, in which expression levels for virtually all the genes were measured during the diauxic shift from fermentation to respiration. Several known motifs were correctly identified, and a new candidate regulat...

  19. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  20. Expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain is down regulated on the surface of CD4 T-cells by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny McLaughlin

    Full Text Available HIV infection elicits defects in CD4 T-cell homeostasis in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. Interleukin-7 (IL-7 is essential to T-cell homeostasis and several groups have shown reduced levels of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127 on both CD4 and CD8 T-cells in viremic HIV+ patients. We have shown previously that soluble HIV Tat protein specifically down regulates cell surface expression of CD127 on human CD8 T-cells in a paracrine fashion. The effects of Tat on CD127 expression in CD4 T-cells has yet to be described. To explore this effect, CD4 T-cells were isolated from healthy individuals and expression levels of CD127 were examined on cells incubated in media alone or treated with Tat protein. We show here that, similar to CD8 T-cells, the HIV-1 Tat protein specifically down regulates CD127 on primary human CD4 T-cells and directs the receptor to the proteasome for degradation. Down regulation of CD127 in response to Tat was seen on both memory and naive CD4 T-cell subsets and was blocked using either heparin or anti-Tat antibodies. Tat did not induce apoptosis in cultured primary CD4 T-cells over 72 hours as determined by Annexin V and PI staining. Pre-incubation of CD4 T-cells with HIV-1 Tat protein did however reduce the ability of IL-7 to up regulate Bcl-2 expression. Similar to exogenous Tat, endogenously expressed HIV Tat protein also suppressed CD127 expression on primary CD4 T-cells. In view of the important role IL-7 plays in lymphocyte proliferation, homeostasis and survival, down regulation of CD127 by Tat likely plays a central role in immune dysregulation and CD4 T-cell decline. Understanding this effect could lead to new approaches to mitigate the CD4 T-cell loss evident in HIV infection.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of mouse alpha A-crystallin gene in a 148kb Cryaa BAC and its derivates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ying

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background αA-crystallin is highly expressed in the embryonic, neonatal and adult mouse lens. Previously, we identified two novel distal control regions, DCR1 and DCR3. DCR1 was required for transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP, in lens epithelium, whereas DCR3 was active during "late" stages of lens primary fiber cell differentiation. However, the onset of transgenic EGFP expression was delayed by 12–24 hours, compared to the expression of the endogenous Cryaa gene. Results Here, we used bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC and standard transgenic approaches to examine temporal and spatial regulation of the mouse Cryaa gene. Two BAC transgenes, with EGFP insertions into the third coding exon of Cryaa gene, were created: the intact αA-crystallin 148 kb BAC (αA-BAC and αA-BAC(ΔDCR3, which lacks approximately 1.0 kb of genomic DNA including DCR3. Expression of EGFP in the majority of both BAC transgenics nearly recapitulated the endogenous expression pattern of the Cryaa gene in lens, but not outside of the lens. The number of cells expressing αA-crystallin in the lens pit was higher compared to the number of cells expressing EGFP. Next, we generated additional lines using a 15 kb fragment of αA-crystallin locus derived from αA-BAC(ΔDCR3, 15 kb Cryaa/EGFP. A 15 kb region of Cryaa/EGFP supported the expression pattern of EGFP also in the lens pit. However, co-localization studies of αA-crystallin and EGFP indicated that the number of cells that showed transgenic expression was higher compared to cells expressing αA-crystallin in the lens pit. Conclusion We conclude that a 148 kb αA-BAC likely contains all of the regulatory regions required for αA-crystallin expression in the lens, but not in retina, spleen and thymus. In addition, while the 15 kb Cryaa/EGFP region also supported the expression of EGFP in the lens pit, expression in regions such as the hindbrain, indicate that additional genomic

  2. JAM-L-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is regulated in cis by alpha4beta1 integrin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Lutz, Pierre G; Calderwood, David A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdoulous, Sandrine

    2008-12-15

    Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are endothelial and epithelial adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of circulating leukocytes to inflammatory sites. We show here that JAM-L, a protein related to the JAM family, is restricted to leukocytes and promotes their adhesion to endothelial cells. Cis dimerization of JAM-L is required to engage in heterophilic interactions with its cognate counter-receptor CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor). Interestingly, JAM-L expressed on neutrophils binds CAR independently of integrin activation. However, on resting monocytes and T lymphocytes, which express the integrin VLA-4, JAM-L molecules engage in complexes with VLA-4 and mainly accumulate in their monomeric form. Integrin activation is required for the dissociation of JAM-L-VLA-4 complexes and the accumulation of functional JAM-L dimers, which indicates that the leukocyte integrin VLA-4 controls JAM-L function in cis by controlling its dimerization state. This provides a mechanism through which VLA-4 and JAM-L functions are coordinately regulated, allowing JAM-L to strengthen integrin-dependent adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells.

  3. SMG1 identified as a regulator of Parkinson's disease-associated alpha-synuclein through siRNA screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Henderson-Smith

    Full Text Available Synucleinopathies are a broad class of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the presence of intracellular protein aggregates containing α-synuclein protein. The aggregated α-synuclein protein is hyperphosphorylated on serine 129 (S129 compared to the unaggregated form of the protein. While the precise functional consequences of S129 hyperphosphorylation are still being clarified, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that S129 phosphorylation is an early event in α-synuclein dysfunction and aggregation. Identifying the kinases and phosphatases that regulate this critical phosphorylation event may ultimately prove beneficial by allowing pharmacological mitigation of synuclein dysfunction and toxicity in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. We report here the development of a high-content, fluorescence-based assay to quantitate levels of total and S129 phosphorylated α-synuclein protein. We have applied this assay to conduct high-throughput loss-of-function screens with siRNA libraries targeting 711 known and predicted human kinases and 206 phosphatases. Specifically, knockdown of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase related kinase SMG1 resulted in significant increases in the expression of pS129 phosphorylated α-synuclein (p-syn. Moreover, SMG1 protein levels were significantly reduced in brain regions with high p-syn levels in both dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD. These findings suggest that SMG1 may play an important role in increased α-synuclein pathology during the course of PDD, DLB, and possibly other synucleinopathies.

  4. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  5. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls.

  6. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Erill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls.

  7. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kuźmicki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  8. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Monika; Miltyk, Wojciech; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Pałka, Jerzy; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  9. A combinatorial code for splicing silencing: UAGG and GGGG motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungha Han

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is widely used to regulate gene expression by tuning the levels of tissue-specific mRNA isoforms. Few regulatory mechanisms are understood at the level of combinatorial control despite numerous sequences, distinct from splice sites, that have been shown to play roles in splicing enhancement or silencing. Here we use molecular approaches to identify a ternary combination of exonic UAGG and 5'-splice-site-proximal GGGG motifs that functions cooperatively to silence the brain-region-specific CI cassette exon (exon 19 of the glutamate NMDA R1 receptor (GRIN1 transcript. Disruption of three components of the motif pattern converted the CI cassette into a constitutive exon, while predominant skipping was conferred when the same components were introduced, de novo, into a heterologous constitutive exon. Predominant exon silencing was directed by the motif pattern in the presence of six competing exonic splicing enhancers, and this effect was retained after systematically repositioning the two exonic UAGGs within the CI cassette. In this system, hnRNP A1 was shown to mediate silencing while hnRNP H antagonized silencing. Genome-wide computational analysis combined with RT-PCR testing showed that a class of skipped human and mouse exons can be identified by searches that preserve the sequence and spatial configuration of the UAGG and GGGG motifs. This analysis suggests that the multi-component silencing code may play an important role in the tissue-specific regulation of the CI cassette exon, and that it may serve more generally as a molecular language to allow for intricate adjustments and the coordination of splicing patterns from different genes.

  10. VARUN: discovering extensible motifs under saturation constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or "don't cares" escalate exponentially with their number, and this gets only worse if a don't care is allowed to stretch up to some prescribed maximum length. In this paper, a notion of extensible motif in a sequence is introduced and studied, which tightly combines the structure of the motif pattern, as described by its syntactic specification, with the statistical measure of its occurrence count. It is shown that a combination of appropriate saturation conditions and the monotonicity of probabilistic scores over regions of constant frequency afford us significant parsimony in the generation and testing of candidate overrepresented motifs. A suite of software programs called Varun is described, implementing the discovery of extensible motifs of the type considered. The merits of the method are then documented by results obtained in a variety of experiments primarily targeting protein sequence families. Of equal importance seems the fact that the sets of all surprising motifs returned in each experiment are extracted faster and come in much more manageable sizes than would be obtained in the absence of saturation constraints.

  11. Detecting Motifs in System Call Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, William O; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The search for patterns or motifs in data represents an area of key interest to many researchers. In this paper we present the Motif Tracking Algorithm, a novel immune inspired pattern identification tool that is able to identify unknown motifs which repeat within time series data. The power of the algorithm is derived from its use of a small number of parameters with minimal assumptions. The algorithm searches from a completely neutral perspective that is independent of the data being analysed, and the underlying motifs. In this paper the motif tracking algorithm is applied to the search for patterns within sequences of low level system calls between the Linux kernel and the operating system's user space. The MTA is able to compress data found in large system call data sets to a limited number of motifs which summarise that data. The motifs provide a resource from which a profile of executed processes can be built. The potential for these profiles and new implications for security research are highlighted. A...

  12. MERTK signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha from the GDI/CHM family of RAB GTPase effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Shameka J; Feathers, Kecia L; Ganios, Anna M; Jia, Lin; Miller, Jason M; Thompson, Debra A

    2015-11-01

    Photoreceptor outer segments (OS) in the vertebrate retina undergo a process of continual renewal involving shedding of disc membranes that are cleared by phagocytic uptake into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, OS phagocytosis is blocked by a mutation in the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK. To identify proteins tyrosine-phosphorylated downstream of MERTK in the RPE, MALDI-mass spectrometry with peptide-mass fingerprinting was used in comparative studies of RCS congenic and dystrophic rats. At times corresponding to peak phagocytic activity, the RAB GTPase effector GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (GDI1) was found to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation only in congenic rats. In cryosections of native RPE/choroid, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and the intracellular tyrosine-kinase SRC. In cultured RPE-J cells, and in transfected heterologous cells, MERTK stimulated SRC-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of GDI1. In OS-fed RPE-J cells, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and SRC on apparent phagosomes located near the apical membrane. In addition, both GDI1 and RAB5, a regulator of vesicular transport, colocalized with ingested OS. Taken together, these findings identify a novel role of MERTK signaling in membrane trafficking in the RPE that is likely to subserve mechanisms of phagosome formation.

  13. Opposing roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and growth hormone in the regulation of CYP4A11 expression in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, Uzen; Machemer, Daniel E W; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Gaynor, Pryce; Lasker, Jerome M; Tukey, Robert H; Johnson, Eric F

    2009-06-12

    CYP4A11 transgenic mice (CYP4A11 Tg) were generated to examine in vivo regulation of the human CYP4A11 gene. Expression of CYP4A11 in mice yields liver and kidney P450 4A11 levels similar to those found in the corresponding human tissues and leads to an increased microsomal capacity for omega-hydroxylation of lauric acid. Fasted CYP4A11 Tg mice exhibit 2-3-fold increases in hepatic CYP4A11 mRNA and protein, and this response is absent in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) null mice. Dietary administration of either of the PPARalpha agonists, fenofibrate or clofibric acid, increases hepatic and renal CYP4A11 levels by 2-3-fold, and these responses were also abrogated in PPARalpha null mice. Basal liver CYP4A11 levels are reduced differentially in PPARalpha-/- females (>95%) and males (<50%) compared with PPARalpha-/+ mice. Quantitative and temporal differences in growth hormone secretion are known to alter hepatic lipid metabolism and to underlie sexually dimorphic gene expression, respectively. Continuous infusion of low levels of growth hormone reduced CYP4A11 expression by 50% in PPARalpha-proficient male and female transgenic mice. A larger decrease was observed for the expression of CYP4A11 in PPARalpha-/- CYP4A11 Tg male mice to levels similar to that of female PPARalpha-deficient mice. These results suggest that PPARalpha contributes to the maintenance of basal CYP4A11 expression and mediates CYP4A11 induction in response to fibrates or fasting. In contrast, increased exposure to growth hormone down-regulates CYP4A11 expression in liver.

  14. Hunting Motifs in Situla Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Preložnik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Situla art developed as an echo of the toreutic style which had spread from the Near East through the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans as far as the Veneti, Raeti, Histri, and their eastern neighbours in the region of Dolenjska (Lower Carniola. An Early Iron Age phenomenon (c. 600—300 BC, it rep- resents the major and most arresting form of the contemporary visual arts in an area stretching from the foot of the Apennines in the south to the Drava and Sava rivers in the east. Indeed, individual pieces have found their way across the Alpine passes and all the way north to the Danube. In the world and art of the situlae, a prominent role is accorded to ani- mals. They are displayed in numerous representations of human activities on artefacts crafted in the classic situla style – that is, between the late 6th  and early 5th centuries BC – as passive participants (e.g. in pageants or in harness or as an active element of the situla narrative. The most typical example of the latter is the hunting scene. Today we know at least four objects decorat- ed exclusively with hunting themes, and a number of situlae and other larger vessels where hunting scenes are embedded in composite narratives. All this suggests a popularity unparallelled by any other genre. Clearly recognisable are various hunting techniques and weapons, each associated with a particu- lar type of game (Fig. 1. The chase of a stag with javelin, horse and hound is depicted on the long- familiar and repeatedly published fibula of Zagorje (Fig. 2. It displays a hound mauling the stag’s back and a hunter on horseback pursuing a hind, her neck already pierced by the javelin. To judge by the (so far unnoticed shaft end un- der the stag’s muzzle, the hunter would have been brandishing a second jave- lin as well, like the warrior of the Vače fibula or the rider of the Nesactium situla, presumably himself a hunter. Many parallels to his motif are known from Greece, Etruria, and

  15. seeMotif: exploring and visualizing sequence motifs in 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hao; Chien, Ting-Ying; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2009-07-01

    Sequence motifs are important in the study of molecular biology. Motif discovery tools efficiently deliver many function related signatures of proteins and largely facilitate sequence annotation. As increasing numbers of motifs are detected experimentally or predicted computationally, characterizing the functional roles of motifs and identifying the potential synergetic relationships between them are important next steps. A good way to investigate novel motifs is to utilize the abundant 3D structures that have also been accumulated at an astounding rate in recent years. This article reports the development of the web service seeMotif, which provides users with an interactive interface for visualizing sequence motifs on protein structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Researchers can quickly see the locations and conformation of multiple motifs among a number of related structures simultaneously. Considering the fact that PDB sequences are usually shorter than those in sequence databases and/or may have missing residues, seeMotif has two complementary approaches for selecting structures and mapping motifs to protein chains in structures. As more and more structures belonging to previously uncharacterized protein families become available, combining sequence and structure information gives good opportunities to facilitate understanding of protein functions in large-scale genome projects. Available at: http://seemotif.csie.ntu.edu.tw,http://seemotif.ee.ncku.edu.tw or http://seemotif.csbb.ntu.edu.tw.

  16. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton I; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access.

  17. Fluorescence imaging analysis of upstream regulators and downstream targets of STAT3 in melanoma precursor lesions obtained from patients before and after systemic low-dose interferon-alpha treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda Pfaff; Kirkwood, John M; Edington, Howard D; Jukic, Drazen M; Farkas, Daniel L; Becker, Dorothea

    2003-01-01

    Atypical nevi are the precursors and risk markers of melanoma. Apart from persistently monitoring these nevocytic lesions and resecting them at the earliest signs of clinical changes, there is as yet no systemic clinical treatment available to interfere with their progression to melanoma. To explore clinical treatments that might interfere with and possibly prevent atypical nevus progression, a previous study documented that 3 months systemic low-dose interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment of patients with a clinical history of melanoma and numerous atypical nevi, led to inactivation of the STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors in atypical nevi. Based upon this finding, we initiated a second study to determine whether systemic low-dose IFN-alpha treatment also impairs the expression of upstream regulators and downstream targets of STAT1 and STAT3 in atypical nevi. Using cyanine dye-conjugated antibodies, fluorescence imaging analysis revealed expression of JAK2, JNK1, AKT1, NF-kappa B, and IFN-alpha/beta receptor in benign and atypical nevi, and early- and advanced-stage melanomas. To determine possible changes in the level of expression of these molecules in atypical nevi, excised before and after 3 months of systemic low-dose IFN-alpha treatment, newly designed optical imaging software was used to quantitate the captured fluorescent hybridization signals on a cell-by-cell basis and across an entire nevus section. The results of this analysis did not provide evidence that systemic low-dose IFN-alpha treatment alters the level of expression of upstream regulators or downstream targets of STAT1 and STAT3.

  18. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  19. Anterograde trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors: function of the C-terminal F(X)6LL motif in export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvernay, Matthew T; Dong, Chunmin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhou, Fuguo; Nichols, Charles D; Wu, Guangyu

    2009-04-01

    We have reported previously that the F(X)(6)LL motif in the C termini is essential for export of alpha(2B)-adrenergic (alpha(2B)-AR) and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we further demonstrate that mutation of the F(X)(6)LL motif similarly abolished the cell-surface expression of alpha(2B)-AR, AT1R, alpha(1B)-AR, and beta(2)-AR, suggesting that the F(X)(6)LL motif plays a general role in ER export of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Mutation of Phe to Val, Leu, Trp, and Tyr, and mutation of LL to FF and VV, markedly inhibited alpha(2B)-AR transport, indicating that the F(X)(6)LL function cannot be fully substituted by other hydrophobic residues. The structural analysis revealed that the Phe residue in the F(X)(6)LL motif is buried in the transmembrane domains and possibly interacts with Ile58 in beta(2)-AR and Val42 in alpha(2B)-AR, whereas the LL motif is exposed to the cytosolic space. Indeed, mutation of Ile58 in beta(2)-AR and Val42 in alpha(2B)-AR markedly disrupted cell surface transport of the receptors. It is noteworthy that the Val and Ile residues are highly conserved among the GPCRs carrying the F(X)(6)LL motif. Furthermore, the Phe mutant exhibited a stronger interaction with ER chaperones and was more potently rescued by physical and chemical treatments than the LL mutant. These data suggest that the Phe residue is probably involved in folding of alpha(2B)-AR and beta(2)-AR, possibly through interaction with other hydrophobic residues in neighboring domains. These data also provide the first evidence implying crucial roles of the C termini possibly through modulating multiple events in anterograde trafficking of GPCRs.

  20. Cinnamon extract attenuates TNF-alpha-induced intestinal lipoprotein ApoB48 overproduction by regulating inflammatory, insulin, and lipoprotein pathways in enterocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated whether a water extract of cinnamon (CE = Cinnulin PF®) attenuates the dyslipidemia induced by TNF-alpha in Triton WR-1339-treated hamsters, and whether CE inhibited the over-secretion of apoB48-induced by TNF-alpha in enterocytes in a 35S-labelling study. In vivo, oral treatment with C...

  1. Regulation of gene expression by dietary Ca2+ in kidneys of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase knockout mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Chon, H.; Gkika, D.; Bluyssen, H.A.; Holstege, F.C.; St. Arnaud, R.; Braam, B.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets (PDDR) is an autosomal disease, characterized by undetectable levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), rickets and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Mice in which the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha-OHase) gene was inactivated, p

  2. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëlle Lempereur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L. which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box. In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif.

  3. CXC chemokine receptor 4 expression and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced chemotaxis in CD4+ T lymphocytes are regulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    We report that interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 can significantly up- or down-regulate CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively. Stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha)-induced CD4+ T-lymphocyte chemotaxis was also correspondingly regulated by IL-4 and IL......,000 SDF-1alpha-binding sites per cell, among freshly isolated CD4+ T lymphocytes, and two types of CXCR4 with different affinities (Kd1 approximately 4.4 nM and Kd2 approximately 14.6 nM), and a total of approximately 130,000 SDF-1alpha-binding sites per cell, among IL-4-stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes......-mobilization stimulation. These results indicate that the effects of IL-4 and IL-10 on the CXCR4-SDF-1 receptor-ligand pair may be of particular importance in the cytokine/chemokine environment concerning the inflammatory processes and in the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection....

  4. Chaotic motifs in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ye, Weiming; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Zhigang; Huang, Xuhui; Hu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Chaos should occur often in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) which have been widely described by nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, if their dimensions are no less than 3. It is therefore puzzling that chaos has never been reported in GRNs in nature and is also extremely rare in models of GRNs. On the other hand, the topic of motifs has attracted great attention in studying biological networks, and network motifs are suggested to be elementary building blocks that carry out some key functions in the network. In this paper, chaotic motifs (subnetworks with chaos) in GRNs are systematically investigated. The conclusion is that: (i) chaos can only appear through competitions between different oscillatory modes with rivaling intensities. Conditions required for chaotic GRNs are found to be very strict, which make chaotic GRNs extremely rare. (ii) Chaotic motifs are explored as the simplest few-node structures capable of producing chaos, and serve as the intrinsic source of chaos of random few-node GRNs. Several optimal motifs causing chaos with atypically high probability are figured out. (iii) Moreover, we discovered that a number of special oscillators can never produce chaos. These structures bring some advantages on rhythmic functions and may help us understand the robustness of diverse biological rhythms. (iv) The methods of dominant phase-advanced driving (DPAD) and DPAD time fraction are proposed to quantitatively identify chaotic motifs and to explain the origin of chaotic behaviors in GRNs.

  5. Nitric oxide enhances the sensitivity of alpaca melanocytes to respond to {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone by up-regulating melanocortin-1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yanjun; Cao, Jing; Wang, Haidong; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Zhiwei; Bai, Rui; Hao, HuanQing; He, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruiwen [College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, 030801 Taigu, Shanxi (China); Dong, Changsheng, E-mail: cs_dong@sxau.edu.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Shanxi Agricultural University, 030801 Taigu, Shanxi (China)

    2010-06-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) and {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH) have been correlated with the synthesis of melanin. The NO-dependent signaling of cellular response to activate the hypothalamopituitary proopiomelanocortin system, thereby enhances the hypophysial secretion of {alpha}-MSH to stimulate {alpha}-MSH-receptor responsive cells. In this study we investigated whether an NO-induced pathway can enhance the ability of the melanocyte to respond to {alpha}-MSH on melanogenesis in alpaca skin melanocytes in vitro. It is important for us to know how to enhance the coat color of alpaca. We set up three groups for experiments using the third passage number of alpaca melanocytes: the control cultures were allowed a total of 5 days growth; the UV group cultures like the control group but the melanocytes were then irradiated everyday (once) with 312 mJ/cm{sup 2} of UVB; the UV + L-NAME group is the same as group UV but has the addition of 300 {mu}M L-NAME (every 6 h). To determine the inhibited effect of NO produce, NO produces were measured. To determine the effect of the NO to the key protein and gene of {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis, the key gene and protein of the {alpha}-MSH pathway were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western immunoblotting. The results provide exciting new evidence that NO can enhance {alpha}-MSH pathway in alpaca skin melanocytes by elevated MC1R. And we suggest that the NO pathway may more rapidly cause the synthesis of melanin in alpaca skin under UV, which at that time elevates the expression of MC1R and stimulates the keratinocytes to secrete {alpha}-MSH to enhance the {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis. This process will be of considerable interest in future studies.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of osteoblastic platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha expression by co-cultured primary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenzeller, Günter; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Schmal, Hagen; Stark, G Björn

    2010-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling plays an important role in osteoblast function. Inhibition of PDGFR activity leads to a suppression of osteoblast proliferation, whereas mineralized matrix production is enhanced. In previous experiments, we showed that co-cultivation of human primary endothelial cells and human primary osteoblasts (hOBs) leads to a cell contact-dependent downregulation of PDGFR-alpha expression in the osteoblasts. In this study, we investigated this effect in more detail, revealing that human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC)-mediated PDGFR-alpha downregulation is dependent on time and cell number. This effect was specific to endothelial cells and was not observed when hOBs were co-cultured with human primary chondrocytes or fibroblasts. Likewise, HUVEC-mediated suppression of PDGFR-alpha expression was only seen in hOBs and mesenchymal stem cells but not in immortalized osteoblastic cell lines. Functional inhibition of gap junctional communication between HUVECs and hOBs by 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid had no effect on HUVEC-mediated PDGFR-alpha downregulation, whereas inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) prevented the HUVEC-mediated reduction in osteoblastic PDGFR-alpha expression. To delineate the molecular mechanism underlying the PDGFR-alpha downregulation, we examined the effect of HUVEC co-cultivation on osteoblastic PDGFR-alpha promoter activity as well as mRNA stability. Co-cultivation of HUVECs with hOBs significantly shortened the half-life of osteoblastic PDGFR-alpha mRNA, but did not decrease its promoter activity. In summary, our data show that PDGFR-alpha is downregulated in hOBs by co-cultivation with human primary endothelial cells through a p38 MAPK-dependent post-transcriptional mechanism.

  7. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  8. Rice bZIP protein, REB, interacts with GCN4 motif in promoter of Waxy gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程世军; 王宗阳; 洪孟民

    2002-01-01

    A bifactorial endosperm box (EB), which contains an endosperm motif (EM) and a GCN4 motif, was found in rice Wx promoter. EB was found in 5′ upstream region of many seed storage protein genes accounting for these genes expression exclusive in endosperm among various cereals. Many reports demonstrated that the bZIP transcription activators isolated from wheat, barley and maize, etc. regulate the gene expression through binding to the GCN4 motif. In this research, we showed that GCN4 sequence could be recognized by nuclear proteins extracted from immature rice seeds. Furthermore, a rice bZIP protein, REB was isolated by using PCR method and REB fusion protein was expressed in E. coli. The results of gel shift analysis showed that REB could recognize and bind to the GCN4 motif in the Wx gene in addition to binding to the target sequence in the promoter of α-globulin.

  9. Identification of Biomarker and Co-Regulatory Motifs in Lung Adenocarcinoma Based on Differential Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhao

    Full Text Available Changes in intermolecular interactions (differential interactions may influence the progression of cancer. Specific genes and their regulatory networks may be more closely associated with cancer when taking their transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and dynamic and static interactions into account simultaneously. In this paper, a differential interaction analysis was performed to detect lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. Furthermore, a miRNA-TF (transcription factor synergistic regulation network was constructed to identify three kinds of co-regulated motifs, namely, triplet, crosstalk and joint. Not only were the known cancer-related miRNAs and TFs (let-7, miR-15a, miR-17, TP53, ETS1, and so on were detected in the motifs, but also the miR-15, let-7 and miR-17 families showed a tendency to regulate the triplet, crosstalk and joint motifs, respectively. Moreover, several biological functions (i.e., cell cycle, signaling pathways and hemopoiesis associated with the three motifs were found to be frequently targeted by the drugs for lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, the two 4-node motifs (crosstalk and joint based on co-expression and interaction had a closer relationship to lung adenocarcinoma, and so further research was performed on them. A 10-gene biomarker (UBC, SRC, SP1, MYC, STAT3, JUN, NR3C1, RB1, GRB2 and MAPK1 was selected from the joint motif, and a survival analysis indicated its significant association with survival. Among the ten genes, JUN, NR3C1 and GRB2 are our newly detected candidate lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. The genes, regulators and regulatory motifs detected in this work will provide potential drug targets and new strategies for individual therapy.

  10. Discovery of sequence motifs related to coexpression of genes using evolutionary computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Gary B.; Weekes, Dana G.; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Harlow, Harry B.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2004-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulatory elements that control gene expression. Recognition of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs in the upstream region of coexpressed genes is therefore critical towards a true understanding of the regulations of gene expression. The task of discovering eukaryotic TFBSs remains a challenging problem. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionary computation can be used to search for TFBSs in upstream regions of genes known to be coexpressed. Evolutionary computation was used to search for TFBSs of genes regulated by octamer-binding factor and nuclear factor kappa B. The discovered binding sites included experimentally determined known binding motifs as well as lists of putative, previously unknown TFBSs. We believe that this method to search nucleotide sequence information efficiently for similar motifs will be useful for discovering TFBSs that affect gene regulation. PMID:15266008

  11. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments.

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  13. Maternal and fetal mechanisms of B cell regulation during pregnancy: human Chorionic Gonadotropin stimulates B cells to produce IL-10 while alpha-fetoprotein drives them into apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Fettke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal immune tolerance towards the fetus is an essential requisite for pregnancy. While T cell functions are well documented, little is known about the participation of B cells. We have previously suggested that IL-10 producing B cells are involved in pregnancy tolerance in mice and humans. By employing murine and human systems, we report now that fetal trophoblasts positively regulate the generation of IL-10 producing B cells. We next studied the participation of hormones produced by the placenta as well as the fetal protein alpha-fetoprotein (AFP in B cell modulation. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG, but not progesterone, estrogen or a combination of both, was able to promote changes in B cell phenotype and boost their IL-10 production, which was abolished after blocking hCG. The hCG-induced B cell phenotype was not associated with augmented galactosylation, sialylation or fucosylation of IgG subclasses in their Fc. In vitro, hCG induced the synthesis of asymmetrically glycosylated antibodies in their Fab region. Interestingly, AFP had dual effects depending on the concentration. At concentrations corresponding to maternal serum levels, it did not modify the phenotype or IL-10 secretion of B cells. At fetal concentrations, however, AFP was able to drive B cells into apoptosis, which may indicate a protective mechanism to avoid maternal B cells to reach the fetus.Our data suggests that the fetus secrete factors that promote a pregnancy-friendly B cell phenotype, unraveling interesting aspects of B cell function and modulation by pregnancy hormones and fetal proteins.

  14. Potassium-3-beta-hydroxy-20-oxopregn-5-en-17-alpha-yl sulfate: a novel inhibitor of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhaidat NM

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nizar M Mhaidat,1,2 Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Karem H Alzoubi,1 Rowan F AlEjielat2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan Background: Previous studies have shown the central role of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78 in colorectal cancer (CRC survival and chemoresistance. In the present study, we aimed to design a GRP78 inhibitor and test its potential to inhibit CRC cells growth. Materials and methods: Computer-aided drug design was used to establish novel compounds as potential inhibitors of GRP78. Discovery Studio 3.5 software was used to evaluate a series of designed compounds and assess their mode of binding to the active site of the protein. The cytotoxicity of the designed compounds was evaluated using the MTT assay and the propidium iodide method. The effect of the inhibitor on the expression of GRP78 was evaluated by immunoblotting. Results: Among the designed compounds, only potassium-3-beta-hydroxy-20-oxopregn-5-en-17-alpha-yl sulfate (PHOS has a potential to inhibit the growth of CRC cells. Inhibition of cellular growth was largely attributed to downregulation of GRP78 and induction of apoptotic cell death. Conclusion: These results introduce PHOS as a promising GRP78 inhibitor that could be used in future studies as a combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of CRC patients. Our ongoing studies aim to characterize PHOS safety profile as well as its mechanism of action. Keywords: UPR, apoptosis, GRP78, CRC, chemotherapy, computer-aided drug design (CADD

  15. Uterine stretch regulates temporal and spatial expression of fibronectin protein and its alpha 5 integrin receptor in myometrium of unilaterally pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shynlova, Oksana; Williams, S Joy; Draper, Haley; White, Bryan G; MacPhee, Daniel J; Lye, Stephen J

    2007-11-01

    The adaptive growth of the uterus during pregnancy is a critical event that involves increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and dynamic remodeling of smooth muscle cell (SMC)-ECM interactions. We have previously found a dramatic increase in the expression of the mRNAs that encode fibronectin (FN) and its alpha5-integrin receptor (ITGA5) in pregnant rat myometrium near to term. Since the myometrium at term is exposed to considerable mechanical stretching of the uterine wall by the growing fetus(es), the objective of the present study was to examine its role in the regulation of FN and ITGA5 expression at late gestation and during labor. Using myometrial tissues from unilaterally pregnant rats, we investigated the temporal changes in Itga5 gene expression in gravid and empty uterine horns by Northern blotting and real-time PCR, in combination with immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses of the temporal/spatial distributions of the FN and ITGA5 proteins. In addition, we studied the effects of early progesterone (P4) withdrawal on Itga5 mRNA levels and ITGA5 protein detection. At all time-points examined, the Itga5 mRNA levels were increased in the gravid uterine horn, compared to the empty horn (P < 0.05). Immunoblot analysis confirmed higher ITGA5 and FN protein levels in the myometrium, associated with gravidity (P < 0.05). Immunodetection of ITGA5 was consistently high in the longitudinal muscle layer, increased with gestational age in the circular muscle layer of the gravid horn, and remained low in the empty horn. ITGA5 and FN immunostaining in the gravid horn exhibited a continuous layer of variable thickness associated directly with the surfaces of individual SMCs. In contrast to the effects of stretch, P4 does not appear to regulate ITGA5 expression. We speculate that the reinforcement of the FN-ITGA5 interaction: 1) contributes to myometrial hypertrophy and remodeling during late pregnancy; and 2) facilitates force transduction

  16. Coordinated induction of bile acid detoxification and alternative elimination in mice: role of FXR-regulated organic solute transporter-alpha/beta in the adaptive response to bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Gernot; Wagner, Martin; Moustafa, Tarek; Fickert, Peter; Silbert, Dagmar; Gumhold, Judith; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Halilbasic, Emina; Denk, Helmut; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a key regulator of hepatic defense mechanisms against bile acids. A comprehensive study addressing the role of FXR in the coordinated regulation of adaptive mechanisms including biosynthesis, metabolism, and alternative export together with their functional significance is lacking. We therefore fed FXR knockout (FXR(-/-)) mice with cholic acid (CA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Bile acid synthesis and hydroxylation were assessed by real-time RT-PCR for cytochrome P-450 (Cyp)7a1, Cyp3a11, and Cyp2b10 and mass spectrometry-gas chromatography for determination of bile acid composition. Expression of the export systems multidrug resistance proteins (Mrp)4-6 in the liver and kidney and the recently identified basoalteral bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter (Ost-alpha/Ost-beta), in the liver, kidney, and intestine was also investigated. CA and UDCA repressed Cyp7a1 in FXR(+/+) mice and to lesser extents in FXR(-/-) mice and induced Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 independent of FXR. CA and UDCA were hydroxylated in both genotypes. CA induced Ost-alpha/Ost-beta in the liver, kidney, and ileum in FXR(+/+) but not FXR(-/-) mice, whereas UDCA had only minor effects. Mrp4 induction in the liver and kidney correlated with bile acid levels and was observed in UDCA-fed and CA-fed FXR(-/-) animals but not in CA-fed FXR(+/+) animals. Mrp5/6 remained unaffected by bile acid treatment. In conclusion, we identified Ost-alpha/Ost-beta as a novel FXR target. Absent Ost-alpha/Ost-beta induction in CA-fed FXR(-/-) animals may contribute to increased liver injury in these animals. The induction of bile acid hydroxylation and Mrp4 was independent of FXR but could not counteract liver toxicity sufficiently. Limited effects of UDCA on Ost-alpha/Ost-beta may jeopardize its therapeutic efficacy.

  17. The alpha7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 increases activity regulated cytoskeleton protein (Arc) gene expression in the prefrontal cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Hansen, Henrik H

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR) have been shown to enhance attentional function and aspects of memory function in experimental models and in man. The protein Arc encoded by the effector immediate early gene arc or arg3.1 has been shown to be strongly implicated in long-ter...... of neurons in the rat prefrontal cortex and this activation likely is important for the attentional effects of this new class of drugs.......Nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR) have been shown to enhance attentional function and aspects of memory function in experimental models and in man. The protein Arc encoded by the effector immediate early gene arc or arg3.1 has been shown to be strongly implicated in long...

  18. Systematic discovery of regulatory motifs in Fusarium graminearum by comparing four Fusarium genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistler Corby

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium graminearum (Fg, a major fungal pathogen of cultivated cereals, is responsible for billions of dollars in agriculture losses. There is a growing interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of this organism, especially the regulation of genes underlying its pathogenicity. The generation of whole genome sequence assemblies for Fg and three closely related Fusarium species provides a unique opportunity for such a study. Results Applying comparative genomics approaches, we developed a computational pipeline to systematically discover evolutionarily conserved regulatory motifs in the promoter, downstream and the intronic regions of Fg genes, based on the multiple alignments of sequenced Fusarium genomes. Using this method, we discovered 73 candidate regulatory motifs in the promoter regions. Nearly 30% of these motifs are highly enriched in promoter regions of Fg genes that are associated with a specific functional category. Through comparison to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp, we observed conservation of transcription factors (TFs, their binding sites and the target genes regulated by these TFs related to pathways known to respond to stress conditions or phosphate metabolism. In addition, this study revealed 69 and 39 conserved motifs in the downstream regions and the intronic regions, respectively, of Fg genes. The top intronic motif is the splice donor site. For the downstream regions, we noticed an intriguing absence of the mammalian and Sc poly-adenylation signals among the list of conserved motifs. Conclusion This study provides the first comprehensive list of candidate regulatory motifs in Fg, and underscores the power of comparative genomics in revealing functional elements among related genomes. The conservation of regulatory pathways among the Fusarium genomes and the two yeast species reveals their functional significance, and provides new insights in their

  19. An atopy-associated polymorphism in the ectodomain of the IL-4R(alpha) chain (V50) regulates the persistence of STAT6 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew Q; Heller, Nicola M; Stephenson, Linda; Boothby, Mark R; Keegan, Achsah D

    2009-08-01

    Several commonly occurring polymorphisms in the IL-4R(alpha) have been associated with atopy in humans; the Q576R and the S503P polymorphisms reside in the cytoplasmic domain, whereas the I50 to V50 polymorphism resides in the extracellular domain of the IL-4R(alpha). The effects of these polymorphisms on signaling remain controversial. To determine the effect of the polymorphisms on IL-4 signaling in human cells, we stably transfected the human monocytic cell line U937 with murine IL-4R(alpha) cDNA bearing the I or V at position 50 and the P503/R576 double mutant. Each form of the murine IL-4R(alpha) mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT6 in response to murine IL-4 treatment similar to the induction of tyrosine phosphorylation by human IL-4 signaling through the endogenous human IL-4R(alpha). After IL-4 removal, tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT6 rapidly decayed in cells expressing I50 or P503R576 murine IL-4Ralpha. In contrast, STAT6 remained significantly phosphorylated for several hours after murine IL-4 withdrawal in cells expressing the V50 polymorphism. This persistence in tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT6 was associated with persistence in CIS mRNA expression. Blocking IL-4 signaling during the decay phase using the JAK inhibitor AG490 or the anti-IL-4R(alpha) Ab M1 abrogated the persistence of phosphorylated STAT6 observed in the V50-IL-4R(alpha)-expressing cells. These results indicate that the V50 polymorphism promotes sustained STAT6 phosphorylation and that this process is mediated by continued engagement of IL-4R(alpha), suggesting enhanced responses of V50 IL-4R when IL-4 is limiting.

  20. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  1. Sublinear Time Motif Discovery from Multiple Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Fu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a natural probabilistic model for motif discovery has been used to experimentally test the quality of motif discovery programs. In this model, there are k background sequences, and each character in a background sequence is a random character from an alphabet, Σ. A motif G = g1g2 ... gm is a string of m characters. In each background sequence is implanted a probabilistically-generated approximate copy of G. For a probabilistically-generated approximate copy b1b2 ... bm of G, every character, bi, is probabilistically generated, such that the probability for bi ≠ gi is at most α. We develop two new randomized algorithms and one new deterministic algorithm. They make advancements in the following aspects: (1 The algorithms are much faster than those before. Our algorithms can even run in sublinear time. (2 They can handle any motif pattern. (3 The restriction for the alphabet size is a lower bound of four. This gives them potential applications in practical problems, since gene sequences have an alphabet size of four. (4 All algorithms have rigorous proofs about their performances. The methods developed in this paper have been used in the software implementation. We observed some encouraging results that show improved performance for motif detection compared with other software.

  2. Motif-guided sparse decomposition of gene expression data for regulatory module identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Eric P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes work coordinately as gene modules or gene networks. Various computational approaches have been proposed to find gene modules based on gene expression data; for example, gene clustering is a popular method for grouping genes with similar gene expression patterns. However, traditional gene clustering often yields unsatisfactory results for regulatory module identification because the resulting gene clusters are co-expressed but not necessarily co-regulated. Results We propose a novel approach, motif-guided sparse decomposition (mSD, to identify gene regulatory modules by integrating gene expression data and DNA sequence motif information. The mSD approach is implemented as a two-step algorithm comprising estimates of (1 transcription factor activity and (2 the strength of the predicted gene regulation event(s. Specifically, a motif-guided clustering method is first developed to estimate the transcription factor activity of a gene module; sparse component analysis is then applied to estimate the regulation strength, and so predict the target genes of the transcription factors. The mSD approach was first tested for its improved performance in finding regulatory modules using simulated and real yeast data, revealing functionally distinct gene modules enriched with biologically validated transcription factors. We then demonstrated the efficacy of the mSD approach on breast cancer cell line data and uncovered several important gene regulatory modules related to endocrine therapy of breast cancer. Conclusion We have developed a new integrated strategy, namely motif-guided sparse decomposition (mSD of gene expression data, for regulatory module identification. The mSD method features a novel motif-guided clustering method for transcription factor activity estimation by finding a balance between co-regulation and co-expression. The mSD method further utilizes a sparse decomposition method for regulation strength estimation. The

  3. High Affinity Heme Binding to a Heme Regulatory Motif on the Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbβ Leads to Its Degradation and Indirectly Regulates Its Interaction with Nuclear Receptor Corepressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eric L; Gupta, Nirupama; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2016-01-29

    Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ are heme-binding nuclear receptors (NR) that repress the transcription of genes involved in regulating metabolism, inflammation, and the circadian clock. Previous gene expression and co-immunoprecipitation studies led to a model in which heme binding to Rev-erbα recruits nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) into an active repressor complex. However, in contradiction, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that heme decreases the affinity of the ligand-binding domain of Rev-erb NRs for NCoR1 peptides. One explanation for this discrepancy is that the ligand-binding domain and NCoR1 peptides used for in vitro studies cannot replicate the key features of the full-length proteins used in cellular studies. However, the combined in vitro and cellular results described here demonstrate that heme does not directly promote interactions between full-length Rev-erbβ (FLRev-erbβ) and an NCoR1 construct encompassing all three NR interaction domains. NCoR1 tightly binds both apo- and heme-replete FLRev-erbβ·DNA complexes; furthermore, heme, at high concentrations, destabilizes the FLRev-erbβ·NCoR1 complex. The interaction between FLRev-erbβ and NCoR1 as well as Rev-erbβ repression at the Bmal1 promoter appear to be modulated by another cellular factor(s), at least one of which is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our studies suggest that heme is involved in regulating the degradation of Rev-erbβ in a manner consistent with its role in circadian rhythm maintenance. Finally, the very slow rate constant (10(-6) s(-1)) of heme dissociation from Rev-erbβ rules out a prior proposal that Rev-erbβ acts as an intracellular heme sensor.

  4. Analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor function in the in vitro and in vivo regulation of alpha-melanotropin-stimulating hormone secretion from melanotrope cells of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koning, H P; Jenks, B G; Roubos, E W

    1993-02-01

    The activity of many endocrine cells is regulated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The effects of GABA are mediated by GABAA and/or GABAB receptors. While GABAB receptors in the central nervous system have now been extensively characterized, little is known of the function and pharmacology of GABAB receptors on endocrine cells. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, GABA inhibits the release of alpha MSH from the endocrine melanotrope cells through both GABAA and GABAB receptors. We have investigated the following aspects of the GABAB receptor of the melanotrope cells of X. laevis: 1) the pharmacology of this receptor, using antagonists previously established to demonstrate GABAB receptors in the mammalian central nervous system; 2) the relative contribution to the regulation of hormone secretion by the GABAA and GABAB receptors on melanotrope cells in vitro; and 3) the role of the GABAB receptor with respect to the physiological function of the melanotrope cell in vivo, i.e. regulation of pigment dispersion in skin melanophores in relation to background color. Our results demonstrate that phaclofen, 2-hydroxysaclofen, and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid dose-dependently blocked the inhibition of alpha MSH release by GABAB receptor activation, but not by GABAA receptor activation. The GABAB receptor antagonist delta-aminovaleric acid appeared to be a selective agonist on the GABAB receptor of melanotrope cells. The inhibitory secretory response to a low dose of GABA (10(-5) M) was not affected by bicuculline, but was significantly reduced by phaclofen, indicating that at a low GABA concentration, the GABAB receptor mechanism would dominate in inhibiting the melanotrope cells. Different thresholds of activation may form the basis for differential action of GABA through both GABA receptor types. The tonic inhibition of alpha MSH release in animals adapted to a white background was not affected by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid, indicating that the GABAB receptor is not (solely

  5. Sequential motif profile of natural visibility graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovacci, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The concept of sequential visibility graph motifs -subgraphs appearing with characteristic frequencies in the visibility graphs associated to time series- has been advanced recently along with a theoretical framework to compute analytically the motif profiles associated to Horizontal Visibility Graphs (HVGs). Here we develop a theory to compute the profile of sequential visibility graph motifs in the context of Natural Visibility Graphs (VGs). This theory gives exact results for deterministic aperiodic processes with a smooth invariant density or stochastic processes that fulfil the Markov property and have a continuous marginal distribution. The framework also allows for a linear time numerical estimation in the case of empirical time series. A comparison between the HVG and the VG case (including evaluation of their robustness for short series polluted with measurement noise) is also presented.

  6. Armadillo motifs involved in vesicular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available Armadillo (ARM repeat proteins function in various cellular processes including vesicular transport and membrane tethering. They contain an imperfect repeating sequence motif that forms a conserved three-dimensional structure. Recently, structural and functional insight into tethering mediated by the ARM-repeat protein p115 has been provided. Here we describe the p115 ARM-motifs for reasons of clarity and nomenclature and show that both sequence and structure are highly conserved among ARM-repeat proteins. We argue that there is no need to invoke repeat types other than ARM repeats for a proper description of the structure of the p115 globular head region. Additionally, we propose to define a new subfamily of ARM-like proteins and show lack of evidence that the ARM motifs found in p115 are present in other long coiled-coil tethering factors of the golgin family.

  7. GPUmotif: an ultra-fast and energy-efficient motif analysis program using graphics processing units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Zandevakili

    Full Text Available Computational detection of TF binding patterns has become an indispensable tool in functional genomics research. With the rapid advance of new sequencing technologies, large amounts of protein-DNA interaction data have been produced. Analyzing this data can provide substantial insight into the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, the massive amount of sequence data presents daunting challenges. In our previous work, we have developed a novel algorithm called Hybrid Motif Sampler (HMS that enables more scalable and accurate motif analysis. Despite much improvement, HMS is still time-consuming due to the requirement to calculate matching probabilities position-by-position. Using the NVIDIA CUDA toolkit, we developed a graphics processing unit (GPU-accelerated motif analysis program named GPUmotif. We proposed a "fragmentation" technique to hide data transfer time between memories. Performance comparison studies showed that commonly-used model-based motif scan and de novo motif finding procedures such as HMS can be dramatically accelerated when running GPUmotif on NVIDIA graphics cards. As a result, energy consumption can also be greatly reduced when running motif analysis using GPUmotif. The GPUmotif program is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gpumotif/

  8. What determines the assembly of transcriptional network motifs in Escherichia coli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M Camas

    Full Text Available Transcriptional networks are constituted by a collection of building blocks known as network motifs. Why do motifs appear? An adaptive model of motif emergence was recently questioned in favor of neutralist scenarios. Here, we provide a new picture of motif assembly in Escherichia coli which partially clarifies these contrasting explanations. This is based on characterizing the linkage between motifs and sensing or response specificity of their constituent transcriptional factors (TFs. We find that sensing specificity influences the distribution of autoregulation, while the tendency of a TF to establish feed-forward loops (FFLs depends on response specificity, i.e., regulon size. Analysis of the latter pattern reveals that coregulation between large regulon-size TFs is common under a network neutral model, leading to the assembly of a great number of FFLs and bifans. In addition, neutral exclusive regulation also leads to a collection of single input modules -the fourth basic motif. On the whole, and even under the conservative neutralist scenario considered, a substantial group of regulatory structures revealed adaptive. These structures visibly function as fully-fledged working units.

  9. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  10. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  11. Control of IgE responses. III. IL-6 and IFN-alpha are isotype-specific regulators of peak BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auci, D L; Kleiner, G I; Chice, S M; Dukor, P; Durkin, H G

    1993-03-01

    The ability of cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, GmCSF) to regulate peak benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses was investigated. These responses were induced in BALB/c mice by ip injection of BPO-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH; 10 micrograms) in aluminum hydroxide gel on Days 0, 21, and 42. On Day 44, or on Days 43, 44, and 45, mice were injected sc with varying doses of cytokine or anti-cytokine antibody. On Day 46, the numbers of BPO-specific AFC (IgM, IgG1, IgE and IgA) in spleen were determined ex vivo in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. Among the cytokines tested, only IL-6 suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses in an isotype-specific fashion (60-90%). However, treatment of mice with anti-IL-6 also suppressed these responses, suggesting that IL-6 can either suppress or increase peak antigen specific IgE responses, depending upon its concentration. Among the cytokines tested, only IFN-alpha increased BPO-specific IgE AFC responses in an isotype-specific fashion. Since treatment with anti-IFN-alpha suppressed these responses, it appears that IFN-alpha is required to maintain peak antigen-specific IgE AFC responses. IL-4 or IFN-gamma nonspecifically suppressed responses of all isotypes. Treatment with anti-IL-4 also suppressed IgE responses, suggesting that this cytokine is required to maintain peak antigen specific IgE responses. Treatment with anti-IFN-gamma increased IgE responses, indicating that IFN-gamma suppresses peak antigen-specific IgE responses.

  12. Identifying motifs in folktales using topic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2013-01-01

    With the undertake of various folktale digitalization initiatives, the need for computational aids to explore these collections is increasing. In this paper we compare Labeled LDA (L-LDA) to a simple retrieval model on the task of identifying motifs in folktales. We show that both methods are well a

  13. Highly scalable Ab initio genomic motif identification

    KAUST Repository

    Marchand, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    We present results of scaling an ab initio motif family identification system, Dragon Motif Finder (DMF), to 65,536 processor cores of IBM Blue Gene/P. DMF seeks groups of mutually similar polynucleotide patterns within a set of genomic sequences and builds various motif families from them. Such information is of relevance to many problems in life sciences. Prior attempts to scale such ab initio motif-finding algorithms achieved limited success. We solve the scalability issues using a combination of mixed-mode MPI-OpenMP parallel programming, master-slave work assignment, multi-level workload distribution, multi-level MPI collectives, and serial optimizations. While the scalability of our algorithm was excellent (94% parallel efficiency on 65,536 cores relative to 256 cores on a modest-size problem), the final speedup with respect to the original serial code exceeded 250,000 when serial optimizations are included. This enabled us to carry out many large-scale ab initio motiffinding simulations in a few hours while the original serial code would have needed decades of execution time. Copyright 2011 ACM.

  14. The Motif of Meeting in Digital Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheail, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on theoretical work which considers the composition of meetings, in order to think about the form of the meeting in digital environments for higher education. To explore the motif of meeting, I undertake a "compositional interpretation" (Rose, 2012) of the default interface offered by "Collaborate", an…

  15. Parallel motif extraction from very long sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are frequent patterns used to identify biological functionality in genomic sequences, periodicity in time series, or user trends in web logs. In contrast to a lot of existing work that focuses on collections of many short sequences, modern applications require mining of motifs in one very long sequence (i.e., in the order of several gigabytes). For this case, there exist statistical approaches that are fast but inaccurate; or combinatorial methods that are sound and complete. Unfortunately, existing combinatorial methods are serial and very slow. Consequently, they are limited to very short sequences (i.e., a few megabytes), small alphabets (typically 4 symbols for DNA sequences), and restricted types of motifs. This paper presents ACME, a combinatorial method for extracting motifs from a single very long sequence. ACME arranges the search space in contiguous blocks that take advantage of the cache hierarchy in modern architectures, and achieves almost an order of magnitude performance gain in serial execution. It also decomposes the search space in a smart way that allows scalability to thousands of processors with more than 90% speedup. ACME is the only method that: (i) scales to gigabyte-long sequences; (ii) handles large alphabets; (iii) supports interesting types of motifs with minimal additional cost; and (iv) is optimized for a variety of architectures such as multi-core systems, clusters in the cloud, and supercomputers. ACME reduces the extraction time for an exact-length query from 4 hours to 7 minutes on a typical workstation; handles 3 orders of magnitude longer sequences; and scales up to 16, 384 cores on a supercomputer. Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  16. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  17. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM.

  18. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit in cultured cerebellar granule cells is developmentally regulated by activation of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, B X; Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1997-01-01

    , no significant change in [3H]Ro15-4513 binding was observed for the 56-kDa polypeptide. Immunolabeling of the alpha6 subunit using silver-enhanced, immuno-gold staining of granule cells showed a significant effect with THIP treatment only at 4 DIV and not at 8 DIV. Examination by light microscopy demonstrated...

  19. A discriminative approach for unsupervised clustering of DNA sequence motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Stegmaier

    Full Text Available Algorithmic comparison of DNA sequence motifs is a problem in bioinformatics that has received increased attention during the last years. Its main applications concern characterization of potentially novel motifs and clustering of a motif collection in order to remove redundancy. Despite growing interest in motif clustering, the question which motif clusters to aim at has so far not been systematically addressed. Here we analyzed motif similarities in a comprehensive set of vertebrate transcription factor classes. For this we developed enhanced similarity scores by inclusion of the information coverage (IC criterion, which evaluates the fraction of information an alignment covers in aligned motifs. A network-based method enabled us to identify motif clusters with high correspondence to DNA-binding domain phylogenies and prior experimental findings. Based on this analysis we derived a set of motif families representing distinct binding specificities. These motif families were used to train a classifier which was further integrated into a novel algorithm for unsupervised motif clustering. Application of the new algorithm demonstrated its superiority to previously published methods and its ability to reproduce entrained motif families. As a result, our work proposes a probabilistic approach to decide whether two motifs represent common or distinct binding specificities.

  20. Identification of SNP-containing regulatory motifs in the myelodysplastic syndromes model using SNP arrays and gene expression arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Fan; Jennifer G.Dy; Chung-Che Chang; Xiaobo Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes have increased in frequency and incidence in the American population,but patient prognosis has not significantly improved over the last decade.Such improvements could be realized if biomarkers for accurate diagnosis and prognostic stratification were successfully identified.In this study,we propose a method that associates two state-of-the-art array technologies-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and gene expression array-with gene motifs considered transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS).We are particularly interested in SNP-containing motifs introduced by genetic variation and mutation as TFBS.The potential regulation of SNP-containing motifs affects only when certain mutations occur.These motifs can be identified from a group of co-expressed genes with copy number variation.Then,we used a sliding window to identify motif candidates near SNPs on gene sequences.The candidates were filtered by coarse thresholding and fine statistical testing.Using the regression-based LARS-EN algorithm and a level-wise sequence combination procedure,we identified 28 SNP-containing motifs as candidate TFBS.We confirmed 21 of the 28 motifs with ChIP-chip fragments in the TRANSFAC database.Another six motifs were validated by TRANSFAC via searching binding fragments on coregulated genes.The identified motifs and their location genes can be considered potential biomarkers for myelodysplastic syndromes.Thus,our proposed method,a novel strategy for associating two data categories,is capable of integrating information from different sources to identify reliable candidate regulatory SNP-containing motifs introduced by genetic variation and mutation.

  1. Interaction of alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 integrins with human parechovirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitsonen, Jani; Susi, Petri; Heikkilä, Outi; Sinkovits, Robert S; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Hyypiä, Timo; Butcher, Sarah J

    2010-09-01

    Human parechovirus (HPEV) infections are very common in early childhood and can be severe in neonates. It has been shown that integrins are important for cellular infectivity of HPEV1 through experiments using peptide blocking assays and function-blocking antibodies to alpha(V) integrins. The interaction of HPEV1 with alpha(V) integrins is presumably mediated by a C-terminal RGD motif in the capsid protein VP1. We characterized the binding of integrins alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(6) to HPEV1 by biochemical and structural studies. We showed that although HPEV1 bound efficiently to immobilized integrins, alpha(V)beta(6) bound more efficiently than alpha(V)beta(3) to immobilized HPEV1. Moreover, soluble alpha(V)beta(6), but not alpha(V)beta(3), blocked HPEV1 cellular infectivity, indicating that it is a high-affinity receptor for HPEV1. We also showed that HPEV1 binding to integrins in vitro could be partially blocked by RGD peptides. Using electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction, we showed that HPEV1 has the typical T=1 (pseudo T=3) organization of a picornavirus. Complexes of HPEV1 and integrins indicated that both integrin footprints reside between the 5-fold and 3-fold symmetry axes. This result does not match the RGD position predicted from the coxsackievirus A9 X-ray structure but is consistent with the predicted location of this motif in the shorter C terminus found in HPEV1. This first structural characterization of a parechovirus indicates that the differences in receptor binding are due to the amino acid differences in the integrins rather than to significantly different viral footprints.

  2. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M Zhao

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P residue, but also the Ser(P and Thr(P residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7, atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27, viral (variola VH1, and Cdc25 (A-C. Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo; Bianca Knoch; Michael Müller; Sander Kersten

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPAR alpha serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPAR alpha binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPAR alpha governs biologi...

  4. Bases of motifs for generating repeated patterns with wild cards

    OpenAIRE

    Pisanti, Nadia; Crochemore, Maxime; Grossi, Roberto; Sagot, Marie-France

    2005-01-01

    Motif inference represents one of the most important areas of research in computational biology, and one of its oldest ones. Despite this, the problem remains very much open in the sense that no existing definition is fully satisfying, either in formal terms, or in relation to the biological questions that involve finding such motifs. Two main types of motifs have been considered in the literature: matrices (of letter frequency per position in the motif) and patterns. There is no conclusive e...

  5. DMPD: The interferon-alpha/beta system in antiviral responses: a multimodal machineryof gene regulation by the IRF family of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ineryof gene regulation by the IRF family of transcription factors. Taniguchi T, Takaoka A. Curr Opin Immuno...sponses: a multimodal machineryof gene regulation by the IRF family of transcript...achineryof gene regulation by the IRF family of transcription factors. Authors Taniguchi T, Takaoka A. Publi

  6. Feedback through graph motifs relates structure and function in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yu; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Kutz, J Nathan; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2016-01-01

    How does the connectivity of a network system combine with the behavior of its individual components to determine its collective function? We approach this question by relating the internal network feedback to the statistical prevalence of connectivity motifs, a set of surprisingly simple and local statistics on the network topology. The resulting motif description provides a reduced order model of the network input-output dynamics and it relates the overall network function to feedback control theory. For example, this new formulation dramatically simplifies the classic Erdos-Renyi graph, reducing the overall graph behavior to a simple proportional feedback wrapped around the dynamics of a single node. Higher-order motifs systematically provide further layers and types of feedback to regulate the network response. Thus, the local connectivity shapes temporal and spectral processing by the network as a whole, and we show how this enables robust, yet tunable, functionality such as extending the time constant w...

  7. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  8. Chiral Alkyl Halides: Underexplored Motifs in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Gál

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While alkyl halides are valuable intermediates in synthetic organic chemistry, their use as bioactive motifs in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry is rare in comparison. This is likely attributable to the common misconception that these compounds are merely non-specific alkylators in biological systems. A number of chlorinated compounds in the pharmaceutical and food industries, as well as a growing number of halogenated marine natural products showing unique bioactivity, illustrate the role that chiral alkyl halides can play in drug discovery. Through a series of case studies, we demonstrate in this review that these motifs can indeed be stable under physiological conditions, and that halogenation can enhance bioactivity through both steric and electronic effects. Our hope is that, by placing such compounds in the minds of the chemical community, they may gain more traction in drug discovery and inspire more synthetic chemists to develop methods for selective halogenation.

  9. MINER: software for phylogenetic motif identification

    OpenAIRE

    La, David; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    MINER is web-based software for phylogenetic motif (PM) identification. PMs are sequence regions (fragments) that conserve the overall familial phylogeny. PMs have been shown to correspond to a wide variety of catalytic regions, substrate-binding sites and protein interfaces, making them ideal functional site predictions. The MINER output provides an intuitive interface for interactive PM sequence analysis and structural visualization. The web implementation of MINER is freely available at . ...

  10. MENGUNGKAP SEJARAH DAN MOTIF BATIK SEMARANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Yuliati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Batik Semarang was born in line with the needs of the people of Hyderabad of the material with a new motif or style tailored to the taste, intention, and creativity of the craftsmen. Batik is a combination of several countries influence developing in Indonesian culture. Based on its shape, Batik designs can be divided into two major groups, namely geometric and non-Geometric. The development of Semarangan batik was due to the fact that certain motif of batik can only be worn by certain people, not for all group of people. Batik semarangan craftments are found in coastal regions. It displays the design composing of ornaments plucked from marine environment. Indonesian Batik develops not only to display a blending of court Batik designs with the coastal Batik technique, but also to incorporate other ornaments which come from many various ethnic groups in Indonesia.   Key words: batik, history, ornaments, marine environment, designs   Batik Semarang lahirkan sejalan dengan kebutuhan dari orang-orang dari Hyderabad akan bahan dengan motif atau gaya baru yang berdasarkan pada rasa, niat, dan kreatifitas dari pembuatnya. Batik merupakan perpaduan dari pengaruh beberapa negara yang berkembang dalam budaya Indonesia. Ditinjau dari desainnya, desain batik dapat dibagi menjadi dua kelompok utama, yakni geometrik dan nongeometrik. Pengembangan yang dilakukan terhadap batik semarangan disebabkan adanya beberapa motif batik yang hanya digunakan oleh kalangan tertentu, dan tidak boleh untuk kalangan umum. Pengrajin batik Semarangan berkembang di kawasan pesisir. Ia menampilkan desain yang terdiri atas berbagai ornamen yang menunjukkan ciri khas kemaritiman. Batik ini dikembangakan tidak hanya menampilkan desain batik khas pesisiran, tetapi juga memasukkan berbagai ornament dari beragam kelompok etnis di Indonesia.   Kata kunci: batik, sejarah, ragam hias, lingkungan pesisir, desain  

  11. Social Network Analysis Based on Network Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Based on the community structure characteristics, theory, and methods of frequent subgraph mining, network motifs findings are firstly introduced into social network analysis; the tendentiousness evaluation function and the importance evaluation function are proposed for effectiveness assessment. Compared with the traditional way based on nodes centrality degree, the new approach can be used to analyze the properties of social network more fully and judge the roles of the nodes effectively. I...

  12. Trading networks, abnormal motifs and stock manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We study trade-based manipulation of stock prices from the perspective of complex trading networks constructed by using detailed information of trades. A stock trading network consists of nodes and directed links, where every trader is a node and a link is formed from one trader to the other if the former sells shares to the latter. Specifically, three abnormal network motifs are investigated, which are found to be formed by a few traders, implying potential intention of price manipulation. W...

  13. Treatment of THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts differentially regulates the expression if IL-1beta and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Hall, Lisa; Cano, Pablo; Arnason, John T; Rojas, Rosario; Lock, Olga; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2007-01-19

    Uncaria tomentosa, commonly known as cat's claw, is a medicinal plant native to Peru, which has been used for decades in the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Uncaria tomentosa can be used as an antioxidant, has anti-apoptotic properties, and can enhance DNA repair, however it is best know for its anti-inflammatory properties. Treatment with Uncaria tomentosa extracts inhibits the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha, which is a critical mediator of the immune response. In this paper, we showed that treatment of THP-1 monocyte-like cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts inhibited the MAP kinase signaling pathway and altered cytokine expression. Using ELISA assays, we showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa extracts augmented LPS-dependent expression of IL-1beta by 2.4-fold, while inhibiting the LPS-dependent expression of TNF-alpha by 5.5-fold. We also showed that treatment of LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts blocked ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that treatment of THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts has opposite effects on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha secretion, and that these changes may involve effects on the MAP kinase pathway.

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of osteoblastic platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha expression by co-cultured primary endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finkenzeller, Günter; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Schmal, Hagen

    2010-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling plays an important role in osteoblast function. Inhibition of PDGFR activity leads to a suppression of osteoblast proliferation, whereas mineralized matrix production is enhanced. In previous experiments, we showed that co-cultivation of h......-life of osteoblastic PDGFR-alpha mRNA, but did not decrease its promoter activity. In summary, our data show that PDGFR-alpha is downregulated in hOBs by co-cultivation with human primary endothelial cells through a p38 MAPK-dependent post-transcriptional mechanism.......Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling plays an important role in osteoblast function. Inhibition of PDGFR activity leads to a suppression of osteoblast proliferation, whereas mineralized matrix production is enhanced. In previous experiments, we showed that co-cultivation...... of human primary endothelial cells and human primary osteoblasts (hOBs) leads to a cell contact-dependent downregulation of PDGFR-alpha expression in the osteoblasts. In this study, we investigated this effect in more detail, revealing that human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC)-mediated PDGFR...

  15. Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites by functional analysis of sets of genes sharing overrep-resented upstream motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silengo Lorenzo

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in the functioning of the cell, and is mostly effected through transcription factors binding to specific recognition motifs located upstream of the coding region of the regulated gene. The computational identification of such motifs is made easier by the fact that they often appear several times in the upstream region of the regulated genes, so that the number of occurrences of relevant motifs is often significantly larger than expected by pure chance. Results To exploit this fact, we construct sets of genes characterized by the statistical overrepresentation of a certain motif in their upstream regions. Then we study the functional characterization of these sets by analyzing their annotation to Gene Ontology terms. For the sets showing a statistically significant specific functional characterization, we conjecture that the upstream motif characterizing the set is a binding site for a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the genes in the set. Conclusions The method we propose is able to identify many known binding sites in S. cerevisiae and new candidate targets of regulation by known transcritpion factors. Its application to less well studied organisms is likely to be valuable in the exploration of their regulatory interaction network.

  16. Intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids contain phylogenetically conserved RNA secondary structure motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delihas Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia species are unusual in that they contain a large number of linear and circular plasmids. Many of these plasmids have long intergenic regions. These regions have many fragmented genes, repeated sequences and appear to be in a state of flux, but they may serve as reservoirs for evolutionary change and/or maintain stable motifs such as small RNA genes. Results In an in silico study, intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids were scanned for phylogenetically conserved stem loop structures that may represent functional units at the RNA level. Five repeat sequences were found that could fold into stable RNA-type stem loop structures, three of which are closely linked to protein genes, one of which is a member of the Borrelia lipoprotein_1 super family genes and another is the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein_1 (CRASP-1 family. Modeled secondary structures of repeat sequences display numerous base-pair compensatory changes in stem regions, including C-G→A-U transversions when orthologous sequences are compared. Base-pair compensatory changes constitute strong evidence for phylogenetic conservation of secondary structure. Conclusion Intergenic regions of Borrelia species carry evolutionarily stable RNA secondary structure motifs. Of major interest is that some motifs are associated with protein genes that show large sequence variability. The cell may conserve these RNA motifs whereas allow a large flux in amino acid sequence, possibly to create new virulence factors but with associated RNA motifs intact.

  17. Dragon polya spotter: Predictor of poly(A) motifs within human genomic DNA sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2011-11-15

    Motivation: Recognition of poly(A) signals in mRNA is relatively straightforward due to the presence of easily recognizable polyadenylic acid tail. However, the task of identifying poly(A) motifs in the primary genomic DNA sequence that correspond to poly(A) signals in mRNA is a far more challenging problem. Recognition of poly(A) signals is important for better gene annotation and understanding of the gene regulation mechanisms. In this work, we present one such poly(A) motif prediction method based on properties of human genomic DNA sequence surrounding a poly(A) motif. These properties include thermodynamic, physico-chemical and statistical characteristics. For predictions, we developed Artificial Neural Network and Random Forest models. These models are trained to recognize 12 most common poly(A) motifs in human DNA. Our predictors are available as a free web-based tool accessible at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dps. Compared with other reported predictors, our models achieve higher sensitivity and specificity and furthermore provide a consistent level of accuracy for 12 poly(A) motif variants. The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. Motif finding in DNA sequences based on skipping nonconserved positions in background Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Sze, Sing-Hoi

    2011-05-01

    One strategy to identify transcription factor binding sites is through motif finding in upstream DNA sequences of potentially co-regulated genes. Despite extensive efforts, none of the existing algorithms perform very well. We consider a string representation that allows arbitrary ignored positions within the nonconserved portion of single motifs, and use O(2(l)) Markov chains to model the background distributions of motifs of length l while skipping these positions within each Markov chain. By focusing initially on positions that have fixed nucleotides to define core occurrences, we develop an algorithm to identify motifs of moderate lengths. We compare the performance of our algorithm to other motif finding algorithms on a few benchmark data sets, and show that significant improvement in accuracy can be obtained when the sites are sufficiently conserved within a given sample, while comparable performance is obtained when the site conservation rate is low. A software program (PosMotif ) and detailed results are available online at http://faculty.cse.tamu.edu/shsze/posmotif.

  19. Dynamic motifs in socio-economic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-12-01

    Socio-economic networks are of central importance in economic life. We develop a method of identifying and studying motifs in socio-economic networks by focusing on “dynamic motifs,” i.e., evolutionary connection patterns that, because of “node acquaintances” in the network, occur much more frequently than random patterns. We examine two evolving bi-partite networks: i) the world-wide commercial ship chartering market and ii) the ship build-to-order market. We find similar dynamic motifs in both bipartite networks, even though they describe different economic activities. We also find that “influence” and “persistence” are strong factors in the interaction behavior of organizations. When two companies are doing business with the same customer, it is highly probable that another customer who currently only has business relationship with one of these two companies, will become customer of the second in the future. This is the effect of influence. Persistence means that companies with close business ties to customers tend to maintain their relationships over a long period of time.

  20. Multilayer motif analysis of brain networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Chavez, Mario; Latora, Vito

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade network science has shed new light on the anatomical connectivity and on correlations in the activity of different areas of the human brain. The study of brain networks has made possible in fact to detect the central areas of a neural system, and to identify its building blocks by looking at overabundant small subgraphs, known as motifs. However, network analysis of the brain has so far mainly focused on structural and functional networks as separate entities. The recently developed mathematical framework of multi-layer networks allows to perform a multiplex analysis of the human brain where the structural and functional layers are considered at the same time. In this work we describe how to classify subgraphs in multiplex networks, and we extend motif analysis to networks with many layers. We then extract multi-layer motifs in brain networks of healthy subjects by considering networks with two layers, respectively obtained from diffusion and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results i...

  1. Selective disruption of ER{alpha} DNA-binding activity alters uterine responsiveness to estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; O'Brien, Jeanne E; Jameson, J Larry; Kissling, Grace E; Korach, Kenneth S

    2009-12-01

    In vitro models have been used to demonstrate that estrogen receptors (ERs) can regulate estrogen-responsive genes either by directly interacting with estrogen-responsive element (ERE) DNA motifs or by interacting with other transcription factors such as AP1. In this study, we evaluated estrogen (E(2))-dependent uterine gene profiles by microarray in the KIKO mouse, an in vivo knock-in mouse model that lacks the DNA-binding function of ERalpha and is consequently restricted to non-ERE-mediated responses. The 2- or 24-h E(2)-mediated uterine gene responses were distinct in wild-type (WT), KIKO, and alphaERKO genotypes, indicating that unique sets of genes are regulated by ERE and non-ERE pathways. After 2 h E(2) treatment, 38% of the WT transcripts were also regulated in the KIKO, demonstrating that the tethered mechanism does operate in this in vivo model. Surprisingly, 1438 E(2)-regulated transcripts were unique in the KIKO mouse and were not seen in either WT or alphaERKO. Pathway analyses revealed that some canonical pathways, such as the Jak/Stat pathway, were affected in a similar manner by E(2) in WT and KIKO. In other cases, however, the WT and KIKO differed. One example is the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway; this pathway was impacted, but different members of the pathway were regulated by E(2) or were regulated in a different manner, consistent with differences in biological responses. In summary, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of uterine genes regulated by E(2) via ERE and non-ERE pathways.

  2. Research Progress on Functional Food Regulating Cholesterol 7-alpha Hydroxylase%以调节胆固醇7α-羟化酶为靶点的功能性食品研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭霄; 张勇; 高鹏飞; 姚国强; 孙天松

    2015-01-01

    胆固醇7α-羟化酶(Cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase,CYP7A1)在维持胆固醇代谢动态平衡时起重要的作用。通过概述CYP7A1的调控机制,综述近年来报道的益生菌、膳食纤维、多酚类物质等功能性食品对CYP7A1基因表达的调节和影响,展望以CYP7A1为靶点的降胆固醇功能性食品的开发前景,旨在为筛选以CYP7A1为靶点的功能性食品提供参考。%Cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (CYP7A1) have been shown to play an important role in maintaining cholesterol metabolism homeostasis. This review outlined the mechanisms underlying regulation of CYP7A1, the functional food which includes probiotics, dietary fiber and polyphenols affecting CYP7A1 and the regulation of gene expression were summarized. In addition , the development prospect of the cholesterol-lowering functional food targeting CYP7A1 was analyzed. The aim of this review was to provide clues in screening to CYP7A1 targets of functional food.

  3. ET-Motif: Solving the Exact (l, d)-Planted Motif Problem Using Error Tree Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Okaily, Anas; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2016-07-01

    Motif finding is an important and a challenging problem in many biological applications such as discovering promoters, enhancers, locus control regions, transcription factors, and more. The (l, d)-planted motif search, PMS, is one of several variations of the problem. In this problem, there are n given sequences over alphabets of size [Formula: see text], each of length m, and two given integers l and d. The problem is to find a motif m of length l, where in each sequence there is at least an l-mer at a Hamming distance of [Formula: see text] of m. In this article, we propose ET-Motif, an algorithm that can solve the PMS problem in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. The time bound can be further reduced by a factor of m with [Formula: see text] space. In case the suffix tree that is built for the input sequences is balanced, the problem can be solved in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. Similarly, the time bound can be reduced by a factor of m using [Formula: see text] space. Moreover, the variations of the problem, namely the edit distance PMS and edited PMS (Quorum), can be solved using ET-Motif with simple modifications but upper bands of space and time. For edit distance PMS, the time and space bounds will be increased by [Formula: see text], while for edited PMS the increase will be of [Formula: see text] in the time bound.

  4. Dynamics of network motifs in genetic regulatory networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Liu Zeng-Rong; Zhang Jian-Bao

    2007-01-01

    Network motifs hold a very important status in genetic regulatory networks. This paper aims to analyse the dynamical property of the network motifs in genetic regulatory networks. The main result we obtained is that the dynamical property of a single motif is very simple with only an asymptotically stable equilibrium point, but the combination of several motifs can make more complicated dynamical properties emerge such as limit cycles. The above-mentioned result shows that network motif is a stable substructure in genetic regulatory networks while their combinations make the genetic regulatory network more complicated.

  5. No tradeoff between versatility and robustness in gene circuit motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Joshua L.

    2016-05-01

    Circuit motifs are small directed subgraphs that appear in real-world networks significantly more often than in randomized networks. In the Boolean model of gene circuits, most motifs are realized by multiple circuit genotypes. Each of a motif's constituent circuit genotypes may have one or more functions, which are embodied in the expression patterns the circuit forms in response to specific initial conditions. Recent enumeration of a space of nearly 17 million three-gene circuit genotypes revealed that all circuit motifs have more than one function, with the number of functions per motif ranging from 12 to nearly 30,000. This indicates that some motifs are more functionally versatile than others. However, the individual circuit genotypes that constitute each motif are less robust to mutation if they have many functions, hinting that functionally versatile motifs may be less robust to mutation than motifs with few functions. Here, I explore the relationship between versatility and robustness in circuit motifs, demonstrating that functionally versatile motifs are robust to mutation despite the inherent tradeoff between versatility and robustness at the level of an individual circuit genotype.

  6. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html.

  7. RNA structural motif recognition based on least-squares distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Shaohong; Zhang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent structural elements occurring in RNA molecules. RNA structural motif recognition aims to find RNA substructures that are similar to a query motif, and it is important for RNA structure analysis and RNA function prediction. In view of this, we propose a new method known as RNA Structural Motif Recognition based on Least-Squares distance (LS-RSMR) to effectively recognize RNA structural motifs. A test set consisting of five types of RNA structural motifs occurring in Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA is compiled by us. Experiments are conducted for recognizing these five types of motifs. The experimental results fully reveal the superiority of the proposed LS-RSMR compared with four other state-of-the-art methods.

  8. CONTEMPORARY USAGE OF TRADITIONAL TURKISH MOTIFS IN PRODUCT DESIGNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Gumuser

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the traditional Turkish motifs and its relations among present industrial designs. Traditional Turkish motifs played a very important role in 16th century onwards. The arts of the Ottoman Empire were used because of their symbolic meanings and unique styles. When we examine these motifs we encounter; Tiger Stripe, Three Spot (Çintemani, Rumi, Hatayi, Penç, Cloud, Crescent, Star, Crown, Hyacinth, Tulip and Carnation motifs. Nowadays, Turkish designers have begun to use these traditional Turkish motifs in their designs so as to create differences and awareness in the world design. The examples of these industrial designs, using the Turkish motifs, have survived and have Ottoman heritage and historical value. In this study, the Turkish motifs will be examined along with their focus on contemporary Turkish industrial designs used today.

  9. AISMOTIF-An Artificial Immune System for DNA Motif Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Seeja, K R

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of transcription factor binding sites is a much explored and still exploring area of research in functional genomics. Many computational tools have been developed for finding motifs and each of them has their own advantages as well as disadvantages. Most of these algorithms need prior knowledge about the data to construct background models. However there is not a single technique that can be considered as best for finding regulatory motifs. This paper proposes an artificial immune system based algorithm for finding the transcription factor binding sites or motifs and two new weighted scores for motif evaluation. The algorithm is enumerative, but sufficient pruning of the pattern search space has been incorporated using immune system concepts. The performance of AISMOTIF has been evaluated by comparing it with eight state of art composite motif discovery algorithms and found that AISMOTIF predicts known motifs as well as new motifs from the benchmark dataset without any prior knowledge about the data...

  10. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  11. Assessing the Exceptionality of Coloured Motifs in Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacroix Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Various methods have been recently employed to characterise the structure of biological networks. In particular, the concept of network motif and the related one of coloured motif have proven useful to model the notion of a functional/evolutionary building block. However, algorithms that enumerate all the motifs of a network may produce a very large output, and methods to decide which motifs should be selected for downstream analysis are needed. A widely used method is to assess if the motif is exceptional, that is, over- or under-represented with respect to a null hypothesis. Much effort has been put in the last thirty years to derive -values for the frequencies of topological motifs, that is, fixed subgraphs. They rely either on (compound Poisson and Gaussian approximations for the motif count distribution in Erdös-Rényi random graphs or on simulations in other models. We focus on a different definition of graph motifs that corresponds to coloured motifs. A coloured motif is a connected subgraph with fixed vertex colours but unspecified topology. Our work is the first analytical attempt to assess the exceptionality of coloured motifs in networks without any simulation. We first establish analytical formulae for the mean and the variance of the count of a coloured motif in an Erdös-Rényi random graph model. Using simulations under this model, we further show that a Pólya-Aeppli distribution better approximates the distribution of the motif count compared to Gaussian or Poisson distributions. The Pólya-Aeppli distribution, and more generally the compound Poisson distributions, are indeed well designed to model counts of clumping events. Altogether, these results enable to derive a -value for a coloured motif, without spending time on simulations.

  12. Bases of motifs for generating repeated patterns with wild cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Nadia; Crochemore, Maxime; Grossi, Roberto; Sagot, Marie-France

    2005-01-01

    Motif inference represents one of the most important areas of research in computational biology, and one of its oldest ones. Despite this, the problem remains very much open in the sense that no existing definition is fully satisfying, either in formal terms, or in relation to the biological questions that involve finding such motifs. Two main types of motifs have been considered in the literature: matrices (of letter frequency per position in the motif) and patterns. There is no conclusive evidence in favor of either, and recent work has attempted to integrate the two types into a single model. In this paper, we address the formal issue in relation to motifs as patterns. This is essential to get at a better understanding of motifs in general. In particular, we consider a promising idea that was recently proposed, which attempted to avoid the combinatorial explosion in the number of motifs by means of a generator set for the motifs. Instead of exhibiting a complete list of motifs satisfying some input constraints, what is produced is a basis of such motifs from which all the other ones can be generated. We study the computational cost of determining such a basis of repeated motifs with wild cards in a sequence. We give new upper and lower bounds on such a cost, introducing a notion of basis that is provably contained in (and, thus, smaller) than previously defined ones. Our basis can be computed in less time and space, and is still able to generate the same set of motifs. We also prove that the number of motifs in all bases defined so far grows exponentially with the quorum, that is, with the minimal number of times a motif must appear in a sequence, something unnoticed in previous work. We show that there is no hope to efficiently compute such bases unless the quorum is fixed.

  13. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    of peptides, and knowledge of their binding specificities is important for understanding differences in the immune response between individuals. Algorithms predicting which peptides bind a given MHC molecule have recently been developed with high prediction accuracy. The utility of these algorithms...... is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  14. Acute cold exposure-induced down-regulation of CIDEA, cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A, in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue by sympathetically activated beta3-adrenoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2009-09-18

    The thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) largely depends on the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is up-regulated by environmental alterations such as cold. Recently, CIDEA (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A) has also been shown to be expressed at high levels in the mitochondria of BAT. Here we examined the effect of cold on the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in interscapular BAT of conscious rats with regard to the sympathetic nervous system. Cold exposure (4 degrees C for 3h) elevated the plasma norepinephrine level and increased norepinephrine turnover in BAT. Cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in BAT, accompanied by up-regulation of mRNA and protein levels of UCP1. The cold exposure-induced changes of CIDEA and UCP1 were attenuated by intraperitoneal pretreatment with propranolol (a non-selective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal) or SR59230A (a selective beta(3)-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal), respectively. These results suggest that acute cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of CIDEA in interscapular BAT by sympathetically activated beta(3)-adrenoreceptor-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  15. MINER: software for phylogenetic motif identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, David; Livesay, Dennis R

    2005-07-01

    MINER is web-based software for phylogenetic motif (PM) identification. PMs are sequence regions (fragments) that conserve the overall familial phylogeny. PMs have been shown to correspond to a wide variety of catalytic regions, substrate-binding sites and protein interfaces, making them ideal functional site predictions. The MINER output provides an intuitive interface for interactive PM sequence analysis and structural visualization. The web implementation of MINER is freely available at http://www.pmap.csupomona.edu/MINER/. Source code is available to the academic community on request.

  16. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-01-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the ...

  17. Electromagnetic Field Seems to Not Influence Transcription via CTCT Motif in Three Plant Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztafrowski, Dariusz; Aksamit-Stachurska, Anna; Kostyn, Kamil; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    It was proposed that magnetic fields (MFs) can influence gene transcription via CTCT motif located in human HSP70 promoter. To check the universality of this mechanism, we estimated the potential role of this motif on plant gene transcription in response to MFs using both bioinformatics and experimental studies. We searched potential promoter sequences (1000 bp upstream) in the potato Solanum tuberosum and thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana genomes for the CTCT sequence. The motif was found, on average, 3.6 and 4.3 times per promoter (148,487 and 134,361 motifs in total) in these two species, respectively; however, the CTCT sequences were not randomly distributed in the promoter regions but were preferentially located near the transcription initiation site and were closely packed. The closer these CTCT sequences to the transcription initiation site, the smaller distance between them in both plants. One can assume that genes with many CTCT motifs in their promoter regions can be potentially regulated by MFs. To check this assumption, we tested the influence of MFs on gene expression in a transgenic potato with three promoters (16R, 20R, and 5UGT) containing from 3 to 12 CTCT sequences and starting expression of β-glucuronidase as a reported gene. The potatoes were exposed to a 50 Hz 60–70 A/m MF for 30 min and the reporter gene activity was measured for up to 24 h. Although other factors induced the reporter gene activity, the MF did not. It implies the CTCT motif does not mediate in response to MF in the tested plant promoters. PMID:28326086

  18. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  19. Protein functional-group 3D motif and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Representing and recognizing protein active sites sequence motif (1D motif) and structural motif (3D motif) is an important topic for predicting and designing protein function. Prevalent methods for extracting and searching 3D motif always consider residue as the minimal unit, which have limited sensitivity. Here we present a new spatial representation of protein active sites, called "functional-group 3D motif ", based on the fact that the functional groups inside a residue contribute mostly to its function. Relevant algorithm and computer program are developed, which could be widely used in the function prediction and the study of structural-function relationship of proteins. As a test, we defined a functional-group 3D motif of the catalytic triad and oxyanion hole with the structure of porcine trypsin (PDB code: 1mct) as the template. With our motif-searching program, we successfully found similar sub-structures in trypsins, subtilisins and a/b hydrolases, which show distinct folds but share similar catalytic mechanism. Moreover, this motif can be used to elucidate the structural basis of other proteins with variant catalytic triads by comparing it to those proteins. Finally, we scanned this motif against a non-redundant protein structure database to find its matches, and the results demonstrated the potential application of functional group 3D motif in function prediction. Above all, compared with the other 3D-motif representations on residues, the functional group 3D motif achieves better representation of protein active region, which is more sensitive for protein function prediction.

  20. The network motif architecture of dominance hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; McDonald, David B

    2015-04-01

    The widespread existence of dominance hierarchies has been a central puzzle in social evolution, yet we lack a framework for synthesizing the vast empirical data on hierarchy structure in animal groups. We applied network motif analysis to compare the structures of dominance networks from data published over the past 80 years. Overall patterns of dominance relations, including some aspects of non-interactions, were strikingly similar across disparate group types. For example, nearly all groups exhibited high frequencies of transitive triads, whereas cycles were very rare. Moreover, pass-along triads were rare, and double-dominant triads were common in most groups. These patterns did not vary in any systematic way across taxa, study settings (captive or wild) or group size. Two factors significantly affected network motif structure: the proportion of dyads that were observed to interact and the interaction rates of the top-ranked individuals. Thus, study design (i.e. how many interactions were observed) and the behaviour of key individuals in the group could explain much of the variations we see in social hierarchies across animals. Our findings confirm the ubiquity of dominance hierarchies across all animal systems, and demonstrate that network analysis provides new avenues for comparative analyses of social hierarchies.

  1. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italiano, J E; Battinelli, E M

    2009-07-01

    One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. A majority of this vast array of secreted proteins are stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on the mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis and secretion, with a particular emphasis on recent findings that clearly demonstrate that platelets contain distinct subpopulations of alpha-granules that undergo differential release during activation. We consider the implications of this new paradigm of platelet secretion, discuss mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis, and review the molecular basis of transport and delivery of alpha-granules to assembling platelets.

  2. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhshandehroo, M.; Knoch, B.; Müller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPAR alpha serves as a molecular target for hypolip

  4. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  5. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The planted (l,d motif search (PMS is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  6. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (${\\rm{M}}_9$) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks...

  7. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  8. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  9. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in epidermal keratinocytes revealed using global transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Tomohiro; Gazel, Alix; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2004-07-30

    Identification of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) as the key agent in inflammatory disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis, led to TNF alpha-targeting therapies, which, although avoiding many of the side-effects of previous drugs, nonetheless causes other side-effects, including secondary infections and cancer. By controlling gene expression, TNF alpha orchestrates the cutaneous responses to environmental damage and inflammation. To define TNF alpha action in epidermis, we compared the transcriptional profiles of normal human keratinocytes untreated and treated with TNF alpha for 1, 4, 24, and 48 h by using oligonucleotide microarrays. We found that TNF alpha regulates not only immune and inflammatory responses but also tissue remodeling, cell motility, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Specifically, TNF alpha regulates innate immunity and inflammation by inducing a characteristic large set of chemokines, including newly identified TNF alpha targets, that attract neutrophils, macrophages, and skin-specific memory T-cells. This implicates TNF alpha in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, fixed drug eruption, atopic and allergic contact dermatitis. TNF alpha promotes tissue repair by inducing basement membrane components and collagen-degrading proteases. Unexpectedly, TNF alpha induces actin cytoskeleton regulators and integrins, enhancing keratinocyte motility and attachment, effects not previously associated with TNF alpha. Also unanticipated was the influence of TNF alpha upon keratinocyte cell fate by regulating cell-cycle and apoptosis-associated genes. Therefore, TNF alpha initiates not only the initiation of inflammation and responses to injury, but also the subsequent epidermal repair. The results provide new insights into the harmful and beneficial TNF alpha effects and define the mechanisms and genes that achieve these outcomes, both of which are important for TNF alpha-targeted therapies.

  10. Detecting DNA regulatory motifs by incorporating positional trendsin information content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kechris, Katherina J.; van Zwet, Erik; Bickel, Peter J.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-05-04

    On the basis of the observation that conserved positions in transcription factor binding sites are often clustered together, we propose a simple extension to the model-based motif discovery methods. We assign position-specific prior distributions to the frequency parameters of the model, penalizing deviations from a specified conservation profile. Examples with both simulated and real data show that this extension helps discover motifs as the data become noisier or when there is a competing false motif.

  11. X-ray structure of Pur-alpha reveals a Whirly-like fold and an unusual nucleic-acid binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebsch, Almut; Roche, Stéphane; Niessing, Dierk

    2009-11-03

    The PUR protein family is a distinct and highly conserved class that is characterized by its sequence-specific RNA- and DNA-binding. Its best-studied family member, Pur-alpha, acts as a transcriptional regulator, as host factor for viral replication, and as cofactor for mRNP localization in dendrites. Pur-alpha-deficient mice show severe neurologic defects and die after birth. Nucleic-acid binding by Pur-alpha is mediated by its central core region, for which no structural information is available. We determined the x-ray structure of residues 40 to 185 from Drosophila melanogaster Pur-alpha, which constitutes a major part of the core region. We found that this region contains two almost identical structural motifs, termed "PUR repeats," which interact with each other to form a PUR domain. DNA- and RNA-binding studies confirmed that PUR domains are indeed functional nucleic-acid binding domains. Database analysis show that PUR domains share a fold with the Whirly class of nucleic-acid binding proteins. Structural analysis combined with mutational studies suggest that a PUR domain binds nucleic acids through two independent surface regions involving concave beta-sheets. Structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the core region harbors a third PUR repeat at its C terminus. Subsequent characterization by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and size-exclusion chromatography indicated that PUR repeat III mediates dimerization of Pur-alpha. Surface envelopes calculated from SAXS data show that the Pur-alpha dimer consisting of repeats I to III is arranged in a Z-like shape. This unexpected domain organization of the entire core domain of Pur-alpha has direct implications for ssDNA/ssRNA and dsDNA binding.

  12. Role of G{alpha}12 and G{alpha}13 as Novel Switches for the Activity of Nrf2, a Key Antioxidative Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    G{alpha}12 and G{alpha}13 function as molecular regulators responding to extracellular stimuli. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is involved in a protective adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study investigated the regulation of Nrf2 by G{alpha}12 and G{alpha}13. A deficiency of G{alpha}12, but not of G{alpha}13, enhanced Nrf2 activity and target gene transactivation in embryo fibroblasts. In mice, G{alpha}12 knockout activated Nrf2 and thereby facilitated heme catabolism to bilirubin a...

  13. PlantLoc: an accurate web server for predicting plant protein subcellular localization by substantiality motif

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shengnan; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng; Xiong, Wenwei; Wang, Zhiheng; Sun, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of subcellular localizations (SCLs) of plant proteins relates to their functions and aids in understanding the regulation of biological processes at the cellular level. We present PlantLoc, a highly accurate and fast webserver for predicting the multi-label SCLs of plant proteins. The PlantLoc server has two innovative characters: building localization motif libraries by a recursive method without alignment and Gene Ontology information; and establishing simple architecture for rapi...

  14. Discovery of sequence motifs related to coexpression of genes using evolutionary computation

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Gary B.; Weekes, Dana G.; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Harlow, Harry B.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2004-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulatory elements that control gene expression. Recognition of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs in the upstream region of coexpressed genes is therefore critical towards a true understanding of the regulations of gene expression. The task of discovering eukaryotic TFBSs remains a challenging problem. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionary computation can be used to search for TFBSs in upstream regions of genes known to be coexpressed. Evolutionar...

  15. Role of PY Motif Containing Protein, WBP-2 in ER, PR Signaling and Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    and expression of the endogenous estrogen-regulated gene, pS2 were measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The siWBP-2...amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using pri- mers specific for estrogen receptor binding site within the pS2 promoter. ChIP analyses demonstrated...WW-domains and PPXY motif have been implicated in many diseases , including muscular dystrophy, Liddle’s syndrome, Alzheimer’s, Huntington disease

  16. STEME: a robust, accurate motif finder for large data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Reid

    Full Text Available Motif finding is a difficult problem that has been studied for over 20 years. Some older popular motif finders are not suitable for analysis of the large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing. We recently published an efficient approximation (STEME to the EM algorithm that is at the core of many motif finders such as MEME. This approximation allows the EM algorithm to be applied to large data sets. In this work we describe several efficient extensions to STEME that are based on the MEME algorithm. Together with the original STEME EM approximation, these extensions make STEME a fully-fledged motif finder with similar properties to MEME. We discuss the difficulty of objectively comparing motif finders. We show that STEME performs comparably to existing prominent discriminative motif finders, DREME and Trawler, on 13 sets of transcription factor binding data in mouse ES cells. We demonstrate the ability of STEME to find long degenerate motifs which these discriminative motif finders do not find. As part of our method, we extend an earlier method due to Nagarajan et al. for the efficient calculation of motif E-values. STEME's source code is available under an open source license and STEME is available via a web interface.

  17. Dystroglycan versatility in cell adhesion: a tale of multiple motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winder Steve J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dystroglycan is a ubiquitously expressed heterodimeric adhesion receptor. The extracellular α-subunit makes connections with a number of laminin G domain ligands including laminins, agrin and perlecan in the extracellular matrix and the transmembrane β-subunit makes connections to the actin filament network via cytoskeletal linkers including dystrophin, utrophin, ezrin and plectin, depending on context. Originally discovered as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex of skeletal muscle, dystroglycan is an important adhesion molecule and signalling scaffold in a multitude of cell types and tissues and is involved in several diseases. Dystroglycan has emerged as a multifunctional adhesion platform with many interacting partners associating with its short unstructured cytoplasmic domain. Two particular hotspots are the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region and at the very carboxy terminus of dystroglycan. Regions which between them have several overlapping functions: in the juxtamembrane region; a nuclear localisation signal, ezrin/radixin/moesin protein, rapsyn and ERK MAP Kinase binding function, and at the C terminus a regulatory tyrosine governing WW, SH2 and SH3 domain interactions. We will discuss the binding partners for these motifs and how their interactions and regulation can modulate the involvement of dystroglycan in a range of different adhesion structures and functions depending on context. Thus dystroglycan presents as a multifunctional scaffold involved in adhesion and adhesion-mediated signalling with its functions under exquisite spatio-temporal regulation.

  18. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es.

  19. A motif-based search in bacterial genomes identifies the ortholog of the small RNA Yfr1 in all lineages of cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axmann Ilka M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are regulators of gene expression in all domains of life. They control growth and differentiation, virulence, motility and various stress responses. The identification of ncRNAs can be a tedious process due to the heterogeneous nature of this molecule class and the missing sequence similarity of orthologs, even among closely related species. The small ncRNA Yfr1 has previously been found in the Prochlorococcus/Synechococcus group of marine cyanobacteria. Results Here we show that screening available genome sequences based on an RNA motif and followed by experimental analysis works successfully in detecting this RNA in all lineages of cyanobacteria. Yfr1 is an abundant ncRNA between 54 and 69 nt in size that is ubiquitous for cyanobacteria except for two low light-adapted strains of Prochlorococcus, MIT 9211 and SS120, in which it must have been lost secondarily. Yfr1 consists of two predicted stem-loop elements separated by an unpaired sequence of 16–20 nucleotides containing the ultraconserved undecanucleotide 5'-ACUCCUCACAC-3'. Conclusion Starting with an ncRNA previously found in a narrow group of cyanobacteria only, we show here the highly specific and sensitive identification of its homologs within all lineages of cyanobacteria, whereas it was not detected within the genome sequences of E. coli and of 7 other eubacteria belonging to the alpha-proteobacteria, chlorobiaceae and spirochaete. The integration of RNA motif prediction into computational pipelines for the detection of ncRNAs in bacteria appears as a promising step to improve the quality of such predictions.

  20. The PPAR alpha-humanized mouse: a model to investigate species differences in liver toxicity mediated by PPAR alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Nagano, Tomokazu; Shah, Yatrik; Cheung, Connie; Ito, Shinji; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-01-01

    To determine the impact of the species difference between rodents and humans in response to peroxisome proliferators (PPs) mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPAR alpha-humanized transgenic mice were generated using a P1 phage artificial chromosome (PAC) genomic clone bred onto a ppar alpha-null mouse background, designated hPPAR alpha PAC. In hPPAR alpha PAC mice, the human PPAR alpha gene is expressed in tissues with high fatty acid catabolism and induced upon fasting, similar to mouse PPAR alpha in wild-type (Wt) mice. Upon treatment with the PP fenofibrate, hPPAR alpha PAC mice exhibited responses similar to Wt mice, including peroxisome proliferation, lowering of serum triglycerides, and induction of PPAR alpha target genes encoding enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism in liver, kidney, and heart, suggesting that human PPAR alpha (hPPAR alpha) functions in the same manner as mouse PPAR alpha in regulating fatty acid metabolism and lowering serum triglycerides. However, in contrast to Wt mice, treatment of hPPAR alpha PAC mice with fenofibrate did not cause significant hepatomegaly and hepatocyte proliferation, thus indicating that the mechanisms by which PPAR alpha affects lipid metabolism are distinct from the hepatocyte proliferation response, the latter of which is only induced by mouse PPAR alpha. In addition, a differential regulation of several genes, including the oncogenic let-7C miRNA by PPs, was observed between Wt and hPPAR alpha PAC mice that may contribute to the inherent difference between mouse and human PPAR alpha in activation of hepatocellular proliferation. The hPPAR alpha PAC mouse model provides an in vivo platform to investigate the species difference mediated by PPAR alpha and an ideal model for human risk assessment PPs exposure.

  1. Complex lasso: new entangled motifs in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemyska, Wanda; Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Kadlof, Michal; Haglund, Ellinor; Sułkowski, Piotr; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2016-11-01

    We identify new entangled motifs in proteins that we call complex lassos. Lassos arise in proteins with disulfide bridges (or in proteins with amide linkages), when termini of a protein backbone pierce through an auxiliary surface of minimal area, spanned on a covalent loop. We find that as much as 18% of all proteins with disulfide bridges in a non-redundant subset of PDB form complex lassos, and classify them into six distinct geometric classes, one of which resembles supercoiling known from DNA. Based on biological classification of proteins we find that lassos are much more common in viruses, plants and fungi than in other kingdoms of life. We also discuss how changes in the oxidation/reduction potential may affect the function of proteins with lassos. Lassos and associated surfaces of minimal area provide new, interesting and possessing many potential applications geometric characteristics not only of proteins, but also of other biomolecules.

  2. Modeling Network Evolution Using Graph Motifs

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Network structures are extremely important to the study of political science. Much of the data in its subfields are naturally represented as networks. This includes trade, diplomatic and conflict relationships. The social structure of several organization is also of interest to many researchers, such as the affiliations of legislators or the relationships among terrorist. A key aspect of studying social networks is understanding the evolutionary dynamics and the mechanism by which these structures grow and change over time. While current methods are well suited to describe static features of networks, they are less capable of specifying models of change and simulating network evolution. In the following paper I present a new method for modeling network growth and evolution. This method relies on graph motifs to generate simulated network data with particular structural characteristic. This technique departs notably from current methods both in form and function. Rather than a closed-form model, or stochastic ...

  3. HYPOSENSITIVE TO LIGHT,an Alpha/Beta Fold Protein,Acts Downstream of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 to Regulate Seedling De-Etiolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Sun; Min Ni

    2011-01-01

    Ambient light has profound effects on early seedling de-etiolation through red and far-red light-absorbing phytochromes and blue and UV-A light-absorbing cryptochromes.Subsequent integration of various light signal transduction pathways leads to changes in gene expression and morphogenic responses.Here,we report the isolation of a new Arabidopsis light-signaling component,HYPOSENSITIVE TO LIGHT or HTL.Both htl-1 and htl-2 alleles displayed a long hypocotyl phenotype under red,far-red,and blue light,whereas overexpression of HTL caused a short hypocotyl phenotype under similar light conditions.The mutants also showed other photomorphogenic defects such as elongated petioles,retarded cotyledon and leaf expansion,reduced accumulation of chlorophyll and anthocyanin pigments,and attenuated expression of light-responsive CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN 3 and CHALCONE SYNTHASE genes.HTL belongs to an alpha/beta fold protein family and is localized strongly in the nucleus and weakly in the cytosol.The expression of HTL was strongly induced by light of various wavelengths and this light induction was impaired in elongated hypocotyl 5.HY5directly bound to both a C/G-box and a G-box in the HTL promoter but with a greater affinity toward the C/G-box.HTL.therefore,represents a new signaling step downstream of HY5 in phy-and cry-mediated de-etiolation responses.

  4. Cloning of somatolactin alpha, beta forms and the somatolactin receptor in Atlantic salmon: Seasonal expression profile in pituitary and ovary of maturing female broodstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taranger Geir

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatolactin (Sl is a fish specific adenohypophyseal peptide hormone related to growth hormone (Gh. Some species, including salmonids, possess two forms: Sl alpha and Sl beta. The somatolactin receptor (slr is closely related to the growth hormone receptor (ghr. Sl has been ascribed many physiological functions, including a role in sexual maturation. In order to clarify the role of Sl in the sexual maturation of female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, the full length cDNAs of slr, Sl alpha and Sl beta were cloned and their expression was studied throughout a seasonal reproductive cycle using real-time quantitative PCR (RTqPCR. Methods Atlantic salmon Sl alpha, Sl beta and slr cDNAs were cloned using a PCR approach. Gene expression of Sl alpha, SL beta and slr was studied using RTqPCR over a 17 month period encompassing pre-vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis, ovulation and post ovulation in salmon females. Histological examination of ovarian samples allowed for the classification according to the degree of follicle maturation into oil drop, primary, secondary or tertiary yolk stage. Results The mature peptide sequences of Sl alpha, Sl beta and slr are highly similar to previously cloned salmonid forms and contained the typical motifs. Phylogenetic analysis of Atlantic salmon Sl alpha and Sl beta shows that these peptides group into the two Sl clades present in some fish species. The Atlantic salmon slr grouped with salmonid slr amongst so-called type I ghr. An increase in pituitary Sl alpha and Sl beta transcripts before and during spawning, with a decrease post-ovulation, and a constant expression level of ovarian slr were observed. There was also a transient increase in Sl alpha and Sl beta in May prior to transfer from seawater to fresh water and ensuing fasting. Conclusion The up-regulation of Sl alpha and Sl beta during vitellogenesis and spawning, with a subsequent decrease post-ovulation, supports a role for Sl during gonadal

  5. Motif-role-fingerprints: the building-blocks of motifs, clustering-coefficients and transitivities in directed networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D McDonnell

    Full Text Available Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are 'structural' (induced subgraphs and 'functional' (partial subgraphs. Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File.

  6. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  7. MicroRNA Expression Profiling by Bead Array Technology in Human Tumor Cell Lines Treated with Interferon-Alpha-2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegrist Fredy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs are positive and negative regulators of eukaryotic gene expression that modulate transcript abundance by specific binding to sequence motifs located prevalently in the 3' untranslated regions of target messenger RNAs (mRNA. Interferon-alpha-2a (IFNα induces a large set of protein coding genes mediating antiproliferative and antiviral responses. Here we use a global microarray-based microRNA detection platform to identify genes that are induced by IFNα in hepatoma- or melanoma-derived human tumor cell lines. Despite the enormous differences in expression levels between these models, we were able to identify microRNAs that are upregulated by IFNα in both lines suggesting the possibility that interferon-regulated microRNAs are involved in the transcriptional repression of mRNA relevant to cytokine responses.

  8. Encoded expansion: an efficient algorithm to discover identical string motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqil M Azmi

    Full Text Available A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009 Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952-7963 devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes [Formula: see text] in theoretical time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the length of the input sequence and [Formula: see text] is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes [Formula: see text] that occur at least [Formula: see text] times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than [Formula: see text] times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms.

  9. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha-dependent regulation of branching morphogenesis in murine embryonic lung: evidence for a role in determining morphogenic properties of FGF7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Edward; Miron-Buchacra, Gabriela; Goldoni, Silvia; Danahay, Henry; Westwick, John; Watson, Malcolm L; Tosh, David; Ward, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is a critical step in the development of many epithelial organs. The phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been identified as a central component of this process but the precise role has not been fully established. Herein we sought to determine the role of PI3K in murine lung branching using a series of pharmacological inhibitors directed at this pathway. The pan-class I PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 greatly enhanced the branching potential of whole murine lung explants as measured by an increase in the number of terminal branches compared with controls over 48 hours. This enhancement of branching was also observed following inhibition of the downstream signalling components of PI3K, Akt and mTOR. Isoform selective inhibitors of PI3K identified that the alpha isoform of PI3K is a key driver in branching morphogenesis. To determine if the effect of PI3K inhibition on branching was specific to the lung epithelium or secondary to an effect on the mesenchyme we assessed the impact of PI3K inhibition in cultures of mesenchyme-free lung epithelium. Isolated lung epithelium cultured with FGF7 formed large cyst-like structures, whereas co-culture with FGF7 and ZSTK474 induced the formation of defined branches with an intact lumen. Together these data suggest a novel role for PI3K in the branching program of the murine embryonic lung contradictory to that reported in other branching organs. Our observations also point towards PI3K acting as a morphogenic switch for FGF7 signalling.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to alpha-cyclodextrin and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses (ID 2926, further assessment) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a health claim pursuant to Article 13.1 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 in the framework of further assessment related to alpha-cyclodextrin and r......Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a health claim pursuant to Article 13.1 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 in the framework of further assessment related to alpha......), may be a beneficial physiological effect. The proposed target population is individuals who wish to reduce their post-prandial glycaemic responses. In weighing the evidence, the Panel took into account that two intervention studies showed a significant effect of alpha-cyclodextrin added to starch...

  11. Intracellular Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by alpha(1A)-Adrenoceptor Is Mediated by Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Independently of Activation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinases 1/2 and Serine-Threonine Kinases in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulu, Nadir; Henning, Robert H.; Guner, Sahika; Zoto, Teuta; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Duin, Marry; Gurdal, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (alpha(1)-AR) is implicated in contraction and hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle (VSM). We examine whether all alpha(1)-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR and explore the mechanism of transactivation. Chinese hamster

  12. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  13. Alpha8 Integrin (Itga8 Signalling Attenuates Chronic Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Reducing Fibroblast Activation, Not by Interfering with Regulation of Cell Turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Marek

    Full Text Available The α8 integrin (Itga8 chain contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal glomerular cells. In unilateral ureteral obstruction Itga8 is de novo expressed in the tubulointerstitium and a deficiency of Itga8 results in more severe renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. We hypothesized that the increased tubulointerstitial damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction observed in mice deficient for Itga8 is associated with altered tubulointerstitial cell turnover and apoptotic mechanisms resulting from the lack of Itga8 in cells of the tubulointerstitium. Induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction was achieved by ligation of the right ureter in mice lacking Itga8. Unilateral ureteral obstruction increased proliferation and apoptosis rates of tubuloepithelial and interstitial cells, however, no differences were observed in the tubulointerstitium of mice lacking Itga8 and wild type controls regarding fibroblast or proliferating cell numbers as well as markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In contrast, unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice lacking Itga8 led to more pronounced tubulointerstitial cell activation i.e. to the appearance of more phospho-SMAD2/3-positive cells and more α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the tubulointerstitium. Furthermore, a more severe macrophage and T-cell infiltration was observed in these animals compared to controls. Thus, Itga8 seems to attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction not via regulation of cell turnover, but via regulation of TGF-β signalling, fibroblast activation and/or immune cell infiltration.

  14. Synthesis of stabilized alpha-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Federico; Katz, Samuel G

    2014-01-01

    Stabilized alpha-helical (SAH) peptides are valuable laboratory tools to explore important protein-protein interactions. Whereas most peptides lose their secondary structure when isolated from the host protein, stapled peptides incorporate an all-hydrocarbon "staple" that reinforces their natural alpha-helical structure. Thus, stapled peptides retain their functional ability to bind their native protein targets and serve multiple experimental uses. First, they are useful for structural studies such as NMR or crystal structures that map and better define binding sites. Second, they can be used to identify small molecules that specifically target that interaction site. Third, stapled peptides can be used to test the importance of specific amino acid residues or posttranslational modifications to the binding. Fourth, they can serve as structurally competent bait to identify novel binding partners to specific alpha-helical motifs. In addition to markedly improved alpha-helicity, stapled peptides also display resistance to protease cleavage and enhanced cell permeability. Most importantly, they are useful for intracellular experiments that explore the functional consequences of blocking particular protein interactions. Because of their remarkable stability, stapled peptides can be applied to whole-animal, in vivo studies. Here we describe a protocol for the synthesis of a peptide that incorporates an all-hydrocarbon "staple" employing a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. With proper optimization, stapled peptides can be a fundamental, accurate laboratory tool in the modern chemical biologist's armory.

  15. Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. Results To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae network in which nodes represent genes (or their protein products and differently colored links represent the aforementioned five biological interaction types. We examined three- and four-node interconnection patterns containing multiple interaction types and found many enriched multi-color network motifs. Furthermore, we showed that most of the motifs form 'network themes' – classes of higher-order recurring interconnection patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs. Network themes can be tied to specific biological phenomena and may represent more fundamental network design principles. Examples of network themes include a pair of protein complexes with many inter-complex genetic interactions – the 'compensatory complexes' theme. Thematic maps – networks rendered in terms of such themes – can simplify an otherwise confusing tangle of biological relationships. We show this by mapping the S. cerevisiae network in terms of two specific network themes. Conclusion Significantly enriched motifs in an integrated S. cerevisiae interaction network are often signatures of network themes, higher-order network structures that correspond to biological phenomena. Representing networks in terms of network themes provides a useful simplification of complex biological relationships.

  16. Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Su; Shen, Chuanbing; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lingling; Xu, Xuemei; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Zhigang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Main indoor allergens for humans are from house dust mites. There are more than 30 allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae but only fourteen allergens have been identified from this mite including Der f 1-3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13-18, and 22. A native allergen protein (Der f 24, 90 kDa) was purified from D. farinae by gel filtration and anionic exchange liquid chromatography combined with IgE immunodetection. Its primary structure was determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis and cDNA cloning. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition tests (ELISA-IT), immunoblots, basophil activation test (BAT) and skin prick test (SPT) were performed to evaluate the allergenicity. It was identified as an alpha (α)-actinin containing a CaM-like domain with EF-hand motifs. Der f 24 reacted to sera from 85.4% (35/41) of patients on western blot analysis. It reduced ∼20% sera IgE reactivity to D. farinae extracts on a competitive ELISA. Eighty percent (8/10) of patients with D. farinae allergy showed positive reactions to Der f 24 in skin prick test. The expression of CD63 on basophils from patients was up-regulated by Der f 24 by ∼5.4-fold. Alpha-actinin was identified as a new type of house dust mite allergen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of α-actinin as an allergen.

  17. Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su An

    Full Text Available Main indoor allergens for humans are from house dust mites. There are more than 30 allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae but only fourteen allergens have been identified from this mite including Der f 1-3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13-18, and 22. A native allergen protein (Der f 24, 90 kDa was purified from D. farinae by gel filtration and anionic exchange liquid chromatography combined with IgE immunodetection. Its primary structure was determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis and cDNA cloning. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition tests (ELISA-IT, immunoblots, basophil activation test (BAT and skin prick test (SPT were performed to evaluate the allergenicity. It was identified as an alpha (α-actinin containing a CaM-like domain with EF-hand motifs. Der f 24 reacted to sera from 85.4% (35/41 of patients on western blot analysis. It reduced ∼20% sera IgE reactivity to D. farinae extracts on a competitive ELISA. Eighty percent (8/10 of patients with D. farinae allergy showed positive reactions to Der f 24 in skin prick test. The expression of CD63 on basophils from patients was up-regulated by Der f 24 by ∼5.4-fold. Alpha-actinin was identified as a new type of house dust mite allergen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of α-actinin as an allergen.

  18. Dynamic Motifs of Strategies in Prisoner's Dilemma Games

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Young Jin; Jeong, Seon-Young; Son, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the win-lose relations between strategies of iterated prisoner's dilemma games by using a directed network concept to display the replicator dynamics results. In the giant strongly-connected component of the win/lose network, we find win-lose circulations similar to rock-paper-scissors and analyze the fixed point and its stability. Applying the network motif concept, we introduce dynamic motifs, which describe the population dynamics relations among the three strategies. Through exact enumeration, we find 22 dynamic motifs and display their phase portraits. Visualization using directed networks and motif analysis is a useful method to make complex dynamic behavior simple in order to understand it more intuitively. Dynamic motifs can be building blocks for dynamic behavior among strategies when they are applied to other types of games.

  19. Dynamic motifs of strategies in prisoner's dilemma games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Roh, Myungkyoon; Jeong, Seon-Young; Son, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the win-lose relations between strategies of iterated prisoner's dilemma games by using a directed network concept to display the replicator dynamics results. In the giant strongly-connected component of the win/lose network, we find win-lose circulations similar to rock-paper-scissors and analyze the fixed point and its stability. Applying the network motif concept, we introduce dynamic motifs, which describe the population dynamics relations among the three strategies. Through exact enumeration, we find 22 dynamic motifs and display their phase portraits. Visualization using directed networks and motif analysis is a useful method to make complex dynamic behavior simple in order to understand it more intuitively. Dynamic motifs can be building blocks for dynamic behavior among strategies when they are applied to other types of games.

  20. BlockLogo: Visualization of peptide and sequence motif conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Simon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    BlockLogo is a web-server application for the visualization of protein and nucleotide fragments, continuous protein sequence motifs, and discontinuous sequence motifs using calculation of block entropy from multiple sequence alignments. The user input consists of a multiple sequence alignment......, selection of motif positions, type of sequence, and output format definition. The output has BlockLogo along with the sequence logo, and a table of motif frequencies. We deployed BlockLogo as an online application and have demonstrated its utility through examples that show visualization of T-cell epitopes...... and B-cell epitopes (both continuous and discontinuous). Our additional example shows a visualization and analysis of structural motifs that determine the specificity of peptide binding to HLA-DR molecules. The BlockLogo server also employs selected experimentally validated prediction algorithms...

  1. An algorithm for motif-based network design

    CERN Document Server

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo

    2016-01-01

    A determinant property of the structure of a biological network is the distribution of local connectivity patterns, i.e., network motifs. In this work, a method for creating directed, unweighted networks while promoting a certain combination of motifs is presented. This motif-based network algorithm starts with an empty graph and randomly connects the nodes by advancing or discouraging the formation of chosen motifs. The in- or out-degree distribution of the generated networks can be explicitly chosen. The algorithm is shown to perform well in producing networks with high occurrences of the targeted motifs, both ones consisting of 3 nodes as well as ones consisting of 4 nodes. Moreover, the algorithm can also be tuned to bring about global network characteristics found in many natural networks, such as small-worldness and modularity.

  2. 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to G alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G12-protein to regulate gene transcription and neuronal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvachnina, Elena; Liu, Guoquan; Dityatev, Alexander; Renner, Ute; Dumuis, Aline; Richter, Diethelm W; Dityateva, Galina; Schachner, Melitta; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A; Ponimaskin, Evgeni G

    2005-08-24

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in the regulation of multiple events in the CNS. We demonstrated recently a coupling between the 5-HT4 receptor and the heterotrimeric G13-protein resulting in RhoA-dependent neurite retraction and cell rounding (Ponimaskin et al., 2002). In the present study, we identified G12 as an additional G-protein that can be activated by another member of serotonin receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor. Expression of 5-HT7 receptor induced constitutive and agonist-dependent activation of a serum response element-mediated gene transcription through G12-mediated activation of small GTPases. In NIH3T3 cells, activation of the 5-HT7 receptor induced filopodia formation via a Cdc42-mediated pathway correlating with RhoA-dependent cell rounding. In mouse hippocampal neurons, activation of the endogenous 5-HT7 receptors significantly increased neurite length, whereas stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors led to a decrease in the length and number of neurites. These data demonstrate distinct roles for 5-HT7R/G12 and 5-HT4R/G13 signaling pathways in neurite outgrowth and retraction, suggesting that serotonin plays a prominent role in regulating the neuronal cytoarchitecture in addition to its classical role as neurotransmitter.

  3. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs.

  4. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  5. Heterogeneity in DNA multiple alignments: modeling, inference, and applications in motif finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Zhou, Qing

    2010-09-01

    Transcription factors bind sequence-specific sites in DNA to regulate gene transcription. Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is an important step for understanding gene regulation. Although sophisticated in modeling TFBSs and their combinatorial patterns, computational methods for TFBS detection and motif finding often make oversimplified homogeneous model assumptions for background sequences. Since nucleotide base composition varies across genomic regions, it is expected to be helpful for motif finding to incorporate the heterogeneity into background modeling. When sequences from multiple species are utilized, variation in evolutionary conservation violates the common assumption of an identical conservation level in multiple alignments. To handle both types of heterogeneity, we propose a generative model in which a segmented Markov chain is used to partition a multiple alignment into regions of homogeneous nucleotide base composition and a hidden Markov model (HMM) is employed to account for different conservation levels. Bayesian inference on the model is developed via Gibbs sampling with dynamic programming recursions. Simulation studies and empirical evidence from biological data sets reveal the dramatic effect of background modeling on motif finding, and demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to achieve substantial improvements over commonly used background models.

  6. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti. The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5′ section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus. Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  7. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  8. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G; Gritsenko, Marina A; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T; Clauss, Therese R W; Brinkley, William R; Smith, Richard D; Stenoien, David L

    2007-11-15

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a crucial regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation-specific antibody that labels the CPC. A mitotic phosphorylation motif {PX[G/T/S][L/M]S(P) P or WGLS(P) P} was identified by MS in 11 proteins, including FZR1 (Cdh1) and RIC8A-two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained the known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B (Aurkb) and TD-60 (Rcc2, RCC1-like), as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A and Cdk1 (Cdc2a), a probable kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins, including SMAD2, PLK3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and PLK3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, and, in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlated with its localization to the mitotic apparatus and the midbody. A mutagenesis approach was used to show that INCENP phosphorylation is required for its localization to the midbody. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of crucial proteins during mitosis.

  9. Up-regulation of alpha-smooth muscle actin in cardiomyocytes from non-hypertrophic and non-failing transgenic mouse hearts expressing N-terminal truncated cardiac troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a restrictive N-terminal truncation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI-ND is up-regulated in the heart in adaptation to hemodynamic stresses. Over-expression of cTnI-ND in the hearts of transgenic mice revealed functional benefits such as increased relaxation and myocardial compliance. In the present study, we investigated the subsequent effect on myocardial remodeling. The alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA isoform is normally expressed in differentiating cardiomyocytes and is a marker for myocardial hypertrophy in adult hearts. Our results show that in cTnI-ND transgenic mice of between 2 and 3 months of age (young adults, a significant level of α-SMA is expressed in the heart as compared with wild-type animals. Although blood vessel density was increased in the cTnI-ND heart, the mass of smooth muscle tissue did not correlate with the increased level of α-SMA. Instead, immunocytochemical staining and Western blotting of protein extracts from isolated cardiomyocytes identified cardiomyocytes as the source of increased α-SMA in cTnI-ND hearts. We further found that while a portion of the up-regulated α-SMA protein was incorporated into the sarcomeric thin filaments, the majority of SMA protein was found outside of myofibrils. This distribution pattern suggests dual functions for the up-regulated α-SMA as both a contractile component to affect contractility and as possible effector of early remodeling in non-hypertrophic, non-failing cTnI-ND hearts.

  10. The small molecule '1-(4-biphenylylcarbonyl)-4-(5-bromo-2-methoxybenzyl) piperazine oxalate' and its derivatives regulate global protein synthesis by inactivating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mi-Na; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Kyung Kon; Kim, So-Young; Kim, InKi

    2016-05-01

    By environmental stresses, cells can initiate a signaling pathway in which eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2-α) is involved to regulate the response. Phosphorylation of eIF2-α results in the reduction of overall protein neogenesis, which allows cells to conserve resources and to reprogram energy usage for effective stress control. To investigate the role of eIF2-α in cell stress responses, we conducted a viability-based compound screen under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress condition, and identified 1-(4-biphenylylcarbonyl)-4-(5-bromo-2-methoxybenzyl) piperazine oxalate (AMC-01) and its derivatives as eIF2-α-inactivating chemical. Molecular characterization of this signaling pathway revealed that AMC-01 induced inactivation of eIF2-α by phosphorylating serine residue 51 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, while the negative control compounds did not affect eIF2-α phosphorylation. In contrast with ER stress induction by thapsigargin, phosphorylation of eIF2-α persisted for the duration of incubation with AMC-01. By pathway analysis, AMC-01 clearly induced the activation of protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) kinase and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), whereas it did not modulate the activity of PERK or heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI). Finally, we could detect a lower protein translation rate in cells incubated with AMC-01, establishing AMC-01 as a potent chemical probe that can regulate eIF2-α activity. We suggest from these data that AMC-01 and its derivative compounds can be used as chemical probes in future studies of the role of eIF2-α in protein synthesis-related cell physiology.

  11. Estrogen receptor alpha, fos-related antigen-2, and c-Jun coordinately regulate human UDP glucuronosyltransferase 2B15 and 2B17 expression in response to 17beta-estradiol in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dong Gui; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2009-08-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15 and 2B17 expression is up-regulated by 17beta-estradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using 5'-deletion mapping and site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol activation of UGT2B15 gene transcription is mediated by a 282-base pair fragment positioned -454 to -172 nucleotides from the translation start site. This region contains two putative activator protein-1 (AP-1) elements, one imperfect estrogen response element (ERE), and two consensus ERE half-sites. We propose that these five sites act as an estrogen response unit (ERU), because mutation in any site reduces activation of the UGT2B15 promoter by 17beta-estradiol. Despite the presence of two AP-1 elements, the UGT2B15 promoter is not responsive to the AP-1 activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Although electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) indicate that the AP-1 proteins c-Jun and Fos-related antigen 2 (Fra-2) bound to the distal AP-1 site, binding of Jun or Fos family members to the proximal AP-1 site was not detected by EMSA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed a 17beta-estradiol-induced recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, c-Jun, and Fra-2 to the 282-bp ERU. The involvement of these three transcription factors in the stimulation of UGT2B15 gene expression by 17beta-estradiol was confirmed by siRNA silencing experiments. Mutagenesis and siRNA experiments indicate that UGT2B17 expression is also regulated by 17beta-estradiol via the ERU, which is fully conserved in both promoters. Because UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 inactivate steroid hormones by glucuronidation, the regulation of their genes by 17beta-estradiol may maintain steroid hormone homeostasis and prevent excessive estrogen signaling activity.

  12. Motif-specific sampling of phosphoproteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Cristian I; McClatchy, Daniel B; Lu, Bingwen; Cociorva, Daniel; Motoyama, Akira; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R

    2008-05-01

    Phosphoproteomics, the targeted study of a subfraction of the proteome which is modified by phosphorylation, has become an indispensable tool to study cell signaling dynamics. We described a methodology that linked phosphoproteome and proteome analysis based on Ba2+ binding properties of amino acids. This technology selected motif-specific phosphopeptides independent of the system under analysis. MudPIT (Multidimensional Identification Technology) identified 1037 precipitated phosphopeptides from as little as 250 microg of proteins. To extend coverage of the phosphoproteome, we sampled the nuclear extract of HeLa cells with three values of Ba2+ ions molarity. The presence of more than 70% of identified phosphoproteins was further substantiated by their nonmodified peptides. Upon isoproterenol stimulation of HEK cells, we identified an increasing number of phosphoproteins from MAPK cascades and AKAP signaling hubs. We quantified changes in both protein and phosphorylation levels of 197 phosphoproteins including a critical kinase, MAPK1. Integration of differential phosphorylation of MAPK1 with knowledge bases constructed modules that correlated well with its role as node in cross-talk of canonical pathways.

  13. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Italiano, J.E.; Battinelli, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. The majority of this vast array of secreted proteins is stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on th...

  14. Transcription factors interacting with herpes simplex virus alpha gene promoters in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, M; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W; Douville, P

    1995-01-01

    Interference with VP16-mediated activation of herpes virus immediate-early (or alpha) genes is thought to be the major cause of establishing viral latency in sensory neurons. This could be brought about by lack of a key activating transcription factor(s) or active repression. In this study we find that sensory neurons express all important components for VP16-mediated alpha gene induction, such as the POU transcription factor Oct-1, host cell factor (HCF) and GABP alpha/beta. However, Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta are only present at low levels and the VP16-induced complex (VIC) appears different. We do not find protein expression of the transcription factor Oct-2, implicated by others as an alpha gene repressor. The POU factor N-Oct3 (Brn 2 or POU3F2) is also present in sensory neurons and binds viral TAATGARAT motifs with higher affinity than Oct-1, indicating that it may be a candidate repressor for competitive binding to TAATGARAT motifs. When transfected into HeLa cells, where Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta are highly abundant, N-Oct3 represses model promoters with multimerized TAATGARAT motifs, but fails to repress complete alpha gene promoters. Taken together our findings suggest that modulation of alpha gene promoters could contribute to viral latency when low concentrations of the activating transcription factors Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta prevail. Our data, however, refute the notion that competing Oct factors are able to block alpha gene transcription to achieve viral latency. Images PMID:8559654

  15. Strategi Mengenali Motif Khas Kain Tenun Cual Bangka Dengan AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyah Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Woven fabric cual Bangka currently used as one of the identity of community pride in Bangka Belitung Islands. The specificity of this fart cual fabric interesting to study because of the motives that have similarities with songket palembang. Woven fabric cual Bangka and Palembang songket cloth looks similar because the same cloth-making techniques - both using techniques sungkit. The purpose of this research is how to recognize a particular motif woven fabric cual fart. This research using Analytical Hierarchy Process ( AHP to classify some specific motifs that exist in woven fabric cual fart. Experts in the field of woven fabric cual is to inform you that the woven fabric cual farts have tabled motif, motifs or patterns, motifs fabric edge, motif gold thread, fabric base material, as well as the specific color. The research involved four experts that the results of the questionnaires is processed by software Expert Choice 2000. The results showed that the main peculiarity of the woven fabric cual fart is in a pattern or motif with a percentage of 31.5, and is the chosen alternative product is songket with a percentage of 25.4.

  16. Computational analyses of synergism in small molecular network motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular functions and responses to stimuli are controlled by complex regulatory networks that comprise a large diversity of molecular components and their interactions. However, achieving an intuitive understanding of the dynamical properties and responses to stimuli of these networks is hampered by their large scale and complexity. To address this issue, analyses of regulatory networks often focus on reduced models that depict distinct, reoccurring connectivity patterns referred to as motifs. Previous modeling studies have begun to characterize the dynamics of small motifs, and to describe ways in which variations in parameters affect their responses to stimuli. The present study investigates how variations in pairs of parameters affect responses in a series of ten common network motifs, identifying concurrent variations that act synergistically (or antagonistically to alter the responses of the motifs to stimuli. Synergism (or antagonism was quantified using degrees of nonlinear blending and additive synergism. Simulations identified concurrent variations that maximized synergism, and examined the ways in which it was affected by stimulus protocols and the architecture of a motif. Only a subset of architectures exhibited synergism following paired changes in parameters. The approach was then applied to a model describing interlocked feedback loops governing the synthesis of the CREB1 and CREB2 transcription factors. The effects of motifs on synergism for this biologically realistic model were consistent with those for the abstract models of single motifs. These results have implications for the rational design of combination drug therapies with the potential for synergistic interactions.

  17. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-06-01

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs.

  18. Conserved sequence motifs in the small subunit of human general transcription factor TFIIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumimoto, H; Ohkuma, Y; Sinn, E; Kato, H; Shimasaki, S; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1991-12-05

    A general initiation factor, TFIIE, is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in conjunction with other general factors. TFIIE is a heterotetramer containing two subunits of relative molecular mass 57,000 (TFIIE-alpha) and two of 34,000 (TFIIE-beta). TFIIE-beta is required in conjunction with TFIIE-alpha for transcription initiation. Here we report the cloning and expression of a complementary DNA encoding a functional human TFIIE-beta. Recombinant TFIIE-beta could replace the natural TFIIE-beta for transcription in conjunction with TFIIE-alpha. Amino-acid sequence comparisons reveal regions with sequence similarities to: subregion 3 of bacterial sigma factors; a region of RAP30 (the small subunit of TFIIF) with sequence similarity to a sigma-factor subregion implicated in binding to RNA polymerase; and a portion of the basic region-helix-loop-helix motif found in several enhancer-binding proteins. These potential homologies have implications for the role of TFIIE in preinitiation complex assembly and function.

  19. A meta-analysis to evaluate the cellular processes regulated by the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Joana; Amado, Francisco M; Vitorino, Rui; Helguero, Luisa A

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the proteins complexes that regulate ERα subcellular localization and activity is still an open question in breast cancer biology. Identification of such complexes will help understand development of endocrine resistance in ER+ breast cancer. Mass spectrometry (MS) has allowed comprehensive analysis of the ERα interactome. We have compared six published works analyzing the ERα interactome of MCF-7 and HeLa cells in order to identify a shared or different pathway-related fingerprint. Overall, 806 ERα interacting proteins were identified. The cellular processes were differentially represented according to the ERα purification methodology, indicating that the methodologies used are complementary. While in MCF-7 cells, the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed ERα essentially represents the same biological processes and cellular components, the proteins identified were not over-lapping; thus, suggesting that the biological response may differ as the regulatory/participating proteins in these complexes are different. Interestingly, biological processes uniquely associated to ERα over-expressed in HeLa cell line included L-serine biosynthetic process, cellular amino acid biosynthetic process and cell redox homeostasis. In summary, all the approaches analyzed in this meta-analysis are valid and complementary; in particular, for those cases where the processes occur at low frequency with normal ERα levels, and can be identified when the receptor is over-expressed. However special effort should be put into validating these findings in cells expressing physiological ERα levels.

  20. Bile acids regulate hepatic gluconeogenic genes and farnesoid X receptor via G(alpha)i-protein-coupled receptors and the AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Risheng; Cronk, Zhumei Xu; Zha, Weibin; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Xuan; Fang, Youwen; Studer, Elaine; Zhou, Huiping; Pandak, William M; Dent, Paul; Gil, Gregorio; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2010-08-01

    Bile acids are important regulatory molecules that can activate specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. In the current study, the chronic bile fistula (CBF) rat model and primary rat hepatocytes (PRH) were used to study the regulation of gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) and the gene encoding short heterodimeric partner (SHP) by taurocholate (TCA). The intestinal infusion of TCA into the CBF rat rapidly (1h) activated the AKT (approximately 9-fold) and ERK1/2 (3- to 5-fold) signaling pathways, downregulated (approximately 50%, 30 min) the mRNA levels of PEPCK and G-6-Pase, and induced (14-fold in 3 h) SHP mRNA. TCA rapidly ( approximately 50%, 1-2 h) downregulated PEPCK and G-6-Pase mRNA levels in PRH. The downregulation of these genes by TCA was blocked by pretreatment of PRH with pertussis toxin (PTX). In PRH, TCA plus insulin showed a significantly stronger inhibition of glucose secretion/synthesis from lactate and pyruvate than either alone. The induction of SHP mRNA in PRH was strongly blocked by inhibition of PI3 kinase or PKCzeta by specific chemical inhibitors or knockdown of PKCzeta by siRNA encoded by a recombinant lentivirus. Activation of the insulin signaling pathway appears to be linked to the upregulation of farnesoid X receptor functional activity and SHP induction.

  1. A speedup technique for (l, d-motif finding algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Hieu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of patterns in DNA, RNA, and protein sequences has led to the solution of many vital biological problems. For instance, the identification of patterns in nucleic acid sequences has resulted in the determination of open reading frames, identification of promoter elements of genes, identification of intron/exon splicing sites, identification of SH RNAs, location of RNA degradation signals, identification of alternative splicing sites, etc. In protein sequences, patterns have proven to be extremely helpful in domain identification, location of protease cleavage sites, identification of signal peptides, protein interactions, determination of protein degradation elements, identification of protein trafficking elements, etc. Motifs are important patterns that are helpful in finding transcriptional regulatory elements, transcription factor binding sites, functional genomics, drug design, etc. As a result, numerous papers have been written to solve the motif search problem. Results Three versions of the motif search problem have been proposed in the literature: Simple Motif Search (SMS, (l, d-motif search (or Planted Motif Search (PMS, and Edit-distance-based Motif Search (EMS. In this paper we focus on PMS. Two kinds of algorithms can be found in the literature for solving the PMS problem: exact and approximate. An exact algorithm identifies the motifs always and an approximate algorithm may fail to identify some or all of the motifs. The exact version of PMS problem has been shown to be NP-hard. Exact algorithms proposed in the literature for PMS take time that is exponential in some of the underlying parameters. In this paper we propose a generic technique that can be used to speedup PMS algorithms. Conclusions We present a speedup technique that can be used on any PMS algorithm. We have tested our speedup technique on a number of algorithms. These experimental results show that our speedup technique is indeed very

  2. Exploitation of peptide motif sequences and their use in nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2010-08-01

    Short amino acid sequences extracted from natural proteins or created using in vitro evolution systems are sometimes associated with particular biological functions. These peptides, called peptide motifs, can serve as functional units for the creation of various tools for nanobiotechnology. In particular, peptide motifs that have the ability to specifically recognize the surfaces of solid materials and to mineralize certain inorganic materials have been linking biological science to material science. Here, I review how these peptide motifs have been isolated from natural proteins or created using in vitro evolution systems, and how they have been used in the nanobiotechnology field.

  3. A comprehensive search for recombinogenic motifs in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry R Johnston

    Full Text Available The patterns of male and female recombination vary greatly on a macro scale. A unique